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Bend-La Pine board OKs budget, contract The Bulletin

The Bend-La Pine School Board unanimously approved the district’s 2011-12 budget, overcoming a $15 million budget shortfall. Board members also unanimously approved a one-year teacher contract, which plays a major role in overcoming the shortfall. The Bend Education Association approved the contract last week, and the cuts include eliminating cost-of-living raises and deferring step

Lava River Cave gets a new look

increases — which come with experience — for two-thirds of the year. Board member Kelly Goff was not present. The teachers also gave up a deferred cost-of-living raise, which was scheduled to take effect on July 1. On top of the contract savings, the district will cut about 50 Bend-La Pine Schools teaching positions. Together, the position cuts and salary-related concessions will save the district about $7 million. See Bend-La Pine / A4

Ahead of July 1 opening, new routes and more LOCAL, C1

Building bond’s fate hinges on committee By Lauren Dake The Bulletin

Redmond Farmers Market a festive affair

SALEM — Local lawmakers have joined forces to push for the purchase of a building to house graduate programs for the Oregon State University-Cascades Campus. They have lobbied their fellow lawmakers and garnered support from the community. Now, they have to wait for the end-of-the session politics to play out to see if the $1.95 million bond they are asking the state to approve will make it out of committee and get the governor’s signature. “Until it’s out of this building and all the votes counted, I’m not going to let up or take anything for granted,” said Rep. Jason Conger, R-Bend. In addition to the bond, which would come from lottery revenue funds, the university would pay about $1.5 million. See Cascades / A4

Proposed OSU-Cascades building 650 S.W. Columbia St. S Columbia

Simpson Ave.

ve. oA ad r o

t.

Centur y Dr.

OSUCascades needs the state to pass a $1.95 million bond in order to complete its purchase of this building to house its graduate programs.

Co l

By Patrick Cliff

OSU-CASCADES

BEND

Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin

Pete Erickson / The Bulletin

Holm Made Toffee Co. vendor Randi Aud sells toffee to Eva Hershiser, 12, and Madelyn Lippincott, 12, both of Bend, at the Redmond Farmers Market in Centennial Park on Tuesday afternoon. More special events are on the calendar for the weekly Tuesday market. On June 28, the focus will be on planting, growing and preserving strawberries.

TOP NEWS INSIDE OBAMA: Historic visit to Puerto Rico, Page A3 SUNSCREEN: FDA revises labels, Page A6

INDEX Abby

E2

Local

C1-6

Business

B1-6

Movies

E3

Classified

F1-6

Obituaries

C5

Comics

E4-5

Shopping

E1-6

Crosswords E5, F2

Sports

D1-6

Editorial

C4

Stocks

B4-5

Horoscope

E5

TV listings

An Independent Newspaper

MON-SAT

Vol. 108, No. 166, 38 pages, 7 sections

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By Eric Schmitt and Mark Mazzetti

Soldiers of the Pakistani Frontier Corps in Warsak, Pakistan.

New York Times News Service

WASHINGTON — Pakistan’s top military spy agency has arrested some of the Pakistani informants who fed information to the Central Intelligence Agency in the months leading up to the raid that led to the death of Osama bin Laden, according to U.S. officials. Pakistan’s detention of five CIA informants, including a Pakistani army major who officials said copied the license plates of cars visiting bin Laden’s compound in Abbottabad in the weeks before the raid, is the latest evidence of the fractured relationship between the United States and Pakistan. It comes at a time when

Kuni Takahashi New York Times News Service

the Obama administration is seeking Pakistan’s support in brokering an endgame in the war in neighboring Afghanistan. At a closed briefing last week, members of the Senate Intelligence Committee asked Michael Morell, the deputy CIA director, to rate Pakistan’s cooperation with the United States on counterterrorism operations, on a scale of 1 to 10.

“Three,” Morell replied, according to officials familiar with the exchange. The fate of the CIA informants arrested in Pakistan is unclear, but U.S. officials said that CIA Director Leon Panetta raised the issue when he traveled to Islamabad last week to meet with Pakistani military and intelligence officers. See Pakistan / A4

By Kate Ramsayer The Bulletin

Fish and wildlife agencies have weighed in on Bend’s proposal to upgrade the Bridge Creek water system — and in some cases, echo concerns expressed by critics of the project. Bend plans to replace pipes that carry the city’s drinking water from a diversion on Bridge Creek, right before it joins Tumalo Creek. The pipes run 10 miles, through U.S. Forest Service property, to the city’s Outback treatment station. While the city has decided to move forward with the $58 million to $73 million project, the effort still needs to go through the Forest Service’s permit process. As part of the environmental analysis, the federal agency is accepting comments on potential issues. See Water / A4

E2

We use recycled newsprint The Bulletin

Fish, wildlife agencies echo concerns about Pakistan arrests CIA informants Bridge Creek project

For Franciscan twins, inseparable to the end, a simple depth By Dan Barry New York Times News Service

ST. BONAVENTURE, N.Y. — They were like paired birds of Franciscan brown. If Brother Julian was gardening in front of the friary, Brother

Adrian weeded in the back. If Adrian was driving the van, Julian sat by his side. Preparing the altar for chapel, chopping wood for kindling, exulting in ice cream at the Twist & Shake, the identical Riester

twins were together, always. For many years at St. Bonaventure University, these simple men were workers, not teachers, and so ever-present in the pastoral setting as to be unseen. Taken for granted, like

the rushing hush of the Allegheny River, or the back-and-forth of the birdsong in the trees. Two weeks ago, the twins died on the same day in a Florida hospital; they were 92. See Twins / A5

Brothers Julian and Adrian Rieste, 92year-old twin friars, died on the same day at a Florida hospital. Nicole Bengiveno New York Times News Service


A2 Wednesday, June 15, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

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YOSEMITE NATIONAL PARK, Calif. — On a June day, Frank Gehrke and Vince White strapped on their cross-country skis and glided across the wintry landscape of Dana Meadows in Yosemite National Park. The surrounding peaks were wrapped in snow, the breeze crisp enough for a hat and gloves. The men screwed together four sections of a hollow aluminum tube White had carried on his backpack. With a vigorous twisting of a handle attached to the cylinder, he drove it into the layers of snow. It didn’t hit dirt for another 7 feet. After pulling up the snowfilled tube, White weighed it to gauge the water content. The Dana Meadows snowpack had enough water to form a 3-footdeep lake. From the Sierra Nevada and the Cascades to the northern Rockies, much of the West’s high country remains buried under a thick snowpack that is filling reservoirs and engaging dam operators in a nerve-racking balancing act as they watch for jumps in temperature that could turn all those scenic piles of white into raging floodwaters. “It’s luck, but it’s also quite a bit of skill being applied,” California state hydrologist Maury Roos said. “We have staff trying to go through the records every day, asking, ‘What is this similar to?’ and it’s been extremely hard to draw a parallel to any other year,” said Jon Ericson, chief of hydrology for the California Department of Water Resources. The first week of June in California, snow depths of 7 feet or more were not uncommon at high elevations. Sensors on Lower Lassen Peak in the Feather River watershed recorded a whopping 24 feet. This year’s early spring snowpack in the Sierra was the fifthlargest in the last 60 years. A cool, cloudy May delayed its melt, and this month has been similar thus far — at some upper elevations, more snow has fallen. California’s two largest reservoirs are nearly full: Lake Shasta, on the upper Sacramento River, and Lake Oroville, on the Feather River, a tributary of the Sacramento. Three years ago, in the middle of a statewide drought, Oroville was half empty. Farther south, on the San Joaquin River, Friant Dam managers have partly drained Millerton reservoir to create room for the coming snowmelt, and they remain vigilant for potential flooding in downriver towns. “Our issue is going to be temperature-driven. That’s what we’re going to be watching,” said Michael Jackson, a reclamation manager for south-central California who is expecting nearly

By Nida Najar New York Times News Service

Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times

Frank Gehrke, right, chief of the California Cooperative Snow Surveys Program, and Vince White, a hydrographer, weigh a sample of the huge snowpack in the eastern Sierra.

Monitoring the West’s snow Water managers in many parts of the West are bracing for possible flooding from a large, late-melting snowpack.

Snow depth 10–60 inches

Wash.

60+ inches

Columbia River

Mont.

Ore.

Wyo. Idaho

Colorado River Basin

Lake Shasta

Calif. Lake Oroville Pacific Ocean

Utah

Nev.

Friant Dam

Colo.

Lake Powell

Lake Mead

Ariz.

