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Central Oregon’s boarders learning to share skateparks • SPORTS, D1

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• November 19, 2010 50¢

Serving Central Oregon since 1903 www.bendbulletin.com

La Pine water plant, rodeo site included in bills package By Keith Chu

Rethinking forest rules on dogs Deschutes officials collecting input on how dogs should share recreational areas By Kate Ramsayer The Bulletin

Some told of getting knocked over by dogs or having to pick up after other people’s animals. Others talked of the need for additional skiing areas for dog owners or better off-leash access to the river in summer — or said they like things the way they are now.

More than 150 people attended a U.S. Forest Service open house in Bend on Thursday evening to talk about off-leash dogs in the Deschutes National Forest. They talked to Forest Service recreation staffers, giving their opinions and ideas on how dogs should share summer and winter trails. “It helps us formulate how to go

forward,” said John Allen, Deschutes National Forest supervisor. Currently, dogs must be kept on a leash in the summer on several popular trails, including the Deschutes River Trail and some trails in the Three Sisters Wilderness. In the winter, dogs are not allowed on the ski trails north of the highway, but people can ski with dogs at

Wanoga Sno-park and Edison Snopark, both south of the Cascade Lakes Highway, and the Skyliner Sno-park along Tumalo Creek. The Bend-based group DogPAC has advocated for a new area for people to ski with their dogs, and for the easing of restrictions of dogs off leash. See Dogs / A5

Weigh in To comment on the issue of dogs in the Deschutes National Forest, e-mail rgyorgyfalvy@fs.fed .us or atinderholt@ fs.fed.us. Comments must be received by Dec. 2.

The Bulletin

WASHINGTON — A top U.S. senator is readying a package of bills that includes a proposal to transfer about 900 acres of federal land to local governments for a new La Pine wastewater treatment plant and future south county rodeo grounds. The package being assembled by Senate Energy Committee Chairman Jeff Bingaman, DN.M., is likely the best chance of passing the assortment of wilderness and other public lands bills before the end of the year, when all unfinished legislation gets scrapped. And Inside although the • A look at La Pine bill is a land bills near certainty in Oregon, to be included, Page A5 it’s uncertain whether or not a bill to create a new wilderness area in northern Jefferson County will make the cut. The package will include all of the roughly 60 bills that have already been debated and passed by the Energy and Natural Resources Committee, said spokesman Bill Wicker. The La Pine bill would transfer two U.S. Bureau of Land Management parcels to Deschutes County: a 750-acre block on the east side of La Pine and a 150-acre piece west of the city. The larger parcel would eventually go to the La Pine Special Sewer District for a site to expand its current wastewater treatment system. The smaller parcel would ultimately go to the La Pine Park and Recreation District and provide a permanent site for the La Pine Rodeo, Frontier Days and perhaps serve as practice grounds for La Pine High School’s equestrian team. See Land / A5

THE BLAYLOCK TRAGEDY

Husband indicted By Erin Golden The Bulletin

IN CONGRESS

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Remembering ‘Woody’ Blaylock Friends, co-workers and family members of Lori “Woody” Blaylock, left, the 48-year-old Bend woman who has been missing since late October, gather for a candlelight vigil Thursday evening in Bend’s Drake Park, above. Blaylock was reported missing on Nov. 2 by her co-workers at St. Charles Bend, where she had worked as a respiratory therapist for 17 years. Her body has not been found, but her husband, Steven Blaylock, was arrested Nov. 10 in connection with her disappearance. On Thursday, a grand jury indicted him on one count of murder.

On the Web: If you missed Sunday’s profile of Blaylock, see www.bendbulletin.com/blaylock

In a bid to remain relevant, libraries start a new chapter By David Sarno Los Angeles Times

LOS ANGELES — Kathy DeGrego’s T-shirt lets you know right away she isn’t an old-school librarian. “Shhh,” it says, “is a fourletter word.” That spirit of bookish defiance has guided the makeover of the suburban Denver library system where DeGrego works. Reference desks and study carrels have been replaced by rooms where kids can play

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“Guitar Hero.” Overdue book fines have been eliminated, and the arcane Dewey Decimal System has been scrapped in favor of bookstore-like sections organized by topic. “It’s very common for people to say, ‘Why do I need a library when I’ve got a computer?’” said Pam Sandlian-Smith, director of the seven-branch Rangeview, Colo., Library District. “We have to reframe what the library means to the community.” See Libraries / A4

Hero dog is euthanized by mistake after escaping from yard in Arizona By Marc Lacey New York Times News Service

The Associated Press ile photo

Target, right, relaxes with another of the dogs who stopped a suicide bomber in Afghanistan, after being brought to the U.S. in July.

Vol. 107, No. 323, 68 pages, 7 sections

FLORENCE, Ariz. — When a suicide bomber entered a U.S. military barracks in Afghanistan in February, it was not American soldiers but Afghan stray dogs that confronted him. Target and two other dogs snarled, barked and snapped at the man, who detonated his bomb at the entrance to the facility but did not kill anyone. The dogs were from the Dand Aw Patan district, in the eastern Paktia province near the Paki-

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stani border. One died of wounds suffered in the blast, and months later, Target and the other dog were flown to the U.S. by a charity and adopted by families. Target — who received a hero’s welcome, including an appearance on “The Oprah Winfrey Show” — went to live with the family of Sgt. Terry Young, 37, an Army medic who witnessed the animals’ bravery and helped treat the dogs and several wounded U.S. soldiers. The glory, though, was shortlived. See Target / A4

TOP NEWS INSIDE

INDEX Abby

Coming soon: Who is Steven Blaylock?

Surviving Afghanistan only to die in a shelter

The Bulletin An Independent Newspaper

The Bend man suspected of killing his wife and leaving her body in the North Santiam River was indicted Thursday on one count of murder. A Deschutes County grand jury convened to consider evidence in the disappearance of 48-year-old Lori “Woody” Steven B l a y l o c k Blaylock handed down the indictment against 46-year-old Steven Paul Blaylock after two days of testimony. The document notes that prosecutors consider the murder an act of domestic violence. Grand jury proceedings are secret and not open to the public. Steven Blaylock was arrested on Nov. 10 on suspicion of murder, assault and tampering with evidence, a day after police served a search warrant on his home, three vehicles and a trailer found at a residence in Silverton. See Indicted / A5

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START: Obama forces a showdown with the GOP on arms treaty, Page A3


A2 Friday, November 19, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

The Bulletin

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“Real discovery is outside the ring of existing knowledge.” — Samuel Chao Chung Ting, leader of the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer project

Seeking the heart of the cosmos Launch day nears for ambitious $1.5B experiment that may help answer the question: What is the universe made of?

Scientists briefly trap one form of antimatter

By Dennis Overbye New York Times News Service

After 16 years and $1.5 billion of other people’s money, it is almost showtime for NASA and Sam Ting. Sitting and being fussed over by technicians in a clean room at the Kennedy Space Center in preparation for a February launching — and looking like a giant corrugated rain barrel — is an 8-ton assemblage of magnets, wires, iron, aluminum, silicon and electronics that is one of the most ambitious and complicated experiments ever to set out for space. The experiment, if it succeeds, could help NASA take a giant step toward answering the question of what the universe is made of. It could also confer scientific glory on both the International Space Station and a celebrated physicist reaching one last time, literally, for the stars. If it fails, it will validate critics who think it a scandal the experiment was ever approved.

The spectrometer The device, named the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer, is designed to sift the high-energy particles flying through space known as cosmic rays. On Feb. 27, the space shuttle Endeavour will ferry the spectrometer to a permanent berth on the space station. But the real destination is the shadow universe. You might think that the universe is made of atoms and molecules, protons and electrons, stars and galaxies — something you learned in high school. That notion has been turned on its head over the past few decades as astronomers have concluded — not happily — that all this is just a scrim overlying a much vaster shadowy realm of invisible “dark matter” whose gravity determines the architecture of the cosmos. If they are lucky, scientists say, the spectrometer could confirm that mysterious signals recorded by other satellites and balloons in recent years are emanations

Ice-spitting comet puts on a snowy show for spacecraft Los Angeles Times LOS ANGELES — A team of astronomers announced their first snow Thursday — not due to the approaching winter, but from a spacecraft that observed a peanut-shaped comet spitting fluffy ice balls into space. The Deep Impact spacecraft flew within 435 miles of the comet known as Hartley 2 on Nov. 4, snapping images as it whizzed past at about 27,000 miles per hour. The images revealed a nearly 1½-mile-long body with a smooth middle and rough, bulbous edges that was spewing gas from its surface. In the two weeks since, scientists noticed the white specks circling the comet, as if it were inside an invisible snow globe. When they analyzed the images, they were in for a surprise — the smooth middle portion was emitting water vapor, while the ends released chunks of ice, some as large as basketballs. The flurry of “snow” surrounding the comet caused astronomers’ jaws to drop, Peter Schultz, a team scientist from Brown University, said in a news conference. Five years ago, Deep Impact shot an 820-pound copper slug into the much larger comet Tempel 1, but that kicked up tiny grains of ice, not large, solid chunks.

New York Times News Service ile photo

A crew works on the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer at CERN (the European Organization for Nuclear Research) in Geneva in August. The device is designed to sift through cosmic rays and will be launched on the space shuttle Endeavour on Feb. 27 for a berth on the International Space Station.

from that dark matter, revealing evidence of particles and forces that have only been theoretical dreams until now. Knowing what nature is made of could be useful someday in ways nobody can dream. Einstein’s curved spacetime, equally elusive to the senses, proved crucial to the function of GPS devices that were invented decades after his death. Or the device could find something even weirder. “Real discovery is outside the ring of existing knowledge,” said Samuel Chao Chung Ting, a professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and leader of the cosmic ray project, in his laboratory at CERN outside Geneva in August. A few yards away, the hulking spectrometer was sitting in a test frame, being pinged by a beam of protons in final tests before being shipped to Cape Canaveral.

Searching for answers According to the laws of physics, equal amounts of matter and its science-fiction-sounding evil twin, antimatter — which annihilates ordinary matter in a flash of energy upon contact — should have been created during the Big Bang. It is one of the abiding mysteries of science why the uni-

verse is now all matter. Or is it? The discovery of a single atomic nucleus heavier than antihelium could mean there was an anti-star or maybe a whole antigalaxy somewhere. “If you don’t do the measurement, you will never know,” Ting said. In 1994, Ting told Dan Goldin, then NASA’s administrator, that he could make that measurement with a space-based cosmic ray detector. Goldin was instantly smitten and agreed to put the spectrometer on the International Space Station. In doing so, Goldin bypassed the agency’s normal peer-review procedures and set off resentment among other cosmic-ray physicists that still lingers. In 1998, a prototype of the spectrometer was built and flown successfully on the space shuttle for 10 days on a trip to the Mir space station. After the shuttle Columbia disintegrated in 2003, killing its crew of seven astronauts, Ting’s fortunes took a turn for the worse. NASA decreed an early end to the shuttle era, and the Alpha spectrometer was dropped from the flight manifest. Ting fought back. In 2005, invited to address a Senate committee on the state of U.S. science,

he used his five minutes and nine transparencies to mount a rousing defense of basic science and of his experiment. “They were surprised to hear that the space station can do good science,” Ting recalled.

The countdown In the following years, powerful senators like Ted Stevens of Alaska, Bill Nelson of Florida and Kay Bailey Hutchinson of Texas sat through Ting’s PowerPoint shows or visited the project at CERN. In the end, Congress ordered NASA to provide an extra shuttle flight for the experiment. “Three days after Barack Obama’s inauguration, we were back on the manifest,” Ting said. By then nobody, with the possible exception of Ting, expected the experiment to find any primordial antimatter. Most theorists have concluded that it disappeared in the first moments after the Big Bang. “The original goal has evaporated,” said Greg Tarle, a cosmicray physicist at the University of Michigan and longtime critic of the experiment. Instead, the heavens were crackling with intimations of dark matter. Two years ago, a European satellite named Pa-

Scientists at CERN have figured out how to trap one type of antimatter — elusive antihydrogen atoms — according to research published online this week in the journal Nature. The amount of antihydrogen the researchers stored — 38 atoms, each held for just about two-tenths of a second — isn’t enough to power a 100-watt light bulb for even half a nanosecond. But once the new procedure is fine-tuned, scientists should be able to create enough of the stuff to conduct a long-awaited test of one of the fundamental theories of particle physics, said Jeffrey Hangst, a physics professor at Denmark’s Aarhus University and the lead author of the study. — Los Angeles Times

mela registered an excess of anti-electrons, or positrons, in space — perhaps from collisions of dark matter particles. But that satellite had no way to tell positrons, which are exotic, from protons, which are humdrum, being the nuclei of hydrogen, and everywhere. The Alpha spectrometer does. “It will tell us whether these things are there or not,” said John Ellis, a CERN theorist. Earlier this year, with a fall flight date finally secured, Ting announced he was ripping out the heart of his experiment and replacing his superconducting magnet with a weaker permanent magnet that had flown on the prototype flight. That meant he would miss the deadline for shipping the instrument to Cape Canaveral, Fla. NASA promptly reshuffled the schedule and moved the flight to next year. The late change led to renewed criticism from scientists who wondered if the experiment had been degraded or whether it was even safe to fly now. Shuttle engineers, however, said they were relieved that they would not have to deal with liquid helium, which can vaporize explosively — as it did in the Large Hadron Collider two years ago.

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} www.dukewarner.com REALTOR


THE BULLETIN • Friday, November 19, 2010 A3

TS  Obama forces showdown with GOP on arms treaty Obama pushing for vote on pact with Russians — a signature issue

The Washington Post

New York Times News Service

An ‘imperative’ After months of quiet negotiations blew up this week, Obama on Thursday escalated ratification of the agreement, the so-called New START treaty, into a public

J. Scott Applewhite / The Associated Press

President Barack Obama speaks in the Roosevelt Room at the White House in Washington, D.C., on Thursday, where he dropped by a meeting on the the new Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty. From left are former Secretary of State James Baker and Vice President Joe Biden. showdown, enlisting former Republican officials and assigning Vice President Joe Biden to work on it “day and night.” An allied group, the American Values Network, kicked off a television and e-mail campaign. “It is a national security imperative that the United States ratify the New Start treaty this year,” said Obama, flanked by Henry Kissinger, James Baker and Brent Scowcroft, all of whom served Republican presidents. “There is no higher national security priority for the lame-duck session of Congress.” Obama has no clear path to ap-

12th-grade reading and math scores rise, surprising experts New York Times News Service Reading scores for the nation’s 12th-grade students have increased somewhat since they dropped to a historic low in 2005, according to results of the largest federal test, released Thursday. Average math scores also ticked upward. Experts said the increases, after years of dismal achievement reports, were surprising because every year the nation’s schools are educating more black and Hispanic students, who on average score lower than whites and Asians. The black-white achievement gap dates back more than a century, though researchers debate why it persists. Researchers presume that language barriers pull down scores for Hispanics. The math and reading tests, known as the National Assessment of Educational Progress and administered by the Department of Education, were given

in spring 2009 to a representative national sample of about 50,000 12th-grade students. Educators and school policymakers closely monitor the national assessment scores much the way corporate leaders and economists watch for changes in the gross domestic product or employment trends. On the 500-point scale used in the reading assessment, the average 12th-grader scored 288 on the 2009 test, up from 286 in 2005. About 38 percent of 12thgraders scored at or above the test’s proficiency level. On the math assessment, which is scored on a 300-point scale, the average 12th-grader scored 153 in 2009, up from 150 in 2005. Because the governing board changed the math test before its 2005 administration, the latest results cannot be compared with previous math tests given in the 1990s and early 2000s.

In Germany, authorities cope with rare terror alert New York Times News Service BERLIN — One day after Germany’s interior minister said there was a concrete threat of a terrorist strike, the nation woke Thursday to reports of a possible bomb intended for an Air Berlin flight, hypercautious police forces at transportation hubs around the nation and a determined call not to let fear change the way people live. By day’s end, Air Berlin said the suspicious laptop bag — identified in Namibia on Wednesday, just a few hours before the minister’s alert — did not contain any explosive material.

Peace prize ceremony may be modified as recipient remains jailed By Keith B. Richburg

By Peter Baker WASHINGTON — Just two weeks after an election that left him struggling to find his way forward, President Barack Obama has decided to confront Senate Republicans in a make-or-break battle over arms control that could be an early test of his mettle heading into the final two years of his term. Obama is pushing for a vote on a signature issue despite long odds, daring Republicans to block an arms-control treaty at the risk of disrupting relations with Russia and the international coalition that opposes Iran’s nuclear program. If he succeeds, Obama will demonstrate strength following the midterm election debacle. If he fails, he will reinforce the perception at home and abroad that his presidency has been weakened. “It’s really high stakes,” said Geoffrey Kemp, a former national security aide to President Ronald Reagan and a scholar at the Nixon Center, a research group in Washington. “I would say it’s the biggest gamble he’s taken so far, certainly on foreign policy.”

DISSIDENT HELD IN CHINA

Police officials said that it had batteries wired to a clock and detonator, and that it would take several days to determine whether it could have exploded or was a false alarm — or was perhaps meant to test security at the southern African airport. The day was, for the most part, routine for Germany’s 82 million citizens. Train stations were buzzing, coffee shops busy, government offices going about their business. Facing one of their most serious terror alerts, Germans broadly supported their government’s call to fight back by resisting fear.

proval of the treaty without Sen. Jon Kyl of Arizona, the lead Republican negotiator, who declared this week that there was no time to reach an agreement this year on a nuclear modernization program that he wanted as the price for ratification.

Scant support The White House has only one Republican supporter, Sen. Richard Lugar of Indiana. A survey of 14 other Senate Republicans who were considered possible supporters found none who were willing to publicly back the treaty. Ten of

Ethics committee advises censure for Rangel By William Branigin The Washington Post

WASHINGTON — The House ethics committee on Thursday recommended that Rep. Charles Rangel, D-N.Y., face a censure for 11 violations of congressional rules related to his personal finances, a penalty that would be a major rebuke for a lawmaker who until recently was one of the most powerful figures in Congress. The full House must now take up the recommendation, likely after Rep. Charles T ha n ksg ivRangel, ing. No House D-N.Y. member has been censured since 1983, when two lawmakers were punished for sexual misconduct with underage congressional pages. The committee also recommended requiring Rangel to pay back taxes dating to the early 1990s, though the amount he allegedly owes was not immediately clear. The 9 to 1 vote came after Rangel appeared before the committee, conceding that he made “mistakes” in violating House rules but insisting that he was not “corrupt.” In a final plea before the committee went behind closed doors to consider a prosecutor’s recommendation of censure, Rangel urged his fellow lawmakers to treat him fairly and to absolve him of corruption in their report to the full House. “I leave the sanction to all of you as it relates to fairness,” Rangel said. “I just hope no matter what you decide in the sanctions that you put in that report that Charles Rangel never sought any personal gain.”

them said they were undecided or were waiting for the same assurances as Kyl. Four did not respond, suggesting that approval may depend on changing Kyl’s mind. Among those who agreed with Kyl that the issue should wait until next year was Sen. Bob Corker of Tennessee, one of three Republicans to vote for the treaty in committee in September. In an interview, he said that the treaty and modernization program needed to be “fully digested, fully explained” and that there was no reason to rush during the lameduck session.

SHANGHAI — Parts of this year’s Nobel Peace Prize ceremony may be postponed because the recipient, Chinese dissident Liu Xiaobo, remains in prison, and his family members have been prevented from leaving China to attend the event on his behalf, according to Nobel committee organizers and supporters of Liu. The event will be held in Oslo on Dec. 10 as scheduled, organizers said, but the awarding of the Peace Prize medal and the accompanying diploma and a check for $1.4 million might be delayed. Instead, according to supporters, text messages from Liu and perhaps some of his past writings may be read aloud. Meanwhile, half a dozen countries, including China, have said they will not send diplomatic representatives to the ceremony. Those bowing to Chinese demands for a boycott are Russia, Cuba, Kazakhstan, Morocco and Iraq. But officials of the Norwegian Nobel Committee told wire services Thursday that diplomats from about 36 other countries have confirmed they will attend. Since Liu, a prominent writer and pro-democracy activist, was awarded the prize Oct. 8, the Chinese government has reacted furiously, repeatedly branding him a criminal, threatening diplomatic relations with Norway and warning other countries that if they sent representatives to

The Associated Press ile photo

Pro-democracy protesters raise pictures of Chinese dissident and Nobel prize winner Liu Xiaobo during a demonstration in Hong Kong on Oct. 8. Oslo they would risk unspecified “consequences.” Domestically, the Chinese government has begun a crackdown on known activists, dissidents, human rights lawyers and supporters of Liu, including his wife, Liu Xia. People have been detained, committed to house arrest, and had their telephone and Internet lines severed, and some have been stopped at the airport as they were leaving the country, for fear they might try to attend the Nobel ceremony. Liu Xia, in a message sent out before her communications were cut off, had urged a hundred of Liu Xiaobo’s supporters to travel to Oslo to celebrate the award. That appeal appeared to trigger the government restrictions on activists’ airport departures — even against those who said they had no intention of traveling to Oslo.


A4 Friday, November 19, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

C OV ER S T OR I ES

Libraries

ing, the company’s books can be read on some electronic readers but not others. If libraries are mainly staying clear of the uphill battle to change copyright law, Google isn’t. Since 2004, the company has scanned more than 10 million books from dozens of libraries around the world. Many of those books are under copyright, but Google wants to be able to share them anyway, including with libraries. Publishers and authors initially rejected the idea and in 2005 sued Google for making unauthorized copies. But after three years of litigation, the two sides crafted a settlement that would allow publishers to sell books through Google and give libraries and users instant access to huge numbers of books that have long been out of print but are still legally protected. The settlement has been opposed by many authors, legal scholars and booksellers, who fear it could give Google too much power over the market for digital books. The 2-year-old pact is under review by a federal court in New York.

Continued from A1 In the struggle to stay relevant — and ultimately to stay open — libraries are reinventing themselves in ways unimaginable even a few years ago, preparing for a future in which most materials can be checked out and read from a home computer, smart phone or electronic reading device. University and public libraries are rushing to push as much material as they can onto the Web, so patrons can peruse genealogical records, historical maps or rare volumes without leaving home. Many public libraries are also becoming digital activity centers, where in addition to books visitors can find game rooms, computer clusters or Internet cafes. Collections of DVDs have swelled, as has the number of high-definition televisions.

A matter of survival Some traditional librarians worry that experiments aimed at making libraries more accessible could dumb them down. “If you want to have game rooms and ping-pong tables and God knows what — poker parties — fine, do it. But don’t pretend it has anything to do with libraries,” said Michael Gorman, a former president of the American Library Association. “The argument that all these young people would turn up to play video games and think, ‘Oh by the way, I must borrow that book by Dostoyevsky’ — it seems ludicrous to me.” Others argue that reinvention is a matter of survival in an age when Google Inc. has made the reference desk almost obsolete and printed books are beginning to look more like antique collectibles. The average number of items checked out per visit by public library users dropped nearly 6 percent between 1997 and 2007, according to the Institute of Museum and Library Services. Book checkouts at the New York Public Library alone plunged by 1 million volumes in the most recent fiscal year. At the 540,000-square-foot Central Library in downtown Los Angeles — the largest public research library west of the Mississippi — few visitors wander the main floors where most of the building’s 2 million books are kept. At wooden reading tables, only a handful of people sit paging through newspapers. But down the escalator it’s a different story. The 70-seat computer center is often packed as patrons read news, watch YouTube videos and scour the Web for jobs. In the last fiscal year, the library system’s patrons checked out 102,000 e-books, more than twice as many as in the previous year. The number is on track to nearly double again in 2010. Like regular books, e-books can be borrowed for a few weeks. Then the book deletes itself from the borrower’s com-

Technology changing Photos by David Sarno / Los Angeles Times

Children visit Anythink Wright Farms, a branch of Anythink Libraries, in Thornton, Colo., in August. The library system was the beneficiary of a 2006 tax initiative that allowed it to raise $43 million to modernize its buildings and revisit the way it relates to patrons.

puter, e-reader or mobile phone. E-book collections at U.S. libraries grew nearly 60 percent between 2005 and 2008, according to the National Center for Education Statistics. During the same period libraries’ print collections grew less than 1 percent, though ink-on-paper works still make up 98 percent of U.S. libraries’ holdings.

appeal to book pirates, including an array of “how-to” and other nonfiction titles. But when it comes to best-sellers, the digital cupboard is often bare.

Awaiting trial

Challenges ahead Joan Frye Williams, a library consultant and futurist, believes that the underlying purpose of libraries will not change, even if bookshelves disappear. “Saying that there’s a challenge to libraries because books are changing would be like saying there’s a challenge to family dinner because plates are changing,” she said. Digital technology is also allowing libraries to digitize large swaths of their collections, creating a virtual library accessible from any computer. Libraries are leading the effort to scan centuries’ worth of rare, unique and fragile materials as varied as medieval religious manuscripts and antique phone books — whatever they’ve kept in the basement. Libraries are reluctant to digitize new best-sellers and other books still in copyright — roughly anything published since 1923. But there remains a vast trove of classic books, government documents, historical papers and other material not covered by copyright that libraries can scan without fear of litigation. Many of these digital books and documents can be

Raphael Workman, 30, finishes a losing chess match with his son Gabriel, 6, at a Rangeview library in Denver, Colo. searched, read and even downloaded free. “It’s a phenomenal boom,” said Paul LeClerc, president and chief executive of the New York Public Library, which has an online repository of more than 700,000 digital images — including early American maps, photographs, books and historical documents — that attracts visitors from 230 countries every month. “It liberates our collections in a way that would have been inconceivable before.” Still, the universal digital library, where users anywhere can access any book, movie or album, is years away. One hurdle is money. Many public library administrators say they don’t have the funds to make a full-scale conversion to digital books and related equipment, including e-readers that could be lent to patrons. Piracy concerns have also

limited the supply of popular new titles. None of the bestselling “Harry Potter” books, for example, is available in a digital version. Publishers and some authors are concerned that books, once online, can easily be copied and shared without authorization. In other cases, such as with the new Jonathan Franzen bestseller “Freedom,” the book is available to consumers as an e-book, but the publisher does not offer electronic versions to libraries. The book’s publisher, Farrar, Strauss and Giroux, declined to comment on whether piracy concerns affected its decision to hold the digital version of “Freedom” out of libraries. Libraries have been building their digital collections by stocking electronic versions of century-old classics not covered by copyright and so-called back-catalog books unlikely to

Candlelight vigil

euthanizing of millions of cats and dogs at shelters every year. And the Puppy Rescue Mission, the organization that raised the several thousand dollars to bring Target to the United States, has expanded its mission to encourage pet owners to install microchips in their animals so they can be easily traced.

“What the libraries are worried about is being sued,” said Peter Jaszi, a professor of copyright law at American University’s Washington College of Law. Until recently, the threat of a lawsuit by publishers was a “hypothetical concern” for libraries, Jaszi said. Noting that libraries are among the largest purchasers of books and other media, he said, “Generally it’s bad business to sue your best customers.” That changed in 2008, when a group of publishers, including Cambridge University Press, sued library officials at Georgia State University for making digital copies of course materials, often from copyright-protected library books, available to students. The case is awaiting trial in federal court. Legal worries have discouraged libraries from making and lending digital copies of many printed books they already own. A few companies, like OverDrive Inc., offer a service with which libraries can buy digital copies of some books. Once borrowers download the digital copy to a PC, they have three weeks until the book deletes itself, at which point another patron can download it. But OverDrive has a limited selection, and because e-books are often wrapped in proprietary software to prevent copy-

Some in the library community worry that libraries could be wiped out by the same technological revolution that threatens video rental, music and book stores, whose wares can now be downloaded in a fraction of the time it takes to drive three blocks and find a parking space. In response, public libraries in particular are looking to become more like community centers. At Rangeview in Colorado, visitors can help cultivate the library’s garden, take classes on how to use Facebook or attend “Harry Potter”-themed rock concerts on the library floor. Alejandra Delacruz, 11, sat in front of a large-screen Apple iMac in the children’s section recently. “I come here twice a week to do my homework,” she said, switching among Facebook, YouTube and a text file with some written notes. In Charlotte, N.C., the library district built a separate complex, the Imaginon, with digital equipment that children and teens can use to make blue-screen movies, stop-motion animations and rap songs. Those who spent their childhood reading “Treasure Island” and “Ramona” in a quiet corner of the stacks may resist the idea that libraries could become frenetic workshops. But advocates say equipping libraries with tools for digital creation may be one way to help young people interact with history and literature in a familiar medium. “That’s how a culture reproduces itself,” said Anne Balsamo, a professor of interactive media at USC. “It doesn’t just make things up willy-nilly, but it also takes time to look back and discover the ways things were done in the past. So yes to rap music and yes to turn-of-thecentury poetry.”

Why pay retail?

Target Continued from A1 Target, after learning to get along with the Young family’s other dog in Arizona, becoming accustomed to dog food and to using a doggie door to relieve herself, escaped from her yard. She was captured last week and euthanized by mistake. “My 4-year-old keeps saying: ‘Daddy, bring Target home. Daddy, get the poison out,’” Young, a father of three, said in a telephone interview, his voice choking with emotion. “Obviously, at first there was extreme anger and horror. Now that a couple of days have passed, the anger has been replaced by sorrow.” To say that Target was a celebrated mutt would be an understatement. Beyond caresses from Oprah, the shepherd mix had appeared on all the major television news channels upon her move to the United States and had won a local Hero Award as dog of the year.

On the loose Target, not used to being confined, escaped last Friday afternoon from Young’s home in the San Tan Valley area in central Arizona. After being spotted on the loose, she was reported to Pinal County’s animal control. Target was brought to the county animal shelter in Florence, where she was held just like any other run-of-the-mill stray. Because she had no tag, microchip or license with the county, her photo went up on the shelter’s

website last Friday in hopes that her owner might respond. Young spotted Target’s photo online that same day and paid the fee by computer to recover her. He mistakenly thought the shelter was closed for the weekend. By the time Young arrived at the pound Monday, the shelter employee in charge of euthanizing animals that day had apparently picked the wrong dog out of the pen and administered a lethal injection, performing what the shelter referred to as “PTS,” or put to sleep. “I am heartsick over this,” Ruth Stalter, the county’s animal care and control director, said in a statement. “I had to personally deliver the news to the dog’s owner, and he and his family are understandably distraught.” Barraged with criticism, the county ordered an investigation and placed the unidentified woman who euthanized Target on administrative leave. “This is unacceptable,” Stalter said, “and no family should be deprived of their companion because procedures were not followed.” The county offered the Young family the services of a grief counselor who specializes in pet issues and agreed to refund the recovery fee and waive any fines, said Heather Murphy, a county spokeswoman. “We are not shying away from this,” she said. “We screwed up, and we’re acknowledging that.” But Target’s fate has mushroomed into more than a family tragedy. Because of the dog’s fame and her heroics in battle, there has been an outpouring of grief.

A candlelight vigil is planned for Dec. 3 to honor Target. Young said he might spread the dog’s ashes, which were provided by the animal shelter, at a memorial service, perhaps at the park where Target used to frolic off leash. A lawyer specializing in animal issues has also contacted Young, who said a lawsuit was possible. Recalling those difficult days in Afghanistan, Young said that perhaps because he and the other soldiers were living like dogs themselves, they bonded with the strays that found their way onto the base. “Our rooms could be mistaken for kennels with the cement floors, smell of urine and feces, razor wire and chain-linked fence all around the compound,” he wrote for his hometown paper in Oklahoma, The McCook Daily Gazette, just days after Target joined him in August. Target had her own Facebook page for those who wanted to follow her new U.S. life. Since word of her death has spread, fans have written of their shock and outrage. “Nooooooooooo!!! So so sad :-( Thank you for all you did Target! Amazing that you survived a war, but not an American shelter ... something is wrong here, baby,” read one posting. The page has been used to organize a write-in campaign to Pinal County officials to express outrage at what happened. The No Kill Advocacy Center has used Target’s death to raise the profile of its campaign to end the

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’Mistakes happen’ At the shelter where Target died, there is significant despair as well, county officials said. “On Monday, I spoke with the director and if she was not openly crying, she was fighting back tears,” Murphy said. “You don’t do this work if you don’t care about animals.” “They love when someone adopts an animal or an animal is returned to its owner. That’s the best part of the job,” Murphy said. “But there is roadkill to pick up, and we recently had to pick up 154 cats from a trailer with no running water. These jobs are thankless even on a good day.” The official investigation into what happened will go beyond one employee’s error and look into the policies of the shelter, officials said. Already, one former employee has come forward to say that he almost euthanized the wrong animal on several occasions. “They said, ‘Ah, don’t worry about it, mistakes happen,’ and we went on,” the former employee, Jason Melroy, told local television station KTAR. “I sedated a dog that wasn’t supposed to be put to sleep. Thank God another officer found it.”

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Dogs Continued from A1 The open house is a way to hear from a broad section of the community, Allen said. “It’s really important for us to hear, as much as possible, the full range of views and beliefs,” he said. The agency will review the comments, Allen said, and then possibly consider new options or more focused community discussions. At the meeting, Bend resident Greg Evans told Allen that the Nordeen Loop, near Swampy Sno-park, would be a great place for people to ski with their dogs. It’s flat and on the other side of the highway from snowmobilers — who currently share Wanoga Sno-park with people who ski with dogs. “I’m lobbying for dogs to be able to be off leash at Swampy (Sno-park),” Evans said. But others disagreed. Nathan Hovekamp, of Bend, said that he’s been hiking on trails for 13 years, and has had multiple encounters where he or his family felt threatened by a dog. The current off-leash restrictions are reasonable, he said, noting that leashes are required only on a small fraction of trails, and only on ones that get lots of traffic. “My feeling is most people support a reasonable compromise, and the current restrictions are a reasonable compromise,” he said. However, Val Gerard, of Bend, said she would like to see the system changed to allow dogs off leash in additional places — but then fine people for having dogs that cause problems. There could be a ranger patrolling, looking for misbehaving dogs, or a number of people could call in to report incidents. “I would like to see responsible dog owners not punished because there are a few not responsible,” she said. Dog owners who attended the

“(Public input) helps us formulate how to go forward. ... It’s really important for us to hear, as much as possible, the full range of views and beliefs.”

Oregon public lands bills in Senate The U.S. Senate may consider a package of 60 public lands bills before the end of this year, including some that would create or expand wilderness in Oregon. 1

— John Allen, Deschutes National Forest supervisor, on ideas for sharing forest recreation areas with dogs meeting had a range of views on the situation. Carolyn Testerman, of Bend, said that it seems like she has to drive far to get to an area where she can let her dogs off leash. But she understands that there are people who use the trails that are afraid of dogs, she said, and doesn’t think it’s a good idea to have cross-country ski areas open to dogs. “You don’t want to see anybody get hurt,” she said. James Cagney, of Bend, is a member of both DogPAC and the Nordic club, and said he skis with his dogs all the time at Wanoga Sno-park. But he doesn’t like the idea of dogs allowed in sno-parks north of the Cascade Lakes Highway. He would, however, like to see more ski trails at Wanoga. Marion McClenathan talked to a Forest Service staffer and said one of her main frustrations was people who don’t pick up after their dogs, leaving bags of dog feces in parking lots. She also said that she understands why the summertime restrictions are necessary. With lots of people on the Deschutes River Trail, it makes sense to keep dogs on a leash. “I’m a dog owner and feel there’s adequate access,” she said. Kate Ramsayer can be reached at 541-617-7811 or at kramsayer@bendbulletin.com.

2 3 4 5 6

The La Pine bill would transfer Pendletonn two U.S. Bureau of Land 5 The Dalles Management parcels to La Grande Salem 3 Deschutes County: a 750-acre 6 Newport block on the east side of La Pine and a 150-acre piece west of the Eugene Ontario Bend city. The larger parcel would go to Burns 2 1 the La Pine Special Sewer District for a site to expand its current wastewater treatment Medford system. The smaller parcel Klamath Falls would go to the La Pine Park 4 and Recreation District. Devil’s Staircase Wilderness Act Molalla River Wild and Scenic Rivers Act Oregon Caves National Monument Boundary Adjustment Act Wallowa Forest Service Compound Conveyance Act The Horse Heaven and Cathedral Rock Wilderness Area bill

Source: U.S. Senate

Land Continued from A1 Those parcels would be transferred to Deschutes County, which would pass them on to the park and sewer districts. La Pine Park and Recreation Department Director Justin Cutler said the land is a key part of the community’s plans. “The goal really is to find a permanent home for the rodeo and Frontier Days, and with this donation we will be able to accomplish both of those goals,” Cutler said. The land would be free, but the county would have to pay costs for surveys and other work to facilitate the transfer. The land could only be used for public purposes — not homes or businesses — and would revert back to the federal government if it was used for anything else. Energy Committee spokesman Wicker didn’t have a list of bills included in the package available, but based on his criteria, four Oregon bills would be included, in addition to the La Pine measure: the Devil’s Stair-

case Wilderness Act, Molalla River Wild and Scenic Rivers Act, Oregon Caves National Monument Boundary Adjustment Act and Wallowa Forest Service Compound Conveyance Act. Several Oregon bills that were top priorities for local environmental groups didn’t meet the Energy Committee’s criteria, including a bill to create the Horse Heaven and Cathedral Rock wilderness areas near the John Day River on the north border of Jefferson County. However, Wyden staff said Thursday he’s still fighting to include other bills that made it through most of the process, including the Horse Heaven and Cathedral Rock wilderness bill. That bill called for the BLM to swap several fragmented parcels with two private landowners and the Young Life Christian ministry, which runs the Washington Family Ranch. The BLM would have traded about 14,124 acres of federal land for 10,182 acres of private land. The conservation group Oregon Wild had also hoped a pro-

New York Times News Service

BEND

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posed wilderness area near the Rogue River in Southern Oregon would be passed this year, said spokesman Sean Stevens. “The other stuff is all very important, but the Wild Rogue has an agreement between the timber industry and conservationists (for the timber industry not to oppose the legislation), and we don’t want to lose the momentum and hard work it took to get to this point,” Stevens said in an e-mail. The U.S. House Natural Resources Committee isn’t putting together a bill of its own, according to a Democratic staffer. Even if a package is introduced, though, there’s no guarantee that U.S. Senate leaders will bring it to a vote, Wicker said. “Alas, the challenge is finding floor time — there is an impressive list of bills in the lame duck queue already,” Wicker said, in an e-mail. “Nevertheless, we are channeling our inner Boy Scout: ‘Be Prepared!’”

Continued from A1 Lori Blaylock had been reported missing on Nov. 2, when she didn’t show up to her job at St. Charles Bend. Blaylock initially told police that his wife had walked away from the couple’s home on Northeast Genet Court sometime on the evening of Oct. 28. He said he didn’t report her missing because he thought she would come home. A sweater Lori Blaylock was believed to be wearing when she disappeared was found last weekend near the river in an area about 4½ miles downriver from Marion Forks. Police believe Blaylock’s body was left in the area. Police have declined to say what led them to the North Santiam River. Weather conditions and swift-moving water have complicated the search for Blaylock, but officials have searched the area with the help of cadaver dogs and divers. This week, Lt. Ben Gregory of the Bend Police Department said police have ended their large-scale search. Officials are still looking for help from anyone who spots possible evidence in the case. Officials also are looking for information from anyone who saw a white Isuzu Trooper pulling a white trailer with the lettering “Nash Blaylock #706” and “Marley Blaylock #5” from Bend to the Idanha area between Oct. 26 and Oct. 31. Blaylock, who is being held without bail at the Deschutes County jail, is scheduled to be arraigned in Deschutes County Circuit Court on Nov. 22.

Keith Chu can be reached at 202-662-7456 or at kchu@bendbulletin.com.

Erin Golden can be reached at 541-617-7837 or at egolden@bendbulletin.com.

— Energy Committee spokesman Bill Wicker, on tackling land bills

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By William J. Broad and David E. Sanger Experts dissecting the computer worm suspected of being aimed at Iran’s nuclear program have determined that it was precisely calibrated in a way that could send nuclear centrifuges wildly out of control. Their conclusion, while not definitive, begins to clear some of the fog around the Stuxnet worm, a malicious program detected this year on computers, primarily in Iran but also India, Indonesia and other countries. The paternity of the worm is still in dispute, but in recent weeks officials from Israel have broken into wide smiles when asked whether Israel was behind the attack, or knew who was. American officials have suggested it originated abroad. The new forensic work narrows the range of targets and deciphers the worm’s plan of attack. Computer analysts say Stuxnet does its damage by making quick changes in the rotational speed of motors, shifting them rapidly up and down. Changing the speed “sabotages the normal operation of the industrial control process,” Eric Chien, a researcher at the computer security company Symantec, wrote in a blog post. Those fluctuations, nuclear analysts said in response to the report, are a recipe for disaster among the thousands of centrifuges spinning in Iran to enrich uranium, which can fuel reactors or bombs. Rapid changes can cause them to blow apart. Reports issued by international inspectors reveal that Iran has experienced many problems keeping its centrifuges running, with hundreds removed from active service since summer 2009. “We don’t see direct confirmation” that the attack was meant to slow Iran’s nuclear work, David Albright, president of the Institute for Science and International Security, a private group in Washington that tracks nuclear proliferation, said in an interview Thursday. “But it sure is a plausible interpretation of the available facts.”

“Alas, the challenge is finding floor time — there is an impressive list of bills in the lame-duck queue already. “Nevertheless, we are channeling our inner Boy Scout: ‘Be Prepared!’”

Greg Cross / The Bulletin

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THE BULLETIN • Friday, November 19, 2010 A5

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A6 Friday, November 19, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

First case of bird flu in 7 years reported in Hong Kong

FINAL RITE ENDS THIS YEAR’S HAJJ

Tweet lands Chinese woman in labor camp BEIJING — China has sentenced a woman to a year in a labor camp for “disrupting social order” by retweeting a satirical message urging Chinese protesters to smash the Japan pavilion at the Shanghai Expo, an international rights group said. Cheng Jianping, 46, re-posted a Twitter message last month hinting that protesters should smash the pavilion and adding the message “Angry youth, charge!” Amnesty International and Cheng’s fiancé said her retweet was meant as satire, mocking anti-Japanese protesters who had grown in number since tensions between the countries increased after a dispute erupted in September over islands claimed by both Japan and China.

By Kevin Drew New York Times News Service

HONG KONG — Health authorities said Thursday that they are increasing their checks on poultry coming from mainland China and at farms and markets across the region after government officials confirmed the first case of bird flu in seven years in the territory. The region’s top health official said there was no increased risk of contracting bird flu after a woman was hospitalized here last weekend with a variation of bird flu. The world’s first outbreak of bird flu among humans occurred here in 1997, when it claimed six lives. “In general, we think the risk of avian influenza in Hong Kong is not that significantly higher than before,” Dr. York Chow, Hong Kong’s secretary for health and food, said in a statement released by the government. “But since there is one case, we have to be very careful as it might actually point out its source of infection, which might give rise to another case.” Speaking to reporters Thursday following a meeting of government agencies, Chow said no “abnormalities” had been detected at mainland poultry farms supplying Hong Kong, but local health authorities would now inspect one out of four chickens coming into the region. Inspection teams also will visit 30 poultry farms across Hong Kong, he said. Hong Kong’s government late Wednesday raised its bird flu alert to “serious” following the announcement of a 59year-old woman diagnosed with avian influenza H5N1.

W  B

Hassan Ammar / The Associated Press

Muslim pilgrims cast stones at a pillar to symbolize the stoning of Satan in a ritual called jamarat, the last rite of the hajj, in Mina near the holy city of Mecca, Saudi Arabia, on Thursday. The hajj, an annual Islamic pilgrimage to Mecca, draws an estimated 2.5 million visitors each year, making it the largest yearly gathering of people in the world.

SWEDEN

Arrest warrants issued for WikiLeaks chief in rape case By John F. Burns and Ravi Somaiya New York Times News Service

LONDON — The Swedish prosecutor’s office said Thursday that a court in Stockholm had approved its request for arrest warrants to be issued for WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange for questioning on charges of rape and other sexual offenses. Assange has strongly denied the accusations. Marianne Ny, director of the Stockholm prosecutor’s office, said in a statement that she had moved to have Assange extradited to Sweden on suspicion of

“rape, sexual molestation and unlawful coercion.” The accusations were first made against Assange, 39, an Australian who created the whistle-blowers’ website, after he traveled to Sweden in mid-August and had brief relationships with two Swedish women that he has described as consensual. Ny said in a telephone interview that the court had approved two arrest warrants, one applicable within the European Union and the other an international warrant that would be issued through Interpol. She said she had acted because “there is a risk of him fleeing.”

The criminal accusations have become embroiled in the political controversy enveloping WikiLeaks, which Assange founded in 2006 as a forum for publishing secret and confidential documents of political, military and economic significance. The contention over the group’s activities reached a new intensity in recent months after WikiLeaks posted a cache of 77,000 secret Pentagon documents on the war in Afghanistan in July, and followed that in October by posting nearly 400,000 Pentagon documents, also secret, on the Iraq war.

Demonstrators block roads in Haiti’s capital PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti — Anti-U.N. violence spread to Haiti’s capital Thursday as protesters blocked roads and attacked foreigners’ cars over suspicions that peacekeepers introduced a cholera epidemic that has killed more than 1,100 people. The unrest followed three days of similar violence in

northern Haiti. The protests come a little more than a week before national elections, and the U.N. has characterized them as political. But the protests are fueled by suspicions, shared by some U.S. disease experts, that a contingent of Nepalese soldiers brought cholera with them to Haiti and spread the disease from their rural base into the Artibonite River system, where the initial outbreak was centered.

Holloway’s dental records reviewed SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico — Dutch authorities are reviewing the dental records of missing U.S. teen Natalee Holloway as they analyze a jawbone with a tooth in it that was found in Aruba last week, the FBI told The Associated Press on Thursday. The girl’s father, Dave Holloway, said earlier that he provided the records but added that he had received no new official information on the investigation on the Dutch island in the Caribbean. “The authorities haven’t confirmed anything with me,” he told the AP in a telephone interview. “It’s pretty much total silence.” — From wire reports

Emilio Morenatti / The Associated Press

Refugees react to the effects of tear gas fired by police and U.N. soldiers during a protest in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, on Thursday. Riots in Haiti have been sparked by suspicions that U.N. soldiers introduced a cholera epidemic that has killed more than 1,100 people.


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THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2010

MARKET REPORT

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2,514.40 NASDAQ CLOSE CHANGE +38.39 +1.55%

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11,181.23 DOW JONES CLOSE CHANGE +173.35 +1.57%

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1,196.69 S&P 500 CLOSE CHANGE +18.10 +1.54%

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Ten-year CLOSE 2.90 treasury CHANGE +1.40%

For a complete listing of stocks, including mutual funds, see Pages B4-5

B U S I N E SS IN BRIEF Mortgage rates rise Thirty- and 15-year fixedrate mortgage rates rose dramatically this week, according to results Thursday of Freddie Mac’s weekly Primary Mortgage Market Survey. The 30-year rate averaged 4.39 percent, with an average 0.9 point, for the week ending Thursday. That was up from last week, when it averaged 4.17 percent. Last year at this time, the 30-year rate averaged 4.83 percent. The 15-year rate this week averaged 3.76 percent, with an average 0.7 point. That was up from last week, when it averaged 3.57 percent. A year ago at this time, the 15-year rate averaged 4.32 percent. “Rates on 30-year fixed-rate mortgages were up to the highest level since early August, and rates on shorter-maturity loans rose as well, although by somewhat lesser amounts,” Frank Nothaft, vice president and chief economist for Freddie Mac, said in a news release.

Even as the fight over foreclosures continues, the high tide of delinquency among homeowners has begun to recede. Households that are behind in their mortgage payments fell during the third quarter to 13.52 percent, from 14.42 percent in the second quarter, the Mortgage Bankers Association reported Thursday. It was the lowest delinquency rate since the beginning of 2009, just as the financial crisis began hitting home. — From wire reports

Corrections In a story headlined “Remodeling their careers,” which appeared Sunday, Nov. 14, on Page G1, the name of John Pyland’s construction company was incorrect in a photo caption, and Pyland was not identified. The name of the company was JP & Sons construction. Also, the headline accompanying a chart with the story was incorrect. The chart represented average annual construction employment. The Bulletin regrets the errors.

Central Oregon fuel prices Prices from the AAA Fuel Price Finder at www .aaaorid.com. Price per gallon for regular unleaded gasoline and diesel, as posted online Thursday. Station, address Per gallon • Space Age Fuel, 20635 Grandview Drive, Bend. . .$2.96 • Conoco, 62980 Highway 97, Bend . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$2.99 • Gordy’s Truck Stop, 17045 Whitney Road, La Pine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$3.02 • Chevron, 1745 N.E. Third St., Bend . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$3.02 • Safeway, 80 N.E. Cedar St., Madras . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$3.03 • Texaco, 178 S.W. Fourth St., Madras . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$3.04 • Chevron, 1400 N.W. College Way, Bend . . . . . .$3.06

DIESEL • Gordy’s Truck Stop, 17045 Whitney Road, La Pine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3.10 • Chevron, 2005 U.S. Highway 97, Redmond . . .$3.36 • Chevron, 1210 S.W. Highway 97, Madras . . . . .$3.40 Collene Funk / The Bulletin

$1352.90 GOLD CLOSE CHANGE +$16.10

Local utilities say they would pass it on to customers By Ed Merriman The Bulletin

Andy Tullis The Bulletin ile photo

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$26.830 SILVER CLOSE CHANGE +$1.323

After nearly a decade of flat electricity rates, customers of Central Electric Cooperative and other utilities that purchase electricity from the Bonneville Power Administration may be hit with rate increases after BPA announced Thursday that it wants to boost rates 8.5 percent next year. On Oct. 1, CEC implemented a 9.5 percent rate increase, raising average monthly residential bills from $102.50 to $112.36, largely to offset a series of BPA

wholesale rate increases, including a 7 percent 2009 BPA rate hike, said Jeff Beaman, CEC spokesman. “We are well aware that the timing of this increase could pose some difficulty for our members in these tough economic times,” Beaman said. “We did not enter into this decision lightly and are implementing the increase because it is in the best long-term interests of the co-op and its membership as we maintain and strengthen our ability to provide reliable, safe service.” Beaman said the Oct. 1 rate increase was the first one imposed on CEC members since 2001, even though BPA raised its wholesale power rates 23 percent during that period. See Rate hike / B5

Ari Delashmutt skis the Cirque Bowl at Mt. Bachelor earlier this year.

Hopes soar for winter

Projections of heavy snowfall, lots of visitors have tourism organizations feeling optimistic By Jordan Novet The Bulletin

The winter recreation season is around the corner in Central Oregon, and key players in the local tourism industry are expecting many good things: good snowfall, good attendance and good revenues. The winter season offers crucial tourism dollars for the region. Almost 43 percent of total room-tax collections in 2009 in the city of Bend were collected during the typical ski season that year, according to a calculation, a period in which Mt. Bachelor ski area typically operates. Not all those dollars are from skiers

and snowboarders, but winter recreationists are considered integral to a Central Oregon tourism economy with an estimated annual economic impact of $570 million. A Colorado-based company devoted to analyzing parts of the mountain-travel industry is sending positive signals about winter tourism business throughout the West. The Mountain Travel Research Program collects and makes projections based on occupancy and rate information from hotels and resorts near such recreation areas as Aspen and Vail, Colo.; Park City, Utah; and Mt. Bachelor. See Tourism / B5

After much fanfare, EUROPEAN CRISIS For first time, GM stock debuts Ireland says with modest gains it’s looking for a bailout

By Bill Vlasic New York Times News Service

GASOLINE

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BPA seeking 8.5% rate hike for next year

STOC K S R E P O R T

Fewer fall delinquent in paying mortgages

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General Motors returned to the stock market Thursday with a car show on Wall Street and a congratulatory message from President Barack Obama, but the shares did not deliver a big surge above the price of the initial public offering. Shares in the nation’s biggest automaker closed at $34.19 in heavy trading, a 3.6 percent increase over the $33-a-share price of its offering. Investors had hoped for a larger bounce on the first day of trading for the company, which was rescued last year by a $50 billion government bailout and swift trip through bankruptcy reorganization. Industry analysts said it appeared that the decision this week by GM and its underwriters to bump up the stock’s target price from the original $26 to $29 range had absorbed the usual first-day rise for an initial public offering. “That was where the bounce was,” said David Cole, chairman emeritus of the Center for

By David Jolly and Niki Kitsantonis New York Times News Service

Fred R. Conrad / New York Times News Service

Traders buy GM shares at the New York Stock Exchange on Thursday, the first day General Motors stock was publicly available. Automotive Research in Ann Arbor, Mich. The relatively small increase in the share price also meant that the U.S. taxpayers likely captured the best return possible in their first divestiture of what was a 61 percent stake in the company. See GM / B5

Irish officials acknowledged for the first time Thursday that Ireland was seeking aid from international lenders. Ireland had been reluctant to accept any bailout that came with strings attached. But Thursday, Finance Minister Brian Lenihan told the Irish parliament that it would be a “very desirable outcome” if a contingency capital fund could be established with the European Union, the International Monetary Fund and the European Central Bank. Patrick Honohan, governor of the Central Bank of Ireland, said in an interview on the Irish state broadcaster RTE that “we’re talking about a very substantial loan for sure” and that such a rescue would be “in the tens of billions” of euros. See Ireland / B2

Steven Rattner is embroiled in a bitter battle with New York Attorney General Andrew Cuomo. The Associated Press ile photo

New York AG accuses former car czar, financier in pension fraud case By Louise Story and Peter Lattman New York Times News Service

Steven Rattner, the prominent financier who oversaw the federal rescue of the auto industry, was formally accused by New York’s attorney general, Andrew Cuomo, on Thursday of engaging in a kickback scheme involving the state’s pension system. On the same day that Rattner was being celebrated on Wall Street for his role in turning around General Motors, he found himself embroiled in a bitter battle with Cuomo, settled similar charges with the Securities and Exchange Commission and escalated a separate legal fight against his

former investment firm. Even as a resurgent GM went public again in a huge stock sale Thursday, Cuomo sought to banish Rattner for life from the securities business in New York. The civil fraud claims, which Rattner contested, came within moments of news that the financier had settled a related dispute with the SEC. In that case, Rattner accepted a two-year ban from certain Wall Street businesses and, without admitting or denying wrongdoing, agreed to pay a $6.2 million fine. Cuomo, New York’s Democratic governor-elect, is seeking stiffer penalties, including $26 million. See Rattner / B5

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B USI N ESS

B2 Friday, November 19, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

M  D I SPATC H E S The Vibe Dance Center has moved to the Bend Towne Center at 740 N.E. Third St., Suite 1, after outgrowing its previous space. The Vibe employs 12 staff members and instructors, and offers classes for all levels, ages 3 to adult, focusing on technique, skill and performance-quality development. The dance center has expanded its offerings from 40 to 55 classes per week. For more information, visit www.danceat thevibe.com or call 541-318-8338. Buckboard Murder Mysteries will open at the Cascade Village Shopping Center on Nov. 27. Based in Bend, Buckboard is in its fifth year of providing interactive entertainment. The holiday mystery shows are a collaboration between Buckboard Murder Mysteries and chef Dave Hatfield of Café 3456. The first show at the new venue will be “The Mafioso Murders.” Other performances, “Eat, Drink and Be Deadly” and “Murder on the Menu,” will be offered on a rotating basis. Tickets are available at www.buckboardmysteries.com or by calling 541-350-0018. NorthWest Crossing’s new community garden has won a “Building a Better Central Oregon” award in its inaugural year. The Central Oregon Association of Realtors recognized several local projects, including the garden, for exceptional contributions to Central Oregon’s built environment. The community garden was built by West Bend Property Co., which developed NorthWest Crossing, and is managed by the Oregon State University Extension Service Master Gardener program.

Unsealed lawsuit indicates Dell hid computer faults By Ashlee Vance New York Times News Service

SAN FRANCISCO — Documents unsealed Thursday in a 3-year-old lawsuit against Dell Inc. have raised more questions about how the company handled an unprecedented number of faulty computers sold to governments, schools and corporations from 2003 to 2005. A judge in the U.S. District Court in North Carolina unsealed hundreds of documents linked to a lawsuit filed by Advanced Internet Technologies that had accused Dell of trying to hide defects in its desktop computers from customers. For instance, the court documents show that the city of New York filed incident reports with Dell on 20.2 percent of a batch of 5,000 computers purchased during this period. A purchase of 2,800 computers by Microsoft resulted in issues with 11 percent of the machines. The documents also show how Dell had resisted informing many of its customers about the extent of the problem. Despite widespread reports from the field, Dell salespeople and technicians were encouraged to keep customers in the dark about the known defects that left computers inoperable. As it tried to deal with the

mounting issues, Dell began ranking customers by importance, putting first those who might move their accounts to another PC maker, followed by those who might curtail sales. The company declined to recall the systems and did what it called “proactive field replacements” for customers that met certain sales and failure rate thresholds. In September, Dell settled the lawsuit with Advanced Internet Technologies without disclosing the terms of the agreement. The issues with the computers revolved around the capacitors that dot computer motherboards. A typical Dell computer could have up to 20 of these capacitors, which cost a fraction of a penny each and help regulate electrical operations of the machines. Earlier this decade, capacitors made in Asia with a bad chemical recipe were sold to numerous makers of televisions, PCs and other electronic devices. The capacitors would bulge when they became too hot and cause devices to malfunction or stop working altogether. Studies conducted by Dell and a third party showed that the company shipped 11.8 million computers from May of 2003 to July 2005 that were at risk of breaking.

If you have Marketplace events you would like to submit, please contact Collene Funk at 541-617-7815, e-mail business@bendbulletin.com, or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at www.bendbulletin.com. Please allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication.

Ireland Continued from B1 Ben May, an economist with Capital Economics in London, said the size of any bailout would depend on what the examiners found on the books of the Irish banks. He said that 60 billion euros ($82 billion) might suffice if the amount was to cover only the government’s financing needs for the next few years but that more might be necessary to have firepower in reserve. Additionally, he said, there was a concern that Irish banks might have trouble rolling over their debt after the European Central Bank began to withdraw the extraordinary measures it used to combat the financial crisis. Also Thursday, experts from the European Union, the IMF and the European Central Bank arrived in Dublin to review the books of Irish lenders. “I think we’re moving toward the next stage,” said Pier Carlo Padoan, chief economist of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. “I’m encouraged by this decision; it’s the beginning of the end, hopefully.” Concerns about Ireland’s fiscal state have contributed to volatility in bond markets in recent days and helped to keep the euro under pressure. In Greece, where Europe’s sovereign debt troubles first surfaced late last year, the Finance Ministry presented to parliament a 2011 budget that would pave the way for further deep cuts while also increasing sales

“I think we’re moving toward the next stage. I’m encouraged by this decision; it’s the beginning of the end, hopefully.” — Pier Carlo Padoan, chief economist of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development taxes and redoubling efforts to crack down on tax evasion. Finance Minister George Papaconstantinou said that the latest measures were ambitious but attainable. “These are not the desires and wishes of the Greek government,” he said, “but concrete measures that have been agreed” with the European Union and the IMF, which bailed out the country in May. The Finance Ministry pledged to reduce the 2011 budget deficit by an additional 5 billion euros ($6.8 billion), to 7.4 percent of gross domestic product. With these measures and other steps announced this year, the ministry said, 14 billion euros in budget savings and additional revenue could be realized next year. The Greek government had anticipated 1.5 billion euros in cuts for next year, but additional measures became necessary after Eurostat, the European Union’s statistics agency, increased its estimate of Greece’s 2009 budget deficit to 15.4 percent of GDP from 13.6 percent

previously. That meant more pain would be needed to put the budget on track for a deficit smaller than 3 percent of GDP by 2014, as stipulated in the country’s $140 billion rescue package. The bulk of the savings is to come from cutting costs at public enterprises and in sectors like military spending and health care. There were no further cuts to salaries and pensions, as officials, concerned over months of demonstrations, had promised. While Greece’s woes result largely from overspending and flawed record keeping by previous governments, Ireland’s woes have come mainly from the damage caused to overextended banks by the bursting of a real estate bubble. The authorities have had to nationalize a large portion of the Irish financial sector, and there are signs that the problems are getting worse, as more people are falling behind on their mortgage payments. The European Central Bank and the Irish central bank have had to step up their aid to Irish financial institutions as investor confidence has ebbed in recent months. Ireland’s government bond yields have risen above 8 percent in recent weeks, a level that would make market refinancing painful. Caroline Atkinson, an IMF spokeswoman in Washington, said in a briefing that the mission, led by the head of the organization’s European department, Ajai Chopra, would begin work today. She declined to comment on how much money Ireland might receive.

BUSINESS CALENDAR TODAY FREE TAX RETURN REVIEWS: If you think you paid too much or missed a deduction, Zoom Tax can help. Call or stop by for an appointment; free; Zoom Tax, 963 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite 100, Bend; 541-385-9666. BEND CHAMBER TOWN HALL BREAKFAST — KNOW THE EMPLOYMENT LANDSCAPE: Bureau of Labor and Industries Commissioner Brad Avakian will discuss regulations businesses should know about, and how BOLI can help educate and train employees to comply with current laws; $25 for Bend Chamber of Commerce members, $35 at the door; 7:30-9 a.m.; Touchmark at Mt. Bachelor Village, 19800 S.W. Touchmark Way; www .bendchamber.org. REDMOND CHAMBER OF COMMERCE COFFEE CLATTER: 8:30-9:30 a.m.; Juniper Golf Course, 1938 S.W. Elkhorn Ave.; 541-548-8198. EDWARD JONES COFFEE CLUB: Current market and economic update including current rates; free; 9 a.m.; Sisters Coffee Co., 61292 S. U.S. Highway 97, Suite 105, Bend; 541-6178861.

SATURDAY INTERMEDIATE EXCEL 2007: Registration required; $59; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Redmond campus, 2030 S.E. College Loop, Redmond; 541-3837270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu.

MONDAY OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Registration required; $35; Pizza Hut, 2139 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com.

TUESDAY BEND CHAMBER BUSINESS SUCCESS PROGRAM: Learn about the power of words and the role they play in creating verbal presentations critical to achieving success in today’s technological business environment. Presented by Alistair Paterson, founder of the Aspirational Alliance; $25 for Bend Chamber of Commerce members, $45 for nonmembers; 11 a.m.-1 p.m.; Touchmark at Mt. Bachelor Village, 19800 S.W. Touchmark Way; www .bendchamber.org.

WEDNESDAY ROTH CONVERSIONS, WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW: Learn the costs and benefits of converting, and potential next steps. Presented by Luiz Soutomaior, CFP, CFS. Registration required by Nov. 22; free; noon-1 p.m.; Charles Schwab & Co., 777 N.W. Wall St., Suite 201, Bend; 541-318-1794.

THURSDAY BEND TOASTMASTERS MEETING: Come and learn how Toastmasters may benefit you; free; 6:30 p.m.;

IHOP, 30 N.E. Bend River Mall Drive; 541-480-1871.

FRIDAY Nov. 26 FREE TAX RETURN REVIEWS: If you think you paid too much or missed a deduction, Zoom Tax can help. Call or stop by for an appointment; free; Zoom Tax, 963 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite 100, Bend; 541-385-9666. EDWARD JONES COFFEE CLUB: Current market and economic update, including current rates; free; 9 a.m.; Sisters Coffee Co., 61292 S. U.S. Highway 97, Suite 105, Bend; 541617-8861.

SATURDAY Nov. 27 OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Registration required; $35; Pizza Hut, 2139 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com.

MONDAY Nov. 29 OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Registration required; $35; 4-8:30 p.m.; Pizza Hut, 2139 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-4476384 or www.happyhourtraining.com.

TUESDAY Nov. 30 FIRST-TIME HOMEBUYER CLASS: Find out about the latest government programs and grants for first-time homebuyers, and those who have not owned for the past three years. Enjoy a free dinner while learning about buying a home. Please call for reservations; 6-8 p.m.; Evergreen Home Loans, 963 S.W. Simpson Ave. #200, Bend; 541-318-5500.

THURSDAY Dec. 2 LEADERSHIP SKILLS SERIES: Central Oregon Community College’s Small Business Development Center will offer a nine-month series designed to give managers and team leaders the skills they need to succeed in their organizations; entire series costs $645, individual seminars are $85; 8 a.m.-noon; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7700 or www.cocc.edu. MANAGING DAY-TO-DAY PERFORMANCE: Managers and team leaders can learn skills to identify performance gaps and increase productivity; $85; 8 a.m.-noon; Central Oregon Community College, Boyle Education Center, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7290 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. CREATING A NOT-SO-BIG INSPIRED HOME: Learn to achieve beauty,

efficiency and conservation of energy and resources in a smaller space. Registration requested by Dec. 2; $12.50; 9 a.m.-noon; Bend Park & Recreation District Office, Community Room, 799 S.W. Columbia St.; 541-480-7303 or bsullivan@ earthadvantage.org. REPRESENTATION-PRACTICE AND PROCEDURES: Study for the Enrolled Agent IRS exams in courses offered by Central Oregon Community College’s Continuing Education Department. Registration required. 541-383-7270. Class continues Dec. 3; $480 plus $145 for required text available at first class; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541383-7700. GREEN BUILDING TOUR AND ANNUAL MEETING: Join the High Desert Branch of Cascadia for its annual meeting, an evening of networking and a tour of The Oxford Hotel; 5-7:30 p.m.; The Oxford Hotel, 10 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541410-9845. BEND TOASTMASTERS MEETING: Come and learn how Toastmasters may benefit you; free; 6:30 p.m.; IHOP, 30 N.E. Bend River Mall Drive; 541-480-1871.

FRIDAY Dec. 3 FREE TAX RETURN REVIEWS: If you think you paid too much or missed a deduction, Zoom Tax can help. Call or stop by for an appointment; free; Zoom Tax, 963 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite 100, Bend; 541-385-9666. REDMOND CHAMBER OF COMMERCE COFFEE CLATTER: Hosted by Polar Bear Gas and Wash; 8:30-9:30 a.m.; Redmond Senior Center, 325 N.W. Dogwood Ave.; 541-548-5393. CREATING A NOT-SO-BIG GREEN HOME: Learn to optimize home sustainability through space planning, proper selection of materials and fixtures, and green building techniques. Architect Michael Klement will showcase exceptional projects; $12.50; 9 a.m.-noon; Bend Park & Recreation District Office, Community Room, 799 S.W. Columbia St.; 541389-7275 or www.earthadvantage .org/education-events. EDWARD JONES COFFEE CLUB: Current market and economic update, including current rates; free; 9 a.m.; Sisters Coffee Co., 61292 S. U.S. Highway 97, Suite 105, Bend; 541-617-8861. OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Registration required; $35; 9 a.m.-1:30 p.m.; Pizza Hut, 2139 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-4476384 or www.happyhourtraining.com.

TUESDAY Dec. 7 OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Registration required; $35; 4-8:30 p.m.; Pizza Hut, 2139 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-4476384 or www.happyhourtraining.

A Magazine Highlighting The Variety Of Organizations That Connect Your Community.

Publishing Sunday, December 12, 2010 in The Bulletin Central Oregon communities continue to grow due to a nationally-recognized appreciation for the region’s quality of life. From providing the most basic needs of food, shelter and security, to creating and maintaining positive social, educational, recreational and professional environments, Central Oregon’s nonprofit community is a foundation for our area’s success and sustainability. Hundreds of organizations and thousands of volunteers make up this nonprofit network. Through the publication of Connections, The Bulletin will both define and profile the organizations that make up this network. Connections will provide readers with a thorough look at nonprofit organizations in Deschutes, Jefferson, and Crook Counties.

Advertising space reservation deadline is Wednesday, November 24, 2010 CALL 541.382.1811 TO RESERVE YOUR SPACE TODAY.

ATTENTION CENTRAL OREGON NONPROFIT GROUPS The Bulletin is in the process of verifying and compiling a comprehensive list of nonprofit entities in Central Oregon. Please fill out this form to verify information in order to be considered for publication in Connections. Mail back to: The Bulletin, Attn: Nicole Werner, P.O. Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708. E-mail information to nwerner@bendbulletin.com or call 541-382-1811 ext. 871

Name of Nonprofit Group ____________________________________________________ Contact Person ____________________________________________________________ Phone __________________ E-mail ___________________________________________ Nonprofit Mission Statement/Purpose___________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________


B USI N ESS

THE BULLETIN • Friday, November 19, 2010 B3

A N Chrysler getting doused by its rivals By Bill Vlasic and Nick Bunkley New York Times News Service

DETROIT — The Big Three is starting to look more like the Big Two, as Chrysler drifts further behind its larger hometown rivals Ford and General Motors, whose newly issued stock was publicly traded for the first time on Thursday. Sergio Marchionne, Chrysler’s chief executive, has been preaching patience and promising a successful turnaround from the company’s bankruptcy — just over a longer timeframe than GM’s. But as investors clamor for a piece of the new GM and bid up Ford’s stock price, Chrysler is increasingly being cast as the odd man out in Detroit’s automotive resurgence. Chrysler’s sales in the United States are less than half what they were five years ago, and its product lineup is still in the early stages of an overhaul. On Wednesday, the company showed off its new Dodge Durango SUV at the Los Angeles auto show, as well as the tiny Fiat 500 microcar that Chrysler dealers will soon begin selling in the United States. But industry analysts said the company remained in low gear and was quite far away from its own public stock offering. “Chrysler is nowhere near ready,” said David Whiston, an equity analyst with the investment firm Morningstar. “It still needs way more car model product than it has.”

Fighting harder Marchionne has said that Chrysler was hurt more by the severe drop in overall auto sales in 2008 and 2009 than other automakers. While GM and Ford took a big hit in sales, too, Ford is back to pre-recession levels, and GM has some of the industry’s fastestgrowing brands. “We got a bloody nose on the way into the recession, and I’m not sure we got it all back on the way out,” he said last week in a conference call on third-quarter earnings. “So we need to fight harder.” Marchionne is also the chief executive of Fiat, the Italian automaker that controls Chrysler by virtue of the 20 percent stake it received in the bailout deal negotiated last year with the U.S. government. With Fiat at the wheel, Chrysler is working to add new fuel-efficient cars to its lineup beginning next year. But in the interim, Chrysler’s sales are stagnant, and the company continues to lose money. Chrysler cut its losses in the third quarter to $84 million, but still owes $7.4 billion to the U.S. and Canadian governments for loans it received. The U.S. government owns 8 percent of Chrysler, whose largest stockholder is the United Automobile Workers retiree health care trust, which owns 55 percent.

A painstaking devotion to Lancias Mechanic relishes in refurbishing, likening Italian cars’ parts to fine jewelry By Nick Czap New York Times News Service

BERKELEY, Calif. — Of all the tools at his disposal, Jaan Hjorth reserves special affection for a 1942 Monarch model EE lathe. The behemoth device, a mad array of levers, dials and hardened cutters, is so versatile that Hjorth calls it “the tool that can make itself.” More to the point, it can whittle a clamp for the ignition coil of a 1958 Lancia Appia, mill a tiny cam for the door lock of a ’65 Lancia Fulvia, or, as needed on a recent afternoon, bore a hole in the tip of a plunger assembly from the thermostatic actuator of an Alfa Romeo fuel-injection system. In a far corner of his repair shop here, Hjorth, lanky and tall, his heavy-metal-length blond hair tied back for safety, secured the plunger in the lathe’s chuck, tightened a bit into a drill-like proboscis and set the machine in motion. As the bit entered the plunger’s tip, tiny brass filaments twisted out and fell onto a mound of shiny aluminum shavings below, remnants of an earlier endeavor.

Precision work Employing a ton-and-a-half apparatus to pare a few milligrams of metal from an object no bigger than a spark plug might seem like overkill, but in Hjorth’s world, precision is of the utmost importance. There are no warehouses brimming with thermostatic actuators for vintage Alfas or ignition coil clamps and door lock assemblies for Lancias; when these parts melt or fracture or otherwise cease to function, Hjorth must painstakingly refurbish and restore them or, frequently, re-create them entirely from scratch. The work is exacting and time-consuming, but like many craftsmen, Hjorth, 54, seems to derive as much satisfaction from the process as he does from the result. This is evident in his reverence for the utility and workmanship of the antique tools that crowd his shop as well as his admiration for the ingenious — and often idiosyncratic — engineering built into the midcentury Italian cars, and Lancias in particular, that are his specialty. Born in Hollywood, Hjorth (pronounced yaawrt) spent much

Photos by Nick Czap / New York Times News Service

Jaan Hjorth checks the ignition of a Lancia with an oscilloscope outside his repair shop in Berkeley, Calif. Hjorth developed an affinity for Italian cars, and on discovering that Italian cars spent much of their time in the shop, he started his own business, which he christened Motor Pro Garage. of his childhood in Europe, and in his teenage years moved to Piedmont, a small city east of San Francisco Bay. It was in this period that he developed an affinity for Italian cars, and on discovering that Italian cars spent much of their time in the shop, maneuvered his way into a job at a garage called Fredz Autogofast in nearby El Cerrito. Initially, the work was far from glamorous — for the most part, Hjorth recalled tedious chores like scraping off the remains of water pump gaskets. Eventually he took on a greater variety of tasks, relishing the work so much that in 1978 he bought the business, the sum total of which he described as “a Rolodex, a hydraulic press and an acetylene torch.” Shortly thereafter, he started his own business, which he christened Motor Pro Garage.

A love of Lancias Hjorth gravitated to Lancias. Founded in 1906 and now a division of Fiat, Lancia built an early (and durable) reputation for graceful, technically innovative cars that performed well on the road and on racetracks. “They were just the most interesting things out there,” Hjorth explained. “They were the bestmade machines in the world from an aesthetic and engineering standpoint.” Arguably, Hjorth owes the

Jaan Hjorth uses his 1942 Monarch EE lathe to refurbish meticulously engineered parts that are no longer in stock. He calls it “the tool that can fix itself.” existence of his niche to the fastidiousness of Lancia’s engineers, which ensured that 50 and 60 years later their creations could be endlessly disassembled, rebuilt and rejuvenated. “Take something like a Lancia ignition lock,” he said. “It’s like looking inside a piece of jewelry. Every last piece comes apart.” Hjorth does most of his business from spring through fall, when the roads are dry. During those seasons, the cars arrive at Motor Pro Garage in a growling, burbling procession. One Friday this September, a striking specimen appeared: a ’62 Lancia Flaminia convertible, a rare model produced in collaboration with a Milanese coachbuilder, Carrozzeria Touring. The Flaminia’s owner, Gary Dowling, a film sound technician who lives in Angwin, a small town about 80 miles north of San Francisco, first made contact

with Hjorth three years ago. At the time, Dowling was about to have his convertible’s upholstery restored and learned from an acquaintance that Hjorth owned a Flaminia coupe with an original, unaltered interior. Dowling asked to see some photographs, which Hjorth gladly supplied. “When you find out someone’s a Lancia nut, you don’t want them to lose the fever,” Hjorth said. “So, sure, I’ll send you some pictures.”

All signs point to Jaan Recently, Dowling, a competent amateur mechanic, was stumped by a peculiar problem. After an extended session of engine tuning, the Flaminia’s idle was rock solid, but at freeway speeds the engine bucked and surged. Once again, said Dowling, “all signs pointed to Jaan.” In the driveway of the shop,

Hjorth raised the car’s lightweight aluminum hood. He took a cursory look, blipped the throttle and listened as the engine returned to the steady drone of its idle. He loped into the shop and emerged carrying a suitcase-size instrument bristling with knobs and switches. “The Hitachi oscilloscope,” said Hjorth, explaining the presence of a tiny gray television-type screen on the box’s face. “Boring, but bulletproof.” He attached the device to the ignition wires, and while flipping switches and turning various knobs, peered at a series of jagged green lines jumping across the screen. “Hmm,” he said. “Your distributor’s not too happy.” Hjorth deftly loosened a nut and pulled the distributor from the engine. Back inside the garage, he mounted it to the spindle of a 1956 Sun distributor testing machine, whose bright colors and pop art-looking logo called to mind a primitive arcade game. A quick spin revealed that one of the distributor’s two sets of contacts was incorrectly gapped. Hjorth adjusted the gap, synchronized the points and returned the distributor to its roost. He then set upon the Flaminia’s Solex carburetor, peeling back its lid to reveal the naked float bowl. Finding nothing out of the ordinary, Hjorth unscrewed a brass jet and examined it under a loupe. “Don’t tell me this is your jet,” he said, with a note of exasperation. He retreated to his workbench and returned with a miniature tapered reamer, the sort used by watchmakers, and proceeded to widen the jet’s orifice by 0.146 millimeter, proposing, as he did so, a curious theory that today’s gasoline is more viscous than the petrol of the ’60s, and that symptoms like the Flaminia’s can often be alleviated by a slight bit of vasodilatation. With the jet reinstalled, it was time for a quick spin, with Hjorth behind the wheel and Dowling in the passenger seat. On the test drive, the Flaminia seemed to be behaving, but Dowling’s trip home would be a truer test. In the meantime, Hjorth had another matter to attend to — reviving a rakish Zagato-bodied 1959 Lancia Flaminia Sport from a sevenyear slumber. A week later, Dowling gave an update on the convertible. The surging was reduced, he said, but not completely alleviated. “I think Jaan needs to ream the jet a little more,” he said. His tone suggested patience rather than frustration, as well as an understanding, no doubt shared by Hjorth, that in dealing with Italian art it is better to cut too little than to cut too much.

Stock offering Marchionne, who previously led Fiat to a comeback, has pledged a public stock offering for Chrysler in the second half of 2011, suggesting that the GM stock would help set the stage. “The success our competitor in town is achieving with its own offering is an indication of the receptiveness of the capital markets,” he said. But industry analysts said it was too soon to tell whether a Chrysler stock offering would generate anything close to the interest shown by investors in GM. Chrysler’s sales in the United States have rebounded some from last year’s dismal performance, when it fell below 1 million vehicles sold for the first time in decades. Its two biggest brands, Dodge and Jeep, have benefited from some new offerings, like the Jeep Grand Cherokee. But its Chrysler brand has plunged to 14th in sales among all the brands sold in the United States, behind traditionally smaller players like Volkswagen, Subaru and Mazda.

1865 NE Highway 20, Bend M o n – S a t 9 –7 | S u n 1 0 – 6

541-389-1177 Expires November 30 , 2010.