N.M. Note: Data as of June 10

Columbia River Water is being released at Grand Coulee Dam to make room for spring snowmelt that is expected to fill reservoir

Colorado River Basin Flooding is a worry in upper basin states; largest late-May snowpack in several decades

Lake Shasta, Lake Oroville California’s two largest reservoirs are nearly full

Lake Powell Expected to rise 17 feet from runoff into the upper Colorado River Basin

Friant Dam Millerton reservoir is half-emptied to create room for coming snowmelt from San Joaquin River

Lake Mead Level is expected to climb 31 feet from releases from Lake Powell

© 2011 MCT Source: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, California Dept. of Water Resources Julie Sheer, Khang Nguyen / Los Angeles Times

twice the average volume of runoff on the upper San Joaquin. Federal and state dam operators consult every day with the Army Corps of Engineers. Once a week they hold a teleconference accompanied by a Web presentation to review the weather forecast, water demand and snow sensor results and see

what “they expect to come down the hill,” Ericson said. Barring a freak weather event, officials say, California should escape serious flooding. Elsewhere in the West, the outlook is more worrisome. Spring rains have already caused flooding on the Missouri River as far south as Iowa, and much of the

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Oregon Lottery Results As listed by The Associated Press

MEGA MILLIONS The numbers drawn are:

9 10 20 51 53 24 x4 Nobody won the jackpot Tuesday night in the Mega Millions game, pushing the estimated jackpot to $53 million for Friday’s drawing.

Wildfire now largest in Arizona’s history By Marc Lacey New York Times News Service

PHOENIX — The massive Wallow fire that is raging through eastern Arizona and neighboring New Mexico has burned up so much additional acreage that it has become the largest fire in Arizona’s history, officials said Tuesday. As of Tuesday morning, the fire had burned more than 469,000 acres, surpassing the 468,000 acres torched in the 2002 Rodeo-Chediski fire, which affected an area not far away in Arizona’s White Mountains. The big difference between the two megafires, though, has been the damage. The Wallow fire has been far less destructive than its predecessor, destroying only 31 homes compared with 465 lost a decade ago. The Wallow fire is named after the Bear Wallow Wilderness in the Apache and Sitgreaves national forests, where the fire is believed to have started after a campfire blew out of control on May 29. The fire was 18 percent contained as of Tuesday morning, which firefighters said represented major progress, even though containing could still take weeks. “As far and wide and long as

World Bank to loan India $1B to clean Ganges River

Flames from the massive Wallow fire engulf a ridgeline Tuesday outside Alpine, Ariz. David Kadlubowski The Arizona Republic

this fire is, 18 percent contained is small, but it’s something and it shows a lot of work has been done,” said Helene Holguin, a spokeswoman for the multiagency firefighting effort. Residents from Eagar and

Springerville, two Arizona communities on the northern edge of the fire, were allowed to return to their homes on Sunday after several days away. But the fire continued eating up forest as winds pushed it northeast. Firefighters were furiously burning backfires in an attempt to contain the blaze, which had extended into New Mexico and threatened the small town of Luna. The fire has sent plumes of smoke over a vast area and tied up traffic as many highways have been closed. Dry weather and fierce winds have caused the fire to spread quickly, frustrating the more than 4,000 firefighters assigned to the blaze.

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dense northern Rocky Mountain snowpack has yet to melt. “Any time from now on, folks need to be ready,” said hydrologist Kevin Low of the Missouri Basin River Forecast Center. “It’s not going to get any better for the next two or three months.” The last dam on the river, Gavins Point on the South Dakota-Nebraska border, is making record releases. In the upper Colorado River Basin, water managers are predicting the biggest flow into Lake Powell since 1997 — raising hopes that a stubborn drought may finally break. Powell’s level is expected to rise 17 feet this year. The water level at Lake Mead, which is fed by Powell and supplies Las Vegas, Arizona and Southern California, is expected to climb 31 feet. “While we’re not fully out of (the drought), we should be in good shape after this year,” said Rick Clayton, who coordinates releases from Powell for the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation. “It’s an exciting year for us.” Scores of automatic snow sensors in the upper Colorado basin recorded the largest late May snowpack in several decades. “The second part of April, when we’d expect to get melt ... we kept getting storms,” said Kevin Werner, a hydrologist with the Colorado Basin River Forecast Center. If a days-long hot streak hits the Rockies, a rush of snowmelt could threaten Grand Junction on the upper Colorado and mountain resort towns such as Steamboat Springs and Aspen. Salt Lake City also could face floods from the melt in the Wasatch Range.

NEW DELHI — Indian officials signed an agreement with the World Bank on Tuesday to use a $1 billion loan to finance the first major new effort in more than 20 years to cleanse the revered Ganges, one of the world’s dirtiest rivers. One-third of India’s 1.2 billion people live along the banks of the 1,560-mile river, many of them relying on it for drinking, cooking and washing. Millions more visit for ritual baths to cleanse themselves of sin. But untreated sewage, agricultural runoff and industrial waste have fouled its waters for decades, and hydroelectric projects and dams threaten to choke off its waters in spots. On Tuesday, a religious leader on a hunger strike over the effect of illegal mining on the state of the river, Swami Nigamanand, died after spending weeks in a coma. The long-awaited loan is part of a government project that aims to halt the discharge of untreated wastewater into the river by 2020. The project, founded in 2009, replaced the 1986 Ganga Action Plan, the last large-scale attempt to address the pollution. That initiative introduced wastewater treatment in certain areas, but it failed to halt raw waste disposal into the Ganges. Critics said it was inadequately financed and poorly managed. Indian officials and representatives of the World Bank said Tuesday that they hoped the new project would be more successful. They cited the greater amount of money being invested, the broader focus on regional environmental health and a planned public education campaign. “What we’re trying to do is take a step back and not look at just one sector — wastewater — but take a larger sectoral approach,” said Genevieve Connors, a water resources specialist for the World Bank. But she noted that the task of cleaning a river was enormous, saying it “takes decades and costs hundreds of billions of dollars.”


THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, June 15, 2011 A3

T S Republican governors push back on Medicaid

After debate, Bachmann expected to gain support 23 great children.” Over the debate’s two hours WASHINGTON — The big- Bachmann was clearly trying gest question for Rep. Michele to catch the attention of votBachmann of Minnesota be- ers who have been wary of her fore the Republican often-intense, somedebate Monday night times strident brand of was whether she politics: establishment could appeal to voters Republicans; pragmabeyond her base in tists who want somethe Tea Party moveone electable; foreign ment, while avoiding policy conservatives; the gaffes that have and middle-class famsometimes undercut ilies who are strugher efforts to position Rep. Michele gling economically. herself as a credible Bachmann, Her admirers said candidate. R-Minn. she showed an ability By most accounts, to speak out on behalf she did just that. of their issues withBachmann toned down her out coming across as a niche passionate style a bit and of- candidate. fered herself as a competent, “She answered the questions knowledgeable insider who that people had: Could she would nonetheless carry on hang with the leaders? Would the fight against big govern- she make a gaffe?” said Anment with the zeal of a Tea drew Hemingway, president of Party activist. the New Hampshire Republi“I’m a former federal tax liti- can Liberty Caucus, a Tea Pargation attorney; I’m a business- ty group that has not backed a woman,” she said in the intro- candidate in the race so far. ductions, addressing herself to “In her demeanor, in the way a national audience that gener- that she carried herself — she ally has had just fleeting expo- walked out of that debate where sure to her career in Congress. everybody said, ‘She is a very “I’ve had five children, and we serious candidate,’” Hemingare the proud foster parents of way said Tuesday.

By Michael D. Shear

New York Times News Service

By Michael A. Fletcher The Washington Post

Faced with severe budget problems, Republican governors are escalating their fight against federal rules requiring states to maintain current levels of health-care coverage for the poor and disabled. The growing resistance to the federal government over the hugely expensive Medicaid program poses a critical test for President Barack Obama, who has the power to relax the rules for states. If he allows states to tighten eligibility requirements, it will outrage many of his core supporters while undermining the central goal of his signature health-care law: expanding insurance coverage. But if the president turns his back on governors struggling to gain control of their finances by trimming their most costly program, he risks intense criticism just as his administration is locked in a battle with Republicans over the nation’s soaring debt. “There is a growing impatience among governors,” said Mike Schrimpf, communications director for the Republican Governors Association. “As the Medicaid portion of state budgets grows, the issue becomes even more pressing.” This week, 29 GOP governors wrote a letter asking congressional leaders for greater flexibility in spending Medicaid dollars. They say that would give them much-needed control over the soaring cost of Medicaid, often the largest single item in state budgets.

Brennan Linsley / The Associated Press

President Barack Obama waves to a crowd gathered inside a hangar at the Muniz Air National Guard Base shortly after his arrival in San Juan, Puerto Rico, on Tuesday. Obama is the first sitting U.S. president to visit Puerto Rico since John F. Kennedy.

In Puerto Rico, Obama vows to back statehood By Helene Cooper New York Times News Service

SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico — President Barack Obama came to this U.S. commonwealth Tuesday and promised to stand by Puerto Rico no matter what residents decide about its future — statehood, independence or a continuation of the status quo. In what White House officials billed as the first official visit of a sitting U.S. president since John F. Kennedy, Air Force One landed just before noon and Obama bounded over to a crowd of about 1,000 people waiting for him at Luis Munoz Marin International Airport. Obama began his four-hour trip with a quick speech in which he rolled his R’s, tried out a little Spanish (Puerto Ricans’ willingness to serve in the armed forces is as American, he said, as “arroz con gandules”), professed his love and admiration for all

things Puerto Rican and promised to support “a clear decision” by the people of Puerto Rico on statehood, whatever it may be. It was not, by any measure, a ground-breaking speech, but then, Obama’s visit here is as much about wooing Hispanic voters in the swing state of Florida as it is about reassuring Puerto Ricans that the United States has not forgotten its island commonwealth in the Caribbean. “The aspirations and the struggles on this island mirror those across America,” Obama assured the people in the airport hangar, which included Marc Antony, the Latino crooner who is married to Jennifer Lopez. The president’s schedule included the speech at the hangar, a visit to La Fortaleza, the longest-serving governor’s mansion in the Western Hemisphere (the White House says), a tour of the Kennedy Suite, where Kennedy

stayed in 1961, and a concert by a youth orchestra. Obama also stopped unannounced for lunch at a local restaurant. Perhaps more important were the interviews Obama scheduled with El Nuevo Dia newspaper and Univision of Puerto Rico, and a fundraising event Tuesday afternoon meant to plump Democratic National Committee coffers. Puerto Ricans hold U.S. citizenship and can serve in the military, but the commonwealth has no voting representative in Congress. And while Puerto Ricans in Puerto Rico can vote in presidential primaries, they cannot vote in presidential elections. Puerto Ricans in the United States can. The President’s Task Force on Puerto Rico’s Status issued a report in March recommending that the island hold two more votes on the issue by the end of 2012.

why we worked this hard. That’s why we poisoned ourselves at this factory. Now it turns out the child is poisoned too. I have no words to describe how I feel.” Such scenes of heartbreak and anger have been repeated across China in recent months with the discovery of case after case of mass lead poisoning — together with instances in which local governments tried to cover them up. In the past 2½ years, thousands of workers, villagers and children in at least nine of mainland China’s 31 province-level regions have been found to be suffering from toxic levels of lead exposure, mostly caused by pollution from battery factories and metal smelters. The cases underscore a pattern of government neglect seen in industry after industry as China strives for headlong growth with only embryonic safeguards. Chasing the political dividends of economic development, local officials regularly overlook environmental contamination, worker safety and dangers to public health until forced to confront them by episodes like the Haijiu factory riot. A report by Human Rights Watch released Wednesday states that some local officials have reacted to mass poisonings by arbitrarily limiting lead testing, withholding and possibly manipulating test results, denying proper treatment to children

and adults and trying to silence parents and activists. “What we are trying to underscore is how little has been done to address the massive impact of lead pollution in China,” Joe Amon, the organization’s health and human rights director, said in an interview. “It really has affected a whole generation of kids.” In more developed nations, where lead pollution has been tightly regulated for decades, a pattern of lead poisoning like China’s would most likely be deemed a public-health emergency. High levels can damage the brain, kidney, liver, nerves and stomach and, in extreme cases, cause death. Children are particularly susceptible because they absorb lead more easily than adults. “No blood lead level has been found to be safe for a child,” Dr. Mary Jean Brown, chief of the lead poisoning prevention branch of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, said in an interview last week. Chinese leaders have acknowledged that lead contamination is a grave issue and have raised the priority of reducing heavy-metal pollution in the government’s latest five-year plan, presented in March. But despite efforts to step up enforcement, including suspending production last month at a number of battery factories, the government’s response remains faltering.

Gov. Perry sounds like a presidential candidate Perry congratulated the Texas Legislature for balancing the state NEW YORK — Texas Gov. budget without raising taxes “to Rick Perry sounded very preserve our job-friendly climate” much like a presidential can- and most of the state’s $6 billion in didate at a New York our Rainy Day Fund. City Republican “In Texas, we can’t fundraising dinner defer today’s tough deciTuesday, blasting sions for tomorrow’s genPresident Barack eration,” Perry said, “and Obama’s economic unlike Washington, we policies and boasting don’t have one of those of Texas’ economic Beijing credit cards to figrowth during his nance deficit spending.” decade-long tenure. Texas Gov. Perry didn’t mention “The Democratic Rick Perry a potential presidential Party is now the campaign during his party of record defi25-minute speech, but cits, historic debt and failed he did ask the audience to supspending measures sold as port his efforts by texting him job creation programs that their contact information. only ended up expanding government,” Perry told 250 Republican loyalists at the 2nd Street Theater presents: New York County GOP’s annual Lincoln Day dinner. Appearing at a hotel at Grand Central Station, Perry bragged about presiding over Friday June 17, 2011 8pm “the strongest economy in this country.” He cited government statistics indicating that 48 percent of the jobs created in the U.S. in the past two years have been created in Texas. “We keep adding jobs while other states lose them left and right,” Perry said. “Those jobs BIG (Bend Improv Group) flee other states because of factors like excess taxation, With special guest comedians: punitive regulation and frivoJake Woodmansee lous litigation.”

By Richard S. Dunham

New York Times News Service

Effort to end ethanol tax credit fails Lead poisoning in China a hidden scourge in Senate By Sharon LaFraniere By Carl Hulse

New York Times News Service

New York Times News Service

MENGXI VILLAGE, China — On a chilly evening early last month, a mob of more than 200 people gathered in this tiny eastern China village at the entrance to the Zhejiang Haijiu Battery Factory, a maker of lead-acid batteries for motorcycles and electric bikes. They shouldered through an outer brick wall, swept into the factory office and, in an outpouring of pure fury, smashed the cabinets, desks and computers inside. News had spread that workers and villagers had been poisoned by lead emissions from the factory, which had operated for six years despite flagrant environmental violations. But the truth was even worse: 233 adults and 99 children were ultimately found to have concentrations of lead in their blood, up to seven times the level deemed safe by the Chinese government. One of them was 3-year-old Han Tiantian, who lived just across the road from the plant. Her father, Han Zongyuan, a factory worker, said he learned in March that she had absorbed enough lead to irreversibly diminish her intellectual capacity and harm her nervous system. “At the moment I heard the doctor say that, my heart was shattered,” Han said in an interview last week. “We wanted this child to have everything. That’s

WASHINGTON — The Senate beat back a challenge to ethanol fuel subsidies Tuesday in a demonstration of how the drive to cut the federal deficit can run headlong into a favored interest on Capitol Hill. At the same time, Vice President Joe Biden expressed confidence about bipartisan talks aimed at producing a budget deal that would clear the way this summer for an increase in the federal debt ceiling. He predicted that lawmakers would have a proposal for “beyond $1 trillion” in savings by the Fourth of July recess. “We are down to the really hard stuff,” Biden told reporters after the first of three meetings of the negotiators this week. On the ethanol subsidy, critics wanted to eliminate, as of July 1, the 45-cent-per-gallon tax credit offered to refiners for using the corn-based fuel at an estimated cost of nearly $6 billion a year. The 59-40 vote Tuesday to advance the measure was 20 votes short of what was needed. The tax benefits are set to expire at the end of the year, but their proponents are already working to renew them.

Seeking refuge, Syrians flee to Turkish border New York Times News Service KHIRBIT EL JOUS, Syria — Hundreds of Syrians displaced by a crackdown on the uprising here fled to the Turkish border by tractor, truck and foot Tuesday, some huddling in muddy olive groves without shelter and

food, residents said. The scenes on both sides of the border, a 520-mile frontier that Syrians can cross without visas, brought yet another dimension to the three-month rebellion against the government of President Bashar Assad.

“What would happen if we enter Turkey now and, when it’s time to return, find everything gone in our absence?” said a man who refused to give his name, as he held a bag of bread and sought shelter on the Syrian side of the border.