B4 Friday, November 19, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Consolidated stock listings Nm

D

A-B-C-D A-Power AAR ABB Ltd ACE Ltd ADC Tel AES Corp AFLAC AGA Med AGCO AGL Res AK Steel AMAG Ph AMB Pr AMN Hlth AMR AOL n APACC ASM Intl ASML Hld AT&T Inc ATP O&G AU Optron AVI Bio AXT Inc Aarons s Aastrom rs AbtLab AberFitc AbdAsPac Abraxas AcaciaTc AcadiaRlt Accelrys Accenture AccoBrds AccretvH n Accuray AcmePkt AcordaTh ActivePwr ActivsBliz Actuant Acuity Acxiom ADAM AdeonaPh AdobeSy Adtran AdvAmer AdvAuto AdvBattery AdvEnId AMD AdvSemi AdvOil&Gs AecomTch AegeanMP Aegon Aeropostl s AeroViron AEterna g Aetna AffilMgrs Affymax Affymetrix AgFeed Agilent Agnico g Agrium g AirProd AirTrnsp AirMedia Aircastle Airgas AirTran AkamaiT Akorn AlskAir AlaskCom Albemarle AlbertoC n AlcatelLuc Alcoa Alcon Alere AlexREE AlexcoR g Alexion Alexza AlignTech Alkerm AllgEngy AllegTch AllegiantT Allergan AlliData AlliancOne AlliBGlbHi AlliBInco AlliBern AlliantEgy AlliantTch AldIrish AlldNevG AlldWldA AllisChE AllosThera AllscriptH Allstate AlnylamP AlphaNRs AlphaPro Alphatec AlpGPPrp AlpTotDiv AlpAlerMLP AlteraCp lf AlterraCap Altria Alumina AlumChina AmBev Amarin Amazon Amdocs Amedisys Ameren Amerigrp AMovilL AmApparel AmAxle AmCampus ACapAgy AmCapLtd AEagleOut AEP AEqInvLf AmExp AFnclGrp AIntGr pfA AmIntlGrp AIntGr62 AmerMed AmO&G AmOriBio AmRepro AmSupr AmTower AmWtrWks Amrign Ameriprise AmeriBrgn Ametek Amgen AmkorT lf Amphenol Amtech Amylin Anadarko Anadigc AnalogDev Ancestry Angiotc gh AnglogldA ABInBev AnnTaylr Annaly Anooraq g Ansys AntaresP AntheraP n Antigenic h Anworth Aon Corp A123 Sys Apache AptInv ApolloGrp ApolloInv Apple Inc ApldEnerg ApldIndlT ApldMatl AMCC Apricus rs AquaAm ArcadiaRs ArcelorMit ArchCoal ArchDan ArchLearn ArenaPhm AresCap AriadP Ariba Inc ArmHld ArmstrWld Arris ArrowEl ArtTech ArtioGInv ArubaNet ArvMerit AsburyA AscentSol AshfordHT Ashland AsiaEntRs AsiaInfoL AspenIns AspenTech AsscdBanc AsdEstat Assurant AssuredG AstoriaF AstraZen athenahlth Atheros AtlasEngy AtlasPplH AtlasPpln Atmel ATMOS AtwoodOcn Augusta g Aurizon g AutoNatn AutoChina

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Nm Autodesk Autoliv AutoData AutoZone Auxilium AvagoTch AvalonBay AvanirPhm AveryD AviatNetw AvisBudg Avista Avnet Avon Axcelis AXIS Cap BB&T Cp BCE g BE Aero BGC Ptrs BHP BillLt BHPBil plc BJsRest BJs Whls BMB Munai BMC Sft BMP Sunst BP PLC BPZ Res BRE BRFBrasil s BSD Med BabckW n Baidu s BakrHu Baldor BallCp BallardPw BallyTech BanColum BcBilVArg BcoBrades BcoLatin BcoSantand BcoSBrasil BcpSouth BkofAm BkAm pfH BkAm wtA BkAm wtB BkHawaii BkIrelnd BkMont g BkNYMel BkNova g BankAtl A BannerCp BarcUBS36 BarcGSOil BrcIndiaTR Barclay Bar iPVix rs BarVixMdT Bard BarnesNob Barnes BarrickG BasicEnSv Baxter BeaconPw BeacnRfg BeazerHm BebeStrs BeckCoult BectDck BedBath Belden Belo Bemis Berkley BerkH B s BerryPet BestBuy BigLots BBarrett BioRef s Biocryst Biodel BiogenIdc BioMarin BioMedR BioScrip BiostarPh Bitauto n BlkHillsCp BlkRKelso Blkboard BlackRock BlkBldA n BlkDebtStr BlkIntlG&I BlkMuniyQ3 BlkMuniyld BlkRlAsst Blackstone BlockHR Blount BlueCoat BlueNile BobEvans Boeing Boise Inc Boise wt BonTon BoozAllen n Borders BorgWarn BostPrv BostProp BostonSci Bowne BoydGm BradyCp Brandyw BrasilTele Braskem BreitBurn BridgptEd BrigStrat BrigExp Brightpnt Brigus grs Brinker Brinks BrMySq Broadcom BroadrdgF BroadSft n Broadwind BrcdeCm Brookdale BrkfldAs g BrkfldPrp BrooksAuto BrwnBrn BrownShoe BrownFB BrukerCp Brunswick Bsquare BuckTch Buckle Bucyrus Buenavent BungeLt CA Inc CB REllis CBIZ Inc CBL Asc CBS B CEVA Inc CF Inds CH Robins CIGNA CIT Grp n CLECO CME Grp CMS Eng CNH Gbl CNO Fincl CNOOC CNinsure CRH CSX CVB Fncl CVR Engy CVS Care CablvsnNY CabotO&G CACI CadencePh Cadence CalDive CalaStrTR Calgon CalifPizza CaliperLSc CallGolf Callidus CallonP h Calpine CAMAC En CamdnP Cameco g CameltInf n Cameron CampSp CampCC n CIBC g CdnNRy g CdnNRs gs CP Rwy g CdnSolar CanoPet Canon CapOne CapitlSrce CapFedF CapsteadM CpstnTrb h CardnlHlth Cardiom g CardiumTh CareFusion CareerEd Carlisle CarMax Carnival CarpTech Carters CascadeB h Caseys CashAm CatalystH Caterpillar CathayGen CaviumNet CedarSh CelSci Celanese CeleraGrp

D 36.26 +.98 1.40 74.54 +1.30 1.44 45.27 +.80 251.17 +1.94 19.71 +.03 25.07 +.47 3.57 107.36 +.88 4.45 +.04 0.80 37.07 +.81 4.26 +.14 13.26 -.07 1.00 21.72 +.20 31.19 +1.13 0.88 29.41 +.41 2.63 +.14 0.84 35.66 +.74 0.60 24.41 +.16 1.83 33.22 +.36 35.78 +.88 0.48 7.65 +.41 1.74 87.25 +2.22 1.74 75.78 +1.98 34.75 +.13 47.01 -.53 .84 +.04 44.74 +.84 9.79 -.01 42.21 +.61 3.73 +.01 1.50 42.83 +.20 0.10 14.76 +.18 5.94 -.19 25.02 +.76 108.14 +1.22 0.60 49.89 +2.02 0.68 44.77 +.19 0.40 65.44 +1.04 1.52 -.03 38.79 +.51 1.34 62.88 +.29 0.57 11.68 +.31 0.51 20.89 +.44 0.68 16.03 +.57 0.80 11.84 +.28 0.33 14.20 +.53 0.88 13.15 -.13 0.04 11.70 +.08 2.05 25.24 +.11 6.52 +.13 2.18 +.07 1.80 44.80 +.34 1.04 2.88 +.72 2.80 58.05 +1.17 0.36 28.04 +.72 1.96 52.83 +1.05 .71 -.11 0.04 1.70 -.02 44.32 +1.21 23.24 +.50 75.46 +1.56 0.28 17.75 +.38 45.33 -2.75 70.83 -2.18 0.72 84.69 +.44 1.00 15.07 +.21 0.32 19.61 +.27 0.48 49.55 +.38 13.89 +.43 1.24 51.09 +.54 .20 -.01 15.77 +.32 4.12 +.04 0.10 6.27 +.06 0.76 55.25 +.40 1.48 77.69 +.91 43.24 -.37 0.20 33.06 +1.50 5.90 +.20 0.92 30.86 +.58 0.28 27.54 +.30 80.86 +1.33 0.30 37.87 +.79 0.60 43.08 +.21 29.57 -.33 38.05 +1.11 20.70 +.17 4.73 +.07 1.84 +.09 64.78 +.26 25.79 +.16 0.68 17.48 +.17 4.31 +.17 3.03 +.35 12.20 -.25 1.44 29.69 +.11 1.28 11.22 +.18 39.94 +.35 4.00 169.15 +.22 0.12 17.80 -.25 0.32 3.91 +.04 1.36 10.55 +.08 0.85 12.78 -.12 0.99 13.52 -.10 1.09 13.79 +.38 0.40 13.05 +.04 0.60 12.53 +.15 15.88 +.53 27.10 +.45 44.58 -1.05 0.80 33.19 +.62 1.68 64.61 +2.11 0.40 7.14 -.01 .50 -.01 12.68 -.39 19.50 +.25 1.12 +.03 59.46 +1.28 0.04 5.38 +.09 2.00 83.53 +1.27 6.56 0.22 11.38 9.03 +.38 0.72 31.08 +.09 0.60 10.99 -.07 22.47 +1.06 0.02 21.94 +.93 1.56 19.96 +.36 15.32 +.14 0.44 17.61 +.35 24.46 +.76 8.55 +.06 1.69 +.02 0.56 18.74 +.32 0.40 25.72 +.20 1.28 26.32 +.36 0.32 42.00 +1.92 0.60 21.33 -.24 18.44 +.13 1.62 +.01 5.72 +.07 19.00 +.36 0.52 30.00 +.50 0.56 17.09 -.08 7.44 +.41 0.32 22.81 +.37 0.28 11.65 +.35 1.28 63.45 +1.07 15.41 +.24 0.05 16.42 +.52 5.69 +.31 0.16 18.48 +.23 0.80 36.98 +1.80 0.10 89.12 -.25 0.46 53.32 +.78 0.92 61.32 +1.14 0.16 23.33 +.38 18.97 +.06 6.40 +.08 0.80 16.42 +.34 0.20 16.55 +.35 22.17 +.17 0.40 120.25 +3.59 1.00 72.25 +1.17 0.04 36.50 +.26 41.09 +.26 1.00 30.72 +.20 4.60 294.75 +3.55 0.84 17.95 +.15 42.72 +.14 5.71 +.15 5.28 225.90+10.82 0.26 23.02 +.09 0.83 19.80 +1.14 1.04 61.76 +1.15 0.34 8.32 +.14 11.49 +.44 0.35 30.79 +.96 0.50 30.91 +1.98 0.12 34.42 +1.06 50.62 +1.00 7.95 +.09 8.35 +.21 5.33 +.17 0.63 9.02 +.09 14.46 +.35 16.50 -.01 5.85 +.24 0.04 7.65 +.43 4.86 +.01 5.58 +.31 12.44 +.05 2.29 +.02 1.80 50.22 +.60 0.28 34.92 +.91 17.72 +.07 47.07 +2.37 1.16 34.62 +.18 12.17 -.13 3.48 76.42 +1.61 1.08 64.05 +.86 0.30 39.14 +1.28 1.08 64.81 +1.25 13.54 +.28 .32 -.01 48.48 +.95 0.20 38.06 -.21 0.04 6.37 +.11 2.00 23.09 -.11 1.66 11.65 +.06 .79 +.00 0.78 36.56 +2.09 5.81 +.36 .49 -.01 23.95 +.49 19.13 +.27 0.68 36.16 +.70 32.51 +.27 0.40 42.09 +.48 0.72 36.32 +1.44 29.98 +.55 .83 +.12 0.54 39.53 -.10 0.14 36.46 +.23 44.54 +1.79 1.76 83.11 +1.94 0.04 13.91 +.07 33.87 +.36 0.36 6.09 +.26 .62 -.02 0.20 36.82 +1.58 5.90 +.01

Nm Celestic g Celgene CellTher rsh CelldexTh Cemex Cemig pf CenovusE n Centene CenterPnt CnElBrasil CentEuro CEurMed CFCda g CenGrdA lf CentAl CntryLink Cenveo Cephln Cepheid Cerner CerusCp ChRvLab ChrmSh ChartInds ChkPoint Checkpnt Cheesecake Chemtura n CheniereEn ChesEng Chevron ChicB&I Chicos ChildPlace Chimera ChinAgri s ChiArmM ChinaAuto ChinaBAK ChinaBiot ChiCbl rsh ChinaCEd ChCBlood n ChinaDigtl ChinaGreen ChinaInfo ChinaInf h ChinaLife ChinaLdg n ChinaMda ChinaMed ChiMYWd n ChinaMble ChinaNGas ChinaNepst ChNBorun n ChinaPStl ChinaRE ChinaSecur ChinaShen ChinaSun ChinaUni ChiValve ChinaYuch ChipMOS Chipotle Chiquita ChrisBnk Chubb ChungTel ChurchDwt CienaCorp Cimarex CinciBell CinnFin Cinemark Cintas Cirrus Cisco Citigp pfJ Citigp pfN Citigrp CitzRepB h CitrixSys CityTlcm Clarcor Clarient h ClaudeR g CleanDsl rs CleanEngy ClearEFd n Clearwire CliffsNRs Clorox CloudPeak Coach CocaCE CocaCl Coeur CogdSpen CogentC Cogent CognizTech CohStInfra CohStQIR Coinstar ColdwtrCrk ColgPal CollctvBrd ColonPT ColSprtw Comcast Comc spcl Comerica CmcBMO CmclMtls CmwReit rs ComScop CmtyHlt CommVlt CBD-Pao s CompDivHd Compellent CompPrdS CompSci Compuwre ComstkRs Con-Way ConAgra ConchoRes ConcurTch Conexant Conns rt ConocPhil ConsolEngy ConEd ConstellA ConstellEn ContlRes Cnvrgys ConvOrg h CooperCo Cooper Ind CooperTire CopanoEn Copel CoreLab s CoreLogic CoreSite n CorinthC CornPdts Corning CorpOffP CorrectnCp Cosan Ltd Costamre n Costco Cott Cp CousPrp Covance CovantaH CoventryH Covidien Crane Cray Inc Credicp CredSuiss CrSuiHiY Cree Inc Crocs Crossh glf CrosstexE CrwnCstle CrownHold Crystallx g Ctrip.com s CubistPh CullenFr Cummins CurEuro CurrCda CurtisWrt CushTRet Cyclacel CyprsBio h CypSemi CypSharp CytRx h Cytec Cytomed Cytori DCT Indl DG FastCh DHT Hldgs DJSP Ent DNP Selct DPL DR Horton DST Sys DSW Inc DTE DWS HiOp DanaHldg Danaher s DaqoNEn n Darden Darling DaVita DeVry DeanFds DeckOut s Deere DejourE g DelMnte Delcath Dell Inc DelphiFn DeltaAir DeltaPtr h Deltek Deluxe DemandTc DenburyR Dndreon DenisnM g Dennys Dentsply Depomed DeutschBk DeutB pf DB Cap pf

D 8.79 +.12 60.74 +.79 .39 +.00 4.37 +.06 0.43 9.16 +.22 0.86 16.94 +.12 0.80 28.98 +.76 22.74 +.14 0.78 15.85 +.16 1.56 13.42 +.18 25.06 +.82 21.01 +.09 0.01 18.44 +.52 10.20 +.11 14.00 +.60 2.90 42.57 +.67 5.12 +.09 65.61 +.53 20.61 +.40 86.38 +1.07 2.55 +.07 33.43 +.67 3.61 +.05 27.97 +1.27 43.19 +.37 17.92 +.26 29.98 +.01 14.08 +.08 4.85 +.13 0.30 22.25 +.15 2.88 83.82 +1.36 28.84 +1.07 0.16 11.19 +.06 48.32 +.48 0.69 4.03 11.91 -.20 2.78 -.08 15.78 +.26 2.08 +.03 11.01 +.28 .51 +.02 7.64 -.09 3.93 -.03 7.12 -.13 8.38 +.52 5.91 +.31 .66 -.04 1.54 66.44 +1.23 24.17 +.73 17.52 -.04 13.63 -.23 10.94 +.84 1.85 50.39 +.18 5.23 +.32 0.28 3.85 -.11 12.39 +1.29 1.58 +.07 10.07 +.51 5.67 +.19 2.82 +.02 4.40 -.02 0.23 13.84 +.01 10.54 +.26 0.25 26.12 +1.54 1.43 +.04 227.64 -3.32 12.28 +.47 0.24 5.30 +.13 1.48 57.85 +.45 1.27 24.40 +.21 0.68 65.42 +1.11 14.57 +.50 0.32 82.25 +1.31 2.48 +.03 1.60 30.13 +.49 0.84 17.79 +.18 0.49 27.14 +.44 13.35 +.04 19.61 +.21 2.13 26.63 +.14 1.97 26.54 +.13 4.30 +.11 .62 -.01 64.94 +1.53 0.52 15.98 +.10 0.42 39.68 +.88 4.99 +.01 1.56 -.06 18.50 +3.18 14.02 +.04 1.40 20.60 +.20 6.99 +.26 0.56 67.80 +1.39 2.20 62.93 +.15 20.87 +1.10 0.60 54.29 +1.77 0.48 25.40 +1.02 1.76 63.84 +1.32 23.23 +1.03 0.40 5.92 +.02 11.81 +.14 10.50 +.02 64.67 +1.89 0.96 16.73 +.14 0.72 8.50 +.10 59.26 -.82 3.38 +.07 2.12 78.21 +.84 16.81 +.46 0.60 17.15 +.14 0.80 53.95 +1.98 0.38 20.57 +.18 0.38 19.42 +.18 0.40 37.41 +.47 0.94 37.79 +.42 0.48 14.20 +.02 2.00 24.90 +.44 31.99 +.06 32.41 +.67 29.55 +.64 0.36 40.69 +1.64 1.36 16.61 +.09 25.28 +1.37 27.91 +.62 0.60 46.21 +.54 10.28 +.15 24.59 +.12 0.40 32.97 +.37 0.92 21.53 +.14 77.47 +1.30 50.38 +.90 1.37 +.02 .50 2.20 61.75 +.94 0.40 41.05 +.90 2.38 48.85 +.27 20.78 +.90 0.96 29.57 +.53 50.51 +1.31 12.39 -.01 .36 -.02 0.06 50.48 +1.50 1.08 52.73 +.79 0.42 21.26 +1.09 2.30 29.64 +.35 1.09 24.44 +.60 0.24 84.21 +1.63 18.47 +.15 13.26 +.01 4.48 +.18 0.56 44.95 +.98 0.20 17.73 +.29 1.65 34.45 +.13 24.31 +.11 13.14 +.43 11.21 +.41 0.82 66.41 -.61 8.02 +.26 0.12 7.68 +.12 47.08 +.48 1.50 15.80 +.09 25.32 +.23 0.80 43.48 +1.04 0.92 37.96 -.05 6.25 +.13 1.70 120.76 +2.81 1.85 41.41 +.38 0.32 2.94 +.02 57.68 +1.39 15.96 +.05 .35 +.05 0.28 9.61 +.25 42.33 +.83 30.57 +.04 .31 46.61 +.71 23.26 +.22 1.80 54.66 +.48 1.05 93.81 +2.06 0.01 135.78 +1.13 97.34 +.26 0.32 29.78 +.88 0.90 9.72 +.09 1.64 +.04 4.09 +.07 15.50 +.17 2.40 13.17 -.16 .98 +.08 0.05 47.77 +2.24 .50 -.01 4.50 +.02 0.28 4.77 +.05 26.38 +.71 0.40 4.42 +.06 .51 +.05 0.78 10.02 +.01 1.21 25.96 +.16 0.15 10.65 -.03 0.60 43.05 +.82 37.97 +.47 2.24 45.31 +.34 0.96 14.44 -.04 14.92 +.49 0.08 43.23 +.65 11.49 +.30 1.28 48.86 -.16 11.90 +.19 72.32 +.96 0.24 45.22 -.30 7.43 -.01 63.34 +1.80 1.20 77.28 +1.28 .35 +.00 0.36 15.71 +1.21 9.90 +.26 13.67 +.32 0.44 27.01 +.83 13.77 +.56 .79 +.02 7.22 +.04 1.00 21.93 +.25 10.39 +.32 18.49 +.37 38.23 +2.36 2.53 +.05 3.61 +.10 0.20 31.07 +.05 5.38 +.02 0.93 55.90 +1.33 1.66 23.90 +.09 1.90 26.11 +.26

Nm

D

DB AgriDL DBGoldSh DBGoldDL DBGoldDS DevelDiv DevonE Dex One n DexCom Diageo DiaOffs DiamRk DianaShip DicksSptg DigitalRlt DigRiver DigitalGlb Dillards DirecTV A DrxTcBll s DrxEMBll s DrTcBear rs DrSCBear rs DREBear rs DrxEBear rs DirEMBr rs DirFnBear DrxFBull s Dir30TrBear DrxREBll s DirxDMBear DirxSCBull DirxLCBear DirxLCBull DirxEnBull Discover DiscCm A DiscCm C DiscvLab h DishNetwk Disney DrReddy Dolan Co DolbyLab DoleFood DollarGen DollarTh DllrTree s DomRescs Dominos Domtar grs Donldson DonlleyRR DoralFncl DEmmett Dover DowChm DrPepSnap DragonW g DrmWksA DressBarn DresserR DryHYSt DryStrt Dril-Quip drugstre DryShips DuPont DuPFabros DuffPhelp DukeEngy DukeRlty DuoyGWat DyaxCp Dynavax Dynegy rs

0.08 0.64 2.38 0.50 0.03 2.12 0.16 6.26 5.68 0.20

7.35 3.41 4.77 8.06 5.06 0.08

2.00 0.35 0.24

1.83 1.00 0.50 1.04 0.40 1.10 0.60 1.00

0.52 0.59

1.64 0.48 0.24 0.98 0.68

Nm 11.26 +.91 15.92 -.20 39.04 +1.08 8.82 -.24 12.60 +.20 71.93 +1.58 6.70 +.45 11.89 +.24 76.12 +2.25 68.34 +.28 9.86 +.14 13.27 +.24 33.39 +.06 51.00 -1.54 36.72 +.26 30.16 +1.45 31.51 +.17 41.89 +.29 39.61 +1.87 37.82 +2.47 27.94 -1.64 20.52 -1.24 21.76 -.60 29.39 -1.96 23.07 -1.81 11.81 -.45 23.01 +.83 42.79 -.46 48.52 +1.26 8.89 -.72 56.64 +3.07 10.46 -.47 61.08 +2.58 46.15 +2.70 18.38 +.03 42.39 +.73 36.90 +.90 .21 -.01 19.00 -.25 37.58 +.36 39.85 +.89 12.59 +.34 64.33 +.39 9.84 +.17 30.08 +.37 46.64 +.42 53.81 -.90 42.80 +.35 14.41 +.21 79.47 +2.31 53.66 +3.15 16.41 +.23 1.55 +.08 16.60 +.16 54.32 +.96 31.36 +.80 37.11 +.69 7.20 +.23 31.92 +.13 24.67 +.25 38.88 +1.05 4.46 +.06 7.94 -.11 77.61 +2.88 1.67 +.03 5.59 +.40 46.53 +.87 22.45 -.06 13.63 +.26 17.69 +.10 11.23 +.02 12.68 -.32 2.20 +.06 1.97 +.07 5.15 +.09

E-F-G-H E-House ETrade rs eBay EDAP TMS EMC Cp EMCOR ENI EOG Res EQT Corp ETF Pall n EagleBulk EagleMat EaglRkEn ErthLink EstWstBcp EastChm EKodak Eaton EatnVan EV LtdDur EVMuniBd EVRiskMgd EV TxDiver EVTxMGlo EVTxGBW Ebix Inc s Ecolab Ecopetrol EdisonInt EducMgmt EducRlty EdwLfSci s 8x8 Inc ElPasoCp ElPasoPpl Elan EldorGld g ElectArts eMagin EBrasAero Emcore EMS EmersonEl EmmisCm EmpireRst Emulex EnbrEPtrs Enbridge EnCana g s EncoreEn EndvSilv g EndoPhrm EndurSpec Ener1 EnerNOC Energen Energizer EngyConv EngyPtrs EngyTsfr EgyXXI rs EnergySol Enerpls g Enersis EnerSys ENSCO Entegris Entercom Entergy EntPrPt EntreM rs EntreeGold EntropCom EnzonPhar EpicorSft Equifax Equinix EqtyOne EqtyRsd EricsnTel EssexPT EsteeLdr EtfSilver Eurand EverestRe EvrgrSlr h ExactSci h ExamWk n ExcelM ExcoRes Exelixis Exelon ExeterR gs ExideTc Expedia ExpdIntl ExpScrip s ExterranH ExtraSpce ExxonMbl F5 Netwks FEI Co FLIR Sys FMC Corp FMC Tech FNBCp PA FSI Intl FTI Cnslt FairchldS FamilyDlr Fastenal FedExCp FedRlty FedSignl FedInvst FelCor Ferro FibriaCelu FidlNFin FidNatInfo FifthStFin FifthThird FifthTh pfB FinEngin n Finisar FinLine FstAFin n FstBcpPR FstCwlth FFnclOH FstHorizon FstInRT FMariner h FMidBc FstNiagara FstPotom FstSolar FTDJInet FT Fincl FirstEngy FstMerit Fiserv FiveStar FlagstB rs Flextrn Flotek h FlowrsFds Flowserve Fluor FocusMda FEMSA FootLockr ForcePro FordM

0.25 15.05 +.22 14.90 +.22 30.57 +.43 4.11 -.26 21.51 +.67 25.93 +.86 2.51 44.46 +.83 0.62 92.11 +1.94 0.88 40.60 +.33 69.26 +3.79 5.30 +.04 0.40 25.32 +.04 0.10 7.53 +.04 0.64 9.04 +.11 0.04 16.99 -.07 1.76 78.96 +1.89 4.77 +.03 2.32 95.77 +3.34 0.72 29.85 +.57 1.39 16.10 +.20 0.92 12.20 -.20 1.80 13.07 +.04 1.62 11.87 +.18 1.53 11.38 +.14 1.56 12.70 +.18 21.67 +.80 0.62 48.89 +1.15 1.34 46.13 +1.28 1.26 37.96 +.50 14.42 +.28 0.20 7.38 -.01 65.94 +.91 2.97 -.07 0.04 13.96 +.24 1.64 32.72 +.07 5.61 +.13 0.05 17.08 +.37 15.54 +.12 5.62 +.34 0.38 29.38 +.55 1.26 49.60 -.16 1.38 55.28 +.93 .59 -.00 1.54 +.34 11.52 +.24 4.11 60.60 +.21 1.70 55.51 +1.08 0.80 27.92 +.14 2.00 20.32 -.34 5.93 +.24 35.88 +.71 1.00 44.24 +1.09 4.35 +.12 24.50 -.47 0.52 44.72 +.29 69.14 +.76 4.77 +.07 13.32 +.18 3.58 51.18 +.52 24.19 +1.15 4.95 +.10 2.16 27.39 +.63 0.68 23.87 +.07 30.01 +.56 1.40 48.90 +.52 6.33 +.31 8.09 +.69 3.32 73.19 +.54 2.33 42.61 +.11 6.00 +1.31 2.80 +.10 8.85 +.38 11.01 -.05 9.19 +.02 0.64 34.77 +.42 81.82 +.44 0.88 17.25 +.21 1.35 49.22 +.91 0.28 10.38 +.17 4.13 108.64 +.95 0.75 74.48 +2.14 26.84 +1.36 10.97 -.13 1.92 85.82 +.81 .81 +.00 6.15 +.08 16.40 +.42 5.99 +.07 0.16 18.50 +.06 6.23 +1.51 2.10 40.02 +.02 5.77 +.22 7.80 +.37 0.28 26.45 +.39 0.40 51.24 +.89 52.99 +1.58 23.31 +.32 0.33 15.71 +.04 1.76 70.31 +1.30 120.51 +5.50 23.09 +.54 27.38 +.39 0.50 76.84 +2.05 80.21 +2.78 0.48 9.23 +.18 2.95 +.16 35.07 +.04 12.71 +.52 0.62 48.68 +.28 0.84 52.03 +.48 0.48 87.09 +1.58 2.68 78.10 +.34 0.24 6.20 +.14 0.96 24.02 +.10 5.95 +.30 14.06 +.39 16.78 +.34 0.72 13.87 0.20 27.12 +.37 1.26 11.55 +.16 0.04 12.08 -.31 1.81 24.70 +.06 15.82 +.32 18.86 +.38 0.16 17.07 +.13 0.24 14.23 +.48 .26 -.01 0.04 6.21 +.09 0.40 17.13 +.16 0.72 9.84 -.02 7.26 +.23 .39 -.24 0.04 10.23 +.19 0.60 12.42 +.11 0.80 15.68 +.13 123.64 +.81 32.96 +.70 0.11 13.90 +.14 2.20 36.03 +.33 0.64 17.66 +.06 55.05 +.72 6.09 +.06 1.27 7.12 +.21 2.94 +.09 0.80 26.04 +.12 1.16 106.51 +1.50 0.50 57.08 +2.13 24.56 +.80 0.64 55.27 +.96 0.60 16.44 -.31 5.10 +.04 16.12 -.56

How to Read the Market in Review He e a e he 2 578 mos ac ve s ocks on he New Yo k S ock Exchange Nasdaq Na ona Ma ke s and Ame can S ock Exchange Mu ua unds a e 415 a ges S ocks n bo d changed 5 pe cen o mo e n p ce Name S ocks a e s ed a phabe ca y by he company s u name no s abb ev a on Company names made up o n a s appea a he beg nn ng o each e e s s D v Cu en annua d v dend a e pa d on s ock based on a es qua e y o sem annua dec a a on un ess o he w se oo no ed Las P ce s ock was ad ng a when exchange c osed o he day Chg Loss o ga n o he day No change nd ca ed by ma k Fund Name Name o mu ua und and am y Se Ne asse va ue o p ce a wh ch und cou d be so d Chg Da y ne change n he NAV YTD % Re Pe cen change n NAV o he yea o da e w h d v dends e nves ed S ock Foo no es – PE g ea e han 99 d – ue ha been a ed o edemp on b ompan d – New 52 wee ow dd – Lo n a 12 mo e – Compan o me ed on he Ame an E hange Eme g ng Compan Ma e p a e g – D dend and ea n ng n Canad an do a h – empo a e mp om Na daq ap a and u p u ng qua a on n – S o wa a new ue n he a ea The 52 wee h gh and ow gu e da e on om he beg nn ng o ad ng p – P e e ed o ue p – P e e en e pp – Ho de owe n a men o pu ha e p e q – C o ed end mu ua und no PE a u a ed – R gh o bu e u a a pe ed p e – S o ha p b a ea 20 pe en w h n he a ea w – T ade w be e ed when he o ued wd – When d bu ed w – Wa an a ow ng a pu ha e o a o u– New 52 wee h gh un – Un n ud ng mo e han one e u – Compan n ban up o e e e hp o be ng eo gan ed unde he ban up aw Appea n on o he name D v dend Foo no es a – E a d dend we e pa d bu a e no n uded b – Annua a e p u o – L qu da ng d dend e – Amoun de a ed o pa d n a 12 mon h – Cu en annua a e wh h wa n ea ed b mo e en d dend announ emen – Sum o d dend pa d a e o p no egu a a e – Sum o d dend pa d h ea Mo e en d dend wa om ed o de e ed – De a ed o pa d h ea a umu a e ue w h d dend n a ea m – Cu en annua a e wh h wa de ea ed b mo e en d dend announ emen p – n a d dend annua a e no nown e d no hown – De a ed o pa d n p e ed ng 12 mon h p u o d dend – Pa d n o app o ma e a h a ue on e d bu on da e Mo a e o abo e mu be wo h $1 and ga ne o e $2 Mu ua Fund Foo no es e – E ap a ga n d bu on – P e ou da quo e n – No oad und p – Fund a e u ed o pa d bu on o – Redemp on ee o on ngen de e ed a e oad ma app – S o d dend o p – Bo h p and – E a h d dend

Sou ce The Assoc a ed P ess and L ppe Nm FordM wt FordC pfS ForestCA ForestLab ForestOil FormFac Fortinet Fortress FortuneBr Fossil Inc FosterWhl FranceTel FrankRes FMCG FresKabi rt FreshMkt n Fronteer g FrontierCm FrontierOil Frontline FuelSysSol FuelCell FultonFncl Fuqi Intl lf FurnBrds FushiCopp GMAC31 GMAC32 GMAC 44 GMX Rs GSI Cmmrc GSI Tech GT Solar GabelliET GabGldNR Gafisa s Gallaghr GameTc hlf GameStop GamGld g Gannett Gap GardDenv Garmin Gartner GascoEngy Gastar grs GaylrdEnt GenProbe GencoShip GnCable GenDynam GenElec GenGrPr n GenMarit GenMills s GenMoly GenMot n GM cvpfB GenSteel GenesisEn Genoptix Genpact Gentex Gentiva h GenuPrt Genworth Genzyme GeoGrp GeoEye GeoGloblR GaGulf Gerdau GeronCp GiantIntac GigaMed Gildan GileadSci GlacierBc GlaxoSKln Gleacher GlimchRt GlobalCash GloblInd GlobPay GblX Uran GlbXSilvM GlbSpcMet GluMobile GolLinhas GolarLNG GoldFLtd GoldRsv g Goldcrp g GoldStr g GoldS60 n GoldmanS Goodrich GoodrPet Goodyear Google vjGrace GrafTech Graingr Gramrcy GranTrra g GrCanyEd GraniteC GrayTelev GrtAtlPac GrtBasG g GrLkDrge GtPlainEn GreenMtC s Griffon Group1 GrpoFin GpTelevisa Guess GugSolar GugGlDiv GulfRes GulfportE GushanE rs Gymbree HCC Ins HCP Inc HDFC Bk HSBC HSBC Cap2 HSN Inc HainCel Hallibrtn Halozyme Hanesbrds HanmiFncl HanoverIns HansenNat HarbinElec HarleyD Harman Harmonic HarmonyG HarrisCorp Harsco HartfdFn HarvNRes Hasbro HatterasF HawaiiEl HawHold Headwatrs HltCrREIT HlthCSvc s HltMgmt HlthcrRlty HealthNet HlthSouth HlthSprg Healthwys HrtlndEx HrtldPay Heckmann Heckmn wt HeclaM Heinz HelixEn HelmPayne Hemisphrx HSchein Herbalife HercOffsh HercTGC Hersha Hershey Hertz Hess HewlettP Hexcel hhgregg Hibbett HighOne n HighwdPrp Hill-Rom HimaxTch HollyCp

D 7.51 -.49 3.25 51.25 -.68 15.20 +.30 32.77 +.73 34.58 +1.10 9.51 +.11 32.56 +1.28 4.86 +.07 0.76 59.36 +.97 69.03 +2.21 28.60 +1.21 1.77 22.89 +.42 0.88 116.95 +1.40 2.00 99.85 +3.01 .03 -.00 33.50 +.66 8.50 +.09 0.75 9.10 +.05 15.05 +.65 1.90 28.40 +.79 34.65 -.02 1.28 0.12 8.85 -.01 6.34 +.04 4.60 +.23 10.17 -.10 1.83 22.33 +.05 1.84 22.30 +.05 1.84 22.71 +.05 4.74 +.04 23.12 -.10 7.24 +.23 7.23 +.13 0.48 5.34 +.08 1.68 18.22 +.37 0.14 15.55 +.27 1.28 28.26 +.46 .36 +.03 20.40 -.60 6.51 +.24 0.16 12.78 +.43 0.40 20.91 +.22 0.20 62.99 +1.10 1.50 28.85 -.51 31.90 +.18 .34 +.01 4.29 +.15 33.05 +.74 49.89 +.81 15.56 +.22 31.37 +.47 1.68 67.05 +1.66 0.48 16.04 +.23 14.68 +.04 0.04 4.14 -.02 1.12 35.31 +.21 5.39 +.24 34.19 2.38 50.45 2.45 -.04 1.55 23.87 +.44 17.20 +.29 0.18 14.53 +.32 0.44 21.36 +.24 23.93 1.64 47.50 +.38 11.54 +.08 70.27 +.52 24.30 +.10 40.99 -.44 .82 +.09 18.92 +1.49 0.32 12.84 +.28 5.79 +.13 0.18 7.05 +.03 1.47 -.02 27.55 +.09 37.95 +.25 0.52 13.40 +.24 2.00 40.25 +.68 2.54 +.17 0.40 7.78 +.17 2.83 +.07 6.05 +.20 0.08 41.19 +.97 17.68 +.72 23.14 +1.01 0.15 16.75 +.61 2.30 -.02 0.40 16.90 +.22 0.68 15.24 +.60 0.16 16.71 +.04 1.64 +.06 0.36 45.63 +.76 4.31 +.10 1.53 23.85 -.12 1.40 167.35 +2.46 1.16 84.44 +1.74 14.26 +.21 10.17 +.46 596.56+13.01 33.10 +1.12 18.70 +.80 2.16 125.24 +.38 1.96 +.06 7.59 -.02 18.82 -.06 0.52 26.35 +.44 1.72 +.21 3.68 +.02 2.79 +.07 0.07 7.20 +.12 0.83 18.70 +.11 30.88 -.31 12.87 +.37 0.40 39.57 +.99 15.27 +.23 0.52 22.85 +.49 0.64 43.59 +.58 7.37 +.11 0.76 14.76 +.11 10.58 +.54 19.10 +1.94 4.04 +.24 65.32 -.02 0.58 28.32 +.38 1.86 32.63 +.21 0.81 182.42 +1.48 1.70 53.37 +.86 28.02 +.19 28.19 +.66 26.08 +.16 0.36 37.56 +2.06 7.27 +.03 26.28 +.43 .94 -.01 1.00 46.69 +.52 50.21 +.37 18.98 -1.01 0.40 31.74 +.62 41.35 +.63 6.54 -.12 0.07 11.76 +.01 1.00 46.38 +.42 0.82 23.23 +.12 0.20 23.76 +.08 13.69 +.54 1.00 47.22 +.80 4.60 30.16 +.03 1.24 22.37 +.12 7.12 +.16 3.82 +.11 2.76 45.40 -.03 0.62 15.68 +.03 8.62 +.07 1.20 20.67 -.08 28.21 +.33 19.01 +.18 28.26 +.41 10.70 +.14 0.08 15.00 +.16 0.04 15.26 +.31 3.88 +.03 .14 -.02 8.47 +.35 1.80 48.19 +.44 13.90 +.37 0.24 47.38 +2.05 .52 +.01 57.86 +.84 1.00 67.92 +.84 2.64 -.02 0.80 10.20 +.01 0.20 6.27 +.18 1.28 46.55 +.31 12.04 +.25 0.40 69.99 +2.17 0.32 41.69 +.72 17.02 +.41 22.53 +.13 28.16 +.31 19.71 -.05 1.70 30.65 +.01 0.41 39.23 +.20 0.25 2.17 -.07 0.60 34.86 +1.35

Nm Hollysys Hologic HomeDp HomeProp HomexDev Honda HonwllIntl HorizLns HorizTFn n Hormel Hornbeck HorsehdH Hospira HospPT HostHotls HotTopic HovnanE HHughes n HubGroup HubbelB HudsCity HugotnR HumGen Humana HuntJB HuntBnk Huntsmn HutchT Hypercom Hyperdyn

D

0.95 2.32 1.21 0.20 0.84

1.80 0.04 0.28

1.44 0.60 1.37 0.48 0.04 0.40

14.40 +.45 16.21 -.24 30.87 +.04 53.13 +.33 33.42 +.52 37.99 +1.04 49.74 +.92 3.91 14.48 +.08 46.90 +1.01 21.80 +.73 12.25 +.36 57.27 +.36 21.77 -.25 15.86 +.41 5.75 +.06 3.77 +.06 40.05 +.11 32.62 +1.12 56.62 +1.87 11.58 +.01 21.04 +.24 24.20 -.31 56.81 -1.24 36.78 +.49 5.76 +.08 13.53 +.51 2.99 7.21 +.08 2.92 +.03

I-J-K-L IAC Inter 27.51 +.51 IAMGld g 0.06 16.75 +.36 ICICI Bk 0.53 52.55 +.89 IDT Corp 0.22 22.48 +.26 IESI-BFC g 0.50 22.57 -.08 iGateCorp 0.26 22.81 +.85 ING GRE 0.54 7.66 +.09 ING 10.91 +.38 INGPrRTr 0.31 5.68 +.01 ION Geoph 6.53 +.49 iShGold s 13.23 +.16 iShGSCI 31.14 +.74 iSAstla 0.81 24.82 +.50 iShBraz 2.58 77.20 +2.12 iSCan 0.42 29.24 +.52 iShEMU 0.96 36.18 +.86 iSFrnce 0.60 25.00 +.65 iShGer 0.30 24.11 +.70 iSh HK 0.48 19.55 +.35 iShItaly 0.45 17.12 +.37 iShJapn 0.16 10.48 +.26 iSh Kor 0.39 56.08 +1.61 iSMalas 0.25 13.96 +.28 iShMex 0.75 58.96 +1.26 iShNeth 0.39 20.90 +.46 iShSing 0.38 13.94 +.29 iSPacxJpn 1.37 46.74 +.99 iShSoAfr 1.36 70.42 +.90 iSSpain 2.26 40.21 +.86 iSTaiwn 0.21 14.05 +.19 iSh UK 0.44 17.35 +.39 iShThai 1.20 64.29 +2.08 iShSilver 26.35 +1.35 iShS&P100 1.08 54.10 +.84 iShDJDv 1.69 48.26 +.54 iShBTips 2.56 109.03 +.18 iShAsiaexJ 0.87 62.68 +1.30 iShChina25 0.68 45.10 +.94 iShDJTr 1.01 87.58 +1.48 iSSP500 2.34 120.38 +1.75 iShBAgB 3.70 107.18 -.03 iShEMkts 0.59 46.48 +1.08 iShiBxB 5.30 109.90 +.08 iSSPGth 1.13 63.10 +1.04 iShNatRes 0.36 38.41 +.80 iShSPLatA 1.22 52.52 +1.22 iSSPVal 1.24 56.35 +.71 iShNMuBd 3.74 100.98 +.44 iShB20 T 3.83 96.00 +.39 iShB7-10T 3.23 96.98 -.23 iShB1-3T 0.98 84.21 +.01 iS Eafe 1.38 57.77 +1.41 iSRusMCV 0.83 42.32 +.54 iSRusMCG 0.52 53.03 +.83 iShRsMd 1.42 95.36 +1.34 iSSPMid 0.99 84.70 +1.15 iShiBxHYB 7.88 90.24 +1.13 iShNsdqBio 88.32 +1.35 iShC&SRl 1.85 62.38 +.53 iSR1KV 1.28 61.52 +.81 iSR1KG 0.72 54.71 +.88 iSRus1K 1.11 66.53 +1.01 iSR2KV 1.06 65.99 +1.10 iShBarc1-3 3.16 104.88 +.27 iSR2KG 0.47 80.21 +1.56 iShR2K 0.79 72.21 +1.38 iShUSPfd 2.89 39.47 +.19 iSRus3K 1.19 71.15 +1.04 iShREst 1.88 53.48 +.37 iShFnSc 0.59 53.77 +.67 iShSPSm 0.58 63.28 +1.05 iShBasM 0.91 70.23 +1.57 iShPeru 0.82 48.01 +1.16 iShDJOE 0.28 51.69 +1.42 iShEur350 1.02 39.46 +.92 iSMsciG 1.06 59.85 +1.38 iStar 5.01 -.17 ITT Corp 1.00 46.30 +.40 ITT Ed 61.78 -.33 icad h 1.42 +.09 Icon PLC 20.48 +.52 IconixBr 17.74 +.17 Idacorp 1.20 36.02 +.10 iGo Inc 2.82 -.01 ITW 1.36 47.25 +.38 Illumina 58.77 +.87 Imax Corp 24.25 +.43 Immucor 18.57 +.39 ImunoGn 8.05 +.21 Imunmd 3.40 +.04 ImpaxLabs 19.58 +.72 Incyte 15.35 -.36 IndoTel 1.25 37.31 +.37 Infinera 8.20 -.14 InfoSpace 7.77 +.07 Informat 39.90 +1.18 InfosysT 0.90 66.34 +1.83 IngerRd 0.28 41.21 +.32 IngrmM 17.98 +.35 Inhibitex 2.19 +.21 InlandRE 0.57 8.41 +.06 Innophos 0.68 35.08 +.52 InovioPhm 1.23 -.02 Inphi n 16.20 +.20 InspPhar 7.00 -.04 IntgDv 6.42 +.17 ISSI 7.28 +.16 IntegrysE 2.72 50.59 -.03 Intel 0.72 21.02 -.07 InteractBrk 17.80 -.29 IntcntlEx 113.15 +1.47 InterDig 33.45 -.05 InterMune 13.72 -.07 IBM 2.60 144.36 +2.41 Intl Coal 6.46 +.46 IntFlav 1.08 51.30 +.65 IntlGame 0.24 15.93 +.24 IntPap 0.50 24.84 +.36 IntlRectif 27.24 +.69 IntTower g 7.76 +.03 InterntCap 11.97 +.38 InterOil g 76.46 +.32 Interpublic 10.53 +.07 Intersil 0.48 13.03 +.25 IntPotash 30.80 +.89 Intuit 48.20 +.65 IntSurg 260.14 -2.28 Invesco 0.44 21.81 +.30 InvMtgCap 3.57 22.50 +.09 InvVKDyCr 1.03 12.19 +.14 InVKSrInc 0.29 4.73 +.07 InvTech 15.28 +.13 InvRlEst 0.69 8.82 +.06 IridiumCm 9.40 +.28 IronMtn 0.25 22.22 +.28 IronwdP n 10.87 -.11 IsilonSys 33.72 Isis 9.71 -.09 IstaPh 4.38 -.01 ItauUnibH 0.59 24.69 +.64 Itron 58.82 +.63 IvanhoeEn 2.34 +.10 IvanhM g 24.32 +.70 JCrew 36.12 -1.34 JA Solar 7.19 -.08 JDS Uniph 11.89 +.39 JPMorgCh 0.20 39.66 +.48 JPMAlerian 1.80 36.15 +.15 JPMCh pfC 1.68 25.55 +.23 Jabil 0.28 14.87 +.86 JackHenry 0.38 27.88 +.50 JackInBox 23.08 +.20 JacksnHew .86 -.02 JacobsEng 40.87 +.62

nc Sa es gu es a e uno c a

Nm Jaguar g Jamba JamesRiv JanusCap Jarden JazzPhrm Jefferies JetBlue JinkoSol n JoAnnStrs JoesJeans JohnJn JohnsnCtl JonesGrp JonesLL JonesSoda JosABnk s JournalCm JoyGlbl JnprNtwk K12 KB FnclGp KB Home KBR Inc KKR n KKR Fn KLA Tnc KT Corp KV PhmA Kaman KC Southn KA MLP Kellogg Kemet rs Kennamtl KennWils KeryxBio KeyEngy Keycorp KilroyR KimbClk Kimco KindME KindredHlt KineticC KingPhrm Kinross g Kirklands KnghtCap KnightTr KnightT Knoll Inc KodiakO g Kohls KopinCp KoreaElc KornFer Kraft KratonPP n KrispKrm Kroger Kulicke L&L Egy n L-1 Ident L-3 Com LAN Air LDK Solar LECG LG Display LJ Intl LKQ Corp LPL Inv n LRAD LSI Corp LTXCrd rs LaZBoy LabCp LaBrnch LadThalFn Ladish LamResrch LamarAdv Landstar LVSands LaSalleH Lattice LawsnSft Lazard LeCroy LeapWirlss LeapFrog LearCorp n LeeEnt LegacyRes LeggMason LeggPlat LenderPS LennarA Lennox LeucNatl Level3 h LexiPhrm LexRltyTr Lexmark LibertyAcq LibAcq wt LbtyASE LibGlobA LibGlobC LibtyMIntA LibMCapA LibStrzA n LibtProp LifeTech LifeTFit LifePtH LigandPhm LillyEli LimelghtN Limited Lincare s LincEdSv LincNat LinearTch LinnEngy Lionbrdg LithiaMot LiveNatn LivePrsn LizClaib LloydBkg Local.com LockhdM Loews Logitech LongtopFn LongweiPI Lorillard LaPac Lowes Lubrizol lululemn g LumberLiq LyonBas A LyonBas B

D 6.37 -.04 2.14 +.04 19.30 +1.09 0.04 11.15 +.20 0.33 31.55 +.18 16.32 +1.27 0.30 24.47 +.02 6.71 +.07 24.60 -1.01 44.57 +.92 1.85 +.04 2.16 63.83 +.77 0.64 36.92 +1.04 0.20 13.79 +.26 0.20 81.00 +1.35 1.12 +.06 42.97 +1.01 4.71 +.08 0.70 75.58 +.52 34.38 +1.27 24.08 +.68 45.04 +.72 0.25 11.29 -.01 0.20 27.57 +1.37 0.23 12.75 +.10 0.56 8.81 +.15 1.00 36.53 +.73 21.97 +.56 2.50 +.08 0.56 26.98 +.59 46.21 +1.56 1.92 28.03 +.25 1.62 49.38 +.50 14.82 +.64 0.48 33.42 +.63 10.24 +.20 5.13 +.03 9.96 -.02 0.04 7.85 +.17 1.40 33.97 +.86 2.64 62.10 +.43 0.72 16.23 +.37 4.44 70.00 +.44 15.74 +.02 39.83 +.88 14.16 +.01 0.10 17.80 +.36 13.01 +.50 13.51 +.03 0.24 18.38 +.10 1.70 22.68 -.02 0.08 15.87 +.32 4.49 +.14 53.62 +.82 3.94 +.23 12.82 +.14 18.25 +.79 1.16 30.72 +.23 26.65 +.44 5.38 +.14 0.42 22.76 -.05 5.94 +.30 9.74 +.22 11.79 +.01 1.60 71.44 +1.23 0.46 30.96 +1.00 11.03 +.06 1.01 +.05 17.10 +.68 4.75 -.39 22.33 +.20 32.15 2.44 +.28 5.57 +.20 7.87 +1.89 8.11 +.39 82.05 +.69 3.06 -.03 1.27 +.07 45.71 +.29 46.03 +1.30 36.33 +.77 0.20 38.03 +.28 47.08 +2.18 0.44 22.73 +.50 4.41 8.57 +.10 0.50 36.91 +.59 9.56 +.56 11.83 +.13 5.57 +.08 87.42 -.21 1.98 -.03 2.08 26.24 -.22 0.24 33.57 +.90 1.08 20.17 +.17 0.40 30.60 -1.12 0.16 15.63 +.13 0.60 41.48 +1.30 26.68 +.54 1.08 -.03 1.41 -.01 0.46 7.57 +.18 36.68 +.43 10.48 -.01 1.76 +.02 0.29 4.69 +.13 38.19 +.38 36.13 +.34 15.45 +.09 57.60 +.85 62.76 +.73 1.90 31.36 -.09 50.14 +.45 39.73 +.94 35.98 +.39 1.52 -.02 1.96 34.79 +.39 6.57 +.05 0.60 33.26 +1.39 0.80 26.32 +.47 1.00 15.47 +.74 0.20 24.54 +.65 0.92 31.85 +.51 2.64 36.50 +.34 3.40 -.01 0.20 13.99 +.81 10.41 +.45 9.60 -.01 6.91 +.34 1.45 4.30 +.11 3.90 +.11 3.00 69.15 +.60 0.25 38.74 +.66 20.48 +.19 40.02 +.25 2.97 +.10 4.50 86.89 +.14 7.98 +.26 0.44 21.64 +.12 1.44 105.00 +1.15 48.43 +1.35 22.19 +.61 27.69 +.46 27.68 +.57

M-N-O-P M&T Bk MBIA MCG Cap MDC MDU Res MEMC MF Global MFA Fncl MIN h MGIC MGM Rsts MIPS Tech MKS Inst MPG OffTr MSC Ind MSCI Inc Macerich MackCali Macys MSG n MagelnHl MagelMPtr MagicSft Magma MagnaI g MagHRes MaidenH MMTrip n Manitowoc MannKd ManpwI Manulife g MarathonO MarinaB rs MktVGold MktV Steel MkVStrMet MktVRus MktVJrGld

2.80 77.78 -1.76 9.87 +.11 0.37 7.23 +.24 1.00 25.63 -.04 0.65 20.49 +.07 11.92 +.20 8.01 +.19 0.90 8.12 -.03 0.58 6.73 +.10 8.40 +.22 12.06 +.24 13.91 +.19 20.60 +.01 2.01 -.02 0.88 58.44 +1.14 35.37 +.62 2.00 44.91 +1.28 1.80 31.03 +.03 0.20 24.73 +.08 22.66 +.88 49.07 +.15 2.98 55.71 +.25 0.50 4.32 +.31 4.16 +.11 1.44 96.99 +.70 6.09 +.92 0.28 7.76 +.12 27.33 -.18 0.08 11.26 +.17 6.08 +.04 0.74 55.82 +2.06 0.52 15.35 +.36 1.00 34.16 +.93 1.84 +.15 0.11 59.03 +.99 0.98 65.90 +1.73 19.94 +.59 0.08 34.70 +.99 38.82 +.99

Nm MktV Agri MkVBrzSC MktVCoal MarkWest MarIntA MarshM MarshIls MStewrt MarvellT Masco Masimo MasseyEn Mastec MasterCrd Mattel Mattson MaximIntg McClatchy McCorm McDrmInt s McDnlds McGrwH McKesson McMoRn McAfee MeadJohn MdbkIns MeadWvco Mechel MedAssets MedcoHlth Mediacom MedProp MediCo Medicis Mednax Medtrnic MelcoCrwn MensW MentorGr MercadoL MercerIntl Merck Meredith MergeHlth Mesab Metabolix Metalico MetLife MetroPCS Micrel Microchp Micromet MicronT MicrosSys MicroSemi Microsoft Microtune Micrvisn MdwGold g MillerHer Millicom MincoG g MindrayM Mindspeed Minefnd g MinesMgt Mirant MitsuUFJ MizuhoFn MobileTel s Modine Mohawk Molex MolsCoorB Molycorp n Momenta MoneyGrm MonPwSys Monotype Monsanto MonstrWw Montpelr Moodys MorgStan MSEMDDbt Mosaic Motorola Motricity n Move Inc MuellerWat MurphO Mylan MyriadG NCR Corp NFJDvInt NGAS Rs h NII Hldg NIVS IntT NPS Phm NRG Egy NV Energy NYSE Eur Nabors NalcoHld NamTai Nanomtr NasdOMX NBkGreece NatCineM NatCity pfA NatFuGas NatGrid NOilVarco NatPenn NatRetPrp NatSemi NatwHP NavigCons NaviosAcq Navios Navistar NektarTh NeoStem Net1UEPS NetLogic s NetApp Netease Netflix Netlist NtScout NetSolTch NetSpend n NeurMtrx Neurcrine NeutTand Nevsun g NDragon NewEnSys NGenBiof h NwGold g NewOriEd NY&Co NY CmtyB NY Times NewAlliBc Newcastle NewellRub NewfldExp NewmtM NewpkRes NewsCpA NewsCpB Nexen g NextEraEn NiSource Nicor NikeB 99 Cents NipponTT NoahHld n NobleCorp NobleEn NokiaCp Nomura NordicAm Nordstrm NorflkSo NA Pall g NoestUt NDynMn g NthnO&G NorTrst NthgtM g NorthropG NStarRlt NwstBcsh NovaGld g Novartis NovtlWrls Novavax Novell Novlus NSTAR NuSkin NuVasive

D 0.42 0.45 0.31 2.56 0.35 0.84 0.04

50.26 +1.09 60.14 +1.72 43.10 +1.47 42.49 +.56 38.72 +.93 25.15 +.26 4.95 -.01 4.51 -.04 18.94 +.20 0.30 11.00 +.04 2.00 30.71 +.69 0.24 48.39 +.98 14.43 +.08 0.60 242.49 +7.92 0.83 25.11 +.19 2.76 +.09 0.84 23.19 +.85 3.13 +.07 1.04 44.16 +.66 17.64 +.35 2.44 79.02 +.65 0.94 35.18 -.15 0.72 65.39 +.69 16.79 +.72 47.28 -.02 0.90 60.00 +.51 0.16 9.35 +.14 1.00 25.44 +.03 24.31 +.98 17.15 -.15 60.00 +1.18 8.48 0.80 10.66 13.21 +.32 0.24 27.50 +.40 60.57 +1.23 0.90 34.60 +.32 6.19 +.01 0.36 27.32 +.07 11.36 +.24 62.12 +.95 6.37 +.19 1.52 35.29 +.82 0.92 33.08 +.28 3.93 +.12 2.39 41.25 +1.23 10.32 +.13 4.21 +.06 0.74 39.17 +.55 11.90 +.06 0.14 12.16 +.30 1.38 33.57 +.55 7.00 +.31 7.29 +.19 44.18 +.41 22.18 +.52 0.64 25.84 +.27 2.90 1.49 -.01 .62 +.01 0.09 20.98 +.21 7.24 92.80 +2.22 1.57 +.10 0.20 27.89 +.50 6.36 +.22 9.82 +.50 3.22 +.09 10.92 -.10 4.95 +.19 3.23 +.13 21.47 +.56 14.51 +.68 52.56 +.59 0.70 20.85 +.36 1.12 49.11 +1.00 28.41 -1.48 15.33 +.14 2.48 +.09 16.14 +.38 10.63 +.29 1.12 59.63 +.38 19.37 +.35 0.40 19.71 +.60 0.42 27.34 +.54 0.20 25.57 +.48 1.20 17.05 +.04 0.20 69.34 +1.92 8.14 +.23 28.61 +.25 2.40 +.08 0.07 3.43 +.05 1.10 66.94 +1.28 19.25 +.24 21.10 +.10 14.39 +.49 0.60 15.97 +.12 .37 +.00 40.57 +1.41 2.40 +.01 6.24 -.01 19.52 +.05 0.48 13.69 +.12 1.20 28.95 +.60 22.27 +.76 0.14 29.32 +.28 6.35 -.11 11.82 +.48 21.83 +.58 0.29 2.00 +.11 0.80 19.18 +.18 1.66 25.08 +.18 1.38 63.36 +2.19 7.17 47.46 +.71 0.44 61.87 +2.68 0.04 6.96 +.04 1.52 25.94 -.11 0.40 13.27 +.12 1.88 36.47 -.16 8.86 +.15 0.20 5.15 -.15 0.24 5.56 +.01 52.88 +1.12 13.75 +.35 1.42 +.01 11.52 +.57 29.77 +.48 53.12 +3.87 39.62 -1.30 168.33 +1.65 2.20 +.06 22.09 +.28 1.42 +.08 13.95 +.53 .57 +.03 6.86 -.02 15.12 +.03 5.71 +.24 .04 7.78 +.28 .06 -.01 8.86 +.22 107.48 -1.15 3.43 -.10 1.00 16.96 +.27 7.95 +.12 0.28 13.31 +.05 5.34 +.27 0.20 17.10 -.14 66.21 +1.99 0.60 60.35 +.76 5.67 -.06 0.15 14.39 +.14 0.15 16.03 +.30 0.20 21.31 +.33 2.00 52.34 +.13 0.92 17.24 +.09 1.86 44.70 +.15 1.24 82.47 +1.08 15.33 -.15 23.05 +.33 16.81 +.31 0.90 35.61 -1.03 0.72 82.78 +1.89 0.56 10.31 +.15 5.81 +.27 1.70 26.61 -.08 0.80 41.88 +.46 1.44 61.15 +.81 5.50 +.39 1.03 31.61 +.39 9.13 +.35 20.78 +1.45 1.12 51.05 +.62 2.91 -.01 1.88 63.07 +1.02 0.40 3.97 0.40 10.79 +.06 14.36 -.04 1.99 56.79 +1.10 9.98 +.56 2.37 +.26 5.67 +.02 29.68 +.29 1.70 42.01 +.49 0.50 31.31 +1.56 23.49 -.52

NuanceCm Nucor NuBldAm n NvIMO NuvMuVal NuvPP NvMSI&G2 NuvPI2 NuvQInc NuvQualPf NuvQPf2 Nvidia NxStageMd OGE Engy OM Group OReillyA h OasisPet n OcciPet Oceaneer OceanFr rs Oclaro rs OcwenFn OfficeDpt OfficeMax OilSvHT OilStates Oilsands g OldDomF s OldNBcp OldRepub Olin OmegaHlt Omncre Omnicom OmniVisn OnSmcnd ONEOK OnyxPh OpenTxt OpenTable Opnext OptimerPh optXprs Oracle OrbitalSci Orbitz Orexigen OrientEH OrienPap n OrientFn OriginAg OrionMar Oritani s OshkoshCp OvShip OwensM s OwensCorn OwensIll Oxigene h PDL Bio PF Chng PG&E Cp PHH Corp PimShMat PLX Tch PMC Sra PMI Grp PNC PNM Res POSCO PPG PPL Corp PSS Wrld Paccar PacerIntl PacBiosci n PacCapB h PacEth h PacSunwr PackAmer PaetecHld PallCorp PalmHHm PanASlv Panasonic PaneraBrd ParPharm ParagShip ParamTch ParaG&S Parexel ParkDrl ParkerHan PrtnrCm PartnerRe PatriotCoal Patterson PattUTI Paychex PeabdyE Pegasys lf Pengrth g PnnNGm PennVa PennWst g PennantPk Penney PenRE Penske Pentair PeopUtdF PepBoy PepcoHold PepsiCo PeregrineP PerfectWld PerkElm Prmian Perrigo PerryEllis PetMed PetChina Petrohawk PetrbrsA Petrobras PetroDev PtroqstE PetsMart Pfizer PhrmAth PharmPdt Pharmacyc Pharmerica PhilipMor PhilipsEl PhlVH PhnxCos PhotrIn PiedNG PiedmOfc n Pier 1 PimcCA3 PimCpOp PimcoHiI PimcoMuni PimcoMu2 PimcMu3 PinnclEnt PinWst PionDrill PioNtrl PitnyBw PlainsAA PlainsEx Plantron PlatGpMet PlatUnd PlugPwr h PlumCrk Polaris Polo RL Polycom PolyMet g PolyOne Polypore Pool Corp Popular PortGE PortglTel PostPrp Potash Potlatch PwrInteg Power-One PwshDB PS Agri PS Oil PS BasMet PS USDBull PS USDBear PwSClnEn PwSWtr PSFinPf PSBldABd PShNatMu PSHYCpBd PwShPfd PShEMSov PSIndia PwShs QQQ Powrwav Praxair PrecCastpt PrecDrill PrmWBc h Prestige PriceTR priceline PrideIntl PrinctnR PrinFncl PrivateB ProShtDow ProShtQQQ ProShtS&P PrUShS&P ProUltDow PrUlShDow ProUltMC ProUltQQQ PrUShQQQ ProUltSP ProUShL20 ProUSL7-10T PrUSCh25 rs ProUSEM rs ProUSRE rs ProUSOG rs ProUSBM rs ProUltRE rs ProUShtFn ProUFin rs PrUPShQQQ PrUPShR2K ProUltO&G ProUBasM ProShtR2K ProUltPQQQ ProUSR2K ProUltR2K ProSht20Tr

D 16.63 +.28 1.44 37.82 +.18 1.40 18.28 -.15 0.86 13.35 -.20 0.47 9.28 -.05 0.94 14.24 -.05 0.75 8.85 +.11 0.89 13.53 -.10 0.95 13.61 -.08 0.60 7.67 +.11 0.66 8.15 +.08 13.32 +.40 20.66 -.72 1.45 44.91 +.83 38.23 +1.45 59.44 +.62 23.24 +.80 1.52 87.32 +1.67 69.85 +1.05 1.01 +.01 9.43 +.32 8.77 +.11 4.68 +.17 17.32 +.37 2.54 129.75 +3.06 58.46 +2.34 .46 -.01 28.03 +.16 0.28 10.06 +.17 0.69 12.79 +.21 0.80 18.39 +.02 1.48 21.03 +.03 0.13 24.44 +.10 0.80 45.36 +.43 28.03 +1.44 7.95 +.16 1.92 50.66 +.31 30.20 +.57 42.78 +.51 66.78 +3.03 1.37 -.01 9.10 +.23 17.19 +.06 0.20 28.31 +.40 16.76 +.45 5.56 +.32 5.40 +.06 11.48 +.29 6.00 -.13 0.16 11.92 +.20 8.57 +.12 13.80 +.20 0.40 10.92 -.03 29.29 +.65 1.75 36.72 +.35 0.71 28.58 +.16 26.33 -.18 27.17 +.14 .27 -.01 1.00 5.69 +.05 0.63 47.18 -.34 1.82 47.47 +.29 20.15 +.33 0.71 101.12 +.03 3.26 -.14 7.38 -.01 3.07 +.05 0.40 56.23 +.83 0.50 12.32 +.02 1.43 102.25 +2.16 2.20 77.55 +1.47 1.40 25.87 +.07 21.49 -1.24 0.48 53.43 +1.78 5.57 +.17 11.58 -.51 .38 -.02 .74 -.04 6.00 +.17 0.60 25.34 +.48 3.95 +.24 0.64 44.34 +.64 .16 -.02 0.10 36.44 +.76 0.11 14.70 +.36 95.37 -.93 37.72 +1.78 0.20 3.68 -.01 21.72 +.37 1.69 +.08 20.41 +.23 4.16 -.03 1.16 79.83 +1.78 3.99 20.71 +.07 2.20 78.00 +.32 14.88 +.94 0.40 28.56 +.33 0.20 20.00 +.17 1.24 28.17 +.36 0.34 57.92 +1.40 0.12 29.31 +.16 0.84 12.64 +.09 34.56 +.01 0.23 16.46 +.13 1.80 22.35 +.49 1.04 11.44 +.26 0.80 31.13 -.48 0.60 13.53 +.14 15.11 +.09 0.76 32.57 +.25 0.62 12.55 +.01 0.12 12.35 +.20 1.08 18.70 +.07 1.92 64.77 +.83 1.60 +.03 25.90 +.18 0.28 23.96 +.58 1.38 22.04 +.26 0.28 60.90 +1.22 25.48 +2.03 0.50 16.86 -.55 3.97 125.30 +2.28 18.27 +.11 1.12 30.54 +.75 1.12 33.60 +.79 33.19 +.96 6.95 +.16 0.50 36.88 -1.40 0.72 16.83 +.35 3.48 +.01 0.60 25.77 +.26 6.32 +.12 11.15 +.08 2.56 59.45 +1.66 0.95 31.37 +1.32 0.15 62.85 +1.31 2.40 +.07 6.12 +.23 1.12 29.05 +.58 1.26 19.52 +.37 9.11 +.04 0.72 8.98 -.04 1.38 17.10 +.04 1.46 12.97 +.30 0.98 12.23 -.36 0.78 10.30 -.35 0.84 10.02 -.43 13.38 +.29 2.10 40.99 +.29 7.03 +.05 0.08 78.78 +2.00 1.46 22.50 +.04 3.80 61.48 +.17 29.61 +.68 0.20 35.63 +1.17 2.24 +.09 0.32 44.01 +.88 .47 +.02 1.68 35.85 +.05 1.60 72.82 +1.19 0.40 106.26 +.84 35.96 +.81 2.08 +.07 11.96 +.33 32.85 +1.01 0.52 21.38 +.02 2.86 +.03 1.04 21.07 +.08 0.77 13.49 +.05 0.80 32.01 +.84 0.40 140.32 +4.25 2.04 32.02 0.20 39.25 +.53 9.15 +.14 25.02 +.66 29.54 +1.04 25.56 +.47 22.07 +.75 22.74 -.16 27.09 +.16 9.75 +.18 0.11 17.81 +.29 1.31 17.98 +.14 1.36 25.43 +.02 1.11 22.79 +.10 1.49 18.34 +.12 1.01 14.34 +.11 1.60 27.59 +.13 0.12 24.68 +.52 0.33 52.43 +.83 2.12 1.80 91.87 +1.56 0.12 134.40 +3.01 8.36 +.46 .43 +.01 11.83 +.59 1.08 58.54 +1.14 410.65 +5.97 32.47 +.90 1.09 +.08 0.55 28.53 +.86 0.04 12.41 +.07 46.14 -.73 36.23 -.58 46.33 -.71 26.56 -.82 0.40 50.63 +1.50 22.47 -.70 0.04 55.26 +1.47 75.31 +2.34 12.70 -.42 0.43 43.35 +1.30 36.70 -.26 40.32 +.17 28.30 -1.24 34.39 -1.75 20.52 -.33 44.13 -1.86 23.84 -1.17 0.41 45.21 +.58 18.32 -.45 0.09 57.69 +1.40 35.66 -1.78 30.17 -1.86 0.23 39.37 +1.54 0.10 41.46 +1.78 35.19 -.67 131.71 +5.85 15.04 -.60 0.01 36.18 +1.32 43.72 -.13

Nm

D

ProUSSP500 ProUltSP500 ProUltCrude ProSUltGold ProUSSlv rs ProUShCrude ProSUltSilv ProUltShYen ProUShEuro ProctGam ProgrssEn ProgrsSoft ProgsvCp ProLogis ProspctCap ProtLife ProvET g ProvidFS Prudentl Prud UK PSEG PubStrg PudaCoal PulseElec PulteGrp PMMI PMIIT PPrIT

22.98 -1.06 0.48 175.86 +7.38 10.34 +.41 64.58 +1.69 13.46 -1.67 12.53 -.56 123.36+11.93 16.63 +.09 19.65 -.34 1.93 64.02 +.75 2.48 43.93 38.51 +.44 1.16 20.91 +.26 0.45 13.31 +.01 1.21 9.96 +.07 0.56 24.13 +.32 0.72 7.25 +.04 0.44 13.84 +.07 1.15 54.47 +.61 0.61 19.80 +.30 1.37 31.16 -.08 3.20 96.18 +.65 13.03 +1.27 0.10 3.92 +.01 6.71 -.03 0.53 7.11 -.07 0.52 5.97 -.03 0.71 6.51 +.03

Q-R-S-T QEP Res n QIAGEN QKL Strs QiaoXing Qlogic Qualcom QuantaSvc QntmDSS QuantFu h QstDiag QuestSft Questar s Questcor QuickLog QksilvRes Quiksilvr QuinStrt n QwestCm RAIT Fin RDA Mic n RF MicD RPC RPM RRI Engy RTI IntlM RXi Phrm Rackspace RadianGrp RadntSys RadientPh RadioShk Radware Ralcorp RAM Engy Rambus Randgold RangeRs RaptorPhm RareEle g RJamesFn Rayonier Raytheon RealD n RealNwk RltyInco RedHat Rdiff.cm RedwdTr RegalBel RegalEnt RgcyCtrs RegncyEn Regenrn RegBkHT RegionsFn RegFn pfZ Regis Cp RehabCG ReinsGrp RelStlAl RenaisRe RenRe prcld ReneSola RentACt Rentech Repsol RepubAir RepubSvc RschMotn ResMed s ResrceCap RetailHT RexEnergy ReynAm s RigelPh RightNow RioTinto s RiteAid Riverbed s RobbMyer RobtHalf RockTen RockwlAut RockColl RockwdH RogCm gs Roper RosettaR RossStrs Rovi Corp Rowan RoyalBk g RBScotlnd RylCarb RoyDShllB RoyDShllA RoyGld Royce Rubicon g RubiconTc RubyTues Ruddick RuthsHosp Ryanair Ryder RdxSPEW RdxSPGth Ryland SAIC SAP AG SBA Com SCANA SEI Inv SK Tlcm SLGreen SLM Cp SM Energy SpdrDJIA SpdrGold SP Mid S&P500ETF Spdr Div SpdrHome SpdrKbwBk SpdrKbwIns SpdrLehHY SpdrNuBST SpdrNuBMu SpdrKbw RB SpdrRetl SpdrOGEx SpdrMetM SPX Cp SRA Intl STEC STMicro STR Hldgs SVB FnGp SabraHlt n Safeway StJoe StJude Saks Salesforce SalixPhm SallyBty n SamsO&G SanderFm SanDisk SandRdge SangBio Sanmina Sanofi Santarus Sapient SaraLee Sasol Satcon h SavientPh Savvis Schlmbrg Schnitzer SchoolSp Schulmn SchwUSMkt SchwEMkt Schwab SciGames Scotts ScrippsNet ScrippsEW SeabGld g SeacoastBk SeadrillLtd SeagateT SealAir Sealy Seanergy SearsHldgs SeattGen SelCmfrt SelMedHld SemiHTr SempraEn Semtech SenHous Sensata n Sensient Sequenom ServiceCp 7DaysGrp ShandaGm Shanda ShawGrp ShengdaTc Sherwin ShipFin Shire ShufflMstr Shutterfly SiderNac s

0.08 34.26 +.64 19.41 +.68 3.82 -.37 1.74 +.03 17.73 +.51 0.76 47.72 -.26 17.98 +.25 3.57 +.13 .55 +.03 0.40 50.94 +.51 25.62 +.43 0.56 17.18 +.18 13.64 +.12 5.04 -.01 14.79 +.01 4.16 +.24 19.35 +.61 0.32 6.88 +.13 1.58 -.03 11.84 -.30 7.17 +.37 0.28 28.50 +1.33 0.84 20.77 +.33 3.87 -.04 28.20 +.38 3.38 +.23 27.00 +.27 0.01 7.57 +.24 17.81 +.30 .46 +.01 0.25 18.99 -.24 32.52 +.93 62.18 1.68 +.08 19.85 +.10 0.17 96.33 +1.80 0.16 41.94 +.92 3.55 +.03 9.98 +.12 0.44 29.64 +.44 2.16 51.51 +.46 1.50 47.07 +.73 27.98 +1.07 3.54 +.23 1.73 33.34 -.31 41.76 +.83 3.23 +.13 1.00 13.97 +.09 0.68 56.98 +.81 0.72 13.27 +.03 1.85 41.09 +.29 1.78 25.30 -.01 24.97 +.46 0.59 77.74 +1.01 0.04 5.31 -.23 2.22 22.60 -2.00 0.16 18.61 +.26 19.39 +.50 0.48 51.07 +1.03 0.40 44.35 +.32 1.00 60.79 +.84 1.82 25.45 +.23 9.12 +.13 0.24 27.15 +.37 1.26 +.01 1.15 26.95 +.70 7.79 -.02 0.80 28.30 +.26 57.25 +1.33 32.78 +.02 1.00 6.61 +.03 1.79 101.08 +.90 11.65 +.10 1.96 32.60 +.57 7.90 +.10 24.25 +.29 0.90 68.71 +2.95 .92 +.01 30.32 +1.31 0.17 29.52 +1.29 0.52 27.54 +.55 0.80 52.52 +1.34 1.40 65.90 +2.09 0.96 55.65 +.68 36.64 +1.22 1.28 36.31 +.31 0.38 71.22 +1.13 31.84 +1.34 0.64 63.45 -1.95 53.42 +.06 31.40 +1.23 2.00 52.98 +1.14 13.43 +.25 42.41 +.31 3.36 64.82 +1.03 3.36 65.55 +1.23 0.44 50.35 +.69 12.99 +.18 4.11 +.07 21.39 +.95 12.56 +.31 0.52 38.18 +.95 5.17 +.21 2.29 30.38 +.85 1.08 43.63 +.84 0.62 44.45 +.63 0.14 41.44 +.76 0.12 15.17 +.13 15.49 +.24 0.67 49.76 +.77 37.93 +.70 1.90 41.10 +.22 0.20 22.93 +.35 18.42 +.12 0.40 63.85 +1.00 11.70 +.18 0.10 49.27 +1.03 2.57 112.15 +1.71 132.09 +1.71 1.54 154.04 +2.14 2.31 119.96 +1.74 1.68 51.04 +.51 0.12 15.55 -.05 0.11 22.88 +.16 0.43 40.06 +.56 4.21 40.40 +.43 0.44 24.04 +.08 0.89 22.29 +.03 0.30 23.12 +.29 0.57 45.38 +.26 0.20 48.19 +1.00 0.35 59.44 +1.59 1.00 65.14 +.60 20.50 +.45 15.02 +.14 0.28 9.06 +.38 19.01 +.39 46.44 +.79 17.72 -.13 0.48 22.83 +.07 17.91 +.43 39.31 +.79 11.44 -.02 115.77 +5.62 41.90 -.26 12.46 -.18 1.22 +.02 0.60 41.75 +.51 38.49 +.56 5.33 +.06 4.16 +.09 11.17 +.21 1.63 34.26 +.93 2.89 -.05 0.35 12.23 +.30 0.46 15.39 +.07 1.46 48.01 +.40 3.73 +.33 12.00 -.18 25.61 +.18 0.84 75.50 +1.10 0.07 54.84 +2.16 13.24 -.61 0.62 20.45 +.45 0.38 28.83 +.40 28.09 +.49 0.24 15.18 +.14 7.39 +.03 1.00 51.41 +1.01 0.30 52.54 +.84 9.08 +.32 28.50 -.53 1.24 +.05 2.31 32.36 +.92 14.22 +.28 0.52 22.70 +.24 3.00 +.15 1.11 +.04 63.70 -2.50 14.61 +.60 8.37 +.42 6.24 +.11 0.55 30.55 +.45 1.56 50.37 +.42 22.99 +.50 1.48 22.88 -.25 26.29 +.64 0.80 33.64 +.60 7.15 +.14 0.16 7.95 22.45 +.27 5.95 -.09 40.50 +.46 30.99 +.37 6.09 1.44 72.73 -.07 1.40 21.67 +.32 0.34 74.12 +1.73 10.41 +.47 32.62 +.62 0.58 16.95 +.33

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C OV ER S T OR I ES

GM

of the company. “We are finally beginning to see some of the tough decisions that we made in the midst of crisis pay off,” Obama said. The president said critics of the government’s role in saving GM and Chrysler were ready to “read the American auto industry its last rites,” but that at least 1 million jobs would have been lost if the Detroit automakers were allowed to fail. “That was not an acceptable option, to throw up our hands and to quit,” he said. The GM offering, including preferred shares and the overallotment, set a record for the largest initial public offering in U.S. history. The entire offering is expected to reach $23.1 billion, including preferred shares and an overallotment option that will be exercised to take advantage of strong demand for GM’s shares.

Continued from B1 Too high of a jump could have left GM and the Obama administration open to the charge that they priced the stock too low, abandoning paper profits that could have gone to taxpayers instead. GM executives celebrated the occasion by ringing the bell to open trading on the New York Stock Exchange — and, they hoped, put an end to the “Government Motors” stigma. “It has held us back,” said Mark Reuss, GM’s head of North American operations. “We know that, and we know that our competitors have certainly taken advantage of all that.” While GM was anxious to move past the bailout, Obama took the opportunity to defend the government’s rescue

Rattner

time during 35 years in business that anyone has questioned my ethics or integrity.” He added, “I intend to clear my name by defending myself vigorously against this politically motivated lawsuit.” Within hours, Cuomo’s office fired back, saying that Rattner had stonewalled its investigation. “Mr. Rattner now has a lot to say as he spins his friends in the press, but when he was questioned under oath about his pension fund dealings, he was much less talkative, taking the Fifth and refusing to answer questions 68 different times,” said Richard Bamberger, a spokesman for Cuomo. Rattner’s lawyers went on the offensive Thursday with a flurry of court filings contesting Cuomo’s allegations. In one document related to a dispute with Quadrangle, Rattner’s lawyers wrote: “The time for the scapegoating of Mr. Rattner is over.” The lawyers also sought to gain access to internal communications in Cuomo’s office related to the case. Rattner’s dispute with Cuomo began several years ago, when the attorney general’s office began examining how investment firms won business from the pension fund and whether they had improper

Continued from B1 While other major figures in the pension investigation had already resolved their cases and Rattner had been expected to reach a settlement with the SEC, the charges from the attorney general’s office amounted to a public showdown between Cuomo and a man who is not only a prominent figure on Wall Street but also a powerful Democratic fundraiser. Indeed, the dispute between Rattner and Cuomo has devolved in recent months into hostilities. After months of negotiations, neither camp has much to lose by digging in. Unless Rattner reaches a settlement with Cuomo — an outcome that, for now, seems unlikely — Cuomo will hand off the investigation to a new attorney general when he becomes governor in January. Rattner lashed out at Cuomo’s office Thursday and accused the attorney general of political grandstanding. He also took aim at the private investment company he helped found, the Quadrangle Group, which settled with Cuomo and the SEC several months ago. “I will not be bullied,” Rattner said. “This episode is the first

Rate hike

THE BULLETIN • Friday, November 19, 2010 B5

rate hikes as a result. Teresa Lackey, marketing and communications manager with MidState Electric Cooperative in La Pine, said a 9 percent rate increase in 2009, boosting the average monthly residential bill from around $80 to $88, was the first rate hike implemented by its board since 2001. However, she said a cost-ofservice study would be needed to determine whether the October 2011 BPA rate hike would result in a back-to-back increase for MidState’s 18,000 customers. In announcing the proposed rate hike Thursday, BPA officials cited the cost of improvements to dams and habitat restoration to protect salmon and steelhead, maintenance to aging federal hydroelectric system dams such as replacing turbines and cranes, and repairs and nuclear fuel purchases for the region’s only nuclear plant at Columbia Generating

Continued from B1 However, following BPA’s announcement Thursday to seek another 8.5 percent increase in wholesale power rates beginning next Oct. 1, Beaman said CEC customers will likely be hit with a second rate increase at that time. “A BPA rate increase will result in another rate increase for our customers as well,” Beaman said. He said the BPA’s rate hike is subject to the federal review process. Beaman said during a cost-ofservice analysis and hearings prior to adopting last month’s CEC rate increase, officials with the co-op had already been warned by BPA that another increase was anticipated next year, and CEC warned the co-op’s 24,400 members to expect back-to-back

Tourism

dealings with officials. The dispute between Rattner and Cuomo escalated in 2009, after Rattner became a leader of the federal auto task force helping to restructure GM and Chrysler. For Rattner, it was a triumphant return to Washington, where he worked early in his career as a reporter for The New York Times. Despite his legal troubles, Rattner has maintained a busy schedule of news media appearances. His wife, Maureen White, has also remained active in fundraising circles. White donated $5,000 early this year to Eric Schneiderman, who will replace Cuomo as attorney general. A spokesman for Schneiderman declined to discuss the case but said he would be tough as attorney general. Cuomo’s office notified Rattner’s lawyers Wednesday night that it planned to file suit Thursday, according to two people briefed on the phone call. When a CNBC reporter asked Rattner on Thursday whether these lawsuits would take away any of the shine of GM’s success, Rattner demurred. “Well, others will have to judge that,” he replied. “What I would say for me, it was the most painful episode I’ve ever been through in my professional life.”

Continued from B1 In a webinar presentation on Wednesday, Ralf Garrison, the company’s director, shared numbers from the National Ski Areas Association on skier visits logged nationally the past few seasons. In the 2007-08 season, an all-time high of 60.5 million visits were recorded. In 2008-09, skier visits dropped to 57.4 million, and in 2009-10 there were 59.7 million. According to Garrison’s data on future reservations at mountain lodging properties, numbers that were last updated Oct. 31, the coming winter season has already seen a 2.7 percent increase in room occupancy compared with last winter. Meanwhile, rates have roughly stayed the same, allowing the buyers’ market to continue. “We find ourselves in a surprisingly good stead in our industry,” Garrison said. Alana Audette, president and CEO of the Central Oregon Visitors Association, expects hotels and resorts here to attract about the same number of people they did last winter, if not more. Garrison said people have been taking more “near-cations” in recent years, opting not to

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typically help reduce rates for its Northwest customers, but with two years of lower Columbia River stream flows and water releases for salmon and steelhead migration, combined with the economic downturn, the BPA reported declining surplus power sales and losses exceeding $300 million in fiscal years 2009 and 2010 combined. “The hardest issues in any rate case involve balancing nearterm and long-term rate consequences,” said Steve Wright, BPA administrator. “We are trying to keep rates as low as possible now without compromising the tremendous value of these low-cost, electricity-generating resources, which will help us keep rates reasonable in the long term.”

travel as far, because the recession has pushed them to spend less. When people do travel to mountains, they hunt for deals, he said — and, since the onset of the recession, they have gotten better at hunting down the best packages. Vanessa Berning, director of sales and marketing at Seventh Mountain Resort southwest of Bend, wrote in an e-mail: “We are ahead of pace for four of the next five months. Currently, the Thanksgiving weekend is ahead of 2009 by about 14 percent. The weather always plays a huge factor in Thanksgiving travel.” Mt. Bachelor is planning to open for its winter season on Wednesday, so long as the weather remains consistently cold so workers can make more snow, said Andy Goggins, director of marketing and communications at the mountain. The mountain reported 21 inches of snow at mid-mountain on Thursday evening, 12 inches of which had fallen within the past 24 hours. Goggins said there is no way to know how this season will compare with those in the past, but season-pass sales are up 7 percent compared with last year. The sales jump could relate to the possibility that La

Niña — the lowering of sea-surface temperatures in the Pacific Ocean, which brings more precipitation to the Pacific Northwest — will cause a particularly snowy season. Mountain staffers are counting on the system’s effects, because more snow means higher attendance, Goggins said. “There’s a lot of excitement out there,” he said. Audette said the amount of snowfall that would be just right is not too much, but not too little. “We want to have a lot of great snow, but we don’t want to have so much snow falling that it makes it difficult for people to drive over the pass and reach us,” she said. Farther to the north, Mt. Hood Meadows ski resort on Thursday evening reported 22 inches of new snow in the last 24 hours, bringing its base depth to 39 inches, and said it would open Saturday.

Ed Merriman can be reached at 541-617-7820 or at emerriman@bendbulletin.com.

Jordan Novet can be reached at 541-633-2117 or at jnovet@bendbulletin.com.

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Station, located on the Hanford Site north of Richland, Wash. The rate proposal will be considered during a public ratesetting process in the coming months, culminating in a July decision on final rates that would take effect Oct. 1, according to the BPS announcement. The proposed rate increase primarily affects Northwest consumer-owned utilities such as public utility districts, tribal utilities, cooperatives, municipalities and federal entities known as preference customers because, by law, BPA must serve their resource needs. BPA also sells power to investor-owned utilities and direct-service industries such as aluminum plants and other large customers, but under different rate structures, according to the BPA. BPA also sells surplus power on the competitive wholesale power market. Those revenues

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YTD Last Chg %Chg

AlskAir Avista BkofAm BarrettB Boeing CascadeB h CascdeCp ColSprtw Costco CraftBrew FLIR Sys HewlettP HmFedDE Intel Keycorp Kroger Lattice LaPac MDU Res MentorGr Microsoft

... 1.00 .04 .36f 1.68 ... .40f .80a .82 ... ... .32 .22 .72f .04 .42f ... ... .65f ... .64f

9 14 17 24 14 ... ... 25 23 47 18 11 ... 11 ... ... 11 ... 16 ... 7

54.14 +1.24 +56.7 21.72 +.20 +.6 11.70 +.08 -22.3 14.96 +.28 +21.7 64.61 +2.11 +19.4 .83 +.12 +22.1 36.76 +.80 +33.7 53.95 +1.98 +38.2 66.41 -.61 +12.2 6.53 +.01 +172.1 27.38 +.39 -16.3 41.69 +.72 -19.1 11.08 +.20 -16.8 21.02 -.07 +3.0 7.85 +.17 +41.4 22.76 -.05 +10.9 4.41 ... +63.3 7.98 +.26 +14.3 20.49 +.07 -13.2 11.36 +.24 +28.7 25.84 +.27 -15.2

Name NikeB Nordstrm NwstNG OfficeMax Paccar PlanarSy PlumCrk PrecCastpt Safeway Schnitzer Sherwin StancrpFn Starbucks TriQuint Umpqua US Bancrp WashFed WellsFargo WstCstB Weyerh

Precious metals Metal NY HSBC Bank US NY Merc Gold NY Merc Silver

Price (troy oz.) $1355.00 $1352.90 $26.830

Pvs Day $1335.00 $1336.80 $25.507

Div

PE

1.24f .80 1.74f ... .48f ... 1.68 .12 .48 .07 1.44 .86f .52 ... .20 .20 .20 .20 ... .20a

21 17 17 24 58 ... 34 20 ... 23 17 9 25 11 ... 16 14 11 ... ...