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A4 Wednesday, June 15, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Shuttle program’s conclusion leaves NASA with pension bill By Mary Williams Walsh New York Times News Service

The nation’s space agency plans to spend about half a billion dollars next year to replenish the pension fund of the contractor that has supplied thousands of workers to the space shuttle program. The shuttle program accounts for a vast majority of the business of United Space Alliance, originally a joint venture of Boeing and Lockheed Martin. With the demise of the shuttle program, United Space Alliance will be left without a revenue source to keep its pension plan afloat. So the company wants to terminate its family of pension plans, covering 11,000 workers and retirees, and continue as a smaller, nimbler concern to compete for other contracts. Normally, a company that lost a lifeblood contract would have little choice but to declare bankruptcy and ask the federal insurer, the Pension Benefit Guaranty Corp., to take over its pensions. But that insurer limits benefits, meaning not everyone gets as much as they had been promised. United Space Alliance’s plan also allows participants to take their pensions as a single check and includes retiree health benefits, neither of which would be permitted by the pension insurer. United Space Alliance, howev-

Cascades Continued from A1 A donor, who wishes to remain anonymous until the deal is complete, would contribute $800,000 to buy the Edge Wireless building at 650 S.W. Columbia St. in Bend. Sen. David Nelson, R-Pendleton, said the Capital Construction subcommittee is still meeting daily, evaluating a slew of bonding projects in addition to general fund projects. “We’re looking at if it’s a good investment,” he said. And overall, the consensus is, “buildings are cheaper right now because of the market.” Rep. Peter Buckley, D-Ashland, said the discussion is also centering around equity and making sure money goes toward helping projects throughout the state. “Lane County wants (bonding) money for their transit system and Eastern Oregon wants an agricultural cultural center,” Buckley said. “We have enough bonding capacity to do it all if we choose. It’s whether the Legislature is comfortable using all it’s bonding capacity.” Most lottery funds are already allocated to education or parks, but there is a sliver reserved for economic development. There is about $282 million in this fund for bonding capacity. The governor has requested about $279 million, which would have to be approved by the Legislature. Perhaps the larger discussion happening right now, Buckley

Water Continued from A1 “The City’s proposed action may impact water quantity and water quality in the Tumalo Creek watershed,” Brett Hodgson, Deschutes District biologist with the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, wrote in a letter to the Forest Service. The cold water in Tumalo Creek plays a big role in providing habitat for fish, he wrote, and helps set the temperature in the Deschutes River all the way to Lake Billy Chinook. “From a fisheries standpoint, Tumalo Creek is uniquely important because of the cold water it harbors,” he said. “One of our comments was for the Forest Service and others to thoroughly evaluate what the potential impacts of this project and the city potentially diverting more water would have on instream flow in Tumalo Creek.” If the city starts taking more water from Tumalo Creek, it would mean less of that cold water in the system. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service also commented on the proposal, requesting that the Forest Service take a look at various aspects of the city’s proposal. Nancy Gilbert, field supervisor for the local Fish and Wildlife Service office, wrote to request that the Forest Service include information in its analysis about how much flows could increase with the city’s ability to control the amount of water diverted,

er, has a rare pledge from a different government agency to pay the bill. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration says in its contract with the company that it will cover its pension costs “to the extent they are otherwise allowable, allocable and reasonable.” NASA interprets this to include the cost of terminating its pension plans outside of bankruptcy. Other federal agencies have made promises to pay contractors’ annual pension costs — the Energy Department, for example, for companies that run nuclear sites — and some government auditors have been warning that investment oversight was lacking and that the potential costs had been underestimated. This appears to be the first time, though, that a company’s main contract has expired and an agency has had to bear the cost of terminating its plans. The backstop will be unusually costly because of market conditions. While United Space Alliance has made its required contributions every year, the fund lost nearly $200 million in the market turmoil of 2008 and 2009. The cash infusion is also being readied at a time when some members of Congress are demanding cuts in spending and threatening to block anything that could be construed as a taxpayer bailout.

said, is how much bonding capacity to use. “If we don’t bond, it’s saving for the future,” he said of the argument, which he said is an argument that is being discussed but not necessarily his stance. Both lawmakers said the feelings are positive surrounding the OSU-Cascades bonding project, but another sticking point is where the bonding bill is located. The Capital Construction subcommittee has been called the “end-game subcommittee.” It’s where final decisions are made and large budgets such as an education reform package and the public safety budget go through. “I would almost describe it as a log jam at the end of the session,” Conger said. He said he hasn’t heard anyone speak out against the OSUCascade project. But there is a reason no bonding authority has passed out of the committee yet. “It’s part of the end-game scenario where there is more an expectation of give and take than just give,” Conger said. Sen. Chris Telfer, R-Bend, said things change quickly in the last week or so of the session. She had heard the OSU project was nearly a done deal. Now, she’s hearing the pushback surrounding how high the state wants to go with the bonding level. But, she said, she remain cautiously optimistic. Lauren Dake can be reached at 541-419-8074 or at ldake@bendbulletin.com.

and how construction of the pipeline could address wetlands and forests. “Please also address the direct, indirect, and cumulative instream flow and temperature impacts to all stream reaches affected by the project, both short and longterm,” Gilbert wrote. She added that although bull trout — a fish listed under the Endangered Species Act — have not been spotted in Tumalo Creek for years, the Fish and Wildlife Service supports the Forest Service surveying for the fish and would like to know what sections of the waterways will be a part of the survey. The Forest Service will now look over the comments to see if people raise issues that have not been considered, said Rod Bonacker, project manager with the Deschutes National Forest. Already, the agency is planning to do an instream flow analysis to determine the effect on stream flow, water temperatures and conditions that could affect habitat. An instream flow analysis is “a little bit more than what we would maybe normally do for a project like this,” Bonacker said. “But there’s enough questions about what would actually happen.” And the Forest Service will also take a look at the water rights on Tumalo Creek, as well as conduct the bull trout survey to see if the listed fish swim in the creek, he said. “They haven’t been seen in a long time,” Bonacker said. “But the habitat’s there, they certainly were there once ... It’s reasonable to ask the question.”

U.S. HISTORY

Who fought in the Korean War? Don’t ask high school seniors By John Hechinger Bloomberg News

BOSTON — U.S. students may know more about Lady Gaga than Abraham Lincoln. Just 12 percent of 12thgraders demonstrated proficiency in American history on a federal test, known as the “Nation’s Report Card,” according to data released Tuesday by the Education Department. Only one in five could name China as a combatant in the Korean War. Overall, seniors showed no improvement in their scores since 2006, the last time the test was given. The results of the National Assessment of Educational Progress follow a call last week by Education Secretary Arne Duncan for more flexibility in carrying out the country’s education law, known as No

Pakistan Continued from A1 Some in Washington see the arrests as illustrative of the disconnect between Pakistani and U.S. priorities at a time when they are supposed to be allies in the fight against al-Qaida — instead of hunting down the support network that allowed bin Laden to live comfortably for years, the Pakistani authorities are arresting those who assisted in the raid that killed the world’s most wanted man. The bin Laden raid and more recent attacks by militants in Pakistan have been blows to the country’s military, a revered institution in the country. Some officials and outside experts said the military is mired in its worst crisis of confidence in decades. U.S. officials cautioned that Morell’s comments about Pakistani support was a snapshot of the current relationship and did not represent the administration’s overall assessment. “We have a strong relationship with our Pakistani counterparts and work through issues when they arise,” said Marie Harf, a CIA spokeswoman. “Director Panetta had productive meetings last week in Islamabad. It’s a crucial partnership, and we will continue to work together in the fight against al-Qaida and other terrorist groups who threaten our country and theirs.” Husain Haqqani, Pakistan’s ambassador to the United States, said in a brief telephone interview that the

Bend-La Pine Continued from A1 “It’s certainly difficult economic times in the community, and I think our teachers recognize that,” said Superintendent Ron Wilkinson. “And their actions reflect that they recognize that.” In part because of its cuts, the district was able to add one day back to its school calendar. That leaves the district six total days short of a full year, 3½ of which are class days. The district has also made cuts to its administrative and classified ranks. The administrative cuts save the district about $1 million and include cutting all eight elementary school assistant principal positions.

Child Left Behind, which he says focuses on math and reading at the expense of other subjects. “These results tell us that, as a country, we are failing to provide children with a high-quality, wellrounded education,” Duncan said in a statement Tuesday. “That’s why we’re putting a greater emphasis on courses like history, art, drama and music in our efforts to fix No Child Left Behind.” In a nationally representative sample of public and private schools, 7,000 fourth-graders, 11,800 eighth-graders and 12,400 12th-graders participated in the most recent history test, which was administered last year. The periodic federal report cards measure knowledge of math, reading, science and six other subjects. Only 20 percent of fourth-graders achieved scores that were considered proficient or better in

history. About a third could explain the purpose of the Declaration of Independence. Seventeen percent of eighth-graders scored proficient or better. Only 14 percent could explain why President Richard Nixon resigned. David Driscoll, chair of the board that administers the test, noted some bright spots. Though only eighth-graders improved scores in a statistically significant way since 2006, overall results increased since 1994. In fourth grade, historically lowerperforming groups, including black and Hispanic students, made larger-than-average gains since 1994. Closing this “achievement gap” has been a major focus of U.S. education policy, especially the No Child Left Behind Law, enacted by President George W. Bush in 2002.

“We are encouraged by the progress of our fourth and eighth graders, particularly by the gains being made by students who traditionally have been among the lowest performers,” Driscoll, former Massachusetts commissioner of education, said in a statement. Fewer than half of fourthgraders have had more than two hours a week devoted to social studies, which may or may not mean history, said Diane Ravitch, a research professor of education at New York University. When fourth-graders could recognize Abraham Lincoln’s picture, only 9 percent could give two reasons why he was important, Ravitch pointed out. “We as a nation must pay more attention to the teaching of U.S. history,” Ravitch said. “We should make sure that there is time for it in the school day.”

CIA and the Pakistani spy agency “are working out mutually agreeable terms for their cooperation in fighting the menace of terrorism. It is not appropriate for us to get into the details at this stage.” Over the past several weeks the Pakistani military has been distancing itself from U.S. intelligence and counterterrorism operations against militant groups in Pakistan. This has angered many in Washington who believe that bin Laden’s death has shaken al-Qaida and that there is now an opportunity to further weaken the terrorist organization with more raids and armed drone strikes. But in recent months, dating approximately to when a CIA contractor killed two Pakistanis on a street in the eastern city of Lahore in January, U.S. officials said that Pakistani spies from the Directorate for InterServices Intelligence, known as the ISI, have been generally unwilling to carry out surveillance operations for the CIA. The Pakistanis have also resisted granting visas allowing U.S. intelligence officers to operate in Pakistan and have threatened to put greater restrictions on the drone flights. It is the future of the drone program that is a particular worry for the CIA. U.S. officials said that during his meetings in Pakistan last week, Panetta was particularly forceful about trying to get Pakistani officials to allow armed drones to fly over even wider areas in the northwest tribal regions. But the CIA is already preparing for the worst: relocating some of the drones from Pakistan to a base in Afghanistan, where they can take off and fly east across the mountains and into the tribal ar-

eas, where terrorist groups find safe haven. Another casualty of the recent tension is an ambitious Pentagon program to train Pakistani paramilitary troops to fight alQaida and the Taliban in those same tribal areas. That program has ended, both American and Pakistani officials acknowledge, and the last of about 120 American military advisers have left the country. U.S. officials are now scrambling to find temporary jobs for about 50 Special Forces support personnel who had been helping the trainers with logistics and communications. Their visas were difficult to obtain and officials fear if these troops are sent home, Pakistan will not allow them to return. In a sign of the growing anger on Capitol Hill, Rep. Mike Rogers, a Michigan Republican who leads the House Intelligence Committee, said Tuesday that he believed elements of the ISI and the military had helped protect bin Laden. Rogers, who met with senior security officials in Pakistan last week, said he had no evidence that senior Pakistani military or civilian leaders were complicit in sheltering bin Laden. And he did not offer any proof to support his assertion, saying only his accusation was based on “information that I’ve seen.” He warned that both lawmakers and the Obama administration could end up putting more restrictions on the $2 billion in U.S. military aid received annually by Pakistan. He also called for “benchmarks” in the relationship, including more sharing of information about militant activities in Karachi, Lahore and elsewhere and more U.S. access to militants detained in Pakistan.

U.S. military commanders in Afghanistan appear cautiously optimistic that they are making progress in pushing the Taliban from its strongholds in that country’s south, but many say a significant American military withdrawal can occur only if the warring sides in Afghanistan broker some kind of peace deal. But the United States is reliant on Pakistan to apply pressure on Taliban leaders, over whom they have historically had great influence. For now, at least, America’s relationship with Pakistan keeps getting tripped up. When he visited Pakistan, Panetta offered evidence of collusion between Pakistani security officials and the militants staging attacks in Afghanistan. U.S. officials said Panetta presented satellite photographs of two bomb-making factories that U.S. spies several weeks ago had asked the ISI to raid. When Pakistani troops showed up days later, the militants were gone, causing U.S. officials to question whether the militants had been warned by someone on the Pakistani side. Shortly after the failed raids, the Defense Department put a hold on a $300 million payment reimbursing Pakistan for the cost of deploying more than 100,000 troops along the border with Afghanistan, two officials said. The Pentagon declined to comment on the payment, except to say it was “continuing to process several claims.”

By eliminating 30 classified positions — which include bus drivers maintenance staff — the district will save about $1 million. The district found additional savings in several other areas. For example, it saved about $1.5 million by pulling back on technology spending and delaying a new science curriculum. The district and the classified union must still finalize a budget deal, and negotiations are ongoing. Patrick Cliff can be reached at 541-633-2161 or at pcliff@bendbulletin.com.

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THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, June 15, 2011 A5

Boast-busters stay busy exposing fake SEALs By Annys Shin The Washington Post

In Louisiana, a man duped the governor into believing he was the lone survivor of a Navy SEAL team ambushed in Afghanistan. In California, a jousting promoter said he was a SEAL veteran, not just a veteran of battles at Renaissance fairs. And in Georgia, a televangelist listed a stint with the SEALs in his online bio for years, along with bit parts in the films “Green Lantern” and “Who’s Your Caddy?” None of these men ever served in the elite Navy units that undergo some of the toughest training in the military and undertake some of its most dangerous Special Forces missions. And while there have always been SEAL impostors, their ranks have been reinforced since a SEAL unit based in Little Creek, Va., killed Osama bin Laden six weeks ago. “I’ve told four women alone this week to run the other direction,” said Mary Schantag, who, along with her husband, Chuck, a disabled veteran, checks out potential impostors and posts

their names on the website of their group, the P.O.W. Network. The claims surface as stray comments in bars, a line in a Facebook profile, or an insignia worn on a cap. The consequences are often nil. Pentagon officials have said they don’t have the resources to fact-check every potential liar. So the only thing standing between SEAL impostors and the truth is a small band of veterans and civilian volunteers, scattered across the country, who have made it their life’s work to expose phonies in all aspects of military service. “Only 500 SEALs served in Vietnam. And we’ve met all 20,000 of them,” said Steve Robinson, a former SEAL in Forsyth, Mo., and author of “No Guts, No Glory: Unmasking Navy SEAL Imposters.” When news of bin Laden’s death broke, these investigators say, they were soon overwhelmed by reports of suspected SEAL phonies. Robinson was called out of selfimposed retirement to help fellow volunteers track down claims. Military service impostors can go to extraordinary lengths to

bolster their lies. A West Virginia man recently went to his grave saying he had won a Purple Heart, a Distinguished Service Cross and a Silver Star — and had news clips from the 1940s to prove it. But when Doug Sterner of Alexandria, Va., a decorated Vietnam War veteran and war hero boast-buster, began digging around in March and obtained the man’s service records, he found a note from 1945 inserted by an officer that said the man’s medal claims were bogus. As is often the case with such posthumous discoveries, the news did not go over well with the man’s family. “If they saw me on the street, they would punch me out,” Sterner said. The Defense Department has so far declined to make verifying war hero claims easier by centralizing records across the services. At the Washington Navy Yard, for example, the names of recipients of all Navy awards sit in boxes, recorded on 3-by-5 index cards. SEAL impostors are among the easiest to catch. With a few clicks, their names can be run through

Nicole Bengiveno / New York Times News Service

Brother David Haack arranges a portrait he painted of Brothers Julian and Adrian Rieste, 92-year-old twin friars, in preparation for their memorial service held at the St. Bonaventure University Chapel.

Twins Continued from A1 Brother Julian died in the morning, and Brother Adrian died in the evening, after being told of Julian’s death. Few who knew them were surprised, and many were relieved, as it would have been hard to imagine one surviving without the other. But the cultivated anonymity of the twins died with them. News of their deaths, beginning with an article in The Buffalo News, traveled around the world, stunning the Catholic university’s officials. Think of it: Eminent Franciscan scholars die with little notice, but the same-day passing of an identical and unassuming pair of Franciscan grunts attracts international attention. Sister Margaret Carney, the university president and a Franciscan scholar, gave great thought to the why. Her conclusion: “The twins incarnate something that people have a hunger to know.” The Riesters were the sons of a prominent Buffalo doctor and his wife, and matching gifts to five older sisters. Though bright and observant, the brothers did not excel in school; a nephew, Kevin McCue, suspects a missed diagnosis of dyslexia. After being turned down by the armed forces on medical grounds — a bad left eye for one, a bad right for the other — they attended radio technology school in California. Then World War II broke out, just as they were exploring religious life. They received an acceptance letter from the Franciscans one morning, and a letter from the draft board that afternoon. They made their choice: Jerome became Brother Julian, and Irving became Brother Adrian. Back then, the Franciscans followed a rather un-Franciscan caste system, with priests the well-educated elite, often working with books, and the lay brothers the less-educated support staff, often working with livestock. The Riesters, though earnestly obedient, did not understand why the two groups were discouraged from fraternizing; why, for example, the priests and brothers had separate recreation rooms. Didn’t St. Francis say that we are all brothers? A “Yes, but” answer came when their superior ordered the dismantling of a modest boat they had built to ply the wondrous Allegheny. He may have thought that the vessel violated