Market recap 82.47 41.88 48.57 17.32 53.43 2.00 35.85 134.40 22.83 54.84 72.73 42.49 30.58 10.73 10.84 25.01 15.12 27.51 2.69 17.27

+1.08 +.46 +1.08 +.37 +1.78 -.11 +.05 +3.01 +.07 +2.16 -.07 +.58 +.59 +.37 +.17 +.28 +.06 +.65 +.04 +.17

+24.8 +11.4 +7.8 +36.5 +47.3 -28.8 -5.1 +21.8 +7.2 +15.0 +18.0 +6.2 +32.6 +78.8 -19.2 +11.1 -21.8 +1.9 +28.1 +9.0

Prime rate Time period

NYSE

YTD Last Chg %Chg

Percent

Last Previous day A week ago

3.25 3.25 3.25

Amex

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

Last Chg

Citigrp GenMot n FordM S&P500ETF BkofAm

4649236 4514444 2425961 1586670 1347363

4.30 +.11 34.19 ... 16.12 -.56 119.96 +1.74 11.70 +.08

Gainers ($2 or more) Name BkIrelnd WirlssHT ChNBorun n ProSUltSilv Grmrcy pfA

Last

Chg %Chg

2.88 +.72 45.47 +5.76 12.39 +1.29 123.36 +11.93 17.26 +1.55

+33.3 +14.5 +11.6 +10.7 +9.9

Losers ($2 or more) Name ProUSSlv rs WmsSon C-TrCVOL IFM Inv n RegFn pfZ

Last

Indexes

Chg %Chg

13.46 -1.67 -11.0 32.09 -3.71 -10.4 92.77 -10.49 -10.2 4.38 -.45 -9.3 22.60 -2.00 -8.1

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

Taseko NA Pall g NovaGld g NwGold g MagHRes

Last Chg

73232 4.70 +.40 66249 5.50 +.39 61504 14.36 -.04 46424 8.86 +.22 41192 6.09 +.92

Gainers ($2 or more) Name MagHRes PudaCoal UraniumEn CPI Aero Taseko

Last

6.09 +.92 +17.8 13.03 +1.27 +10.8 5.80 +.56 +10.7 13.83 +1.25 +9.9 4.70 +.40 +9.3

Name Arrhythm EstnLtCap Cohen&Co EV MAMu ChiMetRur

Last 5.65 3.87 4.41 13.92 2.90

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

Cisco SiriusXM Intel PwShs QQQ Microsoft

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

985111 900816 650986 597959 570749

Name

Last

Exelixis LTXCrd rs MidPenn Tengion n BioSpecific

Last Chg 19.61 1.40 21.02 52.43 25.84

+.21 +.05 -.07 +.83 +.27

Chg %Chg

6.23 +1.51 +32.0 7.87 +1.89 +31.6 7.50 +.94 +14.3 2.45 +.30 +14.0 23.47 +2.76 +13.3

Losers ($2 or more)

Chg %Chg

Name

Last

-.45 -.30 -.29 -.74 -.14

-7.4 -7.2 -6.2 -5.0 -4.6

InfoSvcs un BBC pf II FstUtdCp BkCarol SmartHeat

3.19 -.66 -17.1 7.39 -1.26 -14.5 4.21 -.68 -13.9 2.38 -.37 -13.5 5.00 -.65 -11.5

295 187 33 515 9 5

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Diary 2,465 591 73 3,129 95 12

52-Week High Low Name

Gainers ($2 or more)

Chg %Chg

Losers ($2 or more)

Diary Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Nasdaq

Chg %Chg

Diary 1,991 661 117 2,769 85 40

11,451.53 9,614.32 Dow Jones Industrials 4,957.21 3,742.01 Dow Jones Transportation 413.75 346.95 Dow Jones Utilities 7,817.25 6,355.83 NYSE Composite 2,177.58 1,689.19 Amex Index 2,592.94 2,061.14 Nasdaq Composite 1,227.08 1,010.91 S&P 500 12,970.39 10,596.20 Wilshire 5000 745.95 567.98 Russell 2000

World markets

Last

Net Chg

11,181.23 4,839.96 399.37 7,619.94 2,090.75 2,514.40 1,196.69 12,655.55 720.84

+173.35 +80.30 +2.34 +131.18 +35.95 +38.39 +18.10 +192.28 +13.07

YTD %Chg %Chg +1.57 +1.69 +.59 +1.75 +1.75 +1.55 +1.54 +1.54 +1.85

52-wk %Chg

+7.22 +18.06 +.34 +6.05 +14.56 +10.81 +7.32 +9.58 +15.26

+8.21 +22.34 +7.73 +7.06 +15.81 +16.58 +9.30 +12.44 +23.08

Currencies

Here is how key international stock markets performed Thursday.

Key currency exchange rates Thursday compared with late Wednesday in New York.

Market

Dollar vs:

Amsterdam Brussels Paris London Frankfurt Hong Kong Mexico Milan New Zealand Tokyo Seoul Singapore Sydney Zurich

Close

Change

346.27 2,670.51 3,867.97 5,768.71 6,832.11 23,637.39 36,322.12 20,880.38 3,280.46 10,013.63 1,927.86 3,215.22 4,722.80 5,880.98

+1.40 s +1.74 s +1.99 s +1.34 s +1.97 s +1.82 s +1.34 s +1.17 s -.27 t +2.06 s +1.62 s +.10 s +.38 s +1.71 s

Exchange Rate

Australia Dollar Britain Pound Canada Dollar Chile Peso China Yuan Euro Euro Hong Kong Dollar Japan Yen Mexico Peso Russia Ruble So. Korea Won Sweden Krona Switzerlnd Franc Taiwan Dollar

Pvs Day

.9897 1.6044 .9791 .002080 .1506 1.3635 .1290 .011984 .081301 .0322 .000883 .1454 1.0035 .0330

.9796 1.5899 .9769 .002068 .1505 1.3522 .1289 .012008 .080756 .0319 .000875 .1442 1.0081 .0328

Selected mutual funds YTD Name NAV Chg %Ret Amer Beacon Insti: LgCapInst 18.77 +0.28 +8.8 Amer Beacon Inv: LgCap Inv 17.81 +0.27 +8.5 Amer Century Inv: EqInc 6.96 +0.06 +8.4 GrowthI 24.55 +0.41 +11.4 Ultra 21.57 +0.37 +10.8 American Funds A: AmcpA p 17.88 +0.25 +8.2 AMutlA p 24.47 +0.31 +7.7 BalA p 17.42 +0.18 +9.3 BondA p 12.35 -0.01 +8.2 CapWA p 20.87 +0.03 +6.8 CapIBA p 49.95 +0.54 +7.2 CapWGA p 35.42 +0.63 +6.2 EupacA p 41.30 +0.80 +7.7 FdInvA p 35.13 +0.59 +8.5 GovtA p 14.57 -0.01 +6.5 GwthA p 29.33 +0.47 +7.3 HI TrA p 11.30 +0.03 +13.7 IncoA p 16.41 +0.17 +9.3 IntBdA p 13.58 -0.01 +5.6 ICAA p 27.15 +0.39 +6.2 NEcoA p 24.68 +0.33 +9.7 N PerA p 27.94 +0.52 +9.0 NwWrldA 54.71 +0.89 +15.9 SmCpA p 37.41 +0.55 +18.6 TxExA p 11.95 +0.01 +2.7 WshA p 26.21 +0.36 +8.3 Artio Global Funds: IntlEqI r 30.08 +0.56 +6.5 IntlEqA 29.30 +0.55 +6.3 IntEqII I r 12.46 +0.24 +5.8 Artisan Funds: Intl 21.89 +0.50 +6.0 MidCap 31.34 +0.64 +22.6 MidCapVal 19.79 +0.27 +10.1 Baron Funds: Growth 47.06 +0.49 +13.9 Bernstein Fds: IntDur 14.03 -0.01 +9.7 DivMu 14.43 -0.01 +2.9

TxMgdIntl 15.76 +0.33 +3.1 BlackRock A: EqtyDiv 16.83 +0.25 +7.9 GlAlA r 19.08 +0.24 +7.0 BlackRock B&C: GlAlC t 17.79 +0.22 +6.3 BlackRock Instl: EquityDv 16.86 +0.24 +8.2 GlbAlloc r 19.17 +0.23 +7.2 Calamos Funds: GrwthA p 50.16 +0.96 +12.8 Columbia Class A: DivEqInc 9.54 +0.16 +9.4 Columbia Class Z: Acorn Z 28.68 +0.52 +16.4 AcornIntZ 39.17 +0.70 +16.5 ValRestr 47.26 +0.89 +11.6 DFA Funds: IntlCorEq 10.90 +0.25 +9.5 USCorEq2 10.28 +0.16 +13.5 Davis Funds A: NYVen A 33.01 +0.55 +6.6 Davis Funds C & Y: NYVenY 33.42 +0.56 +6.8 NYVen C 31.73 +0.53 +5.8 Delaware Invest A: Diver Inc p 9.66 +8.1 Dimensional Fds: EmMCrEq 21.45 +0.41 +19.1 EmMktV 36.42 +0.72 +17.0 IntSmVa 16.32 +0.34 +9.3 LargeCo 9.47 +0.15 +9.3 USLgVa 18.77 +0.27 +11.5 US Small 19.68 +0.37 +19.9 US SmVa 23.36 +0.44 +19.2 IntlSmCo 16.25 +0.34 +15.7 Fixd 10.37 +1.2 IntVa 18.05 +0.42 +8.0 Glb5FxInc 11.57 -0.02 +6.7 2YGlFxd 10.23 +1.7 Dodge&Cox: Balanced 67.78 +0.85 +7.8 Income 13.38 +7.0 IntlStk 35.52 +0.79 +11.5 Stock 102.51 +1.71 +7.7

Eaton Vance A: LgCpVal 17.26 NatlMunInc 9.14 Eaton Vance I: GblMacAbR 10.31 LgCapVal 17.31 FMI Funds: LgCap p 14.88 FPA Funds: NwInc 10.99 FPACres 26.60 Fairholme 34.31 Federated Instl: KaufmnK 5.23 Fidelity Advisor A: NwInsgh p 19.27 StrInA 12.82 Fidelity Advisor I: NwInsgtI 19.48 Fidelity Freedom: FF2010 13.49 FF2015 11.24 FF2020 13.60 FF2020K 12.99 FF2025 11.30 FF2030 13.47 FF2035 11.16 FF2040 7.79 Fidelity Invest: AllSectEq 12.54 AMgr50 15.06 Balanc 17.67 BlueChGr 43.02 Canada 54.84 CapAp 24.42 CpInc r 9.37 Contra 65.58 ContraK 65.63 DisEq 21.88 DivIntl 29.90 DivrsIntK r 29.93 DivGth 26.50 EmrMk 26.01 Eq Inc 41.81 EQII 17.20

+0.25 +4.0 +0.09 +0.6 +4.5 +0.25 +4.2 +0.19 +6.0 +3.3 +0.21 +8.8 +0.23 +14.0 +0.08 +12.2 +0.32 +12.0 +0.02 +9.6 +0.32 +12.2 +0.14 +0.11 +0.17 +0.16 +0.16 +0.20 +0.18 +0.12

+8.5 +8.5 +9.1 +9.3 +9.4 +9.4 +9.4 +9.5

+0.20 +9.6 +0.14 +10.2 +0.17 +9.7 +0.82 +13.4 +1.05 +13.1 +0.44 +14.0 +0.05 +14.4 +1.10 +12.7 +1.11 +12.9 +0.35 +4.1 +0.59 +6.8 +0.59 +7.0 +0.51 +12.6 +0.49 +15.0 +0.65 +8.2 +0.26 +6.5

Fidel 30.30 FltRateHi r 9.79 GNMA 11.69 GovtInc 10.66 GroCo 78.39 GroInc 17.31 GrowthCoK 78.46 HighInc r 9.00 Indepn 23.09 IntBd 10.69 IntmMu 10.15 IntlDisc 32.76 InvGrBd 11.61 InvGB 7.45 LgCapVal 11.81 LatAm 57.95 LevCoStk 25.82 LowP r 36.48 LowPriK r 36.48 Magelln 67.99 MidCap 26.41 MuniInc 12.42 NwMkt r 16.09 OTC 51.30 100Index 8.47 Ovrsea 31.93 Puritn 17.36 SCmdtyStrt 11.43 SrsIntGrw 11.06 SrsIntVal 10.02 StIntMu 10.66 STBF 8.49 SmllCpS r 18.07 StratInc 11.43 StrReRt r 9.30 TotalBd 10.92 USBI 11.49 Value 65.26 Fidelity Selects: Gold r 54.91 Fidelity Spartan: ExtMkIn 35.81 500IdxInv 42.48 IntlInxInv 35.46

+0.55 +7.5 +0.01 +6.9 -0.01 +7.9 -0.01 +6.1 +1.48 +13.6 +0.30 +8.2 +1.48 +13.8 +0.03 +12.8 +0.53 +15.9 -0.01 +8.6 +0.01 +3.0 +0.71 +7.9 +8.1 +8.9 +0.19 +5.0 +1.28 +13.4 +0.39 +12.8 +0.47 +14.5 +0.47 +14.6 +1.20 +5.8 +0.43 +13.1 +0.03 +3.3 +0.03 +12.2 +1.01 +12.2 +0.13 +6.8 +0.76 +3.2 +0.20 +10.0 +0.28 +4.9 +0.24 +13.4 +0.24 +3.2 +2.2 +3.9 +0.36 +13.4 +0.01 +9.9 +0.07 +9.8 +8.9 +7.2 +1.05 +14.6 +0.90 +29.3 +0.57 +19.0 +0.64 +9.2 +0.79 +6.1

TotMktInv 34.89 +0.53 +10.9 Fidelity Spart Adv: 500IdxAdv 42.48 +0.64 +9.2 TotMktAd r 34.90 +0.53 +10.9 First Eagle: GlblA 45.28 +0.59 +13.3 OverseasA 22.30 +0.27 +14.6 Frank/Temp Frnk A: FedTFA p 11.53 +0.05 +1.9 FoundAl p 10.38 +0.14 +7.5 HYTFA p 9.81 +0.03 +4.0 IncomA p 2.14 +0.01 +10.2 USGovA p 6.83 +6.6 Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv: GlbBdAdv p +11.5 IncmeAd 2.13 +0.02 +10.4 Frank/Temp Frnk C: IncomC t 2.16 +0.02 +9.6 Frank/Temp Mtl A&B: SharesA 20.28 +0.25 +7.4 Frank/Temp Temp A: ForgnA p 6.96 +0.13 +6.3 GlBd A p 13.60 +0.07 +11.3 GrwthA p 17.60 +0.32 +4.7 WorldA p 14.56 +0.25 +4.2 Frank/Temp Tmp B&C: GlBdC p 13.63 +0.07 +10.9 GE Elfun S&S: S&S PM 38.86 +0.56 +5.4 GMO Trust III: Quality 19.69 +0.28 +2.8 GMO Trust IV: IntlIntrVl 21.78 +0.49 +6.2 GMO Trust VI: EmgMkts r 14.29 +0.28 +16.6 IntlCorEq 28.95 +0.68 +8.3 Quality 19.70 +0.29 +3.0 Goldman Sachs Inst: HiYield 7.28 +0.01 +12.3 HYMuni 8.34 +0.04 +6.7 Harbor Funds: Bond 13.02 -0.01 +8.9 CapApInst 35.35 +0.73 +7.2 IntlInv t 59.07 +1.31 +8.6 Intl r 59.78 +1.32 +8.9

Hartford Fds A: CpAppA p 33.12 +0.46 +8.0 Hartford Fds Y: CapAppI 33.12 +0.47 +8.2 Hartford HLS IA : CapApp 40.37 +0.64 +10.4 Div&Gr 18.81 +0.30 +7.3 Advisers 18.92 +0.19 +8.4 TotRetBd 11.36 +7.8 Hussman Funds: StrGrowth 12.87 -0.16 +0.7 Invesco Funds A: Chart p 15.51 +0.18 +3.3 CmstkA 15.01 +0.23 +9.9 EqIncA 8.28 +0.08 +7.8 GrIncA p 18.23 +0.26 +6.6 HYMuA 9.12 +0.02 +5.2 Ivy Funds: AssetSC t 23.31 +0.43 +7.0 AssetStA p 24.01 +0.45 +7.8 AssetStrI r 24.22 +0.45 +8.0 JPMorgan A Class: CoreBd A 11.62 -0.01 +7.8 JPMorgan Sel Cls: CoreBd 11.62 -0.01 +8.0 HighYld 8.20 +0.02 +13.4 IntmTFBd 10.85 +2.3 ShtDurBd 11.03 -0.01 +3.2 USLCCrPls 19.58 +0.34 +7.7 Janus T Shrs: OvrseasT r 49.53 +0.89 +16.5 PrkMCVal T 21.60 +0.23 +9.1 Twenty T 64.32 +1.12 +4.4 John Hancock Cl 1: LSBalanc 12.80 +0.13 +10.3 LSGrwth 12.67 +0.18 +10.7 Lazard Instl: EmgMktI 21.32 +0.30 +18.8 Lazard Open: EmgMkO p 21.65 +0.31 +18.4 Legg Mason A: WAMgMu p 15.31 +0.10 +0.9 Longleaf Partners: Partners 27.39 +0.41 +13.7 Loomis Sayles:

LSBondI 14.32 +0.02 +12.7 StrInc C 14.92 +0.04 +12.0 LSBondR 14.27 +0.03 +12.5 StrIncA 14.84 +0.03 +12.7 Loomis Sayles Inv: InvGrBdY 12.49 +0.02 +11.4 Lord Abbett A: AffilA p 10.83 +0.16 +6.6 BdDebA p 7.77 +0.01 +11.5 ShDurIncA p 4.65 +6.4 MFS Funds A: TotRA 13.80 +0.13 +7.2 ValueA 21.89 +0.32 +6.5 MFS Funds I: ValueI 21.99 +0.32 +6.7 MainStay Funds A: HiYldBA 5.92 +0.01 +11.4 Manning&Napier Fds: WldOppA 8.58 +0.17 +6.3 Matthews Asian: AsianGIInv 18.22 +0.18 +16.9 PacTgrInv 23.18 +0.31 +20.5 MergerFd 16.01 +0.06 +3.0 Metro West Fds: TotRetBd 10.66 -0.01 +12.1 TotRtBdI 10.66 +12.3 Mutual Series: GblDiscA 29.20 +0.37 +9.3 GlbDiscZ 29.61 +0.38 +9.6 QuestZ 18.45 +0.19 +7.1 SharesZ 20.48 +0.25 +7.7 Neuberger&Berm Inv: GenesInst 42.50 +0.62 +12.6 Neuberger&Berm Tr: Genesis 44.07 +0.65 +12.3 Northern Funds: HiYFxInc 7.32 NA Oakmark Funds I: EqtyInc r 26.76 +0.27 +4.8 Intl I r 19.07 +0.37 +13.2 Oakmark r 40.20 +0.56 +8.5 Old Westbury Fds: GlobOpp 8.01 +0.05 +13.3 GlbSMdCap 14.99 +0.24 +17.4 Oppenheimer A:

CapApA p 41.76 +0.71 +4.6 DvMktA p 34.87 +0.57 +21.2 GlobA p 59.33 +1.08 +11.9 GblStrIncA 4.31 +0.01 +15.6 IntBdA p 6.68 +0.03 +8.2 MnStFdA 31.15 +0.37 +10.7 RisingDivA 14.92 +0.22 +8.3 S&MdCpVl 29.90 +0.42 +12.5 Oppenheimer B: RisingDivB 13.53 +0.20 +7.5 S&MdCpVl 25.68 +0.37 +11.7 Oppenheimer C&M: RisingDvC p 13.49 +0.20 +7.6 Oppenheimer Roch: RcNtMuA 6.84 +0.04 +3.5 Oppenheimer Y: DevMktY 34.57 +0.57 +21.6 IntlBdY 6.68 +0.03 +8.5 PIMCO Admin PIMS: TotRtAd 11.52 +9.4 PIMCO Instl PIMS: AlAsetAut r 11.07 +11.0 AllAsset 12.54 +0.05 +12.9 ComodRR 8.63 +0.21 +12.9 HiYld 9.33 +0.01 +13.6 InvGrCp 11.72 +12.5 LowDu 10.65 -0.01 +5.3 RealRtnI 11.55 +0.01 +9.2 ShortT 9.93 +2.0 TotRt 11.52 +9.6 TR II 11.13 -0.01 +8.7 PIMCO Funds A: LwDurA 10.65 -0.01 +4.9 RealRtA p 11.55 +0.01 +8.8 TotRtA 11.52 +9.2 PIMCO Funds C: TotRtC t 11.52 +8.5 PIMCO Funds D: TRtn p 11.52 +9.3 PIMCO Funds P: TotRtnP 11.52 +9.5 Perm Port Funds: Permannt 44.23 +0.36 +14.4 Pioneer Funds A: PionFdA p 38.71 +0.59 +9.1

Price Funds: BlChip 36.68 CapApp 19.81 EmMktS 34.82 EqInc 22.28 EqIndex 32.32 Growth 30.89 HlthSci 28.61 HiYield 6.80 IntlBond 10.16 IntlStk 14.13 MidCap 56.86 MCapVal 22.66 N Asia 19.17 New Era 48.60 N Horiz 31.41 N Inc 9.67 R2010 15.30 R2015 11.76 R2020 16.15 R2025 11.77 R2030 16.80 R2040 16.85 ShtBd 4.88 SmCpStk 32.69 SmCapVal 34.04 SpecIn 12.38 Value 22.22 Putnam Funds A: GrInA p 12.78 VoyA p 22.51 Royce Funds: PennMuI r 10.87 PremierI r 19.09 Schwab Funds: 1000Inv r 36.29 S&P Sel 18.94 Scout Funds: Intl 31.66 Selected Funds: AmShD 39.91 AmShS p 39.83 Templeton Instit: ForEqS 20.27 Third Avenue Fds:

+0.73 +11.9 +0.20 +9.1 +0.66 +15.7 +0.28 +7.8 +0.49 +9.0 +0.59 +12.3 +0.43 +9.3 +0.01 +13.2 +0.02 +5.2 +0.27 +12.1 +0.84 +19.7 +0.29 +9.4 +0.23 +18.8 +1.05 +11.4 +0.49 +22.8 +7.8 +0.15 +9.7 +0.13 +10.2 +0.21 +10.6 +0.17 +10.9 +0.25 +11.1 +0.27 +11.2 +3.5 +0.54 +21.3 +0.61 +15.5 +0.03 +8.9 +0.34 +8.5 +0.19 +7.3 +0.38 +14.1 +0.19 +15.0 +0.33 +17.0 +0.55 +10.0 +0.29 +9.2 +0.65 +9.6 +0.64 +7.1 +0.64 +6.8 +0.38 +5.3

ValueInst 51.54 Thornburg Fds: IntValA p 27.54 IntValue I 28.16 Tweedy Browne: GblValue 23.57 Vanguard Admiral: CAITAdm 10.82 CpOpAdl 72.90 EMAdmr r 39.15 Energy 117.79 500Adml 110.47 GNMA Ad 11.07 HlthCr 52.16 HiYldCp 5.74 InfProAd 26.15 ITBdAdml 11.56 ITsryAdml 11.80 IntGrAdm 60.99 ITAdml 13.40 ITGrAdm 10.28 LtdTrAd 11.04 LTGrAdml 9.36 LT Adml 10.82 MCpAdml 86.96 MuHYAdm 10.22 PrmCap r 66.24 STsyAdml 10.88 ShtTrAd 15.89 STIGrAd 10.84 TtlBAdml 10.77 TStkAdm 29.99 WellslAdm 52.47 WelltnAdm 52.45 Windsor 43.01 WdsrIIAd 43.76 Vanguard Fds: AssetA 23.75 CapOpp 31.55 DivdGro 13.90 Energy 62.71 EqInc 19.53 Explr 67.69 GNMA 11.07

+0.65 +11.3 +0.58 +11.7 +0.59 +12.1 +0.28 +11.2 +0.02 +3.3 +1.20 +5.1 +0.78 +14.9 +2.51 +5.1 +1.67 +9.2 +7.6 +0.68 +3.9 +12.3 +0.01 +7.4 -0.02 +11.8 -0.02 +9.5 +1.45 +12.9 +0.01 +2.8 -0.02 +11.9 +2.1 +0.02 +10.3 +0.03 +2.4 +1.29 +17.2 +0.02 +3.3 +1.02 +7.4 +3.1 +1.1 +5.5 -0.01 +7.3 +0.46 +10.8 +0.26 +9.4 +0.56 +7.6 +0.68 +7.7 +0.64 +5.3 +0.28 +11.3 +0.52 +5.0 +0.19 +6.6 +1.34 +5.1 +0.27 +9.3 +1.15 +18.1 +7.5

GlobEq 17.63 HYCorp 5.74 HlthCre 123.57 InflaPro 13.31 IntlGr 19.15 IntlVal 32.24 ITIGrade 10.28 LifeCon 16.21 LifeGro 21.47 LifeMod 19.30 LTIGrade 9.36 Morg 17.15 MuInt 13.40 MuLtd 11.04 PrecMtls r 25.89 PrmcpCor 13.22 Prmcp r 63.81 SelValu r 18.08 STAR 18.86 STIGrade 10.84 StratEq 17.40 TgtRetInc 11.29 TgRe2010 22.40 TgtRe2015 12.39 TgRe2020 21.89 TgtRe2025 12.43 TgRe2030 21.24 TgtRe2035 12.80 TgtRe2040 20.98 TgtRe2045 13.24 USGro 17.50 Wellsly 21.66 Welltn 30.37 Wndsr 12.75 WndsII 24.65 Vanguard Idx Fds: 500 110.45 Balanced 20.84 EMkt 29.73 Extend 38.51 Growth 30.16 ITBnd 11.56 MidCap 19.15 REIT r 17.57

+0.33 +12.5 +12.2 +1.62 +3.8 +7.3 +0.45 +12.7 +0.72 +5.3 -0.02 +11.8 +0.11 +9.0 +0.30 +10.4 +0.20 +10.0 +0.02 +10.2 +0.33 +12.3 +0.01 +2.7 +2.1 +0.68 +26.7 +0.21 +9.2 +0.98 +7.4 +0.25 +13.4 +0.22 +8.6 +5.4 +0.28 +13.9 +0.05 +8.3 +0.18 +9.2 +0.12 +9.5 +0.24 +9.7 +0.15 +9.8 +0.29 +10.0 +0.19 +10.2 +0.31 +10.1 +0.19 +10.1 +0.31 +6.3 +0.11 +9.3 +0.33 +7.6 +0.21 +7.7 +0.36 +5.2 +1.67 +9.1 +0.19 +9.6 +0.59 +14.8 +0.62 +17.9 +0.49 +11.3 -0.02 +11.7 +0.29 +17.1 +0.14 +21.4

SmCap

32.35 +0.52 +17.7

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20.16 +0.34 +19.8

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15.10 +0.23 +15.7

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10.67 -0.01 +4.4

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10.77 -0.01 +7.2

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15.64 +0.35 +8.5

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10.10 +0.24

EmMkInst

29.80 +0.59 +15.0

NS

ExtIn

38.58 +0.63 +18.1

FTAllWldI r

93.45 +2.07 +9.0

GrwthIst

30.17 +0.49 +11.5

InfProInst

10.65

+7.4

InstIdx

109.75 +1.66 +9.2

InsPl

109.76 +1.66 +9.3

InsTStPlus

27.10 +0.41 +10.8

MidCpIst

19.22 +0.28 +17.2

SCInst

32.42 +0.53 +17.9

TBIst

10.77 -0.01 +7.4

TSInst

29.99 +0.45 +10.8

Vanguard Signal: 500Sgl

91.26 +1.38 +9.2

STBdIdx

10.67 -0.01 +4.5

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10.77 -0.01 +7.3

TotStkSgl

28.94 +0.44 +10.7

Western Asset: CorePlus I

10.90 -0.02 +12.3


B6 Friday, November 19, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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L

C

Inside

OREGON Oregon State Hospital dedicates new building, see Page C3. Cannon Beach considers options for bridge, see Page C3.

www.bendbulletin.com/local

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2010

Bend-La Pine Schools mulls uses for Title I funds

HEALTH CARE REFORM

Wyden seeking early waivers By Keith Chu

By Sheila G. Miller The Bulletin

For the first time in years, La Pine Middle School no longer houses fifth-graders. After 15 years of overcrowding at La Pine Elementary, the community now has a second school, Rosland Elementary, and the two elementary schools have taken the fifthgraders back. And with those fifth-graders

has gone some federal funding targeted to students living in poverty. Bend-La Pine Schools, which receives millions in Title I federal money every year designed to help bridge the learning gap for impoverished students, uses an early-intervention model, flooding the money into qualifying elementary schools. See Bend-La Pine / C5

The Bulletin

WASHINGTON — States would be able to opt out of some federal health care rules three years sooner, under a bill introduced by U.S. Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., on Thursday. In introducing the bill, cosponsored by Sen. Scott Brown, R-Mass., Wyden fulfilled an earlier promise to help states obtain waivers of some requirements

under the new health reform bill, which passed earlier this year. C u r r e n t l y, states can apply for waivers beginning in 2017, three years after most of the health reform regulations go into effect. Wyden’s bill would allow

IN CONGRESS

waivers in 2014. “What we can do is to come up with a way to provide more flexibility and particularly more choice and competition for our states and states around the country,” Wyden said. “It is my hope this will be a signal here in the chamber that here, in these difficult issues that were so contentious in the political campaign, it’s going to be possible to come together and find some

common ground.” Wyden has long been a proponent of waivers to allow states to create their own public insurance options or opt out of individual insurance mandates. To obtain a waiver, though, a state must demonstrate its plan will give quality coverage to at least as many people as would have been covered under the federal rules. See Waivers / C2

The community provides

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

P

rineville Community Thanksgiving dinner guests, Leslee Seamons, 30, left, her daughter Kyla Seamons, 7, center, and Dan Allen, 54, get their plates filled with food Thursday night during the holiday event hosted

by the Crook County Kids Club at the Crook County Fairgrounds.

Officials warn of dangers when frying turkeys By Megan Kehoe The Bulletin

Those planning to break out the turkey fryer this Thanksgiving should take certain precautions to avoid injury and damage when cooking their turkey, according to the Bend Fire Department. “We generally get twice the number of cooking fire calls on Thanksgiving than usual,” said Deputy Fire Marshal Jeff Bond. “So we like to use the opportunity to talk to people about cooking safety.” The department is planning to do this by having its annual media demonstration next Tuesday, in which it will show just how dangerous frying a turkey can be when done improperly. See Turkeys / C5

Correction In a story headlined “Avion files request to increase water rates by 17 percent,” which appeared Thursday, Nov. 18, on Page C1, Jason Wick’s name was spelled incorrectly. The Bulletin regrets the error.

Related • More Thanksgiving meals and events are listed in The Bulletin’s community calendar, Page E3

• How single parents are coping during holidays without their kids, Page E1

Sisters considers raising water rates By Patrick Cliff The Bulletin

SISTERS — The Sisters City Council continues to struggle with the possibility of raising water rates, to narrow a gap in the water fund. The city has been working on the issue at least since the summer, and after a Thursday morning work session remains a distance away from making any rate changes. Currently, the city charges just under $20 for the first 1,337 cubic feet of water. Anything above that costs users 99 cents per 100 cubic feet. Sisters’ base consumption rate is considerably higher than other cities around the region. Madras has a base of 500 cubic feet, while Bend’s is 400. In effect, by paying for water they do not use, low water users are subsidizing heavier users in Sisters, according to city staff. The average home in Sisters uses 450 cubic feet of water per winter month and about 600 cubic feet in summer. Several councilors backed the idea of lowering the base consumption in Sisters, but Councilor Pat

Central Oregon comparisons SISTERS (CURRENT)

BEND

Monthly base charge: $19.80 Base usage: 1,337 cubic feet Volume rate: 99 cents per 100 cubic feet

Monthly base charge: $18.40 Base usage: 400 cubic feet Volume rate: $1.38 per 100 cubic feet

SISTERS (PROPOSAL’S FIRST YEAR)

MADRAS

Monthly base charge: $19.82 Base usage: 1,000 cubic feet Volume rate: $1.25 per 100 cubic feet

SISTERS (PROPOSAL’S THIRD YEAR) Monthly base charge: $18.98 Base usage: 500 cubic feet Volume rate: $1.86 per 100 cubic feet

Thompson argued doing that — and so increasing the cost to heavy water users — would mean higher costs of doing business with local shops and businesses. “I don’t think subsidizing is the right word,” Thompson said. “Be-

Monthly base charge: $21.35 Base usage: 500 cubic feet Volume rate: $1.08 per 100 cubic feet

REDMOND Monthly base charge: $12.60 Base usage: No base Volume rate: $1.02 per 100 cubic feet Sources: City of Bend, City of Madras, City of Redmond, City of Sisters

cause (residents) are going to pay for it one way or another.” City staff has long endorsed a plan to lower the consumption base over three years while increasing overage charges to about $1.86 per 100 cubic feet of water.

The effect of that plan, for most residential customers, would be an immediate decline of about 60 cents a month. By the plan’s third year, though, a home with water usage under 500 cubic feet would see a decline from $19.80 a month to $18.98 a month. Industrial, commercial and public accounts would feel the bulk of the increase. Sisters Elementary School, for instance, would pay $3,176 in the summer, about twice its current cost. A large grocery store’s rates would jump in the summer from $107 to about $214, according to a staff report. For much of the year, though, most of those customers would experience smaller increases. The elementary school, for example, would jump from about $105 to nearly $182 in January, according to city projections. Rates at a small restaurant would roughly double. Retail stores would see a smaller increase, of about $5 or $6 during peak summer months, and a decline of 80 cents in winter. See Water / C5


C

C2 Friday, November 19, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

OV ER

S T ORY

‘Barefoot bandit’ angles for a plea deal By Mike Carter The Seattle Times

SEATTLE — Colton HarrisMoore, the teenage “Barefoot Bandit� who was the subject of a two-year manhunt, pleaded not guilty Thursday morning to five federal charges in U.S. District Court in Seattle. Magistrate Judge Mary Alice Theiler scheduled HarrisMoore’s trial for Jan. 18 before U.S. District Judge Richard Jones.

Afterward, Harris-Moore’s attorney, John Henry Browne, said he hopes a plea deal can be struck that would limit the 19year-old’s time in prison. He suggested that Harris-Moore’s family might be interested in selling his story and using the proceeds to pay restitution to the dozens of victims. Harris-Moore is suspected of dozens of burglaries and the thefts of autos, boats and five airplanes in several Washing-

ton counties as well as Oregon, Idaho, Wyoming, South Dakota, Nebraska, Iowa, Illinois and Indiana. He was indicted last week on five criminal counts, four of which are punishable by up to 10 years in prison and fines of up to $250,000. Browne said after Thursday’s arraignment that he hoped a plea agreement would cover the federal as well as state charges the teen is facing. A number of jurisdictions have already agreed not

to charge Harris-Moore providing he receives an adequate federal sentence and pays restitution, Browne said. Browne said Harris-Moore would not take any of the money if his story was sold in a book or movie deal. A plea deal like that, Browne said, could optimistically mean that Moore might serve as little as four years in prison. “That would be a best-case scenario,� Browne said.

L B   Compiled from Bulletin staff reports

Drug dispute leads to SWAT team call Four Bend residents were arrested Wednesday night after they allegedly threatened another group of people with a gun and fled in a taxi to another home across town. At about 7:40 p.m., police were called to a home on Northeast Lotus Drive, where four people had reportedly forced their way inside and threatened one of the residents with a handgun. According to a news release from the Bend Police Department, the four suspects took off on foot and then got into a taxi. Bend Police officers, along with Deschutes County Sheriff’s deputies and Oregon State Police troopers, searched the area and learned that one of the suspects had apparently confronted one of the residents about a drug-related debt. The residents said the suspects had pointed the gun at one person and punched another in the face, as well as breaking and damaging several items inside

the home. On their way out, the suspects broke the windshield of a vehicle, the release said. Police learned that the suspects had taken the taxi to a home on Southwest Westpine Place. Officials blocked off traffic around the area and contacted two people as they were leaving the home — who told them that three other people were still inside. Officers called for assistance from the Central Oregon Emergency Response team and were able to make contact with the people in the home. The situation ended peacefully when the suspects left the home and were detained, the release said. Police executed a search warrant and recovered evidence from the robbery and arrested four people: 20-year-old Nicholas I. Scott, 19-year-old Andrew J. Scott, 22-year-old Cody T. Greff and 18-year-old Ciera M. Carr. All four were lodged in the Deschutes County jail on suspicion of first-degree robbery, first-degree burglary, unlawful use of a weapon, menacing, seconddegree criminal mischief and

fourth-degree assault.

Man arrested after high-speed chase A 20-year-old Bend man who fled the scene of a reported domestic dispute was arrested Wednesday evening after leading police on a high-speed chase though northeast Bend. At about 10:30 p.m., police were called to a dispute on Northeast Covington Lane, off Neff Road. Officers headed to the scene were told that a man involved in the alleged incident had left in a white Jeep Cherokee, according to a news release from the Bend Police Department. An officer spotted the Jeep driving away from the scene at a high speed and followed it to Highway 20 near the Powell Butte highway, where he attempted to pull it over. The Jeep continued east at speeds of higher than 80 miles per hour before finally stopping near the intersection of Highway 20 and Gosney Road. The driver, Darren M. Belloir, was arrested on suspicion of

drunken driving, reckless driving and attempting to elude an officer. After investigating the reported dispute, police determined that no crimes had occurred before Belloir fled the scene.

Police searching for missing transient Police are seeking the public’s help in locating a transient man known to have lived in the Redmond area. Bobbie Lee Miller, 59, was last seen on Sept. 5 headed east from a campsite near the corner of Southeast Ninth Street and state Highway 126. Miller was carrying personal belongings that have since been recovered, and was reported missing by acquaintances on Sept. 22. Redmond Police said there is currently no indication foul play is involved. Individuals who recreate on Bureau of Land Management east of Redmond are asked to report any signs of Miller or suspicious circumstances to Deschutes County dispatchers by calling 541-693-6911.

N  R POLICE LOG The Bulletin will update items in the Police Log when such a request is received. Any new information, such as the dismissal of charges or acquittal, must be verifiable. For more information, call 541-383-0358. Bend Police Department

Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 9 a.m. Nov. 17, in the 62700 block of Larkview Drive. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 9:10 a.m. Nov. 17, in the 100 block of Southeast 13th Street. Theft — A theft was reported at 12:39 p.m. Nov. 17, in the 100 block of

Northeast Bend River Mall Avenue. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 3:13 p.m. Nov. 17, in the 500 block of Northwest Wall Street. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 8:04 p.m. Nov. 17, in the 2700 block of Northeast Shepard Place. DUII — Darren Belloir, 20, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 3 a.m. Nov. 17, in the area of U.S. Highway 20 and Gosney Road. Redmond Police Department

Burglary — A burglary was reported at 11:23 p.m. Nov. 17, in the 100 block of Northwest Elm Avenue. Vehicle crash — An accident was re-

ported at 8:25 p.m. Nov. 17, in the 1400 block of Northeast Seventh Street. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 2:40 p.m. Nov. 17, in the 2300 block of Southwest Obsidian Avenue. Unauthorized use — A vehicle was reported stolen at 9:29 a.m. Nov. 17, in the area of Southwest 35th Street and Southwest Lava Avenue. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 12 a.m. Nov. 17, in the 2800 block of Southwest Indian Circle. Prineville Police Department

Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 2:04 p.m. Nov. 17, in the area of Northeast Third and Court streets. Criminal mischief — An act of

criminal mischief was reported at 2:54 p.m. Nov. 17, in the area of Northeast Juniper Street. Theft — A theft was reported at 3:32 p.m. Nov. 17, in the area of North Main Street. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 5:23 p.m. Nov. 17, in the area of Southeast Lynn Boulevard and Combs Flat.

Woman arrested after giving breast exams in barroom By Patrick Orr McClatchy -Tribune News Service

BOISE, Idaho — Police arrested a woman in Idaho’s capital city after they say she impersonated a plastic surgeon and conducted breast exams on at least two women in local bars. Kristina Ross was booked Tuesday into the Ada County jail. She faces accusations of unlicensed practice of medicine. It all started earlier this month, when Boise police were called to a downtown medical office by employees of a licensed plastic surgeon. Boise police said Ross, 37, approached women in local bars and nightclubs with the convincing persona of a doctor named Berlyn Aussieahshowna. Ross — posing as Dr. Aussieahshowna — touched the women’s breasts under the guise of a “breast exam,� the release said. Prosecutors said Wednesday one woman disrobed for

Waivers Continued from C1 In a Senate floor speech, Wyden argued that it makes no sense to force states to follow rigid federal guidelines for three years, and then create entirely new systems a few years later. “That’s going to put us through a lot of bureaucratic water torture to figure out how to synchronize those two dates,� Wyden said. Brown agreed with Wyden’s reasoning, in a Senate speech. “Oregon is different from Massachusetts,� Brown said. “Oregon might want to implement reforms to create a coverage mechanism that I might not like or I might want to imple-

Ross and another was grabbed above her clothes. On Nov. 2, employees of a licensed plastic surgeon at a Boise medical office said they’d taken several calls in recent weeks from women asking for Dr. Aussieahshowna, and claiming they had scheduled appointments and surgeries. But no doctor with that name worked at that office. Officers were able to obtain the names of two women who had called. The women told police they had seen the suspect at local nightclubs on more than one occasion, and that her vocabulary and apparent medical knowledge appeared legitimate. Ross, who has a previous criminal history in Idaho as a man, currently identifies herself as a woman. She is booked into the Ada County jail as a woman and is being held in protective custody by herself at this time.

ment in the state of Massachusetts, but that’s OK.� Oregon Human Services Director Bruce Goldberg has said he’s interested in obtaining a waiver for Oregon, to allow more flexibility in a state insurance exchange that’s in the works. Sen. Jeff Merkley, D-Ore., also spoke in support of the measure, saying states can serve as laboratories for good ideas that could then be used nationwide. “States have a powerful opportunity to form policies that may work well under particular circumstances,� Merkley said, “but also may provide insights to our whole national strategy for affordable health care.� Keith Chu can be reached at 202-662-7456 or at kchu@bendbulletin.com.

Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office

Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 7:35 p.m. Nov. 17, in the 63300 block of U.S. Highway 20 in Bend. Theft — A theft was reported at 11:01 a.m. Nov. 17, in the 53700 block of Seventh Street in La Pine.

Pop duo Milli Vanilli stripped of Grammy in 1990 The Associated Press Today is Friday, Nov. 19, the 323rd day of 2010. There are 42 days left in the year. TODAY’S HIGHLIGHT IN HISTORY On Nov. 19, 1863, President Abraham Lincoln delivered the Gettysburg Address as he dedicated a national cemetery at the site of the Civil War battlefield in Pennsylvania. ON THIS DATE In 1600, King Charles I of England was born in Dunfermline, Fife, Scotland. In 1794, the United States and Britain signed Jay’s Treaty, which resolved some issues left over from the Revolutionary War. In 1831, the 20th president of the United States, James Garfield, was born in Orange Township, Ohio. In 1919, the Senate rejected the Treaty of Versailles by a vote of 55 in favor, 39 against, short of the two-thirds majority needed for ratification. In 1942, during World War II, Russian forces launched their winter offensive against the Germans along the Don front. In 1959, Ford Motor Co. announced it was halting production of the unpopular Edsel. In 1969, Apollo 12 astronauts Charles Conrad and Alan Bean made the second manned landing on the moon. In 1977, Egyptian President Anwar Sadat became the first Arab leader to visit Israel. In 1985, President Ronald Reagan and Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev met for the first time as they began their summit in Geneva. In 1990, the pop duo Milli

T O D AY I N H I S T O R Y Vanilli was stripped of its Grammy Award because other singers had lent their voices to the “Girl You Know It’s True� album. TEN YEARS AGO President Bill Clinton ended a historic visit to Vietnam. Attorney Charles Ruff, who’d represented President Clinton during the Monica Lewinsky scandal and his impeachment trial, died in Washington, D.C., at age 61. FIVE YEARS AGO Two dozen Iraqi men, women and children in Haditha were killed by U.S. Marines after a Marine was killed by a roadside bomb; the squad leader, Staff Sgt. Frank Wuterich, is awaiting trial on charges of voluntary manslaughter. President George W. Bush arrived in Beijing for talks with Chinese leaders. For the first time in 58 years, Indians legally walked into Pakistan after a landmark decision to temporarily open divided Kashmir’s heavily militarized border following a major earthquake. Tropical Storm Gamma deluged the coast of Central America. ONE YEAR AGO President Barack Obama wrapped up his weeklong Asia trip in South Korea, where he said the United States had begun talking with allies about fresh punishment against Iran for defying efforts to halt its nuclear weapons pursuits. President Hamid Karzai pledged to get tough on corruption and strengthen security in Afghanistan as he started a

second five-year term. Artist Jeanne-Claude, who helped create various “wrapping� projects with her husband Christo, died in New York at age 74. TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS Actor Alan Young is 91. Talkshow host Larry King is 77. Former General Electric Chief Executive Jack Welch is 75. Talkshow host Dick Cavett is 74. Broadcasting and sports mogul Ted Turner is 72. Singer Pete Moore (Smokey Robinson and the Miracles) is 71. Sen. Tom Harkin, D-Iowa, is 71. TV journalist Garrick Utley is 71. Actor Dan Haggerty is 69. Former Health and Human Services Secretary Tommy Thompson is 69. Fashion designer Calvin Klein is 68. Sportscaster Ahmad Rashad is 61. Actor Robert Beltran is 57. Actress Kathleen Quinlan is 56. Actress Glynnis O’Connor is 55. Newscaster Ann Curry is 54. Former NASA astronaut Eileen Collins is 54. Actress Allison Janney is 51. Rock musician Matt Sorum (Guns N’ Roses, Velvet Revolver) is 50. Actress Meg Ryan is 49. Actress-director Jodie Foster is 48. Actress Terry Farrell is 47. TV chef Rocco DiSpirito is 44. Actor Jason Scott Lee is 44. Olympic gold medal runner Gail Devers is 44. Actress Erika Alexander is 41. Rock musician Travis McNabb is 41. Singer Tony Rich is 39. Country singer Jason Albert (Heartland) is 37. Country singer Billy Currington is 37. Dancer-choreographer Savion Glover is 37. Country musician Chad Jeffers is 35. Rhythm-andblues singer Tamika Scott (Xscape) is 35. Rhythm-and-blues

singer Lil’ Mo is 33. Olympic gold medal gymnast Kerri Strug is 33. Actor Reid Scott is 33. THOUGHT FOR TODAY “My theology, briefly, is that the universe was dictated but not signed.� — Christopher Morley, American author and journalist (1890-1957)

HOLIDAY DOUBLE DEAL OF

N! IN W ! WIIG G I B B VE E AV !! S SA G G I I B B

THE DAY CONGRATULATIONS TO OUR WINNER

Gerald Itkin

Store employee Noel Pinnic k displays the style of PATA GONIA down sweater won by Geral d.

THANK YOU TO EVERYONE WH O ENTERED OUR DRAWING

Look for Holiday Double Deal Of The Day Every Monday In The Bulletin!

920 NW Bond Street • 541-382-6694


THE BULLETIN • Friday, November 19, 2010 C3

O Feds seek prison sentence for Islamic charity co-founder Seda terrorism enhancement is not called for because the evidence GRANTS PASS — Prosecu- prosecutors used was questiontors want to send the co-found- able, Seda never obstructed the er of an Islamic charity based investigation, and he should in Oregon to prison for eight not be liable for unpaid taxes. years for conspiring to smuggle “The government may not $150,000 to Islamic fighters in simply rely on videotapes or Chechnya and trying to cover ‘common knowledge’ that up the money on the organiza- some Chechens at some time tion’s tax return. committed acts of terror,” they Pete Seda, also known as wrote. Pirouz Sedaghaty, was convictDespite six years of trying, ed in September of conspiracy federal investigators were nevand tax fraud. er able to bring actual terrorThe former Ashland tree sur- ism charges against Seda, an geon and co-founder of the U.S. Iranian-born tree surgeon and branch of Al-Haramain Islamic naturalized American citizen Foundation is scheduled to be who co-founded the American sentenced Tuesday in U.S. Dis- branch of Al-Haramain Islamic trict Court in Eugene. Foundation. Federal prosecutors During the trial, contend in a sentencthe government preing memo obtained by sented evidence the The Associated Press money came from that Seda’s sentence an Egyptian benefacshould be longer than tor through a London normal for his crimes bank to Ashland in because he “intended 2000, where Seda and to promote” terrorism co-founder Soliman by helping Islamic Pete Seda Hamd Al-Buthe confighters battling Rusverted it to travelers sia in Chechnya and checks. Al-Buthe failed asked that he be sentenced to to declare the money was leaveight years. ing the country when he flew Prosecutors wrote they will with it to Saudi Arabia, where call a colonel in the Russian he deposited it in a bank. Federal Security Service as a The U.S. Treasury Departwitness in the sentencing hear- ment in 2004 declared the founing. Sergey Ignatchenk will dation branch Seda ran was a appear by video link to testify terrorist organization for being about terrorism in Chechnya. part of the larger organization The memo also cites evi- in Saudi Arabia, which was dence Seda tried to obstruct accused of funneling money the investigation, and that the to terrorists. The Ashland scheme was sophisticated, fur- branch’s assets were frozen ther reason for a longer than and sold off. normal sentence. But a federal judge ruled in The government also wants 2008 that the chapter’s con$81,000 in unpaid taxes. stitutional right to due proDefense attorneys contend cess was violated because the the time Seda has already Treasury Department never spent in jail is enough. They gave it a chance to refute the filed papers arguing that the designation.

By Jeff Barnard

The Associated Press

Photos by Steve Dykes / The Associated Press

One of the outdoor courtyards is shown during a walking tour of the Oregon State Hospital on Thursday in Salem. A new building at the hospital was dedicated today, and the hope is that it will help conjure images different than the ones people remember from the movie “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest.”

State hospital rebuilt following abuses Building dedicated with hopes of changing image By Jonathan J. Cooper The Associated Press

SALEM — The crumbling Oregon State Hospital had toxic paint, asbestos and a leaky roof — an enduring symbol of the psychiatric neglect portrayed in “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest,” filmed at the 127-year-old facility. On Thursday, officials unveiled part of a new hospital that will replace the decrepit asylum and, they hope, a legacy of real abuses that never made it into a Hollywood film but very well could have. Forty percent of the 19th century building was unusable, left to rot and collect piles of pigeon droppings. In its shadow is a new hospital designed to facilitate modern theories in mental health treatment, trying to mimic as much as possible daily life outside the institution. “This setting will no longer be known for a Hollywood movie or a place of broken hope,” said Gov. Ted Kulongoski, a Democrat finishing his final term in office. “It will be the life at the end of despair and the start of a new dawn that will help patients recover.” A maximum security section is the first major portion of the new hospital. It’s the admissions and stabilization center, where the most vulnerable patients are brought in from the outside world. In the old hospital, patients are segregated into wards based on their condition. Schizophrenia over here. Depression over there. They stay in their corner of the institution with the same patients and the same staff, and are treated for one condition at a time. It was built for an era when psychiatrists theorized that patients would get better from interactions with others who shared their ailments. But doctors now know that many patients suffer from multiple conditions. In the new facility, patients from different wings will be brought together in a “treatment mall,” where they have access to recreation, medical services and social interaction. It’s all

A photograph of the old “Tub Room” from the 1970s is shown on the wall of Oregon State Hospital during a tour of the facility’s newest building on Thursday, in Salem.

An exterior view of one of the buildings used in the filming of the movie “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest” is shown on the campus of the Oregon State Hospital on Thursday. The new “Tub Room” is shown during a walking tour of the Oregon State Hospital on Thursday. designed to give them choices. Sensitivity rooms with adjustable lighting and music will help edgy patients get away from bothersome stimuli and calm down. Metal bars that protected glass windows are gone, replaced in the new building with modern, shatterproof windows. There’s no barbed wire or chain-link fencing. And patients in the stabilization ward will have their own rooms, giving them privacy and dignity that helps with their treatment but is unattainable in the old building. Along with the upgraded facilities, the hospital is hiring new staff and stepping up care to its patients, almost all of whom are involuntarily committed by a judge. In the new treatment model, there’s no subtly demeaning Nurse Ratched; patients are encouraged to take part in their own care. They meet with a medical team to discuss their personal goals and work out a plan to accomplish them. Treatment is more effective when patients buy in, officials said. The buildings that were the

The Associated Press

set for “Cuckoo’s Nest” are still standing, for now. Some parts are still housing patients; others are abandoned. Faded, peeling yellow paint and broken windows stand out as an enduring symbol of the neglect that too often met the patients who passed through for more than a century. Most of it will be torn down once the patients are moved to the new building next year. A portion of the original 1883 building — the part considered most architecturally significant — is being restored and will eventually house a mental health museum.

All the changes upgrade a facility that just two years ago was the subject of a scathing report by the U.S. Department of Justice. Federal investigators found mice in rooms, deaths from pneumonia and outbreaks of scabies, along with nearly 400 cases of patientagainst-patient assault over one year. Although “Cuckoo’s Nest” was filmed here, neither the movie nor the 1962 Ken Kesey novel on which it was based makes any specific references to Oregon State Hospital. Kesey drew on his experiences working at a veterans hospital in Palo Alto, Calif., and set his satirical story at an unnamed institution in Oregon.

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ASHLAND — The worst residential fire in at least a century in Ashland destroyed 11 homes in the Southern Oregon city last August. But new houses are beginning to rise from sites excavated after the blaze to remove all the rubble and debris. Dan and Julie Thomas are among the homeowners who are rebuilding. Dan Thomas owns Circle T Construction, and he’s try-

ing to finish framing his new house this month and put the roof on before winter rains begin. Crews are laying foundations, installing plumbing and starting to build new homes on eight other lots next door. Ten years of Thomas family memories went up in smoke with the fire. But Julie Thomas told the Ashland Daily Tidings their children can’t wait to move back after the new house is done.


C4 Friday, November 19, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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The Bulletin AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER

BETSY MCCOOL GORDON BLACK JOHN COSTA ERIK LUKENS

Chairwoman Publisher Editor-in-chief Editor of Editorials

Bend taxpayers deserve a look

T

he Bend-La Pine School District aspires to provide a “worldclass education” for its students, and maybe it will someday. In the meantime, though, it’s certainly giving taxpayers and

parents a world-class education in the art of secrecy. Apparently, the people who pay the bills have no business scrutinizing the methods by which the district hopes to achieve its lofty educational standing. And these people plan to ask voters to build new schools in the near future? For more than a year, the district has been working with an Oregon nonprofit called the Chalkboard Project on an initiative that would, among other things, create new ways to evaluate and compensate teachers. Participation in the CLASS Project, as it’s known, is entirely voluntary — the district doesn’t have to do it — and the details are largely a matter of negotiation. “Each district’s CLASS Project design looks different,” according to the Chalkboard Project, “because each district has different student and staff needs.” On Sept. 27 — almost two months ago — we asked the district to provide copies of all CLASS Project-related communications with the Chalkboard Project since June 2009. During much of this period, the district was hammering out the initiative’s core “blueprints” in four areas, including, as we’ve noted, evaluation and compensation. We believe these documents will give taxpayers and parents a valuable, behind-the-scenes look at the district’s attempt to limp toward some of the reform measures that have gained prominence in recent months, thanks to President Obama’s Race to the Top Initiative. Oregon famously dropped out of the contest in May, making voluntary efforts like the CLASS Project even more important. We don’t know what the documents we’ve requested will reveal, but we do know a few things. First, evaluations and compensation are very sensitive issues both to teachers (for very understandable reasons) and to the Oregon Education Association, which exercises enormous political clout. The OEA helped sink Oregon’s Race to the Top application by submitting a letter of “support” that expressed its opposition to core reform areas involving merit pay and the use of student test scores in holding teachers accountable. Second, we know that the district’s carefully constructed design team contained not one, but two, members of the Oregon Education Association, one a district employee and the other a regional representative. The rest of the design team consisted of teachers, administrators and one school board member — but not a single parent without an official tie to the district or the union. Judging by the composition of the design team, the district was under no illusion that the CLASS Project design process was anything but a potentially tense negotiation among interest groups, which didn’t for some reason include plain old parents. Because, you know, parents are just too stupid to understand the mysteries of public education. Shortly after our Nov. 2 editorial on this subject, a mem-

ber of the OEA’s board of directors told us in an e-mail that the public has no business looking behind the scenes “since their lack of understanding of the systems (sic) 4 components (compensation, evaluations, etc.) would slow down the process. I mean no disrespect to the local taxpayers, but how many of them have read and fully understand the teacher’s contract” and various laws and policies governing evaluation, professional development and so on? Third, we know that the district really — and we mean REALLY — doesn’t want the public to know what its design team was telling the Chalkboard Project. The cost of fulfilling our public records request has grown (and grown) since we made it back in September. And on Wednesday, the attorney representing the district, John Witty, told us it would cost roughly $2,000 to find out how public employees were using public computers on the public’s dime to conduct the public’s business. Why so much? Because, writes Witty, it’ll take the district’s lawyers about 16 hours, at $115 per hour, to read through the e-mails in order to black out certain information, some of which, he says, might be exempted from disclosure under state and federal law. Releasing certain other information, he writes, would constitute an “unreasonable invasion of individual privacy” and, perhaps, get the district sued. These e-mails, remember, were sent by district representatives to people working for the Chalkboard Project. The notion that a member of the public must pay thousands of dollars to read communications sent freely to a private, nonprofit organization is almost too ludicrous for words. How carefully did the district’s lawyers screen the design team’s e-mails before they popped up on the Chalkboard Project’s computer screens? The district is engaged in a shopworn — but effective — strategy to circumvent Oregon’s public records laws. It’s willing to cough up public documents, but only at a price most members of the public can’t afford. Last we checked, the Bend-La Pine School Board was supposed to represent the interests of taxpayers and parents. It’s time for the board to weigh in on this matter. We’ll happily pay the cost of copying the documents we’ve requested — $100, according to John Witty — but the stonewalling bill is ridiculous. The people who elected this school board have a right to know how their schools conduct their business — which is, incidentally, the business of educating their children. Or does the school board support the view, expressed by our irate OEA board member, that taxpayers are just too dumb to understand something as complex as public education?

Cost of Obama’s trip was nonsense

O

n Nov. 4, Anderson Cooper did the country a favor. He expertly deconstructed on his CNN show the bogus rumor that President Barack Obama’s trip to Asia would cost $200 million a day. This was an important “story.” It underscored just how far ahead of his time Mark Twain was when he said a century before the Internet, “A lie can travel halfway around the world while the truth is still putting on its shoes.” But it also showed that there is an antidote to malicious journalism — and that’s good journalism. In case you missed it, a story circulated around the Web on the eve of Obama’s trip that it would cost U.S. taxpayers $200 million a day — about $2 billion for the entire trip. Cooper said he felt impelled to check it out because the previous evening he had had Rep. Michele Bachmann of Minnesota, a Republican and tea party favorite, on his show and had asked her where exactly Republicans will cut the budget. Instead of giving specifics, Bachmann used her airtime to inject a phony story into the mainstream. She answered: “I think we know that just within a day or so the president of the United States will be taking a trip over to India that is expected to cost the taxpayers $200 million a day. He’s taking 2,000 people with him. He’ll be renting over 870 rooms in India, and these are five-star hotel rooms at the Taj Mahal Palace Hotel. This is the kind of over-the-top spending.” The next night, Cooper explained that he felt compelled to trace that story back to its source, since someone had used his show to circulate it. His research, he said, found that it had originated from a quote by “an alleged Indian provincial official,” from the Indian state of Maharashtra, “reported by India’s Press Trust, their equivalent of our AP or Reuters. I say ‘alleged’ provincial official,” Cooper added, “because we have no idea who

THOMAS FRIEDMAN this person is, no name was given.” It is hard to get any more flimsy than a senior unnamed Indian official from Maharashtra talking about the cost of an Asian trip by the American president. “It was an anonymous quote,” said Cooper. “Some reporter in India wrote this article with this figure in it. No proof was given; no follow-up reporting was done. Now you’d think if a member of Congress was going to use this figure as a fact, she would want to be pretty darn sure it was accurate, right? But there hasn’t been any follow-up reporting on this Indian story. The Indian article was picked up by The Drudge Report and other sites online, and it quickly made its way into conservative talk radio.” Cooper then showed the following snippets: Rush Limbaugh talking about Obama’s trip: “In two days from now, he’ll be in India at $200 million a day.” Then Glenn Beck, on his radio show, saying: “Have you ever seen the president, ever seen the president go over for a vacation where you needed 34 warships, $2 billion — $2 billion, 34 warships. We are sending — he’s traveling with 3,000 people.” In Beck’s rendition, the president’s official state visit to India became “a vacation” accompanied by one-tenth of the U.S. Navy. Ditto the conservative radio talk-show host Michael Savage. He said, “$200 million? $200 million each day on security and other aspects of this incredible royalist visit; 3,000 people, including Secret Service agents.” Cooper then added: “Again, no one really seemed to care to check the facts.

For security reasons, the White House doesn’t comment on logistics of presidential trips, but they have made an exception this time.” He then quoted Robert Gibbs, the White House press secretary, as saying, “I am not going to go into how much it costs to protect the president, (but this trip) is comparable to when President Clinton and when President Bush traveled abroad. This trip doesn’t cost $200 million a day.” Geoff Morrell, the Pentagon press secretary said: “I will take the liberty this time of dismissing as absolutely absurd, this notion that somehow we were deploying 10 percent of the Navy and some 34 ships and an aircraft carrier in support of the president’s trip to Asia. That’s just comical. Nothing close to that is being done.” Cooper also pointed out that, according to the Congressional Budget Office, the entire war effort in Afghanistan was costing about $190 million a day and that President Bill Clinton’s 1998 trip to Africa — with 1,300 people and of roughly similar duration, cost, according to the Government Accountability Office and adjusted for inflation, “about $5.2 million a day.” When widely followed public figures feel free to say anything, without any fact-checking, we have a problem. It becomes impossible for a democracy to think intelligently about big issues — deficit reduction, health care, taxes, energy/climate — let alone act on them. Facts, opinions and fabrications just blend together. But the carnival barkers that so dominate our public debate today are not going away — and neither is the Internet. All you can hope is that more people will do what Cooper did — so when the next crazy lie races around the world, people’s first instinct will be to doubt it, not repeat it. Thomas Friedman is a columnist for The New York Times.

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We welcome your letters. Letters should be limited to one issue, contain no more than 250 words and include the writer’s signature, phone number and address for verification. We edit letters for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject poetry, personal attacks, form letters, letters submitted elsewhere and those appropriate for other sections of The Bulletin. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

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Please address your submission to either My Nickel’s Worth or In My View and send, fax or e-mail them to The Bulletin. WRITE: My Nickel’s Worth OR In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-385-5804 E-MAIL: bulletin@bendbulletin.com

Celebrate Thanksgiving by helping out those in need F JANET rom the first time those pilgrims sat down to celebrate their successful harvest, Thanksgiving has been a day devoted to food. Food, in fact, was a big reason for that first Thanksgiving: Having survived a difficult winter, the pilgrims, with help from their American Indian neighbors, had grown enough over the summer to see them through the second winter, and they wished to thank God for their bounty. Today, many households celebrate Thanksgiving as the one day in the year we can indulge in gluttony without having to feel too guilty. This year I’d like to suggest a way to bring more than calories to the table next week. A report released by the U.S. Department of Agriculture earlier this month shows that more than 50 million Americans had a hard time feeding themselves adequately at some time last year, and that among that number 17 million were children. That doesn’t mean they were

starving or even malnourished; it just means that there was a time during the year when they were unsure they could put enough food on their plates to feel satisfied. Its official title is food insecurity. This in a nation with some of the lowest food prices and strongest agricultural production in the world. Like so much else that seems wrong with the world these days, lingering economic hard times lie behind the food insecurity numbers, USDA says. National unemployment rates that hover near 10 percent — higher in Oregon and even higher than that in Central Oregon — make feeding the family more difficult. Still, the numbers could be worse. Nine million more Americans received food stamps last year than in the year before, and that kept the numbers just about even with those in 2008. And for kids, school districts go out of their way to assure that every child gets at least one good solid meal a day, all year long.

STEVENS

Thus, this summer, kids a few blocks from my house could eat lunch delivered by the school district to a small neighborhood park. A substantial number did just that. In fact, because of increased use of food stamps, food banks and other free food sources, food insecurity hasn’t risen much in the last year, though it is up from when times were better. One place the increase shows up is at the Bend Family Kitchen, a cooperative effort among several Bend churches that currently is serving more than 3,000 meals (two dinners and four lunches weekly) a month to all comers. The record, 3,024 meals, was set in April, and

it hasn’t backed off much since. Family Kitchen, like NeighborImpact’s food bank and other food programs in the region, must meet that demand at a time when charitable donations in general are down. Meanwhile, there’s that Thanksgiving dinner. By my very, very rough calculations, a family Thanksgiving meal is likely to set you back about $45 if you skip the wine or other alcohol and purchase a pre-made pie. Turkeys are expensive this year, though at under $1 a pound they remain a bargain when compared to other meats. Other items, from canned cranberry sauce (50 cents a can) to fresh green beans ($1 a pound or more) aren’t particularly expensive, but Thanksgiving dinner is a meal in which tradition rules and if you grew up in a household with two types of potatoes, stuffing, salad and more on the plate, it all adds up. So here’s what I propose: I plan to keep track of what I spend on Thanksgiving

dinner, then match that amount with a gift to one of the agencies in our community whose mission is to feed the hungry. It won’t be a big gift by charitable standards, but it will come at the beginning of the winter season in which demand for food is especially high. I hope you’ll join me. I know we live in an incredibly generous community, and I know that none of us wants to believe a neighbor or a neighbor’s child might by worried about where his or her next meal is coming from. We cannot fix the economy, you and I, though I know we’d all like to. What we can do is extend our hands to those who need our help. Doing so with a donation to match our Thanksgiving dinner seems to me to be an especially meaningful way of celebrating the holiday devoted to food. Janet Stevens is deputy editor of The Bulletin.


THE BULLETIN • Friday, November 19, 2010 C5

O Cleo Lorine Cox

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N   Dorothy A. Dahl, of Redmond Sept. 6, 1918 - Nov. 17, 2010 Arrangements: Autumn Funerals-Redmond 541-504-9485 www.autumnfunerals.net Services: Family services to be held at a later date.

Kenneth James Lakin, of Bend Sept. 27, 1964 - Nov. 14, 2010 Arrangements: Autumn Funerals, Bend, 541-318-0842 www.autumnfunerals.com Services: Private Family Services will be held.

Nancy Nevel, of Prineville Dec. 18, 1946 - Nov. 16, 2010 Arrangements: Prineville Funeral Home, 541-447-6459 Services: Graveside service will be held Friday, November 19, 2010 at 10:00am at Juniper Haven Cemetery.

Obituary Policy Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They may be submitted by phone, mail, e-mail or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541-617-7825. DEADLINES: Death notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and noon on Saturday. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by 1 p.m. Friday for Sunday or Monday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details. PHONE: 541-617-7825 MAIL: Obituaries P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-322-7254 E-MAIL: obits@bendbulletin.com

Bend-La Pine Continued from C1 Now that La Pine Middle School doesn’t have elementaryaged students, the district has decided to focus the funding entirely on elementary schools. In 2007, about 35 percent of students in Bend-La Pine Schools were eligible for federal free and reduced lunch, which is how the school district measures poverty. Today, that number is more like 45 percent. Dana Arntson, the district’s federal services director, said Bend-La Pine Schools received nearly $3 million in Title I funds for the 2010-11 school year. That allocation comes in the form of a formula grant; the district applies for the grant, but receives it based on a formula that takes into account the number of students in poverty in the area. The amount received isn’t based on how many schools the district has, or the number of schools that qualify for Title I funds. Over the past several years, Arntson said, the amount of Title I funding the district has received has increased in step with the district’s rise in poverty. Each year, she uses free and reduced lunch data from April 1 for the coming year’s budget. There are basic rules that govern how those federal dollars must be spent. Any school with more than 75 percent of its stu-

Oct. 10, 1919 – Nov. 16, 2010 BEND - Cleo Lorine Cox passed away peacefully at her residence in Bend, Oregon, on November 16, 2010. She was born in Straight Creek, Kansas, on October 10, 1919, to Loren Franklin and Mary Emily Bales. Cleo graduated from Salem High School in 1936, and later from Cleo Lorine Cox Salem Beauty Academy. She married Burl Cox on September 12, 1940. Cleo is survived by her son, Raymond (Robin) of Salem; her daughter, Karen Cox of Bend, Oregon; her sisters, Euela (Colin) Scott of Salem, Elizabeth (LaVerne) Hayhurst of Chowchilla, California and Louise Pontiff of Lodi, California; her brother, Charles Bales of North Manchester, Indiana; grandchildren, Shannon Coman of Portland, Kip (Anna) Gray of Sam's Valley, Oregon, Brandon (Alex) Cox of Seattle, Washington; great-grandchildren, Joe, Kelli, Syd and Stellan; and numerous beloved nieces and nephews. Cleo found joy in her faith, her love of large extended family, gardening, sewing, family gatherings, camping and fishing. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be sent to Partners In Care Hospice Center, 2075 NE Wyatt Court, Bend, Oregon 97701. Viewing will be on Friday, from 3:00 - 8:00 pm, at Virgil T. Golden Funeral Service. A funeral service celebrating the life of Cleo Lorine Cox will be held at 11:30 am, on Saturday, November 20, 2010, at Virgil T. Golden Funeral Service.

Water Continued from C1 Councilor Bill Merrill suggested that the city should consider having a base rate, but no base consumption. That way, he said, residents pay for exactly what they use. He equated his position to buying gas. Each person pays for what his or her car uses, and not the gas of anyone else’s car. Paying for water should be the same way, Merrill said. “I think the equity issue is extremely important,” Merrill said.

dents qualifying for free and reduced lunch must be funded with Title I dollars. Ensworth Elementary, which on April 1, 2010, had 76 percent of its students qualifying, is an example.

Free lunch average Title I funds cannot go to any school that is below the district’s free and reduced lunch average. In April, the district’s average had risen to 46 percent. That disqualified elementary schools like Miller, High Lakes, Highland and Amity Creek. When a school receives Title I funding, there are two possible models it can use. The first is a targeted assistance model, which identifies students in need of extra help and provides them with tutoring or other assistance. The second is a schoolwide model, in which all students receive the benefits of the additional funds. In Bend-La Pine, Buckingham, Ponderosa, Lava Ridge and Westside Village schools all use the targeted assistance model, because schools new to the funding are required by law to use that model; the remaining Title I schools offer the schoolwide model. “It’s a better model,” Arntson said. “Every kid’s a title kid.” This fall, Rosland Elementary opened in La Pine, necessitating a change in the use of Title I funds there. For years, La Pine Middle School has included fifthgraders in an attempt to relieve

Get A Taste For Food, Home & Garden Every Tuesday In AT HOME

Painter Oliveira dies at 81 New York Times News Service Nathan Oliveira, a leading Bay Area artist who achieved national prominence fusing abstract expressionism and figuration in psychologically charged canvases that explored human isolation and alienation, died Saturday at his home in Palo Alto, Calif. He was 81. The cause was complications of pulmonary fibrosis and diabetes, his son, Joe, said. Oliveira employed a bravura, brushy style of paint applica-

Turkeys Continued from C1 “Last year was pretty spectacular,” said Bond of the fiery demonstration, in which members of the department drop an unthawed turkey into a pot containing too much oil. “It was really good — not in terms of the potential injury and damage that frying a turkey can cause, but in terms of showing people how to avoid making mistakes,” Bond said. Those frying their bird this holiday should take some basic precautions to ensure their holiday doesn’t involve fire engines or trips to the hospital. The department recommends that residents fry their turkeys in an outdoor setting and on a level surface to avoid spilling hot oil. Cooks should properly protect themselves with goggles and gloves in case of splatter, and should always keep a fire extinguisher handy. “One of the most common mistakes people make is filling the pot too full with oil,” said Bond. “So, when they lower the turkey in, the hot oil overflows.” Bond also said that another mistake cooks tend to make

tion. His abstracted figures and landscapes, however, reflected an affinity with the darker vision of European artists like Oskar Kokoschka and Edvard Munch, or more nearly contemporary artists like Alberto Giacometti and Francis Bacon, who shared his sense of human conflict and existential angst. In 1951, he married Ramona Christensen, who died in 2006. In addition to their son, Joe, of Palo Alto, he is survived by two daughters.

when it comes to frying is that they don’t properly thaw the turkey, which causes the oil to splatter violently. To avoid explosive oil and the painful burns it can cause, the department recommends filling the pot with just enough oil to immerse the turkey by an inch, and to lower the bird carefully into the fryer. The turkey should never be dropped recklessly into the pot. While the turkey is frying, the oil temperature should be monitored closely. Once the bird is done, cooks should allow ample time for the oil to cool down before disposing of it. Should something go haywire during the frying process, and a fire starts, residents should call 911. If the fire is small enough, Bond recommends residents use a fire extinguisher to quash the flames. However, if the fire is out of control, residents should vacate the area and call the department for help. “You should immediately get everyone out of the house,” said Bond. “The most important thing is to never put yourself in harm’s way.” Megan Kehoe can be reached at 541-383-0354 or at mkehoe@bendbulletin.com.

Mayor Lon Kellstrom asked staff to develop a rate study that considers lowering the base consumption immediately to 500 cubic feet or 700 cubic feet, while leaving the rate the same. The water fund has a $90,000 shortfall. Even if changes are made now, the shortfall will likely remain into next year because the summer provides the bulk of the water revenues. Over time, the city believes its proposed increases would help cover that shortfall. Whatever price the city eventually decides on, councilors

need to be certain the revenue will cover the water department’s needs, Kellstrom said. The city can consider some moves, like spending the water department’s roughly $70,000 reserve, but the water rates still need to cover the entire system, he said. “We have a certain level of revenue we have to have to make the system function,” Kellstrom said. “We can trim around the edges, but you’ve got a big nut to cover.”

overcrowding at the elementary level. As a result, the school received Title I funding; but this year Rosland Elementary and La Pine Elementary took all the fifth-graders, and now they’re receiving the Title I funds instead of the middle school.

and education assistants. Some schools also use the funds for behavioral specialists. Arntson said these uses, primarily at the elementary level, are common. “Statewide, and nationally, this is typically what is done,” she said. “When we get kids at 5 or 6 years old, they come to us with a certain skill set, and some come with a bigger skill set than others. For the most part, you can link the lack of skill set to those living in poverty. They don’t have the language skills, they haven’t had literacy or preliteracy skills.” As a result, the district focuses on those early grades to try to fill in those gaps. “Then by middle school and high school, they’ll have a level playing field,” Arntson said. “That’s the goal.”

Early intervention model used “We use an early intervention model with all of our Title I funds at the elementary level,” Arntson said. “As long as the middle school had fifth-graders, we felt it was appropriate for them to receive funding, but when we changed grade configurations that changed.” La Pine Middle School Principal Jim Boen said the transition made sense. “As a district, we decided our resources should be put toward elementary and not middle,” he said. “We were the only middle school (receiving Title I funds) so it made sense then to make the transition. ... It’s the same kids we’re going to get, so it’s just serving them before they get to the middle school.” The federal money is used to provide full-day kindergarten, reading and math specialists,

Patrick Cliff can be reached at 541-633-2161 or at pcliff@bendbulletin.com.

Sheila G. Miller can be reached at 541-617-7831 or at smiller@bendbulletin.com.

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W E AT H ER

C6 Friday, November 19, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

THE BULLETIN WEATHER FORECAST

Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LLC ©2010.

TODAY, NOVEMBER 19

SATURDAY

Today: Mostly cloudy and unseasonably cool.

Ben Burkel

Bob Shaw

FORECASTS: LOCAL

HIGH

LOW

40

21

STATE Western

43/24

Warm Springs 45/28

36/18

Willowdale Mitchell

Madras

37/20

28/9

39/31

Central

36/18

44/37

32/18

37/17

Snow will be likely in the Cascades today.

37/19

45/35

35/18

42/33

34/20

44/29

51/31

Reno

Expect a few rain and snow showers, primarily over the mountains.



Crater Lake

Idaho Falls Elko

51/40

38/20

Silver Lake

32/15

24/10

Boise

40/21

Redding Christmas Valley

Chemult

Bend



39/19

31/11

Helena

44/35

Eastern

Hampton Fort Rock

32/14

Eugene Grants Pass



Missoula

45/37

Burns

35/17





24/18

San Francisco 57/48

54/33

Salt Lake City



Moon phases Full

Last

New

First

Nov. 21 Nov. 28 Dec. 5

Dec. 13

54/43

City

Yesterday Hi/Lo/Pcp

Friday Hi/Lo/W

TUESDAY

Mostly cloudy, scattered snow showers, LOW cold.

Astoria . . . . . . . . 49/41/0.63 . . . . . 48/38/sh. . . . . . 45/36/sh Baker City . . . . . .51/34/trace . . . . . 39/25/sn. . . . . . 37/24/sn Brookings . . . . . . 48/43/0.87 . . . . . 49/43/sh. . . . . . 46/38/sh Burns. . . . . . . . . . 46/32/0.01 . . . . . .37/25/rs. . . . . . 35/24/sn Eugene . . . . . . . . 50/40/1.08 . . . . . 45/35/sh. . . . . . 43/33/sh Klamath Falls . . . 45/32/0.12 . . . . . . 36/24/c. . . . . . 36/23/sn Lakeview. . . . . . . 46/37/0.00 . . . . . 34/27/sn. . . . . . 33/21/sn La Pine . . . . . . . . 37/31/0.23 . . . . . 35/17/sn. . . . . . 34/19/sn Medford . . . . . . . 45/34/0.13 . . . . . 45/35/sh. . . . . . 43/34/sh Newport . . . . . . . 52/43/1.31 . . . . . 48/39/sh. . . . . . 46/37/sh North Bend . . . . . 54/45/1.43 . . . . . 50/39/sh. . . . . . 47/38/sh Ontario . . . . . . . . 58/34/0.00 . . . . . .44/32/rs. . . . . . 41/32/rs Pendleton . . . . . . 49/35/0.06 . . . . . 48/28/pc. . . . . . 42/25/rs Portland . . . . . . . 48/37/1.33 . . . . . 45/37/sh. . . . . . 42/33/rs Prineville . . . . . . . 40/33/0.16 . . . . . .37/22/rs. . . . . . 36/23/rs Redmond. . . . . . . 50/34/0.13 . . . . . .41/20/rs. . . . . . 37/22/rs Roseburg. . . . . . . 50/43/0.48 . . . . . 44/37/sh. . . . . . 42/35/sh Salem . . . . . . . . . 49/41/1.29 . . . . . 45/35/sh. . . . . . 43/34/sh Sisters . . . . . . . . . 40/33/0.18 . . . . . .40/20/rs. . . . . . 37/20/rs The Dalles . . . . . . 51/39/0.27 . . . . . 48/30/pc. . . . . . 43/31/rs

LOW

0

MEDIUM 2

4

HIGH 6

LOW

30 12

PRECIPITATION

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39/32 24 hours ending 4 p.m.. . . . . . . . 0.70” Record high . . . . . . . . . . . . .72 in 1936 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.19” Record low. . . . . . . . . . . . . -12 in 1955 Average month to date. . . . . . . . 0.80” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .45 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.65” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27 Average year to date. . . . . . . . . . 9.29” Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.. . . 29.91 Record 24 hours . . . . . . . 1.46 in 1945 *Melted liquid equivalent

SKI REPORT

The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is for solar at noon.

0

HIGH

TEMPERATURE

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . . . .8:54 a.m. . . . . . .5:25 p.m. Venus . . . . . . . .4:31 a.m. . . . . . .3:07 p.m. Mars. . . . . . . . .8:46 a.m. . . . . . .5:34 p.m. Jupiter. . . . . . . .1:56 p.m. . . . . . .1:35 a.m. Saturn. . . . . . . .3:11 a.m. . . . . . .2:50 p.m. Uranus . . . . . . .2:00 p.m. . . . . . .1:53 a.m.

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX Saturday Hi/Lo/W

Partly cloudy and unseasonably cold.

32 11

PLANET WATCH

OREGON CITIES

Calgary

Portland

Brothers

Sunriver

Seattle

Paulina

La Pine 33/16

Vancouver 15/-4

36/19

Crescent

Crescent Lake

BEND ALMANAC SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE Sunrise today . . . . . . 7:06 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 4:35 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 7:07 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 4:34 p.m. Moonrise today . . . . 3:10 p.m. Moonset today . . . . 5:08 a.m.

HIGH

33 18

NORTHWEST Yesterday’s regional extremes • 59° Rome • 27° Meacham

MONDAY

Mostly cloudy, scattered snow showers, LOW cold.

HIGH

38 18

38/23

Camp Sherman 37/18 Redmond Prineville 40/21 Cascadia 37/22 39/22 Sisters 40/20 Bend Post 40/21

HIGH

Mostly cloudy, scattered snow showers, LOW cooler.

Rain and mountain snow showers will be likely across the Northwest today.

Cloudy with periods of rain and mountain snow.

42/27 41/26

Oakridge Elk Lake

44/27

39/23



29/25

Marion Forks

Ruggs

Condon

Maupin

Government Camp

Tonight: Mostly cloudy, cold, isolated snow showers developing.

SUNDAY

Ski report from around the state, representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday: Snow accumulation in inches Ski area Last 24 hours Base Depth Anthony Lakes . . . . . . . no report . . . no report Hoodoo . . . . . . . . . . . . . no report . . . no report Mt. Ashland. . . . . . . . . . no report . . . no report Mt. Bachelor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 . . . . . . 18-25 Mt. Hood Meadows . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Mt. Hood Ski Bowl . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Timberline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . . . 12 Warner Canyon . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Willamette Pass . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report

V.HIGH 8

10

ROAD CONDITIONS Snow level and road conditions representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday. Key: T.T. = Traction Tires. Pass Conditions I-5 at Siskiyou Summit . . . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires I-84 at Cabbage Hill . . . . . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 20 at Santiam Pass . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 26 at Government Camp. . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 26 at Ochoco Divide . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 58 at Willamette Pass . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 138 at Diamond Lake . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 242 at McKenzie Pass . . . . . . . . .Closed for season

Aspen, Colorado . . . . . . no report Mammoth Mtn., California . . . 0.0 Park City, Utah . . . . . . . no report Squaw Valley, California . . . . . 0.0 Sun Valley, Idaho. . . . . . no report Taos, New Mexico. . . . . no report Vail, Colorado . . . . . . . . no report

. . . no report . . . . . . 13-30 . . . no report . . . no report . . . no report . . . no report . . . no report

For links to the latest ski conditions visit: www.skicentral.com/oregon.html

For up-to-minute conditions turn to: www.tripcheck.com or call 511

Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are high for the day.

S

S

S

Yesterday’s U.S. extremes (in the 48 contiguous states):

• 85° Indio, Calif.

• 2° Alamosa, Colo.

• 1.73” Florence, Ore.

Honolulu 82/70

S

S

S

Vancouver 39/31

S

Calgary 15/-4

S

Saskatoon 12/-11

Seattle 44/37

S

S

S

S

S

S

S S

Quebec 38/30

Winnipeg 21/6

Halifax 38/26 P ortland Billings Portland 42/29 28/14 Green Bay 45/37 St. Paul Boston 44/27 37/21 To ronto Buffalo 45/36 Rapid City Boise 47/38 Detroit 45/34 New York 35/20 42/33 48/36 48/37 Des Moines Cheyenne Philadelphia Columbus Chicago 49/27 46/27 51/39 50/38 55/32 Omaha San Francisco Salt Lake Washington, D. C. 47/26 56/49 City 51/38 Denver Louisville 54/43 60/31 Kansas City 59/43 St. Louis Las 58/37 60/37 Vegas Albuquerque 71/50 Charlotte Oklahoma City Nashville Little Rock 61/30 60/36 64/39 62/42 Los Angeles 63/45 Atlanta 66/57 Phoenix 79/56 65/39 Birmingham Dallas Tijuana 67/45 66/47 67/51 New Orleans 71/57 Orlando Houston 77/56 Chihuahua 69/52 78/39 Miami 80/67

Anchorage 23/1

Bismarck 25/14

La Paz 85/55 Juneau 33/19

Mazatlan 88/61

Thunder Bay 34/13

Monterrey 80/50

FRONTS

Bridges pose evacuation plan hitch for coastal town By Nancy McCarthy The Daily Astorian

CANNON BEACH — The goal: Evacuate downtown Cannon Beach before a tsunami hits. The problem: The existing bridge across Ecola Creek will collapse, stranding students at Cannon Beach Elementary School and those at the Cannon Beach Conference Center who need to reach the higher north end of town across the creek. The solution: a stationary pedestrian bridge made of concrete or a floating bridge made of wood. And therein lies the conflict. The city’s emergency preparedness committee supports a 12-foot-wide concrete pedestrian bridge across the creek in addition to the current bridge. The cost could range between $1.6 million and $3 million, depending on the bridge’s alignment. The committee is working with a proposal from OBEC Consulting Engineers of Eugene that suggests two bridge alignments. Although the proposal, requested

by Public Works Director Mark See, was submitted to the committee in February, it wasn’t until this month that some members of the City Council learned about it. Meanwhile, Mayor Mike Morgan began talking to architect and former mayor Jay Raskin about a wooden stationary pedestrian bridge or a floating bridge that would cost between $300,000 and $600,000.