“The twins incarnate something that people have a hunger to know.” — Sister Margaret Carney, president of St. Bonaventure University and a Franciscan scholar

their vow of poverty — or, more likely, he may have disliked how they took seminarians, their betters, for boat rides. Here, then, were two shy men, surrounded by scholars, discouraged from speaking, uncertain what to say if given the chance and yet confident that this was their calling. “They were definitely second-class citizens and not always treated well,” said Michael Riester, a cousin and a former Franciscan. “But they channeled it, always, spiritually.” After working together at St. Bonaventure for several years, the brothers were assigned to different Buffalo parishes in 1956, a psychologically taxing separation that ended 17 years later, after their superiors concluded that they functioned best in concert. They were reunited and sent back to serve the dozens of friars living on the St. Bonaventure campus. Together, they attended to the menial so that their fellow friars could focus on the cerebral. Brother Julian became the sacristan, maintaining the chapel, and Brother Adrian became the chauffeur, but they also built the bookshelves and maintained the garden and cleared the growth from the shrines in the woods — and rarely spoke unless invited. By now the Franciscan caste system had mostly gone away, and lay brothers were encouraged to excel. But the shy twins remained deferential, although they sometimes thrilled in the vicarious. “When I came here as a young Franciscan, they used to get a kick out of the fact that I’d make my opinions known,” recalled Brother Edward Coughlin, a Franciscan scholar who lived with them in the friary. To dismiss the twins as blank slates would be to misjudge them; their simplicity had depth. Rarely speaking of yesterday, they lived in the God-given now. Spending hours examining every flower at the Pleasant Valley Nursery. Licking every Twist & Shake ice cream cone so as to make it last and last. Pondering the art in the studio of Brother David Haack, then going off to build picture frames in their nearby workshop — where, occasionally, he heard

them call each other by Jerome and Irving. If they quarreled, Brother David said, “It would be over the measurement of a piece of wood.” And even then, it would be done silently: a slight cock of Julian’s head, to suggest that he didn’t agree with Adrian’s calculations. They came to teach better-educated friars about stripping life to its essence. For example, the Rev. Canice Connors, a Franciscan who spent a restful summer at the friary after years of investigating sexual-abuse cases involving the clergy, became enchanted by the guileless twins, who seemed to embrace a deeper, ego-free reality. One night, Connors treated the twins to dinner at the Old Library restaurant, for which they wore fine, identical suits given to them by a nephew. During the long meal, they tried their first White Russians and rejoiced in an alcoholic drink that was like melted ice cream. They asked for a second, and continued to tell Franciscan tales summoned from 60 years of quiet observation. “It was a rare event in my life,” Connors said. “I couldn’t stop laughing.” Not long after, the brothers survived an awful accident while driving the friary van; they were saying another rosary, apparently, and didn’t see the truck. This ended Brother Adrian’s time as the friary chauffeur and signaled the approach of a full retirement for both to Florida, in 2008, following a farewell dinner in their honor. Last week, Brother Julian and Brother Adrian Riester were returned to St. Bonaventure for a memorial service and a side-byside burial. Their coffins were carried by, among others, a few of the dozen or so Franciscans still on campus; their brothers. The solemn and joyful day encouraged more stories about the twins. How they adorned the friary trees with birdhouses. How they toured the campus on identical bicycles, one with a pinwheel on its handlebars. And how they often sat in silent prayer in the chapel, so still that you might not know they were there.

a comprehensive and regularly updated database of all men who trained and served with the Naval Special Warfare units, which include the SEALs and their precursor units, from the end of World War II to the present day. Robinson estimates there are only 7,000 living former SEALs and 2,200 on active duty. By his calculations, the odds of running into someone who has played in the NFL are better than the odds of meeting a SEAL.

Some try to scam VA Saying you’re an ex-SEAL might get you a free dinner down at the VFW lodge or overcome a woman’s better judgment, but other fakers are out to defraud the Department of Veterans Affairs. Others still are people with legitimate accomplishments — doctors, engineers, police officers and preachers — who can’t resist the urge to embellish. Celebrity fitness trainer Carter Hays was already established in his field when he started claiming to be an ex-SEAL four years ago. He

Cristina Fletes / The Washington Post

Doug Sterner, of Alexandria, Va., curator of the Military Times Hall of Valor, goes after phony heroes. did it, he said, to “fill a hole in my character.” Hays had actually served in the Army in the ’70s, was a combat medic and had wanted to join Special Forces but never did. “When you have something missing in your heart, and if you don’t fill it with Christ, you will fill it with what is accessable (sic) at the time or moment,” he said in an e-mail. “I never intended it to be ‘public.’ Just a few friends.” But Hays’ claims did become

public when he trained participants on the “Biggest Loser” TV show. His SEAL claim, which he circulated on the Web, caught the attention of ex-SEAL Don Shipley of Chesapeake, Va., who specializes in outing phony SEALs. Shipley made Hays the subject of one of his “Phony Navy SEAL of the Week” YouTube videos, in which he excoriates poseurs. “I made a terrible mistake that I am ashamed for,” Hays said in an e-mail to The Post.


N AT ION

A6 Wednesday, June 15, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

NORTH DAKOTA AT LARGE DISTRICT

$200 million $100 $50

By Matthew Perrone

$10

The Associated Press

$445 million

KANSAS 1ST DISTRICT

$369 million Source: Environmental Working Group

FDA clarifies sunscreen labels

Includes about $250 million in wheat, corn and sorghum crop subsidies. Alicia Parlapiano / The Washington Post

WASHINGTON — Help is on the way if you’re confused by the maze of sun protection numbers and other claims on sunscreens. Starting next summer, you can start looking for SPF 15 bottles and tubes with the label “broad spectrum” and feel confident they’re lowering your risk of skin cancer. Under new rules published Tuesday, sunscreens will have to filter out the most dangerous type of radiation to claim they protect against skin cancer and premature aging. “Broad spectrum” is the new buzzword from the Food and Drug Administration to describe a product that does an acceptable job of blocking both ultraviolet B rays and ultraviolet A rays. If a sunscreen doesn’t protect against both, or the sun protection factor is below 15, then it has to carry a warning: “This product has been shown

Blocking the sun New federal guidelines for sunscreen labels will give consumers better information about a product’s effectiveness.

Sunscreen Absorbs UV radiation

Updated labels • Products that protect against UVA and UVB will read Broad spectrum

• Sunscreens that only protect against UVB will read Product has been shown only to help prevent sunburn, not skin cancer or early skin aging

Sun’s rays

UVB

In 2009, the USDA distributed $16.3 billion to farms in the form of annual direct and countercyclical crop subsidies, crop insurance premium subsidies, and conservation and disaster programs.

2009 USDA subsidies to congressional districts

Skin

UVA

Where the Farm Subsidies Go

Epidermis Dermis

• UVB rays Only penetrate epidermis and cause sunburn; SPF only protects against these rays

• UVA rays Penetrate deep, weaken tissues; cause cancer

Source: Skin Cancer Foundation, U.S. Food and Drug Administration © 2011 MCT Melina Yingling / McClatchy-Tribune News Service

only to help prevent sunburn, not skin cancer or early skin aging.” The guidelines, which spent more than 30 years in bureaucratic limbo, are designed to help consumers like Paul Woodburn, who says he’s not sure of the dif-

ference between UVA and UVB rays and that he judges sunscreen solely by the SPF number. The new regulations require that sunscreens be tested for the ability to block the more dangerous UVA rays, which can pen-

etrate glass and pose the greatest risk of skin cancer and wrinkles. The FDA currently requires testing only for protection against UVB rays, which primarily cause sunburn but can also cause cancer and other damage. That’s what the familiar SPF measure is based on. “For the first time, the FDA has clearly defined the testing required to make a broad-spectrum protection claim in a sunscreen,” said Dr. Ronald Moy, president of the American Academy of Dermatology. The new rules were decades in the making. The FDA announced its intent to draft sunscreen rules in 1978 and published them in 1999. The agency then delayed finalizing the regulations until it could address concerns from both industry and consumers. Last year an estimated 68,130 people in the U.S. were diagnosed with melanoma — the most dangerous form of skin cancer — and an estimated 8,700 died, according to the National Cancer Institute.