Heated debate Discussion over the two concepts has already become heated, especially now that the city has an opportunity to seek a grant from the Oregon Department of Transportation to do a geological study of the creek bank. The grant application is due this month. “I think it’s great that the city got OBEC involved and came up with a proposal for a fixed bridge,” Morgan said at a City Council meeting earlier this month. “But a fixed bridge will cost $1.5 million to $3 million.

“The option Jay is proposing is to have a flexible bridge that will withstand an earthquake, and allow the evacuation of children and the conference center, and then be destroyed by a tsunami. “I think both approaches have merit, but it would be hard to pass a bond measure for a $3 million bridge, where $300,000 to $500,000 is more doable,” Morgan said. If the city were to spend $3 million on a bridge that is wide enough for pedestrians and possibly an emergency vehicle, Morgan added, it might as well replace the existing two-lane bridge. State geologists have said that the wooden pilings under the existing Ecola Creek Bridge wouldn’t withstand either an earthquake or a tsunami. The wooden bridge that spanned the creek during the 1964 tsunami collapsed when a house and other debris hit it. It took several months before that bridge was replaced with the bridge that is there now.

O  B Professor of the year found at Willamette SALEM — Willamette University chemistry professor Karen McFarlane Holman has been named the Oregon professor of the year. The Oregonian reports she was in Washington, D.C., on Thursday to pick up the award from the Council for the Advancement and Support of Education and the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. The 43-year-old is known for her enthusiastic teaching and variety of interests. She’s a researcher, a mother of two and occasionally plays guitar in the punk rock band Funhouse Strippers.

Supreme Court clears way for Walmart MEDFORD — An Oregon Su-

preme Court ruling clears the way for a Walmart Supercenter in Medford. The Mail Tribune reports the state’s highest court Thursday unanimously overturned a decision by the state Land Use Board of Appeals requiring the city of Medford to do a comprehensive traffic study for the site. The city had argued that traffic issues were resolved when the property was rezoned. Walmart has been trying to build a superstore on the site of an old baseball field for more than six years.

Sheriff cuts patrols to only 1 shift per day KLAMATH FALLS — The Klamath County Sheriff’s Office is cutting back its patrols to only one shift of deputies each day. The Herald and News reported the cutback is in response to county budget cuts and financial

instability that led five deputies to seek new jobs elsewhere. The Klamath County Sheriff’s Office had 24-hour patrol coverage until budget constraints forced personnel reductions. As of January, only one 10to 12-hour shift of deputies will patrol Klamath County each day.

Yesterday Friday Saturday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . . .58/24/0.15 . . .72/44/s . . . 74/57/s Akron . . . . . . . . .43/37/0.02 . 48/34/pc . . 44/33/pc Albany. . . . . . . . .49/40/0.00 . 43/30/pc . . 48/24/pc Albuquerque. . . .57/25/0.00 . . .61/30/s . . 67/32/pc Anchorage . . . . .20/10/0.00 . . . .23/1/s . . . . 27/5/c Atlanta . . . . . . . .63/39/0.00 . . .65/39/s . . . 67/45/s Atlantic City . . . .58/39/0.01 . . .51/37/s . . . 59/40/s Austin . . . . . . . . .66/44/0.00 . . .68/42/s . . . 75/60/s Baltimore . . . . . .58/38/0.00 . . .50/37/s . . . 59/38/s Billings. . . . . . . . .60/25/0.00 . .28/14/sn . . . 18/6/sn Birmingham . . . .63/42/0.00 . . .67/45/s . . . 69/49/s Bismarck . . . . . . .35/22/0.00 . 25/14/pc . . 25/13/sn Boise . . . . . . . . . .58/42/0.00 . . 42/33/rs . . .38/32/rs Boston. . . . . . . . .54/46/0.00 . . .45/36/s . . 52/31/pc Bridgeport, CT. . .58/46/0.00 . . .47/38/s . . 53/33/pc Buffalo . . . . . . . .47/35/0.00 . 45/34/pc . . . 42/30/c Burlington, VT. . .44/39/0.00 . 38/31/pc . . 39/21/sn Caribou, ME . . . .47/35/0.01 . 29/20/pc . . 27/15/sn Charleston, SC . .68/40/0.00 . . .67/46/s . . 70/46/pc Charlotte. . . . . . .62/31/0.00 . . .60/36/s . . . 65/39/s Chattanooga. . . .62/39/0.00 . . .64/40/s . . . 67/42/s Cheyenne . . . . . .56/22/0.00 . 46/27/pc . . . 49/29/c Chicago. . . . . . . .39/31/0.00 . . .55/32/s . . 45/40/pc Cincinnati . . . . . .47/29/0.05 . . .55/39/s . . . 56/43/s Cleveland . . . . . .45/40/0.03 . 48/35/pc . . . 43/36/s Colorado Springs 69/19/0.00 . 63/34/pc . . . 57/35/s Columbia, MO . .40/32/0.02 . . .59/38/s . . 60/49/pc Columbia, SC . . .66/35/0.00 . . .65/39/s . . . 71/40/s Columbus, GA. . .67/40/0.00 . . .68/41/s . . . 70/46/s Columbus, OH. . .43/32/0.00 . . .51/39/s . . . 52/40/s Concord, NH . . . .51/37/0.00 . 42/27/pc . . 46/22/pc Corpus Christi. . .69/49/0.00 . . .73/54/s . . . 77/63/s Dallas Ft Worth. .58/41/0.00 . . .66/47/s . . . 70/59/s Dayton . . . . . . . .45/31/0.00 . . .51/37/s . . . 51/40/s Denver. . . . . . . . .62/27/0.00 . . .60/31/s . . 57/34/pc Des Moines. . . . .39/32/0.00 . . .49/27/s . . 42/41/pc Detroit. . . . . . . . .47/37/0.00 . . .48/36/s . . . 44/35/s Duluth . . . . . . . . .25/17/0.00 . 33/12/pc . . 24/23/sn El Paso. . . . . . . . .67/35/0.00 . . .71/41/s . . . 73/43/s Fairbanks. . . . . . . .13/1/0.00 . . . .15/1/c . . 29/11/sn Fargo. . . . . . . . . .31/23/0.00 . 27/10/pc . . 26/18/sn Flagstaff . . . . . . .57/17/0.00 . . .55/31/s . . 50/31/sh

Yesterday Friday Saturday Yesterday Friday Saturday Yesterday Friday Saturday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . .42/37/0.00 . 48/31/pc . . 43/33/pc Rapid City . . . . . .57/19/0.00 . 35/20/pc . . . 39/19/c Savannah . . . . . .70/37/0.00 . . .69/45/s . . 71/48/pc Green Bay. . . . . .36/33/0.00 . 44/27/pc . . 36/30/pc Reno . . . . . . . . . .66/51/0.00 . . .54/33/c . . 41/27/sn Seattle. . . . . . . . .44/35/0.19 . .44/37/sh . . .39/28/rs Greensboro. . . . .57/37/0.00 . . .59/37/s . . . 64/38/s Richmond . . . . . .59/35/0.00 . . .55/34/s . . . 63/38/s Sioux Falls. . . . . .36/22/0.00 . . .40/17/s . . 35/26/pc Harrisburg. . . . . .54/38/0.00 . . .49/34/s . . 57/34/pc Rochester, NY . . .43/36/0.04 . 47/35/pc . . . 44/29/c Spokane . . . . . . .39/32/0.52 . .37/25/sn . . 31/17/sn Hartford, CT . . . .53/46/0.00 . . .45/32/s . . 52/27/pc Sacramento. . . . .65/42/0.00 . .59/47/sh . . 53/43/sh Springfield, MO. .41/35/0.00 . . .61/39/s . . . 63/49/s Helena. . . . . . . . .48/24/0.00 . .24/10/sn . . .17/-2/sn St. Louis. . . . . . . .45/40/0.03 . . .60/37/s . . . 61/47/s Tampa . . . . . . . . .78/62/0.00 . . .78/58/s . . . 79/62/s Honolulu . . . . . . .81/70/0.00 . . .82/70/t . . . 82/70/s Salt Lake City . . .60/37/0.00 . 54/43/pc . . 50/40/sh Tucson. . . . . . . . .81/43/0.00 . . .79/48/s . . 77/47/pc Houston . . . . . . .66/48/0.00 . . .69/52/s . . . 75/60/s San Antonio . . . .68/43/0.00 . . .70/49/s . . . 76/63/s Tulsa . . . . . . . . . .49/31/0.00 . . .67/45/s . . . 68/53/s Huntsville . . . . . .61/42/0.00 . . .63/38/s . . . 67/44/s San Diego . . . . . .67/55/0.00 . 63/51/pc . . . .59/55/r Washington, DC .59/42/0.00 . . .51/38/s . . . 60/40/s Indianapolis . . . .46/34/0.00 . . .55/37/s . . . 53/42/s San Francisco . . .59/46/0.00 . .57/48/sh . . 56/48/sh Wichita . . . . . . . .46/25/0.00 . . .61/35/s . . . 58/45/s Jackson, MS . . . .58/49/0.01 . . .67/47/s . . . 71/52/s San Jose . . . . . . .63/44/0.00 . .61/48/sh . . 55/45/sh Yakima . . . . . . . .49/32/0.13 . 42/23/pc . . .39/24/rs Madison, WI . . . .35/30/0.00 . . .49/27/s . . 40/32/pc Santa Fe . . . . . . .57/21/0.00 . . .57/28/s . . 59/25/pc Yuma. . . . . . . . . .83/54/0.00 . 80/57/pc . . 73/52/pc Jacksonville. . . . .71/40/0.00 . . .71/50/s . . 74/51/pc Juneau. . . . . . . . .29/17/0.00 . . .33/19/s . . 29/21/pc Kansas City. . . . .43/28/0.00 . . .58/37/s . . . 56/50/s Amsterdam. . . . .45/39/0.00 . . .44/38/c . . . 45/35/c Mecca . . . . . . . . .97/68/0.03 . 95/75/pc . . . 97/73/s Lansing . . . . . . . .41/32/0.00 . . .46/31/s . . 42/33/pc Athens. . . . . . . . .68/53/0.00 . .68/53/sh . . 68/54/pc Mexico City. . . . .63/50/0.00 . 78/46/pc . . 78/47/pc Las Vegas . . . . . .68/46/0.00 . 71/50/pc . . 64/47/sh Auckland. . . . . . .73/55/0.00 . .69/56/sh . . 65/59/sh Montreal. . . . . . .43/37/0.03 . . .40/32/c . . .35/18/sf Lexington . . . . . .44/34/0.04 . . .56/39/s . . . 62/43/s Baghdad . . . . . . .84/50/0.00 . . .86/53/s . . . 83/50/s Moscow . . . . . . .36/32/0.00 . 45/40/pc . . 42/36/sh Lincoln. . . . . . . . .47/21/0.00 . . .50/26/s . . 43/35/pc Bangkok . . . . . . .91/77/0.00 . . .88/77/t . . . .88/76/t Nairobi . . . . . . . .75/61/0.59 . . .76/60/t . . . .76/58/t Little Rock. . . . . .53/46/0.00 . . .63/45/s . . . 68/50/s Beijing. . . . . . . . .48/28/0.00 . . .52/30/s . . . 61/38/s Nassau . . . . . . . .84/73/0.51 . . .82/71/t . . . 79/68/s Los Angeles. . . . .64/55/0.00 . 66/57/pc . . . .60/54/r Beirut. . . . . . . . . .77/68/0.00 . . .81/68/s . . . 83/66/s New Delhi. . . . . .68/59/0.00 . . .82/59/s . . . 80/57/s Louisville . . . . . . .47/43/0.07 . . .59/43/s . . . 64/47/s Berlin. . . . . . . . . .43/41/0.00 . .44/35/sh . . . 43/35/c Osaka . . . . . . . . .57/45/0.00 . . .61/47/s . . . 63/48/s Memphis. . . . . . .52/48/0.14 . . .63/49/s . . . 69/54/s Bogota . . . . . . . .63/50/0.27 . .67/52/sh . . 63/51/sh Oslo. . . . . . . . . . .21/16/0.00 . 29/18/pc . . .29/21/sf Miami . . . . . . . . .83/72/0.00 . 80/67/pc . . 80/69/pc Budapest. . . . . . .52/46/0.11 . .55/43/sh . . 50/33/pc Ottawa . . . . . . . .39/32/0.11 . . .41/33/c . . .33/16/sf Milwaukee . . . . .39/31/0.00 . . .52/32/s . . 40/38/pc Buenos Aires. . . .79/48/0.00 . 85/62/pc . . 85/60/pc Paris. . . . . . . . . . .46/43/0.04 . . .50/40/c . . 51/40/pc Minneapolis . . . .31/27/0.00 . 37/21/pc . . 32/28/pc Cabo San Lucas .86/57/0.00 . . .86/62/s . . 85/64/pc Rio de Janeiro. . .84/70/0.00 . . .86/73/s . . . .85/73/t Nashville . . . . . . .60/41/0.00 . . .62/42/s . . . 67/47/s Cairo . . . . . . . . . .79/63/0.00 . . .81/62/s . . . 80/60/s Rome. . . . . . . . . .61/48/0.38 . .61/48/sh . . 60/50/sh New Orleans. . . .67/57/0.00 . . .71/57/s . . . 75/58/s Calgary . . . . . . . . . .9/0/0.14 . . 15/-4/sf . . . 11/-7/sf Santiago . . . . . . .73/52/0.00 . . .69/49/t . . 63/45/sh New York . . . . . .55/45/0.00 . . .48/37/s . . 53/32/pc Cancun . . . . . . . .79/72/0.00 . 82/64/pc . . . .81/65/t Sao Paulo . . . . . .82/63/0.00 . . .84/62/s . . . .87/63/t Newark, NJ . . . . .56/39/0.00 . . .48/37/s . . 54/33/pc Dublin . . . . . . . . .52/43/0.02 . .51/42/sh . . 48/42/sh Sapporo. . . . . . . .51/31/0.00 . . .46/36/s . . 45/35/pc Norfolk, VA . . . . .58/39/0.00 . . .54/38/s . . . 62/44/s Edinburgh . . . . . .46/43/0.00 . .47/40/sh . . 44/32/pc Seoul . . . . . . . . . .52/28/0.00 . 53/34/pc . . . 55/34/s Oklahoma City . .52/31/0.00 . . .64/39/s . . . 67/49/s Geneva . . . . . . . .48/37/0.09 . 46/33/pc . . 48/39/sh Shanghai. . . . . . .63/48/0.00 . . .61/51/s . . . 66/53/s Omaha . . . . . . . .43/26/0.00 . . .47/26/s . . 42/36/pc Harare . . . . . . . . .84/64/0.00 . . .84/63/t . . . .83/64/t Singapore . . . . . .88/75/0.14 . . .87/77/t . . . .88/77/t Orlando. . . . . . . .78/61/0.00 . . .77/56/s . . 79/59/pc Hong Kong . . . . .75/70/0.00 . 77/66/pc . . 80/69/pc Stockholm. . . . . .34/30/0.00 . 36/29/pc . . .35/30/rs Palm Springs. . . .81/55/0.00 . 76/51/pc . . 66/49/sh Istanbul. . . . . . . .66/57/0.00 . 67/52/pc . . 68/53/pc Sydney. . . . . . . . .77/63/0.00 . .65/58/sh . . . 70/57/s Peoria . . . . . . . . .41/31/0.00 . . .55/32/s . . 51/43/pc Jerusalem . . . . . .82/51/0.00 . . .83/57/s . . . 80/55/s Taipei. . . . . . . . . .72/66/0.00 . .74/67/sh . . 76/67/pc Philadelphia . . . .56/42/0.00 . . .50/38/s . . 56/36/pc Johannesburg . . .59/54/1.44 . . .71/57/t . . . .80/60/t Tel Aviv . . . . . . . .81/63/0.00 . . .83/64/s . . . 80/63/s Phoenix. . . . . . . .82/55/0.00 . . .79/56/s . . 78/52/pc Lima . . . . . . . . . .70/61/0.00 . . .70/61/s . . . 69/59/s Tokyo. . . . . . . . . .59/48/0.00 . .59/49/sh . . 59/51/sh Pittsburgh . . . . . .44/37/0.00 . 48/37/pc . . 50/35/pc Lisbon . . . . . . . . .63/52/0.00 . .61/53/sh . . 58/50/sh Toronto . . . . . . . .43/36/0.02 . . .47/38/c . . 43/26/pc Portland, ME. . . .52/37/0.00 . 42/29/pc . . 48/31/sh London . . . . . . . .50/41/0.18 . .53/40/sh . . 50/36/pc Vancouver. . . . . .41/36/0.01 . .39/31/sh . . .34/24/sf Providence . . . . .54/42/0.00 . . .47/35/s . . 53/31/pc Madrid . . . . . . . .55/39/0.00 . .56/39/sh . . 54/35/sh Vienna. . . . . . . . .50/43/0.01 . .47/41/sh . . 47/34/pc Raleigh . . . . . . . .62/34/0.00 . . .59/35/s . . . 64/38/s Manila. . . . . . . . .88/75/0.00 . . .89/77/t . . . .90/77/t Warsaw. . . . . . . .50/45/0.00 . 49/35/pc . . 44/35/sh

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Heated spray can rockets out of oven PORTLAND — A Portland woman who wanted to warm up a cold can of spray paint put it in her oven. KGW reports the can exploded Tuesday, shot out the oven door and through the kitchen ceiling. Firefighters found it smoldering in the attic. The woman was reminded by firefighters to read the safety label; it’s a bad idea to heat products that are under pressure. — From wire reports

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S

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NFL Inside The Bears shut out the Dolphins, see Page D3.

www.bendbulletin.com/sports

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2010

BASEBALL

PREP GIRLS SOCCER

Seattle ace wins AL Cy Young NEW YORK — For once, Felix Hernandez got all the support he needed for a big win. The Seattle ace earned the AL Cy Young Award on Thursday despite a modest 1312 record. His major leagueleading 2.27 ERA and supeSeattle rior stats pitcher Felix put him Hernandez far ahead of Tampa Bay’s DaInside vid Price • Commentary, and the Yankees’ Page D5 CC Sabathia and their impressive win-loss numbers. Victimized by the Mariners’ poor hitting all season, Hernandez found ample backing with the voters in this pitchers’ duel. They clearly recognized how little the last-place Mariners helped him — in 10 starts, they were either shut out or held to one run. “This confirms the Cy Young is an award not only for the pitcher with the most wins, but the most dominant,” a teary-eyed Hernandez said while celebrating with relatives at his family’s home in Valencia, Venezuela. King Felix got 21 of the 28 first-place votes and 167 points in balloting by the Baseball Writers’ Association of America. The 24-year-old right-hander led the league in innings (249 2⁄3), was second in strikeouts (232) and held AL opponents to the lowest batting average (.212). Price, who went 19-6 with a 2.72 ERA, was second with four first-place votes and 111 points. Sabathia, who was 217 with a 3.18 ERA, drew the other three first-place votes and finished third at 102. — The Associated Press

FOOTBALL Pop Warner: Doctor’s OK needed for concussed kids Pop Warner, the nation’s oldest and largest youth football organization, is requiring a note from a doctor before letting anyone who’s suffered a head injury back on the field. “It takes all the pressure off a coach,” said Jon Butler, Pop Warner’s executive director. “There is no decision — the child is out until being signed off by a trained medical professional.” The organization also announced Thursday the creation of a national medical advisory board. The chairman is Dr. Julian Bailes, who works with the NFL Players Association on concussion-related issues and is chairman of neurosurgery at West Virginia University’s medical school. “The NFL, NCAA and national federation for high schools have all made changes, and we want to carry that down to youth football,” Bailes said. “We want to be responsible and responsive.” Bailes said there are fewer concussions among youths than at higher levels “just because the athletes are smaller and they don’t generate the high-velocity impacts.” “But sometimes,” he added, “the recognition of the occurrence of a concussion can be more difficult in a youngster, and we worry about the vulnerability of the younger brain.” — The Associated Press

INDEX S coreboard ................................D2 NHL ...........................................D2 Football .....................................D3 Basketball ................................. D4 Baseball .....................................D5 Adventure Sports...................... D6

Mountain View, Summit square off for 5A title

ADVENTURE SPORTS

Sisters plays in Class 4A state final By Beau Eastes

Inside

The Bulletin

Mountain View coach Grant Mattox knows his team is the underdog heading into Saturday’s Class 5A girls soccer state championship against crosstown rival Summit. The Storm have knocked off the Cougars twice this season, most recently 3-0 on Oct. 21. But Mountain View’s firstyear coach is far from ready to concede the Storm their first girls soccer state title. “We’re not going to roll over just because they beat us twice,” says Mattox, who has guided the Cougars to a 14-21 mark this year. “That’s why they play the game. … We know them and they know us. And we know what we need to do to stop them.” For the second time in three

• More information on the state title matches involving Central Oregon teams, Page D5 years the 5A girls soccer championship will be played between a pair of high schools from Bend in Hillsboro. Mountain View and Summit, who play at 10:30 a.m., meet in the first of four games scheduled at Hillsboro Stadium on Saturday. Sisters High will also be fighting for a girls soccer state championship Saturday. The Outlaws play Mazama of Klamath Falls in the Class 4A state title match at 3:30 p.m. at Hillsboro’s Liberty High School. See Soccer / D5

NBA

Portland seems cursed when it comes to big men Photos by Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Redmond’s Shawn Ison, 13, launches above a cement transition while riding his scooter at the Redmond Skatepark on Tuesday afternoon. Scooter riders and skateboarders have been learning to share space in Redmond.

The right to scoot? REDMOND — espite the noticeable chill in the air, the Redmond Skatepark was crowded Tuesday afternoon with more than 20 skateboarders, their wheels humming across the cement and boards grinding along the transitions. Once school was over for the day, the younger scooter riders began showing up. One could feel a subtle change in the vibe at Central Oregon’s most popular outdoor skatepark — as if some of the skateboarders were still learning to tolerate scooter riding, a burgeoning sport (or fad?) that appeals to “tweens.” Indeed they are — and they made their opinions evident to me. But the scooter riders made just as clear that they, too, need a place to ride and perform tricks. “If you can’t ride scooters here, there’s nowhere else to really ride them,” said Shawn Ison, 13, of Redmond. “Everybody needs to learn how to share with each other.” As Ison spoke, a skateboarder and a scooter rider cruised in and out of a bowl at

D

The Central Oregon skateboarding community adjusts to the influx of young scooter riders

the same time, cognizant of each other and seemingly riding safely. “Right here, this is an example of sharing,” Ison pointed out. “There’s two people in the bowl but they’re still sharing the same space.” Redmond Public Works is currently conducting a trial period for allowing scooters at the skatepark (and this week marks about halfway through the planned six-month trial). Signs are posted at the park welcoming feedback from users (skatepark@ ci.redmond.or.us or 541-504-2000). “We can’t be down there all the time and can’t observe everything, so we need to rely on the users to let us know how it’s working out,” said Redmond Public Works Director Chris Doty. “We’ve had a few contacts from folks within the skateboard community who haven’t been too happy with the amount of scooters down there and how they ride, but just a couple responses. There hasn’t been a flood of responses one way or the other.” See Scoot / D6

MARK MORICAL

At left, scooter rider Isaiah Wallace, 14, and skateboarder Mike Davis Jr., 12, share the transition while performing tricks side by side on the coping at the Redmond Skatepark Tuesday afternoon.

By Anne M. Peterson

as a society, we all want to find someone PORTLAND — to point the finger at, With Greg Oden facor blame, and someing yet another knee times things just hapoperation that will pen,” McMillan said. keep him off the court Inside “These injuries, each for yet another season, • Blazers take one of them, they just Portland Trail Blazers out Nuggets, happened.” coach Nate McMillan McMillan made without Roy, confronted the perthe comments durPage D4 ceived curse that has ing a hastily called a hung over his oft-innews conference on jured 7-foot center. a stormy Wednesday There’s a tendency to grasp night to announce that Oden for answers why Oden is in- would have microfracture surjury-prone, or why former gery on his left knee. Blazers Bill Walton or more It was yet another setback infamously Sam Bowie were, for the former No. 1 draft pick, too. McMillan said the truth is who has played just 82 games that it’s merely an unfortunate since he came into the league coincidence. in 2007. “When things go wrong, we See Portland / D4 The Associated Press

Juan Fach / The New York Times

A baseball player takes batting practice during a training session in San Pedro de Macoris, Dominican Republic, in September at an academy run by Arias & Goodman Sports Agency.

U.S. investors profit from baseball in Dominican By Michael S. Schmidt New York Times News Service

SANTO DOMINGO, Dominican Republic — Investors from the United States believe they have found an exotic new prospect: Latin American baseball players, some as young as 13 and many from impoverished families. Recognizing that majorleague teams are offering multimillion-dollar contracts to some

teenage prospects, the investors are either financing upstart Dominican trainers, known as buscones, or building their own academies. In exchange, the investors are guaranteed significant returns — sometimes as much as 50 percent of their players’ bonuses when they sign with major-league teams. Agents in the United States typically receive 5 percent. See Dominican / D5


D2 Friday, November 19, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

O  A

SCOREBOARD

TELEVISION

PA 150 214 208 245

N CAROLINA 2.5 2.5 NC State Stanford 8 7 CALIFORNIA C Florida 15.5 18 TULANE Virginia Tech 2 2.5 MIAMI-FLORIDA Kansas St 3 2 COLORADO NEVADA 37.5 38 New Mexico St UAB 20 20 Memphis BYU 27.5 29 New Mexico y-Notre Dame 8 8 Army Pittsburgh 3 2.5 S FLORIDA SOUTHERN MISS 5 4 Houston Oklahoma 7 7.5 BAYLOR Nebraska 3 2.5 TEXAS A&M W Virginia 5.5 4.5 LOUISVILLE Usc 3 3 OREGON ST LSU 16.5 16.5 Mississippi Utah 3.5 3 SAN DIEGO ST HAWAII 30 30 San Jose St S CAROLINA 23.5 22 Troy TEXAS 21 21 Fla Atlantic NAVY 15 13 Arkansas St Mid Tenn St 3.5 5 W KENTUCKY Florida Int’l 8 10 UL-LAFAYETTE UL-MONROE 2 1 North Texas* l-Landover, Md.; w-Wrigley Field; y-Yankee Stadium.

PA 185 179 250 257

BASKETBALL Men’s college

ON DECK

TODAY AUTO RACING Noon — NASCAR, Sprint Cup, Ford 400, qualifying, ESPN2.

BASKETBALL 2 p.m. — Men’s college, Coaches vs. Cancer, consolation game, Maryland vs. Illinois, ESPN2.

Today Football: Class 5A state quarterfinals: Corvallis at Mountain View, 7 p.m. Saturday Girls soccer: Class 5A state championship, Summit vs. Mountain View at Hillsboro Stadium, 10:30 a.m.; Class 4A state championship at Liberty High in Hillsboro, Sisters vs. Mazama, 3:30 p.m.

4 p.m. — NBA, Oklahoma City Thunder at Boston Celtics, ESPN.

FOOTBALL NFL

4 p.m. — Men’s college, Coaches vs. Cancer, final, Pittsburgh vs. Texas, ESPN2. 6:30 p.m. — NBA, Chicago Bulls at Dallas Mavericks, ESPN.

FOOTBALL 6:30 p.m. — College, Fresno State at Boise State, ESPN2.

GOLF 9 p.m. — PGA European Tour, Hong Kong Open, third round, Golf Channel.

SATURDAY SOCCER 4:30 a.m. — English Premier League, Arsenal at Tottenham Hotspur, ESPN2.

FOOTBALL 9 a.m. — College, Wisconsin at Michigan, ESPN. 9 a.m. — College, Pittsburgh at South Florida, ESPN2. 9 a.m. — College, Oklahoma State at Kansas, FSNW. 9 a.m. — College, Yale at Harvard, VS. network. 9 a.m. — College, Virginia at Boston College, ESPNU. 12:30 p.m. — College, Virginia Tech at Miami, ESPN. 12:30 p.m. — College, Stanford at Cal, FSNW. 12:30 p.m. — College, Mississippi at LSU, CBS. 12:30 p.m. — College, Illinois at Northwestern, ESPNU. 12:30 p.m. — United Football League, Las Vegas Locomotives at Hartford Colonials, VS. network. 4 p.m. — College, Army vs. Notre Dame, NBC. 4 p.m. — College, Arkansas at Mississippi State, ESPN. 4 p.m. — College, Connecticut at Syracuse, ESPNU. 4 p.m. — College, Missouri at Iowa State, FSNW. 5 p.m. — College, USC at Oregon State, ABC.

AUTO RACING 1 p.m. — NASCAR, Nationwide Series, Ford 300, ESPN2.

BASKETBALL 7 p.m. — NBA, Utah Jazz at Portland Trail Blazers, Comcast SportsNet Northwest.

GOLF 9 p.m. — PGA European Tour, Hong Kong Open, final round, Golf Channel.

SUNDAY FOOTBALL 10 a.m. — NFL, Oakland Raiders at Pittsburgh Steelers, CBS. 1 p.m. — NFL, Indianapolis Colts at New England Patriots, CBS.

NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE ——— AMERICAN CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF N.Y. Jets 7 2 0 .778 208 New England 7 2 0 .778 258 Miami 5 5 0 .500 172 Buffalo 1 8 0 .111 164 South W L T Pct PF Indianapolis 6 3 0 .667 240 Tennessee 5 4 0 .556 241 Jacksonville 5 4 0 .556 196 Houston 4 5 0 .444 217 North W L T Pct PF Baltimore 6 3 0 .667 196 Pittsburgh 6 3 0 .667 200 Cleveland 3 6 0 .333 172 Cincinnati 2 7 0 .222 184 West W L T Pct PF Oakland 5 4 0 .556 235 Kansas City 5 4 0 .556 212 San Diego 4 5 0 .444 239 Denver 3 6 0 .333 203 NATIONAL CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF Philadelphia 6 3 0 .667 257 N.Y. Giants 6 3 0 .667 236 Washington 4 5 0 .444 183 Dallas 2 7 0 .222 194 South W L T Pct PF Atlanta 7 2 0 .778 222 New Orleans 6 3 0 .667 201 Tampa Bay 6 3 0 .667 188 Carolina 1 8 0 .111 104 North W L T Pct PF Chicago 7 3 0 .700 191 Green Bay 6 3 0 .667 221 Minnesota 3 6 0 .333 169 Detroit 2 7 0 .222 215 West W L T Pct PF Seattle 5 4 0 .556 166 St. Louis 4 5 0 .444 160 San Francisco 3 6 0 .333 160 Arizona 3 6 0 .333 175 ——— Thursday’s Game Chicago 16, Miami 0 Sunday’s Games Detroit at Dallas, 10 a.m. Oakland at Pittsburgh, 10 a.m. Washington at Tennessee, 10 a.m. Houston at N.Y. Jets, 10 a.m. Buffalo at Cincinnati, 10 a.m. Arizona at Kansas City, 10 a.m. Cleveland at Jacksonville, 10 a.m. Baltimore at Carolina, 10 a.m. Green Bay at Minnesota, 10 a.m. Atlanta at St. Louis, 1:05 p.m. Seattle at New Orleans, 1:05 p.m. Tampa Bay at San Francisco, 1:05 p.m. Indianapolis at New England, 1:15 p.m. N.Y. Giants at Philadelphia, 5:20 p.m. Monday’s Game Denver at San Diego, 5:30 p.m.

AUTO RACING 10 a.m. — NASCAR, Sprint Cup, Ford 400, ESPN.

FIGURE SKATING 11 a.m. — ISU Grand Prix, Cup of Russia, NBC (taped).

BASKETBALL 2:30 p.m. — Men’s college, Puerto Rico tournament, consolation, teams TBA, ESPN2. 4:30 p.m. — Men’s college, Puerto Rico tournament, final, teams TBA, ESPN2.

SOCCER 5:30 p.m. — Major League Soccer, MLS Cup, FC Dallas vs. Colorado Rapids, ESPN.

RADIO TODAY BASKETBALL 4 p.m. — NBA, Oklahoma City Thunder at Boston Celtics, KICE-AM 940.

FOOTBALL 7 p.m. — High school, Corvallis at Mountain View, KICE-AM 940.

BASKETBALL 2 p.m. — Men’s college, San Jose State at Oregon, KBND-AM 1110. 7 p.m. — NBA, Utah Jazz at Portland Trail Blazers, KBND-AM 1110.

FOOTBALL 5 p.m. — College, USC at Oregon State, KICE-AM 940, KRCO-AM 690.

SUNDAY FOOTBALL 1 p.m. — NFL, Seattle Seahawks at New Orleans Saints, KBNW-FM 96.5.

BASKETBALL 4:30 p.m. — Men’s college, Texas Southern at Oregon State, KICE-AM 940. Listings are the most accurate available. The Bulletin is not responsible for late changes made by TV or radio stations.

PA 188 194 197 252 PA 209 193 229 252 PA 175 151 206 215 PA 146 143 195 202 PA 199 164 198 261

Bears 16, Dolphins 0 Chicago Miami

3 3 10 0 — 16 0 0 0 0 — 0 First Quarter Chi—FG Gould 46, 3:48. Second Quarter Chi—FG Gould 24, 10:27. Third Quarter Chi—FG Gould 50, 11:47. Chi—Forte 2 run (Gould kick), 1:57. A—68,752. ——— Chi Mia First downs 19 10 Total Net Yards 268 187 Rushes-yards 40-135 13-39 Passing 133 148 Punt Returns 4-27 1-7 Kickoff Returns 1-10 3-98 Interceptions Ret. 1-5 1-0 Comp-Att-Int 16-25-1 17-29-1 Sacked-Yards Lost 3-23 6-39 Punts 4-43.8 7-40.1 Fumbles-Lost 1-0 2-0 Penalties-Yards 5-45 5-45 Time of Possession 37:51 22:09 ——— INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Chicago: Forte 25-97, Cutler 4-28, Taylor 11-10. Miami: Thigpen 6-27, Brown 3-10, Williams 3-1, Cobbs 1-1. PASSING—Chicago: Cutler 16-25-1-156. Miami: Thigpen 17-29-1-187. RECEIVING—Chicago: Knox 5-55, Hester 4-41, Olsen 4-40, Forte 2-7, Bennett 1-13. Miami: Hartline 570, Marshall 3-41, Brown 3-19, Moore 2-20, Fasano 1-16, Williams 1-12, Bess 1-9, Cobbs 1-0. MISSED FIELD GOALS—None.

SATURDAY

Thursday’s Games ——— FAR WEST Arizona 83, New Mexico St. 57 CS Monterey Bay 50, Cal Poly 47 Colorado St. 77, Denver 66 North Florida 76, Wyoming 60 Saint Mary’s, Calif. 101, Point Loma 69 Santa Clara 66, Rice 65 Stanford 81, Virginia 60

PA 165 162 182 213

Thursday’s Summary

1 p.m. — NFL, Seattle Seahawks at New Orleans Saints, Fox. 5:15 p.m. — NFL, New York Giants at Philadelphia Eagles, NBC.

IN THE BLEACHERS

College Schedule All Times PST (Subject to change) ——— Thursday’s Games SOUTH Alabama 63, Georgia St. 7 Nicholls St. 27, SE Louisiana 25 FAR WEST Washington 24, UCLA 7 Air Force 35, UNLV 20 Today’s Game FAR WEST Fresno St. (6-3) at Boise St. (9-0), 6:30 p.m. Saturday’s Games EAST Virginia (4-6) at Boston College (5-5), 9 a.m. Duquesne (6-4) at Bryant (7-3), 9 a.m. St. Francis, Pa. (1-9) at Cent. Connecticut St. (7-3), 9 a.m. Villanova (6-4) at Delaware (9-1), 9 a.m. Yale (7-2) at Harvard (6-3), 9 a.m. Penn St. (6-4) vs. Indiana (4-6) at Landover, Md., 9 a.m. Lehigh (8-2) at Lafayette (2-8), 9 a.m. James Madison (5-5) at Maine (4-6), 9 a.m. Towson (1-9) at New Hampshire (6-4), 9 a.m. Columbia (4-5) at Brown (5-4), 9:30 a.m.

Penn (8-1) at Cornell (2-7), 9:30 a.m. Bucknell (1-9) at Holy Cross (5-5), 9:30 a.m. Massachusetts (6-4) at Rhode Island (4-6), 9:30 a.m. Monmouth, N.J. (3-7) at Albany, N.Y. (5-5), 10 a.m. Colgate (6-4) at Fordham (5-5), 10 a.m. Marist (3-7) at Georgetown, D.C. (3-7), 10 a.m. Dartmouth (5-4) at Princeton (1-8), 10 a.m. Wagner (5-5) at Sacred Heart (3-7), 10 a.m. E. Michigan (1-9) at Buffalo (2-8), 11 a.m. Arkansas St. (4-6) at Navy (7-3), 12:30 p.m. Army (6-4) vs. Notre Dame (5-5) at Bronx, N.Y., 4 p.m. Connecticut (5-4) at Syracuse (7-3), 4 p.m. SOUTH VMI (3-7) at Gardner-Webb (2-7), 8:30 a.m. West Virginia (6-3) at Louisville (5-5), 9 a.m. N.C. State (7-3) at North Carolina (6-4) 9 a.m. Troy (5-4) at South Carolina (7-3), 9 a.m. Pittsburgh (5-4) at South Florida (6-3), 9 a.m. Appalachian St. (9-1) at Florida (6-4), 9:30 a.m. Charleston Southern (3-7) at Coastal Carolina (5-5), 10 a.m. Austin Peay (2-8) at E. Kentucky (5-5), 10 a.m. Delaware St. (2-8) at Howard (1-9), 10 a.m. Campbell (3-7) at Morehead St. (4-6), 10 a.m. Davidson (3-7) at Presbyterian (1-9), 10 a.m. Duke (3-7) at Georgia Tech (5-5), 10:30 a.m. S. Carolina St. (8-2) at N. Carolina A&T (1-9), 10:30 a.m. Prairie View (6-4) at Alabama A&M (3-7), 11 a.m. Alcorn St. (5-5) at Jackson St. (7-3), 11 a.m. Georgia Southern (6-4) at Furman (5-5), 11 a.m. Tennessee St. (3-7) at Murray St. (5-5), 11 a.m. Old Dominion (7-3) at N.C. Central (3-7), 11 a.m. The Citadel (2-8) at Samford (4-6), 11 a.m. Norfolk St. (5-5) at Savannah St. (1-9), 11 a.m. Clemson (5-5) at Wake Forest (2-8), 11 a.m. Florida A&M (7-3) vs. Bethune-Cookman (10-0) at Orlando, Fla., 11:30 a.m. W. Carolina (2-8) at Elon (5-5), noon Chattanooga (6-4) at Wofford (8-2), noon. Mississippi (4-6) at LSU (9-1), 12:30 p.m. Stony Brook (6-4) at Liberty (7-3), 12:30 p.m. North Texas (3-7) at Louisiana-Monroe (4-6), 12:30 p.m. Virginia Tech (8-2) at Miami (7-3), 12:30 p.m. UCF (7-3) at Tulane (4-6), 12:30 p.m. Richmond (6-4) at William & Mary (7-3), 12:30 p.m. Hampton (5-5) at Morgan St. (4-6), 1 p.m. Memphis (1-9) at UAB (3-7), 1 p.m. Middle Tennessee (3-6) at W. Kentucky (2-8), 1:15 p.m. Jacksonville St. (9-1) at Tennessee Tech (4-6), 2 p.m. Fla. International (4-5) at Louisiana-Lafayette (2-8), 4 p.m. Arkansas (8-2) at Mississippi St. (7-3), 4 p.m. Tennessee (4-6) at Vanderbilt (2-8), 4:30 p.m. Florida St. (7-3) at Maryland (7-3), 5 p.m. Houston (5-5) at Southern Miss. (7-3), 5 p.m. MIDWEST Oklahoma St. (9-1) at Kansas (3-7), 9 a.m. Wisconsin (9-1) at Michigan (7-3), 9 a.m. Purdue (4-6) at Michigan St. (9-1), 9 a.m. N. Illinois (8-2) at Ball St. (4-7), 10 a.m. N. Dakota St. (7-3) at Missouri St. (4-6), 11 a.m. North Dakota (3-7) at S. Dakota St. (4-6), 11 a.m. Indiana St. (6-4) at S. Illinois (4-6), 11 a.m. N. Iowa (7-3) at W. Illinois (6-4), 11 a.m. Kent St. (4-6) at W. Michigan (4-6), 11 a.m. Ohio St. (9-1) at Iowa (7-3), 12:30 p.m. Illinois (5-5) at Northwestern (7-3), 12:30 p.m. Missouri (8-2) at Iowa St. (5-6), 4 p.m. Rutgers (4-5) at Cincinnati (3-6), 4:30 p.m. SOUTHWEST East Carolina (6-4) at Rice (2-8), 10 a.m. UTEP (6-5) at Tulsa (7-3), 11 a.m. Marshall (4-6) at SMU (5-5), noon Texas St. (4-6) at Sam Houston St. (5-5), noon Northwestern St. (5-5) at Stephen F.Austin (8-2), noon Weber St. (6-4) at Texas Tech (5-5), noon Florida Atlantic (4-5) at Texas (4-6), 12:30 p.m. McNeese St. (6-4) at Cent. Arkansas (6-4), 1 p.m. Panhandle St. (6-4) at Lamar (4-6), 4 p.m. Oklahoma (8-2) at Baylor (7-4), 5 p.m. Nebraska (9-1) at Texas A&M (7-3), 5 p.m. Ark.-Pine Bluff (5-5) at Texas Southern (7-3), 5 p.m. FAR WEST Kansas St. (6-4) at Colorado (4-6), 11 a.m. Montana St. (8-2) at Montana (7-3), 11 a.m. Colorado St. (3-8) at Wyoming (2-9), 11 a.m. Idaho (4-6) at Utah St. (4-6), noon Stanford (9-1) at California (5-5), 12:30 p.m. Idaho St. (1-9) at E. Washington (8-2), 1:05 p.m. New Mexico St. (2-8) at Nevada (9-1), 1:05 p.m. Portland St. (2-8) at N. Arizona (5-5), 2:05 p.m. New Mexico (1-9) at BYU (5-5), 3 p.m. Sacramento St. (6-4) at UC Davis (5-5), 4 p.m. Southern Cal (7-3) at Oregon St. (4-5), 5 p.m. Utah (8-2) at San Diego St. (7-3), 7 p.m. San Jose St. (1-9) at Hawaii (7-3), 7:30 p.m. The AP Top 25 Fared Thursday No. 1 Oregon (10-0) did not play. Next: vs. No. 23 Arizona, Friday, Nov. 26. No. 2 Auburn (11-0) did not play. Next: at No. 10 Alabama, Friday, Nov. 26. No. 3 Boise State (9-0) did not play. Next: vs. Fresno State, today. No. 4 TCU (11-0) did not play. Next: at New Mexico, Saturday, Nov. 27. No. 5 LSU (9-1) did not play. Next: vs. Mississippi, Saturday. No. 6 Wisconsin (9-1) did not play. Next: at Michigan, Saturday. No. 7 Stanford (9-1) did not play. Next: at California, Saturday.

No. 8 Ohio State (9-1) did not play. Next: at No. 21 Iowa, Saturday. No. 9 Nebraska (9-1) did not play. Next: at No. 18 Texas A&M, Saturday. No. 10 Alabama (9-2) beat Georgia State 63-7. Next: vs. No. 2 Auburn, Friday, Nov. 26. No. 11 Michigan State (9-1) did not play. Next: vs. Purdue, Saturday. No. 12 Oklahoma State (9-1) did not play. Next: at Kansas, Saturday. No. 13 Arkansas (8-2) did not play. Next: at No. 22 Mississippi State, Saturday. No. 14 Virginia Tech (8-2) did not play. Next: at No. 24 Miami, Saturday. No. 15 Missouri (8-2) did not play. Next: at Iowa State, Saturday. No. 16 Oklahoma (8-2) did not play. Next: at Baylor, Saturday. No. 17 South Carolina (7-3) did not play. Next: vs. Troy, Saturday. No. 18 Texas A&M (7-3) did not play. Next: vs. No. 9 Nebraska, Saturday. No. 19 Nevada (9-1) did not play. Next: vs. New Mexico State, Saturday. No. 20 Southern Cal (7-3) did not play. Next: at Oregon State, Saturday. No. 21 Iowa (7-3) did not play. Next: vs. No. 8 Ohio State, Saturday. No. 22 Mississippi State (7-3) did not play. Next: vs. No. 13 Arkansas, Saturday. No. 23 Arizona (7-3) did not play. Next: at No. 1 Oregon, Friday, Nov. 26. No. 24 Miami (7-3) did not play. Next: vs. No. 14 Virginia Tech, Saturday. No. 25 Utah (8-2) did not play. Next: at San Diego State, Saturday. PAC-10 CONFERENCE Standings All Times PST Conf. W L Oregon 7 0 Stanford 6 1 USC 4 3 Arizona 4 3 Oregon State 3 3 California 3 4 Washington 3 4 UCLA 2 5 Arizona State 2 5 Washington State 1 7 Thursday’s Game Washington 24, UCLA 7 Saturday’s Games Stanford at Cal, 12:30 p.m. USC at Oregon State, 5 p.m

Ov’ll W L 10 0 9 1 7 3 7 3 4 5 5 5 4 6 4 6 4 6 2 9

Betting Line NFL (Home teams in Caps) Opening Current Underdog Sunday STEELERS 8 7 Raiders JETS 7 7 Texans Ravens 9 10 PANTHERS TITANS 7 7 Redskins COWBOYS 7.5 7 Lions Packers 2.5 3 VIKINGS BENGALS 5 5.5 Bills JAGUARS 2 2 Browns CHIEFS 7 8 Cardinals SAINTS 11.5 12 Seahawks Falcons 3 3 RAMS 49ERS 3 3.5 Bucs PATRIOTS 3 3 Colts EAGLES 3.5 3 Giants Monday CHARGERS 9.5 10 Broncos Bye week: Packers, Saints, Raiders, Chargers. Favorite

College (Home teams in Caps) Opening Current Underdog Today BOISE ST 30.5 31 Fresno St Saturday l-Penn St 11 10 Indiana Tennessee 10.5 9 VANDERBILT SYRACUSE 4 4 Connecticut Florida St 5.5 4.5 MARYLAND Clemson 13.5 13.5 WAKE FOREST GEORGIA TECH 12.5 12 Duke BOSTON COLL 7 6.5 Virginia CINCINNATI 10.5 13 Rutgers MICHIGAN ST 21 20 Purdue Wisconsin 6 4 MICHIGAN Ohio St 3 3 IOWA Missouri 12 11 IOWA ST Oklahoma St 22.5 24 KANSAS Arkansas 4 3 MISSISSIPPI ST No Illinois 14.5 15 BALL ST E Carolina 11 9 RICE W MICHIGAN 4 3 Kent St TULSA 18 17.5 Utep BUFFALO 6.5 7 E Michigan WYOMING 1.5 2.5 Colorado St UTAH ST 2.5 2.5 Idaho SMU 13 14 Marshall w-Illinois 7.5 7.5 Northwestern Favorite

SOUTHWEST Arkansas 75, Grambling St. 52 Baylor 63, Jackson St. 49 Oklahoma 82, Texas Southern 52 MIDWEST Kansas St. 76, Presbyterian 67 Loyola of Chicago 73, E. Illinois 62 Michigan 69, Bowling Green 50 Missouri 66, W. Illinois 61 S. Dakota St. 94, SW Minnesota St. 80 Valparaiso 98, Purdue-N. Central 44 SOUTH Charleston Southern 103, Montreat 85 Florida 105, N. Carolina A&T 55 Florida A&M 64, Savannah St. 53 Florida St. 89, Fla. International 66 Gardner-Webb 78, Va. Intermont 42 Georgia Southern 101, Reinhardt 84 LSU 79, Tenn.-Martin 56 Liberty 82, S. Virginia 49 Lipscomb 104, Austin Peay 101, OT Longwood 104, Virginia-Wise 70 UCF 65, South Florida 59 UNC Wilmington 60, Morehead St. 58 VMI 65, Jacksonville St. 55 EAST Army 63, N.J. Tech 60 Iona 81, Richmond 77, 2OT La Salle 88, Prairie View 74 Providence 77, Morgan St. 55 Stony Brook 66, Fairleigh Dickinson 59 Yale 75, Boston College 67 TOURNAMENTS 2K Sports Classic First Round Pittsburgh 79, Maryland 70 Texas 90, Illinois 84, OT Charleston Classic First Round George Mason 78, Charlotte 56 Georgetown 80, Coastal Carolina 61 N.C. State 85, East Carolina 65 Wofford 79, S.C.-Upstate 61 Honda Puerto Rico Tip-off First Round Minnesota 95, W. Kentucky 77 North Carolina 107, Hofstra 63 Vanderbilt 59, Nebraska 49 West Virginia 84, Davidson 70

NHL Scoring Leaders Through Wednesday’s Games GP G A Steven Stamkos, TB 18 16 14 Sidney Crosby, Pit 20 13 16 Alexander Semin, Was 19 14 11 Alex Ovechkin, Was 19 10 15 Daniel Sedin, Van 18 12 12 Henrik Sedin, Van 18 2 22 Chris Stewart, Col 18 11 11 Eric Staal, Car 18 9 13 Derek Roy, Buf 20 9 13 Corey Perry, Anh 21 9 13 Martin St. Louis, TB 18 8 14 Patrick Sharp, Chi 20 11 10 Claude Giroux, Phi 19 10 11 Brad Richards, Dal 16 8 13 Teemu Selanne, Anh 21 8 13

PTS 30 29 25 25 24 24 22 22 22 22 22 21 21 21 21

SOCCER MLS MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCER All Times PST —— MLS CUP Sunday, Nov. 21: Colorado vs. FC Dallas at Toronto, 5:30 p.m.

DEALS Transactions

Women’s college Thursday’s Games ——— FAR WEST Cal St.-Fullerton 69, San Francisco 66 Idaho St. 68, Air Force 58 Portland 91, Washington St. 80 Portland St. 69, UC Santa Barbara 66, OT SOUTHWEST Oklahoma St. 84, Grambling St. 40 MIDWEST Illinois St. 84, E. Illinois 53 Memphis 80, Indiana 71 Penn St. 96, Oakland, Mich. 89, OT Saint Mary’s, Calif. 70, Drake 46 UCLA 86, Notre Dame 83, 2OT Wis.-Green Bay 69, Wisconsin 43 SOUTH Alabama A&M 66, Stillman 54 Arizona 72, Mississippi 70 Cumberland, Tenn. 66, Tennessee St. 62 Duke 75, Auburn 62 Florida St. 63, Colorado St. 52 Howard 54, Radford 46 Maryland 72, Towson 47 Northwestern 61, W. Kentucky 54 Old Dominion 79, N. Carolina A&T 65 South Carolina 73, Clemson 59 Tennessee 85, Virginia 73 Tennessee Tech 81, Lipscomb 65 Vanderbilt 70, Samford 60 Virginia Tech 73, Elon 66 Wake Forest 95, S. Carolina St. 36 EAST George Washington 63, Coppin St. 42 Hofstra 84, Stony Brook 72 Monmouth, N.J. 74, St. Peter’s 50 Rutgers 54, Princeton 53 TOURNAMENT Preseason Women’s NIT Semifinals DePaul 74, Florida 73 Purdue 73, S. Dakota St. 40

HOCKEY NHL NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE All Times PST ——— EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GP W L OT Pts Philadelphia 20 12 6 2 26 Pittsburgh 20 10 8 2 22 N.Y. Rangers 19 10 8 1 21 New Jersey 19 5 12 2 12 N.Y. Islanders 18 4 11 3 11 Northeast Division GP W L OT Pts Montreal 19 12 6 1 25 Boston 17 11 5 1 23 Ottawa 19 9 9 1 19 Toronto 18 7 8 3 17 Buffalo 20 7 10 3 17 Southeast Division

GP W L OT Pts GF GA 19 14 4 1 29 70 49 19 10 7 2 22 60 63 18 9 9 0 18 58 61 19 7 9 3 17 58 69 17 8 9 0 16 46 44 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Detroit 16 12 3 1 25 58 40 Chicago 21 10 9 2 22 62 59 St. Louis 17 9 5 3 21 44 47 Columbus 16 10 6 0 20 46 41 Nashville 17 8 6 3 19 45 48 Northwest Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Vancouver 18 10 5 3 23 55 46 Colorado 18 10 7 1 21 63 56 Minnesota 17 9 6 2 20 40 39 Calgary 17 7 10 0 14 47 52 Edmonton 17 4 10 3 11 42 71 Pacific Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Los Angeles 17 12 5 0 24 53 39 Anaheim 21 10 8 3 23 52 61 San Jose 18 9 5 4 22 55 49 Phoenix 18 8 5 5 21 50 54 Dallas 17 10 7 0 20 53 49 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. Thursday’s Games Boston 4, Florida 0 Toronto 3, New Jersey 1 Tampa Bay 8, Philadelphia 7 Nashville 3, Montreal 0 Dallas 5, San Jose 4, OT Today’s Games Carolina at Pittsburgh, 4 p.m. Minnesota at Detroit, 4:30 p.m. Los Angeles at Buffalo, 4:30 p.m. Washington at Atlanta, 4:30 p.m. Ottawa at St. Louis, 5 p.m. N.Y. Rangers at Colorado, 6 p.m. Phoenix at Edmonton, 6 p.m. Chicago at Calgary, 6:30 p.m. Columbus at Anaheim, 7 p.m. Saturday’s Games Los Angeles at Boston, 4 p.m. Tampa Bay at Buffalo, 4 p.m. Toronto at Montreal, 4 p.m. Florida at N.Y. Islanders, 4 p.m. Philadelphia at Washington, 4 p.m. Nashville at Carolina, 4 p.m. New Jersey at St. Louis, 5 p.m. N.Y. Rangers at Minnesota, 5 p.m. Colorado at Dallas, 5 p.m. Chicago at Vancouver, 7 p.m. Columbus at San Jose, 7:30 p.m.

Washington Tampa Bay Carolina Atlanta Florida

GF 70 61 57 34 39

GA 49 53 52 62 62

GF 49 51 47 43 53

GA 39 31 60 52 64

BASEBALL American League KANSAS CITY ROYALS—Signed RHP Steven Shell and OF Brett Carroll to minor league contracts. Re-signed RHP Luis Mendoza, RHP Julio Pimentel, C Cody Clark, INF Irving Falu, INF Mario Lisson and INF Jamie Romak to minor-league contracts. MINNESOTA TWINS—Signed manager Ron Gardenhire to a two-year contract extension through the 2013 season. Signed pitching coach Rick Anderson, bench coach Steve Liddle, bullpen coach Rick Stelmaszek, third base coach Scott Ullger, hitting coach Joe Vavra, first base coach Jerry White, athletic trainer Rick McWane, assistant athletic trainer Dave Pruemer and strength and conditioning coordinator Perry Castellano to two-year contracts through the 2012 season. NEW YORK YANKEES—Traded 1B Juan Miranda to Arizona for RHP Scott Allen. National League ATLANTA BRAVES—Named Marty Reed pitching coach for Gwinnett (IL); Rocket Wheeler manager and Mike Alvarez pitching coach for Mississippi (SL); Luis Salazar manager, Derek Botelho pitching coach and Bobby Moore hitting coach for Lynchburg (Carolina); Paul Runge manager, Derrick Lewis pitching coach, Carlos Mendez hitting coach and Ty Cobbs trainer for Rome (SAL); Randy Ingle manager, Gabe Lukert pitching coach and D.J. Boston hitting coach for Danville (Appalachian); Jonathan Schuerholz manager, Vladimir Nunez pitching coach and Brandon Harris trainer for the Braves (GCL). COLORADO ROCKIES—Traded INF Clint Barmes to Houston Astros for RHP Felipe Paulino. FOOTBALL National Football League CINCINNATI BENGALS—Signed DE Victor Adeyanju. Placed DE Jonathan Fanene on injured reserve. CLEVELAND BROWNS—Signed OL Jeff Hansen to the practice squad. NEW YORK JETS—Waived DL Jarron Gilbert. HOCKEY National Hockey League NHL—Suspended Calgary F Olli Jokinen three games for a cross check to the head of Colorado’s Wojtek Wolski in a Nov. 17 game. Suspended Tampa Bay F Mattias Ritola two games for hitting New York Islander Matt Moulson from behind in a Nov. 17 game. CAROLINA HURRICANES—Reassigned D Brett Carson to Charlotte (AHL). EDMONTON OILERS—Placed G Nikolai Khabibulin on injured reserve. Recalled G Martin Gerber from Oklahoma City (AHL). LOS ANGELES KINGS—Placed F Scott Parse on injured reserve. MONTREAL CANADIENS—Recalled D Yannick Weber from Hamilton (AHL). NEW YORK ISLANDERS—Assigned F Jon Sim to Bridgeport (AHL). TAMPA BAY LIGHTNING—Recalled F James Wright and D Matt Roy from Norfolk (AHL). SOCCER Major League Soccer KANSAS CITY WIZARDS—Announced they are changing their name to Sporting Kansas City. COLLEGE LOUISIANA-MONROE—Agreed to terms with Todd Berry, football coach, on a one-year contract extension. WEST ALABAMA—Named Will Hall football coach.

Lightning strike last to knock off Flyers in wild 8-7 affair The Associated Press PHILADELPHIA — Steven Stamkos had his second hat trick of the season, and the Tampa Bay Lightning needed each of his goals — and many more. Stamkos also added two assists, and the Lightning overcame a two-goal deficit to beat Philadelphia 8-7 on Thursday night. The Flyers tied a franchise record for most goals scored in a loss. “I’ve never been part of anything like this, even going back to minor hockey,” said Stamkos, the 20-year-old star who leads the NHL with 19 goals and 35 points. “It was like we were back

in the 80s, everyone was rocking the mustaches on the ice and the goals were coming left right and center. It was a flashback.” Nate Thompson scored the tiebreaking goal at 5:19 of the third period, flicking a rebound off Dana Tyrell’s shot past backup goalie Brian Boucher to complete the 15-goal night. The Lightning trailed on four occasions, but rallied to win for just the third time in November. Philadelphia, whose 10-game points streak ended Tuesday night in Montreal, lost its second straight and also snapped a seven-game home winning streak. Adam Hall, Ryan Malone,

NHL ROUNDUP Brett Clark and Steve Downie also scored for Tampa Bay, and Martin St. Louis had five assists. Nikolay Zherdev scored twice for Philadelphia, and Andreas Nodl, Jeff Carter, Scott Hartnell, Danny Briere and Andrej Meszaros also scored. Stamkos tied Sidney Crosby for the NHL goals lead last season with 51. “He’s automatic,” Thompson said. “Whenever he gets the puck anywhere in the scoring zone, nine times out of 10, it’s going in.”

The teams scored 15 times on 64 shots, or once every 4.2 shots. “It was an exciting game to be a part of,” Stamkos said. “I guess if you were a goalie, it was tough, they probably deserved a better fate. Everything just seemed to find the net. It’s about time we get on a roll.” Also on Thursday: Stars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Sharks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 DALLAS — Mike Ribiero backhanded a rebound past goalie Antti Niemi at 2:52 of overtime after capping Dallas’

two-goal comeback in the final 3 minutes of regulation. James Neal scored the second of his two goals on the night with 2:35 left in regulation, and Ribeiro tied it at 4 off a scramble in front of the net 29 seconds later. Bruins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Panthers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0 BOSTON — Milan Lucic scored Boston’s first three goals, and Tuukka Rask made 41 saves for his first victory of the season after opening 0-4-1. Lucic scored late in the first period, then added two goals in a 15-second span late in the third for his second career hat trick. He has 10 goals this season.

Predators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Canadiens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0 MONTREAL — Pekka Rinne made 30 saves for his second shutout, Marcel Goc scored twice and Nashville ended Montreal’s winning streak at four games. Rinne got his 16th career shutout, blanking Montreal for the second time in just over a year. Maple Leafs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Devils . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 TORONTO — Jonas Gustavsson made 29 saves, and Mikhail Grabovski, Phil Kessel and Kris Versteeg scored to help Toronto improve to 7-8-2 with its second straight victory after an eightgame winless streak.


THE BULLETIN • Friday, November 19, 2010 D3

NFL

Bears shut out Dolphins

COLLEGE FOOTBALL

S  B

“We should wait to see what the next couple of weeks tell us. The Reggie Bush situation is branded in the brain of every voter. We don’t want to be caught looking silly twice.” — Tom Luicci, chairman of the New Jersey Heisman voting chapter, on comparing the situation of Auburn quarterback Cam Newton with that of USC running back Reggie Bush

The Associated Press MIAMI — The Chicago Bears had a ready response for Brandon Marshall’s taunting. Julius Peppers and a swarming defense allowed only 187 yards and a single third-down conversion Thursday night, and the Bears won 16-0 to send the injury-ravaged Miami Dolphins to their second home shutout in 40 years. Marshall drew an early flag for taunting when he flipped the ball at former Denver teammate Jay Cutler, standing in front of the Bears bench. “We don’t need that to fire us up,” Chicago coach Lovie Smith said. “We were fired up when we stepped on the field.” Marshall also was penalized for an illegal block and dropped two passes before he left the game in the second quarter after aggravating a sore right hamstring. He wore street clothes on the sideline in the second half and didn’t talk to reporters after the game. Miami’s already depleted offensive line lost center Cory Procter with a left knee injury. And with third-string quarterback Tyler Thigpen taking six sacks in his first NFL start since 2008, the Dolphins (5-5) were no match for a Bears defense that took over the NFL lead in points allowed per game. “Offensively we’re embarrassed what we put on the field,” Thigpen said. “I put the blame on me.” Playing in Miami for the first time since losing Super Bowl 41 to Indianapolis, the Bears (73) won for the third time in 12 days and moved a half-game ahead of Green Bay atop the NFC North. Peppers had three sacks and Charles Tillman recorded an interception for the Bears, who earned their first shutout since Nov. 19, 2006, against the Jets.

COLLEGE FOOTBALL ROUNDUP

Huskies grind out victory over Bruins The Associated Press SEATTLE — Jake Locker scored on a 3-yard run in the first half, and Quinton Richardson returned an interception 28 yards for a touchdown with 6:22 left to help Washington keep its fledgling bowl hopes alive with an ugly 24-7 win over UCLA on Thursday night. With Locker trying to protect a cracked rib, the Huskies (4-6, 3-4 Pac-10) turned to the combo of running back Chris Polk and freshman Jesse Callier. Polk carried 25 times for a career-high 138 yards and capped the second-best night of his career with a 2-yard TD plunge with 4:24 left. Callier added 110 yards as the Huskies ran for a season-high 253 yards against the Bruins (46, 2-5). Erik Folk kicked a 27-yard field goal on the first possession of the second half to give Washington a 10-7 lead. That remained in jeopardy until Richardson stepped in front of Darius Bell’s pass. In the final home game of his career, Locker was just 10 of 21 passing for 68 yards and an interception. He carried just four times for 9 yards as Washington coach Steve Sarkisian tried to protect the quarterback’s tender ribs that kept him on the sideline Nov. 6 against Oregon. Also on Thursday: No. 10 Alabama. . . . . . . . . . . . . .63 Georgia State . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 TUSCALOOSA, Ala. — Greg McElroy completed 12 of 13 passes for 159 yards and two touchdowns and Alabama routed Georgia State. It’s the most points for the Crimson Tide (9-2) since a 66-3 win over Vanderbilt in 1979. The game against a Football Championship Subdivision team competing in its first year of college football was predictably little more than a warmup for next week’s showdown with No. 2 Auburn.

Dave Martin / The Associated Press

Auburn quarterback Cam Newton celebrates with teammates and fans after a 49-31 win over Georgia in Auburn, Ala., Saturday. Newton is the current favorite to win the Heisman Trophy, but allegations about his recruitment to Mississippi State are making some Heisman voters pause.

Allegations against Auburn QB complicate Heisman Trophy voting By Bill Pennington New York Times News Service

The 925 ballots for the 2010 Heisman Trophy were mailed Monday from New York. The voters, mostly journalists, have until Dec. 6 to return the ballot, although in recent years the vast majority have been submitted online. The three-week period between mailed and submitted ballots has traditionally been a time for Heisman voters to ruminate over the leading contenders, especially as they watched pivotal lateNovember games. But in this college football season, there is one runaway contender in the Heisman Trophy chase: Auburn quarterback Cam Newton. And while voters will closely watch Newton’s final games against Alabama and South Carolina, they are also keeping a close eye on a news story that is changing almost daily. Federal, state and NCAA investigators are looking into Newton’s recruitment a year ago because of allegations that he was being shopped to Mississippi State for a six-figure amount. There are also news reports that Newton left Florida in 2008 because of three instances of academic cheating.

How will they vote? Although there is a great deal of uncertainty about the outcome of the investigations and how long they will take, interviews this week with a cross section of Heisman voters have made three things evident: • If the vote were held this week, Newton would be the likely winner by a substantial margin. • A growing sector of the voters, however, is increasingly troubled by the reports about Newton and probably won’t vote for him unless he is exonerated before Dec. 6. If additional damaging reports about Newton surface in the next two weeks, this sector of voters will expand; many voters said they were waiting for more information before making a final decision. • Reggie Bush’s unprecedented forfeiture of his 2005 Heisman in September is weighing heavily on the minds of voters, who are nervous about awarding another Heisman that could be revoked in the future.

Quotable “As long as Cam Newton is eligible to play, he gets my full consideration,” said John Hunt, a Heisman voter from The Oregonian newspaper. “And if the season were to end right now, he’d get my No. 1 vote. The Heisman Trust can take away a trophy, but as voters, we’re not in that business.” Chuck Hathcock, the sports editor of The Grenada Star in Mississippi, who also has a Heisman vote, expressed an opposing opinion. “Sooner or later, we have to send a message about what’s right and what’s wrong,” Hathcock said. “People tell me that the kinds of things we’re hearing about with Cam Newton are just part of college football now. But I say it’s not a part of college football, and if it is, we need to stop it.” Tom Luicci, chairman of the New Jersey Heisman voting chapter, said any voter who had made up his mind already “isn’t being fair.” “We should wait to see what the next couple of weeks tell us,” Luicci, who writes for The Star-Ledger of Newark, said. “The Reggie Bush situation is branded in the brain of every voter. We don’t want to be caught looking silly twice.” (Company policy does not allow New York Times reporters to vote for athletic awards.)

The Heisman standard? There is no comparable Heisman precedent to what the voters are faced with this year. The trophy, first awarded by New York’s Downtown Athletic Club in 1935, has few candidacy guidelines. Although good citizenship, personal integrity and principled behavior were never official guide-

lines for winning the trophy, in the first 30 years of the award, such virtues were valued by the voters. Newspaper accounts of the candidates’ lives on and off the field shaped voters perceptions since many of them — in an era before nationally televised games — had never seen some top candidates play. But when more games were broadcast in the 1970s, and with the explosion of games on cable television after the late 1980s, the Heisman race evolved into much more of an assessment of football accomplishment.

Looking for precedent There were a few unusual circumstances. Johnny Rodgers of Nebraska was the leading candidate in 1972, but a few years earlier, when he was 18, he had been at the wheel of the getaway car in a gas station robbery. He received probation for the crime but that did not make him NCAA ineligible. Still, many voters kept Rodgers off their Heisman ballot because of his past, although he won the trophy in a relatively close vote. Multiple Heisman winners have run afoul of the law after winning the trophy, most notably O.J. Simpson. But the list also includes the 1959 winner, Billy Cannon, who was jailed for counterfeiting, and the 1978 winner, Billy Sims, who served jail time for failing to make child support payments. What set Bush apart is that he was ruled ineligible by the NCAA for his Heisman Trophy season. And it is the possibility that Newton’s 2010 season could be eventually judged similarly that has some Heisman voters worried.

What to do with Newton “Obviously a voter can’t ignore what’s going on — eligibility is in question and the story changes every day,” said Jenni Carlson of The Oklahoman. “I feel fortunate that we’ve got some time to wait for more information or a resolution. And if the investigation isn’t swift and nothing has changed, I’m going to be wrestling with what to do. You want to give the trophy to someone who is going to have it forever.” According to Harry King of The Arkansas News, the recent reports about Newton have yet to be substantiated. Assessing his Heisman decision, King wrote, “If damaging facts are still unavailable, Newton gets my vote.” A website dedicated to the Heisman, StiffArmTrophy.com, conducts weekly straw polls of Heisman voters and last week it also asked voters if the allegations against Newton would affect their vote. Of the 58 voters who responded to the question, 46 said the allegations would make no difference. Newton finished first in the poll of 66 voters. Another website, heismanpundit.com, also conducted a poll this week that had Newton in the first position. Chris Huston, the publisher of HeismanPundit, said he thought Newton had lost about 20 percent of his support since the first stories about his recruitment surfaced. “If the Newton pay-for-play story stays alive, if there is this drip, drip, drip of new details, it could make the final vote closer,” said Huston, who has a Heisman vote. “But overall, I think a lot of guys are just going to hold their nose and vote. They feel like they don’t have a viable alternative.”

And finally... The last variable in the countdown to Dec. 6 is the chance that Newton may not play well in his final two games. “We were looking at a runaway victory and that’s not the case now,” Kari Chisholm, founder of StiffArmTrophy, said. “He might not survive a mediocre game. I still think he’ll win, but I guess there’s a reason the ballots aren’t due until Dec. 6.”

Football • Beavers, Cougs to meet in Seattle in 2011: Washington State has moved its 2011 matchup against Oregon State from its home field in Pullman to Seattle’s Qwest Field. Washington State athletic director Bill Moos made the announcement on Thursday. The Cougars were originally schedule to play UNLV on Sept. 10 in Seattle. That game will now be played in Pullman. The Beavers and Cougars will meet on Oct. 22. Moos says the game will cap a week of Washington State activities in the Seattle area. Moos says his intent is to have at least one conference game in Seattle every year. • Attorney says Rogers made ‘stupid decision’ with text: An attorney for Kenny Rogers says his client knows he made “a stupid decision” when he sent a fellow Mississippi State booster a text of Cecil Newton’s payment plan to secure his son’s commitment to the Bulldogs. In a phone interview with The Associated Press Thursday, Doug Zeit says Rogers sent the text after Cecil Newton insisted he do it. Zeit says Rogers sent the text to Bill Bell requesting $80,000 the day after Cam Newton signed with MSU, $50,000 30 days later and another $50,000 30 days after that. Zeit says no money ever changed hands. • Commish proud of Vick: NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell says Michael Vick is doing all the right things and he’s proud of the way the Philadelphia Eagles’ quarterback has turned his life around after serving time in prison for his role in a dogfighting ring. Speaking to the New York Daily News on a train ride to Philadelphia, Goodell said Thursday the 30-year-old Vick is doing a terrific job on and off the field. Goodell says society needs more success stories and he’s hoping Vick will be one, a person who made tragic error and overcomes it. • Eagles go even greener: The Philadelphia Eagles are taking their gridiron off the grid. The team said Thursday that it will add wind turbines, solar panels and a cogeneration plant at Lincoln Financial Field over the next year, a combination that will make the stadium selfsufficient and let the Eagles sell some power back to the electric grid. Eagles owner Jeffrey Lurie said the plan was part of the Eagles commitment to be a socially responsible organization. “Owning an NFL team, I think you have an opportunity to lead the way,” Lurie told The Associated Press. “It’s a public building seen across the country and, sometimes, the world.” Under the plan, approximately 80 spiral-shaped wind turbines will be mounted on the stadium’s roof and 2,500 solar panels attached to the stadium’s facade. Together, they will contribute an estimated 30 percent to the total energy production.

Baseball • Twins give extension to

manager: The Minnesota Twins have signed newly minted American League Manager of the Year Ron Gardenhire to a two-year contract extension through the 2013 season. The Twins announced the deal Thursday, the day after Gardenhire was voted the league’s top manager for the first time in his nine-year career. The Twins also gave two-year extensions through the 2012 season to Gardenhire’s entire coaching staff. The Twins have won the AL Central six times since he took over in 2002. Minnesota went 94-68 this year before being swept in the first round of the playoffs by the New York Yankees.

Basketball • Five charged in Kansas ticket scandal: Federal prosecutors have charged five former University of Kansas employees with conspiring to steal more than $2 million in tickets to university athletic events. Among those charged was Charlette Blubaugh, the former associate athletic director in charge of the ticket office. Prosecutors say she began stealing season tickets in 2005, then gave them to others to sell. Prosecutors say the employees made between $3 million and $5 million.

Auto racing • Pressure on NASCAR Sprint Cup points leader going into finale: Look out, Denny Hamlin. Jimmie Johnson and Kevin Harvick are right behind you — and they’re making sure you know it. With the title up for grabs in Sunday’s season finale, Johnson and Harvick are doing their best to turn up the heat on NASCAR’s points leader. Stuck on a podium between the two drivers trying to stop him from winning his first NASCAR title, Hamlin didn’t participate in the generally good-natured — but pointed — mudslinging being tossed at him from both sides. “He definitely seems like the most nervous,” Harvick said, nodding at Hamlin. “For us, I mean, we have nothing to lose. This guy does,” Johnson said, putting his arm around Hamlin.

Cycling • 2012 Tour to stage opening three days in Belgium: The 2012 Tour de France will spend its first three days in eastern Belgium, starting with a time trial along the river Meuse in Liege. It will be the second time in eight years that the Tour starts in Liege. After the prologue, the first stage will be a hilly trek through the verdant Ardennes region, an early opportunity for breakaways in the three-week event. The 120-mile first stage will start from Liege and make a big loop in eastern Belgium before finishing in Seraing. The second stage will leave from the Liege suburb of Vise, but organizers are unsure if the race will then head into the Netherlands, Germany or Luxembourg, or head straight into France. — From wire reports

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D4 Friday, November 19, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

NBA SCOREBOARD

NBA ROUNDUP

EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division Boston New Jersey New York Toronto Philadelphia

W 9 4 4 3 2

L 2 7 8 9 10

Orlando Atlanta Miami Charlotte Washington

W 8 8 7 4 3

L 3 4 4 7 7

Chicago Cleveland Indiana Milwaukee Detroit

W 6 5 5 5 4

L 4 5 5 6 8

Pct .818 .364 .333 .250 .167

GB — 5 5½ 6½ 7½

L10 8-2 3-7 3-7 2-8 2-8

Str W-3 L-1 W-1 W-1 L-5

Home 5-0 2-4 1-4 1-3 1-4

Away 4-2 2-3 3-4 2-6 1-6

Conf 7-1 2-6 3-3 3-4 2-7

Away 2-1 5-1 2-2 3-3 0-5

Conf 5-2 5-2 5-2 3-4 2-7

Away 1-3 3-1 2-2 2-3 2-5

Conf 2-2 5-4 3-3 4-1 1-4

Southeast Division Pct .727 .667 .636 .364 .300

GB — ½ 1 4 4½

L10 7-3 6-4 7-3 4-6 3-7

Str W-3 W-2 W-2 W-1 L-1

Home 6-2 3-3 5-2 1-4 3-2

Central Division Pct .600 .500 .500 .455 .333

GB — 1 1 1½ 3

L10 6-4 5-5 5-5 5-5 4-6

Str L-1 W-1 W-1 L-1 L-2

Home 5-1 2-4 3-3 3-3 2-3

WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division New Orleans San Antonio Dallas Memphis Houston

W 9 9 7 4 3

L 1 1 3 8 8

Utah Oklahoma City Portland Denver Minnesota

W 8 7 8 6 4

L 4 4 5 6 9

L.A. Lakers Golden State Phoenix Sacramento L.A. Clippers

W 10 7 6 3 1

L 2 4 6 7 12

Pct .900 .900 .700 .333 .273

GB — — 2 6 6½

L10 9-1 9-1 7-3 3-7 3-7

Str W-1 W-8 L-1 L-4 L-2

Home 6-0 5-1 4-2 2-4 1-3

Away 3-1 4-0 3-1 2-4 2-5

Conf 6-1 5-1 4-3 4-5 1-6

Away 5-2 3-1 4-4 2-5 1-7

Conf 2-4 4-3 4-4 5-4 2-4

Away 4-1 2-4 3-4 2-2 0-7

Conf 7-2 4-1 5-4 1-4 1-9

Northwest Division Pct .667 .636 .615 .500 .308

GB — ½ ½ 2 4½

L10 8-2 6-4 5-5 5-5 3-7

Str W-1 W-2 W-2 L-1 W-1

Home 3-2 4-3 4-1 4-1 3-2

Paciic Division Pct .833 .636 .500 .300 .077

GB — 2½ 4 6 9½

L10 Str 8-2 W-2 6-4 W-1 5-5 L-2 3-7 L-6 1-9 L-8 ——— Thursday’s Games

Indiana 107, L.A. Clippers 80 Portland 86, Denver 83

Home 6-1 5-0 3-2 1-5 1-5

Orlando 105, Phoenix 89 Today’s Games

Oklahoma City at Boston, 4 p.m. Houston at Toronto, 4 p.m. Charlotte at Miami, 4:30 p.m. Cleveland at New Orleans, 5 p.m. Chicago at Dallas, 6:30 p.m. New York at Golden State, 7:30 p.m.

Milwaukee at Philadelphia, 4 p.m. Memphis at Washington, 4 p.m. L.A. Lakers at Minnesota, 5 p.m. San Antonio at Utah, 6 p.m. New Jersey at Sacramento, 7 p.m. Saturday’s Games

Phoenix at Charlotte, 4 p.m. Miami at Memphis, 5 p.m. Oklahoma City at Milwaukee, 5:30 p.m. New Jersey at Denver, 6 p.m. New York at L.A. Clippers, 7:30 p.m.

Orlando at Indiana, 4 p.m. Dallas at Atlanta, 5 p.m. Cleveland at San Antonio, 5:30 p.m. Utah at Portland, 7 p.m. All Times PST

SUMMARIES Thursday’s summaries

(Nelson 12). Total Fouls—Phoenix 23, Orlando 27. Technicals—Orlando defensive three second 2. A—18,846 (18,500).

Blazers 86, Nuggets 83

Pacers 107, Clippers 80

DENVER (83) Anthony 5-15 8-10 18, S.Williams 1-1 0-0 2, Nene 3-8 6-7 12, Billups 3-8 4-4 13, Afflalo 5-11 2-2 16, Harrington 6-11 2-2 17, Forbes 2-7 0-1 4, Lawson 0-4 1-2 1, Ely 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 25-65 23-28 83. PORTLAND (86) Batum 5-14 2-4 14, Aldridge 9-20 6-8 24, Camby 2-10 1-2 5, Miller 8-15 0-0 16, Matthews 8-18 1-4 20, Fernandez 2-6 0-2 6, Cunningham 0-2 1-2 1, Johnson 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 34-85 11-22 86. Denver 28 17 26 12 — 83 Portland 16 27 26 17 — 86 3-Point Goals—Denver 10-26 (Afflalo 4-8, Harrington 3-7, Billups 3-7, Lawson 0-1, Anthony 0-1, Forbes 0-2), Portland 7-22 (Matthews 3-8, Fernandez 2-6, Batum 2-7, Miller 0-1). Fouled Out—Anthony. Rebounds—Denver 43 (Afflalo 11), Portland 64 (Camby 14). Assists—Denver 18 (Billups, Lawson 5), Portland 18 (Miller 6). Total Fouls—Denver 26, Portland 20. Technicals—Portland defensive three second 2. A—20,532 (19,980).

Magic 105, Suns 89

L.A. CLIPPERS (80) Aminu 3-9 6-8 12, Griffin 6-13 0-3 12, Jordan 0-7 0-0 0, Bledsoe 3-5 2-2 8, Gordon 5-17 8-12 19, Foye 2-6 0-0 4, Gomes 0-4 2-2 2, Smith 2-5 0-0 4, Collins 0-2 0-0 0, Butler 1-3 0-0 2, Cook 3-6 4-4 11, Warren 2-4 2-2 6. Totals 27-81 24-33 80. INDIANA (107) Granger 6-14 6-7 22, McRoberts 1-4 1-2 3, Hibbert 9-13 0-0 18, Ford 4-11 3-4 11, Rush 4-7 2-2 14, George 1-4 1-1 3, Hansbrough 3-4 1-2 7, Price 6-10 0-0 14, Foster 1-1 0-0 2, Posey 4-7 0-0 12, D.Jones 0-2 1-2 1. Totals 39-77 15-20 107. L.A. Clippers 25 18 16 21 — 80 Indiana 22 31 27 27 — 107 3-Point Goals—L.A. Clippers 2-9 (Cook 1-1, Gordon 1-3, Foye 0-1, Warren 0-1, Butler 0-1, Gomes 0-2), Indiana 14-26 (Rush 4-5, Granger 4-6, Posey 4-7, Price 2-6, George 0-1, Ford 0-1). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—L.A. Clippers 50 (Griffin, Aminu, Bledsoe 8), Indiana 56 (Hibbert, Hansbrough 8). Assists—L.A. Clippers 10 (Bledsoe 5), Indiana 24 (Price 6). Total Fouls—L.A. Clippers 18, Indiana 25. Technicals—L.A. Clippers defensive three second 2. A—12,459 (18,165).

PHOENIX (89) Hill 8-9 5-6 21, Turkoglu 0-8 2-2 2, Frye 4-8 0-0 10, Dragic 4-9 2-5 10, J.Richardson 3-7 0-2 7, Warrick 1-5 3-4 5, Dudley 3-5 5-5 11, Childress 2-5 3-3 7, Siler 1-2 0-0 2, Barron 0-1 2-4 2, Clark 5-9 2-2 12. Totals 31-68 24-33 89. ORLANDO (105) Q.Richardson 6-10 0-0 15, Lewis 6-9 0-0 13, Howard 8-9 4-8 20, Nelson 6-8 1-1 15, Carter 5-8 1-4 13, Pietrus 4-8 0-0 10, Bass 1-5 3-4 5, Duhon 1-4 0-0 2, Gortat 1-6 2-2 4, Anderson 1-5 4-4 6, Allen 1-2 0-0 2. Totals 40-74 1523 105. Phoenix 15 19 25 30 — 89 Orlando 31 31 29 14 — 105 3-Point Goals—Phoenix 3-18 (Frye 2-5, J.Richardson 1-3, Warrick 0-1, Dudley 0-1, Dragic 0-3, Turkoglu 0-5), Orlando 10-25 (Q.Richardson 3-7, Nelson 2-3, Carter 2-4, Pietrus 2-5, Lewis 1-2, Anderson 0-2, Duhon 0-2). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Phoenix 41 (Clark, Frye 6), Orlando 47 (Howard 12). Assists—Phoenix 15 (Dragic 4), Orlando 25

Through Thursday’s Games SCORING G FG FT PTS AVG Durant, OKC 11 101 88 308 28.0 Ellis, GOL 11 110 59 292 26.5 Bryant, LAL 12 105 88 316 26.3 Rose, CHI 10 101 40 255 25.5 Anthony, DEN 12 106 67 289 24.1 Wade, MIA 11 87 79 264 24.0 Nowitzki, DAL 10 89 56 236 23.6 Gay, MEM 12 113 35 281 23.4 Westbrook, OKC 11 81 92 256 23.3 Gordon, LAC 11 82 80 255 23.2 Martin, HOU 11 72 89 254 23.1 Gasol, LAL 12 111 53 275 22.9 Scola, HOU 11 102 48 252 22.9 Williams, UTA 12 88 73 267 22.3 Beasley, MIN 12 106 41 266 22.2 Granger, IND 10 79 37 221 22.1 James, MIA 11 79 77 243 22.1 Stoudemire, NYK 12 95 64 259 21.6

LEADERS

Matthews, Aldridge lead Blazers to victory With no Brandon Roy, Portland finds a way to defeat Denver, 86-83

Greg Wahl-Stephens / The Associated Press

Denver Nuggets’ Carmelo Anthony shoots against Portland Trail Blazers’ Wesley Mathews (2) during the first half of Thursday’s game in Portland. and Arron Afflalo had 16. “The intensity and competition was first class, the defense on both ends was first class,” Denver coach George Karl said. “We just hurt ourselves by not rebounding and with a few too many basic turnovers.” Denver had a 45-43 halftime lead following a first half in which both teams had one big run. The Nuggets scored 17 unanswered points during the final 4:11 of the first quarter to take a 28-16 lead into the second quarter. The Blazers responded by starting the second quarter with a 13-2 spurt, as Matthews hit three consecutive 3pointers during a 63-second stretch. The Nuggets maintained a twopoint lead after three quarters, but the Blazers started the fourth quarter with a 10-3 run. Portland led by as many as seven points late before holding on. Afflalo missed two 3-point attempts during the final 10 seconds that would have tied the game. Notes: During the first half, Portland took 20 more shots than Denver, but the Nuggets made it up at the free throw line with 19 attempts to the Blazers’ six. ... Portland plays

Portland Continued from D1 Oden’s rookie season was put off by microfracture surgery on his other knee. Then a little more than a month into last season he broke his left kneecap, which also required surgery and has kept him off the court ever since. Because of his apparent predisposition toward injury, Oden has often been compared to Bowie, fairly or unfairly considered one of the NBA’s biggest draft busts. The Blazers took the 7-foot-1 Bowie with the No. 2 overall pick, passing on Michael Jordan. While Bowie played in 76 games his rookie season, averaging 10 points and 8.6 rebounds, he appeared in just 63 games over the next four seasons because of injuries. He missed the entire 1987-88 season and in all he had five operations on his legs. Then there was Walton, the No. 1 overall draft pick in 1974 who, like Oden, was hailed as a franchise player. But his first two seasons were beset by injury, with a broken nose, leg, foot and wrist. Walton’s legacy ultimately turned in the 1976-77 season when the Blazers won the NBA championship. No one has seen enough of Oden to justly call him a bust on the court, which Walton’s story shows. But there are questions about whether he’ll ever live up to the potential he showed when the Blazers drafted him. Portland selected Oden out of Ohio State over Kevin Durant, who went to the Oklahoma City franchise and has blossomed into one of the NBA’s best players. Teamed with guard Brandon Roy and forward LaMarcus Aldridge, who were already lifting the Blazers out of the so-called Jail Blazers era, Oden was seen as the final component of a trilogy that would take Portland back to the NBA finals.

Bruce Ely / The Oregonian via The Associated Press

Portland Trail Blazers’ Martell Webster, left, comforts Greg Oden, center, after a knee injury in the first half of a game against the Houston Rockets in Portland on Dec. 5, 2009. Oden will be missing the rest of this season with a different knee injury. Those hopes were dashed when shortly before his rookie season started, the team announced Oden would have microfracture surgery on his right knee. Oden, always chided about how his mature looks belie his actual age, was still a looming presence that first season, making regular personal appearances and even keeping a popular blog. He even did some campaigning for Barack Obama’s presidential bid. He showed promise the next season when he played in 61 games, averaging 8.9 points and seven rebounds. But he was at times moody with lofty expectations clearly weighing on him. He really began to blossom last season when he became a starter and was aver-

Texas tops Illinois in overtime The Associated Press

The Associated Press PORTLAND — Wesley Matthews is helping the injury-depleted Portland Trail Blazers pull out some close victories. Playing without leading scorer Brandon Roy and a day after learning it was losing Greg Oden for the season to knee surgery, Matthews had his first career double-double with 20 points and 10 rebounds and Portland rallied in the fourth quarter to beat the Denver Nuggets 86-83 Thursday night. “Whatever it takes to help the team win. Everybody has to step up, including me,” said Matthews, who is filling in for Roy. “I love that we won. I love winning. We fought together as a team and got a big time win tonight.” LaMarcus Aldridge scored 24 points and grabbed 10 rebounds, and Andre Miller scored 12 of his 16 points in the second half for Portland (8-5), which outscored Denver 17-12 during the fourth quarter. The Blazers have won two straight since Roy was sidelined with a left knee injury. Roy isn’t expected to return to the lineup until Nov. 26 in a game against New Orleans. Matthews, obtained this summer as a free agent, has been a sensational starter in Roy’s absence. He scored 30 points in a 100-99 win at Memphis on Tuesday. Matthews is averaging 25 points and seven rebounds in two Portland starts. Aldridge was a steady force throughout. The 6-foot-11 forward scored 10 points during the second quarter, and had at least four points in every period. The Blazers, who outrebounded Denver 48-35 and outshot the Nuggets 85-65, aren’t hanging their heads in Roy’s absence. “We’ve got a good team with good players so we can still win games,” Portland forward Nicolas Batum said. The Blazers’ defense was also able to neutralize Denver’s leading scorer, Carmelo Anthony. He led the Nuggets (6-6) with 18 points, but shot just five of 15 from the field and fouled out with 3:35 remaining in the game. “We tried to attack him,” Batum said. “We know that he doesn’t want to play defense.” Matthews and Batum were largely responsible for guarding Anthony during his 35 minutes of action. Anthony ended up fouling out on an offensive foul, bowling over Batum. “Every time he goes left, I know he’s going to spin. Almost every time,” said Batum, who added, “I was surprised they called it.” Marcus Camby led Portland with 14 rebounds. Anthony was one of five Denver players to score in double figures. Reserve Al Harrington scored 17 points,

MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL ROUNDUP

aging 11.7 points, 8.8 rebounds and 2.4 blocks. But then he was hurt in a game against Houston in early December, crashing to the floor with his kneecap visibly contorted. Now the new injury, which the Blazers insist is not related to the kneecap. “This is really tough for us to have to sit here and talk about someone like Greg, who doesn’t deserve what’s going on with him because he’s worked his tail off to get to where he’s at to get ready to play basketball,” Blazers trainer Jay Jensen said, at times pausing to regain his composure. Oden, who could not immediately be reached for comment, will undergo the microfracture surgery on Friday at the Steadman Hawkins Clinic in Vail, Colo.

only one game during the next seven days, Saturday at home against Utah. ... Anthony has 52 rebounds during his past four games. ... Portland is 8-0 this season when holding the opponent to less than 100 points. ... The Blazers were just 11 of 22 from the free throw line. Also on Thursday: Magic. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .105 Suns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .89 ORLANDO, Fla. — Jameer Nelson had 15 points and a season-high 12 assists, and Orlando easily handled a Phoenix team playing without Steve Nash. Dwight Howard added 20 points and 12 rebounds, and every starter scored in double digits for the Magic, who built a 32-point lead and blew past the Suns from the opening tip. Pacers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107 Clippers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .80 INDIANAPOLIS — Danny Granger scored 22 points and Roy Hibbert had 18 points and eight rebounds for short-handed Indiana. Brandon Rush and A.J. Price each added 14 points for the Pacers, who shot 51 percent from the field to make up for the absence of starters Darren Collison and Mike Dunleavy.

McMillan said he spoke to Oden on Wednesday. “As I’ve talked to him, it is a challenge, and we all are faced with different challenges throughout our lives. He’s just unfortunate to have situations over the last few years that haven’t been good,” McMillan said. “He has to stay positive, he has to keep believing, he has to keep working to get back on the floor. The main thing is he has to stay positive.” It is unclear whether Oden will ever play for the Blazers again. The team decided late last month not to extend his rookie contract. That means that on July 1 Oden will become a restricted free agent and he can deal with other teams, but Portland will have the right to match any offers. There is an argument that even as a backup, Oden’s size and the skills he has been able to show make him a commodity. Then again, it’s difficult to return from even one microfracture surgery, and Oden will have had two. Denver forward Kenyon Martin is the only NBA player to return from the procedure on both knees. For the time being, Oden’s injury was still sinking in with both his team and its faithful fans. “Oden” was a trending topic on Twitter on Thursday. Reid Bamford, a Blazers fan from Beaverton said he doesn’t blame the team for selecting Oden over Durant, and he doesn’t necessarily buy into the whole curse thing. “Disappointment,” was his one-word summation. “Structurally, he’s got a problem,” Bamford said. “I don’t think those legs can hold up to the weight of his body.” The front page of the Blazers’ official website on Thursday splashed the word “Courage.” It went on to say: “The courage for us to not give up. The courage for us to not give in. The courage for us to stand together.”

NEW YORK — Texas’ two young frontcourt players had impressive numbers Thursday night. When it came to overtime, though, the senior man up front made sure the Longhorns took the lead for good. Sophomore Jordan Hamilton had 25 points on ninefor-17 shooting and freshman Tristan Thompson had 20 points on eight-of-11 shooting, four assists and five blocks for Texas in the semifinals of the 2K Sports Classic. Senior Gary Johnson had 16 points, four and an assist in the Longhorns’ 8-0 run to start the overtime of their 9084 victory over No. 13 Illinois. All three of them had seven rebounds. “They were terrific, those guys have done a good job for us,” Texas coach Rick Barnes said of Hamilton and Thompson. “You don’t understand how hard (Illinois’ Demetri) McCamey is to guard and we went after him all night long. ... There’s little subtle games that went on in the game that won’t show up in the stat sheet that were huge.” The Longhorns (3-0) will face No. 5 Pittsburgh in tonight’s championship game of the tournament that benefits Coaches vs. Cancer. The Panthers advanced with a 7970 victory over Maryland at Madison Square Garden. McCamey had 22 points to lead Illinois (3-1). Also on Thursday: No. 3 Kansas State . . . . . . . 76 Presbyterian. . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 MANHATTAN, Kan. — Jacob Pullen scored 15 points, leading Kansas State to a toughvictory over Presbyterian. Up 14 at the half, Kansas State (3-0) couldn’t shake Presbyterian. It was 69-65 with 2:30 remaining before K-State pulled away. No. 5 Pittsburgh. . . . . . . . . . 79 Maryland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70 NEW YORK — Freshman Talib Zanna had 14 points and 12 rebounds to lead Pittsburgh (4-0) past Maryland in the semifinals of the 2K Sports Classic. No. 8 North Carolina . . . . . 107 Hofstra . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico — Harrison Barnes scored 19 points in North Carolina’s win in the opening round of the Puerto Rico Tip-Off. Barnes made all four threepoint attempts and scored all his points in the first half to help the Tar Heels (2-0) storm out to a 25-point lead. No. 9 Florida . . . . . . . . . . . . 105 N. Carolina A&T . . . . . . . . . . 55 GAINESVILLE, Fla. — Chandler Parsons and Kenny Boynton led eight players in double figures with 16 points apiece, and Florida beat North Carolina A&T. The Gators (2-1) bounced back from an 18-point loss two nights early to fourth-ranked Ohio State and eclipsed the 100point mark for the first time since 2007. No. 15 Missouri . . . . . . . . . . 66 W. Illinois . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 COLUMBIA, Mo. — Laurence Bowers had nine points, 10 rebounds and four blocked shots, and N Missouri overcame awful free throw shooting in its opener to hold off Western Illinois. Missouri won its 48th consecutive non conference home game despite going only 14 for 27 from the line. No. 17 Baylor . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 Jackson State . . . . . . . . . . . 49 WACO, Texas — Star freshman Perry Jones had 20 points and eight rebounds, helping Baylor beat Jackson State. The Bears (3-0) had 26 turnovers in a sporadic performance in their last game before the return of suspended guard LaceDarius Dunn. No. 20 Georgetown . . . . . . . 80 Coastal Carolina . . . . . . . . . 61 CHARLESTON, S.C. — Jason Clark hit five 3-pointers and scored 22 points for Georgetown. Georgetown improved to 3-0 for the fourth straight season and nearly shot the Chanticleers (2-2) out of Carolina First Arena, going 14 of 30 from behind the arc.


THE BULLETIN • Friday, November 19, 2010 D5

Dominican Continued from D1 The investors include Brian Shapiro, a New York hedge fund manager who, along with Reggie Jackson, tried to buy the Oakland Athletics several years ago; Steve Swindal, the former general partner of the New York Yankees; Abel Guerra, a former White House official under President George W. Bush; and Hans Hertell, a former U.S. ambassador to the Dominican Republic. Other, less prominent investors have had no previous connections to baseball or the Dominican Republic. Those investors include a real estate lawyer from New Jersey, a dentist from California and a computer salesman from upstate New York. Educators and Major League Baseball officials worry because there is no oversight of the investors’ academies, and they question why the investors want to be part of a system that takes teenagers out of school and has been involved in scandals over steroid use and players lying about ages. “If the investment is benefiting the player in some way and improving his circumstances, providing, as I said, educational opportunities, etc., then it can be a good thing,” said Sandy Alderson, who oversaw the revamping of baseball’s operations in the Dominican Republic until he was named the New York Mets’ general manager last month. “But generally speaking, there is no assurance that is happening.” At academies run by investors from the United States, the players are typically 13 to 19 years old and forgo formal schooling to train. Several of the players said they would return to school if they were not signed to a professional contract. The conditions of the academies vary from less than desirable to impeccable — like the one run and financed by Swindal, Guerra and Hertell. Gary Goodman, a real estate lawyer from Cranford, N.J., opened his academy with a former Dominican minor-league player in 2009. “Are we there to make a profit? Absolutely,” said Goodman, who, like many investors, wires thousands of dollars a month to feed, clothe, house and train the prospects, including many who cannot read and do not attend school. Goodman and several other investors said their money helped to improve the lives of prospects and their families. They also take a smaller percentage of the players’ contracts than other trainers typically do, they said. Some of these investors have gained a foothold in the market by lending money directly to prospects’ families, who agree to repay the loans and give the investors a significant portion of the prospects’ signing bonuses. These practices are worrisome for critics like David P. Fidler, a professor of international law at Indiana University.

Soccer Continued from D1 In addition to Mountain View and Summit already having played each other twice in Intermountain Conference play this year — the Storm also topped the Cougars 4-1 on Oct. 12 — the two teams are loaded with players who compete with one another in club soccer. “Just because it’s Mountain View, it automatically brings more to the game,” Summit coach Jamie Brock says. The Storm (14-2-2 overall) have been one of the most productive teams in the state all season, scoring a 5A-best 92 goals this year while giving up just nine scores, the fewest goals allowed in 5A. “You give them just a little crack and they’re good at finishing,” Mattox says about Summit’s offense. “The thing that makes them so strong is that they don’t have one key player you can shut down. They’ve got good players all over.” Despite averaging slightly more than five goals a game, no player on the Storm’s roster has scored more than 20 goals this season. Eve Hess (19 goals), Kristen Parr (13) and Tashia Davis (11) all scored more than 10 goals this year, making it almost impossible for defenses to collapse on just one Summit player. “We’re dangerous from anywhere,” Brock says. “We’re a team that can and will finish.” The Cougars are no slouches, either. After falling behind 1-0 on the road to Eugene’s Marist High in the 5A semifinal round on Tuesday, Mountain View rallied back to win 2-1 in overtime and advanced to its second state championship match in

BA S E BA L L C O M M E N TA RY

M’s Hernandez scores one for progress with Cy Young win By Larry Stone The Seattle Times

SEATTLE — atching the growth of Felix Hernandez — on and off the field — since he arrived in Seattle as a cavalier 19-year-old has been rewarding. It’s called maturity, and at age 24, Hernandez is evolving admirably on all fronts, a man of both substance and stuff. Hernandez’s coronation as one of the game’s premier pitchers (and there are those who would remove the qualifier “one of,” but I’ll hold off as long as Roy Halladay and Tim Lincecum are still active) arrived Thursday, when he overwhelmingly won the American League’s Cy Young award. Some would say the Baseball Writers’ Association of America came of age Thursday, as well. No question this year’s AL Cy Young vote was being viewed as a referendum to see if the head-in-the-sand dinosaurs of the BBWAA were ready to join the 21st century. As a card-carrying tyrannosaurus — but one who tries to keep his head above ground — I fretted over the repercussions if CC Sabathia or David Price, with statistics inferior to Hernandez in virtually every aspect except victories, had pulled out the Cy Young. The grudging acknowledgment of growth the BBWAA had earned last year for giving the Cys to Zack Greinke and Tim Lincecum — with 16 and 15 wins, respectively — would have surely boomeranged. But score one for progress, as Hernandez received 21 of the 28 first-place votes from two BBWAA members in each American League city (including, in the interests of full disclosure, myself. My five-person ballot read: 1, Hernandez; 2, Price; 3, Cliff Lee; 4, Jon Lester; 5, Sabathia). You could make the argument (and some of my fellow voters did) that never mind victories; with the Mariners hopelessly out of contention virtually all season, Hernandez never had to pitch under the same pressure as did Sabathia and Price as their teams vied for the postseason. But Felix had his own pressure to deal with — the likeli-

W Juan Fach / The New York Times

A trainee walks on the campus at California Sports Management, a dormitory for about a dozen baseball prospects as young as 13, in San Cristobal, Dominican Republic, in September. Recognizing that Major League Baseball teams are offering multimillion-dollar contracts to some teenage prospects, investors in Latin America are either financing upstart Dominican trainers, known as buscones, or building their own academies. “Buscones in the Dominican Republic are in the business of selling children,” he said. “And it’s very disturbing that American investors would come in to profit from a system that exploits and discriminates against young children.” An hour and a half by car from Santo Domingo, at the end of a dirt road in the town of Don Gregorio, a piece of the Dominican baseball system can be found in a small house surrounded by concrete walls and metal fences topped with shiny barbed wire. The entrances are locked. Inside is a pension, a dormitory for about a dozen prospects as young as 14. They are trained by California Sports Management of Sacramento, a firm run by the agent Greg J. Maroni and financed by his father, Greg G. Maroni, a dentist who owns several fast-food franchises. Along with using the academy to produce teenage Dominican players they can represent, the younger Maroni represents Neftali Feliz, the Texas Rangers’ closer. The dormitory, which was built in 2007, contains one large bedroom with bunk beds and a small bathroom with two showers. The barbed wire was installed a few months ago, after a player hopped the fence to look for girls in town, said Carlos Paulino, a Dominican trainer who runs the dormitory for California Sports Management. Although one coach supervises the dormitory at night, two other prospects had gone over the fence earlier this year, Paulino said in September. “It’s to make sure they don’t get out.” A few weeks later, though, the younger Maroni and Paulino said that Paulino’s characterization of the barbed wire was incorrect

and that it had been installed to prevent break-ins. “We’re not running a concentration camp,” Maroni said. Maroni’s father said he had invested about $200,000 in the academy since 2007 and that he wires about $2,000 a month to the Dominican Republic to operate it. When a prospect signs a contract with a major-league team, the Maronis take 10 percent to 30 percent of the bonus and split the profit with their Dominican trainers. The elder Maroni said he did not know whether his players went to school. “It would be a sure nice goal in the long term,” he said. “Maybe we can give them some English and basic arithmetic classes so they know what a Social Security number is and know a checkbook.” The academy property features an outdoor weightlifting area, a batting cage, a pitcher’s mound, and space to park a midsize school bus, which shuttles players to a local field for practice. A loan to a player’s family led Goodman, the real estate lawyer from New Jersey, to start his academy. He traveled to the Dominican Republic in 2008 with Alfredo Arias, a former Dominican minor-leaguer, to explore investment opportunities. Around that time Jose Cano, an independent trainer and the father of Robinson Cano, the Yankees’ second baseman, said he had a business opportunity for Goodman and Arias, his longtime friend. The family of Jorge Martinez, one of Cano’s players, needed money for food and equipment for the boy, who would be eligible to sign with a major-league team later that year. Goodman and Arias lent $15,000 to Cano to give to the

Martinez family. In return, they were allowed to represent him and promised 7 percent of his signing bonus. “Ultimately, the young man signed with the Cleveland Indians and received a significant signing bonus of $790,000,” Goodman said. “We got our percentage, and Cano got his percentage and the player got his.” Goodman and Arias said that they received $50,000 from the signing bonus along with the $15,000 they had lent, and that Cano received $200,000. By 2009, Goodman and Arias had founded their own academy, Arias y Goodman in San Pedro de Macoris. Arias, who makes his home in a gated community several miles from the dormitory, said he believed the academy would make a profit of about $1 million in signing bonuses this year. He said that he, Goodman and another investor each put about $400,000 into the venture. At their dormitory, about a dozen players live in a house with small bedrooms, the players jammed in as if on a ship. In one, three bunk beds line a wall. At one point, Arias said, 30 players lived there. “We need to upgrade the facility,” Goodman said. “I mean, we functioned this year without air conditioning in the dormitory.” Alderson said he hoped the American investors realized their investments were teenagers, including many who will never reach the major leagues. “These are people who have given up other possibilities, forgone other opportunities, have not gone to school,” Alderson said. “It’s not just mailing in a check to some mutual fund and hoping that you’re going to get a return.”

State final previews An glance at the Class 5A and 4A girls soccer championships:

CLASS 5A STATE FINAL

CLASS 4A STATE FINAL

Who: Mountain View Cougars (14-2-1) vs. Summit Storm (14-2-2) When: Saturday, 10:30 a.m. Where: Hillsboro Stadium Cost: $8 for adults, $5 for students Mountain View player to watch: Torie Morris, the Cougars’ center defender, anchors Mountain View’s defense, but is also a threat offensively. Morris has scored in each of the Cougars’ three playoff victories this season, including the game-winning goal Tuesday in Mountain View’s 2-1 overtime semifinal win over Marist. Summit player to watch: Storm senior forward Eve Hess has two goals and an assist against Mountain View this season. Hess also scored the only goal in Summit’s 1-0 victory over Crescent Valley in the state semifinal round Tuesday. Noteworthy: The two teams have played twice this season, with Summit winning both matches. The Storm defeated Mountain View 4-1 on Oct. 12 and 3-0 on Oct. 21. … Three players for Mountain View — senior goalkeeper Amy Clason-Messina and junior defenders Torie Morris and Allie Cummins — all started in the 2008 5A state championship match, which the Cougars lost 1-0 to Bend High. … Mountain View’s only two losses this season were against Summit. … The Storm enter Saturday’s final on an 11-game unbeaten streak. Summit’s last loss was a 2-1 defeat to Bend High on Sept. 30.

Who: Mazama Vikings (15-2-1) vs. Sisters Outlaws (17-0) When: Saturday, 3:30 p.m. Where: Liberty High School, Hillsboro Cost: $8 for adults, $5 for students Mazama player to watch: Sophomore forward Kylie Durant scored both of the Vikings’ goals in Mazama’s 2-1 overtime victory over Gladstone in the 4A state semifinals on Tuesday. Durant led the Vikings in goals this season with 18. Sisters player to watch: Outlaw junior goalkeeper Sara Small was named the Sky-Em League player of the year earlier this month after giving up just two goals in 10 league matches this season. Noteworthy: Sisters is hoping to become the first 4A girls state champion to go undefeated and untied since Hidden Valley won state in 2006 with a 17-0 record. … This is the first girls soccer state final appearance for either team. … Mazama shared the Skyline Conference championship with Hidden Valley this season, but defeated the Mustangs 2-1 in the quarterfinal round of the playoffs. … The Outlaws have won their last two games on the road, defeating Philomath 3-2 in the state quarterfinal round and Scappoose 2-1 on Tuesday in the state semifinals. … Mazama is just three years removed from a winless season. In 2007, the year before current coach Angela Durant took over, the Vikings went 0-11-1.

three years. The Cougars have scored 72 goals this season — the best mark in 5A behind Summit — and have posted 11 shutouts in 2010 behind the play of senior goalkeeper Amy Clason-Messina. “It’s going to be an 80-minute brawl,” says Brock, whose squad grabbed a 2-0 lead by halftime the last time it played Mountain View. “There’s something to be said about the team that scores first. We came back from being down 1-0 the first time we played (the Cougars), but in a

game like this, the first score, as far as confidence and momentum goes, will be big.” In the 4A final, the Outlaws (17-0) are hoping to cap their most successful girls soccer season to date with their first state championship. Since making a surprising run to the 4A/3A/2A/1A state semifinals last season, Sisters has been one of the most dominant teams in the state, regardless of classification, outscoring its opponents this year 98-6. Junior goalkeeper Sara Small

leads an Outlaw defense that has recorded 12 shutouts this season. Not even a lower-than expected No. 4 seed for the state playoffs — Sisters was 4A’s only undefeated squad in the regular season — has slowed down the Sky-Em League champions, as the Outlaws advanced to the state championship after winning quarterfinal and semifinal matches on the road. Beau Eastes can be reached at 541-383-0305 or at beastes@ bendbulletin.com.

hood that his team, game in and game out, would supply him virtually no run support. No need to quantify again the historic ineptitude of the Mariners’ offense except to point out that Hernandez received a grand total of seven runs of support in his 12 losses. In a national conference call Thursday, Hernandez was incredibly gracious. At the same time he told of his delirious, tearful joy upon receiving the call from BBWAA secretarytreasurer Jack O’Connell (“It was a great, great, great, great, amazing thing”), he absolved his offense of blame. “They tried to do too much for me,” he said. “I love my teammates.” But the fact remains, glaringly so, that Hernandez’s lackluster record was purely a byproduct of the fact that his consistent magnificence was not backed up by enough runs to give him the deserved “Ws”. It’s not as if BBWAA members had a sabermetric enlightenment, as has been portrayed in some quarters. This wasn’t about xFIP or WPA or WAR. Hernandez won largely on the strength of his more traditional numbers — ERA and innings pitched and strikeouts and quality starts and opponents’ batting average. But it still took a leap of illumination, as a body, to disregard Hernandez’s 13-12 record and give him the Cy Young. No way that would have happened 50 years ago, or 20, or even five years ago. In 2005, Bartolo Colon, by most statistical measures, was outpitched by Johan Santana, and yet Santana lost the Cy Young to Colon largely because the Angels pitcher went 21-8 while Santana was 16-7. Given a redo, with modernday sensibilities, I think the BBWAA vote goes for Santana, just as they’d probably take Randy Johnson and his 16-14 record over Roger Clemens’ 18-4 in 2004 if given a second crack at it. Fortunately, all of us are more informed now, and did what I feel confident was the right thing. Hernandez now stands as a pioneer of sorts, a trailblazer for the no-longer radical concept of giving the Cy Young to the best pitcher, regardless of record.

Expanded playoffs appear inevitable By Ronald Blum The Associated Press

ORLANDO — Commissioner Bud Selig’s plan to expand baseball’s playoffs to 10 teams seemed inevitable after little to no opposition emerged during meetings this week with owners and general managers. Because baseball’s labor contract runs to December 2011, the extra round of playoffs is not likely to start until 2012. Selig said his special 14-man committee will discuss adding two wild-card teams when it meets Dec. 7 during the winter meetings in nearby Lake Buena Vista. “We will move ahead, and move ahead pretty quickly,” Selig said Thursday after three days of meetings concluded. A change would have to be approved by owners, who next meet Jan. 12-13 in Paradise Valley, Ariz., and by the players’ association, which has said it is open to the extra round. The additional games also would have to be sold to baseball’s national television partners and slotted into a crowded schedule that already has pushed the World Series into November in the past two years. “I’m not going to rule out anything,” Selig said. “We’ll just proceed and whatever we decide, then we’ll just see how fast we can get it done. Once we pass something, I’m always anxious to get it done.” Selig’s committee includes

managers Tony La Russa, Jim Leyland and Mike Scioscia, and former manager Joe Torre. There would be two wild-card teams in each league, and the wild-card teams would meet to determine which advances to division series with the three firstplace teams in each league. “I think it’s definitely worth looking at. I have no problem with that,” Yankees co-owner Hank Steinbrenner said. Some would have the new round be best-of-three, and others would have it as a one-game winner-take-all. The mechanics appear to be at issue more than the concept. “I pretty much know where all the constituencies are now,” Selig said. “Eight is a very fair number but so is 10.” Baseball doubled its postseason teams to four in 1969 and again to eight in 1995, a year later than intended because of a players’ strike that wiped out the 1994 World Series. The vote to first add wild cards took place in September 1993. “I got ripped and torn apart, and it was pretty bad,” Selig said. “If I had defiled motherhood I don’t think I could have gotten ripped any more than I did. But now it’s fascinating to me. Now they not only like it so much, they want more of it.” The regular-season schedule will almost certainly not be reduced from 162 games. “There’s not much interest in that,” he said.


A D V EN T U R E S P ORT S

D6 Friday, November 19, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Bend drag-boat racer takes top spot at World Finals Bulletin staff report CHANDLER, Ariz. — Bend’s Al Zemke won the Stock Eliminator class championship earlier this month at the Lucas Oil Drag Boat Racing World Finals at Firebird Lake. More than 130 of the best drag boats and drivers from across the country competed in the four-day event, held Nov. 4-7. Classes ranged from personal water craft to Top Fuel Hydros capable of completing the quarter mile in less than 4.5 seconds at speeds in excess of 250 mph. The Stock Eliminator Class completes the quarter mile in 11 seconds at speeds of more than 100 mph. In the final

elimination round, Zemke clocked an 11.038 elapsed time to defeat the 2009 Southern Drag Boat Association champion out of Texas. Zemke was the Columbia Drag Boat Association 11second champion in 2009 and was named the sportsman of the year in 2009 by the CDBA, which stages an annual race at Haystack Reservoir near Culver each September. Zemke’s 1977 Dominator boat features a custom built Ford engine with more than 850 horsepower. Central Oregon fielded another competitor at the World Finals, Redmond’s Jessica Haavisto, who competed in the River Racer class.

E C 

Please e-mail sports event information to sports@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at bendbulletin.com. Items are published on a space-availability basis, and should be submitted at least 10 days before the event.

ALPINE SKIING MT. BACHELOR SPORTS EDUCATION FOUNDATION ALPINE WINTER SKIING: Enrollment for ages 7 and older at Mt. Bachelor; 541-388-0002; mbsef@ mbsef.org; www.mbsef.org. MT. BACHELOR SPORTS EDUCATION FOUNDATION ALPINE FALL DRYLAND TRAINING: For ages 13 and older; through November; 541-388-0002; mbsef@ mbsef.org; www.mbsef.org.

BIKING BEND ENDURANCE ACADEMY CYCLOCROSS: Programs for 2010 include five-day or three-day options for ages 10-23; riders will be grouped based on age and ability; through Dec. 12, times vary; www.BendEnduranceAcademy. org; 541-335-1346. CROSSAFLIXION CUP CYCLOCROSS SERIES: For youths through masters, and beginners through experienced riders, Nov. 27 at Seventh Mountain Resort; races start at 9 a.m.; registration on race day or at http://signmeup.com; $10-$25 except for kiddie cross race (12-and-under), which is free; contact Gina Miller at 541-318-7388 or gina@FreshAirSports.com. BEND ENDURANCE COMPETITION CYCLING: Professional coaching in the disciplines of mountain, road, freeride and cyclocross for participants ages 13-18; through Dec. 12, TuesdaysSundays from 3:45-5:45 p.m.; www.BendEnduranceAcademy. org; 541-678-3865. DIRT RIDERS NIGHT RIDES: Casual mountain bike rides on Tuesday nights; cnightingale@ deschutesbrewery.com.

MISCELLANEOUS THE URBAN GPS ECOCHALLENGE: Trips on paths and trails along Deschutes River through Old Mill District shops and Farewell Bend Park daily at 9 a.m. and 1:30 p.m.; like a scavenger hunt with clues and checkpoints; $65, includes guide, GPS and instruction, water, materials; 541-389-8359, 800-962-2862; www.wanderlusttours.com.

NORDIC SKIING BEND ENDURANCE ACADEMY NORDIC MASTERS: Technique group and training group options; for adults ages 20 and older with intermediate to advanced nordic skiing abilities; weekday and weekend options from Dec. 6 to Feb. 23; portion of proceeds will go to Meissner Nordic Community Ski Trails; enrollments vary; www.bendenduranceacademy. org; 541-678-3864. MT. BACHELOR SPORTS EDUCATION FOUNDATION NORDIC WINTER SKIING: Enrollment for ages 7 and older; at Mt. Bachelor; 541-388-0002; mbsef@ mbsef.org; www.mbsef.org. MT. BACHELOR SPORTS EDUCATION FOUNDATION NORDIC FALL DRYLAND TRAINING AND CONDITIONING PROGRAM: For ages 11 through high school age; through November; 541388-0002; mbsef@mbsef. org; www.mbsef.org. BEND ENDURANCE ACADEMY NORDIC SKIING: Programs conducted at Virginia Meissner Sno-park on Century Drive west of Bend; transportation provided from Bend; Development Team for ages 11-18 began Nov. 17; Youth Club for ages 7-11 starts Dec. 4; times vary; www.bendenduranceacademy.

org; 541-678-3865.

PADDLING PRIVATE AND GROUP KAYAK ROLL SESSIONS: Thursdays, 6:30 to 8:30 p.m., Juniper Swim & Fitness Center, Bend; instruction by Tumalo Creek Kayak & Canoe staff, gear is provided; $45; 541-317-9407.

ROLLER DERBY RENEGADE ROLLER DERBY: Practice with the Renegades Sundays from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at Bend’s Midtown Ballroom; drop-in fee of $7; loaner gear available; contact nmonroe94@gmail.com. PRACTICE WITH THE LAVA CITY ROLLER DOLLS ALL-FEMALE ROLLER DERBY LEAGUE: 3 to 5 p.m. on Sundays and 8-10 p.m. on Tuesdays; at Central Oregon Indoor Sports Center; $6 per session, $40 per month; deemoralizer@lavacityrollerdolls. com or 541-306-7364.

RUNNING DIRTY HALF COURSE PREVIEW (WEATHER PERMITTING): Nov. 21, 9 a.m.; run or mountain bike the brand new Dirty Half Marathon course for June 2011; weather permitting, we’ll mark the new course and let you try it out for size; free; 541-317-3568 or superdave@footzonebend.com. REDMOND RUNNING GROUP: Meets at 8 a.m. on Saturdays for a 4- to 8-mile run; contact Dan Edwards at dedwards@bendbroadband. com or 541-419-0889. FLEET FEET GROUP RUN: Every Wednesday at 6 p.m. at Fleet Feet Sports in Bend; free; www.fleetfeetbend.com. FOOTZONE NOON RUNS: Noon on Wednesdays at FootZone, 845 N.W. Wall St., Bend; seven-mile loop with shorter options; free; 541-317-3568. TEAM XTREME’S RUNNING CLUB IN REDMOND: Meets at 8 a.m. on Saturdays at Xtreme Fitness Center, 1717 N.E. Second St.; 2- to 5-mile run; free; 541-923-6662. RUNS WITH CENTRAL OREGON RUNNING KLUB (CORK): 8 a.m. on Saturdays at Drake Park for 6-18 miles; free; runsmts@gmail.com. FOOTZONE WOMEN’S RUNNING GROUP: Distances and locations vary; paces between 7- and 11-minute miles can be accommodated; Sundays at 9 a.m.; locations vary, Bend; free; 541-317-3568 or jenny@footzonebend.com.

SCUBA DIVING BASIC BEGINNER SCUBA DIVING CLASSES: Central Oregon Scuba Academy at Cascade Swim Center in Redmond, ongoing; certification for anyone 12 and older; vacation refresher and dive industry career classes for certified divers; cost varies; Rick Conners at 541312-2727 or 541-287-2727.

SNOWBOARDING DRYLAND SNOWBOARD CLASS: At Acrovision Sports Center in Bend; Mondays and Wednesdays from 7:30 to 8:30 p.m.; instruction by Justin Norman, guest appearances by technique rider Jonah Owen and others; 541-388-5555. MT. BACHELOR SPORTS EDUCATION FOUNDATION FREERIDE SKI AND SNOWBOARD WINTER PROGRAMS: Enrollment for ages 8 and older; at Mt. Bachelor; 541-388-0002; mbsef@ mbsef.org; www.mbsef.org.

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

A group of skateboard and scooter riders watch as Gabe Triplette, of Bend, right, launches on his skateboard from the snake run bowl to a nearby transition during a riding session at the Redmond Skatepark on Tuesday afternoon.

Scoot Continued from D1 Doty added that, overall, he thinks the trial period is working out well, and that he has received no reports of injuries related to skateboard/scooter collisions. A final decision on scooters in the skatepark will likely be made in March, after the trial period, he said. Scooters have two wheels, with handlebars that turn the front wheel. Widely considered merely a toy 10 years ago, scooters are now used to perform impressive aerial tricks akin to BMX riders and skateboarders. A few months ago the Truck Stop Skate Park, a pay-to-use indoor park in Bend, hosted the Northwest Scoot Championships. The competition featured a pro trick competition and a big-air contest. “I like scootering (more than skateboarding) because I can learn faster and I can do more tricks,” Ison said. “I think I’ll be on scooters until I’m 18 or so.” If anybody is torn over the issue of scooters in skateparks, it’s Andy McIntosh, manager of the nonprofit Truck Stop. The park allows scooters during all skateboarding sessions, which cost $5 to $10 for 2½ hours. The scooter riders are helping to keep the Truck Stop’s doors open. But as a skateboarder, McIntosh said he is wary of promoting scooter riding. “As you get older, you grow out of it, which I think is kind of good,” McIntosh said of scooter riding. “It’s so easy that kids kind of cling to it. For me, being a skateboarder, I don’t push it. I want them to learn to skateboard. Skateboarders have had to work to get skateparks made. These kids come along and it’s a little annoying in a sense.” That sentiment is shared throughout most of the Central Oregon skateboarding community. Gabe Triplette, 34, is a skateboarding and snowboarding instructor in Bend. He worries not only about scooter riders getting in the way of skateboarders, but also about scooter riding hindering the progression of youngsters as skateboarders and snowboarders. He called scooter riding “instant gratification,” something that can be mastered quickly without much development of skill and technique. “Some (scooter riders) are snowboarders, and scooting is not helping your snowboarding at all, and skateboarding would be,” Triplette said, adding that scooting actually leads to a regression of boarding skills because you have the handlebars to hang on to. Triplette and most other local skateboarders said they can learn to coexist with the scooter riders if the youngsters learn and adhere to park etiquette. They said they are weary of the scooter riders not paying attention to others, taking off in random directions, throwing items into the bowls, and loitering on the lips of ramps and transitions. “I don’t think they (scooters) really belong here for the most part,” said Mikal Lilly, 35, on Tuesday as she took a short break from skateboarding at the Redmond Skatepark. “They don’t go with the flow. If you watch everyone that’s skating, it’s pretty much one

“I don’t think they (scooters) really belong here for the most part. They don’t go with the flow. ... So many little kids (scooter riders) have almost gotten hurt because they’re not paying attention to the flow of the park.” — Skateboarder Mikal Lilly tempo. So many little kids (scooter riders) have almost gotten hurt because they’re not paying attention to the flow of the park.” Skatepark sessions typically include an unspoken but well-established rhythm of taking turns. “Skateboarders pay attention to everyone, but sometimes the scooter guys will just go,” Triplette added. “There’s usually not more than one skateboarder (riding in a certain area) at once … scooter guys will go four or five at once. They’ll jump in the bowl with you, and that’s like talking during somebody’s (golf) backswing. It can really affect you.”

Scooter rider Isaiah Wallace, 14 and of Redmond, was enjoying a session on his scooter at the Redmond Skatepark on Tuesday. He said that only a handful of scooter enthusiasts are a problem for skateboarders. “There’s only a few kids that are on scooters that get in people’s way a lot, and that’s the reason they don’t like it,” Wallace said. “If people just start paying attention on the scooters and not getting in people’s way then it would be a lot better. But if they really don’t want us here, then they need to make a different park for us.” Bend’s Kyle Bishoff, 18, ap-

proached me at the Redmond Skatepark and said he has plans to produce a public service announcement about skatepark etiquette and post it on YouTube. Bishoff said that as long as scooter riders follow the rules — specifically, not cutting other riders off and not standing in the way — he has no problem with them in skateparks. “There’s some pretty general hatred toward anybody who doesn’t skateboard if you’re a skateboarder,” Bishoff explained. “But I’m not like that. I’m also trying to tell skateboarders the same thing. “People didn’t like skateboarding either when it first came out. I would never try scooters — I don’t really like it. But they’re just trying to have fun, too.” Mark Morical can be reached at 541-383-0318 or at mmorical@ bendbulletin.com.

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F

Inside

FAMILY INSIDE

K I D C U LT U R E

Gear for kids on the go

Dear Abby Man seeks words of comfort for sister unlucky in love, Page E2

‘Lennon Naked’ “Masterpiece Contemporary” offers uninspired biopic on John Lennon, Page E2

Kid Culture features fun and educational books and toys for kids.

Family Calendar Listing of family-friendly events, Page E3

The Patriot Series Baseball Glove

F A M I LY IN BRIEF Bullying is top fear of parents of teens Illustration by Greg Cross The Bulletin

Parents of children ages 1217 say their No. 1 fear for their kids is bullying or cyberbullying, according to a recent national survey conducted by Care.com. About 30 percent of parents say they fear bullying over terrorism, kidnapping, car crashes, suicide or other hazards. According to the survey, about 75 percent of parents are monitoring their children’s use of social media and text messaging because of concerns about bullying. Fathers believe bullying is the greatest threat to children, but mothers tend to fear kidnapping the most.

Fearless kids have less empathy, study finds

B E ST B E T S FOR FAMILY FUN

ALONE BUT NOT LONELY Survive the holidays without the kids By Alandra Johnson The Bulletin

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ami Chapin remembers the first holiday she didn’t share with her two sons. It was Halloween in 2006. She went to dinner and then home afterward. She didn’t even want to hand out candy. Mostly she just missed her boys. During other holidays without her sons, the divorced Bend mom sometimes found herself wallowing in self-pity. She thought about what her kids were doing and felt left out. As time has passed, celebrating the holidays without her kids has become a little easier. Today, Chapin is also

Inside Local experts recommend websites for separated parents, Page E6 a mom to a 2-year-old daughter, and a stepmom to two girls. Now for holidays, she and her husband either have all five kids or just their daughter. “I thought I would always be sad and depressed about it,” said Chapin. See Alone / E6

Details, Page E3

Owl Legends High Desert Museum’s newest owl, Aurora, will flex her wings alongside several other owls during this fun demonstration, which will take place several times next week.

Thanksgiving What are you thankful for? Amid the hubbub, turkey and pie, families may want to take a moment to reflect and give thanks.

Gingerbread Junction This collection of gingerbread houses in Sunriver opens Thursday.

• Television • Comics • LAT crossword • Sudoku • Horoscope www.bendbulletin.com/family

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2010

Children ages 3-4 who tend to show fearless behavior also tend to show more aggression and less empathy, according to new research from the University of Haifa’s Faculty of Education. The fearless children had a difficult time identifying facial expressions that showed fear, even though they had no trouble identifying happiness, sadness, anger or surprise. While the fearless kids tended to be very friendly, smiley and social, they had a hard time identifying distress in their friends and also didn’t show a great deal of interest in helping their friends. The fearless children also tended toward aggressive behavior, which could include taking advantage of their peers and showing a lack of regret or guilt. — Alandra Johnson, The Bulletin

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HELPING CENTRAL OREGON FAMILIES THRIVE

In the past, Bend mom Tami Chapin, center, has had to spend holidays without any of her children. Other years, she celebrates with the whole family, including, from left, daughter Brooklyn, 2, husband Eric Chapin, son Cameron Ray, 11, stepdaughters Rosey, 5, and Delaney, 9, and son Dominic Ray, 8. Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

By Akadema $229 Appropriate for ages 10 and older Toy Tips: A Fun: A Movement: B+ Thinking: C Personality: C Social Interaction: B+ For the baseball and softball lover, a good glove that fits well is important for appropriate play. This AmeriSubmitted photo ca n-made baseball glove is handmade in the company’s New Jersey facility, using black precision-kip leather mended with gray lacing. Each glove features a custom red, white and blue “Made in the USA” label, evoking the true spirit of America’s favorite game. We tested this glove and found it to fit well and feel comfortable during play. The glove should not get wet or be kept in cold temperatures. See Toys / E6

Researcher helps decode babies’ cries By Jondi Gumz Santa Cruz Sentinel

SANTA CRUZ, Calif. — Every mother with a new baby has to figure out what to do when the baby wakes up at night and cries. Alicia Zenteno knows crying is the way a baby communicates. “It’s OK,” said Zenteno, 29, whose daughter Sofia is 3 months old. “She’s trying to tell me something.” She knows how to soothe her baby and “not be anxious and desperate.” It’s not something she learned when her older daughter, Camila, was born more than three years ago. Instead, she learned the secrets of baby behavior from Jane Heinig, executive director of the University of California, Davis Human Lactation Center, who visited Santa Cruz and Watsonville, Calif., last month. While interviewing mothers participating in the federally funded Women Infants Children nutrition program, Heinig discovered many switched from breast-feeding to formula and cereal, believing their babies awoke at night and cried because they didn’t get enough milk. See Behavior / E6

What’s normal? How many times do most babies wake up at night? 0-8 weeks: 3-4 times 2 months: 2-3 times 4 months: 1-2 times 6 months: 0-1 time For more tips, go to www.secrets ofbabybehavior.com Source: Women Infants Children and the UC Davis Human Lactation Center


T EL EV ISION

E2 Friday, November 19, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Man seeks words of comfort ‘Masterpiece Contemporary’ offers for sister who’s unlucky in love uninspired biopic on John Lennon

Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby .com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

SAN FRANCISCO — John Lennon has never left the public consciousness since his murder outside the Dakota in 1980, but he’s been getting even more attention this year because he would have turned 70 and because next month marks the 30th anniversary of his death. This week, “Masterpiece Contemporary” gets in on the act with “Lennon Naked,” a mostly unnecessary biopic. This is such a once-overlightly look at a pivotal chapter in Lennon’s life that it may as well be a VH1 “Where Are They Now?” episode (answer: six feet under and spinning in his grave). Christopher Eccleston, of “Dr. Who” fame, plays John and is adequate here and there, but is just too old to play young John, no matter how many long-haired wigs he dons or how many love beads. There’s also the problem of his accent, an attempt at Liverpudlian that ends up being unconvincingly singsong or disappearing altogether. “Lennon Naked” attempts to hit the highlights of Lennon’s life from 1967 to ’71 in 90 mostly annoying minutes. The writing, by Robert Jones, is often silly (First wife Cynthia to moody John in the back of a limo: “I just want to hold your hand” Yeah, yeah, yeah? No, no, no!). Even sillier is Edmund Coulthard’s direction. There’s nothing inherently wrong with splicing archival footage of the real John with Eccleston’s fictional take on him, except that it only underscores how miscast Eccleston is in the role. But there’s so much of the old foot-

‘Lennon Naked’ Where: ‘Masterpiece Contemporary’ on OPB When: 10:30 p.m. Sunday

age, it only serves to bog down the pacing of the story line. Coulthard also tosses in a whole bunch of film-schoolish scenes of white balloons drifting in the sky and overlit memory shots of John being abandoned by his father at the beach as a little kid. All of it has to do with the idea that what drove John was being left by his parents to be raised by an aunt. Not a bad thematic concept, but coupled with Jones’ uninspired script, Coulthard’s bloviated direction results in a film with all the artistic substance of dryer lint. Of the actors playing the other three Beatles, only Craig Cheetham as Ringo sort of looks correct, but, of course, it is Ringo he’s playing, which means he doesn’t get much to say. Andrew Scott, playing Paul, works so hard at trying to mimic McCartney’s flute-like speech pattern he ends up sounding like a cartoon voice. Rory Kinnear is fine as Brian Epstein, the band’s gay manager whose death from a drug overdose only added to Lennon’s sense of abandonment by authority figures. Naoko Mori plays Yoko well enough and screeches to ear-splitSelf Referrals Welcome

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ting perfection when John and Yoko start recording together. The relationship between them is actually adequately written. You get a sense of their passion, but also of the subtle control Yoko had already begun to exercise over John and, by extension, the fate of the Beatles. The only truly good acting comes from Christopher Fairbank as John’s ne’er-do-well dad, Freddie, who comes back into John’s life after a 17-year separation, once the Beatles hit it big. Fairbank does such a good job portraying the unrepentant neediness of the senior Lennon that it almost makes you forget how average the script is. Despite the fact that the film focuses on just a few critical years of Lennon’s life, the pacing is both plodding and scattershot at the same time. Dump the archival footage — we know the Beatles were a big deal and we don’t need so many reminders of how much Eccleston doesn’t look like John — dig deeper into character and spend time actually dramatizing Lennon’s life at this point and Coulthard almost could have had something. In other words, imagine.

Saturday, December 4, 2010 at 3 PM & 7PM Sunday, December 5, 2010 at 3 PM

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cause I am so close to all of them I’m scared, worried and sometimes downright depressed at the thought of losing any of them. I know in the circle of life, death should be accepted as the next great adventure, but I don’t know if I can handle that. I’m asking for advice on how to handle these events now. I do not have family near me but an amazing circle of friends for support. I just know that I’m going to slip into a world of sadness that I’m afraid I won’t come out of. My problems may seem minor in light of today’s issues, but I do need guidance. — Selfish in Las Vegas Dear Selfish: The concerns you are feeling are not “selfish.” They are normal, if somewhat premature. You are fortunate to have your

San Francisco Chronicle

LLE

Point out that when one man after another is unfaithful, it can damage a woman’s self-esteem. And when that happens it can make her insecure and willing to suspend her better judgment out of fear that she’ll be alone. Explain that women with high selfesteem receive more respect because they won’t settle for less, and that they don’t jump into relationships — they wait for a man to prove himself.

By David Wiegand parents and grandparents in your life — if only through phone calls and e-mails. You are also lucky to have supportive friends nearby. The hardest part of grieving the loss of a loved one is regret about words that were never said. So tell your parents and grandparents often how much you love and appreciate them. See them when you can. And continue to be the kind of person of whom they can be proud, because when they are gone, YOU will be their legacy. Dear Abby: Please tell me how to tell my husband of 25 years, who has different political views than mine, to shut up during news shows and comedies and mysteries I watch on MY TV — not his — within earshot of his office. He insists on coming in while I’m trying to concentrate and blasting his views, whether I want to hear them or not. — Frustrated in Dayton, Ohio Dear Frustrated: You can’t completely ignore your husband’s rants — but when you’re trying to devote your attention to one of your favorite TV shows, some headphones might lessen the distraction. Contact your local electronics store for suggestions.

CEN

DEAR ABBY

ON

Dear Abby: I’m a 33-year-old man who has finally found the love of my life. My girlfriend and I have been together for three years. Needless to say, an engagement is right around the corner. I have a sister who has struggled her entire life dating the wrong men. She’s beautiful inside and out. She called me last night crying, asking me why men always cheat on her. Most people would assume that the use of the word “always” is an exaggeration. I would have to say that 90 percent of her boyfriends have indeed cheated on her one way or another — whether it was in high school, or when she dated a race car driver or, more recently, an acquaintance of mine. What can I say to reassure her that there are some good guys left in this world who won’t cheat? — Looking for Answers for Sis Dear Looking for Answers: Tell your sister that there are men with character who take relationships seriously. They may not be as glamorous as a race car driver, or flashy or glib, but they have more important qualities to offer. Point out that when one man after another is unfaithful, it can damage a woman’s self-esteem. And when that happens it can make her insecure and willing to suspend her better judgment out of fear that she’ll be alone. Explain that women with high self-esteem receive more respect because they won’t settle for less, and that they don’t jump into relationships — they wait for a man to prove himself. Men value more highly what they have to work for. Perhaps that will help to set her straight. Dear Abby: I have lived an amazing life surrounded by family, friends and loved ones. My parents and maternal grandparents are still active in my daily life. Be-

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SportsCenter (Live) Å SportsCenter (Live) Å SportsCenter (Live) Å 21 23 22 23 NBA Basketball: Thunder at Celtics College Football Fresno State at Boise State (Live) NFL Live (N) NBA Tonight NASCAR Now (N) 2010 World Series of Poker 22 24 21 24 College Basketball Boxing: 2004 Pemberton vs. Sheika Boxing: Diaz vs. Guerrero AWA Wrestling Å AWA Wrestling Å Boxing: 2005 Castillo vs. Corrales Boxing: 2005 Marquez vs. Polo 23 25 123 25 Boxing: 2003 Pemberton vs. Sheika SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express 24 63 124 My Wife and Kids My Wife and Kids Melissa & Joey Melissa & Joey Melissa & Joey Melissa & Joey Melissa & Joey Melissa & Joey Melissa & Joey Melissa & Joey The 700 Club (N) ‘G’ Å 67 29 19 41 Gilmore Girls I Solemnly Swear ‘PG’ Hannity (N) On the Record, Greta Van Susteren The O’Reilly Factor Hannity On the Record, Greta Van Susteren Glenn Beck 54 61 36 50 The O’Reilly Factor (N) Å Down Home Paula’s Best 30-Minute Meals Good Eats Game. Unwrapped Chopped Cornuchopia ‘G’ Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Outrageous Food Best Thing Ate Thanksgiving Unwrapped 177 62 46 44 B’foot Contessa Football Preview Runnin’ With PAC Beavers Football Cougars Access Huskies Beavers Football Preview Seahawks The Final Score Boxing 20 45 28* 26 Beavers Football Runnin’ With PAC UEFA Champ. (3:30) “The Day After Tomorrow” Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Two/Half Men ›› “Lara Croft: Tomb Raider” (2001) Angelina Jolie, Jon Voight. ›› “My Super Ex-Girlfriend” (2006) Uma Thurman, Luke Wilson. 131 Get It Sold ‘G’ Income Property Designed to Sell Hunters Int’l House Hunters Property Virgins Property Virgins Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l 176 49 33 43 Get It Sold ‘G’ MysteryQuest Devil’s Triangle ‘PG’ Modern Marvels ‘PG’ Å Modern Marvels ‘PG’ Å Modern Marvels (N) ‘PG’ Å Jobsite Concrete Countdown ‘PG’ Gangland Assassins ‘14’ Å 155 42 41 36 (4:00) First Apocalypse ‘PG’ Å Old Christine Old Christine How I Met How I Met Reba ‘PG’ Å Reba ‘PG’ Å Reba ‘PG’ Å Reba ‘PG’ Å Reba ‘PG’ Å Reba ‘PG’ Å How I Met How I Met 138 39 20 31 Unsolved Mysteries ‘PG’ Å The Rachel Maddow Show (N) Lockup: Raw Harsh Reality Lockup Inside Alaska Lockup: San Quentin Lockup: San Quentin Lockup: San Quentin Poetry slam. 56 59 128 51 Countdown With Keith Olbermann That ’70s Show That ’70s Show That ’70s Show Pranked ’ ‘14’ Pranked ’ ‘14’ Pranked ’ ‘14’ Pranked ’ ‘14’ Jackass ’ ‘MA’ Jackass ’ ‘MA’ ››› “Dawn of the Dead” (2004, Horror) Sarah Polley, Ving Rhames. ’ 192 22 38 57 The Seven ’ iCarly ‘G’ Å iCarly iTwins ‘G’ iCarly iKiss ‘G’ iCarly ‘G’ Å iCarly ‘G’ Å iCarly iStart a Fan War (N) ‘G’ Å Big Time Rush George Lopez ’ George Lopez ’ Glenn Martin The Nanny ‘PG’ The Nanny ‘PG’ 82 46 24 40 iCarly ‘G’ Å (5:57) UFC Unleashed ’ ‘PG’ Å UFC 122: Marquardt vs. Okami ’ Ways to Die Ways to Die (11:35) Entourage 132 31 34 46 CSI: Crime Scene Investigation ‘PG’ › “Cold Creek Manor” (2003, Suspense) Dennis Quaid, Sharon Stone, Stephen Dorff. Å WWE Friday Night SmackDown! (N) ’ Å Sanctuary Animus (N) ’ Å Stargate Universe Malice ’ Å 133 35 133 45 Scare Tactics ’ Behind Scenes Hal Lindsey Joel Osteen ‘PG’ Frederick Price Praise the Lord Å Life Focus ’ ‘G’ Joseph Prince Kim Clement Changing-World First to Know Jan Crouch. 205 60 130 Love-Raymond King of Queens King of Queens Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ Dr. Seuss’ Grinch ››› “Shrek” (2001) (PA) Voices of Mike Myers, Eddie Murphy. Å (10:25) ›› “Dr. Seuss’ The Cat in the Hat” (2003) 16 27 11 28 Love-Raymond ›› “Dementia” (1955, Horror) Adrienne ››› “The Last Wave” (1978, Suspense) Richard Chamberlain, Olivia Hamnett, David ››› “Gallipoli” (1981, Drama) Mark Lee, Mel Gibson, Bill Kerr. Two Outback runners ››› “Picnic at Hanging Rock” (1975, Mystery) Rachel Roberts, Dominic Guard. 101 44 101 29 Gulpilil. An attorney is haunted by aboriginal tribal rites. join World War I. Schoolgirls and teacher eerily vanish in 1900 Australia. Å Barrett, Ben Roseman. Wedding Day Cake Boss ‘PG’ Cake Boss ‘PG’ What the Sell?! What the Sell?! What Not to Wear Alexandra ‘PG’ What Not to Wear Hillary (N) ’ ‘PG’ Homemade Millionaire Beauty ‘PG’ What Not to Wear Hillary ‘PG’ Å 178 34 32 34 Say Yes, Dress Law & Order Admissions ’ ‘14’ Bones The Woman in Limbo ’ ‘14’ ›› “The Bucket List” (2007) Jack Nicholson. Premiere. Å ›› “The Bucket List” (2007) Jack Nicholson, Morgan Freeman. Å 17 26 15 27 Law & Order ’ ‘14’ Å (DVS) Johnny Test ‘Y7’ Johnny Test ‘Y7’ Hole in the Wall Star Wars: Clone Batman: Brave Ben 10 Ult. Sym-Bionic Titan Generator Rex Star Wars: Clone Sym-Bionic Titan King of the Hill King of the Hill Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ 84 Bizarre Foods/Zimmern Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Ghost Adventures ‘PG’ Å Ghost Adventures (N) ‘PG’ Å Ghost Adventures ‘PG’ Å Ghost Adventures ‘PG’ Å 179 51 45 42 Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations All in the Family All in the Family Sanford & Son Sanford & Son Sanford & Son Sanford & Son Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Roseanne ‘PG’ (11:31) Roseanne 65 47 29 35 Good Times ‘PG’ The Jeffersons NCIS Petty officer is murdered. ‘PG’ NCIS Dead and Unburied ‘PG’ Å ›› “National Treasure” (2004) Nicolas Cage. A man tries to steal the Declaration of Independence. Å House Office Politics ’ ‘14’ Å 15 30 23 30 NCIS Escaped ’ ‘PG’ Å Don’t Forget Don’t Forget Bret Michaels 40 Naughtiest Celebrity Scandals Stars’ actions dominate headlines. ‘14’ Kid Rock: Born MTV World Stage Music Awards 191 48 37 54 (4:30) ››› “Dirty Dancing” (1987) Jennifer Grey, Patrick Swayze. ’ PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS

(4:35) “Buffy the Vampire Slayer” (6:05) ›› “The Karate Kid Part II” 1986 Ralph Macchio. ’ ‘PG’ Å ›› “The Taking of Pelham 123” 2009 Denzel Washington. ’ ‘R’ Å (9:50) ›› “Spy Game” 2001, Suspense Robert Redford. ’ ‘R’ Å Fox Legacy ›› “The Black Rose” 1950, Adventure Tyrone Power. ‘NR’ Å ››› “Lloyds of London” 1936, Drama Tyrone Power. ‘NR’ Å Fox Legacy ›› “The Black Rose” 1950, Adventure Tyrone Power. ‘NR’ Å Snowboard BC One The Daily Habit Thrillbillies ‘14’ Dirt Demons ASP Women’s The Daily Habit Cubed (N) Å The Daily Habit Thrillbillies ‘14’ Dirt Demons ASP Women’s The Daily Habit Golf American Century Championship, Final Round From Edgewood Tahoe Golf Course in Lake Tahoe. ’ Å Golf in America Golf Central European PGA Tour Golf UBS Hong Kong Open, Third Round (Live) (4:00) “The National Tree” ‘PG’ Å “Moonlight and Mistletoe” (2008) Candace Cameron Bure. ‘PG’ Å “The Good Witch’s Gift” (2010) Catherine Bell, Chris Potter. ‘PG’ Å “The Most Wonderful Time of the Year” (2008) Henry Winkler. ‘PG’ Å (3:15) ››› “Avatar” 2009 Sam Worthing- (6:15) ›› “Starsky & Hutch” 2004, Comedy Ben Stiller, Owen Wilson. Two detectives › “Couples Retreat” 2009, Comedy Vince Vaughn, Jason Bateman. Four Midwestern Dennis Miller: The Big Speech (N) ’ ››› “Avatar” 2009 Sam Worthington. ’ HBO 425 501 425 10 ton. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å investigate a cocaine dealer. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å couples descend on an island resort. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å ‘MA’ Å ‘PG-13’ Å (3:30) Chaos ‘R’ (5:25) ›› “Hostel Part II” 2007 Lauren German. ‘R’ Todd Margaret Arrested Dev. Undeclared ‘PG’ Undeclared ‘PG’ ››› “Carrie” 1976, Horror Sissy Spacek. ‘R’ Whitest Kids Todd Margaret Arrested Dev. IFC 105 105 (6:35) › “The Mod Squad” 1999 Claire Danes. Three street (4:45) ››› “Deceived” 1991 Goldie Hawn. An art expert (8:15) › “The Fourth Kind” 2009, Suspense Milla Jovovich. A psychologist in Nome, ›› “Fast & Furious” 2009, Action Vin Diesel. Fugitive Dom Torretto and Brian MAX 400 508 7 searches for her husband’s true identity. ’ ‘PG-13’ punks become undercover cops to avoid jail. ‘R’ Alaska, uncovers evidence of alien abductions. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å O’Conner resume a feud in Los Angeles. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å Dog Whisperer (N) ‘G’ Dangerous Encounters Ultimate Factories Porsche ‘G’ Dog Whisperer ‘G’ Dangerous Encounters Ultimate Factories Porsche ‘G’ China’s Warrior King ‘PG’ NGC 157 157 Zevo-3 ‘Y7’ Å Zevo-3 ‘Y7’ Å Avatar-Last Air Avatar-Last Air The Troop ’ ‘G’ Invader Zim ‘Y7’ Zevo-3 ‘Y7’ Å Zevo-3 ‘Y7’ Å Avatar-Last Air Avatar-Last Air The Troop ’ ‘G’ Invader Zim ‘Y7’ Invader ZIM ‘Y7’ Rocko’s Life NTOON 89 115 189 Reel in, Outdoors Match Fish. Spanish Fly Bill Dance Salt. Wanna Fish Outdoor’s 10 Match Fish. Savage Wild Hunting Count. On Your Own Profess. Gold Tips 4CE Deer City USA American Hunter OUTD 37 307 43 Inside the NFL (iTV) ’ ‘PG’ Å ›› “How to Lose Friends & Alienate People” 2008 Simon Pegg. A British journalist in Weeds ’ ‘MA’ Å The Big C Taking › “Push” 2009, Suspense Chris Evans, Dakota Fanning. iTV Premiere. Rogue psy- Strikeforce Challenger Series Vitor SHO 500 500 New York offends those he seeks to impress. ‘R’ Å the Plunge ‘MA’ chics battle a covert government agency. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å Ribeiro vs. Justin Wilcox (iTV) NASCAR Racing Camping World Truck Series: Ford 200 (Live) Trackside At... (N) Formula 1 Debrief (N) NCWTS Setup NASCAR Racing Camping World Truck Series: Ford 200 SPEED 35 303 125 (3:30) K-PAX (5:35) ››› “About a Boy” 2002, Comedy-Drama Hugh Grant. ‘PG-13’ (7:20) ››› “Up” 2009 Voices of Ed Asner. ‘PG’ › “Legion” 2010, Horror Paul Bettany. ‘R’ (10:45) ››› “Signs” 2002 Mel Gibson. ‘PG-13’ STARZ 300 408 300 Battle of HS Mu(5:45) “Irresistible” 2006, Drama Susan Sarandon, Sam Neill, Emily Blunt. An illustra- › “Scary Movie 2” 2001 Shawn Wayans. Members of a psychol- “Before I Self Destruct” 2009 50 Cent. A man turns to a life of “Green Street 2: Stand Your Ground” 2009, Crime Drama Ross TMC 525 525 sicals tor believes a woman is trying to destroy her family. ‘R’ ogy class venture into a haunted house. ’ ‘R’ McCall, Marina Sirtis. ’ ‘NR’ Å crime to support his younger brother. ‘R’ Å Buck Stops Bucks Gun It w/Spies Elk Fever Tred Barta Whitetail Rev. Buck Stops Bucks Gun It w/Spies Elk Fever Tred Barta Whitetail Rev. Dangerous Game Dangerous Game VS. 27 58 30 ›› “Heartbreakers” 2001, Comedy Sigourney Weaver, Jennifer Love Hewitt. ‘PG-13’ Å Ghost Whisperer ’ ‘PG’ Å Secret Lives of Women ‘14’ ›› “Heartbreakers” 2001, Comedy Sigourney Weaver, Jennifer Love Hewitt. ‘PG-13’ Å WE 143 41 174 ENCR 106 401 306 FMC 104 204 104 FUEL 34 GOLF 28 301 27 HALL 66 33 18 33


THE BULLETIN • Friday, November 19, 2010 E3

FAMILY CALENDAR

A weekly compilation of family-friendly events throughout Central Oregon

P  ’ G  M 

Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event� on our website at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351. The Family Movie Guide should be used along with the Motion Picture Association of America rating system for selecting movies suitable for children. Only films rated G, PG or PG-13 are included in this weekly listing, along with occasional R-rated films that may have entertainment value or educational value for older children with parental guidance.

Full events calendar and movie times are in today’s GO! Magazine.

Ralph Fiennes stars as the evil Lord Voldemort in “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1.� See the full review in today’s GO! Magazine.

FRIDAY IRISH CELTIC JAM: Bring an instrument to join a jam session of Celtic music, or come and listen; free; 6-9 p.m.; Dudley’s Bookshop Cafe, 135 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-749-2010. “IT’S A WONDERFUL LIFE�: The La Pine High School drama department presents the holiday classic about a man who sees what the world would be like without him when an angel visits on Christmas Eve; $5, $4 with a donation of canned food; 7 p.m.; La Pine High School, 51633 Coach Road; 541-322-5360. JAZZBROS AND CENTRAL SINGERS: The choirs perform a jazz fusion concert; $5; 7 p.m., doors open 6:30 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Wille Hall, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7512. “RENT�: BEAT performs the hit musical; $15, $10 students 18 and younger; 7:30 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-419-5558 or www.beatonline.org. THE CENTRAL OREGON MASTERSINGERS: The premier 45-voice choir present “Cathedral Classics� under the direction of Clyde Thompson; $15; 7:30 p.m.; Bend Church of the Nazarene, 1270 N.E. 27th St.; 541-385-7229 or www .co-mastersingers.com.

SATURDAY INDOOR SATURDAY SWAP: Sale of toys, tools, clothes, jewelry and more; free admission; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Indoor Swap Meet, 401 N.E. Second St., Bend; 541-317-4847. HARMONY 4 WOMEN CONCERT: Tickets available at The Ticket Mill in Bend, The High Desert Gallery in Bend and Sisters, Paulina Springs Bookstore in Redmond and Sisters, Great American Home Furnishings in Redmond, Home Federal Bank and Riches & Rags in Prineville and online at www.wrcco.org. Attendees can have their photos taken by a professional photographer, refreshments for sale; advance tickets are $12 for either show or $15 at the door; November 20, 2:30 and 7 p.m.; Summit High School, 2855 N.W. Clearwater Drive, Bend; 541-410-4162. “IT’S A WONDERFUL LIFE�: The La Pine High School drama department presents the holiday classic about a man who sees what the world would be like without him when an angel visits on Christmas Eve; $5, $4 with a donation of canned food; 7 p.m.; La Pine High School, 51633 Coach Road; 541-322-5360. POWELL BUTTE HOLIDAY CONCERT: Featuring Bronn & Kathryn Journey along with The Bells of Sunriver Handbell Choir; $8 in advance, $12 at the door; 7 p.m.; Powell Butte Christian Church, 13720 S.W. State Highway 126; 541-548-3066 or powellbuttechurch.com. “RENT�: BEAT performs the hit musical; $15, $10 students 18 and younger; 7:30 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-419-5558 or www .beatonline.org. THE CENTRAL OREGON MASTERSINGERS: The premier 45-voice choir present “Cathedral Classics� under the direction of Clyde Thompson; $15; 7:30 p.m.; Bend Church of the Nazarene, 1270 N.E. 27th St.; 541-385-7229 or www.co-mastersingers.com.

The Associated Press

By Roger Moore The Orlando Sentinel

‘Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1’ Pete Erickson / The Bulletin ile photo

The Central Oregon Mastersingers will perform Saturday at the Bend Church of the Nazarene.

THE CELTIC TENORS: Matthew Gilsenan, Daryl Simpson and James Nelson perform “A Celtic Christmas�; SOLD OUT; 7:30 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org.

SUNDAY DORIAN MICHAEL AND KENNY BLACKWELL: The mandolin and guitar duo performs; free; 2 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-312-1032 or www.deschuteslibrary.org/calendar.

MONDAY MARY YOUNGBLOOD: A native flute concert; free; 4 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Wille Hall, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-3782.

WEDNESDAY THANKSGIVING DINNER: A meal of turkey, mashed potatoes, gravy, yams, vegetables, a dessert and more; free; noon-3 p.m.; La Pine Community Kitchen, 16480 Finley Butte Road; 541-536-1312 or lapinecommunitykitchen@ crestviewcable.com.

Story times, library youth events for Nov. 19-26 BEND PUBLIC LIBRARY; 601 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-617-7097: • BABY STEPS: Ages 0-18 months; 11 a.m. Wednesday. • TODDLIN’ TALES: Ages 18-36 months; 10:15 a.m. Tuesday and Wednesday and 11 a.m. Tuesday. • PRESCHOOL PARADE: Ages 3-5; 10:15 a.m. Friday, 1:30 p.m. Tuesday. • SATURDAY STORIES: Ages 3-5; 10:15 a.m. Saturday.

• TODDLIN’ TALES: Ages 18-36 months; 10:15 and 11:15 a.m. Tuesday. • PRESCHOOL PARADE: Ages 3-5; 10:15 and 11:15 a.m. Wednesday. • MOVIE MANIA: Watch “Ramona and Beezusâ€?; ages 6-11; 1 to 3 p.m. Monday.

CROOK COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY; 175 S.W. Meadow Lakes Drive, Prineville; 541-4477978: • PRESCHOOL STORY TIME: Ages 3 and older; 6:30 p.m. Tuesday. • WE READ: Ages 0-3; 10 a.m. Wednesday and 6:30 p.m. Monday.

SUNRIVER AREA PUBLIC LIBRARY; 56855 Venture Lane, Sunriver; 541-312-1080:

JEFFERSON COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY; 241 S.W. Seventh St., Madras; 541-475-3351: • PRESCHOOL STORY TIME: Ages 3-5; 10:30 a.m. AND 6:30 p.m. Tuesday. • SPANISH STORY TIME: All ages; 1 p.m. Wednesday. • TODDLERS STORY TIME: Ages 0-2; 10:10 a.m. Tuesday.

HIGH DESERT MUSEUM; 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754: • TOTALLY TOUCHABLE TALES: Ages 2-5; 10:30 a.m. Tuesday; included with admission ($15 adults, $12 ages 65 and older, $9 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger) • WILD WEDNESDAYS: Treasure hunt for ages 6-12; included with admission ($10 adults, $9 ages 65 and older, $6 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger)

LA PINE PUBLIC LIBRARY; 16425 First St., La Pine; 541-312-1090: • FAMILY STORY TIME: All ages; 10:30 a.m. Tuesday. REDMOND PUBLIC LIBRARY; 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave., Redmond; 541-312-1054: • BABY STEPS: Ages 0-18 months; 10:30 a.m. Thursday.

THURSDAY GINGERBREAD JUNCTION: A display of gingerbread houses opens; runs through Dec. 26; free; 8 a.m.-9 p.m.; Sunriver Resort, 17600 Center Drive; 541-5934609 or www.sunriver-resort. com/landing/gingerbread.php. THANKSGIVING DAY COMMUNITY MEAL: A hot breakfast and traditional Thanksgiving dinner featuring holiday fare; free; 8:30-11:30 a.m.; Bend’s Community Center, 1036 N.E. Fifth St.; 541-312-2069. BEND TURKEY TROT: 5K and 10K races through the Old Mill District and along the Deschutes River; Online registration closes midnight on Monday Nov. 22, in-person registration is available at Fleet Feet until 6 p.m. Nov. 24 and at the Les Schwab Ampitheater 7:30 a.m. to 8:30 a.m. Nov. 25; Proceeds to benefit Girls on the Run; $20, $10 ages 12 and younger; 9 a.m.; Les Schwab Amphitheater, 344 S.W. Shevlin Hixon Drive; 541-322-9383 or www.bendturkeytrot.com. I LIKE PIE FUN RUN AND PIE CONTEST: Run or walk 2K, 5K, 10K or 10 miles and eat pie; bring a pie to enter judged baking contest; registration required; donations benefit NeighborImpact; $5 and five cans of food suggested donation; 9 a.m.; FootZone, 845 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-3568 or www.footzonebend.com. COMMUNITY OF REDMOND THANKSGIVING DINNER: Community dinner featuring holiday fare; open to everyone; free, donations accepted; noon3 p.m.; Redmond Senior Center, 325 N.W. Dogwood Ave.; 541-548-5483.

SISTERS PUBLIC LIBRARY; 110 N. Cedar St., Sisters; 541-312-1070: • FAMILY FUN STORY TIME: Ages 0-5; 10:30 a.m. Wednesday.

BARNES & NOBLE BOOKSELLERS; 2690 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend; 541-318-7242: • ONCE UPON A STORY TIME: All ages; 11 a.m. Friday.

CAMALLI BOOK COMPANY: 1288 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite C, Bend; 541-323-6134: • STORY TIME: Ages 2-6; 2 p.m. Tuesday. * Story times are free unless otherwise noted

F DVD  W

A very vivid ‘Nightmare Before Christmas’ By Jen Chaney The Washington Post

The ghoulish, stop-motionanimated sights in Halloween Town have never looked sharper than they do in Tim Burton’s “The Nightmare Before Christmas� two-disc collector’s edition ($33). The delightfully macabre tale, whose style can best be described as Rankin-Bass meets “Beetlejuice,� has become a holiday classic in the 15 years since its theatrical release. The version found on the new DVD has been digitally remastered, achieving a visual depth as close to multiple dimensions as a movie can get without forcing people to wear those goofy glasses. Viewers will justifiably marvel at the sparkling flecks in the Christmas Town snow and the moody grays that cast creepy-fun shadows throughout Halloween Town. And that’s just on the regular disc; one assumes

the picture is even brighter on the Blu-ray DVD ($40). So that’s the good “Nightmare� news. The bad? Many of the extras — including a making-of featurette, deleted scenes, two early short films by Burton and a series of storyboard-to-film comparisons — already appeared on previous releases. The DVD does contain some fresh supplemental material, though, including an often engaging commentary by Burton, Elfman and director Henry Selick; an unnecessarily lengthy look at how Disneyland’s Haunted Mansion attraction gets revamped, “Nightmare�-style, during the holidays; and a new introduction to Burton’s short, “Frankenweenie,� in which he reveals that production is under way on a full-length, animated adaptation of the family-dog-as-Frankenstein feature. Also original to the collector’s edition: Chris-

Submitted photo

Tim Burton’s “Nightmare Before Christmas� has been digitally remastered and re-released in a two-disc collector’s edition. topher Lee’s reading of the poem that inspired “Nightmare Before Christmas,� a rendering that will remind many of a certain Dr. Seuss favorite about a grinchy character who hates the Whos down in Whoville. Considering that the box set also comes with a digital copy

of the film, allowing its oddball beauty to be uploaded to mobile devices, most will be perfectly satisfied with the new “Nightmare� collection, especially if they don’t already own one of the previous incarnations. It’s too bad that Disney has not yet upgraded some of the more dated extras.

Rating: PG-13 for some sequences of intense action violence, frightening images and brief sensuality. What it’s about: The wizards and witch are a long way from Hogwarts, on the run as they try to foil You Know Who’s plans. The kid attractor factor: The Harry Potter epic winds down with an “Empire Strikes Back� dose of gloom and doom. Good lessons/bad lessons: Education builds the character we need to make it through life’s trials. Violence: Bloody, in a couple of instances. Language: The occasional mild oath. Sex: Near nudity in one scene of “brief sensuality.� Drugs: None Parents’ advisory: The PG-13 is for blood and violence and one slightly racy hallucination. Suitable for 10 and older.

‘The Next Three Days’ Rating: PG-13 for violence, drug material, language, some sexuality and thematic elements. What it’s about: A husband believes his wife’s innocence so completely that he sets out to bust her out of jail. The kid attractor factor: A prison break, thoughtfully considered, thrillingly executed. Good lessons/bad lessons: The average person does not have what it takes to plan a violent crime or commit one. Thankfully. Violence: A beating, shootings, blood. Language: Pretty clean, considering. Sex: Suggested. Drugs: Alcohol is consumed. Parents’ advisory: A bit too sophisticated to work for younger kids, suitable for 12 and older.

‘Unstoppable’ Rating: PG-13 for sequences of action and peril, and some language. What it’s about: Two railroad workers try to catch and stop a

runaway train. The kid attractor factor: A runaway train! Good lessons/bad lessons: Companies lay off their most experienced “heroes� every day. Violence: Injuries, an off-camera death. Language: Some profanity, understandable, considering the circumstances. Sex: Hooters Girls are ogled. Drugs: None Parents’ advisory: A very positive, family-friendly action picture, OK for 8 and older.

‘Megamind’ Rating: PG for action and some language What it’s about: A supervillain discovers life isn’t all that after he finally foils his superhero foe. The kid attractor factor: Animation in the chatty, wacky Dreamworks style Good lessons/bad lessons: “As long as there’s evil, good will rise up against it.� Violence: Cartoonish. Because it’s a cartoon. Language: A famous AC/DC song about a certain highway is played, but otherwise... Sex: Nope Drugs: None Parents’ advisory: A Dreamworks kids’ comedy that’s Disney/Pixar clean. Suitable for all ages.

‘Hereafter’ Rating: PG-13 for mature thematic elements including disturbing disaster and accident images, and for brief strong language. What it’s about: People who have lost loved ones or have been through near-death experiences are drawn to a man who can actually talk to the dead — reluctantly. The kid attractor factor: Matt Damon, an epic tsunami and visions of the afterlife. Good lessons/bad lessons: Go to the light. Or don’t, if you want to hang around to tell the tale. Violence: A vivid drowning, a deadly car accident. Language: Bits of profanity. Sex: Flirtation, rather overt. Drugs: Wine is consumed. Parents’ advisory: A bit over the heads of small children, but perhaps of some comfort to tweens and teens. OK for 10 and older.

Seeking friendly duplicate bridge? Go to www.bendbridge.org Five games weekly


E4 Friday, November 19, 2010 • THE BULLETIN TUNDRA

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HEART OF THE CITY

SALLY FORTH

FRAZZ

ROSE IS ROSE

STONE SOUP

LUANN

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM

DILBERT

DOONESBURY

PICKLES

ADAM

WIZARD OF ID

B.C.

SHOE

GARFIELD

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PEANUTS

MARY WORTH


THE BULLETIN • Friday, November 19, 2010 E5 BIZARRO

DENNIS THE MENACE

SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively. SOLUTION TO YESTERDAY’S SUDOKU

CANDORVILLE

H BY JACQUELINE BIGAR

GET FUZZY

NON SEQUITUR

SAFE HAVENS

SIX CHIX

ZITS

HERMAN

HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Friday, Nov. 19, 2010: This year, you become more mellow and easygoing. Others often seek you out with many ideas, wanting your support. Learn to carefully weigh the pros and cons, not eliminating any choice until you are ready. Often, others seem to be challenging. They simply have different points of view. If you are single, you have a kaleidoscope of suitors. The real issue is who, what and when? From late spring on could be quite promising. If you are attached, your partner could become more buoyant and demanding at the same time. Let him or her assume a larger role in your relationship. This person is simply expressing him- or herself. TAURUS can be challenging but has similar issues. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHHH You wake up on the right side of the bed. As a result, you are naturally indulgent of those around you. A boss, though aggravating, responds to your attitude. Complete rather than begin any new projects. Tonight: Out — your treat. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHHHH You cannot believe the difference a few days or a few hours make. Reach out for someone at a distance who means a lot to you. You note an easy flow, which is new. Be ready to update your opinions about a situation. Tonight: All smiles. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHH You don’t need to let others

know how you feel. Your general demeanor expresses your feelings. Nevertheless, you could be somewhat exhausted by the past few days. Don’t feel as if you need to push so hard. Tonight: Nothing is obligatory. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHH A meeting could prove to be your passport to a new direction. You discover many different ideas to get to the same end result, but everyone wants to get to this point. Note a change in a partner or dear friend. Tonight: Only where people are. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHH Complete as much as you can, freeing yourself up to relax for the next few days. Consider reorganizing your plans or moving a meeting as need be. Be willing to accept a completely foreign approach to a project. It just might work better. Tonight: A force to be dealt with. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHHH Explore options with confidence that up till now you had not dared to look at. Investigate different ideas. Understand those around you better by walking in their shoes. Your newfound empathy increases your ease in relating. Tonight: Follow the music. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHHH Let a partner play the stronger role he or she has always wanted to play. Realize what is happening between you and another person. You might need to revise your opinions about this person and what you want. Tonight: Go along with a pal’s suggestion. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHHH Others appear to be more confident than they have been

for a substantial period. Listen to suggestions. The more you incorporate others’ ideas, the more you gain their support. A change in communication styles might be strangely more effective. Tonight: Just don’t be alone. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHH A level, easy approach works beyond your expectations. Apply new information and perspectives as to how to handle your finances. Make more time for a hobby or some pastime you enjoy. Relaxed and centered, you will do better work. Tonight: Finally, some free time. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHHHH Your perspective about a project or key person in your life keeps updating. You know the matter in question won’t be boring, and will be worthwhile to pursue. Share more of those wild ideas you generally keep to yourself. Tonight: Let your hair down. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHH Your view keeps updating, though you might be exhausted by everything that you need to take in. A family situation, though difficult, could be worked through, if you so choose. Don’t get caught up in a power struggle. Tonight: Your home is your castle. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHHHH Finally, you feel more upbeat and relaxed. Understand what is happening between you and a friend. Perhaps some distance and perspective could make a difference. You cannot always hold people in the same place. They change. Tonight: TGIF. Meet friends. © 2010 by King Features Syndicate


C OV ER S T OR I ES

E6 Friday, November 19, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Adolescent changes are no excuse for misbehavior By Gregory Ramey Cox Newspapers

Q:

My 13-year-old daughter has been extremely moody lately. She’ll be very happy one moment and be crying over the most minor of situations a few minutes later. I realize she is going through many changes and I try to be understanding of her disrespectful and highly emotional behavior. My friends tell me just to wait a few years and she will come back to the sweet girl that I’ve always

Behavior Continued from E1 She teamed up with the WIC program to provide handouts to parents explaining how often infants wake at night — three to four times per night in the first eight weeks — and why they cry. It could be the baby needs a diaper change or a break from activity rather than another feeding. A baby who frowns may be a sign of too much interaction or too much noise. Her three-year study found that when mothers got information about baby behavior, more breast-fed their infants exclusively for the first four months, and the percentage of overweight babies dropped. A year and a half ago, Heinig started a “Secrets of Baby Behavior” blog, short 500-word posts illustrated with baby photos. It has grown from 40 readers to more than 36,000. “So many parents needed this information,” she said, recalling how a father soothing his baby at the Phoenix airport told her he knew what to do because he read a blog about it from the Univer-

Alone Continued from E1 But now, she is able to look forward to the holidays and enjoy them. Lillian Quinn, a lawyer at Non Hostile Family Law in Bend, says the holidays are a tremendous issue for divorcing parents. Most have never envisioned this scenario, and it is really hard. “It’s so emotionally painful. Your family is not the same as it was.”