From the White House to the heartland, a call to give up farm subsidies Homeless population up slightly, as ranks grow outside cities By Philip Rucker The Washington Post

HILL CITY, Kan. — This is what Washington’s new austerity has brought. A freshman Republican congressman, himself a fifth-generation corn farmer and his family a longtime beneficiary of government agricultural subsidies, drove through the endless fields of far-flung western Kansas to deliver a difficult message. “Everybody needs to share,” Rep. Tim Huelskamp told a few dozen townspeople sitting patiently on the hard wooden benches of the Graham County Courthouse. “If you’re a farmer like me, you’re going to expect less. Something’s going to go away. The direct payments are going to go away.” Huelskamp appears to be right. Dramatically cutting or eliminating direct crop subsidies, which totaled about $5 billion last year, has emerged as one of the few areas of agreement in the budget talks under way between the White House and congressional leaders of both parties. In their recent budget proposals, House Republicans and House Democrats targeted farm subsidies, a program long protected by members of both parties. The GOP plan includes a $30 billion cut to direct payments over 10 years, which would slash them by more than half. Those terms are being considered in the debt-reduction talks led by Vice President Biden, according to people familiar with the discussions. “There’s no sacred cows anymore,” Sen. Chuck Grassley, RIowa, a farmer who represents one of the nation’s biggest farming states, said in April in a conference call with Iowa reporters. “The bottom line is, ag should be cut like everything else, but no more than anything else. I think direct payments will be done away with.” President Barack Obama also has taken aim at farm subsidies, with a plan to scale back payments to farmers with incomes of more than $250,000 a year. These talks come as Congress separately begins crafting a new farm bill, which is passed about every five years and sets the terms of the government’s agricultural programs.

Crop insurance to stay So far, the plans spare the agricultural program that farmers and their backers in Congress say is the most essential: insurance to help growers if they have a bad yield or lose crops because of extreme weather, such as a tornado or drought. “Crop insurance is really key to making sure that they can manage their risks,” Republican Rep. Kristi Noem recently told reporters. She represents South Dakota, another large farming state, and her family owns a ranch that receives direct subsidies. “So we’re going to make sure that that program remains viable and a useful tool for them.” Although no budget deal has been reached, senior officials on Capitol Hill and at the Agriculture Department said they are operating under the assumption that, at a minimum, direct payments will face major reductions. At a Senate hearing in May, Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack told lawmakers that the department is “prepared to do as much as we can with fewer resources, but there is no doubt that cuts will have a real impact

on American agriculture and on American people. There will be pain, and everyone will have to sacrifice something.” That was certainly the approach Huelskamp took with his constituents. He did not promise to go back to Washington and fight to preserve a program that funnels about $250 million of public money into farmers’ pockets in his district each year. Although farm subsidies are often decried as a form of corporate welfare, Washington’s powerful agribusiness lobbyists have long argued that they help keep rural outposts such as Hill City afloat. And yet, as Huelskamp recently carried his austerity message across the sprawling 1st Congressional District — which is second only to North Dakota’s statewide House district in amount of total subsidies — there was no outcry from farmers. “I’m sure they’re going to go away. It’s all giveaways — any entitlement program is a giveaway,” said Don Paxson, 72, who farms corn and wheat, adding that he received about $8,000 this year in subsidies. “We need to wean them off everything — any income from the government. It’s all a welfare state,” said Carl Quint, 56, another farmer who stands to lose money.

‘It’s embarrassing’ The government’s farm program arose during the Great Depression to provide a safety net. To protect farmers against big surpluses of commodities such as wheat, corn, soybeans and rice — which lead to falling prices that threaten their livelihoods — the government began awarding cash payments. The subsidies are based on a formula that includes the amount of tillable land, the type of crops and the farm’s historical production yield. But the payments are not based on how much crop a farmer yields in a given year; a farmer who grows nothing one year would still receive his or her regular payment. “It’s embarrassing that we still have those levels of payments,” said Dan Glickman, a former Democratic congressman from Kansas and President Bill Clinton’s agriculture secretary. “Agriculture economically is very bullish now, and they don’t need the same kind of programs that they did in the past.” Lawmakers seem to agree. Democrats and Republicans from farm states are privately warning their local farm bureaus to expect cuts. Even if individual farmers are willing to give up the subsidies, Huelskamp, who is on the House Agriculture Committee, and other lawmakers are being lobbied from the industry’s official representatives to maintain the program. Steve Baccus, president of the Kansas Farm Bureau, said he wants policymakers to appreciate the economic impact that the subsidies have on farming towns everywhere. “Our farmers take that money to town and use it to buy farm machinery, vehicles, washing machines,” Baccus said. Charles Conner, president of the National Council of Farmer Cooperatives, said that spending on subsidies has fallen dramatically, relative to other government programs. “You cannot in any way claim that rampant government spending over the last several years has been caused by farm programs,” Conner said.

By Tony Pugh McClatchy-Tribune News Service

WASHINGTON — Despite high unemployment and a stalled economy, the nation’s homeless population grew only slightly in 2010 as stimulus-funded initiatives helped to take or keep nearly 700,000 people off the streets, according to a federal report released Tuesday. While once a predominantly urban problem largely of individuals without families, homelessness, like poverty, has increasingly migrated to suburban and rural areas where more non-Hispanic white families are being affected. In fact, the number of homeless people in households

Homeless in the U.S. Number 650,000 of people who were likely to be homeless on a given night last year. Percent of those 650,000 homeless people who stayed in a shelter. Percent of the nation’s homeless population in California, New York and Florida. (Those states account for 25 percent of total U.S. population.)

62% 40%

with at least one adult and one child has increased 20 percent since 2007, and families make up a larger share of those in emer-

gency housing than ever before. About 1.6 million people spent at least one night in emergency housing last year, up 2.2 percent from 2009. Nearly 650,000 were likely to be homeless on a given night in 2010, compared with 643,000 in 2009. These modest increases reported in the 2010 Annual Homeless Assessment Report to Congress not only reflect the success of anti-homeless Recovery Act initiatives, but also a bipartisan push to house “chronically homeless” people with severe disabilities and long histories of homelessness. Since the recession hit in December 2007, the number of chronically homeless Americans has fallen 11 percent to 109,920 in 2010. Meanwhile, the number

of long-term housing beds to accommodate them has increased 34 percent over the same period.

Where Buyers And Sellers Meet

CORRECTION In our 6/12/11 ad on pg. 14, the Samsung 43" Plasma HDTV incorrectly states 50' under the Sale $539.99. The correct size is 43". We apologize for any inconvenience. ®


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At Work Preventive health initiatives prove difficult to measure, see Page B3.

www.bendbulletin.com/business

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, JUNE 15, 2011

MARKET REPORT

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2,678.72 NASDAQ CLOSE CHANGE +39.03 +1.48%

STOC K S R E P O R T For a complete listing of stocks, including mutual funds, see Pages B4-5

B U S I N E SS IN BRIEF

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12,076.11 DOW JONES CLOSE CHANGE +123.14 +1.03%

Chase CEO shuffles bank’s top ranks Jamie Dimon, the chief executive of JPMorgan Chase & Co., removed the head of the bank’s consumer banking business and reshuffled several other top executives in the biggest shake-up of his management team since the financial crisis. Dimon has prided himself on the stability of his core group of senior leaders, many of whom have worked alongside him for over a decade at Citigroup Inc. and then Bank One of Chicago. But amid an effort to repair its mortgage business and restructure its international activities, Dimon moved aside two of his most loyal lieutenants while elevating three top managers he did not even know before coming to JPMorgan in 2004.

1,287.87 S&P 500 CLOSE CHANGE +16.04 +1.26%

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BONDS

Ten-year CLOSE 3.09 treasury CHANGE +3.34%

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$1523.80 GOLD CLOSE CHANGE +$8.80

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$35.410 SILVER CLOSE CHANGE +$0.674

Bend paddle Hiring expected to slow manufacturer Report suggests layoffs could make a return making waves New York Times News Service

The online music service Pandora may not be profitable, but that hasn’t discouraged investors clamoring for a piece of it. Pandora Media on Tuesday priced its initial public offering at $16 a share, above its recently raised target range. The company, whose shares will start trading on the New York Stock Exchange today under the ticker “P,” has raised $234.9 million, valuing the business at $2.6 billion.

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SMALL BUSINESSES

By Catherine Rampell

Pandora raises price of public offering

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In the latest sign that the economic recovery may have lost whatever modest oomph it had, more small businesses say that they are planning to shrink their payrolls than want to expand them.

That is according to a new report released Tuesday by the National Federation of Independent Business, a trade group that regularly surveys its membership of small businesses across America. The federation’s report for May showed the worst hiring prospects

Burger business sizzling

in eight months. The finding provides a glimpse into the pessimism of the nation’s small businesses as they put together their budgets for the coming season, and depicts a more gloomy outlook than other recent (if equally lackluster) economic indicators because this one is forward-looking. See Hiring / B5

A Hawaiian burger and fries are served up at Pilot Butte Drive-In Westside.