The problem The holidays are about family, about being together and about feeling connected, according to Bend marriage and family therapist and co-parenting specialist Matilde Konigsberg. This is why, when a person feels as if his or her family is crumbling around them, they can feel devastated during the holidays. People going through a separation or divorce are at risk of feeling depressed and alienated. When they attend social functions where everyone else is laughing and smiling, they can end up feeling isolated, Konigsberg says. “We think we should be happy, but are sometimes in a sad situation. There is a disconnect,” said Konigsberg. “It’s OK to be in that place.” Divorce can also bring about financial stress, which can be amplified greatly during the holidays, according to Konigsberg. Dave Hakanson works for the

education, emotional support and reasonable rules and consequences, you can enjoy this important stage of your daughter’s life.

known. Is this typical behavior for kids her age? Adolescence is a time of many physical and psychological changes. This can result in behavior that appears highly emotional and unpredictable. However, you need to be careful that you don’t condone inappropriate behavior simply because she is going through puberty. Try the following approach. First, make sure your daughter is well educated on what is going on with her during this time of many

changes. Kids may be reluctant to talk with their parents about such issues but there are lots of information available on the Internet or books such as the “American Medical Association Girl’s Guide to Becoming a Teen.” Second, clearly communicate that she cannot use these changes as an excuse for misbehavior. Kids, like the rest of us, need to learn how to monitor our emotions. You need not wait for a couple of years for your daughter to “return to normal.” With good

sity of California, Davis. Parents of a newborn may be short on sleep, but that’s normal. “A 2-week-old sleeping through the night is not normal,” said Robbie Gonzalez-Dow, the regional breast-feeding liaison at Community Bridges, after hearing about babies being given Benadryl at night. “Commercials sell parents on the idea that they can have a perfect baby,” Heinig said. “On television, all those babies can be controlled. People don’t see real babies doing real things.” When a baby cries in public, strangers step in with advice, observed Cathy Cavanaugh, director of the Santa Cruz County Women Infants Children program. “The response to every cry is to feed,” added Dana Wagner, who chairs the Santa Cruz County Breastfeeding Coalition. “That leads to tremendous overfeeding.” Deutron Kebebew, who heads the PAPAS fatherhood project in Watsonville, Calif., said information about normal baby behavior would be useful for dads, too. To raise a child, he said, “it takes two.”

Alicia Zenteno, a Women, Infants and Children staff member, shares a quiet moment with her 3-month-old daughter, Sofia, at WIC in Watsonville, Calif., on Oct. 20. Zenteno doesn’t get anxious when her baby cries after learning the secrets of baby behavior from a study done by Jane Heinig of the University of California, Davis. “She’s trying to tell me something.”

A:

county, helping local parents who are separating or divorcing. When the time comes to discuss the holidays, Hakanson says this is often an emotional turning point in the meeting. “People don’t quite grasp the implications there about how their lives are going to change,” said Hakanson. A light flashes when they realize Christmas and the other holidays will never be the same. “It dawns on them in a new way.” Susan Pease Gadoua, a California licensed clinical social worker and author of “Contemplating Divorce: A Step-by-Step Guide to Deciding Whether to Stay or Go,” says it is entirely normal for parents to feel some sadness around the holidays. How long parents feel the raw emotions of the divorce depends on a number of factors, according to Gadoua. These include: whether both parents made the choice to split, whether it came as a surprise, the number, age and temperaments of the children, whether a move is involved, the financial resources available and whether there is a new romantic relationship or betrayal involved. Robert Emery, a divorce mediation expert with the University of Virginia, said, “Time heals, but often not fast enough and never completely. Divorced parents need to realize that it will likely take a few years for things to really get better. And even then, they are likely to feel a tinge of the old emotions, because the feelings are both powerful and genuine.”

Q:

My third grader has numerous school projects that he cannot do on his own. I’ve seen some of the other students’ work and it appears they were done by adults. I don’t want my son to be at a disadvantage, so I end up helping him. Is this wrong? Yes. I can’t imagine your child is learning very much

A:

when you do his school projects. Meet with the teacher and express your concerns. Teachers can readily distinguish parent projects from ones completed by students. I’m certain the teacher will reassure you that your child won’t be penalized for doing his own work. Gregory Ramey, Ph.D., is a child psychologist and vice president for outpatient services at The Children’s Medical Center of Dayton, Ohio.

Casey Valentine / Santa Cruz Sentinel

Resources UP TO PARENTS (www.uptoparents.org): Dave Hakanson recommends this website as a good resource for parents who are splitting up.

MATILDE KONIGSBERG (www.shifting matters.com): This is the website for this local Bend co-parenting specialist.

Keeping positive During Thanksgivings without her sons, Chapin and her now-husband would travel to the coast. This gave them something to look forward to. “Try to plan something for yourself. Try not to sit around wallowing in your sorrows.” Her family has also worked to establish new traditions that aren’t bound by any specific day. Each year they go to the Christmas brunch in Sunriver (held before Christmas) and they drive to Eagle Crest to look at the holiday lights. All of the kids look forward to these traditions. Gadoua strongly recommends creating new rituals. “Trying to re-create what you did when you and your spouse were together can be painful and leave you feeling empty.” A few examples include: hosting a party with friends, taking the children back East and attending midnight

services at church. “Shifts can make a difference in reclaiming the holidays even when they are subtle.” Konigsberg suggests parents make a concerted effort to focus on the wellbeing of the kids. They will naturally want to please both parents and feel torn. Parents can assure the children that they are loved and that there is good in the world. “Avoid any conflict, avoid any confrontation,” said Konigsberg. “As they get older, it gets easier,” said Chapin. Her sons are now 11 and 8. Her oldest has a cell phone, which makes it easy for him to call and check in.

Dos and dont’s Chapin doesn’t want to see her sons go. She wants them to stay with her, but she knows she can’t say that to them. “You don’t want to make it worse.” Emery says parents can tell their children they will miss them and also tell them they want them to have a blast. “You want your children’s focus to be on themselves, not on missing you (even if all you can do is think about them).” Competing can also be a problem. The first year after the split, Chapin says they pretended that Santa also came to their house (albeit a day early). Since then, they stopped doing that because it was just too much. “It’s not helpful to try to outdo each other,” said Chapin. She has realized over time that, while kids like opening presents, that is not

what they really care about. “It’s about where your heart is.” Quinn warns against drinking too much alcohol, as people are already likely feeling emotional. She also encourages parents to talk to a friend or confidant about their feelings. “If you’re struggling, don’t put that on your kids. Don’t load them with guilt.” Hakanson agrees with this sentiment, saying, “We know conflict between parents causes the most harm to children.” It is parents’ job to work particularly hard during the holidays to try to get along. Planning ahead is a great idea, says Konigsberg. Parents should discuss plans for the holidays before they arrive. Konigsberg suggests people focus on “spiritual centeredness.” Maybe take a walk by themselves, meditate, do yoga, write, dance, watch an uplifting movie, go skiing, “anything to lift the spirit.” If the big picture doesn’t look too rosy, just try to focus on small things. “Little happiness.” She also says it’s OK to try to avoid or disengage from difficult relatives. Quinn suggests people consider volunteering — forcing themselves out of their normal routines and giving something back. She also encourages people to pamper and take care of themselves. Alandra Johnson can be reached at 541-617-7860 or at ajohnson@bendbulletin.com.

Toys Continued from E1

Kryptonics Shredder Combo Series By Bravo Sports $49.99 Appropriate for ages 8 and older Toy Tips: B+ Fun: B+ Movement: A Thinking: A Personality: C Social Interaction: B Skateboarding is an individual sport that requires appropriate safety equipment, especially for beginners. Toy Tips Magazine recommends lessons, but we know from our research that kids would rathSubmitted photo er hop on and go. This combo pack includes a 31-inch-long, nine-ply maple double kickboard with slim 50-millimeter PVC street wheels, OPP helmet and OPP pad set (knees and elbows). This is a great set for the new skateboarder. Skateboarding can develop confidence while practicing gross motor movement. Tester’s tip: Never let a child skateboard in the street. Look for local skateparks in your area.

RumbaTime By RumbaTime $20 Appropriate for ages 10 and older Toy Tips: A Fun: B+ Movement: A Thinking: B+ Personality: C Social Interaction: C For the swimming or diving enthusiast, this ultra-lightweight (10 grams) silicone watch is water-resistant to 99 feet. Children can time themselves for self-motivation with competitive swimming or use it the old-fashioned way and keep time. The watch comes in over 32 colors and 10 different styles. Recommendations from Marianne M. Szymanski, publisher of www.toytips.com, Toy Tips Magazine and coauthor of “Toy Tips: A Parent’s Essential Guide to Smart Toy Choices.”

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THE BULLETIN • Friday, November 19, 2010 F1

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The Bulletin

General Merchandise

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Pets and Supplies

Pets and Supplies

Pets and Supplies

Pets and Supplies

Pets and Supplies

Lhasa Apso Pup, 8 weeks, female, 1st shots, & dewormed, $300, 541-548-5772.,

Rescued kittens still available for adoption! Social, altered, shots, ID chip, more. Nice adult cats also avail. Visit at 65480 78th, Bend, Sat/Sun 1-4, other days by appt. See www.craftcats.org for map/ photos/more. 541-389-8420 or 598-5488 for info, lv msg.

English Bulldog puppies, AKC, Grand sire by Champion Cherokee Legend Rock, #1 Bulldog in USA ‘06, ‘07 and ‘08, ready to go! $1300/ea. 541-306-0372

200 202

Want to Buy or Rent

CAVALIER KING CHARLES PUREBRED pups, 1 male left! $800. References available. Call 541-664-6050 shellyball1@mac.com

Shop space wanted 200 sq.ft., power, secure, central location in Bend. 541-350-8917. Wanted:Jewelry buffer/polisher, silver smithing tools, equip & supplies. 541-350-7004

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Holiday Bazaar & Craft Shows Country Christmas & More! Fri. 9-7 & Sat. 9-4 Smith Rock Community Church 8344 11th St., Terrebonne Western Theme & more. Non-Perishable items for church bank appreciated. 541-923-3633

208

Pets and Supplies 2 Baby Bearded Dragons, $50 each. 2 Baby Chameleons, $50 each. 541-350-8949 AKC Shih-tzu Pup, male 15 weeks, started with loving family, Lovable and very playful. $499. Please call (541) 306-7479 Beagle Puppies - 8 weeks, 1st/2nd shots. Great with kids. $250 (541)419-4960.

FREE KITTENS! Pet-quality, ready Dec. 15. Only 2 left. Call 541-420-0097. Free to good home, adult cats, spayed/neutered. Moving to Wisconsin, 541-385-8361.

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads Chihuahua- absolutely adorable teacups, wormed, 1st shots, $250, 541-977-4686. CHIHUAHUA - AKC Longhaired Tiny Blue Brindle Apple head boy. 5 MOS trained loves everyone! Sweet, needs best buddy!! $300 541-207-4466 Chi-Pom puppies, 1 boy, 1 girl, 1st shots. $175 each. Call Brooke, 541-771-2606 Cockapoo pups AKC parents. Low shed, great family dogs. $300. 541-504-9958 Cockatiel male w/nice cage, stand, food, $75. 3 Canary males, $40-$50 each. Canary hen, $15. 548-7947. Dachshund AKC mini puppies, www.bendweenies.com,mocha green eyes,$350,541-508-4558

dorky pups, small, ready now! Can e-mail pix. Call 541-874-2901, or charley2901@gmail.com English Bulldog AKC male, “Cooper” is 8 mo. old, all shots, $1500. 541-325-3376.

The Bulletin German Shepherd Puppies, 4 white, $700-$800, 4 dark mahogany, $500, great disposition, parents on-site, no papers, Gene, 541-610-5785.

German Shepherd Puppies, 7 weeks, black, parents on site, $350. 541-536-5538 German Shorthair male, 4 mos, AKC, champ lines, calm, handsome, smart, started training. $400. 541-330-0277 German Wirehaired Pointer Pups, champ bloodlines, great colors, $400. Will trade for guns. 541-548-3408

German Wirehair Pointer puppies, M/F, 11 wks AKC/ NAVDHA. 541-805-9478 jcallis@eoni.com Golden Retriever AKC puppies, Born Oct 6th. Sire is beautiful English Cream. Light Golden Dam, bred for temperament with obedience champion bloodline. Males $550. 503-481-3366

Lhasa Apso puppies! 1 male & 4 females, multi-color, ready now. $175 ea. 541-416-1123

Golden Retriever Puppies!! AKC, Sweet and Sassy! 1 male, 1 female, ready now. $600. 541-419-3999 or email oregonhomes@hotmail.com

www.bendbulletin.com

210

Shih Tzu AKC, adorable, spoiled pups. Beautiful markings, dew clawed, $400, avail. 11/24, showing 11/20,541-514-8160

Golden Retriever pups AKC, $500. shots, wormed vet-checked. (509) 281-0502.

Find Classifieds at 210

Furniture & Appliances Furniture & Appliances Med-Lift Recliner Chair, large & comfortable, brown. Purchased new 9/2010, used 4x, $1200 obo. 541-420-1294 Brushed Nickel headboard and footboard for queen size bed, $150. 541-385-9177 Coffee & End Table, Cherry, $200, call 503-933-0814 local.

212

Antiques & Collectibles

DEALER DICKER DAY Come meet the dealers and make your best deal! Perfect opportunity to pick up holiday gifts! Sat., Nov. 20 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., 498 So. 6th in The Cent-Wise Building, downtown Redmond.

Couch hide-a-bed, brown, La-ZBoy, new never used mattress, Lawyer’s Bookcase, $425. PiMini-Loveseat/hide a bed, tan, $150, 503-933-0814, . ano stool with ball & claw unique, perfect for RV, $150 feet, $45. 541-389-5408 Fridge, Admiral, 21.1 cu ft, OBO 503-933-0814, local black, top freezer, like new, Silky Terrier, AKC, Female New La-z-Boy Lift Seat recliner, The Bulletin reserves the right $200 OBO. 541-408-2749 puppy. 5 Months old. Full to publish all ads from The brown, used 2 weeks. $1500 reg. $300. 541-316-0638 Bulletin newspaper onto The Fridge, Igloo, AC/DC, 2 cu.ft, new; sell $850. 541-620-1502 Bulletin Internet website. just right truckers/travel, like Range, Gas, New Kenmore Welsh Terrier puppy, Adorable new, $80, 503-933-0814, local White, $300; Fridge, good Female, ready Dec. 15th for Min-Pin pups, Adorable pure cond., Kenmore, white, top Christmas. $800. Call GE 18 Cu ft. Refrigerator, 2 yrs bred, 8 weeks old, Black & old, top freezer & icemaker, freezer w/ice maker, 21 541-910-3020. Tan, 4 males $400/ea and 1 $300 cash. 541-526-5048 cu.ft., $200; 541-549-8626 Velvet tobacco tin, round, female $500. up-to-date, on $10/pocket, $5; black rotor GENERATE SOME excitement in Refrigerator, 17 cu ft Maytag, shots. Pics available. phone, $20. 541-548-8718. glass shelves, frost-free, your neigborhood. Plan a ga541-633-6148 (leave msg) white, $150. 541-549-5068 rage sale and don't forget to Yorkie Mix pups, very tiny & 215 advertise in classified! Papillons (3), 6 mo. female, cute, 8 weeks old, $220 Second Hand 385-5809. Coins & Stamps black/white, $300, 4.5 yr. fecash. 541-678-7599 Mattresses, sets & male, red/white, $250, 5 yr. Hotpoint Washer, good cond, singles, call old male, can be papered,$350, WANTED TO BUY 210 you haul. $50 or best offer. alvinoshields@yahoo.com US & Foreign Coin, Stamp & 541-598-4643. 541-633-7384 Furniture & Appliances Currency collect, accum. Pre POODLES AKC Toy, tiny Appliances! A-1 Quality & Honesty! Lift recliner, very good condi- Washer, like new, used twice, & 1964 silver coins, bars, dryer, 3 yrs old, white, $295/ toy. Also Pom-a-Poos. Home tion, $400 OBO, call rounds, sterling fltwr. Gold A-1 Washers & Dryers pair. Rachel, 541-408-4937 raised! 541-475-3889 541-317-4636. coins, bars, jewelry, scrap & $125 each. Full Warranty. dental gold. Diamonds, Rolex Free Del. Also wanted W/D’s Log Bed, Custom, in Pine, 212 **QUAKER PARROT/PARA& vintage watches. No coldead or alive. 541-280-7355. queen size, $400, call KEET** to good home. Blue, Antiques & lection too large or small. Bed541-480-3068. 2 yr. old, hand raised. Comes rock Rare Coins 541-549-1658 Collectibles w/large, NICE cage/stand. Appliances, new & recondi- Mattress, Queen size,dbl. pillowtioned, guaranteed. Over$150. 541-848-1612. 240 top,dark floral, like new, stored BROTHERS portable typewriter, stock sale. Lance & Sandy’s chinamending@gmail.com in plastic, $3000 new, sell for only $20. Crafts and Hobbies Maytag, 541-385-5418 $350, 503-933-0814 local. 541-548-8718. Queensland Heelers Standards & mini,$150 & up. Bed Frames,2 Antique, twin, ca. Mattress Set, queen size, Brown gallon Purex jug, $10; Alpaca Yarn, various colors/ blends/sparkle. 175 yds/skein 1900,carved headboard/foot541-280-1537 w/frame, very good cond., Mrs. Butterworth glass syrup $7.50-8.50 ea. 541-385-4989 http://rightwayranch.spaces.live.com board, $200, 541-815-5000 $50 OBO, 541-647-2621. bottle, $12. 541-548-8718. Mini-Dachshund pups, PURE BRED Rare Dapples & black/tan.2 males & 1 female. Strong, healthy, home nurtured. 1st shots, ready to be your companion, $300 & $350 541-848-5677,541-771-1165

HOUND PUPS. We have 3 females and 1 male, 9 weeks, 1st and 2nd shots, all black and tan color variety. Ready to go to a good home. $100. If interested give a holler at 541-233-3355. Thanks! Invisible Fence, new, $150, extra collar, $25, 503-933-0814, local. Kittens! Young, social, altered, shots, ID chipped. Rescued, avail. thru foster moms. Tom Tom Motel next to Sonic, 3600 N. 3rd, see mgr., Sat/ Sun 12-4 only. 541-815-7278 Low adoption fee. Lab AKC Puppies Ready to Go! Excellent family/hunting dogs. For details call 541-601-8757 LAB PUPS, AKC yellows & blacks, champion filled lines, OFA hips, dew claws, 1st shots, wormed, parents on site, $500/ea. 541-771-2330. www.kinnamanranch.com Labradoodles, Australian Imports - 541-504-2662 www.alpen-ridge.com Labrador pups AKC, chocolate, yellow, hips guaranteed, $250 to $450. 541-954-1727

Shih Tzu puppies, 3 girls, 2 boys, 1 very small female, $450-$750. 541-788-0090

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F2 Friday, November 19, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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AD PLACEMENT DEADLINES

PLACE AN AD

Edited by Will Shortz

Monday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Mon. Wednesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Tues. Thursday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Wed. Friday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Thurs. Saturday Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:00am Fri. Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:00 Fri. Sunday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. PRIVATE PARTY RATES Starting at 3 lines *UNDER $500 in total merchandise 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16.00

Place a photo in your private party ad for only $15.00 per week.

Garage Sale Special

OVER $500 in total merchandise 4 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $17.50 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $23.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $32.50 28 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $60.50

4 lines for 4 days. . . . . . . . . $20.00

(call for commercial line ad rates)

A Payment Drop Box is available at Bend City Hall. CLASSIFICATIONS BELOW MARKED WITH AN (*) REQUIRE PREPAYMENT as well as any out-of-area ads. The Bulletin reserves the right to reject any ad at any time.

CLASSIFIED OFFICE HOURS: MON.-FRI. 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. SATURDAY by telephone 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

*Must state prices in ad

is located at: 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, Oregon 97702 PLEASE NOTE: Check your ad for accuracy the first day it appears. Please call us immediately if a correction is needed. We will gladly accept responsibility for one incorrect insertion. The publisher reserves the right to accept or reject any ad at anytime, classify and index any advertising based on the policies of these newspapers. The publisher shall not be liable for any advertisement omitted for any reason. Private Party Classified ads running 7 or more days will publish in the Central Oregon Marketplace each Tuesday. 246

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Guns & Hunting and Fishing

Guns & Hunting and Fishing

Misc. Items

Building Materials

.40 SW Beretta 9000S, as new, holds 10+1, $575 OBO. Call 541-728-1036

Walther/Interarms PPK/S .380 Compact Auto. Excellent condition, new holster, 2 clips, original box and manual. $475 541-598-7632

GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809.

Bend Habitat RESTORE Building Supply Resale Quality at LOW PRICES 740 NE 1st 312-6709 Open to the public .

GENERATOR 2200W on wheels, good cond., $115. 541-410-3425.

Carrier 3 ton Heat Pump and Furnace, $1000. Bradford White 80 gallon elect water heater, $125. 541-480-6900.

.44 Magnum, 150 rounds, $795. Doc. Pre-Ban AR-15 w/37mm Launcher! 4 clips, $1395.30-06, 15-400 wide Bushnell weatherproof, $595. Barretta .380 new in box, ankle holster, $395. Security Shotgun, $295. 541.601.6350. www.iBuy2Day.com/home Bushmaster M4A3 .223 calibre with 5 clips, like new. $850. 541-689-2752 CASH!! For Guns, Ammo & Reloading Supplies. 541-408-6900.

GIANT Gun & Knife Show Portland Expo Center Nov. 19, 20, 21, 2010 Fri., 12-6, Sat. 9-5, Sun. 10-4. Admission $9 503-363-9564 wesknodelgunshows.com

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Computers HP Office Jet 6500, wireless all in one printer like new $100, HP price $199, new in box HP keyboard $20, 541-389-0340 THE BULLETIN requires computer advertisers with multiple ad schedules or those selling multiple systems/ software, to disclose the name of the business or the term "dealer" in their ads. Private party advertisers are defined as those who sell one computer.

Juniper Rim Game Preserve - Brothers, OR Our Chukars are ready to fly! Bring a shotgun, give ‘em a try! They’re on special this fall so just give us a call! 541-419-3923;541-419-8963

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Misc. Items Bedrock Gold & Silver BUYING DIAMONDS & R O L E X ’ S For Cash 541-549-1592

Buying Diamonds /Gold for Cash SAXON'S FINE JEWELERS

541-389-6655

Ruger 338 M-77 S/S, synthetic stock, Nikon 4.5-14 scope, $675 OBO. 541-420-9063

BUYING Lionel/American Flyer trains, accessories. 541-408-2191.

Ruger Red Label 20G 26" O/U complete. 99%+. $995/ offer. Jon at 541-480-3945

Dress, formal, women’s party, black, gold sequins, brand new, $40, 541-508-3886.

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Estate Sales INDOOR ESTATE SALE Sat-Sun 8-4 snow or shine. No early birds. Bedroom, dining, & living room furntiure, piano, linens, kitchen, holiday, jewelry, nick nacks, patio,& garden. 63334 Brightwater Dr, Bend

Look What I Found!

You'll find a little bit of everything in The Bulletin's daily garage and yard sale section. From clothes to collectibles, from housewares to hardware, classified is always the first stop for cost-conscious consumers. And if you're planning your own garage or yard sale, look to the classifieds to bring in the buyers. You won't find a better place for bargains!

Call Classifieds: 385-5809 or Fax 385-5802 282

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The Bulletin Offers Free Private Party Ads • 3 lines - 3 days • Private Party Only • Total of items advertised must equal $200 or Less • Limit one ad per month • 3-ad limit for same item advertised within 3 months 541-385-5809 • Fax 541-385-5802 Wanted - paying cash for Hi-fi audio & studio equip. McIntosh, JBL, Marantz, Dynaco, Heathkit, Sansui, Carver, NAD, etc. Call 541-261-1808

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Medical Equipment Wheelchair, Breezy, black & chrome, exc. cond., $100 OBO. 541-647-2621.

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Snow Removal Equipment Snowblower, John Deer 826D,26” cut, 8HP, like new, asking $600, 541-504-8484. SNOW BLOWER - Signature, like new. Paid $750; selling for $350. 541-536-3537

SNOW PLOW, Boss 8 ft. with power turn , excellent condition

HH FREE HH Garage Sale Kit Place an ad in The Bulletin for your garage sale and receive a Garage Sale Kit FREE! KIT INCLUDES: • 4 Garage Sale Signs • $1.00 Off Coupon To Use Toward Your Next Ad • 10 Tips For “Garage Sale Success!” • And Inventory Sheet PICK UP YOUR GARAGE SALE KIT AT: 1777 SW Chandler Ave. Bend, OR 97702

Garage Sale Sat. only, 8-3. Couch/loveseat, Eddie Bauer bassinet, X-Box 360, all season 17” tires (90% tread), lawnmower, lots of baby stuff, clothes, misc. 2649 NE Laramie Way.

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Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale

All Year Dependable Firewood: SPLIT dry Lodgepole, $150 for 1 cord or $290 for 2, Bend del. Cash Check Visa/MC 541-420-3484

Huge Indoor Warehouse Garage/Rummage sale, Fri-Sat, 9 until slow down! Make offers, everything goes! 61510 American Lane.

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Sales Redmond Area

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Sales Other Areas DON'T FORGET to take your signs down after your garage sale and be careful not to place signs on utility poles! www.bendbulletin.com

The Satterlee Estate Sale: 720 NW Glass Dr, Madras. 50 years accumulation, household items, furniture & antiques, Christmas Decor, small boat & etc. Sale Starts Nov. 19th & 20th, Fri. 8-4, Sat. 8-12.

Tractor, Case 22 hp., fewer than 50 hrs. 48 in. mower deck, bucket, auger, blade, move forces sale $11,800. 541-325-1508.

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Hay, Grain and Feed

SPLIT, DRY LODGEPOLE DELIVERY INCLUDED! $175/CORD. Leave message, 541-923-6987

Bluegrass Straw mid-size 3x3, $25/bale; Orchard grass hay mid-size 3x3 $45/bale. Small bale orchard/alfalfa mix, $160/ton. Volume discounts, delivery avail. 541-480-8648.

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Gardening Supplies & Equipment

Premium Orchard grass, & Premium Oat grass mix. 3x3 midsize bales, no rain, no weeds. Orchard @$65/bale; Oat @$50/bale 541-419-2713

BarkTurfSoil.com

Wheat Straw: Certified & Bedding Straw & Garden Straw; Kentucky Bluegrass; Compost; 541-546-6171.

Instant Landscaping Co. PROMPT DELIVERY 541-389-9663

Horses and Equipment

Worm Bins, (2) all holes properly drilled, ready for new habitants! $6. 541-389-7280

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Lost and Found Found Bersa Series 95 .380, will hold until 3/12/2011. Jason, PO Box 1001, Bend, OR 97709 FOUND Camera, Snow Goose Rd OWWII in Bend, October. Call to I.D., 916-624-5941.

FOUND Mercedes Keys, 11/14, center of Mt. Washington Dr. Call to identify 541-382-6251 Found Pit Bull male, cropped ears/tail, brindle/white, NE Bend, 11/10. 541-706-1681

FOUND WATCH in Boonesborough area. 541-388-1781. LOST small, black zipped bag, cash inside with grocery receipts. 541-383-1475. Precious stone found around SE duplex near Ponderosa Park. Identify 541-382-8893. REMEMBER: If you have lost an animal don't forget to check The Humane Society in Bend, 382-3537 or Redmond, 923-0882 or Prineville, 447-7178

341 200 ACRES BOARDING Indoor/outdoor arenas, stalls, & pastures, lessons & kid’s programs. 541-923-6372 www.clinefallsranch.com

HORSES FOR SALE! Looking for good homes for TB, Clydes, Arab, QH. Call and come see. 541-420-3186. NELSON #760-10W brand new back-to-back wall-mounted automatic waterers including plumbing kit & insulation, $850. 541-948-3170 Quarterhorses, young, very gentle, for Christmas maybe? Call 541-382-7995, evenings.

READY FOR A CHANGE? Don't just sit there, let the Classified Help Wanted column find a new challenging job for you. www.bendbulletin.com

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Farmers Column 12x24 STORAGE BUILDINGS for protecting hay, firewood, livestock etc. $1743 Installed. 541-617-1133. CCB #173684. kfjbuilders@ykwc.net A farmer that does it right & is on time. Power no till seeding, disc, till, plow & plant new/older fields, haying services, cut, rake, bale, Gopher control. 541-419-4516 Orchard Grass, $165/ton, Alfalfa, $150/ton, Mix Hay, $160/ton, Feeder Hay, $100/ton, cheap delivery avail., 541-891-4087.

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Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Electronics Engineer needed in Bend, Requirements incl. 4 yrs. exp. Send resume. to Nanometrics, Inc., 1550 Buckeye Drive, Milpitas, CA 95035.

ATTENTION: Recruiters and Businesses -

Executive

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Schools and Training Advertise in 30 Daily newspapers! $525/25-words, 3days. Reach 3 million classified readers in Alaska, Idaho, Oregon, Montana, Washington & Utah. (916) 288-6019 email: elizabeth@cnpa.com for the Pacific Northwest Daily Connection. (PNDC) ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Paralegal, *Accounting, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. Call 866-688-7078 www.CenturaOnline.com (PNDC) TRUCK SCHOOL www.IITR.net Redmond Campus Student Loans/Job Waiting Toll Free 1-888-438-2235

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1st Quality Grass Hay Barn stored, 2 string, no weeds 65 lb. bales, $160/ton; 5+ tons, $150/ton. Patterson Ranch in Sisters, 541-549-3831

Post-Moving Sale/Downsizing! FOUND Fly Box at South Junction. Call to identify, Lots of extras, chairs house541-848-2226 hold art, etc. Leather sectional & queen bed frame. FOUND hunting Rifle, Powell Fri-Sat, 9-2, 3750 SW Gene Butte area October 30. Call Sarazan at The Greens. 541-771-6558. 541-504-7171 FOUND man’s ring 11/15, BLM land east of Redmond, Call to Find It in identify. 541-548-5024 The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

MACHETE POWER-FEED 24 PTO 3 pt. chipper, $495. 541-317-8412, 541-408-2877

CRUISE THROUGH classified when you're in the market for a new or used car.

SUPER TOP SOIL www.hersheysoilandbark.com Screened, soil & compost mixed, no rocks/clods. High humus level, exc. for flower beds, lawns, gardens, straight screened top soil. Bark. Clean fill. Deliver/you haul. 541-548-3949.

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Kioti CK-20 2005, 4x4, hydrostatic trans, only 85 hrs, full service at 50 hrs., $7600 or make offer, 541-788-7140.

Fuel and Wood A-1 Quality Tamarack & Red Fir Split & Delivered,$185/cord, Rounds $165. Seasoned, burns twice as long as lodgepole. 541-416-3677

$3,000. 541-385-4790.

Sales Northeast Bend Sales Southeast Bend Christmas/Garage Sale: Sat. 9-3, Christmas decor, karaoke machine, bicycle, bestseller books, DVDs, glassware, clothes, baked goods, dog fleece outfits, gifts for giving or personal enjoyment, 62934 Marsh Orchid Dr, off Empire or Purcell, Follow signs.

Gas Pot Belly stove, cost new $1700, sell for $500 OBO, never used, 541-549-4834

YEAR END SPECIAL $130 cord lodgepole, split & delivered, $100 a cord for rounds. 541-610-6713.

Sales Northwest Bend MOVING SALE! Lots of miscellaneous, plus western/horse items. Fri. & Sat., 9-5, 64770 Horseman Lane, in Tumalo. MOVING SALE! Lots of miscellaneous, plus western/horse items. Fri. & Sat., 9-5, 64770 Horseman Lane, in Tumalo.

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Heating and Stoves

Gas fireplace, Lopi Freestanding, 40,000 BTU, glass front, w/brass, exc. cond., $450 OBO, 541-382-8543.

Employment

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TV, Stereo and Video Jacket, Mens, leather, brown, Farm Equipment GARAGE DOOR exc. cond., 48 long, $40, and Machinery 42" Hitachi HD/TV works great, 6’x6’ roll-up type, $25. 541-508-3886. Oak entertainment center Call 541-923-0442 John Deere 10’ seed drill, grass with lighted bridge and shelf. Moving Boxes, Dish Pack, 10 and grain and fertilizer boxes, Cabinets have speaker doors avail., $4 each, New Window, double paned, 7” spacing, exc. cond., 35”x35”, easy tilt-out for and glass doors on top for 541-923-8868. $3,450 OBO; 2006 Chalcleaning, $40. 541-389-7280 collectibles. Excellent shape. lenger 16x18 in-line baler, NEED TO CANCEL $400 takes both, call Plumbing materials & tools, low bale count, exc. cond. OR PLACE YOUR AD? 541-318-1907. some free, call $13,500 OBO. 541-419-2713. The Bulletin Classifieds 541-504-4588. has an "After Hours" Line 55” Mitsubishi projection TV, Call 383-2371 24 hrs. great condition, great pic266 to cancel or place your ad! ture, $350. 541-548-9861

Gun + bullets for sale: NEF handi-rifle 45-70 w/Bushnell 3x9 scope $200; 7 boxes .22 cal bullets (100 in a box), $8 per box; 1 box .38/357 cal bullets SWC (500 in box) $35; 2 boxes .44 cal bullets SWC (500 in each box), $45 257 per box; 3 boxes .30 cal bullets (100 in each box) $10 Musical Instruments per box; 2 boxes .338 cal bullets (50 in each box), $15 FREE Piano, Ivory keys perfect, per box; 2 boxes 7mm cal exterior & sound good, older bullets (100 in each box), upright. 541-548-7254 $10 per box. Call Mike 541 480 3018 Piano, Story & Clark Spinet Size Maple, w/bench, $400 GUNS OBO, 541-549-8626. Buy, Sell, Trade 541-728-1036. H & H FIREARMS Buy, Sell, Trade, Consign Across From Pilot Butte Drive-In 541-382-9352

Farm Market

Looking for Employment Caregiver w/20+yrs exp seeks job; all ages/aspects of care. Pets, too! Great rates, ref’s, bkgrnd check. 541-419-7085 Grandma loves to cook & bake. Let me share/teach what I know. 541-588-0455

Director, Humane Society of Central Oregon. Ideal candidate will have 5-8 yrs. prof. management exp., including fundraising, PR & donor development in a non-profit setting. Visit www.hsco.org for position details & to submit letter of interest & resume to: careers@hsco.org. No phone calls please. Equal Opportunity Employer.

Front Office Position 4 Days a week, dental assistant preferred. Drop off resume at 2078 NE Professional Ct., Bend. 541-382-2281. Jack Miller, DMD Branden Ferguson, DDS

General DO YOU NEED A GREAT EMPLOYEE RIGHT NOW? Call The Bulletin before noon and get an ad in to publish the next day! 385-5809. VIEW the Classifieds at: www.bendbulletin.com

Groomer

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Employment Opportunities Administrative Assistant Assist a tax negotiations attorney in casual Bend office. Client contact and clerical support. Clerical or legal support experience and college degree a plus. Benefits after 90 days. Fax cover letter, resume and salary requirement to: 541-330-0641.

Advertise and Reach over 3 million readers in the Pacific Northwest! 30 daily newspapers, six states. 25-word classified $525 for a 3-day ad. Call (916) 288-6010; (916) 288-6019 or visit www.pnna.com/advertising_ pndc.cfm for the Pacific Northwest Daily Connection. (PNDC) Caregiver: Adult Family home 2-3 24 hr. shifts/week. Must have criminal background check & exp. preferred. Call w/resume 541-317-5012. Caregiver Prineville senior care home looking for Care Manager for two 24-hour shifts per week. Must be mature and compassionate, and pass criminal background check. Ref. required. 541-447-5773.

CRUISE THROUGH Classified when you're in the market for a new or used car.

Dental Receptionist/Office Manager, Attractive benefit package. Must be detailed in computer work & have exc. people skills, Refs. required. Fax resume to 541-475-6159.

HOODOO SKI AREA GROOMER - Full-time, at least 1 yr. exp req'd email jim@hoodoo.com for more info print off app from website www.hoodoo.com Hairstylist / Nail Tech Also needs to be licensed for waxing. Recent relevant exp necessary. Hourly/commission. Teresa, 541-382-8449.

Health Care Behavioral Health Utilization Management Specialist: Full time position in public sector managed behavioral health organization. Position located in Bend, Oregon. Under administrative direction BHUMS is responsible for planning, implementing, monitoring and coordinating mental health/ substance abuse outpatient utilization management program and related functions; and performs related duties as required. Requires min. 3 yrs. of related experience, master's level Oregon clinical license (or license eligible). Competitive salary; excellent benefits. Call (541) 753-8997 or visit our website www.abhabho.org Receptionist - Full Time, at Cinder Rock Veterinary Clinic in Redmond. Wage depends on exp. Medical/Retirement benefits. Some evenings and Saturdays. Send letter of application and/or resume to Dena at 2630 S. Canal Blvd. Redmond, OR 97756. Deadline for applications is December 3, 2010.

Retail

MORE THAN JUST A JOB Looking for a career? We have opportunities available as Assistant Store Manager for our Redmond Retail Store. Successful candidates will be results-oriented team players with at least 5 years big-box retail leadership experience and excellent interpersonal, customer service, and computer skills. Must pass pre-employment drug screen and criminal background check. Advancement opportunities available. DOE + benefit package, including medical/dental/life insurance, vacation, sick and holiday pay, 2 retirement plans. Send resume and cover letter: humres@gicw.org

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Meat & Animal Processing Meat Goats, (3), $100 each, please call 541-923-8370 for more info.

Equal Opportunity Employer

The Bulletin's classified ads include publication on our Internet site. Our site is currently receiving over 1,500,000 page views every month. Place your employment ad with The Bulletin and reach a world of potential applicants through the Internet....at no extra cost!

Need Help? We Can Help! REACH THOUSANDS OF POTENTIAL EMPLOYEES EVERY DAY! Call the Classified Department for more information: 541-385-5809 Remember.... Add your web address to your ad and readers on The Bulletin's web site will be able to click through automatically to your site.

Weatherization NeighborImpact is seeking qualified energy auditors to perform work in Crook, Deschutes, and Jefferson counties. Contractors may download the Request for Quotes from the NeighborImpact website www.neighborimpact.org Contractors should submit their quote no later than 4:30 p.m., December 17, 2010, to: NeighborImpact, 2303 SW First Street, Redmond, OR 97756 or fax to: (541) 504-3373 Attn: Weatherization Dept.

Finance & Business

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Real Estate Contracts LOCAL MONEY We buy secured trust deeds & note, some hard money loans. Call Pat Kelley 541-382-3099 extension 13.

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Loans and Mortgages

Izzy's Restaurants is expanding its mgmt team and seeks experienced, qualified candidates with working knowledge of all aspects of restaurant operations, including financial. Candidates must have strong leadership qualities and work in harmony with staff to ensure smooth restaurant operations to create a high standard for customer service and quality excellence.

WARNING The Bulletin recommends you use caution when you provide personal information to companies offering loans or credit, especially those asking for advance loan fees or companies from out of state. If you have concerns or questions, we suggest you consult your attorney or call CONSUMER HOTLINE, 1-877-877-9392.

Please e-mail or fax resumes referencing "Restaurant Manager" to donac@izzyspizza.com or 541-928-8127. EOE

BANK TURNED YOU DOWN? Private party will loan on real estate equity. Credit, no problem, good equity is all you need. Call now. Oregon Land Mortgage 388-4200.

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Business Opportunities Ski Patrol Position

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Hoodoo Ski Area Ski Patrol Position, experience req'd. Please print application from website, send in and patrol director will call for scheduling interview.

A BEST-KEPT SECRET! Reach over 3 million Pacific Northwest readers with a $525/25-word classified ad in 30 daily newspapers for 3-days. Call (916) 288-6019 regarding the Pacific Northwest Daily Connection or email elizabeth@cnpa.com (PNDC)

www.hoodoo.com Trucking John Davis Trucking in Battle Mountain, NV, is currently hiring for: CDL Class A Drivers & Maintenance Mechanics. MUST BE WILLING TO RELOCATE. For application, call 866-635-2805 or email jdtlisa@battlemountain.net or www.jdt3d.net Healthcare

Trillium, a Eugenebased health plan serving Medicare and Medicaid, is seeking: Senior Auditor to perform audit & risk assignment to ensure program internal controls & fiscal compliance with applicable state & federal rules & regulations. Must demonstrate aptitude for quantitative analysis & have strong observation skills & perseverance in investigation. 3 yrs experience with health plan preferred.

Auditor to be responsible to carry out activities of auditing work plans to ensuring compliance with applicable state and federal rules and regulations. 1 yr experience with health plan preferred. Must use logic & reasoning to identify solutions. Bachelors in accounting or business administration or equivalent work related experience required.

Director of Medical Management to develop and oversee medical management strategies and initiatives in collaboration with the CMO. Applicants should have a strong aptitude for program development and demonstrated ability to manage quality and productivity of departmental tasks and workflow. Responsible for hiring, training, coaching, counseling and evaluating both clinical and departmental support staff. Demonstrate effective leadership for the purpose of improving team performance. Manage change and encourage innovation, build collaborative relationships, encourage involvement and initiative, and develop goal orientation in staff. RN with current Oregon license in good standing. Post graduate level educational preparation or equivalent experience preferred. Access application at www.trilliumchp.com/careers.php Send resume and application to: P.O. Box 11740 Eugene, OR 97440-1740 attn: HR


To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

THE BULLETIN • Friday, November 19, 2010 F3

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Apt./Multiplex SE Bend

Houses for Rent SE Bend

Ofice/Retail Space for Rent

Manufactured/ Mobile Homes

Motorcycles And Accessories

Boats & Accessories

Motorhomes

Fifth Wheels

An Office with bath, various sizes and locations from $250 per month, including utilities. 541-317-8717

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61166 Larkspur Loop - Cute 3 Bdrm 2 bath, fenced yd, dbl garage, 1100 sq ft, 1 yr lease, $850/mo + $800 dep; $200 off 1st month. 541-389-9303

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Apt./Multiplex SW Bend

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Roommate Wanted

Happy holidays! Enjoy living at 179 SW Hayes Ave. Spacious 2 Bdrm townhouses, 1.5 baths, W/D hookups, fenced yard. NO PETS. W/S/G pd. Rent starts at $525 mo. 541-382-0162; 541-420-2133

Rentals

600 ROOMMATE WANTED: Upscale home, privileges, garage, SW Bend, professional, references. 541-306-3485

A 3 bdrm 1.5 bath triplex on Wilson/6th. New paint, partly fenced yd. $695 incl W/S. See www.rentalsinbend.com Available now! 541-322-0183

642 TownHome Upstairs room, $300 mo+$300 dep 1/3 util. Redmond Dez 541-610-9766

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Vacation Rentals and Exchanges BEND 6 Bedroom Luxury vacation rental, centrally located, available Thanksgiving/ Christmas. 541-944-3063 or see www.bluskylodge.com

Steens Mountain Home Lodgings See Bend Craigslist for more info, 541-589-1982.

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Rooms for Rent Mt. Bachelor Motel has rooms, starting at $150/wk. or $35/night. Includes guest laundry, cable & WiFi. Bend 541-382-6365 STUDIOS & KITCHENETTES Furnished room, TV w/ cable, micro. & fridge. Util. & linens, new owners, $145-$165/wk. 541-382-1885 Tumalo Studio: 2 rooms, own bath & kitchen, separate entrance, util., wi-fi, & satellite TV incl., $475, avail. 1st week Dec., 541-389-6720.

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Condo / Townhomes For Rent Avail. now,unfurnished 1 bdrm. condo at Mt. Bachelor Village, W/S/G/elec, amenities, lower level, no smoking/pets $650+dep, 541-389-1741 Long term townhomes/homes for rent in Eagle Crest. Appl. included, Spacious 2 & 3 bdrm., with garages, 541-504-7755.

Apt./Multiplex Redmond 1st Month Free w/ 6 mo. lease! 2 bdrm., 1 bath, $550 mo. includes storage unit & carport. Close to schools, parks & shopping. On-site laundry, no-smoking units, dog run. Pet Friendly. OBSIDIAN APARTMENTS 541-923-1907 www.redmondrents.com 4-plex SW Redmond 2 bdrm 2 bath, all appls, W/D hkup, garage, fenced, w/s/g pd. Half off 1st mo! $650 mo + dep; pet nego. 541-480-7806

Looking for 1, 2 or 3 bedroom? $99 First mo. with 6 month lease & deposit Chaparral & Rimrock Apartments Clean, energy efficient smoking & non- smoking units, w/patios, 2 on-site laundry rooms, storage units available. Close to schools, pools, skateboard park and, shopping center. Large dog run, some large breeds okay with mgr. approval. & dep. 244 SW RIMROCK WAY Chaparral, 541-923-5008 www.redmondrents.com Call about Our Specials! Studios to 3 bedroom units from $395 to $550 • Lots of amenities. • Pet friendly • W/S/G paid THE BLUFFS APTS. 340 Rimrock Way, Redmond 541-548-8735 managed by

Houses for Rent SW Bend 2 bdrm., 1 bath mfd. home, with heat pump, insulated windows, fenced yard. W/S/G paid. $565/mo. + sec. deposit. 541-382-8244. $925: 2 bdrm, 1 bath log home, 19427 Kemple Dr., west side location, $250 cleaning dep., call 503-860-2824.

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Houses for Rent Redmond 4/2 Mfd 1605 sq.ft., family room, w/woodstove, new carpet/paint, single garage w/opener. $795/mo. 541-480-3393,541-610-7803 Advertise your car! Add A Picture! Reach thousands of readers!

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

A Beautiful 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath duplex in Canyon Rim Village, Redmond, all appliances, includes gardener. $795 mo. 541-408-0877.

Eagle Crest behind the gates 10th Fairway, 3 Bdrm + den, 3.5 bath, 2400 sq ft, O/S garage, W/D, deck, views quiet low maint. Year round pool, tennis golf. No smkg, pet w/dep. $1400 + sec. Possible lease option, owner will carry w/down, $349,000. Call 541-923-0908; 541-480-7863 Newer, 2 bdrm., 2 bath, MFG home w/2 car garage. appl. & heat pump. 1260 sq.ft. Yard w/sprinkler system, corner lot. One pet possible on approval and dep. Quiet neighborhood. $775 mo.+ dep. 834 NE Modoc Ct., Call (503) 803-4718

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Houses for Rent La Pine

GSL Properties

Just bought a new boat? Sell your old one in the classiieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates! 541-385-5809

Downtown Redmond Retail/Office space, 947 sq ft. $650/mo + utils; $650 security deposit. 425 SW Sixth St. Call Norb, 541-420-9848

Real Estate For Sale

MOVE IN TODAY! 2/1 $9999; 2/2, $13,000; 3/2 $12,357. Financing avail. w/ good credit. 2002 14x56, Shadow Deluxe $13,782 cash.John,541-350-1782 Honda American Classic Edition. MUST SELL & MOVE! 1990 sgl. 2002, black, perfect, gawide, 728 sq. ft. 2 bdrm, 1 raged, 5,200 mi. $3495. bath in The Pines. No land 541-610-5799. $7500. Call Theresa Ramsay, Broker, 541-815-4442. Motorcycle Trailer Will Finance - 2 bdrm., 1 bath, Kendon stand-up motornew laminate wood flooring cycle trailer, torsion bar & paint, large yard, small suspension, easy load and pets OK, $500 down, $180 unload, used seldom and mo, or $6900, 541-383-5130. only locally. $1700 OBO. Call 541-306-3010.

865

Boats & RV’s

POLARIS PHOENIX 2005, 2X4, 200cc, new

705

Real Estate Services * Real Estate Agents * * Appraisers * * Home Inspectors * Etc. The Real Estate Services classification is the perfect place to reach prospective B U Y E R S AND SELLERS of real estate in Central Oregon. To place an ad call 385-5809

850

Snowmobiles Arctic Cat Mountain 800 2004, injected, battery-free ignition, electric start, lefty throttle, high-output new battery, 151”x2” track, ice scrapers, cover, belts, storage wheels, etc. Ready! $3900 OBO. 541-536-5456

719

20114 Carson Creek, Bend. 3 bdrms, 2.5 bath, 1488 sq. ft., corner lot. Will consider trades. Call 541-480-7752. Price $159,900

YAMAHA 1998 230CC motor, 4WD, used as utility vehicle. excellent running condition. $2000 OBO. 541-923-4161, 541-788-3896.

Yamaha 2008 Nitro 1049cc, 4 stroke, bought new Feb 2010, still under warranty, 550 miles, too much power for wife! $6000. Call 541-430-5444

860

Malibu Skier 1988, w/center pylon, low hours, always garaged, new upholstery, great fun. $9500. OBO. 541-389-2012.

875

Watercraft

Yamaha 350 Big Bear 1999, 4X4, 4 stroke, racks front & rear, strong machine, excellent condition. $2,200 541-382-4115,541-280-7024

Ads published in "Watercraft" include: Kayaks, rafts and motorized personal watercrafts. For "boats" please see Class 870. 541-385-5809

FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT!

Waverider Trailer, 2-place, new paint, rail covers, & wiring, good cond., $495, 541-923-3490.

745

Homes for Sale

Southwind Class A 30’ 1994, twin rear beds, loaded, generator, A/C, 2 TV’s, all wood cabinets, basement storage, very clean, $14,999 or trade for smaller one. 541-279-9445/541-548-3350

Queen

34’

COLLINS 18’ 1981, gooseneck hitch, sleeps 4, good condition, $1950. Leave message. 541-325-6934

Everest 32’ 2004, 3 slides, island kitchen, air, surround sound, micro., full oven, more, in exc. cond., 2 trips on it, 1 owner, like new, REDUCED NOW $26,000. 541-228-5944

65K miles, oak cabinets, interior excellent condition $7,500, 541-548-7572.

Fleetwood Wilderness 2004 36½’, 4 slide-outs, fireplace, A/C, TV, used 3 times. Like new! List $52,000, sell $22,950. 541-390-2678, Madras

“WANTED” RV Consignments All Years-Makes-Models Free Appraisals! We Get Results! Consider it Sold! We keep it small & Beat Them All!

Randy’s Kampers & Kars 541-923-1655

Hitchhiker II 2000 32’ 2 slides, very clean and in excellent condition. Only $18,000! (541) 410-9423, (541) 536-6116.

Winnebago Class C 28’ 2003, Ford V10, 2

The Bulletin Classiieds

Motorcycles And Accessories

Marathon V.I.P. Prevost H3-40 Luxury Coach. Like new after $132,000 purchase & $130,000 in renovations. Only 129k orig. mi. 541-601-6350. Rare bargain at just $122,000. Look at : www.SeeThisRig.com

Travel 1987,

rear end, new tires, runs excellent, $1800 OBO, 541-932-4919.

Snowmobiles, (2) Polaris and (2) Arctic Cats, all for $3750, call 541-536-2792.

Real Estate Trades

NEW HOME at

Ads published in the "Boats" classification include: Speed, fishing, drift, canoe, house and sail boats. For all other types of watercraft, please see Class 875. 541-385-5809

GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809.

ATVs

700 800

20.5’ Seaswirl Spyder 1989 H.O. 302, 285 hrs., exc. cond., stored indoors for life $11,900 OBO. 541-379-3530

Cedar Creek 2006, RDQF. Loaded, 4 slides, 37.5’, king bed, W/D, 5500W gen., fireplace, Corian countertops, skylight shower, central vac, much more, like new, $43,000, please call 541-330-9149.

slides, 44k mi., A/C, awning, good cond., 1 owner. $37,000. 541-815-4121

Hitchiker II 32’ 1998 w/solar system, awnings, Arizona rm. great shape! $15,500 541-589-0767, in Burns.

***

CHECK YOUR AD Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are misunderstood and an error can occur in your ad. If this happens to your ad, please contact us the first day your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. Deadlines are: Weekdays 12:00 noon for next day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for Sunday; Sat. 12:00 for Monday. If we can assist you, please call us:

2 Bdrm., 1 bath, super clean, Central Location, $400 1/2 off move-in ready, mfd home, 1st month! Studio apt in new wall to wall carpet, incl. small complex, w/s/g + range, fridge, W/D, dbl. ga632 cable pd. no smoking/pets. rage, no pets/smoking, $695 Call 541-598-5829 until 6pm. mo, 1st & last, $750 security, Apt./Multiplex General $250 cleaning dep., $25/apCute Duplex, SW area, 3 plicant screening fee for The Bulletin is now offering a Bdrm 2 bath, garage, private credit check, rental history & MORE AFFORDABLE Rental fenced yard, W/D hkup. Half criminal background check. rate! If you have a home or 385-5809 off 1st month! $700/mo.+ Please call 503-637-5054 or apt. to rent, call a Bulletin The Bulletin Classified deposit. Call 541-480-7806. 503-351-1516 Classified Rep. to get the *** new rates and get your ad Like New Duplex. Nice neighSunriver Lease option, 661 started ASAP! 541-385-5809 borhood. 2 bdrm., 2 bath, Cozy 2+2, dbl. garage, w/ 1-car garage, fenced yard, Houses for Rent 634 decks, lots of windows, wood central heat, fully landscaped, Prineville stove & gas heat, near Lodge $675+dep. 541-545-1825. Apt./Multiplex NE Bend $230,000. 541-617-5787 3 Bdrm, 1 bath, carport, stove, 648 1 & 2 bdrms Available 748 refrigerator, w/d hookup, starting at $575. Reserve Houses for Avail. Dec. 1. No smoking, Northeast Bend Homes Now! Limited Availability. pet negotiable. $500/mo. Rent General Alpine Meadows Call 503-851-8848 A Nice 3 Bdrm., 2 bath, 1128 541-330-0719 Cozy 2+2, dbl. garage, sq.ft., all new carpet, pad & Professionally managed by 664 w/decks, lots of windows, inside paint,fenced yard, heat Norris & Stevens, Inc. wood stove & gas heat, all Houses for Rent pump., dbl. garage, quiet 1085 NE Purcell - Pilot Butte appl. incl. W/D, near Lodge cul-de-sac, only $112,900, Furnished Village 55+ Community 2 $775, 541-617-5787 Randy Schoning, Broker, bdrm rentals @$850, in hosJohn L Scott, 541-480-3393 The Bulletin is now offering a RIVERFRONT: walls of winpital district. 541-388-1239 dows with amazing 180 deLOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE 750 www.cascadiapropertymgmt.com gree river view with dock, Rental rate! If you have a Redmond Homes 1st Mo. Free w/ 12 mo. lease canoe. piano, bikes, covered home to rent, call a Bulletin Beautiful 2 bdrms in quiet BBQ, $1450. 541-593-1414 Classified Rep. to get the Eagle Crest behind the gates complex, park-like setting, new rates and get your ad 10th Fairway, 3 Bdrm + den, 671 covered parking, w/d hookstarted ASAP! 541-385-5809 3.5 bath, 2400 sq ft, O/S gaups, near St. Charles. $550Mobile/Mfd. rage, W/D, deck, views quiet 650 $595/mo. 541-385-6928. for Rent low maint. Year round pool, Houses for Rent 2 Bdrm., 1.5 bath, 992 sq ft, tennis golf. No smkg, pet near hospital, fenced back On 10 acres, between Sisters & NE Bend w/dep. $1400 + sec. Posyard, large deck, gas heat, Bend, 3 Bdrm., 2 bath, 1484 sible lease option, owner will A/C, all appl., W/D, pets OK, 1150 NE 6th St., Handy losq.ft., mfd., family room w/ carry w/down, $349,000. Call $750+deposit 541-548-4780 wood stove, all new carpet & cation, 1800 sq.ft., 3 bdrm., 1 541-923-0908; 541-480-7863 paint, + 1800 sq.ft. shop, bath, family room, clean, nice 762 fenced for horses, $1295, ** Pick your Special ** yard, sprinkler system, avail. 541-480-3393,541-610-7803 12/1, $950/mo, $800 dep., 2 bdrm, 1 bath Homes with Acreage no pets or smoking, as low as $495 687 541-389-4985. Country Living: 4 Bdrm 2 bath, Carports & Heat Pumps. Commercial for exc cond, all appls incl. GaPet Friendly & No App. Fee! 3 Bdrm, 1 bath, 1092 sq.ft., rage, shed, fenced, $169,900. Rent/Lease wood stove, newer carpet, Fox Hollow Apts. Heather Hockett, Broker, C21 vinyl, fenced yard, (541) 383-3152 Gold Country, 541-420-9151. Cascade Rental Mgmt. Co. single garage, $795/mo. Light Industrial, various sizes, North and South Bend loca541-480-3393,541-610-7803 773 tions, office w/bath from $99 MOVES YOU IN !!! Acreages $400/mo. 541-317-8717 Limited numbers available Find exactly what 1, 2 and 3 bdrms. you are looking for in the 10 Acres,7 mi. E. of Costco, W/D hookups, patios or decks, quiet, secluded, at end of Office / Warehouse CLASSIFIEDS Mountain Glen, road, power at property line, space • 1792 sq ft 541-383-9313 water near by, $250,000 827 Business Way, Bend Professionally managed by Cozy 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, 2-car gaOWC 541-617-0613 Norris & Stevens, Inc. rage, close to hospital, shop- 30¢/sq ft; 1st mo + $200 dep Paula, 541-678-1404 ping, Mtn View HS. Available FARM FOR SALE! Move In Special now, no smkg or pets. $850/ 1/2 Off First Full Month Office/Warehouse Space, Vale, OR. 151 acres irrigated mo, 1yr lease. 541-923-7453 land w/150 acres dry hillside 1027 NE Kayak Lp. #1 6400 sq.ft., (3) 12x14 doors, pasture. 4 Bdrm home, out3 bdrm/ 2 bath, basic appl., on Boyd Acres Rd, NOTICE: buildings & corrals. Irrigagas heat, gas fireplace, 1 car 541-382-8998. All real estate advertised tion well & 1884 water rights garage, no pets. $775+dep. here in is subject to the FedThe Bulletin offers a LOWER, from creek. Near Bullycreek With lease. eral Fair Housing Act, which MORE AFFORDABLE Rental Reservoir w/fishing, boating Viking Property Management makes it illegal to advertise rate! If you have a home to & camping. Area known for 541-416-0191 any preference, limitation or rent, call a Bulletin Classified pheasant, quail & chukkar discrimination based on race, Newer Duplex 2/2, close to Rep. to get the new rates and hunting; deer & elk hunting color, religion, sex, handicap, Hospital & Costco, garage, get your ad started ASAP! nearby. Shown by appt only! familial status or national yard maint., fireplace, W/D, 541-385-5809 $1,250,000. 1-208-466-8510. origin, or intention to make W/S, pet? 1025 Rambling any such preferences, limitaLn. #1 $725. 541-420-0208 tions or discrimination. We Newly painted 2 Bdrm 1 bath in will not knowingly accept any triplex, gas stove, private advertising for real estate yard, plenty of parking space, which is in violation of this no smoking; cat OK. $520/ law. All persons are hereby mo + deposit. 541-419-4520 informed that all dwellings advertised are available on 636 an equal opportunity basis. Apt./Multiplex NW Bend The Bulletin Classified

Baja Vision 250 2007, new, rode once, excellent condition, $1700. 541-647-4641 or 541-923-6283.

Yamaha YFZ450 2006, very low hrs., exc. cond., $3700, also boots, helmet, tires, avail., 541-410-0429

870

Boats & Accessories CRAMPED FOR CASH? Use classified to sell those items you no longer need. Call 385-5809

HARLEY Davidson Fat Boy - LO 2010, Health forces sale, 1900 mi., 1K mi. service done, black on black, detachable windshield, back rest & luggage rack, $13,900, Mario, 541-549-4949, 619-203-4707

HARLEY Davidson Fat Boy - LO 2010, Health forces sale, 1900 mi., 1K mi. service done, black on black, detachable windshield, back rest & luggage rack, $13,900, Mario, 541-549-4949, 619-203-4707

17½’ 2006 BAYLINER 175 XT Ski Boat, 3.0L Merc, mint condition, includes ski tower w/2 racks - everything we have, ski jackets adult and kids several, water skis, wakeboard, gloves, ropes and many other boating items. $11,300 OBO . 541-417-0829

17’

Seaswirl

Seaswirl

1972,

18’ Geary Sailboat, trailer, classic little boat, great winter project. $400 OBO. 541-647-7135

Check out the classiieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

Harley Davidson Ultra Classic 2008, clean, lots of upgrades, custom exhaust, dual control heated gloves & vest, luggage access. 15K, $17,000 OBO 541-693-3975.

880

Motorhomes Allegro

31’ 1989, basement model, 86K, walk around queen, dinette, couch, generator, 2 roof A/C’s, 454 Chevrolet, clean & nice too, $7200. Please call 541-508-8522 or 541-318-9999.

Beaver Patriot 2000, Walnut cabinets, solar, Bose, Corian, tile, 4 door fridge., 1 slide, w/d, $99,000. 541-215-0077

Harley Davidson Heritage Soft Tail 2009, 400 mi., extras incl. pipes, lowering kit, chrome pkg., $16,900 OBO. 541-944-9753

Harley Davidson Police Bike 2001, low mi., custom bike very nice.Stage 1, new tires & brakes, too much to list! A Must See Bike $10,500 OBO. 541-383-1782

881

Gearbox 30’ 2005, all the bells & whistles, sleeps 8, 4 queen beds, reduced to $17,000, 541-536-8105 JAYCO 31 ft. 1998 slideout, upgraded model, exc. cond. $10,500. 1-541-454-0437.

Tri-Hull, fish and ski boat, great for the family! 75 HP motor, fish finder, extra motor, mooring cover, $1200 OBO, 541-389-4329.

17’

19’ Blue Water Executive Overnighter 1988, very low hours, been in dry storage for 12 years, new camper top, 185HP I/O Merc engine, all new tires on trailer, $7995 OBO, 541-447-8664.

19 FT. Thunderjet Luxor 2007, w/swing away dual axle tongue trailer, inboard motor, great fishing boat, service contract, built in fish holding tank, canvas enclosed, less than 20 hours on boat, must sell due to health $25,000. 541-389-1574.

20.5’ 2004 Bayliner 205 Run About, 220 HP, V8, open bow, exc. cond., very fast w/very low hours, lots of extras incl. tower, Bimini & custom trailer, $19,500. 541-389-1413

KOMFORT 27’ 5th wheel 2000 trailer: fiberglass with 12’ slide, stored inside, in excellent condition. Only $13,500 firm. Call 541-536-3916.

Travel Trailers

1972,

Tri-Hull, fish and ski boat, great for the family! 75 HP motor, fish finder, extra motor, mooring cover, $1200 OBO, 541-389-4329.

Harley Davidson Heritage Softail 1988, 1452 original mi., garaged over last 10 yrs., $9500. 541-891-3022

Wet-Jet personal water craft, new batteries & covers, “SHORE“ trailer includes spare & lights, 2 for $2400. Bill 541-480-7930.

Winnebago Itasca Horizon 2002, 330 Cat, 2 slides, loaded with leather. 4x4 Chevy Tracker w/tow bar available, exc. cond. $65,000 OBO. 509-552-6013.

Bounder 34’ 1994, only 18K miles, 1 owner, garage kept, rear walk round queen island bed, TV’s,leveling hyd. jacks, backup camera, awnings, non smoker, no pets, must see to appreciate, too many options to list, won’t last long, $18,950, 541-389-3921,503-789-1202

Find It in The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

Dutch Star DP 39 ft. 2001, 2 slides, Cat engine, many options, very clean, PRICE REDUCED! 541-388-7552. Gulfstream Scenic Cruiser 36 ft. 1999, Cummins 330 hp. diesel, 42K, 1 owner, 13 in. kitchen slide out, new tires, under cover, hwy. miles only, 4 door fridge/freezer icemaker, W/D combo, Interbath tub & shower, 50 amp. propane gen & more! $55,000. 541-948-2310.

Houseboat 38X10, w/triple axle trailer, incl. private moorage w/24/7 security at Prinville resort. PRICE REDUCED, $21,500. 541-788-4844.

Springdale 29’ 2007, slide, Bunkhouse style, sleeps 7-8, exc. cond., $13,900 or take over payments, 541-390-2504

Mobile Suites, 2007, 36TK3 with 3 slide-outs, king bed, ultimate living comfort, large kitchen, fully loaded, well insulated, hydraulic jacks and so much more. Priced to sell at $59,500! 541-317-9185

Montana 37’ 2005, very good condition, just serviced, $23,000 OBO. 541-604-1808

TERRY 27’ 5th wheel 1995 with big slide-out, generator and extras. Great condition and hunting rig, $9,900 OBO. 541-923-0231 days.

885

Canopies and Campers

Weekend Warrior Toy Hauler 28’ 2007, Gen, fuel station,exc.

cond. sleeps 8, black/gray interior, used 3X, $29,900. 541-389-9188. Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

882

Fifth Wheels

Alpha “See Ya” 30’ 1996, 2 slides, A/C, heat pump, exc. cond. for Snowbirds, solid oak cabs day & night shades, Corian, tile, hardwood. $14,900. 541-923-3417.

2003 Lance 1030 Camper, satellite dish, 3600 gen, pullout pantry, remote elec jacks, Qn bed, all weather pkg, solar, AC, $17,500. 2007 Dodge 6.7 Cummins Diesel 3500 4x4 long bed, sway bar, airbags, canopy, bedliner, gooseneck, 58K mi, $34,900. Or buy as unit, $48,500. 541-331-1160

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

The Bulletin

Fleetwood Elkhorn 9.5’ 1999,

extended overhead cab, stereo, self-contained,outdoor shower, TV, 2nd owner, exc. cond., non smoker, $8900 541-815-1523.

Lance 1010 10’1” 1999.Micro, A/C, gen, awnings, TV, stereo, elec jacks, reduced to $7950. 541-410-8617

Call 541-385-5809 to promote your service • Advertise for 28 days starting at $140 (This special package is not available on our website)

1 Bdrm. $420+dep. Studio $385+dep. No pets/smoking, W/S/G paid. Apply at 38 NW Irving #2, near downtown Bend. 541-389-4902. 1 Month Rent Free 1550 NW Milwaukee. W/D included! $595/mo. Large 2 Bdrm, 1 Bath, Gas heat. W/S/G Pd. No Pets. Call us at 382-3678 or

Visit us at www.sonberg.biz A block from the river! Sunny, spacious 3 Bdrm 1½ bath in 4-plex. Deck, storage, w/d hkups, w/s/g pd. $750. No smkg/dogs. 541-318-1973

Fully furnished loft apt. on Wall Street in Bend. All utilites paid and parking. Call 541-389-2389 for appt. Quiet 2 bdrm, new windows, W/G/S/Cable paid, laundry on-site, cat OK, $575/mo, $500 dep., 541-383-2430 or 541-389-9867. River & Mtn. Views, 930 NW Carlon St., 2 bdrm., 1.5 bath, W/S/G paid, W/D hook-up, $650/mo. $600 dep. No pets. 541-280-7188.

Very Quaint Studio Cottage, w/ knotty pine paneling, kitchen & bath w/shower, 502½ NW Florida, $525mo.+last+dep., avail. now, 541-324-6856.

638

Apt./Multiplex SE Bend

When buying a home, 83% of Central Oregonians turn to

call Classified 385-5809 to place your Real Estate ad Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

652

Houses for Rent NW Bend Beautifully furnished 6 Bdrm, 3 Bath, granite kitchen, fenced yard. Skyliner Summit. $2500 includes water/garbage; min 6-mo lease. 541-944-3063 Great NW Location! Exquisite, Studio cottage, short walk to downtown, river & Old Mill, pet? $575 Avail. 12/1, 503-729-3424 .

2 Bdrm. in 4-Plex, 1 bath, new Older 1 Bdrm cottage, garage, carpet/paint, W/D hookups, large yard, no pets, washer & storage, deck, W/S paid, $575 dryer incl, refs & credit +dep. no pets, 541-480-4824 check, $525, 1st/last/dep. 1 Mo. Free Option. 541-382-3672 leave msg.

Accounting/Bookeeping

Debris Removal

Handyman

Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care

Balanced Bend Bookkeeping Seeing new clients, provide services for regular bookkeeping, training & catch up projects. 541-350-3652

JUNK BE GONE l Haul Away FREE For Salvage. Also Cleanups & Cleanouts Mel 541-389-8107

ERIC REEVE HANDY SERVICES

Adult Care

Drywall

Experienced Male Caregiver offering assistance with medical & non-medical tasks & activities. Refs. avail. upon request, 541-548-3660.

Complete Drywall Services Remodels & Repairs No Job Too Small. Free Exact Quotes. 541-408-6169 CCB# 177336

Barns

Excavating

M. Lewis Construction, LLC "POLE BARNS" Built Right! Garages, shops, hay sheds, arenas, custom decks, fences, interior finish work, & concrete. Free estimates CCB#188576•541-604-6411

Building/Contracting NOTICE: Oregon state law requires anyone who contracts for construction work to be licensed with the Construction Contractors Board (CCB). An active license means the contractor is bonded and insured. Verify the contractor’s CCB license through the CCB Consumer Website www.hirealicensedcontractor.com

or call 503-378-4621. The Bulletin recommends checking with the CCB prior to contracting with anyone. Some other trades also require additional licenses and certifications.

Hourly Excavation & Dump Truck Service. Site Prep Land Clearing, Demolition, Utilities, Asphalt Patching, Grading, Land & Agricultural Development. Work Weekends. Alex541-419-3239CCB#170585

Handyman

I DO THAT! Lets get to your Fall projects, Remodeling, Handyman, Professional & Honest Work. CCB#151573-Dennis 317-9768

Home & Commercial Repairs, Carpentry-Painting, Pressure-washing, Honey Do's. Small or large jobs. On-time promise. Senior Discount. All work guaranteed. 541-389-3361 or 541-771-4463 Bonded & Insured CCB#181595

Snow Removal

NOTICE: OREGON Landscape Contractors Law (ORS 671) requires all businesses that advertise to perform Land scape Construction which in cludes: planting, decks, fences, arbors, water-fea tures, and installation, repair of irrigation systems to be li censed with the Landscape Contractors Board. This 4-digit number is to be in cluded in all advertisements which indicate the business has a bond, insurance and workers compensation for their employees. For your protection call 503-378-5909 or use our website: www.lcb.state.or.us to check license status before con tracting with the business. Persons doing landscape maintenance do not require a LCB license.

Reliable 24 Hour Service •Driveways •Walkways •Roof tops •De-icing

Call The Bulletin At 541-385-5809. Place Your Ad Or E-Mail At: www.bendbulletin.com

Holiday Lighting

Nelson Landscape Maintenance

More Than Service Peace Of Mind.

Fall Clean Up •Leaves •Cones and Needles •Pruning •Debris Hauling

Gutter Cleaning

From foundation to roof, we do it all! 21 Years Experience.

Randy, 541-306-7492

Lawn & Landscape Winterizing •Fertilizer •Aeration •Compost

CCB#180420 Margo Construction LLC Since 1992 •Pavers •Carpentry, •Remodeling, •Decks •Window/Door Replacement •Int/Ext Paint CCB 176121 • 541-480-3179

EXPERIENCED Commercial & Residential Free Estimates Senior Discounts

541-390-1466 Same Day Response Check out the classiieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

Serving Central Oregon Residential & Commercial

SPRINKLER BLOW-OUT & Repair • Fall Clean up • Weekly Mowing & Edging •Flower bed clean up

• Snow Removal •Senior Discounts

Bonded & Insured 541-815-4458 LCB#8759

Pet Services

Fall Maintenance! Thatch, Aerate, Monthly Maint., Weeding, Raking. 541-388-0158 • 541-420-0426 www.bblandscape.com

Serious On-site Horse Care Full service sitting w/options for more in-depth care. Call EquiCare, 541-706-1820 (leave message if no answer)

FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT!

Remodeling, Carpentry

The Bulletin Classiieds

Kitchens & Baths Structural Repair, We move walls. Small Jobs Welcome. Another General Contractor, Inc. CCB# 110431. 541-617-0613, 541-390-8085

Masonry Chad L. Elliott Construction

Repair & Remodeling:

MASONRY Brick * Block * Stone Small Jobs/Repairs Welcome L#89874.388-7605/385-3099

Moving and Hauling Harris Custom Crating: We provide custom crating, palletizing, strap & wrap and arrange shipping if required. 541-390-0704,541-390-0799

Painting, Wall Covering WESTERN PAINTING CO. Richard Hayman, a semi-retired painting contractor of 45 years. Small Jobs Welcome. Interior & Exterior. Wallpapering & Woodwork. Restoration a Specialty. Ph. 541-388-6910. CCB#5184 MARTIN JAMES European Professional Painter Repaint Specialist Oregon License #186147 LLC. 541-388-2993

Tenant Improvement Structural remodel - 23 yrs exp Quality • Dependable • Honest Armstrong Gen’l Contractor CCB#152609 • 541-280-5677


F4 Friday, November 19, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

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Legal Notices

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Legal Notices

Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE Lien Claimant: Old Mill Self Storage 150 SW Industrial Way Bend, Oregon 97702 Debtor: Timothy Jackson Unit #218 Auction: Saturday, Nov. 20 Time: 10:00 AM LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE OF FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT AND NOTICE OF INTENT TO REQUEST RELEASE OF FUNDS Date of Notice: November 19, 2010 Name of Responsible Entity (RE) City of Bend Address: 710 NW Wall Street City, State, Zip Code: Bend, OR 97701 Telephone Number of RE Preparer Agency: (541)312-4915 These notices shall satisfy two separate but related procedural requirements for activities to be undertaken by the City of Bend or Grantee REQUEST FOR RELEASE OF FUNDS On or about December 6, 2010 the City of Bend will submit a request to the Oregon Department of Housing and Community Services for the release of Neighborhood Stabilization funds under Division B, Title III of the Housing and Economic Recovery Act (HERA) of 2008, as amended, to undertake three projects known as: Lots 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 of JUNIPER LANE, City of Redmond, Deschutes County, Oregon. FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT The City of Bend has determined that the project will have no significant impact on the human environment. Therefore, an environmental Impact Statement under the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) is not required. Additional project information is contained in the Environmental Review Record (ERR) on file at the City of Bend, 710 NW Wall Street, Bend, OR 97701 and may be examined or copied weekdays 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.. PUBLIC COMMENTS Any individual, group, or agency disagreeing with this determination or wishing to comment on the project bay submit written comments to the City of Bend at 710 NW Wall Street, Bend, OR 97701, attention: Jim Long, Affordable Housing Manager. All comments received within fifteen days form the publishing date will be considered by the City of Bend prior to authorizing submission of a request for release of funds. Comments should specify which Notice they are addressing. RELEASE OF FUNDS The City of Bend certifies the Jim Long, in his capacity of Affordable Housing Manager, and Certifying Officer consents to accept the jurisdiction of the Federal Courts if an action is brought to enforce responsibilities in relation to the environmental review process and that these responsibilities have been satisfies. HUD's approval of the certification satisfies its responsibilities under NEPA and related laws . OBJECTIONS TO RELEASE OF REFUNDS Oregon Housing and Community Services will accept objections to its release of funds and the City of Bend's certification for a period of fifteen days following the anticipated submission date or its actual receipt of the request (whichever is later) only if they are on one of the following bases: (a) the certification was not executed by the Certifying Officer of the City of Bend; (b) the City of Bend has omitted a step or failed to make a decision or finding required by HUD regulations at 24 CFR Part 58 before approval of a release of funds by HUD; or (d) another Federal agency acting pursuant to 40 CFR Part 1504 has submitted a written finding that the project is un-

satisfactory from the standpoint of environmental quality. Objections must be prepared and submitted in accordance with the required procedures (24 CFR Part 58) and shall be addressed to Oregon Housing and Community Services, NSP Coordinator, 725 Summer St. NE, Suite B, Salem, OR 97301-1266 Jim Long Affordable Housing Manager City of Bend 710 NW Wall Street Bend, OR 97701 Published: November 19, 2010 LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING The Deschutes County Hearings Officer will hold a Public Hearing on December 7, 2010 at 6:30 p.m. in the Barnes and Sawyer Rooms of the Deschutes Services Center at 1300 NW Wall Street in Bend, to consider the following request: FILE NUMBERS: NCU-10-1 and A-107. LOCATION: The subject property has an assigned address of 4991 NE 5th Street, Redmond and is identified on Deschutes County Assessor's Map #14-13-27, tax lot 900. APPLICANTS/OWNERS/APPELLANTS: Roger and Linda Abbas, 6827 NE 3rd Street, Redmond, OR 97756. REQUEST: Appeal of an administrative decision denying a Non-Conforming Use confirmation for a "trailer space" on the subject property. STAFF CONTACT: William Groves, Senior Planner. Copies of the staff report, application, all documents and evidence submitted by or on behalf of the applicant and applicable criteria are available for inspection at the Planning Division at no cost, and can be purchased for 25 cents/page. They are also available online at: www.co.deschutes.or.us/cdd /. Please contact Will Groves, Senior Planner (email willg@deschutes.org) with the County Planning Division at (541) 388-6518 if you have any questions. LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE OF SEIZURE FOR CIVIL FORFEITURE TO ALL POTENTIAL CLAIMANTS AND TO ALL UNKNOWN PERSONS READ THIS CAREFULLY If you have any interest in the seized property described below, you must claim that interest or you will automatically lose that interest. If you do not file a claim for the property, the property may be forfeited even if you are not convicted of any crime. To claim an interest, you must file a written claim with the forfeiture counsel named below, The written claim must be signed by you, sworn to under penalty of perjury before a notary public, and state: (a) Your true name; (b) The address at which you will accept future mailings from the court and forfeiture counsel; and (3) A statement that you have an interest in the seized property. Your deadline for filing the claim document with forfeiture counsel named below is 21 days from the last day of publication of this notice. Where to file a claim and for more information: Diana Vitolins, Crook County District Attorney Office, 300 NE Third Street, Prineville, OR 97754. Notice of reasons for Forfeiture: The property described below was seized for forfeiture because it: (1) Constitutes the proceeds of the violation of, solicitation to violate, attempt to violate, or conspiracy to violates, the criminal laws of the State of Oregon regarding the manufacture, distribution, or possession of controlled substances (ORS Chapter 475); and/or (2) Was used or intended for use in committing or facilitating the violation of, solicitation to violate, attempt to violate, or conspiracy to violate the criminal laws of the State of Oregon regarding the manufacture, distribution or possession of controlled substances (ORS Chapter 475).

IN THE MATTER OF: #1 U.S. Currency in the amount of $3,143.00, Case #10-10-65612 seized 09/30/10 from Alejandro Cardona Flores. IN THE MATTER OF: #2 U.S. Currency in the amount of $6,210.00, Case # 10-036484 seized 02/23/10 from Tyler Brown. LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE TO INTERESTED PERSONS Lorraine Sedeyn has been appointed Administrator of the Estate of Elmer F. Neale, Deceased, by the Circuit Court, State of Oregon, Deschutes County, under case number 10PB0134SF. All persons having a claim against the estate must present the claim within four months of the first publication date of this notice to BRYANT, LOVLIEN & JARVIS, PC at 591 SW Mill View Way, Bend, OR 97702, Attn.: John D. Sorlie, or they may be barred. Additional information may be obtained from the court records, the administrator or the following-named attorney for the administrator. Date of first publication: November 12, 2010. JOHN D. SORLIE BRYANT, LOVLIEN & JARVIS, PC 591 SW MILL VIEW WAY BEND, OR 97702 LEGAL NOTICE Subcontractor Bid Solicitation Project: Central Oregon Community College Health Careers Building BID DATE and Time: November 23rd @ 2:00pm Construction of a new 47,000 sq. ft. building to include classrooms, lab spaces, and auxiliary spaces. Prevailing wage/BOLI requirements apply. For information on how to obtain Bonding, Insurance, or lines of credit, contact Allied Insurance at (510) 578-2000 or Skanska USA Building, Inc. Skanska is an equal opportunity employer and actively requests bids from Minority, Women, Disadvantaged, and Emerging Small Business Enterprises. Skanska Contact: Todd Predmore, phone #503-641-2500, e-mail: todd.predmore@skanska.com LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE The Trustee under the terms of the Trust Deed described herein, at the direction of the Beneficiary, hereby elects to sell the property described in the Trust Deed to satisfy the obligations secured thereby. Pursuant to ORS 86.745, the following information is provided: 1. PARTIES: Grantor: KATHLEEN J. WARREN. Trustee: FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON. Successor Trustee: NANCY K. CARY. Beneficiary: WORLD SAVINGS BANK, FSB. 2. DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: The real property is described as follows: Lot Three (3), PLEASANT RIDGE, recorded July 29, 1993 in Cabinet D page 1, Deschutes County, Oregon. 3. RECORDING. The Trust Deed was recorded as follows: Date Recorded: August 29, 2007. Recording No. 2007-47388 Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 4. DEFAULT. The Grantor or any other person obligated on the Trust Deed and Promissory Note secured thereby is in default and the Beneficiary seeks to foreclose the Trust Deed for failure to pay: Monthly payments in the amount of $1,683.93 each, due the fifteenth of each month, for the months of February 2010 through September 2010; plus late charges and advances; plus any unpaid real property taxes or liens, plus interest. 5. AMOUNT DUE.

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Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust (hereafter referred to as the Trust Deed) made by: Kristi Rae Rucker, as the Grantor, and CitiBank, N.A., as the Beneficiary, dated February 9th, 2007, and recorded February 23rd, 2007, as Doc No. 2007-11119 in the Mortgage Records of Deschutes County, Oregon, covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: LOT 84, BLOCK 6, LAZY RIVER SOUTH, IN THE CITY OF LA PINE, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, for the real property described above is purported to be: 52854 Timber Lane Loop, La Pine, Oregon 97739. The Tax Assessor's Parcel Number (Property Tax ID) for the Real Property is/are purported to be: 127019 and/or 245176. Both the beneficiary and the trustee, Sia Rezvani, have elected to foreclose the above referenced Trust Deed and sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the Trust Deed and a Notice of Default and Election to Sell has been recorded pursuant to ORS 86.735(3). All right, title, and interest in the said described property which the grantors had, or had power to convey, at the time of execution of the Trust Deed, together with any interest the grantors or their successors in interest acquired after execution of the Trust Deed shall be sold at public auction to the highest bidder for cash to satisfy the obligations secured by the Trust Deed and the expenses of sale, including the compensation of the trustee as provided by law, and the reasonable fees of trustee's attorneys. The default(s) for which foreclosure is made is (1) the grantor's failure to make regular payments to the beneficiary, such default beginning May 3rd, 2010, and continuing through the date of this Notice, and (2) failure to carry, and/or provide evidence of, extended coverage hazard insurance, in violation of the Trust Deed, and (3) any defaults or breaches occurring after the date of this document is executed. The current balance of payments now due, together with late charges, attorney and trustee fees, costs, title expenses, and other allowed charges is $4,035.05 together with any default in the payment of recurring obligations as they become due, periodic adjustments to the payment amount, any further sums advanced by the beneficiary to protect the property or its interest therein, additional costs and attorney fees as provided by law, and prepayment penalties/premiums, if any, together with defaulted amounts owed to senior lienholders. The amount required to cure the default in payments to date is calculated as follows: From: 5/03/10; No. Payments: 4; Amount per: $466.44= Total of past-due payments: $1,865.76 Total Late charges: $93.29 Trustee's/Attys Fees and Costs: $2,076.00 Total necessary to cure default in payments to date: $4,035.05 + proof of insurance + proof taxes are current + proof seniors are current or tender of sufficient funds to cure any/all senior defaults. Please note this amount is subject to confirmation and review and is likely to change during the next 30 days. Please contact Rezvani Law Office to obtain a "reinstatement" and/or "payoff" quote prior to remitting funds. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by the Trust Deed due and payable. The amount required to discharge this lien in its entirety to date is: $203,596.20. Said sale shall be held at the hour of 11:10 a.m. on January 4th, 2011, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, and pursuant to ORS 86.745(7) shall occur at the following designated place: INSIDE THE MAIN LOBBY OF THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND, IN THE CITY OF BEND, OREGON. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation(s) of the Trust Deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by ORS 86.753. The mailing address of the trustee is: Rezvani Law Office, LLC, P.O. Box 865, Gresham, Oregon 97030, the telephone number for the trustee is 503-666-3407. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" and/or "grantors" includes any successor in interest to the Grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation the performance of which is secured by the Trust Deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Actual payoff and/or reinstatement amounts may change on a daily basis and therefore any payoff/reinstatement is subject to the Trustee's final review and confirmation. Dated this 25th day of August, 2010. By: /s/ Sia Rezvani, Successor Trustee (203655 11/19/10, 11/26/10, 12/03/10, 12/10/10)

The amount due on the Note which is secured by the Trust Deed referred to herein is: Principal balance in the amount of $362,348.07; plus interest at an adjustable rate pursuant to the terms of the Promissory Note from January 15, 2010; plus late charges of $502.48; plus advances and foreclosure attorney fees and costs. 6. SALE OF PROPERTY. The Trustee hereby states that the property will be sold to satisfy the obligations secured by the Trust Deed. A Trustee's Notice of Default and Election to Sell Under Terms of Trust Deed has been recorded in the Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 7. TIME OF SALE. Date: February 3, 2011. Time: 11:00 a.m. Place: Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, Oregon. 8. RIGHT TO REINSTATE. Any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time that is not later than five days before the Trustee conducts the sale, to have this foreclosure dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due, other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred, by curing any other default that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Trust Deed and by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with the trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amount provided in ORS 86.753. You may reach the Oregon State Bar's Lawyer Referral Service at 503-684-3763 or toll-free in Oregon at 800-452-7636 or you may visit its website at: www.osbar.org. Legal assistance may be available if you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines. For more information and a directory of legal aid programs, go to http://www.oregonlawhelp.o rg. Any questions regarding this matter should be directed to Lisa Summers, Paralegal, (541) 686-0344 (TS #17368.30316). DATED: September 22, 2010. /s/ Nancy K. Cary. Nancy K. Cary, Successor Trustee, Hershner Hunter, LLP, P.O. Box 1475, Eugene, OR 97440. LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No.: T10-67834-OR Reference is made to that certain deed made by, ASHWAN1 KUMAR as Grantor to WESTERN TITLE & ESCROW, as trustee, in favor of "MERS" IS MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, dated 01-01-2008, recorded 01-04-2008, in official records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No., fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2008-00554 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 244203 LOT 47, THREE PINES, P.U.D., PHASE 6, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 19080 NORTHWEST MOUNT HOOD PLACE BEND, OR 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: INSTALLMENT OF PRINCIPAL AND INTEREST PLUS IMPOUNDS AND / OR ADVANCES WHICH BECAME DUE ON 06/01/2010 PLUS LATE CHARGES, AND ALL SUBSEQUENT INSTALLMENTS OF PRINCIPAL, INTEREST, BALLOON PAYMENTS, PLUS IMPOUNDS AND/OR ADVANCES AND LATE CHARGES THAT BECOME PAYABLE. Monthly Payment $5,054.64 Monthly Late Charge $204.79 By this reason of said default the

beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $630,923.62 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.5% per annum from 05-01-2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on 02-19-2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at FRONT ENTRANCE OF THE COURTHOUSE, 1164 N.W. BOND STREET, BEND, OR 97701 County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by Mm of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. For sales information, please contact AGENCY SALES AND POSTING at WWW.FIDELITYASAP.COM or 714-730-2727 Dated: October 01, 2010 FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY AS TRUSTEE C/O CR TITLE SERVICES INC. P.O, Box 16128 Tucson, AZ 85732-6128 PHONE NUMBER 866-702-9658 REINSTATEMENT LINE 866-272-4749 Maria De La Torre, Asst. Sec. ASAP# 3770851 10/29/2010, 11/05/2010, 11/12/2010, 11/19/2010

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tice of Default and Election to Sell Under Terms of Trust Deed has been recorded in the Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 7. TIME OF SALE. Date: February 3, 2011. Time: 11:00 a.m. Place: Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, Oregon. 8. RIGHT TO REINSTATE. Any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time that is not later than five days before the Trustee conducts the sale, to have this foreclosure dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due, other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred, by curing any other default that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Trust Deed and by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with the trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amount provided in ORS 86.753. You may reach the Oregon State Bar's Lawyer Referral Service at 503-684-3763 or toll-free in Oregon at 800-452-7636 or you may visit its website at: www.osbar.org. Legal assistance may be available if you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines. For more information and a directory of legal aid programs, go to http://www.oregonlawhelp.o rg. Any questions regarding this matter should be directed to Lisa Summers, Paralegal, (541) 686-0344 (TS #17368.30546). DATED: September 15, 2010. /s/ Nancy K. Cary. Nancy K. Cary, Successor Trustee, Hershner Hunter, LLP, P.O. Box 1475, Eugene, OR 97440. LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE The Trustee under the terms of the Trust Deed described herein, at the direction of the Beneficiary, hereby elects to sell the property described in the Trust Deed to satisfy the obligations secured thereby. Pursuant to ORS 86.745, the following information is provided: A.TRUST DEED ONE: 1. PARTIES: Grantor: KARL F. ALDINGER. Trustee: FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON. Successor Trustee: NANCY K. CARY. Beneficiary: WORLD SAVINGS BANK, FSB. 2. DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: The real property is described as follows: Lot One Hundred Sixty-two (162), AWBREY VILLAGE, PHASE 3, recorded June 19,2001, in Cabinet E, Page 642, Deschutes County, Oregon. 3. RECORDING. The Trust Deed was recorded as follows: Date Recorded: October 2, 2006. Recording No. 2006-66613 Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 4. DEFAULT. The Grantor or any other person obligated on the Trust Deed and Promissory Note secured thereby is in default and the Beneficiary seeks to foreclose the Trust Deed for failure to pay: Biweekly payments in the amount of $1,221.21 each, due biweekly each month, for the months of December 2008 through September 2010; plus late charges and advances; plus any unpaid real property taxes or liens, plus interest. 5. AMOUNT DUE. The amount due on the Note which is secured by the Trust Deed referred to herein is: Principal balance in the amount of $451,056.91; plus interest at an adjustable rate pursuant to the terms of the Promissory Note from December 15, 2008; plus late

charges of $964.87; plus advances and foreclosure attorney fees and costs. B. TRUST DEED TWO: 1. PARTIES: Grantor: KARL F. ALDINGER. Trustee: FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON. Successor Trustee: NANCY K. CARY. Beneficiary:WORLD SAVINGS BANK, FSB. 2. DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: The real property is described as follows: Lot One Hundred Sixty-two (162), AWBREY VILLAGE, PHASE 3, recorded June 19,2001, in Cabinet E, Page 642, Deschutes County, Oregon. 3. RECORDING. The Trust Deed was recorded as follows: Date Recorded: October 2, 2006. Recording No. 2006-66614 Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 4. DEFAULT. The Grantor or any other person obligated on the Trust Deed and Promissory Note secured thereby is in default and the Beneficiary seeks to foreclose the Trust Deed for failure to pay: Monthly payments in the amount of $606.08 each, due the fifteenth each month, for the months of January 2009 through September 2010; plus late charges and advances; plus any unpaid real property taxes or liens, plus interest. 5. AMOUNT DUE. The amount due on the Note which is secured by the Trust Deed referred to herein is: Principal balance in the amount of $80,973.29; plus interest at an adjustable rate pursuant to the terms of the Promissory Note from December 15, 2008; plus late charges of $341.57; plus advances and foreclosure attorney fees and costs. 6. SALE OF PROPERTY. The Trustee hereby states that the property will be sold to satisfy the obligations secured by the Trust Deed. A Trustee's Notice of Default and Election to Sell Under Terms of Trust Deed has been recorded in the Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 7. TIME OF SALE. Date: February 3, 2011. Time: 11:00 a.m. Place:Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, Oregon. 8. RIGHT TO REINSTATE. Any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time that is not later than five days before the Trustee conducts the sale, to have this foreclosure dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due, other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred, by curing any other default that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Trust Deed and by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with the trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amount provided in ORS 86.753. You may reach the Oregon State Bar's Lawyer Referral Service at 503-684-3763 or toll-free in Oregon at 800-452-7636 or you may visit its website at: www.osbar.org. Legal assistance may be available if you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines. For more information and a directory of legal aid programs, go to http://www.oregonlawhelp.o rg. Any questions regarding this matter should be directed to Lisa Summers, Paralegal, (541) 686-0344 (TS #17368.30775). DATED: September 23, 2010. /s/ Nancy K. Cary. Nancy K. Cary, Successor Trustee, Hershner Hunter, LLP, P.O. Box 1475, Eugene, OR 97440.

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE The Trustee under the terms of the Trust Deed described herein, at the direction of the Beneficiary, hereby elects to sell the property described in the Trust Deed to satisfy the obligations secured thereby. Pursuant to ORS 86.745, the following information is provided: 1. PARTIES: Grantor: JAMES L. HANZELY AND ANGELA R. HANZELY. Trustee: FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON. Successor Trustee: NANCY K. CARY. Beneficiary: WORLD SAVINGS BANK, FSB. 2. DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: The real property is described as follows: Lot One Hundred Four (104), RED HAWK UNIT ONE, City of Redmond, recorded March 18, 1993, in Cabinet C, Page 754, Deschutes County, Oregon. 3. RECORDING. The Trust Deed was recorded as follows: Date Recorded: November 29, 2005. Recording No.: 2005-81752 Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 4. DEFAULT. The Grantor or any other person obligated on the Trust Deed and Promissory Note secured thereby is in default and the Beneficiary seeks to foreclose the Trust Deed for failure to pay: Monthly payments in the amount of $1,102.75 each, due the fifteenth of each month, for the months of April 2009 through August 2010; plus late charges and advances; plus any unpaid real property taxes or liens, plus interest. 5. AMOUNT DUE. The amount due on the Note which is secured by the Trust Deed referred to herein is: Principal balance in the amount of $191,618.03; plus interest at an adjustable rate pursuant to the terms of the Promissory Note from March 15, 2009; plus late charges of $199.70; plus advances and foreclosure attorney fees and costs. 6. SALE OF PROPERTY. The Trustee hereby states that the property will be sold to satisfy the obligations secured by the Trust Deed. A Trustee's Notice of Default and Election to Sell Under Terms of Trust Deed has been recorded in the Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 7. TIME OF SALE. Date: February 3, 2011. Time: 11:00 a.m. Place: Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, Oregon. 8. RIGHT TO REINSTATE. Any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time that is not later than five days before the Trustee conducts the sale, to have this foreclosure dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due, other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred, by curing any other default that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Trust Deed and by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with the trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amount provided in ORS 86.753. You may reach the Oregon State Bar's Lawyer Referral Service at 503-684-3763 or toll-free in Oregon at 800-452-7636 or you may visit its website at: www.osbar.org. Legal assistance may be available if you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines. For more information and a directory of legal aid programs, go to http://www.oregonlawhelp.o rg. Any questions regarding this matter should be directed to Lisa Summers, Paralegal, (541) 686-0344 (TS #17368.30443). DATED: September 17, 2010. /s/ Nancy K. Cary. Nancy K. Cary, Successor Trustee, Hershner Hunter, LLP, P.O. Box 1475, Eugene, OR 97440

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE The Trustee under the terms of the Trust Deed described herein, at the direction of the Beneficiary, hereby elects to sell the property described in the Trust Deed to satisfy the obligations secured thereby. Pursuant to ORS 86.745, the following information is provided: A. TRUST DEED ONE: 1. PARTIES: Grantor: BARRY BERGMAN AND JOAN BERGMAN. Trustee: FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON. Successor Trustee: NANCY K. CARY. Beneficiary: WORLD SAVINGS BANK, FSB. 2. DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: The real property is described as follows: Lot Three (3), COPPER CANYON PHASE 1, recorded March 11, 2005, in Cabinet G, Page 625, Deschutes County, Oregon. 3. RECORDING. The Trust Deed was recorded as follows: Date Recorded: June 7, 2006. Recording No. 2006-39525 Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 4. DEFAULT. The Grantor or any other person obligated on the Trust Deed and Promissory Note secured thereby is in default and the Beneficiary seeks to foreclose the Trust Deed for failure to pay: Monthly payments in the amount of $1,965.58 each, due the fifteenth of each month, for the months of September 2008 through September 2010; plus late charges and advances; plus any unpaid real property taxes or liens, plus interest. 5. AMOUNT DUE. The amount due on the Note which is secured by the Trust Deed referred to herein is: Principal balance in the amount of $330,330.25; plus interest at an adjustable rate pursuant to the terms of the Promissory Note from August 15, 2008; plus late charges of $2,079.43; plus advances and foreclosure attorney fees and costs. B. TRUST DEED TWO: 1. PARTIES: Grantor: BARRY BERGMAN AND JOAN BERGMAN. Trustee: FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON. Successor Trustee: NANCY K. CARY. Beneficiary: WORLD SAVINGS BANK, FSB. 2. DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: The real property is described as follows: Lot Three (3), COPPER CANYON PHASE 1, recorded March 11, 2005, in Cabinet G, Page 625, Deschutes County, Oregon. 3. RECORDING. The Trust Deed was recorded as follows: Date Recorded: June 7, 2006. Recording No. 2006-39526 Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 4. DEFAULT. The Grantor or any other person obligated on the Trust Deed and Promissory Note secured thereby is in default and the Beneficiary seeks to foreclose the Trust Deed for failure to pay: Monthly payments in the amount of $502.22 each, due the fifteenth of each month, for the months of September 2008 through September 2010; plus late charges and advances; plus any unpaid real property taxes or liens, plus interest. 5. AMOUNT DUE. The amount due on the Note which is secured by the Trust Deed referred to herein is: Principal balance in the amount of $64,923.00; plus interest at an adjustable rate pursuant to the terms of the Promissory Note from August 15, 2008; plus late charges of $569.34; plus advances and foreclosure attorney fees and costs. 6. SALE OF PROPERTY. The Trustee hereby states that the property will be sold to satisfy the obligations secured by the Trust Deed. A Trustee's No-

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Reference is made to that certain deed made by Larry T. Matthews and Roxanne A. Mathews, Husband And Wife, as Grantor to Western Title Company, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., ("mers") As Nominee For Irwin Mortgage Corporation, as Beneficiary, dated December 05, 2001, recorded December 17, 2001, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2001-61950 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: The north half (N1/2) of the west half (W1/2) of the south twenty acres of the northwest quarter of the southwest quarter (NW 1/4 SW 1/4) of section 6, township 21 south, range 11 east of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 54547 Huntington Road Bend OR 97707. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due February 1, 2010 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $906.15 Monthly Late Charge $33.53. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $92,041.36 together with interest thereon at 6.750% per annum from January 01, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on February 03, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: September 27, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is January 04, 2011, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Pamela Reeves, as Grantor to AmeriTitle, as Trustee, in favor of Bill Sonnabend, as Beneficiary, dated July 24, 2008, recorded July 25, 2008, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2008-31397 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: LOT ELEVEN (11), BLOCK ONE HUNDRED EIGHT (108), DESCHUTES RIVER RECREATION HOMESITES UNIT 8 PART II, RECORDED JULY 5, 1967, IN CABINET A, PAGE 137, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 15750 Sparks Dr., La Pine, Oregon 97739. Both the beneficiary and the successor trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due February 28, 2010 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $466.34 Monthly Late Charge $27.98. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $72,468.27 together with interest thereon at 7% per annum from December 2, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any stuns advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, George B. Heilig the undersigned successor trustee or his designee will on March 9, 2011 at the hour of 10:00 am, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, at the 1164 NW Bond Street, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by her of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required Under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: November 12, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is March 9, 2011, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260. Dated: 11/12/2010 By: George B. Heilig, Successor Trustee, HEILIG MISFELDT & ARMSTRONG, LLP, 310 NW 7"' Street, Suite 100, Corvallis, Oregon 97330, (541) 754-7477, www.hmalaw.net.

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxx5314 T.S. No.: 1300235-09.

R-347835 10/29, 11/05, 11/12, 11/19


THE BULLETIN • Friday, November 19, 2010 F5

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809 Autos & Transportation

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Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories

Antique and Classic Autos

Pickups

Pickups

Pickups

Sport Utility Vehicles

Sport Utility Vehicles

Sport Utility Vehicles

900

Diamond-plated tool box for bed of pickup. $100. Call 541-389-1582

908

Aircraft, Parts and Service

Studded snow tires 245-75-R16 Wildcat Touring AT, 4 for $500. Call 541-312-2972 Tires, (4), 13”, studded, mounted on Toyota rims, exc., $200, 541-420-9989. Tires, (4) 205/65/15 Michelin X-Ice snow tires on Audi/VW alloy wheels. $450 obo 541-350-9582 or 541-598-3807.

1/3 interest in Columbia 400, located at Sunriver. $150,000. Call 541-647-3718

1982 PIPER SENECA III Gami-injectors, KFC200 Flight Director, radar altimeter, certified known ice, LoPresti speed mods, complete logs, always hangared, no damage history, exc. cond. $175,000, at Roberts Field, Redmond. 541-815-6085. 2 hangars at Roberts Field, Redmond, OR. Spots for 5 planes. $536 annual lease. Reduced to $125,000 or make offer! 541-815-6085. Beechcraft A36 BDN 1978 3000TT, 1300 SRMAN, 100 TOP, Garmins, Sandel HSI, 55X A/P, WX 500, Leather, Bose, 1/3 share - $50,000 OBO/terms, 541-948-2126.

Grumman AA-5 Traveler, 1/4 interest, beautiful, clean plane, $9500, 619-822-8036 www.carymathis.blogspot.com

916

Trucks and Heavy Equipment Case 780 CK Extend-a-hoe, 120 HP,

TIRES: 4 Schwab 225/60R18, Studless snow tires, used, 2 seasons, $295. 541-447-1668 Tires (4), Studless Mud/Snow, 235/60R-17, mounted on Raclin Black custom wheels, 17x7.5, $400, 541-504-8085. Tires on Rims, (4) Schwab studded snows, 265/70R16, on Yukon rims, $250 ,541-306-4295

Tires Studded, Nokian, LT265/ 70R17, mounted on GM Mag wheels, like new, $990, 541-383-2337 Tires studded winter traction, mounted/balanced, 5-hole, P185-75R14, $199.99 cash. 541-312-4608 6-10 am/pm TIRES, WINTER STUDDED, P215/70R15 studded, $150. 541-388-4850

Winter is coming! Snow tires for sale. 235/70 R-16. Set of four - $100. Call (541) 923-7589 Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS

932

Antique and Classic Autos

real nice inside & out, low mileage, $2500, please call 541-383-3888 for more information.

Chevrolet Nova, 1976 2-door, 20,200 mi. New tires, seat covers, windshield & more. $5800. 541-330-0852.

Wabco 666 Grader - New tires, clean, runs good -$8,500. Austin Western Super 500 Grader - All wheel drive, low hours on engine - $10,500. 1986 Autocar cement truck Cat engine, 10 yd mixer $10,000. Call 541-771-4980

Chevy Corvette 1979, 30K mi., glass t-top, runs & looks great, $12,500,541-280-5677

Chevy Suburban 1969, classic 3-door, very clean, all original good condition, $5500, call 541-536-2792.

Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale

925

Utility Trailers

Chevy

Wagon

Ford Mustang Coupe 1966, original owner, V8, automatic, great shape, $9000 OBO. 530-515-8199

Mercedes 380SL 1983, Convertible, blue color, new tires, cloth top & fuel pump, call for details 541-536-3962

Mercedes-Benz 280c 1975 145k, good body & mechanical, fair interior, can email pics. $3350. 541-548-3628

Chrysler 300 Coupe 1967, 440 engine, auto. trans, ps, air, frame on rebuild, repainted original blue, original blue interior, original hub caps, exc. chrome, asking $10,000 or make offer. 541-385-9350.

Smolich Auto Mall

Smolich Auto Mall

Smolich Auto Mall

Special Offer

Special Offer

Special Offer

Honda Ridgeline 2006 AWD 48K miles, local, 1 owner, loaded w/options. $21,999. 541-593-2651 541-815-5539

Dodge Ram 3500 2010 Dual Wheel Diesel, 6 Speed Manual, 4X4, Laramie. Vin #162026

Now Only $47,779

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1178 • DLR

366

Chevy 1/2 Ton 1995, 4X4, 350 engine, auto, cold A/C, new tires, brakes, shocks, & muffler, w/ camper shell, runs great. $4000. 541-706-1568

Chevy Silverado 1500 4x4, 2000, Reg cab w/long bed, white, V6, 4.3 L, 20mpg, auto trans, ABS, AC, dual airbags, tow pkg, runs & drives excellent, maint’d extremely well; non-smoker. Recent brks, bearing, tune-up, tires, trans & coolant flush. 183K mi. $4950 obo. 541-633-6953

Yukon SLT 2003 4x4 $12,984 VIN#132979

541-598-3750 DLR 0225

FORD 350 LARIAT 2002 4x4 crewcab, 7.3 diesel 135k, dually, matching canopy, towing special, gooseneck, too! Orig. 63-year-old construction owner needs money, will trade, $18,500. (541) 815-3639 or (541) 508-8522

CHEVY BLAZER 2000, ZR2 LS 4x4, 130k miles, 90% tread left on $2000 worth of tires. Under KBB at $4995. Can be seen at Redmond’s Hwy 97 Park & Sell. 541-546-6838.

V6, auto, 4WD, tow pkg., very good cond, extra clean, A/C, non-smoker owned, loaded, etc, etc, $4800, 503-539-7554 (Bend).

Porsche 914, 1974 Always garaged, family owned. Runs good. $5500. 541-550-8256

VW Super Beetle 1974 New: 1776 CC engine, dual Dularto Carbs, trans, studded tires, brakes, shocks, struts, exhaust, windshield, tags & plates; has sheepskin seatcovers, Alpine stereo w/ subs, black on black, 25 mpg, extra tires. Only $3000 541-388-4302. Partial Trade.

VW Super Beetle 1974 New: 1776 CC engine, dual Dularto Carbs, trans, studded tires, brakes, shocks, struts, exhaust, windshield, tags & plates; has sheepskin seatcovers, Alpine stereo w/ subs, black on black, 25 mpg, extra tires. Only $3000 541-388-4302. Partial Trade.

Pickup

Dodge Quad Cab 2006 4X4! Call for great value information! Vin #693847

Now Only $15,999

NISSAN

smolichmotors.com 366

366

Ford Explorer 2008 Eddie Bauer 4x4 28k mi. Loaded! $25,437

Jeep CJ7 1986 Classic, 6-cyl, 5-spd., 4x4, good cond, price reduced to $7950, 541-593-4437.

Lexus GX470 2009 sport utility 4 WHEEL DRIVE Sport package, Navigation, 14,000 miles. $47,995

VIN#B29136

VIN#X590171829

541-598-3750

541-598-3750 DLR 0225

DLR 0225

Jeep Grand Cherokee Limited 1998, like new, low mi., just in time for the snow, great cond., $7000, 541-536-6223.

The Bulletin To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

Porsche Cayenne Turbo 2008, AWD, 500HP, 21k mi., exc. cond, meteor gray, 2 sets of wheels and new tires, fully loaded, $69,000 OBO. 541-480-1884

GMC Jimmy 4x4 UT 1986, 2-Dr, Auto, Tow package, Good condition, $1495, 541-815-9939.

Jeep Wrangler 2004, right hand drive, 51K, auto., A/C, 4x4, AM/FM/CD, exc. cond., $11,500. 541-408-2111

Need help ixing stuff around the house? Call A Service Professional and ind the help you need. www.bendbulletin.com

DLR 0225

i v n i g g s k n Tha

Smolich Auto Mall

DEADLINES

We will be closed Thursday, November 25th RETAIL, CLASSIFIED & LEGAL NOTICE ADVERTISING

FORD F-250 390 4x4, 1973 Runs good, $1600 OBO 541-536-9221

SuperDuty King Ranch 13,000 miles, Black with Gold Trim, every option available, Leveling Kit, Custom Wheels & Tires Like New - $40,000 - Call after 5pm (541) 447-4722

Chevy Tahoe Z71 2004 AWD & Leather! Vin #137297

Now Only $12,744

NISSAN

smolichmotors.com

Ford F-350 Crew 4x4 2002. Triton V-10, 118k, new tires, wheels, brakes. Very nice. Just $14,700. 541-601-6350 Look: www.SeeThisRig.com FORD pickup 1977, step side, 351 Windsor, 115,000 miles, MUST SEE! $4500. 541-350-1686

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Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classiieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days (Private Party ads only)

DEADLINES DAY

DEADLINE

Thursday 11-25 ............................ Monday 11-22 Noon GO! Magazine 11-26 .................... Monday 11-22 5 pm Friday 11-26..................................Tuesday 11-23 Noon Saturday 11-27 .............................Tuesday 11-23 Noon Sunday 11-28 ............................... Tuesday 11-23 4 pm Monday 11-29 ........................ Wednesday 11-24 Noon At Home Tuesday 11-30 ......... Wednesday 11-24 Noon

CLASSIFIED PRIVATE PARTY DEADLINES Thursday, Nov. 25th Deadline is Noon Wednesday, Nov. 24th Friday, Nov. 26th Deadline is 3:00 pm Wednesday, Nov. 24th

Classifieds • 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Circulation Telephone Service at 541-385-5800 will be open Thanksgiving Day from 6:30 am to 10:30 am to help with your holiday morning delivery.

Ford Ranger XLT 2000, X-Cab, air, 4x4, auto, canopy, 65K mi, $6800, 541-388-1469

1969,

152K mi. on chassis, 4 spd. transmission, 250 6 Cyl. eng. w/60K, new brakes & master cylinder, $2500, please call 503-551-7406 or 541-367-0800.

541-389-1178 • DLR

VIN#113246

X-Cab, 460, A/C, 4-spd., exc. shape, low miles, $3250 OBO, 541-419-1871.

Ford F350 2008

Pickups C-10

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1177 • DLR#366

541-598-3750

541-389-1178 • DLR

541-389-1178 • DLR

933

NISSAN

$24,887

Ford F250 1986, 4x4,

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Hard top. 28K Miles! VIN #530123

leather, DVD system, loaded, 46, 000 miles. KBB retail $27,850. Our price …

MUST SELL due to death. 1970 Monte Carlo, all original, many extras. Sacrifice $6000. 541-593-3072

DODGE D-100 1962 ½ Ton, rebuilt 225 slant 6 engine. New glass, runs good, needs good home. $2700. 541-322-6261

541-322-7253

V6, 7 Passenger, Family SUV! Vin #A06585

Chevy Blazer 2004,

Ford F150 XLT, 2005, Black, short bed, 85,000 miles, runs great, no problems. $17,500. 541-408-7823 no calls after 8:00 pm.

OLDS 98 1969 2 door hardtop, $1600. 541-389-5355

Jeep Wrangler 2006

Ford Explorer 2005

Chevy Tahoe 2006 LT Ford F-150 2006, Triton STX, X-cab, 4WD, tow pkg., V-8, auto, reduced to $15,999 obo 541-554-5212,702-501-0600

Mercury Monterrey 1965, Exc. All original, 4-dr. sedan, in storage last 15 yrs., 390 High Compression engine, new tires & license, reduced to $4850, 541-410-3425.

Sport Utility Vehicles

Honda Passport 2001 4x4 EX, grt in snow! Studded tires Toule case, exc cond, 103K, $6200 obo 503-528-6388 Bend

Moonroof, leather

Dodge Ram 3500 dually 2003 Cummins Diesel 24V, 113K, new tires, TorkLift hitch, exc cond, $25,900. 541-420-3250

Chevy Colorado 2004, LS, 4x4, 5 cyl., 4 spd., auto, A/C, ps, pl, pw, CD, 60K mi., $8925. 541-598-5111.

International Flat Bed Pickup 1963, 1 ton dually, 4 spd. trans., great MPG, could be exc. wood hauler, runs great, new brakes, $2500. 541-419-5480.

935

NISSAN

Ford T-Bird 1955, White soft & hard tops, new paint, carpet, upholstery, rechromed, nice! $32,000. 541-912-1833

1957,

4-dr., complete, $15,000 OBO, trades, please call 541-420-5453. Big Tex Landscaping/ ATV Trailer, dual axle flatbed, 7’x16’, 7000 lb. GVW, all steel, $1400. 541-382-4115, or 541-280-7024.

FIAT 1800 1978 5-spd., door panels w/flowers & hummingbirds, white soft top & hard top, Reduced to $5,500, 541-317-9319,541-647-8483

WHEELS , CHROME, (4), 6-lug, 16x6.5, fit GM SUV & truck, $100, 541-389-1913

Cadillac El Dorado 1977, very beautiful blue,

Mustang MTL16 2006 Skidsteer, on tracks, includes bucket and forks, 540 hrs., $18,500. 541-410-5454

2, 4 barrel, 225 hp. Matching numbers $52,500, 541-280-1227.

TIRES, set of 4 P265/70R16 $200. 541-388-4850

90% tires, cab & extras, 11,500 OBO, 541-420-3277

International 1981,T-axle-300 13 spd.Cummins/Jake Brake,good tires/body paint;1993 27’ stepdeck trailer, T-axle, Dove tail, ramps. $7950, 541-350-3866

Corvette 1956, rebuilt 2006, 3 spd.,

*** CHECK YOUR AD Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are mis understood and an error can occur in your ad. If this happens to your ad, please contact us the first day your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. Deadlines are: Weekdays 12:00 noon for next day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for Sunday; Sat. 12:00 for Monday. If we can assist you, please call us: 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classified ***

Dodge Ram 2001, short bed, nice wheels & tires, 86K, $5500 OBO, call 541-410-4354.

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Ford Excursion 4x4 2000. Nice Red, like new, only 68k, seats 9. Just $16,700. 541-601-6350 Look: www.SeeThisRig.com

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705, et seq. and O.R.S. 79-5010, et seq. Trustee No.: fc26264-5 Loan No.: 0146797048 Title No.: 4503788 Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by Thomas J. Bennett, as Grantor, to First American Title Insurance Co. of OR., as Trustee, in favor of SunTrust Mortgage, Inc., as Beneficiary, dated 07/24/2007, recorded on 07/31/2007 as Instrument No. 2007-42230 and Loan Modification Recorded on 03/13/2009 as Instrument No. 2009-10403, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by SunTrust Mortgage, Inc.. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LEGAL DESCRIPTION: LOT 8 IN BLOCK JJ OF DESCHUTES RIVER WOODS, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. TOGETHER WITH THAT PORTION DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: A PORTION OF LOT 41 OF BLOCK JJ, PLAT OF DESCHUTES RIVER WOODS, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON, BEING DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SAID LOT 41, BEING A 5/8 INCH IRON ROD; THENCE NORTH 34° 11' 17" EAST ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID LOT 41 A DISTANCE OF 104.47 FEET TO A 5/8 INCH IRON ROD; THENCE NORTH 38° 59' 00" WEST ALONG THE EAST LINE OF SAID LOT 41 A DISTANCE OF 15.00 FEET; THENCE LEAVING SAID EAST LINE OF SAID LOT SOUTH 26° 40' 17" WEST 109.76 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. Account No.: 107315 The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 60475 Umatilla Circle, Bend, OR 97702 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Trust Deed and a Notice of Default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735 (3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is Grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: monthly payments of $2,897.90 beginning 03/01/2010, together with title expenses, costs, trustee's fees and attorney's fees incurred herein by reason of said default, and any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein. ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and Deed of Trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: Principal balance of $377,415.26 with interest thereon at the rate of 7.125% per annum from 02/01/2010, together with any late charge(s), delinquent taxes, insurance premiums, impounds and advances; senior liens and encumbrances which are delinquent or become delinquent together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and any attorney's' fees and court costs, and any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that, First American Title Insurance Company c/o Mortgage Lender Services, Inc., the undersigned trustee will, on 01/06/2011, at the hour of 11:00AM in accord with the standard of time established by O.R.S. 187.110, At the Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, OR, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in O.R.S. 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "Grantor" includes any successor in interest to the Grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. For Trustee Sale Information please call (925) 603-7342. Dated: 8-26-10 First American Title Insurance Company, Trustee By: Mortgage Lender Services, Inc., Agent Lauren Meyer, Sr. Trustee Sale Officer Direct Inquiries To: SunTrust Mortgage Inc. c/o Mortgage Lender Services Inc., 4401 Hazel Avenue #225, Fair Oaks, CA 95628 (916) 962-3453 MORTGAGE LENDER SERVICES, INC. MAY BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. (RSVP# 203305, 11/12/10, 11/19/10, 11/26/10, 12/03/10 ) Call The Bulletin At 541-385-5809. Place Your Ad Or E-Mail At: www.bendbulletin.com

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx8007 T.S. No.: 1303408-09.

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx5271 T.S. No.: 1300305-09.

Reference is made to that certain deed made by Byron K. Ames and Lisa A. Ames Tenants By The Entirety, as Grantor to Western Title, as Trustee, in favor of National City Mortgage A Division of National City Bank A National Banking Association, as Beneficiary, dated October 18, 2007, recorded October 24, 2007, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2007-56560 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 9, block 7, Lazy River South, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 16677 Sprague Loop La Pine OR 97739. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due July 1, 2010 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,789.06 Monthly Late Charge $78.52. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $252,819.78 together with interest thereon at 5.980% per annum from June 01, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on February 15, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: October 12, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is January 16, 2011, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird

Reference is made to that certain deed made by Joseph M. Davies and Stacey M. Davies, As Tenants By The Entirety, as Grantor to Western Title & Escrow Co., as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., Mortgageit, Inc., as Beneficiary, dated December 26, 2006, recorded January 03, 2007, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2007-00233 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 4, block 3, first addition to Chaparral Estates, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 6415 SW Jaguar Ave. Redmond OR 97756. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due July 1, 2010 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $2,745.40 Monthly Late Charge $120.21. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $392,555.68 together with interest thereon at 5.750% per annum from June 01, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on February 03, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: September 27, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is January 04, 2011, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird

R-351208 11/12, 11/19, 11/26, 12/03

R-347840 10/29, 11/05, 11/12, 11/19


F6 Friday, November 19, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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Suzuki XL7 2008 Premium, Loaded, Roof Rack, 7 Passenger, 39K Miles! Vin #106479

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smolichmotors.com 541-749-4025 • DLR

366

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541-385-5809

Toyota Land Cruiser 1970, 350 Chevy engine, ps, auto, electric winch, new 16” tires and wheels, $12,000. 541-932-4921.

Audi A4 Nearly New 2009 Only 8,000 miles & many premium options on this A4 sedan including heated leather seats, Bluetooth, iPod dock & sunroof. The Quattro all-wheel drive system performs amazingly well in all weather conditions. Asking $2500 below Kelley Blue Book! $28,995. 541-350-3502

Ford Flex AWD 2010

Chevy Impala Luxury 2009

7 Passenger, Like New but priced Better! 25K Miles! VIN #A25280.

42K Miles! Vin #209196

Audi S4 2005, 4.2 Avant Quattro, tiptronic, premium & winter wheels & tires, Bilstein shocks, coil over springs, HD anti sway, APR exhaust, K40 radar, dolphin gray, ext. warranty, 56K, garaged, $30,000. 541-593-2227

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541-389-1177 • DLR#366

541-389-1177 • DLR#366

Buick LeSabre 2004, custom, 113k hwy miles, white, looks/drives perfect. $5950; also 1995 Limited LeSabre, 108k, leather, almost perfect, you’ll agree. $2900. Call 541-508-8522, or 541-318-9999.

Chrysler Cordoba 1978, 360 cu. in. engine, $400. Lincoln Continental Mark VII 1990, HO engine, SOLD. 541-318-4641.

Buick LeSabre Limited Edition 1985, 1 owner, always garaged, clean, runs great, 90K, $1895, 541-771-3133.

Honda Accord EX 1990, in great cond., 109K original mi., 5 spd., 2 door, black, A/C, sun roof, snow tires incl., $3500. 541-548-5302

Ford Focus SE Wagon 2007 4-dr, 8800 mi, 30+ mpg, brand new cond, $12,500 obo cash. 541-475-1165 aft 6

541-385-5809

Honda Civic LX 2006, 4-door, 45K miles,

Ford Mustang Cobra 2003, SVT, perfect, super charged, 1700 mi., $25,000/trade for newer RV+cash,541-923-3567

Ford Mustang Convertible LX 1989, V8 engine, white w/red interior, 44K mi., exc. cond., $6995, 541-389-9188.

Honda S 2000, 2002. Truly like new, 9K original owner miles. Black on Black. This is Honda’s true sports machine. I bought it with my wife in mind but she never liked the 6 speed trans. Bought it new for $32K. It has never been out of Oregon. Price $17K. Call 541-546-8810 8am-8pm.

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Toyota SR5 4Runner 2004 4WD. V-6. Moonroof. Tow. CD. New Michelins. 1 owner. Exc. $18,999. 541-480-3265. Dlr. #8308. Vin #025731.

940

Vans

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Chrysler PT Cruiser 2007

Chrysler 1999 AWD Town & Country LXI, 109k; 1998 Town & Country 7 passenger, leather, used but not abused. I’ll keep the one that doesn’t sell. Takes $3500 and up to buy. Bob, as you can see, likes mini vans. 541-318-9999 or 541-508-8522.

Loaded and Hard to find V6. 30K Miles! VIN #407550

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smolichmotors.com

Kia Spectra LS, 2002 96K miles, black, 5-speed, runs good, $2600. Phone 541-749-0316

Lincoln Continental 2000, loaded, all pwr, sunroof, A/C, exc. cond. 87K, $6250 OBO/ trade for comparable truck, 541-408-2671,541-408-7267

Now Only $9,999 Mercedes V-12 Limousine. Hand crafted for Donald Trump. Cost: $1/2 million. Just $27k. 541.601.6350 Look: www.SeeThisRig.com Mercury Grand Marquis 1992, 4 door, 130k miles, $1500 OBO. 541-388-4850

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2000 Audi A6

Mazda Miata MX5 2003, silver w/black interior, 4-cyl., 5 spd., A/C, cruise, new tires, 23K, $10,500, 541-410-8617.

Mazda SPEED6 2006, a rare find, AWD 29K, Velocity Red, 6 spd., 275 hp., sun roof, all pwr., multi CD, Bose speakers, black/white leather $17,500. 541-788-8626

NOW

Pontiac Fiero GT 1987, V-6, 5 spd, sunroof, gold color, good running cond, reduced, now $1500. 541-923-0134.

NOW

$

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6 Year/100k Powertrain Warranty Low Miles, Loaded, Leather, Nav.

$

2003 Mercedes C320

VW Certified, Low miles. Stk. 3519, Kelley Blue Book $15,820

NOW

18,495

$

2007 Mini Cooper S

Only 16k Miles, Nav., Moonroof.

Stk. 3414, VIN L84656

Stk. AA30167J, VIN 134876.

Kelley Blue Book $21,030

Kelley Blue Book $21,665

21,995

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23,995

2005 Volvo XC90

Low Miles, Automatic

$

22,999

AWD, Loaded, 3rd Row

Audi Certified, Low Miles.

Stk. 71031K, VIN 51200237.

Stk. 3465, VIN 125841.

Kelley Blue Book $23,125

Kelley Blue Book $25,135

CarreraAutoOutlet cars you can get into

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WAS $17,995

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Moonroof, Alloy Wheels, Auto, All Weather Pkg.

Low Miles

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16,488

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’08 SUBARU OUTBACK ’03 SUBARU FORESTER XT TURBO LIMITED

Automatic, AWD

$

23,488

16,988

VIN: 507426

VIN: 805276

’04 FORD F-250 SUPER CAB

’02 TOYOTA RAV4

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Loaded, Leather, Moonroof, Very Very Clean

WAS $17,995

WAS $18,995

16,995

$

12,999 VIN: 760719

VIN: 075212

’02 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE SPORT 4X4

Certifi ed Pre-Owned

Pre-Owned

19,998

6 Year/100k Powertrain Warranty

6 Year/100k Powertrain Warranty

Automatic, Low Miles, Loaded

Automatic, Low Miles, Loaded

$

18,999

$

Leather, Loaded, Very Clean

18,999

VIN: 704170

VIN: 304808

9,998

VIN: D03912

$

9,999

VIN: 304770

VIN: 239489

’05 SUBARU LEGACY GT

’06 SUBARU FORESTER 2.5i

’06 SUBARU LEGACY SEDAN 2.5 LIMITED

’00 SUBARU OUTBACK 2.5i LIMITED

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All Weather Pkg, Alloy Wheels, Automatic

Leather, Low Miles, Automatic

Leather, Loaded, Automatic, Low Miles

$

15,999

$

15,999

’07 SUBARU FORESTER

$

’06 SUBARU FORESTER

$

13,999

9,998

VIN: 209336

VIN: 628075

’08 SUBARU OUTBACK LIMITED

’97 TOYOTA T100 EXT CAB 4X4 LONG BOX

VIN: 718659

VIN: 219087

17,995

$

$

16,999

’06 SUBARU OUTBACK ’08 SUBARU FORESTER ’08 SUBARU OUTBACK 2.5 WAGON 2.5 3.02 LIMITED Certifi ed

Low Miles, Leather, Loaded, Moonroof, Automatic

2007 Audi A4

WAS $17,995

6 Year/100k Powertrain Warranty

6 Year/100k Powertrain Warranty 6 Year/100k Powertrain Warranty

Leather, Loaded, Very Clean, Manual

2009 VW Jetta TDI

Low Miles, Full Options

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Certifi ed Pre-Owned

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R E S TAU R A N T S : A review of Rivals Sports Bar, Grill & Poker, PAGE 10

EVERY FRIDAY IN THE BULLETIN NOVEMBER 19, 2010

GAMING: ’Call of Duty: Black Ops’ is in stores, PAGE 24


PAGE 2 • GO! MAGAZINE C O N TAC T U S EDITOR Julie Johnson, 541-383-0308 jjohnson@bendbulletin.com

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2010

inside

REPORTERS

FINE ARTS • 12

Jenny Harada, 541-383-0350 jharada@bendbulletin.com Breanna Hostbjor, 541-383-0351 bhostbjor@bendbulletin.com David Jasper, 541-383-0349 djasper@bendbulletin.com Alandra Johnson, 541-617-7860 ajohnson@bendbulletin.com Ben Salmon, 541-383-0377 bsalmon@bendbulletin.com

• Central Oregon Metal Arts Guild plans one-day show • Central Singers, JazzBros perform • Tower Theatre hosts modern dance • Mastersingers perform in concert • Harmony 4 Women at Summit High • Art Exhibits lists current exhibits

DESIGNER Althea Borck, 541-383-0331 aborck@bendbulletin.com

SUBMIT AN EVENT GO! MAGAZINE is published each Friday in The Bulletin. Please submit information at least 10 days before the edition in which it is printed, including the event name, brief description, date, time, location, cost, contact number and a website, if appropriate. E-mail to: events@bendbulletin.com Fax to: 541-385-5804, Attn: Community Life U.S. Mail or hand delivery: Community Life, The Bulletin 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, OR 97702

HOLIDAY BAZAARS • 20 • This week’s bazaars

OUT OF TOWN • 21 • Portland Center Stage plans holiday shows • A guide to out of town events

MUSIC • 3 • GWAR returns • Ascetic Junkies play Silver Moon • Talib Kweli at Century Center • Freak Mountain Ramblers at McMenamins • Texas Hippie Coalition plays Domino Room • Sean Hayes returns to town • Moon welcomes Diego’s Umbrella • Shireen Amini singalong!

GAMING • 24 • Review of “Call of Duty: Black Ops” • What’s hot on the gaming scene

MOVIES • 25

OUTDOORS • 15 • Great ways to enjoy the outdoors

ADVERTISING 541-382-1811

Cover photo courtesy Warner Bros. Pictures

AREA 97 CLUBS • 8 • Guide to area clubs

CALENDAR • 16 • A week full of Central Oregon events

MUSIC RELEASES • 9 • Take a look at recent releases

PLANNING AHEAD • 18 • Make your plans for later on

RESTAURANTS • 10 • A review of Rivals Sports Bar, Grill & Poker

TALKS & CLASSES • 19 • Learn something new

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• COVER STORY: “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1” is in theaters • “The Next Three Days,” “Fair Game” and “The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet’s Nest” also open in Central Oregon • “Disney’s A Christmas Carol,” “The Kids are All Right,” “Avatar Extended Collector’s Edition,” Cats & Dogs: The Revenge of Kitty Galore,” “The Last Airbender” and “Lottery Ticket” are out on Blu-ray and DVD • Brief reviews of movies showing in Central Oregon


THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2010

GO! MAGAZINE •

PAGE 3

music

GWAR performs at Bend’s Midtown Ballroom in 2007. The band’s new album is called “Bloody Pit of Horror.” Andy Tullis / The Bulletin ile photo

Shock & eww GWAR returns to Bend for another over-the-top spectacle By Ben Salmon The Bulletin

F

all in Bend has become GWAR season, it seems, as the infamously gory band of monsters returns to town annually to fill the Midtown Ballroom with thrash metal and toilet humor, “slaughter” a parade of celebrities, and splatter everyone in the place with fake blood and other bodily fluids. If you know what GWAR’s all about, you’re either stoked for Saturday’s show (see “If you go”), or you at least know not to be alarmed. GWAR is satire, a thunderous comedy show, an over-the-top spectacle of ultra-violence that some art-school kids from Virginia have turned into a long career. If these folks were truly a menace to society, they wouldn’t have a dozen albums (including the brand new “Bloody Pit of Horror”) and hundreds of shirt-staining shows under their

oversized, studded belts, which must be awfully stinky after 25 years on the road. But if you don’t know what GWAR’s all about, you may be worried about this band, their work, and the effect they may have on your loved one that wants to see them this weekend. That’s understandable; you’re not the first, nor will you be the last. (The band was caught up in the late-’80s uproar over graphic lyrics in music, leading to a classic appearance on Joan Rivers’ talk show. Check it out on YouTube.) To quell your fears, I suggest doing what others have done. Get to know GWAR. Get up close and personal with the ringleader of this magnificently disgusting sideshow. Read our (slightly edited) interview with the man known as Oderus Urungus. You’ll learn to love him. Or, he’ll kill you and eat you.

GO!: Hi Oderus, how’s it going? What’s on the agenda for today? Oderus Urungus: We have just landed in California, which for GWAR can only mean one thing: smoking meth and having sex with sea lions. Wait, that’s two things. After that I believe there are some shows to play. GO!: Your brand new album is called “Bloody Pit of Horror,” and I read a review that calls it a return to GWAR’s punk/thrash roots. Was that a conscious effort on the band’s part? Or is that reviewer … totally wrong? OU: People say all kinds of things to explain our greatness. They are all wrong. Unfortunately I don’t know the reasons either. We just make metal music, we don’t really think about it. If we did, then I am sure it would suck. This isn’t “mind music,” this is … heavy metal. And a good thing too, I am dumb as a post. Continued Page 5

If you go What:GWAR, with The Casualties, Infernaeon and Mobile Death Camp When:8 p.m. Saturday, doors open at 7 p.m. At 4 p.m., meet members of GWAR and Danger Ehren of “Jackass” at Ranch Records (831 N.W. Wall St., Bend) Where:Midtown Ballroom, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend Cost:$22 plus fees in advance, $24 at the door. Advance tickets available at Ranch Records (541-389-6116) and Side Effect Boardshop (541-312-8255) in Bend, plus www.bendticket.com and all TicketsWest outlets. Contact:541-390-8648 or markiewirges@gmail.com.


PAGE 4 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2010

m u s i c

TALIB KWELI

THE ASCETIC JUNKIES

Submitted photo

Their new album is packed with hooks Submitted photo

By Ben Salmon The Bulletin

The master MC returns to Bend By Ben Salmon The Bulletin

C

entral Oregon’s hip-hop heads have plenty of opportunities to see their favorite kind of music performed live, though their options do tend to range from amazing to awful. So it’s worth noting when someone like Talib Kweli — the Brooklyn, N.Y. MC widely considered one of the most gifted rappers and lyricists alive — stops in Bend for the third time in four years, as he’ll do on Saturday night (see “If you go”). Kweli named his 2004 album “The Beautiful Struggle,” and that’s a neat summary of the man’s career. He made his name as half of the Black Star duo with Mos Def; the two released a classic album in 1998 that still sets hip-hop tongues to wagging a dozen years later. (They haven’t released a second.) Since, Kweli has been closely aligned with some of the biggest names in the game. Kanye West cut his teeth producing his early solo work, and JayZ once famously rapped: “If skills sold, truth be told, I’d probably be Talib Kweli.” But Kweli’s own profile has always risen steadily, without the starmaking spike enjoyed by his associates, leading some to wonder if hip-hop’s general public is more interested in beefs and braggadocio than Kweli’s brand of strong, smart socio-political commentary delivered through a tenacious, grainy flow. Before he headed toward Bend, Kweli was kind enough to answer a few questions from GO! via e-mail. Here they are, slightly edited: GO!: I know you grew up in a house with two

If you go What: Talib Kweli, with Mosley Wotta, DJ R-2 and a showcase of Bend’s emerging MCs When: 8 p.m. Saturday Where: Century Center, 70 S.W. Century Drive, Bend Cost: $22 in advance, $25 at the door, $20 with student ID. Advance tickets available at Showcase Hats & Apparel (541-647-2246), Vanilla Urban Threads (541-617-6113) and www.bendticket.com. Contact: art@riseupinternational.com

parents who were professors. Were you first exposed to hip-hop inside that house? If so, what kind of stuff did they listen to? And if not, where did you first hear hip-hop? Talib Kweli: I was first exposed to hip-hop on the streets of New York. In the subways, on the radio. My father was a DJ in college so he had an extensive record collection, everyone from Bob Dylan to Miles Davis to Funkadelic to Salsoul Orchestra. GO!: You’ve had an interesting career arc — early critical success, but more slow-burning commercial success — especially for hip-hop, where there are so many flashes in the pan. Do you attribute the level you’ve reached today more to your skill as an MC and lyricist, or to hustle and perseverance? Continued next page

H

igh up on The Ascetic Junkies’ MySpace page is a defiant declaration: “not a folk/bluegrass band.” That’s true, though Graham Houser’s banjo plays such a prominent role in the Portlandbased quintet’s sound, you can forgive — or at least understand — those who paint them into a string-band corner. But banjo be damned, The Ascetic Junkies — formed by core couple Matt Harmon and Kali Giaritta after they moved from the East Coast — are a pop band through and through, and nowhere is that more evident than on their brand new album, “This Cage Has No Bottom,” released earlier this week on Timber Carnival Records. The Junkies will celebrate their new album tonight in Bend (see “If you go”). “Cage” is filled to the brim with everything that’s great about the Junkies: lively arrangements, spirited, sparkling melodies and bright-eyed boy/girl vocals as far as the ear can hear. Lyrically, Harmon and Giaritta walk a line between playful and provocative, delivering lines about life, death, whiskey and religion via hooks so cheerful, they sweep aside the world-weary feel that runs through these songs. The result is a sound that combines the rootsy cool of neobluegrassers The Avett Brothers, the radiant charm of Mates of State’s fluttery indie-pop, and

If you go What: The Ascetic Junkies, with Erin Cole-Baker When: 9 tonight Where: Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend Cost: $7 Contact: 541-388-8331 or www.silvermoonbrewing.com

the carnivalesque racket of early Of Montreal, wrapped loosely in Portland’s DIY ethos. (“Cage” was recorded in “every room except the kitchen” of the Harmon/Giaritta house, and several songs feature the beerfueled stomps, claps and vocals of four of the Junkies’ friends.) On the album’s first track, “Why Do Crows?,” Harmon and Giaritta sing: “Why do musicians try to drag you along with the weight of their pain when they sing?” It’s a fair question, and they have an answer that sort of sums up their band. “My love don’t worry. There’s no need to fret,” they sing. “Yeah we’re all going to die, but it won’t happen yet, so … ” So what? So yeah … this world can be a drag sometimes. For 12 songs and 39 minutes, at least, let’s plug our ears, sing at the top of our lungs, and drown it all out. Ben Salmon can be reached at 541-383-0377 or bsalmon@ bendbulletin.com.


THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2010

GO! MAGAZINE •

PAGE 5

music

HAPPY THANKSGIVING FROM THE BULLETIN’S MUSIC BLOG, FREQUENCY!

Warm bu t a bi t t oo ?

Let’s all give thanks for the local music scene and the folks who make it go, shall we? This week on the blog: • new videos from Brother Ali and Cloaked Characters • new music from Loch Lomond and Sara Jackson-Holman • the lineup for Sisters Folk Festival’s Winter Concert Series • a bunch of awesome Built to Spill songs to clog your RSS feed

AND MORE! FIND IT ALL AT ...

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GWAR From Page 3 GO!: Appearances on Fox News, Jimmy Fallon, a sweet spot at Bonnaroo, that fancy new “Zombies, March!” video … it seems there’s a bit of a GWAR revival going on. Agreed? If so, to what do you attribute this sudden surge in interest/respect? OU: Just the latest developments of a 25-year-long assault upon all things alive and otherwise … we have killed so much of the competition, it was inevitable that we would get some more exposure. Plus so many other bands have either given up, dropped dead, or just plain sucked, our place at the top of the heap seems assured. The fact that we are immortal gives

Talib Kweli From previous page TK: I think my career is a result of many factors, most notably my parents encouraging creative expression. They also taught me the value of hard work and ambition. I think I’m willing to work harder than most, and I know I love it more than most. I think these things make up for whatever I lack in talent. I also never shun new or different forms of hip-hop. I embrace it all and celebrate (it) as expression, even when I don’t understand it. GO!: What’s on the horizon for you? I’ve seen reports about two different records — “Gutter Rainbows” and “Prisoner of Conscious.” Can you set me straight on the plan? TK: “Gutter Rainbows” will be out January 25. I am doing it myself. “Prisoner of Conscious”

us a small advantage of course. By the time most humans have learned from their mistakes they have become fat and old and not commercially viable. In our case getting fat and old actually seems to help us! GO!: Who should we expect to see added to the litany of the slain on this tour? OU: Well that would spoil everything, now wouldn’t it!? Part of the real joy of the GWAR experience is the genuine shock you receive when you witness your loved ones being dragged on stage, chopped into bits, and then distributed to the surviving crowd as food. Not something you would expect from your Mom, but nevertheless she volunteered for the entire sickening ritual. There are also a couple of high-profile celebrity

will be out in the spring. GO!: That one title, “Prisoner of Conscious,” is interesting. Do you feel trapped by your reputation as a “conscious” hip-hop artist? Do you feel like you’ve grown a bit of a chip on your shoulder in recent years because of people’s insistence on labeling you and what you do? TK: I disagree, I think that if I grew a chip on my shoulder I’d be irrelevant. I think I’ve been very careful to not grow a chip on my shoulder and to be able to drive in all lanes. It’s the media that focuses on that not me. But that’s essentially what the album title is about. GO!: For that matter, do you tire of people constantly asking you about another Black Star re-

mutilations we are carrying out but once again I am not going to spill the beans, but I will tell you that Lady Gaga is one of them! GO!: This makes several years in a row you’ve been to Bend. If GWAR is so tough, shouldn’t you have conquered this town by now? Is Bend tougher than it looks? OU: Well, you are mountain people, right? Doesn’t that make you a little hardier, like from wrestling bears and such? But all across the country I meet people who are like “I have seen you guys like six times.” Well, that is the last thing you want to tell me if you want to make it seven! Ben Salmon can be reached at 541-383-0377 or bsalmon@ bendbulletin.com.

cord? I assume that you’re proud of the fact that that record still resonates with people, but does it feel as much like a blessing as it did in, say, 1999? Or do you have days where it feels like a burden? TK: Sometimes it’s tough because I’m a fan of Black Star too, and asking over and over again won’t make it happen any faster. Look at my output. Clearly putting out music is not something I don’t know how to make happen. I wish people would appreciate my other efforts more, but how can I be mad at the love for Black Star? I love it. Ben Salmon can be reached at 541-383-0377 or bsalmon@ bendbulletin.com.

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Tickets & Info: TowerTheatre.org Ticket Mill | 541.317.0700

Bend


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THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2010

music McMenamins marks sixth anniversary It’s that time of year again. Time to get Freaky! Bend’s branch of the McMenamins empire — Old St. Francis School — opened six years ago, and the folks behind the popular bar/hotel/hangout want to celebrate. As they do every year, they’re bringing the grizzled veterans in Freak Mountain Ramblers over from Portland to play the party. The Freaks have built a sizable regional following thanks to their acid-frazzled blend of psychedelic rock ’n’ roll, left-of-center country and electric blues. Counting three members with ties to the old Holy Modal Rounders family from way back when, Freak Mountain Ramblers are like the revisionist, retrofit godfathers of the alt-country sound employed by bands like the Bottle Rockets, Blue Mountain and Old 97s. Introduce yourself at www .freakmountain.com. Freak Mountain Ramblers; 7 tonight and 7 p.m. Saturday ; free; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www .mcmenamins.com.

Make way for the Texas Hippie Coalition Holy cow! Texas Hippie Coalition is not what I expected.

Upcoming Concerts

Texas Hippie Coalition Submitted photo

I saw the band name. Then I saw the name of their new album, “Rollin’.” And then I saw some posts on Facebook encouraging fans to “get some THC!” (That’s a thinly veiled reference to a major substance in cannabis, I do believe.) So, I navigated to www .THCOutlaw.com expecting some easygoing country-stonerrock kind of thing. In fact, the Texas Hippie Coalition is heavy. Really heavy. The band has a sort of tug-of-

war thing going on, with the Southern ’70s rock of Lynyrd Skynyrd and Molly Hatchet pulling on one side, and the serrated modern metal of White Zombie and Pantera yanking on the other. The result is music that is pounding and powerful, with lots of Lone Star State swagger and buzzy, howling hooks. If that’s your thing, hit the internet and check out the tunes, especially the current hit “Pissed Off And Mad About It,” which sounds ex-

actly how you imagine it sounds. Texas Hippie Coalition, with Tempesta and Exfixia; 7 p.m. Wednesday; $8 in advance, $10 at the door. Advance tickets available at Bend’s Indoor Garden Station (541-385-5222), Showcase Hats (541-647-2246), Ranch Records (541-389-6116) and www.bend ticket.com; Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; actiondeniro@msn.com or www.myspace .com/actiondeniroproductions. — Ben Salmon

Nov. 26 — David JacobsStrain (roots blues), Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, Bend, 541-388-8331 or www. silvermoonbrewing.com. Nov. 27 — Cosy Sheridan (folk), HarmonyHouse concerts, Sisters, 541-548-2209. Nov. 30 — Lucero (altcountry), Domino Room, Bend, markiewirges@gmail.com. Dec. 1 — The Parson Red Heads (indie rock), McMenamins Old St. Francis School, Bend, 541-382-5174 or www.mcmenamins.com. Dec. 1 — Preservation Hall Jazz Band (jazz), Tower Theatre, Bend, 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org. Dec. 2 — Big Bad Voodoo Daddy’s Wild & Swingin’ Holiday Party (Santa-swing), Tower Theatre, Bend, 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org. Dec. 2 — Mystic Roots (reggae), Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, Bend, 541-388-8331 or www. silvermoonbrewing.com. Dec. 8 — Béla Fleck & The Flecktones (banjo-technics), Mountain View High School, Bend, 541-3220863 or www.kpov.org. Dec. 12 — Brother Ali and The Grouch (hip-hop), Domino Room, Bend, www. randompresents.com. Dec. 16 — Dick Dale (guitar hero), Domino Room, Bend, www.randompresents.com. Dec. 17 — Sweatshop Union (hip-hop), Domino Room, Bend, www.randompresents.com. Dec. 18 — Crown Point (poprock), JC’s, 541-383-3000. Dec. 18 — The Quick & Easy Boys (funk-rock), Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, Bend, 541-388-8331 or www. silvermoonbrewing.com. Dec. 29 — Reverend Horton Heat (psychobilly), Midtown Ballroom, Bend, www. randompresents.com. Jan. 10 — The Steep Canyon Rangers (bluegrass), Sisters High School, 541-549-4979 or www.sistersfolkfestival.org. Jan. 14 — The Wailers (reggae), Tower Theatre, Bend, 541-3170700 or www.towertheatre.org. Jan. 22 — LJ Booth (folk), HarmonyHouse concerts, Sisters, 541-548-2209. Jan. 29 — Beth Wood (folk), Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, Bend, 541388-8331 or www. silvermoonbrewing.com. Feb. 4 — Tom Russell (Americana), Sisters High School, 541-549-4979 or www.sistersfolkfestival.org. Feb. 19 — Johnsmith (folk), HarmonyHouse concerts, Sisters, 541-548-2209.


THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2010

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music

Brighten The Holidays With The Bulletin’s 50 Day Holiday Package.

Sean H a y e s r e tu r n s to Mandala yoga studio In April, San Francisco singersongwriter Sean Hayes played at Mandala Yoga Community’s studio in downtown Bend, and I wrote a little brief, which I wrapped with a warning: “The excellent Songs: Illinois blog wonders aloud if ‘Run Wolves Run’ will push Hayes into the same ‘upper stratosphere’ as songwriters like Josh Ritter, Josh Rouse and Brett Dennen,” a back issue of The Bulletin reminds me. “So if you want to catch a talented, veteran and on-the-rise artist in a yoga studio in downtown Bend, this might be your last chance.” Lucky for you, I was wrong. Hayes returns to Mandala Saturday night, just a few weeks removed from the birth of his first baby. But I stand by my premise. Hayes’ shuffling acoustic folkblues is just too catchy and connectable to avoid the spotlight for long. His songs ooze intimacy, like tasty little morsels packed with deeply personal (and slyly melodic) feelings, insights and life lessons. Put on headphones and you’d swear the guy was sitting 10 feet away, strumming his guitar and making uncomfortable eye contact. Visit www.seanhayesmusic.com for a taste. And besides, I’m not the only one who thinks Hayes’ music is worth hearing. Since his last visit to Bend, his work has been featured on a Subaru commercial, in the TV shows “Parenthood” and “Bored to Death,” and in an odd little bit on Justin Timberlake’s website. Justin Timberlake, people! There is no arguing with that. So if he’s back in town next year but still playing Mandala, perhaps it’s Bend’s fault, hmm? Sean Hayes, with Jill H and DJ Lucius; 8 p.m. Saturday, doors open 7 p.m.; $18 at the door or at the website below; Mandala Yoga Community, 55 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; www.mandala yogabend.com.

Diego’s Umbrella lands at Silver Moon Gypsy rock. Pirate polka. Urban mariachi music. There are any number of ways to describe the multicultural mash-up of styles played by San Francisco sextet Diego’s Umbrella, and most of them are accurate. But there is one all-encompassing term that works for these guys, too: Fun. Diego’s Umbrella is tons of fun, taking Latin and Eastern European influences, pushing them through a punk-rock

Sean Hayes Submitted photo

prism, and creating a cosmopolitan sound ideal for the drinking and the dancing. Think the Beach Boys and the Minutemen playing flamenco music in a Tarantino flick, and you’re at least on the right planet. These dudes go the full nine yards, donning elaborate uniforms to match their style. They’re currently touring behind their latest album, the awesomely named “Double Panther.” Because a double panther is twice as vicious and cuddly as a single panther, you know. Learn more at www.diegosumbrella. com. Diego’s Umbrella; 9 p.m. Saturday; $6; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www.silvermoonbrewing.com.

Shireen Amini wants a b-day singalong Multitalented local singersongwriter Shireen Amini has been away from Bend’s live scene for a bit as she works on tunes for her upcoming second album. But tonight, she’s returning to performance with a bang, and she wants you — yes, you — to be involved.

“I am going to turn Parrilla Grill into a cozy, communal music-making experience,” Amini wrote earlier this month. Her plan is to invite some of her favorite local musicians and some of her young students to accompany her, or lead songs. “We’ll be singing some tried-and-true soul, rock, R&B classics like ‘Lean On Me,’ ‘Let It Be,’ ‘La Bamba’ and mucho mas. It will be kind of like singing around a campfire except we’ll be singing around the margarita bar.” Sounds refreshing, right? Anyone and everyone is invited to show up and sing or just “absorb the joy and spirit we’ll be raising in there,” Amini says. She’s even going to bring lyric sheets to pass around, as well as a few of her own new songs for a test drive. I forgot to mention: Saturday is Shireen’s birthday! And her one wish is that you’d show up tonight and join in the fun. You don’t want to bum her out on her birthday weekend, do you? Shireen’s Birthday Sing-along, with Shireen Amini, special guests and you; 7 tonight; free; Parrilla Grill, 635 N.W. 14th St., Bend; 541-617-9600. — Ben Salmon

Receive 50 days of The Bulletin including Holiday inserts, local shopping and sales guides, Holiday events, activities and Special Holiday Deals Of The Day offers for only $18.50. Plus, your Holiday subscription includes full web access to bendbulletin.com perfect for checking on weather conditions, local events or staying in touch with local news while you travel.

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THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2010

area clubs BEND

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

821 N.W. Wall St., 541-323-2328 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave.

The Blacksmith Restaurant 211 N.W. Greenwood Ave., 541-318-0588

Bo Restobar 550 N.W. Franklin Ave., 541-617-8880

Post-derby bash w/ Kleverkill, 10 pm m Blacksmith After Dark, 10 pm dj A Fine Note Karaoke, 9 pm

Century Center 70 S.W. Century Drive

Crossings Lounge 3075 N. U.S. Highway 97, 541-389-8810

SUNDAY

Sagebrush Rock, 9 pm r/p

Blacksmith After Dark, 10 pm dj A Fine Note Karaoke, 9 pm Talib Kweli, 8 pm, $22-25 h (P. 4) Sagebrush Rock, 9 pm r/p

JC’s 642 N.W. Franklin Ave., 541-383-3000

Madhappy Lounge 850 N.W. Brooks St., 541-388-6868

Out of the Blue, 8:30 pm r/p DJ Hoppa + MineUs, 9 pm h

Mandala Yoga Community 55 N.W. Minnesota Ave.

McMenamins Old St. Francis 700 N.W. Bond St., 541-382-5174

Freak Mtn. Ramblers, 7 pm a (P. 6)

Midtown Ballroom 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave.

Northside Pub 62860 Boyd Acres Road, 541-383-0889

Parrilla Grill 635 N.W. 14th St., 541-617-9600

Emerald City, 9 pm r/p

Strictly Organic Coffee Bar 450 S.W. Powerhouse Dr., 541-647-1402

The Summit Saloon & Stage 125 N.W. Oregon Ave., 541-749-2440

Tumalo Feed Co. 64619 U.S. Highway 20, 541-382-2202

j

Hip-hop Jazz

m p

WEDNESDAY

Metal Punk

r/p

w

Americana Rock/Pop World

THURSDAY

Thanksgiving dance party, 9 pm dj Sean Hayes, 8 pm, $18 r/p (P. 7) Freak Mtn. Ramblers, 7 pm a (P. 6) GWAR, 8 pm, $22-24 m (P. 3) Emerald City, 9 pm r/p

Jukebot!, 7 pm r/p

Jazz Sundays, 2 and 5 pm j

DJ Chris, 9 pm dj

Bo Reynolds & Deb Yager, 6:30 pm a Karaoke, 8 pm

1020 N.W. Wall St., 541-385-8898 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., 541-388-8331

TUESDAY

h

KC Flynn, 9 pm r/p Out of the Blue, 8:30 pm r/p

Sidelines Sports Bar & Grill Silver Moon Brewing Co.

f

a

DJ Folk

Pete Mason, 7 pm f

2754 N.W. Crossing Drive, 541-385-1777 19570 Amber Meadow Drive, 541-728-0095

dj

Shireen Amini’s b-day bash, 7 pm r/p (P. 7)

portello winecafe River Rim Coffeehouse

c

Blues Country

Texas Hippie Coalition, 7 pm m (P. 6)

51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., 541-388-1106

415 N.E. Third St., 541-323-2520

b

Hilst & Coffey, 7 pm f

Domino Room

Kayo’s

MONDAY

MUSIC TYPE:

Bill Keale, 6 pm r/p

5 Fusion & Sushi Bar The Annex

Get listed At least 10 days prior to publication, e-mail events@bendbulletin.com. Please include date, venue, time and cost.

Ascetic Junkies, Erin C-B, 9 pm, $7 r/p (P. 4)

Diego’s Umbrella, 9 pm, $6 r/p (P. 7)

Canaan Canaan, 5-7 pm f DJ Steele, 9 pm dj Pat Thomas, 9 pm c

Harpist Rebecca Smith, 2-4 pm w DJ Steele, 9 pm dj Pat Thomas, 9 pm c

Open mic, 7 pm

Josh Hart Project, 7 pm r/p

Typhoon 550 N.W. Franklin Ave., 541-322-8889

REDMOND Avery’s Wine Bar & Bistro 427 S.W. Eighth St., 541-504-7111

Brassie’s Bar Eagle Crest Resort, 541-548-4220

Cafe Alfresco 614 N.W. Cedar Ave., 541-923-2599

Millennium Cafe 445 S.W. Sixth St., 541-350-0441

Bellavia, 6 pm j Lindy Gravelle, 7-10 pm c

Lindy Gravelle, 7-10 pm c

Allan Byer, 6-9 pm f Free roll hold ‘em tournament, 6 pm

Free roll hold ‘em tournament, 6 pm

Free roll hold ‘em tournament, 1 pm

Dance w/ Hi Desert Wranglers, 7 pm, $4-6

VFW Hall 1836 S.W. Veterans Way, 541-548-4108

SISTERS Cork Cellars Wine Bar 161 Elm St., 541-549-2675

The Quons, 7 pm r/p Lino, 8 pm, $5

Three Creeks Brewing Co. 721 Desperado Court, 541-549-1963

r/p

LA PINE Jade’s Jazz Lounge 51470 U.S. Highway 97 #5, 541-876-1009

Mission: Blues, 7 pm b

Scott Morrison, 7 pm r/p

TERREBONNE Pump House 8320 N. U.S. Highway 97, 541-548-4990

Rough String Band, 8 pm c

Free roll hold ‘em tournament, 6 pm

Free roll hold ‘em tournament, 6 pm


THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2010

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music releases Die Antwoord $O$ Interscope Records Die Antwoord’s rap-meetselectro-rave noise comes at you quickly and busily, claustrophobically even. Perfect for strobelight accompaniment, there are wobbling old tech-house synths in “Beat Boy,” hyper Jamaican dancehall in “Evil Boy” (with help from Philly’s master of the genre, Diplo), and more speeding rude squirts and squelches throughout this debut CD than a closet full of whoopee cushions. Yet South Africa’s Die Antwoord never misses, at least in

Sufjan Stevens THE AGE OF ADZ Asthmatic Kitty Records When Sufjan Stevens dismissed his plan to spend the remainder of his career making concept albums for all 50 states, more than a few felt betrayed. Five long years came and went since the folk singer’s breakout smash, “Illinoise,” and various EPs and B-sides were not enough to quell fans’ appetites. Alas, the wait is over, and instead of an Americana postcard or recognizable skyscraper on the cover art, Stevens presents a foreboding alien robot as the welcome mat to this sprawling work. “The Age of Adz” zaps the once-minimalist folk singer light years into the future (or, perhaps more accurately, the present) through premeditated tape glitch-

terms of its wildly contagious melodies, that it’s a pop act. When hard-as-nails MC Ninja (Betty Boop-voiced singer YoLandi Vi$$er and a tracks-build-

ing DJ Hi-Tek complete the trio) isn’t acting as a deadpan motivational speaker on the epically hypnotic “Enter the Ninja,” he’s intoning salacious hometown slang on “Scopie” and dissing your mom on “Fish Paste” through songs so sonorous you might embarrass yourself singing them out loud. Forget about the cheap dominatrix gear they wear or their now-famous Fincher-meetsCronenberg videos. Die Antwoord is nasty pop for fans of the leather bar and the Disney Channel. — A.D. Amorosi, The Philadelphia Inquirer

es, dubstep beats and keyboard blips in logarithmic fashion. It’s a far cry from the whispering banjo ballads of “Greetings From Michigan: The Great Lake State” and the softer moments of “Illinoise,” but it works. At times, Stevens’ schoolboy rasp feels almost taunting, particularly on the epic “I Want to be Well,” and his acoustic fingerpicking and trademark alto horns can still be heard in the belly of the technological beast that powers up when you hit play. The beauty of this record lies in its use of tension and release, of the balance between bombardment and understatement. These songs are long, really long, but they are delicate, intensely crafted compositions which are often broken into classically structured movements. On the album’s title track, Stevens subtly enunciates

the word “Adz” as “Oz,” and his remaining wizardry is a warning for listeners to not be distracted amid the chaos of 21st-century technological life. If “Michigan” and “Illinoise” were folk operas in black and white, “The Age of Adz” shows Stevens wide awake in a world of color. — John Hendrickson, The Denver Post

new, every sock and shoe, my face and your face, tenderly renewed.” While the overarching connection adds another level to “Swanlights,” Hegarty and The Johnsons know they are most effective when his distinc-

tive, tremulous voice is least adorned, so the streamlined soul of “Thank You for Your Love,” where he seemingly creates the happy ending to his wrenching trademark “Fistful of Love,” is relentlessly spare. He sounds like he’s about to burst with joy in “I’m in Love,” with the minimalist orchestration and the looped synth riff only showcasing his excitement that much more. On the beautiful “Fletta,” Hegarty’s vocals flit and float like airborne ballerinas over gorgeous string arrangements and booming horns. In a way, that’s how “Swanlights” works overall, offering surprises within elegant surprises. — Glenn Gamboa, Newsday

Antony & The Johnsons SWANLIGHTS Secretly Canadian In “Swanlights,” Antony Hegarty bridges the gap between his raw, stunning breakthrough “I Am a Bird Now” and the lush follow-up “The Crying Light.” That’s not to say Hegarty is reining in his ambitions. He establishes the musical theme of “everything is new” early, chanting it initially in “Everything Is New,” acknowledging the feeling without going into details. By the time he reaches the epic “Christina’s Farm,” he can outline the reasons he is seeking a rebirth and how he knows he has achieved it: “Everything is

Darius Rucker CHARLESTON, SC 1966 Liberty Records Darius Rucker sounds downright cuddly compared with many of his pop-country contemporaries. That only makes sense, given that he jumped onto the genre from the soft-rock/R&B train of Hootie & the Blowfish, but his approachable persona runs deeper than that. He eschews the confrontational stance of many of country’s most polarizing stars (Toby Keith, Dixie Chicks), but also brings a modest urgency that elevates him from the calculated, Jimmy Buffet-esque mind-

lessness of artists like Kenny Chesney. The title of Rucker’s third solo album and second country outing nods to both his Southern upbringing — a narrative he’s been pushing since his crossover to the twangier side in 2008 — and his professed love of Nashville mainstay Radney Foster. It’s an agreeable platter, overflowing with melody-drenched contributions from A-list country songwriters and lots of bright, layered instrumentation (see the charming, if self-conscious “In a Big Way”). The mid-tempo single “Come Back Song” isn’t much of a stretch from Rucker’s previous style, and he occasionally indulges in hoary country clichés (the plodding “Whiskey and You,” the Brad Paisley-aided “I Don’t Care”). But “Charleston, SC 1966” proves that Rucker’s transformation from ’90s has-been to 21st-century country luminary is both impressive and inarguably complete. If anything, he probably should have made the switch sooner. — John Wenzel, The Denver Post

Lil Wayne I AM NOT A HUMAN BEING Universal Motown Records It’s not clear how Lil Wayne managed to record an album of new songs while serving an eightmonth prison sentence that began last March. But as the title suggests, Wayne is not of this world. And as the material suggests, Wayne might be the only rapper living there, such are the depth and breadth displayed here. Designed as a stopgap before “Tha Carter IV,” his new one, “I Am Not a Human Being,” is a well-executed summary of everything Wayne has done before: schoolyard bragging (“Gonorrhea”), money/power metaphors (“Bill Gates”), twisted love songs (“With You”), attempts at solitude (“I’m Single”). Even his ill-advised fascination with rap-rock finds the right home on the Rick Rubin-flavored

www.educate.com

541-389-9252 Bend • 2150 NE Studio Rd.

title track. Jay-Z’s confidence, Biggie’s rhymes, 2Pac’s pace — Wayne isn’t a human being. He’s the house that hip-hop built. — Michael Pollock, The Philadelphia Inquirer


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THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2010

restaurants

Worth the

gamble Pete Erickson / The Bulletin

A group of people enjoy beer and Monday Night Football at Rivals Sports Bar, Grill & Poker in Bend.

Rivals Sports Bar is a good choice for the big game

Rivals Sports Bar, Grill & Poker

By John Gottberg Anderson

Location: 2650 N.E. Division St., Bend Hours: 11:30 a.m. to 2 a.m. Monday to Friday, 9 a.m. to 2 a.m. Saturday and Sunday Price range: Starters and salads $4 to $12, sandwiches and burgers $7 to $10; weekend breakfast $5 and $7.50 Credit cards: American Express, MasterCard, Visa Kids’ menu: No Vegetarian menu: Chipotle veggie burger, salads and a few deep-fried starters Alcoholic beverages: Full bar Outdoor seating: No

For The Bulletin

E

xcept in the occasional seclusion of a friend’s rec room, I am not a poker player. I don’t sit at the tables in Las Vegas or Reno. I barely know the difference between a full house and a royal flush. I have trouble deciding whether to “hold ’em or fold ’em.” I rarely take a bigger gamble than choosing between a red and a white wine. Were it not for a dozen flat-screen televisions, I might feel out of place at Rivals Sports Bar, Grill & Poker. Instead, I consider this an excellent option for enjoying a light meal while watching the big game. Open since mid-April 2009, Rivals appears to have achieved success where a string of other eater-

ies failed in the same location. From Country Kitchen to Bernie’s BBQ to Pepe’s Mexican Restaurant, the previous occupants of the North Division Street space tumbled like dominos, one after the next. Rivals may have been headed in the same downhill direction until July of this year, when the business was acquired by Gary and Linda Sobala. The Sobalas had constructed the building in 1992 as a restaurant; they sold the business in 1995, Gary Sobala said, but continued to serve as landlords to the series of food-service tenants. “What we bring to the place is stability,” Sobala said. “I saw quite a bit of potential here. And we have seen a steady climb in business since we took over.” Continued next page

Reservations: No Contact: 541-550-7771 or www.rivalsbend.com

Scorecard OVERALL: B+ Food: B. Good burgers, decent salads; choose carefully to avoid deep-fried dishes. Service: A. Prompt, efficient and attentive, right down to the refilling of water glasses. Atmosphere: B. Laid-back sport-bar mood, with pennants and sports photos on the walls. Value: A. Almost nothing on the menu is priced higher than $10.


THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2010

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restaurants From previous page

First impressions The front portion of Rivals is classic sports bar and grill, with pennants of professional sports teams draped around the ceiling and framed black-and-white photos of historic sports heroes on the walls. The rear room, almost as large as the primary dining area, is furnished with tables where poker tournaments are a regular feature and Texas Hold ’em is the game of choice. Rivals’ atmosphere is very pleasant. The crowd here is not a rowdy one; the clientele is somewhat older and more mature than at other downtown Bend sports bars. That doesn’t mean they don’t cheer for the Ducks or Beavers or Trail Blazers. They do, but the cheers are a little more subdued than elsewhere. When my companion and I perused the online menu before our first visit, however, we almost reversed our decision to drop by. We are not fans of deepfried foods, and the Web menu seemed to be dominated by that genre of cuisine. The sampler platter, for instance, boasted of “all your favorites — breaded chicken breast strips, mozzarella sticks, onion rings & potato skins.” I even found the dessert description frightening: “2 Deep Fried Twinkies.” Fortunately, those items represent only a part of the menu. “We changed the menu a couple of months ago,” Sobala told me. “We added lots of salads and made it a healthier sports-bar menu. Now, for instance, you can get your guacamole bacon cheeseburger with fries, if you want — or for no extra charge, you can get it with a salad.” Indeed, I found the burgers and other sandwiches to be generous and well-made. The salads were fresh if unexciting, while the service was friendly and reliable on both of my visits. Although I haven’t dropped in for a weekend morning breakfast, Sobala told me that the grill offers seven choices at prices ranging from only $5 to $7.50.

Dining at Rivals My bacon cheeseburger was excellent. Two thick slices of smoked bacon were draped across a 6-ounce patty of fresh ground chuck steak, topped with melted cheddar cheese. (Diners also have a choice of pepperjack or Swiss.) The burger was served on a fresh Kaiser roll lightly dressed with mayonnaise; it was the kind of bun that held together as

Next week: Shari’s Restaurants Visit www. bendbulletin.com /restaurants for readers’ ratings of more than 150 Central Oregon restaurants. I ate the sandwich, but was soft to the bite. The garnish — green leaf lettuce, sliced red onion and two slices of tomato — was presented on the side. My friend had a grilled Reuben sandwich, served with Swiss cheese on toasted, marbled rye bread. She was mildly disappointed that larger slices of bread had not been chosen for the sandwich, but she felt let down even more that it was filled with less sliced pastrami than sauerkraut. Both the burger and the Reuben were served with hand-cut fries, tasty but not out of the ordinary. On a later visit, we skipped the beef in favor of bird. My companion had a large house salad topped with grilled chicken. The chopped romaine lettuce, very fresh and crunchy, was tossed with coarsely sliced carrot, tomatoes, red onions and a combination of shredded cheddar and jack cheeses. The chicken breast sliced on top was simply grilled, unseasoned except for salt and pepper. My Western barbecue chicken sandwich came, like my earlier burger, on a Kaiser roll dressed with butter and mayonnaise. The breast of chicken was marinated and served in barbecue

sauce, then topped with cheddar and three large, deep-fried onion rings. The garnish of tomato, lettuce and onion was again presented on the side. Service on both visits, by two different waitresses, was efficient and attentive. Both servers were sure that we were satisfied with our food while keeping our water glasses filled and drink orders taken. Speaking of drinks: Rivals has a full bar with a good selection of spirits and craft beers, including several from local breweries. But its wine selection is terrible. When I expressed an interest in a glass of wine rather than beer, I discovered that my only options were a quartet of inexpensive Mondavi Woodbridge varietals — merlot, cabernet, chardonnay and white zinfandel. I opted for a beer. This was one wine gamble that I refused to take. John Gottberg Anderson can be reached at janderson@ bendbulletin.com.

Oregon Red, a dessert wine that is the first to be made from all locally grown grapes. Following a formal grand opening at 5 p.m. Nov. 27, the M Bar will be open Tuesday through Saturday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. for tastings and 5 p.m. to close for bistro fare; 643 N.W. Colorado Ave., Bend; 541-546-5464, www.maragas winery.com. Chanterelle restaurant at the Pronghorn Club will serve a public buffet dinner for Thanksgiving. With two seatings, at 1:30 and 4:30 p.m., the buffet — priced at $36 for adults and $14 for youngsters ages 6 to 14 — will feature sage-roasted turkey, sliced ham and roasted salmon with root vegetables, plus all the trimmings and a choice of desserts. For families that prefer to take their dinner home, the Pronghorn kitchen will prepare a four-course meal ($28 adults, $12 youth) for reheating, if ordered by noon Tuesday. 65600 Pronghorn Club Drive (off Powell Butte Highway), Bend; 541693-5300, www.pronghornclub .com.

RECENT REVIEWS SMALL BITES Chef David Touvelle of Chow prepares bistro-style small plates Friday and Saturday evenings at the new M Bar, a joint venture with the Maragas Winery. The renovated former Bend tasting room now has a Greek taverna feel with table and bar seating as well as a pair of upstairs lofts. Culver-based Maragas Winery has expanded its wine selection to 11 vintages and varietals, including Central

Where Buyers And Sellers Meet

Anthony’s at the Old Mill (B): Despite a highly professional wait staff, Anthony’s falls short of its considerable promise. Grilled fish and chowder are good but the recipes are unimaginative, the menu overpriced and the ambience lacking in intimacy. Open 11:30 a.m. to 9:30 p.m. Monday to Thursday, 11:30 a.m. to 10:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. and 4 to 9:30 p.m. Sunday. 475

S.W. Powerhouse Drive (The Old Mill District), Bend; 541389-8998; www.anthonys.com/ restaurants/info/bend.html. TLC Deli & Catering (B): Although this off-the-beatentrack enterprise gets most of its business from catering, the four-table cafe serves madefrom-scratch breakfast and lunch plates. The homemade salads and soups are especially good. Service and décor are basic. Open Monday to Friday, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. 1605 N.E. Lytle St., Bend; 541-382-1646. Black Horse Saloon (B+): This quirky northeast Bend tavern may have a soft spot for motorcycle riders in ambience and decor, but despite loud music, it’s a docile place. The kitchen turns out solid, fresh, no-frills fare, and service is fast and friendly. Open 11 a.m. to close Monday to Friday, 9 a.m. to close Saturday and Sunday. 20565 Brinson Blvd. (at Boyd Acres Avenue), Bend; 541-3824270, www.blackhorsesaloon .com. Mazatlan Family Mexican Restaurants (C+): Portions are good and prices moderate, but food and service are mediocre at both the Bend and west Redmond restaurants. Open 11 a.m. to 9:30 p.m. Sunday to Thursday, 11 a.m. to 10:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday. 61419 S. Third St., Bend (541-3858772); 1302 S. U.S. Highway 97, Redmond (541-923-7426); 905 S.W. Rimrock Way, Suite 202, Redmond (541-548-1595); 887 N. Main St., Prineville (541447-7437); 675 N.W. U.S. Highway 26, Madras (541-475-6873); www.mazatlancentralor.com.

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PAGE 12 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2010

fine arts

Metal talents Little known metal arts guild ready to showcase different styles By David Jasper The Bulletin

W

hen the Central Oregon Metal Arts Guild was founded 10 years ago, its goal was communication among

jewelers. Longtime member Goph Albitz, a goldsmith, said the guild (also known as COMAG) originally served as a way for jewelry-making bench workers to gather and discuss techniques. Added jeweler James Dixon, another longtime member, “We already knew each other, so it was kind of a way to get together and be able to work with each other and help each other out.” After a while, membership was opened up to all manner of metal workers, including blacksmiths, bronze sculptors, steel fabricators and others, even a few gemstone workers; the group is open to all practitioners of the metal arts, said Dixon. Today, the guild has 55 members, about 50 of whom are active in the group and attend its monthly meetings, according to member Gabrielle Taylor. “Now, it’s everyone that shares technique,” said Taylor, who makes fine silver using precious metal clay. Her art career began with pottery, and she’s also done spinning and weaving. “(I’ve) always been about creating things. And jewelry is just the best,” she said. On Saturday, Dixon, Albitz, Taylor and eight other members will participate in a one-day trunk show at Arts Central starting at 10 a.m. (see “If you go,” Page 13). In case you’ve never been to a trunk show, it’s an event in which the artist or designer brings in their wares to show and sell. Member artists work with gold, silver, bronze, copper and steel, to a wide variety of ends. Folks who attend the trunk show will see everything from metal jewelry with fine gems to sculpture and ornamental hardware for the home. Continued next page

David Jasper / The Bulletin

Central Oregon Metal Arts Guild member James Dixon demonstrates how detachable gemstones clip into the metal rings he designs.


THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2010

GO! MAGAZINE •

PAGE 13

fine arts

Submitted photo

Harmony 4 Women, directed by Connie Norman, will perform Saturday at Summit High School in Bend.

C entral Singers and JazzBros to perform

C.O. Mastersingers perform sacred music

Central Oregon Community College’s vocal jazz ensemble, Central Singers, will perform a jazz fusion concert with Bend trio JazzBros at 7 p.m. tonight at Wille Hall Campus Center, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend. Pieces to be performed include “I Want You Back” by Michael Jackson, “Spooky” by Mike Shapiro and Harry Middlebrooks Jr., “Fragile” by Sting, “Lee’s Summit” by Pat Metheny and more. Original compositions will also be performed. General admission is $5. Contact: 541-383-7512.

The Central Oregon Mastersingers, a 42-voice choir, will perform its “Cathedral Classics” at 7:30 p.m. tonight and Saturday at Bend Church of the Nazarene, 1270 N.E. 27th St. Under the direction of Clyde Thompson, the program will feature classic and contemporary works, including “Dixit Dominus” by George Frideric Handel and “And There Was a Great Calm” by the young American composer Tarik O’Regan. Admission is $15. Contact: 541-385-7229 or www .co-mastersingers.com.

Modern dance takes Harmony 4 Women the stage at the Tower concert returns Paul Taylor has been hailed as the reigning master of modern dance (Time) and the greatest choreographer in the world (Vanity Fair). At 8 p.m. Saturday, his Taylor 2 modern dance troupe will perform new and classic Taylor dances — known for both their grace and physicality — at the Tower Theatre in Bend as part of a five-city Northwest tour. Tickets are $35 and $45 and are available at the Tower Theatre box office, 835 N.W. Wall St., online at www .towertheatre.org or by calling at 541-317-0700. While the troupe is in town, Bend Dance Project will hold a 90-minute master class instructed by Paul Taylor Dance Company’s rehearsal director, Ruth Andrien, also a former dancer with the company. The class is limited to 25 dancers ages 15 and older. Cost is $25. Each dancer attending the workshop may buy one discounted performance ticket for $15. Contact: 541-410-8451.

Novice women as well as seasoned barbershop singers from across Central Oregon will perform in the second-annual Harmony 4 Women concert at 2:30 and 7 p.m. Saturday at Summit High School, 2855 N.W. Clearwater Dr., Bend. Advance tickets to this professionally directed concert are $12 and are available online at www .wrcco.org or at the Ticket Mill in Bend, The High Desert Gallery in Bend and Sisters, Paulina Springs Books in Redmond and Sisters, Great American Home Furnishings in Redmond and at Home Federal Bank and Riches & Rags in Prineville. Tickets at the door are $15. Four nonprofit organizations focused on women will benefit from the performances’ proceeds: Saving Grace, Grandma’s House, Women’s Resource Center of Central Oregon and the Central Oregon Showcase Chorus, a member of Sweet Adelines. Contact: 541-306-3043 or nueland@bendcable.com. — David Jasper

From previous page Albitz began making jewelry in the 1960s after apprenticing as a precision toolmaker, “the basis of the precise tolerances and clean uncluttered lines that I use in the construction of my work today,” according to his website (www.gophstudios.com). Dixon’s work includes rings that allow their wearers to pop in different stones, sort of like a mood ring, only the wearer is in charge, not the temperature of the air. Rochelle Davenport and Andrea Gorman, like Taylor, make fine silver using precious metal clay, a process that Taylor explained. “It is precious metal suspended in a clay base,” she said. “The piece is formed, then it’s fired. Everything burns off, leaving pure silver. … It’s a marvelous process. You can get a lot of texture; I don’t have to carve and engrave everything.” The process was invented in the early 1990s by an employee of Mitsubishi Materials Corporation, according to the Precious Metal Clay Guild’s website, www.pmcguild.com. Artist Dede Leupold, another COMAG member participating in the trunk show, uses a similar technique, combining polymer clay with precious metals. Rounding out Saturday’s trunk show are Pete Small, who does bronze casting, and silversmiths Suzy Williamson, Denise Harrison, Judy Clinton and Stella Rose Powell. The structure of the group’s early shows reflected their

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intentions behind organizing a guild in the first place: The artists would pair up and unite their skills to create unique pieces using both artists’ talents. “The idea was to get two people from different mediums to work together and make one piece,” Albitz explained. That structure was somewhat limiting, members said, and in August, COMAG members had their first show of their individual works. “It was so well-received that we said, ‘Why don’t we do a one-day trunk show, which then shows all of the variety of work of the people in the guild,” Taylor said. “Because we all have styles in the different things we do.”

The group’s first show was in 2001 at Mirror Pond Gallery (in the spot now known as Arts Central), but many of its subsequent shows were held at members’ shops, news of which was spread primarily through word of mouth, according to Dixon. “This group has been quietly working in Bend for so many years, and the public at large (has) no clue about the wide range of artists we have in metal work here,” added Taylor. That could change after Saturday’s show. Guild members, with their decades of experience, hope to see anyone and everyone interested in learning about metal art. “We’re sharers of information,” said Albitz. Of course, COMAG artists — including those dealing with the high cost of precious metals — won’t object if visitors bring their wallets as well. “You’re not only shopping local, but you’re buying local,” Dixon said. “You can’t get more local than (this). … It’s made by people in town.” David Jasper can be reached at 541-383-0349 or djasper@ bendbulletin.com.


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THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2010

fine arts ART EXHIBITS AMBIANCE ART CO-OP: Featuring works by glass blower and fuser James Landgraf; through November; 435 S.W. Evergreen Ave., Redmond; 541-548-8115. ART BY KNIGHT: Featuring oil paintings by Laurel Knight and bronze sculpture by Steven L. Knight ; 236 N.W. Newport Ave., Bend; 541-633-7488 or www.ArtbyKnight.com. ARTS CENTRAL: Featuring “Fish, Birds, and Buddhas,” works by John Hillmer; through November; show and sale of works by the Central Oregon Metal Arts Guild from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday ; 875 N.W. Brooks St., Bend; 541-317-9324. ATELIER 6000: Featuring “Broadsides,” mixed-media and two-dimensional works emphasizing text and image; through November; 389 S.W. Scalehouse Court, Suite 120, Bend; 541-330-8759 or www.atelier6000.com. BEND FURNITURE AND DESIGN: Featuring pottery by Annie Dyer ; 2797 N.W. Clearwater Drive, Suite 500, Bend; 541-633-7250. BEND PUBLIC LIBRARY: Featuring “Art of Photography”; through January; 601 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-312-1037. BLUE STAR SALON: Featuring “Native American Portraits; In A New Light,” works by Jane Marie Lauren; through November; 1001 N.W. Wall St., #103, Bend; 541-306-4845. CAFE SINTRA: Featuring “3 Points of View,” a continually changing exhibit of photographs by Diane Reed, Ric Ergenbright, and John Vito; 1024 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-8004. CANYON CREEK POTTERY: Featuring

Submitted photo

“Color Cascade,” featuring a spectrum of colorful quilts by various quilt makers, is on display through November at QuiltWorks in Bend. pottery by Kenneth Merrill; 310 N. Cedar St., Sisters; 541-549-0366 or www.canyoncreekpotteryllc.com. DON TERRA ARTWORKS: Featuring more than 200 artists; 222 W. Hood Ave., Sisters; 541-5491299 or www.donterra.com. DOUGLAS FINE JEWELRY DESIGN: Featuring works by Steven Douglas; 920 N.W. Bond St., Suite 106, Bend; 541-389-2901. FOOTZONE: Featuring images from the Wild Desert Calendar; through November; 845 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-3568. FRANKLIN CROSSING: Featuring “Art in the Atrium,” mixed-media and oil paintings by Sandy Brooke; through Nov. 28; 550 N.W. Franklin Ave., Bend; 541-382-9398. FURNISH.: Featuring works by

Saturday, December 4, 2010 at 3 P.M. & 7 P.M. Sunday, December 5, 2010 at 3 P.M. Bend Senior High School Auditorium Adults: $17 • Children (12 & Under): $6 At the Door - Adults: $20 • Children (12 & Under): $7

TO PURCHASE TICKETS: Box Office: (541) 390-7549

www.centraloregonschoolofballet.com

Marjorie Wood Hamlin; 761 N.W. Arizona Ave., Bend; 541-617-8911. THE GALLERY AT THE PINCKNEY CENTER: Featuring “Retrospective: A Passionate Journey with Paint,” works by Judy Hoiness; through Dec. 10; Pinckney Center for the Arts, Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7510. GHIGLIERI GALLERY: Featuring original Western-themed and African-inspired paintings and sculptures by Lorenzo Ghiglieri; 200 W. Cascade Ave., Sisters; 541-5498683 or www.art-lorenzo.com. THE GOLDSMITH: Featuring pastel art by Nancy Bushaw; 1016 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-647-2676. HIGH DESERT GALLERY OF BEND: Featuring “Conversations,” works by Karin Richardson, and “Dock Side,” works by Shannon Weber; Richardson is through Dec. 15, Weber is through November; 10 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-549-6250. HIGH DESERT MUSEUM: Featuring “James B. Thompson: The Vanishing Landscape,” paintings and prints of the American West; through Jan. 3; 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754. HOT BOX BETTY: Featuring miniature custom-framed works by Nicole Samples; through November; 903 N.W. Wall St., #1, Bend; 541-383-0050. THE HUB HEALING ARTS CENTER: Featuring mixed-media collage paintings by Rosalyn Kliot; Dawson Station, 219 N.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-548-6575. JENNIFER LAKE GALLERY: Featuring paintings by Jennifer Lake; 220 W. Cascade Ave., Sisters; 541-549-7200 or www. jenniferlakegallery.com. JILL’S WILD (TASTEFUL) WOMEN WAREHOUSE: Featuring works by Jill Haney-Neal; 20512 Nels Anderson Place, Building 3, Bend; 541-6176078 or www.jillnealgallery.com.

KAREN BANDY STUDIO: Featuring “Vibrant Colors”; through November; 25 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Suite 5, Bend; 541-388-0155. LAHAINA GALLERIES: Featuring paintings and sculptures by Frederick Hart, Robert Bissell, Alexi Butirskiy, Aldo Luongo, Dario Campanile, Hisashi Otsuka, David Lee, Mollie Jurgenson, Katherine Taylor, Donna Young and more; 425 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Suite 307, Old Mill District, Bend; 541-3884404 or www.lahainagalleries.com. LA PINE PUBLIC LIBRARY: Featuring paintings by Karen Lyn Manning; through Dec. 2; 16425 First St., La Pine; 541-312-1090. LUBBESMEYER FIBER STUDIO: Featuring fiber art by Lori and Lisa Lubbesmeyer; 450 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Suite 423, Old Mill District, Bend; 541-330-0840 or www.lubbesmeyerstudio.com. MARCELLO’S ITALIAN CUISINE AND PIZZERIA: Featuring several local artists; 4 Ponderosa Road, Sunriver; 541-593-8300. MOCKINGBIRD GALLERY: Featuring “High & Dry,” a group show focused on Central and Eastern Oregon landscapes; through November; 869 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-388-2107 or www.mockingbird-gallery.com. MOSAIC MEDICAL: Featuring mixedmedia collage paintings by Rosalyn Kliot ; 910 S. U.S. Highway 97, Suite 101, Madras; 541-475-7800. OREGON YERBA MATE: Featuring mixed-media collage and fiber art by Rosalyn Kliot; through November; 528 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-504-8870. PATAGONIA @ BEND: Featuring photography by Mike Putnam; 920 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-6694. PAVE FINE JEWELRY: Featuring “Geisha Series,” works by Jane Marie Lauren; through November; 101 Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-322-0500. POETHOUSE ART: Featuring

resident artists; 55 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-728-0756. QUILTWORKS: Featuring works by Wendy Hill and a group show, “Color Cascade”; through November; 926 N.E. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-728-0527. RED CHAIR GALLERY: Featuring “Creative Harvest,” works by Laura Jo Sherman, Will Nash and Annie Dyer; through November; 103 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend; 541-306-3176. RIVER BEND FINE ART: Featuring works by Natasha Bacca; through November; 844 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-728-0553 or www. riverbendfineartgallery.com. ROTUNDA GALLERY: Featuring “High Desert Palette,” works by members of the High Desert Art League; through November; Robert L. Barber Library, Central Oregon Community College; 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7564. SAGE CUSTOM FRAMING AND GALLERY: Featuring mixed-media works by Ron Raasch; through November; 834 N.W. Brooks St., Bend; 541-382-5884. SISTERS ART WORKS: Featuring “Ice Gazing,” photography by Lynn Woodward; through December; 204 W. Adams St., Sisters; 541-420-9695. SISTERS GALLERY & FRAME SHOP: Featuring landscape photography by Gary Albertson; 252 W. Hood Ave., Sisters; 541-549-9552 or www.garyalbertson.com. SODA CREEK GALLERY: Featuring originals and prints of Western, wildlife and landscape paintings; 183 E. Hood Ave., Sisters; 541-549-0600. SUNRIVER AREA PUBLIC LIBRARY: Featuring works by Cameron Kaseberg and Chandra vanEijnsbergen; through January; 56855 Venture Lane, Sunriver; 541-312-1080. SUNRIVER LODGE BETTY GRAY GALLERY: Featuring paintings by Mike Smith; 17600 Center Drive, Sunriver; 541-382-9398. TBD LOFT: Featuring “Community Portrait: Who Are We?,” an evolving exhibit by various artists; through December; 856 N.W. Bond St., Suite 2, Bend; 541-388-7558. TECHSPACE BEND: Featuring “Through the Lens,” works by the Bend Photographers Group; through Nov. 26; 906 N.W. Harriman St., Bend; info@techspacebend.com. TETHEROW AT THE FRANKLIN CROSSING BUILDING: Featuring paintings of the High Desert by local artist David Wachs; corner of Franklin Avenue and Bond Street, Bend; www. wordsideas.blogspot.com. THUMP COFFEE: Featuring KC Lockrem’s mixed-media works on paper; through November; 25 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-388-0226. TUMALO ART CO.: Featuring “Shared Vision,” works by Bruce Jackson and Tracy Leajgeld; through November; 450 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Suite 407, Bend; 541-3859144 or www.tumaloartco.com.


THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2010

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outdoors Outing shorts are trimmed versions of stories published in The Bulletin in the past several weeks. For the complete stories, plus more photos, visit www.bendbulletin.com/outing.

Tumalo Creek trail in Shevlin Park

Wahclella Falls Getting there: Wahclella Falls is located at Exit 40 on Interstate 84, at the Bonneville Dam, west of Hood River. Difficulty: Easy Cost: $5 fee or Northwest Forest Pass required Contact: Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area at 541308-1700.

Portland may want to con-

sider stopping at this delightful waterfall in the Columbia River Gorge. The loop hike is just under two miles and offers plenty of gorgeous scenery. — Bulletin staff

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compared to the busier trails to the south within Shevlin Park. With darkness coming on earlier

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— Bulletin staff

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BEND

Getting there: From Bend, head west on Shevlin Park Road and turn right into the parking lot at Shevlin Park. The trail begins behind Aspen Hall.

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Difficulty: Easy Cost: Free Contact: 541-389-7275 or www.bendparksandrec.org

Featured Business of the Week:

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CUSTOM PICTURE FRAMING & GALLERY

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2736 NW Crossing Drive, Suite 120 Bend, OR 97701 | 541-323-EYES (3937)

834 NW Brooks Street Behind the Tower Theatre

541-382-5884


PAGE 16 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, NOVEMBER THE BULLETIN 19, 2010 • FRIDA

this w CENTRAL OREGON’S LAST COMIC STANDING

TODAY

‘IT’S A WONDERFUL LIFE’

TODAY & SATU

What: The La Pine High School drama department presents the holiday classic about a man who sees what the world would be like without him when an angel visits on Christmas Eve. Member of the La Pine High School drama department rehearse a scene for the play.

TIM LEE

TODAY What: The scientist-turnedcomedian, pictured, performs. When: 8 p.m. Where: Tower Theatre, 835 N.W.

Wall St. Bend Cost: $20, $10 children and students Contact: 541-317-0700

What: Final round of the competition where comedians present comic acts and attempt to advance to the next round. Finalist Jake Woodmansee performs. When: 8 p.m. to 10 p.m.

Where: Old Stone Church, 157 N.W. Franklin Ave., Bend Cost: $10 Contact: 541-585-3557 Courtesy Eva Moore

HAHACHUCKLE GIGGLE LAUGHHEHE SNORTGRIN TODAY A CASCADES CLASSICAL EVENING: Concert pianist Dr. William Chapman Nyaho performs pieces by Chopin, Bach-Rachmaninoff, Beethoven and Gershwin; proceeds benefit the Cascades Classical Music Foundation; $75; 6 p.m.; Broken Top Club, 61999 Broken Top Drive, Bend; 541-383-0868. IRISH CELTIC JAM: Bring an instrument to join a jam session of Celtic music, or come and listen; free; 6-9 p.m.; Dudley’s Bookshop Cafe, 135 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-749-2010. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Melany Tupper will discuss her book “The Sandy Knoll Murder”; free; 6:30 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 422 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-526-1491. “IT’S A WONDERFUL LIFE”: The La Pine High School drama department presents the holiday classic about a man who sees what the world would be like without him when an angel visits on Christmas Eve; $5, $4 with a donation of canned food; 7 p.m.; La Pine High School, 51633 Coach Road; 541-322-5360. FREAK MOUNTAIN RAMBLERS: The

Portland-based Americana group performs; part of the Great Northwest Music Tour; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www. mcmenamins.com. (Story, Page 6) JAZZBROS AND CENTRAL SINGERS: The choirs perform a jazz fusion concert; $5; 7 p.m., doors open 6:30 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Wille Hall, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7512. (Story, Page 13) “TWELVE ANGRY MEN”: A screening of the 1957 unrated film; free; 7:30 p.m.; Jefferson County Library, Rodriguez Annex, 134 S.E. E St., Madras; 541-475-3351 or www.jcld.org. IMPROV SHOW: Improv comedy with Triage; scenes and characters madeup on the spot based on audience suggestion; $5; Doors open at 7 p.m., show at 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803. “RENT”: BEAT performs the hit musical; $15, $10 students 18 and younger; 7:30 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-4195558 or www.beatonline.org.

AREA 97 CLUBS See what’s playing at local night spots on Page 8. CENTRAL OREGON MASTERSINGERS: The premier 45-voice choir presents “Cathedral Classics,” under the direction of Clyde Thompson; $15; 7:30 p.m.; Bend Church of the Nazarene, 1270 N.E. 27th St.; 541-385-7229 or www. co-mastersingers.com. (Story, Page 13) CENTRAL OREGON’S LAST COMIC STANDING: Final round; comedians present comic acts; Sponsored by the Central Oregon Sleep Disorders Center; $10; 8-10 p.m.; Old Stone Church, 157 N.W. Franklin Ave., Bend; 541-585-3557. TIM LEE: The scientist-turned-comedian performs; $20, $10 children and students; 8 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-3170700 or www.towertheatre.org. THE ASCETIC JUNKIES: The Portlandbased indie folk band performs, with Erin Cole-Baker; $7; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood

Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www. silvermoonbrewing.com. (Story, Page 4)

SATURDAY Nov. 20 INDOOR SATURDAY SWAP: Sale of toys, tools, clothes, jewelry and more; free admission; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Indoor Swap Meet, 401 N.E. Second St., Bend; 541-317-4847. COMAG TRUNK SALE: A sale of art produced by the Central Oregon Metal Arts Guild; free; 10 a.m.4 p.m.; Arts Central, 875 N.W. Brooks St., Bend; 541-771-2370. HARMONY 4 WOMEN CONCERT: Annual benefit concert; attendees can have their photos taken by a professional photographer, refreshments for sale; advance tickets are $12 for either show or $15 at the door; 2:30 and 7 p.m.; Summit High School, 2855 N.W. Clearwater Drive, Bend; 541-306-3043 or nueland@ bendcable.com. (Story, Page 13) FREAK MOUNTAIN RAMBLERS: The Portland-based Americana group performs; part of the Great Northwest Music Tour; free; 7 p.m.;

McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-3825174 or www.mcmenamins.com. TOY RUN AND CASINO NIGHT: Featuring dinner, casino games with funny money, raffles, live music and more; proceeds benefit the South Central Oregon Outreach & Toy Run; $30, $25 before Nov. 15; 6-10 p.m.; La Pine Event Center, 16405 First St.; 541-536-8398. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Melany Tupper will discuss her book “The Sandy Knoll Murder”; free; 6:30 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 252 W. Hood Ave., Sisters; 541-549-0866. “IT’S A WONDERFUL LIFE”: The La Pine High School drama department presents the holiday classic about a man who sees what the world would be like without him when an angel visits on Christmas Eve; $5, $4 with a donation of canned food; 7 p.m.; La Pine High School, 51633 Coach Road; 541-322-5360. GWAR: The satirical metal band performs, with The Casualties, Infernaeon and Mobile Death Camp; $22 plus fees in advance, $24 at the door.; 8 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; Midtown


AY, NOVEMBER THE BULLETIN 19, 2010 • FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2010

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Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at www.bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

PAUL TAYLOR DANCE COMPANY — TAYLOR 2

I LIKE PIE FUN RUN AND PIE CONTEST

SATURDAY

THURSDAY What: The innovative modern dance company performs. When: 8 p.m. Where: Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St. Bend Cost: $35 or $45 Contact: 541-317-0700

What: Run or walk 2K, 5K, 10K or 10 miles and eat pie; bring a pie to enter judged baking contest. FootZone’s Dave Thomason holds up a pie during last year’s event.

When: 9 a.m. Where: Foot Zone, 845 N.W. Wall St. Bend, Cost: $5 and five cans of food suggested donation Contact: 541-317-3568

URDAY

c

s

When: 7 p.m. Where: La Pine High School, 51633 Coach Road, La Pine Cost: $5, $4 with a donation of canned food Contact: 541-322-5360

Ballroom, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-390-8648. (Story, Page 3) POWELL BUTTE HOLIDAY CONCERT: Featuring Bronn & Kathryn Journey along with The Bells of Sunriver Handbell Choir; $8 in advance, $12 at the door; 7 p.m.; Powell Butte Christian Church, 13720 S.W. State Highway 126; 541-548-3066 or www.powellbuttechurch.com. “RENT”: BEAT performs the hit musical; $15, $10 students 18 and younger; 7:30 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-4195558 or www.beatonline.org. CENTRAL OREGON MASTERSINGERS: The premier 45-voice choir presents “Cathedral Classics,” under the direction of Clyde Thompson; $15; 7:30 p.m.; Bend Church of the Nazarene, 1270 N.E. 27th St.; 541-385-7229 or www.co-mastersingers.com. PAUL TAYLOR DANCE COMPANY — TAYLOR 2: The innovative modern dance company performs; $35 or $45; 8 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www. towertheatre.org. (Story, Page 13) SEAN HAYES: The San Francisco-based

indie-folk musician performs; with acts Jill H and DJ Lucius; $18; 8 p.m., doors open at 7 p.m..; Mandala Yoga Community, tbd loft, 55 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-326-7866 or www. mandalayogabend.com. (Story, Page 7) TALIB KWELI: The underground hip-hop star performs, with Mosley Wotta, DJ R-2 and emerging local MCs; $22 plus fees in advance, $25 at the door, $20 students; 8 p.m.; Century Center, 70 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; art@ riseupinternational.com or www. bendticket.com. (Story, Page 4) DIEGO’S UMBRELLA: The San Franciscobased pirate polka band performs; $6; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541388-8331 or www.silvermoonbrewing. com. (Story, Page 7)

SUNDAY Nov. 21 DORIAN MICHAEL AND KENNY BLACKWELL: The mandolin and guitar duo performs; free; 2 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-312-1032 or

HOLIDAY BAZAARS ‘Tis the season, Page 20. www.deschuteslibrary.org/calendar.

MONDAY Nov. 22 MARY YOUNGBLOOD: A native flute concert; free; 4 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Wille Hall, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-3782. THE CELTIC TENORS: Matthew Gilsenan, Daryl Simpson and James Nelson perform “A Celtic Christmas”; SOLD OUT; 7:30 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-3170700 or www.towertheatre.org.

TUESDAY Nov. 23 NO EVENTS LISTED.

WEDNESDAY Nov. 24 THANKSGIVING DINNER: A meal of turkey, mashed potatoes, gravy and more; free; noon-3 p.m.; La Pine Community Kitchen, 16480 Finley Butte Road; 541536-1312 or lapinecommunitykitchen@ crestviewcable.com. TEXAS HIPPIE COALITION: Texas-based band with modern metal and southern influences performs, with Tempesta and Exfixia; $8 in advance, $10 at the door; doors open at 7 p.m.; Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; www. myspace.com/actiondeniroproductions. (Story, Page 6)

THURSDAY Nov. 25 GINGERBREAD JUNCTION: A display of gingerbread houses opens; runs through Dec. 26; free; 8 a.m.-9 p.m.; Sunriver Resort, 17600 Center Drive; 541-593-4609 or www.sunriver-resort. com/landing/gingerbread.php. THANKSGIVING DAY COMMUNITY

MEAL: A hot breakfast and traditional Thanksgiving dinner featuring holiday fare; free; 8:30-11:30 a.m.; Bend’s Community Center, 1036 N.E. Fifth St.; 541-312-2069. BEND TURKEY TROT: 5K and 10K races through the Old Mill District and along the Deschutes River; registration available at Les Schwab Ampitheater, 7:30-8:30 a.m.; proceeds to benefit Girls on the Run; $20, $10 ages 12 and younger; 9 a.m.; Les Schwab Amphitheater, 344 S.W. Shevlin Hixon Drive; 541-322-9383 or www.bendturkeytrot.com/. I LIKE PIE FUN RUN AND PIE CONTEST: Run or walk 2K, 5K, 10K or 10 miles and eat pie; bring a pie to enter judged baking contest; registration required; donations benefit NeighborImpact; $5 and five cans of food suggested donation; 9 a.m.; FootZone, 845 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541317-3568 or www.footzonebend.com. COMMUNITY OF REDMOND THANKSGIVING DINNER: Community dinner featuring holiday fare; open to everyone; free, donations accepted; noon-3 p.m.; Redmond Senior Center, 325 N.W. Dogwood Ave.; 541-548-5483.


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THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2010

planning ahead Right around the Corner NOV. 26-27 — WONDERLAND EXPRESS AUCTION: A silent auction of unique creations; proceeds benefit Wonderland Express’ annual event; free admission; noon-6 p.m. Nov. 26, 9:30 a.m.-2 p.m. Nov. 27; Sunriver Resort Great Hall, 17728 Abbot Drive; 541-593-4405 or www.wonderlandexpress.com. NOV. 26 — GRAND ILLUMINATION: Kick off the season with one of Central Oregon’s largest holiday light displays; featuring sleigh rides, live music, and Santa; free; 4 p.m.; Sunriver Resort, 17600 Center Drive; 541-593-1000 or www.sunriver-resort.com. NOV. 26 — HOLIDAY ART WALK: Featuring a showcase of local art and music at various downtown stores; free; 5-8 p.m.; downtown Redmond; 541-923-5191. NOV. 26 — CHRISTMAS TREE LIGHTING CEREMONY: The annual tree-lighting ceremony in Barclay Park will feature carolers, the bell choir and speeches; those attending are encouraged to bring donations of canned food; free; 5:30 p.m.; downtown Sisters; 541-549-0251. NOV. 26-27 — RENT: BEAT performs the hit musical; $15, $10 students 18 and younger; 7:30 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-419-5558 or www.beatonline.org. NOV. 26 — DAVID JACOBS-STRAIN: The Eugene-based blues musician performs; $5 to $10; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www.silvermoonbrewing.com. NOV. 27 — PET PHOTOS WITH SANTA: Bring your pet to have photos taken with Santa; proceeds to benefit Humane Society of Redmond; donations accepted; 11 a.m.-3 p.m.; Humane Society of Redmond Thrift & Gifts, 1776 S. Highway 97; 541-5484428 or www.redmondhumane.org. NOV. 27 — SISTERS CHRISTMAS PARADE: The annual Christmas Parade down Hood Avenue will feature dozens of floats and entries, along with Santa Claus himself; free; 2 p.m.; downtown Sisters; 541-549-0251. NOV. 27 — REDMOND STARLIGHT HOLIDAY PARADE: Themed “The Polar Express”; free; 5 p.m.; downtown Redmond; 541-923-5191. DEC. 1 — WHAT’S BREWING? : Crook County Foundation presents this series of programs to discuss matters important to the community; Featuring guest speaker Toby Van Altvorst discussing the possibility of new jobs in Crook County; free; 7-8 a.m.; Meadow Lakes Restaurant, 300 Meadow Lakes Drive, Prineville; 541-447-6909. DEC. 1 — “THE METROPOLITAN OPERA: DON PASQUALE”: Starring Anna Netrebko, Matthew Polenzani, Mariusz Kwiecien and John Del Carlo in an encore presentation of Donizetti’s masterpiece; opera performance

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin ile photo

Rio, center left, and Tippet, a pair of Pembroke Welsh corgies, trot along under the direction of owner Clyde Bildine, of Sisters, during the Sisters Christmas Parade in 2008. This year’s event takes place Nov. 27. transmitted in high definition; $18; 6:30 p.m.; Regal Old Mill Stadium 16, 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-382-6347. DEC. 1 — GOOD CHAIR, GREAT BOOKS: Read and discuss “Out Stealing Horses” by Per Petterson; bring a lunch; free; 6:30 p.m.; Sisters Public Library, 110 N. Cedar St.; 541-312-1070 or www. deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. DEC. 1 — THE PARSON RED HEADS: The Los Angeles-based folkpop band performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-3825174 or www.mcmenamins.com. DEC. 1 — PRESERVATION HALL JAZZ BAND: A performance of gumbo-flavored holiday favorites and images that express the spirit and style of New Orleans; $37 or $42; 7:30 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-3170700 or www.towertheatre.org. DEC. 2 — GOOD CHAIR, GREAT BOOKS: Read and discuss “Fortunate Son” by Walter Mosley; bring a lunch; free; noon-1 p.m.; Sunriver Area Public Library, 56855 Venture Lane; 541-312-1080 or www. deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. DEC. 2 — HOLIDAY OPEN HOUSE: Annual miniature exhibition of fine arts and crafts featuring work by more that 17 artists; free; 5-8 p.m.; The Oxford Hotel, 10 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-388-8964 or www.TeenyTinyArtShow.com.

DEC. 2, 4, 5 AND 9 — A BEND CHRISTMAS CELEBRATION: Music, storytelling and carols with Michael John; $10, $5 ages 12 and younger, $25 families; 7 p.m. Dec. 2 and 9, 11 a.m. Dec. 4, 2 p.m. Dec. 5; Bend Performing Arts Center, 1155 S.W. Division St.; 541-5046721 or http://bendpac.org. DEC. 2 — “MOON OVER BUFFALO”: Preview night of Cascades Theatrical Company’s presentation of Ken Ludwig’s comedy about two fading stars hoping to stage a comeback; $10; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www.cascadestheatrical.org. DEC. 2 — BIG BAD VOODOO DADDY CHRISTMAS: The Los Angeles-based hipsters perform yuletide classics; $40; 7:30 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-3170700 or www.towertheatre.org. DEC. 2 — MYSTIC ROOTS BAND: The Chico, Calif.-based reggae band performs; $7; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331.

Farther Down the Road DEC. 3 — CHRISTMAS KAYAKERS FLOAT: Kayaks and canoes decorated with lights paddle a loop beginning at the bridge at Galveston Avenue; free; 4:15 p.m. gathering, 5 p.m. float; Mirror Pond, Deschutes River at Drake Park, Bend; 541-330-9586.

DEC. 3-5, DEC. 9 — “MOON OVER BUFFALO”: Cascades Theatrical Company’s presentation of Ken Ludwig’s comedy about two fading stars hoping to stage a comeback; with champagne and dessert reception; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m. Dec. 3-4 and 9, 2 p.m. Dec. 5; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www.cascadestheatrical.org. DEC. 4 — TEMPLE GRANDIN: The Oregon Cattlemen’s Association’s Annual Convention presents world-renowned cattle care advocate Temple Grandin; $10; 10:30 a.m.; The Riverhouse Hotel & Convention Center, 3075 N. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-389-3111. DEC. 4 — FESTIVAL OF TREES: The 27th annual event showcases decorated Christmas trees, wreaths and more; music, refreshments, visits with Santa, an auction of trees, and more; proceeds benefit Redmond-Sisters Hospice; free daytime family festivities, $40 evening event; 11 a.m.-2 p.m. family festivities, 5 p.m. evening gala, 7:30 p.m. tree auction; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, Middle Sister, Three Sisters Conference and Convention Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-548-7483. DEC. 4 — BEND CHRISTMAS PARADE: Parade theme is “Christmas Carols on Parade”; free; noon; downtown Bend; 541-388-3879. DEC. 4-5 — “THE NUTCRACKER”:

The Central Oregon School of Ballet performs the classic dance; $17 in advance, $20 at door; $6 ages 12 and younger in advance, $7 at door; 7 p.m. Dec. 4, 3 p.m. Dec. 5; Bend High School, 230 N.E. Sixth St.; 541-390-7549 or www. centraloregonschoolofballet.com. DEC. 4 — ART FOR INDIA: Fourth annual event features canvas art, an auction, slide show, live music and more; benefits underprivileged children in India; $10, free ages 9 and younger; 5 p.m.; Century Center, 70 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; www. riseupindia.wordpress.com. DEC. 4 — GRANT SABIN: The Colorado-based blues and indie folk act performs; The Dela Project opens; $5; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331. DEC. 8 — WHAT’S BREWING? : Crook County Foundation presents this series of programs to discuss matters important to the community; Featuring Chris Telfer discussing ideas for balancing the state budget; free; 7-8 a.m.; Meadow Lakes Restaurant, 300 Meadow Lakes Drive, Prineville; 541-447-6909. DEC. 8 — BÉLA FLECK & THE FLECKTONES: The bluegrass-jazz fusion act performs a holiday concert; proceeds benefit KPOV; $33-$47, with fees in advance; 7 p.m.; Mountain View High School, 2755 N.E. 27th St., Bend; 541322-0863 or www.kpov.org.


THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2010

GO! MAGAZINE •

PAGE 19

talks, classes, museums & libraries Education OWL LEGENDS: The High Desert Museum’s new owl will fly along with a barn owl and great horned owl; $7 plus admission for nonmembers or $5 members; 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. Nov. 22-24 and 26-27; High Desert Museum, 59800 S, U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754. SEA TURTLES: Sea turtle expert Brad Nahill talks about his volunteer project to protect endangered leatherback turtles in Costa Rica; free; 10 a.m. to noon Nov. 20; Central Oregon Community College’s Boyle Education Center, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270. AARP DRIVER SAFETY PROGRAM: 541-317-0610. AEROSPACE CADET EDUCATION: 541-598-7479. CENTRAL OREGON COMMUNITY COLLEGE COMMUNITY CLASSES: www.cocc.edu or 541-383-7270. COMPASSIONATE COMMUNICATION: www.katyelliottmft.com or 541-633-5704. COMPUTER CLASSES: 541383-7270 or www.cocc.edu; Deschutes Public Library System, www.dpls.us or 541-312-1020. KINDERMUSIK: www.kidsmovewith music.com or 541-325-6995. KINDERMUSIK: www.developmusic .com or 541-389-6690. LATINO COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION: 541-382-4366 or www.latca.org. METAPHYSICAL STUDY GROUP: 541-549-4004. MOTORCYCLE SAFETY: http://teamoregon.orst.edu. NEIL KELLY CO. REMODELING SEMINARS: 541-382-7580. PARTNERS IN CARE PRESENTATIONS: loriew@partnersbend.org or 541-382-5882. PEACE CENTER OF CENTRAL OREGON: Compassionate communication, Enneagram, yoga and more; www.pcoco.org or 541-325-3174. SPIRITUAL AWARENESS COMMUNITY OF THE CASCADES: www.spiritual awarenesscommunity.com or 541-388-3179. THE STOREFRONT PROJECT: Creative writing workshops for middle- and high-school students; 541-330-4381 or www.thenatureofwords.org. WOMEN’S RESOURCE CENTER CLASSES: www.wrcco. org or 541-385-0750. WRITERS GUILD: 541-923-0896.

Parks & Recreation BEND PARK & RECREATION DISTRICT: www.bendparksandrec.org or 541-389-7275. BEND SENIOR CENTER: 541-388-1133. CAMP TUMALO: www.camptumalo. com or 541-389-5151. REDMOND AREA PARK AND RECREATION DISTRICT: www.raprd.org or 541-548-7275. SISTERS ORGANIZATION FOR

ACTIVITIES AND RECREATION: www.sistersrecreation.com or 541-549-2091.

Outdoor Recreation LEARN TO SKATE SKI: Central Oregon Community College beginning level class, students provide own equipment; $109 including pass or $89 with own pass; 8:30 to 10 a.m. Sundays, Nov. 28 to Dec. 19; Mt. Bachelor’s groomed Nordic trails; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. SNOWSHOE INTRODUCTION: Central Oregon Community College offers basics of snowshoeing; 3 to 5 p.m. Dec. 1 (classroom session) and 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Thursdays Dec. 2-16 (field sessions); 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. DESCHUTES LAND TRUST: www.deschuteslandtrust.org or 541-330-0017. THE ENVIRONMENTAL CENTER: www .envirocenter.org or 541-322-4856. OREGON PALEO LANDS INSTITUTE OUTDOOR EXCURSIONS: www .paleolands.org or 541-763-4480. OUTDOORS SKILLS WORKSHOPS: 800-720-6339, ext. 76018. PINE MOUNTAIN OBSERVATORY: pmo-sun.uoregon.edu. REI: www.rei.com/stores/96 or 541-385-0594. SILVER STRIDERS: strideon@silver striders.com or 541-383-8077. SUNRIVER NATURE CENTER & OBSERVATORY: www.sunrivernature center.org or 541-593-4442. TRADITIONAL MOUNTAINEERING MAP, COMPASS AND GPS SKILLS: Offering outdoor and indoor classes; 541-385-0445. WANDERLUST TOURS: www.wanderlusttours. com or 541-389-8359.

Arts & Crafts ART BOOK IN A BOX: Create a hardcover book with print making methods; $85; 12:30 to 3 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays, Nov. 30 to Dec. 9; Atelier 6000, 389 S.W. Scalehouse Ct., Suite 120, Bend; 541-330-8759. ABRACADABRA ARTS & CRAFTS: www.abracadabracrafts.com. ART IN THE MOUNTAINS: www.artinthemountains. com or 541-923-2648. ART STATION: Art camps, classes and workshops; www.artscentraloregon. org or 541-617-1317. ATELIER 6000: Printmaking, book arts and more; www.atelier6000. com or 541-330-8759. CREATIVITY RESOURCE FOUNDATION: 541-549-2091. DON TERRA ARTWORKS: 541-5491299 or www.donterra.com. JENNIFER LAKE GALLERY ART ACADEMY: 541-549-7200. KEN ROTH STUDIO: Painting workshops; www.kenrothstudio.

Photo courtesy Kimberly Teichrow

Aurora, the High Desert Museum’s new owl, will fly during the Owl Legends show, which will take place Nov. 22-24 and 26-27. com or 541-317-1727. KINKER ART STUDIO: 541-306-6341. PAINT ITALY, BEND OR SEATTLE WITH CINDY BRIGGS: 541-420-9463, www.cindybriggs.com or www .MakeEveryDayAPainting.com. SAGEBRUSHERS ART SOCIETY: http://sagebrushersartofbend. com or 541-617-0900.

Performing Arts ACADEMIE DE BALLET CLASSIQUE: 541-382-4055. ACTOR’S REALM: 541-4107894 or volcanictheatre@ bendbroadband.com. ADULT MODERN DANCE: Taught by Fish Hawk Wing Modern Dance troupe; 541-788-0725. AN DAIRE ACADEMY OF IRISH DANCE: 541-678-1379. BARBERSHOP HARMONY: www. showcasechorus.org or 541447-4756 or 541-526-5006. BEND EXPERIMENTAL ART THEATRE: www.beatonline.org or 541-419-5558. CASCADE COMMUNITY SCHOOL OF MUSIC: www.ccschoolofmusic. org or 541-382-6866. CENTRAL OREGON DANCE COMPANY: www.centraloregondance.com or 541-419-8998 or 541-388-9884. CENTRAL OREGON SCHOOL OF BALLET: www. centraloregonschoolofballet. com or 541-389-9306.

CHILDREN’S MUSIC THEATRE GROUP: www.cmtg.org or 541-385-6718. THE CLOG HOUSE: 541-548-2062. CUBAN STYLE DRUMMING CLASSES: 541-550-8381. GOTTA DANCE STUDIO: 541-322-0807. GYPSY FIRE BELLYDANCE: 541-420-5416. HAND DRUMMING: 541-350-9572. INDONESIAN ORCHESTRA: 541-408-1249. JAZZ DANCE COLLECTIVE: www.jazzdancecollective. org or 541-408-7522. LINE DANCE CLASSES: 562-508-1337 or danceforhealth@ymail.com. MODERN SQUARE DANCE CLASSES: 541-385-8074. REDMOND SCHOOL OF DANCE: 541-548-6957 or www. redmondschoolofdance.com. SCENE STUDY WORKSHOP: 541-9775677 or brad@innovationtw.org. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING: 541-549-7311. SQUARE DANCING: 541-548-5743. TANGO DANCE: 541-330-4071. WEST AFRICAN DRUM: 541-760-3204.

Museums A.R. BOWMAN MEMORIAL MUSEUM: Exhibits about Crook County, the City of Prineville Railroad and the local timber industry; Free; 246 N. Main St.,

Prineville; www.bowmanmuseum. org or 541-447-3715. DES CHUTES HISTORICAL MUSEUM: Explores the history, culture and heritage of Deschutes County; $5 adults, $2 ages 13-17, children ages 12 and younger free with adult; 129 N.W. Idaho Ave., Bend; www.deschuteshistory. org or 541-389-1813. FORT ROCK MUSEUM: A collection of original buildings from the early 1900s homestead era;$1; Fort Rock; www.fortrockmuseum. com or 541-576-2251. HIGH DESERT MUSEUM: Featuring the “Year of the Forest: Human Connections through Dec. 12” exhibit; $10 adults, $9 ages 65 and older, $6 ages 5-12: free ages 4 and younger and members. Open 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. daily (closed Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Year’s days); 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; www.highdesertmuseum. org or 541-382-4754. THE MUSEUM AT WARM SPRINGS: Cultural, traditional and artistic heritage of the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs $7 adults, $6 seniors, $3.50 ages 5-12, $4.50 students; 2189 U.S. Highway 26, Warm Springs; www.museumatwarmsprings. org or 541-553-3331. REDMOND MUSEUM: Featuring displays highlighting 100 years of Redmond history; $2; 529 S.W. Seventh St.; 541-504-3038. SUNRIVER NATURE CENTER & OBSERVATORY: Featuring live birds of prey, hands-on exhibits, nature trail, telescopes, night sky viewing and more; $3 adults, $2 ages 12 and younger; 57245 River Road, Sunriver; www.sunrivernaturecenter. org or 541-593-4394.

Libraries BEND GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY LIBRARY: Williamson Hall at Rock Arbor Villa (behind Jake’s Diner), 2200 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend; 541-317-9553 or www.orgenweb. org/deschutes/bend-gs. BEND PUBLIC LIBRARY: 601 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-617-7040. CROOK COUNTY LIBRARY: 175 N.W. Meadow Lakes Drive, Prineville; 541-447-7978. FAMILY HISTORY LIBRARY: 1260 N.E. Thompson Drive, Bend; 541-382-9947. LA PINE PUBLIC LIBRARY: 1642 51st St., La Pine; 541-312-1091. JEFFERSON COUNTY LIBRARY: 241 S.E. 7th St., Madras; 541-475-3351. REDMOND PUBLIC LIBRARY: 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave., Redmond; 541-312-1050. ROBERT L. BARBER LIBRARY: 2600 N.W. College Way (COCC), Bend; 541-383-7560. SISTERS PUBLIC LIBRARY: 110 N. Cedar St., Sisters; 541-312-1070. SUNRIVER AREA PUBLIC LIBRARY: 56855 Venture Lane, Sunriver; 541-312-1080.


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THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2010

holiday bazaars T

he following is a list of holiday bazaars for the upcoming week.

it to The Bulletin, Holiday Bazaars, P.O. Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708.

A new list of upcoming bazaars will publish every Friday in

The deadline is the Monday before each Friday’s publication. Con-

GO! Magazine. To submit a bazaar that has not already appeared, send your information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or mail

ONGOING CHRISTMAS AT COLLAGE: Gift items, decor, candles, cards, frames, clothes, jewelry and more; 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday to Saturday through Dec. 23; 339 S.W. Sixth St., Suite B, Redmond; 541-617-1259 or www.christmasatcollage.com. HOLIDAY BOUTIQUE: Holiday decorations, novelties, clothing and more; 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Tuesdays through Sundays; Humane Society of Redmond Thrift & Gifts, 1776 S. U.S. Highway 97, Redmond; 541-923-8558.

TODAY ASSEMBLY OF GOD SALE: Quilts, crafts and wooden toys; 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Redmond Assembly of God Church, 1865 W. Antler Ave.; 541-548-4555. CANDY CANE CHRISTMAS BAZAAR: Crafted items; 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.; 1515 N.W. Lower Bridge Way, Terrebonne; 541-548-1538. COUNTRY CHRISTMAS AND MORE: Western-themed decor, wreaths, mirrors, crafts and more; donation of nonperishable food requested;

9 a.m. to 7 p.m.; Smith Rock Community Church, 8344 11th St., Terrebonne; 541-923-3633. FAITH LUTHERAN CHRISTMAS BAZAAR: Homemade crafts, jewelry and baked goods; cafe will serve food; 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Faith Lutheran Church, 52315 Huntington Road, La Pine; 541-536-1198. HOLIDAY BAZAAR: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Discovery Park Lodge, 2868 N.W. Crossing Drive, Bend; 541-389-1043. CRAFTY LADIES CHRISTMAS SALE: Handmade baby items, diaper bags, totes, purses, blankets, afghans, decorations, door prizes and more; 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.; 225 S.W. Meadow Lakes Drive, Prineville; 541-416-0948. ONE OF A KIND HOLIDAY BAZAAR: Garden items, jewelry, decor, kitchen items, cards, food and more; proceeds benefit Sisters Community Garden; 4 to 9 p.m.; 69206 Easy St., Sisters; 541-4205875 or jgbrown@outlawnet.com.

SATURDAY ASSEMBLY OF GOD SALE: Quilts, crafts and wooden toys; 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Redmond Assembly of

Find Your Dream Home In Real Estate Every Saturday

tact: 541-383-0351. Admission to bazaars is free unless otherwise noted.

God Church, 1865 W. Antler Ave.; 541-548-4555. CANDY CANE CHRISTMAS BAZAAR: Crafted items; 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.; 1515 N.W. Lower Bridge Way, Terrebonne; 541-548-1538. COUNTRY CHRISTMAS AND MORE: Westernthemed decor, wreaths, mirrors, crafts and more; donation of nonperishable food requested; 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Smith Rock Community Church, 8344 11th St., Terrebonne; 541-923-3633. FAITH LUTHERAN CHRISTMAS BAZAAR: Homemade crafts, jewelry and baked goods; cafe will serve food; 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Faith Lutheran Church, 52315 Huntington Road, La Pine; 541-536-1198. HOLIDAY CRAFT & GIFT BAZAAR: Handmade gifts, decor and more; cafe will serve food; 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-388-1133. ONE OF A KIND HOLIDAY BAZAAR: Garden items, jewelry, decor, kitchen items, cards, food and more; proceeds benefit Sisters Community Garden; 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.; 69206 Easy St., Sisters; 541-420-5875 or jgbrown@outlawnet.com. CRAFTY LADIES CHRISTMAS SALE: Handmade baby items, diaper

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bags, totes, purses, blankets, afghans, decorations, door prizes and more; 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.; 225 S.W. Meadow Lakes Drive, Prineville; 541-416-0948. GIRLS GONE CRAFTY: Knitted items, jewelry, woodwork, greeting cards and more; 10 a.m.

to 4 p.m.; 2543 N.W. Crossing Drive, Bend; 541-389-0247. LEFSE SALE AND CHILI FEED: Scandinavian and Christmas baked goods; cafe will serve chili; 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Grace First Lutheran Church, 2265 Shevlin Park Road, Bend; 541382-7182 or 541-382-6862.

Celebrate the Season OSU BEAVER HOME GAMES

U of O DUCK HOME GAMES

11/20/10 USC 12/04/10 Civil War

11/26/10 Arizona 12/04/10 Civil War

ONLY $49 ROUND TRIP!

Nutcracker Blend Beneits the Central Oregon School of Ballet

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THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2010

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out of town The following is a list of other events “Out of Town.”

Concerts

Courtesy Owen Carey

Wade McCollum stars as Crumpet the Elf in David Sedaris’ “The Santaland Diaries.” The popular Portland Center Stage production runs Nov. 30-Jan. 2 at the Gerding Theater at the Armory.

‘Tis the

Season

Portland stage brings holiday classics to life By Jenny Harada The Bulletin

A

lthough some may not want to admit it, the holidays are just around the corner. Stores are already lined with Christmas decorations, carols are starting to pump through the airwaves and networks are scheduling their marathon screenings of “It’s a Wonderful Life,” “A Christmas Story” and other holiday films. The Portland Center Stage is capturing this holiday spirit with two productions: “A Christmas Story” (Nov. 21-Dec. 26) and “The Santaland Diaries” (Nov. 30-Jan. 2). Both productions run at the Gerding Theater at the Armory in Portland. Adapted by Phil Grecian, “A Christmas Story” is based on the 1983 cult classic film of the same name. The film was originally inspired by “a series of classic short stories by ’60s era New York underground radio raconteur Jean Shepherd,” according to the news release. Shepherd’s voice is heard as the narrator in the film. Like the film, the play revolves around little Ralphie Parker (played by Michael Cline) who dreams of owning a Red Ryder range

model air rifle. To get his prized possession, Ralphie must face schoolyard bullies, department store Santas and bunny pajamas. The play is directed by Rose Riordan and features an ensemble of 11 children. “The Santaland Diaries” is based on “humorist David Sedaris’ experience as a Christmas elf named ‘Crumpet’ at the Macy’s department store in New York City,” according to the news release. Adapted by Joe Mantello, this one-man show stars Wade McCollum as Crumpet. This is the show’s fifth outing at the Portland Center Stage, after popular runs in 2002, 2003, 2004 and 2009. Ticket prices for “A Christmas Story” range from $36 to $63 for adults and $18 for students, depending on day of performance and seating location. Tickets for “The Santaland Diaries” range from $33 to $50 for adults and $23 for students. Tickets are selling fast for both productions. To purchase tickets and for more information, contact 503-445-3700 or visit www.pcs .org. Jenny Harada can be reached at 541-3830350 or jharada@bendbulletin.com.

Nov. 19 — Meg Hutchinson, Britt Pavilion, Jacksonville; 800-8827488 or www.brittfest.org. Nov. 19 — Shawn McDonald, McDonald Theatre, Eugene; TW* Nov. 20 — Pretty Lights, McDonald Theatre, Eugene; TW* Nov. 22 — Freak Mountain Ramblers, McMenamins Crystal Ballroom, Portland; TM* Nov. 24 — Lifehouse, Roseland Theater, Portland; TW* Nov. 26 — Fools for Rowan, Ross Ragland Theater, Klamath Falls; 541-884-5483 or www.rrtheater.org. Nov. 26 — Gwar, Roseland Theater, Portland; TW* Nov. 26 — Jason Bonham’s Led Zeppelin Experience, Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; TM* Nov. 26 — Susan McKeown, WOW Hall, Eugene; 541-6872746 or www.wowhall.org. Nov. 27 — The Frames, Wonder Ballroom, Portland; TM* Dec. 3 — Big Bad Voodoo Daddy, Ross Ragland Theater, Klamath Falls; 541-884-5483 or www.rrtheater.org. Dec. 3 — The Black Crowes, Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; TM* Dec. 3 — The Books, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* Dec. 3 — Cherry Poppin’ Daddies, WOW Hall, Eugene; 541-6872746 or www.wowhall.org. Dec. 3 — An Evening with The Black Crowes, Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; TM* Dec. 3 — The Gracious Few, Wonder Ballroom, Portland; TM* Dec. 4-5 — Christmas with the Trail Band: Featuring Linda Hornbuckle; Craterian Ginger Rogers Theater, Medford; 541779-3000 or www.craterian.org. Dec. 5 — Hellyeah, McDonald Theatre, Eugene; TW* Dec. 6 — Oak Ridge Boys, Hult Center, Eugene; 541-682-5000 or www.hultcenter.org. Dec. 7 — Béla Fleck & The Flecktones, Hult Center, Eugene; 541-6825000 or www.hultcenter.com. Dec. 8 — Leonard Cohen, Theater of the Clouds, Portland; 877-7897673 or www.rosequarter.com. Dec. 8 — The Posies/Brendan Benson/Aqueduct, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* Dec. 12 — The Dandy Warhols, McMenamins Crystal Ballroom, Portland; TM* Dec. 21 — Tomaseen Foley’s A Celtic Christmas, Craterian Ginger Rogers Theater, Medford; 541779-3000 or www.craterian.org. Dec. 29 — Jim Brickman, Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; TM* Dec. 30 — Reverend Horton Heat,

Wonder Ballroom, Portland; TM* Dec. 31 — Andre Nickatina, Roseland Theater, Portland; TW* Dec. 31 — Gift of Gab/Marv Ellis, McDonald Theatre, Eugene; TW* Dec. 31 — Pink Martini, Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; TM* Jan. 7-9 — RiverCity Music Festival: Featuring The Time Jumpers, Guy Clark, Peter Rowan Bluegrass Band, Rhonda Vincent & The Rage and the John Jorgenson Quintet; Red Lion on the River, Jantzen Beach; 503-2820877 or www.rivercitybluegrass.com. Jan. 22 — Dan Reed Band/ Stephanie Schneiderman, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* Jan. 28 — The Bill Charlap Trio, The Shedd Institute, Eugene; 541-4347000 or www.theshedd.org.

Lectures & Comedy Nov. 19 — Daniel Tosh, Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; TM* Nov. 19 — Suzanne Westenhoefer, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* Nov. 20 — Chicago City Limits, Ross Ragland Theater, Klamath Falls; 541-884-5483 or www.rrtheater.org. Nov. 21 — Daniel Tosh, Hult Center, Eugene; 541-682-5000 or www.hultcenter.org. Jan. 8 — Joan Rivers: Also featuring the Oregon Symphony; Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; 800228-7343 or www.orsymphony.org. Jan. 25 — Elizabeth Strout: Part of the Portland Arts & Lectures series; Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; 503-227-2583 or www.literary-arts.org. Jan. 28 — Brian Regan, Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; TM* Feb. 17 — The Moth, Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; TM*

Symphony & Opera Nov. 20-22 — “Stephen Hough Plays Liszt”: Featuring music by Meyerbeer, Liszt and Mahler; presented by the Oregon Symphony; Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; 800-2287343 or www.orsymphony.org. Nov. 27-28 — “Cirque de la Symphonie for the Holidays”: Presented by the Oregon Symphony; Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; 800-2287343 or www.orsymphony.org. Dec. 2 — “Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony”: Featuring music by Beethoven; presented by the Eugene Symphony; Hult Center, Eugene; 541-682-5000 or www.hultcenter.org. Dec. 5 — Yo-Yo Ma: Featuring music by Adams, Copland, Shostakovich and Rimsky-Korsakov; presented by the Oregon Symphony; Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; SOLD OUT; 800-228-7343 or www.orsymphony.org. Dec. 6 — Béla Fleck & The Flecktones: Performing with the Oregon

Continued next page


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THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2010

out of town From previous page Symphony; Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; 800-2287343 or www.orsymphony.org. Dec. 10-12 — “Gospel Christmas”: Featuring the Northwest Community Gospel Choir; presented by the Oregon Symphony; Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; 800-2287343 or www.orsymphony.org. Dec. 11 — The Esquire Jazz Orchestra, Ross Ragland Theater, Klamath Falls; 541-884-5483 or www.rrtheater.org. Dec. 11-12 — Yuletide Celebration: Featuring holiday songs, Broadway style acts, an orchestra and tap-dancing Santas; presented by the Eugene Symphony; Hult Center, Eugene; 541-682-5000 or www.hultcenter.org. Dec. 18-19 — “Handel’s Messiah”: Featuring the Portland Symphonic Chamber Choir; presented by the Oregon Symphony; Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; 800-2287343 or www.orsymphony.org. Dec. 23 — “Comfort & Joy”: Holiday concert featuring the Pacific Youth Concert; presented by the Oregon

*Tickets • TM — Ticketmaster, 800745-3000, www.ticketmaster.com • TW — TicketsWest, 800992-8499, www.ticketswest.com Symphony; Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; 800-2287343 or www.orsymphony.org. Dec. 30-31, Jan. 2 — “La Boheme”: Opera by Puccini; presented by the Eugene Opera; Hult Center, Eugene; 541-682-5000 or www.hultcenter.org. Jan. 9 — “Happy Trails”: Featuring music of the great American West; part of the Oregon Symphony’s Kids Concert Series; Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; 800-2287343 or www.orsymphony.org. Jan. 15-17 — “Emanuel Ax Plays Brahms”: Featuring Grammy Awardwinning pianist; Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; 800-2287343 or www.orsymphony.org.

Jan. 18 — “The Fire and Passion of Tango”: Featuring musicians and dancers from Argentina; Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; 800-228-7343 or www.orsymphony.org. Jan. 20 — “Dvorák’s Cello Concerto”: Featuring music by Barber, Schumann and Dvorák; presented by the Eugene Symphony; Hult Center, Eugene; 541-6825000 or www.hultcenter.org. Jan. 20 — “Lang Lang in Recital”: Featuring music by Bach, Schubert and Chopin; Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; 800-2287343 or www.orsymphony.org. Jan. 22-23 — “Three Broadway Divas”: Featuring Debbie Gravitte, Jan Horvath and Christiane Noll; presented by the Oregon Symphony; Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; 800-2287343 or www.orsymphony.org. Jan. 29 — “A Gala Evening with Itzhak Perlman”: Featuring music by Beethoven, Strauss and Mendelssohn; presented by the Eugene Symphony; Hult Center, Eugene; 541-682-5000

or www.hultcenter.org. Jan. 29, 31 — “Percussion Spectacular”: Featuring percussionist Colin Currie; presented by the Oregon Symphony; Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; 800-2287343 or www.orsymphony.org. Feb. 17 — “Scheherazade”: Featuring music by Dvorák, Poulenc and Rimsky-Korsokav; presented by the Eugene Symphony; Hult Center, Eugene; 541-6825000 or www.hultcenter.org. Feb. 20 — Cirque de la Symphonie, Hult Center, Eugene; 541-6825000 or www.hultcenter.org.

Theater & Dance Through Nov. 21 — “The Coming of Rain”: West Coast premiere of Richard Marius’ stage adaptation of his critically acclaimed novel; presented by the Oregon State University Theatre; Withycombe main stage; Corvallis; 541-737-2784 or www.oregonstate.edu./dept/theatre. Through Nov. 21 — “An Iliad”: A one-man adaptation by Denis O’Hare and Lisa Peterson; presented by Portland Center Stage; Ellyn Bye Studio, Gerding Theater at the Armory, Portland; 503-445-3700 or www.pcs.org. Through Nov. 27 — “Hedda Gabler”: Play by Henrik Ibsen; adapted and directed by Craig Willis; Lord Leebrick Theatre Company, Eugene; 541-465-1506 or www.lordleebrick.com. Through Dec. 19 — “Mars on Life — LIVE!”: Late-night talk show starring Susannah Mars; presented by Artists Repertory Theatre; Alder Stage, Portland; 503-2411278 or www.artistsrep.org. Nov. 19 — Paul Taylor Dance Company: Taylor 2: Program combines athleticism, humor and emotion; Hult Center, Eugene; 541682-5000 or www.hultcenter.org. Nov. 20-21 — “String Theory”: Presented by Ballet Fantastique; Hult Center, Eugene; 541-6825000 or www.hultcenter.org. Nov. 21-Dec. 26 — “A Christmas Story”: Based on the classic motion picture; presented by Portland Center Stage; Gerding Theater at the Armory, Portland; 503-445-3700 or www.pcs.org. Nov. 26-Dec. 24 — “Ebenezer Ever After”: Musical by Don Flowers and Fred Walton; presented by Stumptown Stages; Theatre! Theatre!, Portland; 503-381-8686 or www.stumptownstages.com. Nov. 30-Jan. 2 — “The Santaland Diaries”: Based on the true chronicles of David Sedaris’ experience as Crumpet the Elf in Macy’s Santaland display; adapted for the stage by Joe Mantello; presented by Portland Center Stage; Ellyn Bye Studio, Gerding Theater at the Armory, Portland; 503-445-3700 or www.pcs.org. Dec. 2-4 — Jason Samuels Smith: Featuring tap dancer Jason Samuels Smith, winner of the 2009 Dance Magazine Award; presented by White Bird Dance; Newmark Theatre, Portland; TM*

Dec. 3-18 — “The Santaland Diaries”: Based on the true chronicles of David Sedaris’ experience as Crumpet the Elf in Macy’s Santaland display; adapted for the stage by Joe Mantello; presented by the Lord Leebrick Theatre Company; Eugene; 541-465-1506 or www.lordleebrick.com. Dec. 3-19 — “Irving Berlin’s White Christmas”: A musical adaption of the 1954 film starring Bing Crosby, Danny Kaye, Rosemary Clooney and Vera Ellen; The Shedd Institute, Eugene; 541-4347000 or www.theshedd.org. Dec. 9-23 — “A Tuna Christmas”: A sequel to the hit comedy, “Greater Tuna”; presented by the Oregon Repertory Theatre; Winningstad Theatre, Portland; TM* Dec. 11-12, 17-18— “A Holiday Revue”: Featuring several Christmas standards; created in collaboration with Susannah Mars and Richard Bower; presented by the Oregon Ballet Theatre; Keller Auditorium, Portland; TM* Dec. 11-24 — “George Balanchine’s The Nutcracker”: Presented by the Oregon Ballet Theatre; Keller Auditorium, Portland; TM* Dec. 12 — Posado Milagro: Celebration featuring Latin American traditions; Miracle Theatre Group, Portland; 503236-7253 or www.milagro.org. Dec. 17-18 — “A Musical Christmas”: Holiday revue presented by the Teen Musical Theater of Oregon; Craterian Ginger Rogers Theater, Medford; 541-7793000 or www.craterian.com. Dec. 17-19 — “The Nutcracker”: Presented by the Eugene Ballet Company; Hult Center, Eugene; 541682-5000 or www.hultcenter.org. Dec. 23 — Radio City Christmas Spectacular: Featuring the Radio City Rockettes; Rose Garden, Portland; 877-789-7673 or www.rosequarter.com. Jan. 4-Feb. 6 — “Superior Donuts”: Comedy-drama by Tracy Letts; presented by Artists Repertory Theatre; Morrison Stage, Portland; 503-241-1278 or www.artistsrep.org. Jan. 13-15 — “Doug Elkins & Friends’ Fräulein Maria”: Featuring choreography by Doug Elkins; set to the score of the film “The Sound of Music”; part of the White Bird Dance Series; Newmark Theatre, Portland; TM* Jan. 20-22 — Oslund + Co/Dance: Featuring choreography by Mary Oslund; part of the White Bird Uncaged series; Lincoln Hall, Portland State University, Portland; 503-725-3307 or www.whitebird.org. Jan. 22 — Ailey II: A showcase for rising young dancers and choreographers; Craterian Ginger Rogers Theater, Medford; 541779-3000 or www.craterian.com. Jan. 25 — “‘S Wonderful — The New Gershwin Musical”: Musical revue featuring music and lyrics by George and Ira Gershwin; Craterian Ginger Rogers Theater, Medford; 541779-3000 or www.craterian.com. Feb. 2 — “Monty Python’s Spamalot”: A tuneful spoof of the King Arthur


THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2010

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PAGE 23

out of town legend, based on the cult classic film, “Monty Python and the Holy Grail”; Craterian Ginger Rogers Theater, Medford; 541-7793000 or www.craterian.com.

Exhibits Through Nov. 20 — Pacific Northwest College of Art: The following exhibits are currently on display: “George Johanson: Seven Decades of Painting” (through Nov. 20), “Jungjin Lee: Wind” (through Jan. 10) and “Web of Trails” (through Jan. 10); Portland; 503-226-4391 or www.pnca.edu. Through Nov. 27 — Henk Pander and Marlene Bauer, The Laura Russo Gallery, Portland; 503-2262754 or www.laurarusso.com. Through Nov. 27 — Jim Koudelka, Mary Lou Zeek Gallery, Salem; 503581-3229 or www.zeekgallery.com. Through Nov. 28 — “Shihoko Fukumoto: Indigo is the Color of My Dreams”: Exhibit featuring textile artist Shihoko Fukumoto; Portland Japanese Garden, Portland; 503-2231321 or www.japanesegarden.com. Through Dec. 5— Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art: The following exhibits are currently on display: “Christophe Goodstein: Inferno” (through Dec. 5), “Giuseppe Vasi’s Rome: Lasting Impressions from the Age of the Grand Tour” (through Jan. 2) and “Excessive Obsession” (through July 31, 2011); University of Oregon, Eugene; 541-3463027 or jsma.uoregon.edu. Through Dec. 19 — Museum of Natural and Cultural History: The following exhibits are currently on display: “PaleoLab — Oregon’s Past Revealed: Horses and Grasslands” (through Dec. 19), “Yellowstone to Yukon” (through Dec. 19) and “We are Still Here — Stephanie Wood on Baskets and Biography” (through June 2011); University of Oregon, Eugene; 541-346-3024 or natural-history.uoregon.edu. Through Dec. 31 — “Jews@Work: Law and Medicine”: The exhibition focuses on the challenges Jews faced in their career choices as well as on the contributions they were able to make; Oregon Jewish Museum, Portland; 503226-3600 or www.ojm.org. Through Dec. 31 — Korey Gulbrandson and Jeff Butler, Laurence Gallery Salishan, Gleneden Beach; 541-764-2318 or www.lawrencegallery.net. Through Dec. 31 — Nancy Tipton and Neal Philpott, Lawrence Gallery Sheridan, Sheridan; 503-843-3633 or www.lawrencegallery.net. Through Jan. 2 — Portland Art Museum: The following exhibits are currently on display: “The Dorothy and Herbert Vogel Collection: Fifty Works for Fifty States” (through Jan. 2), “Lee Kelly” (through Jan. 9) and “Thomas Moran at Shoshone Falls” (through Jan. 16); Portland; 503-226-2811 or www.portlandartmuseum.org. Through Jan. 8 — Museum of Contemporary Craft: The following exhibits are currently on display: “Collateral Matters: Selections by

Kate Bingaman-Burt and Clifton Burt” (through Jan. 8) and “Object Focus: The Book” (through Feb. 26); Portland; 503-223-2654 or www. museumofcontemporarycraft.org. Through Jan. 20 — “Outreach to Space”: Traveling exhibit exploring space and space travel; built by San Francisco’s Exploratorium; Science Factory, Eugene; 541-6827888 or www.sciencefactory.org. Through Jan. 23 — “Tinkertoy: Build Your Imagination”: Featuring giant replicas of the classic Tinkertoy construction set; Portland Children’s Museum, Portland; 503-2236500 or www.portlandcm.org. Through Feb. 6 — Oregon Museum of Science and Industry: The following exhibits are currently on display: “Identity: An Exhibition of You” (through Feb. 6) and “Design Zone: Behind the Scenes” (through May 30); Portland; 503797-4000 or www.omsi.edu. Nov. 26-Jan. 2 — ZooLights: Holiday light show features animal silhouettes and moving light sculptures; Oregon Zoo, Portland; 503-2261561 or www.oregonzoo.org. Dec. 3 — “Unwrapped”: A winter soirée that benefits the Portland Institute for Contemporary Art; Wieden+Kennedy Atrium, Portland; 503-242-1419, ext. 225 or www.pica.org. Jan. 28-29 — “Stitches in Bloom Quilt Show,” The Oregon Garden, Silverton; 503-874-8100 or www.oregongarden.org. Jan. 29-30 — Sagebrush Rendezvous: Featuring an art exhibit and wine tasting; Running Y Ranch Convention Center, Klamath Falls; 541-891-8618 or www.klamath. org/events/sagebrushart.

www.pixpatisserie.com. Dec. 3 — Motorcycle Ice Racing, Memorial Coliseum, Portland; 877789-7673 or www.rosequarter.com. Dec. 4-7 — Rogue Winterfest, Evergreen Federal Bank’s Bear

Garden & Living Show, Lane County Convention Center, Eugene; 541-4849247 or www.eugenehomeshow.com. Jan. 28-30 — OpenLens Festival: Featuring new Oregon-made films; DIVA Center, Eugene; 541-344-3482 or www.openlens.proscenia.net.

n i g v i D g s k i n n n a er h T

Make Your Reservations Now! Serving a turkey or prime rib dinner with salad and dessert for $25 Additional menu items will also be available

Miscellany Through Nov. 21 — Olio Nuovo Festa: Festival celebrates the olive, the harvest and the pressing of new olive oil; Oregon Olive Mill, Dayton; 503-864-2200 or www.oregonolivemill.com. Through Dec. 12 — “Japanese Currents: The Samurai Tradition”: Featuring the evolution of the samurai film genre; Northwest Film Center, Portland; 503-2211156 or www.nwfilm.org. Through Dec. 23 — Polar Express Train Ride: Featuring hot chocolate, cookies, a reading of “Polar Express” and photos with Santa; Hood River; 800-8724661 or www.mthoodrr.com. Nov. 19 — Beaujolais Nouveau Fête and Wine Auction, Heathman Restaurant and Bar, Portland; 503223-8388 or www.afportland.org. Nov. 19 — GingerBread Jubilee, Craterian Ginger Rogers Theater, Medford; 541-7793000 or www.craterian.org. Nov. 20 — Restoration Pow-Wow: Presented by the Confederated Tribes of Siletz Indians; Chinook Winds Casino Resort, Lincoln City; 800-992-1399, ext. 1230. Nov. 27 — La Fête du Macaron: An all-day celebration of everything macaron; Pix Pâtisserie, Portland; 503-232-4407 or

Hotel, Grants Pass; www. roguewinterfest.com. Jan. 21-23 — ChocolateFest, Oregon Convention Center, Portland; 503228-1367 or www.worldforestry.org. Jan. 21-23 — Good Earth Home,

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PAGE 24 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2010

gaming Close to perfection

TOP 10 XBOX 360 The editors of Game Informer rank the Top 10 games for November: 1. “Assassin’s Creed: Brotherhood,” Ubisoft

For ‘Call of Duty,’ year of controversy ends on high note with ‘Black Ops’

2. “Fable III,” Microsoft Game Studios 3. “Rock Band 3,” MTV Games 4. “DJ Hero 2,” Activision 5. “Call of Duty: Black Ops,” Activision 6. “Castlevania: Lords of Shadow,” Konami

By Adam Biessener Game Informer Magazine

7. “Super Meat Boy,” Team Meat

Y

ou can’t keep “Black Ops” out from under the microscope after the high-profile departure of the creative minds that drove the “Call of Duty” franchise at Infinity Ward earlier this year. Can Treyarch come through with a blockbuster hit in the vein of “Modern Warfare,” not just a by-the-numbers off-year title like the studio has churned out in the past? Yes and no, but “Black Ops” is the best game Treyarch has made, and a hell of a good time no matter how you slice it. The series has always hung its single-player hat on creating spectacular moments that players remember for years. It didn’t matter if you couldn’t remember the name of the faceless army ranger you’re playing as, because oh my god they just dropped an EMP on the White House! “Black Ops” flips this equation around. The story is coherent, and the characters are more than cardboard cutouts. I wanted to keep playing to find out how the plot ends up, not just to see what crazy situation is around the next corner. On the other hand, as “Black Ops” makes gains in characterization and storytelling, it loses spectacle. Far too much of the roughly seven-hour campaign is spent running through the same pop-and-

8. “NBA 2K11,” 2K Sports 9. “Dance Central,” MTV Games 10. “Need For Speed Hot Pursuit,” Electronic Arts McClatchy-Tribune News Service

Weekly download McClatchy-Tribune News Service

“Call of Duty: Black Ops” includes a finely crafted multiplayer setup. shoot motions we’ve been doing for years. Be sure to stick around after the credits; the best bit of the game is hidden there. The campaign puts players neck deep in the close-up brutality of combat. Limbs shatter disgustingly as bullets rip apart flesh and bone. Gore flies in all directions. In one uncomfortable sequence, the player has to torture a restrained prisoner. This is an emphatically mature game (in the ESRB sense, anyway). Everyone should make their own judgment on what they are comfortable with, but “Black Ops” crossed my personal line in its bloody depictions of violence, particularly the torture sequence. I wasn’t able to compartmentalize it as enjoyable cartoon violence

EW RE V I

New game releases The following titles were scheduled for release the week of Nov. 14: • “Game Party: In Motion” (X360, PS3) • “Zumba Fitness” (Wii) • “Deca Sports Freedom” (X360) • “Zumba Fitness: Join the Party” (X360) • “Pac-Man Party” (Wii) • “Create” (Wii, PC, PS3, X360) • “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, Part 1”

‘CALL OF DUTY: BLACK OPS’ 9 (out of 10) PlayStation 3, Xbox360, PC Activision, Treyarch ESRB rating: M for Mature like I have with so many games over the years. None of this carries over to online play, where the faster pace fosters a certain detachment from the violence. For my money, Treyarch has crafted the finest “Call of Duty” multiplayer game to date. The maps are fantastic and offer great variety in size, aesthetics, verticality, and paths. The core design is largely unchanged;

(DS, X360, Wii, PC, PS3) • “EA Sports Active NFL Training Camp” (Wii) • “Marvel Super Hero Squad: The Infinity Gauntlet” (PS3, Wii, DS, X360) • “DanceDanceRevolution” (Wii, PS3) • “Jillian Michaels Fitness Ultimatum 2011” (Wii) • “Namco Museum Megamix” (Wii) • “Shawn Johnson Gymnastics” (Wii) • “Naruto Shippuden: Dragon Blade Chronicles” (Wii)

it features the same modes, perks, and a similar arsenal to “Modern Warfare.” The action is as responsive, technically impressive, and engrossing as it has been since Infinity Ward pioneered it three years ago. The fan-favorite zombies mode returns as well, with players cooperating against the undead hordes on two vastly different maps. It’s tough to hate on something as skillfully executed as “Black Ops.” “Call of Duty” remains the smoothest, most approachable first-person shooter out there, and I had a blast playing it. On the other hand, it’s disappointing that Treyarch’s much-hyped hugebudget entry in the franchise feels like “Modern Warfare 2.5.” I’m happy to get a refined update. This year, anyway.

• “EA Sports Active 2” (PS3, Wii, X360) • “Apache: Air Assault” (X360, PS3) • “Pro Evolution Soccer 2011” (Wii) • “Assassin’s Creed: Brotherhood” (PS3, X360) • “Tom Clancy’s Ghost Recon” (Wii) • “The Sims 3” (Wii) • “NBA Jam” (X360, PS3) • “uDraw Studio” (Wii) • “Dood’s Big Adventure” (Wii) — Gamespot.com

‘DREAM CHRONICLES’ Reviewed for: Xbox 360 Also available for: Nintendo DS, Windows PC, Macintosh, iPhone/ iPod Touch From: KatGames/Hudson ESRB Rating: E for Everyone It’s entirely fitting that “Dream Chronicles” got lost this fall among the sea of big-ticket Xbox Live Arcade games that released around it. “Chronicles” is a hidden-object game — which, for the uninitiated, presents players with mostly static environments and tasks them with finding items hidden within the scene that help complete whatever task is needed to advance to the next scene. At that, “Chronicles” does fine, mixing in object hunts with the occasional light puzzlesolving diversion and wrapping it inside a story that, while kind of incomprehensible, is engaging in a strangely soothing way. But object hunts are an odd fit for a system that operates on the strength of a controller rather than a mouse, and while “Chronicles” cleverly lets players “peek” into the scene with the triggers, using a joystick to move a cursor around will always feel awkward. “Chronicles” also is too short and too easy to command the same asking price as “Super Meat Boy” and four tables of “Pinball FX 2,” to name only two recent XBLA games that provide more value and take much better advantage of the system’s strengths. — Billy O’Keefe, McClatchy-Tribune News Service


THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2010

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PAGE 25

movies Ralph Fiennes stars as the evil Lord Voldemort in “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1.” The Associated Press

THE BEGINNING

OF THE END

Harry Potter’s epic story gets more complex in ‘Deathly Hallows’

H

arry, Hermione and Ron have grown up. The horrors they met at Hogwarts are but nostalgic memories. They are cast out now into the vastness of the world, on their own, and Voldemort and his Death Eaters draw ever closer.

Also drawing near is an equally unsettling phenomenon, sexual maturity. Both are barely kept at bay in this first installment of the last installment of the saga Harry Potter. David Yates’ “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows” is a handsome and sometimes harrowing film — and will be completely unintelligible for anyone coming to the series for the first time. At 146 minutes, it confronts us with a roll call of the many, many characters in the series, and requires a nearly encyclopedic recall of the previous chapters of

the epic. I’ve seen all the films and there were times when I had no idea what they were talking about here. Indeed, there are times when Hermione has to explain to Harry. My cluelessness didn’t bother me because the film depends more on mood and character than many of the others, and key actions seem to be alarmingly taking place offscreen. Our three heroes have left Hogwarts behind, Quidditch games are a thing of the past, and things have come to such a pass that Harry keeps his white owl in a cramped

parrot cage. The film opens with a frightening meeting of the Ministry of Magic, plotting the destruction of all three characters. Presiding is Lord Voldemort (Ralph Fiennes), his noseless face disturbingly like a snake’s. Harry must be destroyed. That our hero survives after the myriad attacks on his life in the earlier installments does not speak well for Voldemort’s minions, but this time they mean business. Continued next page

ROGER EBERT

“Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1” 146 minutes PG-13, for some sequences of intense action violence, frightening images and brief sensuality


PAGE 26 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2010

movies From previous page Harry (Daniel Radcliffe) moves his family to a safe haven. He joins Hermione (Emma Watson) and Ron (Rupert Grint) in flight, sometimes literally. They seek counsel from old friends, and spend a great deal of time in wilderness isolation. They have the ability to materialize anywhere, and we find them in forbidding forests, beside mirrorlike lakes ringed by mountains, and in a harsh landscape where the rocks have been riven by deep cracks. That some of these locations are actual and others are CGI is usually not noticeable, although I doubt that Harry would have skipped so casually over these cracked stones if they were real. This isolation serves two purposes. It helps conceal them from Voldemort. And, especially after Ron Weasley seems to live up to his name and weasel out, it allows Harry and Hermione to become closer friends than ever, confidants, and even, yes, in love. They share a kiss so chaste that passion seems a stranger to them; they might as well be observing a formal ritual. And they