By Ed Merriman The Bulletin

You won’t find Don Ho impersonators, fields of sugar cane or Waimea Bay waves, but Bend is home to a business that evolved from a hobby building wooden outrigger paddles in Hawaii into a global paddle manufacturing company called Kialoa Paddles Inc. When Dave Chun built his first wooden outrigger paddles 20 years ago, he was a social worker in Hawaii, where he and his wife, Meg, a teacher, belonged to an outrigger club with about 250 members. “In Hawaii, racing outriggers is a very popular sport,” Dave Chun said. “The outrigger people are a very close-knit community. When I started building paddles, I was just curious to see if I could build a better paddle. “The first ones I made were for two friends who were getting married. I thought outrigger paddles would be a good gift.” Then he made paddles for himself and Meg, and for a couple of other friends, and that started the ball rolling. After starting the business in Hawaii in 1991, the Chuns moved to Central Oregon in 1992, first at a truck shop on the 270-acre site formerly occupied by the Shevlin-Hixon and Brooks-Scanlon lumber mills. They were in Redmond from 1994 through 2007, followed by a move in 2008 to a new location on Bend’s east side at 747 S.E. Business Way, Suite 6. During that time, Meg Chun said, employment has grown from two part-time employees (the Chuns) to 14 full-time employees at the company’s Bend headquarters. See Kialoa / B2

Google unveils new search features SAN FRANCISCO — Google Inc. showed off some new tricks for easier and faster Web searching on the desktop. One tool lets users with the Chrome browser search for information on a desktop computer by using voice commands just as they would on a mobile device powered by Google’s Android software. Another tool available in extensions for Google’s Chrome browser and Mozilla’s Firefox browser enables the user to drag a digital image into the search box to find out about it. Google on Tuesday also unveiled Instant Pages, which immediately loads Web pages after users click on search results, cutting several seconds from the search process. — From wire reports

Ed Merriman / The Bulletin

Meg and Dave Chun, owners of Kialoa Paddles, display two of their carbon fiber paddles at the company headquarters in Bend. So far this year Kialoa sales are up 43 percent compared with this time last year, according to the Chuns.

JC Penney hires Apple executive as CEO, hoping for retail ‘magic’

Wealth grows but not from equity Despite increases in overall household net worth, homeowners’ equity in their homes is near its lowest point. U.S. households’ and nonprofit organizations’ net worth

Photos by Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

A customer walks out of the Pilot Butte Drive-In Westside restaurant in Bend on Tuesday afternoon.

$60.0

P

ilot Butte Drive-In has opened its new west-side location on Southwest Century Drive near Safeway. The restaurant, famous for its 18-ounce hamburger, opened about a week ago — launching with a half-off grand opening day — in the space previously occupied by Tony’s Delicatessen. The response has been great, said Bill Falconer, co-owner. “On opening day, we broke all our records for oneday sales,” he said. The Pilot Butte Drive-In Westside serves up burgers, Cobb salads, shakes and other food between 11 a.m. and 9 p.m. daily. If response remains strong, the res-

55.0

50.0

Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 2009

2010

’11

Owner’s equity as percentage of household real estate

taurant may launch breakfast service ahead of schedule, Falconer said. Previously, he thought he might start the service in the coming winter months. Pilot Butte Drive-In opened in a former A&W on Northeast Greenwood Avenue and Northeast Ninth Street on Bend’s east side in 1983, according to The Bulletin’s archives. The restaurant has been mentioned in Reader’s Digest, in various guidebooks and on Internet bulletin boards. Falconer and his wife, Tammy, bought the restaurant in April 2007. It’s open from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. — Tim Doran, The Bulletin

42 percent

38.0%

40

The Ms. generation: single, female, retired, broke

38

36

By Mandy Locke

Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 2009

2010

By Stephanie Clifford and Miguel Helft New York Times News Service

$58.1

McClatchy-Tribune News Service

’11

Note: All figures not seasonally adjusted Source: Federal Reserve AP

RALEIGH, N.C. — Female baby boomers shattered glass ceilings and enrolled in colleges that shut out their mothers. They took pills to control how many babies they would bear. Others chose to forgo mother-

hood and stay single; some married and stayed home to tend to their families. And all this unprecedented freedom of choice got many single female baby boomers to a dead end, wondering how they’ll afford to live decades longer.

Single female baby boomers are the least-prepared of this more than 75-million-strong generation to financially navigate their senior years. Their moms, too, weren’t prepared, but most braved those years alongside a husband. See Boomers / B5

JC Penney has poached the head of Apple’s retail stores to head the department store chain, betting that a deity of the digerati can revive its sales in the same way he found success in brick-and-mortar stores for Apple. Ron Johnson of Apple will become Penney’s chief executive Nov. 1, when Myron “Mike” Ullman III, the current chief executive, will step down and take a role as executive chairman, the company announced Tuesday. Given that most products can be bought online, retailers have been trying to give shoppers reasons to go to physical stores — known as “retail theater” or “retailtainment” in the industry. Arguably, no business has done that better than Apple under Johnson, who turned the boring computer sales floor into a sleek playroom filled with gadgets. Retail analysts said the expectation at JC Penney was that Johnson could similarly transform Penney, which like many traditional big mall retailers has been struggling since the recession and the huge growth of online shopping. “If he can take a little bit of that magic and sprinkle it onto JC Penney, you could really create the next generation of retailing,” said Deborah Weinswig, a retail analyst with Citi. “We’re at a very interesting kind of intersection right now where retail needs to be fun, it needs to be exciting.” See Penney / B2


C OV ER S T OR I ES

B2 Wednesday, June 15, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Penney Continued from B1 Since Johnson did not seem to be in line for the chief executive job at Apple, the move to JC Penney, based in Plano, Texas, gives him a chance to run a company. Still, it was a surprising step at a time when Apple’s retail stores continue to thrive. “My lifetime dream has been to lead one of the large great retailers, to reimagine what it could be,” Johnson, who was vice president of merchandising at Target Stores before joining Apple in 2000, said in an interview. “In the U.S., the department store has a chance to regain its status as the leader in style, the leader in excitement. It will be a period of true innovation for this company.” Analysts and investors cheered the hire, with shares rising 17 percent to close at $35.37.

A different animal Yet the job ahead of Johnson at Penney will be very different from the one at Apple, which already had a cult following when Johnson joined it. And Apple’s imprint got bigger and bigger with a its rat-a-tat hits, from the iPod to the iPhone to the iPad. “Apple sells best in class product and faces basically little to no competition,” said Michelle Clark, an analyst with Morgan Stanley. “JC Penney, on the other hand, operates in an intensely competitive industry and sells merchandise that is undifferentiated versus peers and in fact has been lagging peers. Running the two is completely different.” JC Penney had first contacted Johnson three or four years ago, Ullman said. That was about the time that the chief of merchandising and second-in-command at JC Penney, Ken Hicks, had resigned, but it is unclear whether Penney was then talking to Johnson about a board position or the merchandising job. This time, the wooing of Johnson started with the two activist investors who joined JC Penney’s board in January. In November, the activist investor groups, Pershing Square Capital Management and Vornado Realty Trust, bought 26.4 percent of JC Penney stock. In January, William A. Ackman from Pershing and Steven Roth from Vornado joined the Penney board and, as part of that arrangement, got to appoint an additional director. While Johnson was intrigued by the possibility, he did not want to become just a board member and also asked for the chief executive position, according to a person briefed on the matter who was not authorized to speak publicly. Yet Penney seems to have limited Johnson’s role. Come November, Johnson will have the marketing, product and merchandising functions reporting to him. But all other major departments, including finance, stores, JCPenney.com, corporate communications and legal will continue to report to Ullman. “Even though he’s being given the title of CEO, his role is more like that of a chief merchant than it is of a CEO,” said Michelle Clark, an analyst with Morgan Stanley. “He is, in effect, being hired as a chief merchant and probably over time they will transition.”

Record of success Johnson has drawn widespread credit for being the mastermind of Apple’s hugely successful retail strategy. “Ron Johnson is the Steve Jobs of the retail industry,” Ackman said. He came to Apple in 2000, when the company was struggling to survive. When it opened its first store in Tysons Corner, Va., just over 10 years ago, Apple’s foray into retailing was received with heavy skepticism. But Apple defied critics. Computers had previously been sold at drab big-box stores, but Apple came in with stores designed with glass and steel. It invited passersby in to check their email or play around on new gadgets, offered accessible technical support at stations dubbed “Genius Bars” and held one-onone training sessions and group workshops on how to use Apple’s products. “They turned retail upside down,” said Charles Wolf, an analyst with Needham & Co. “Instead of filling shelves with items, they built this zenlike environment. They created a unique experience and became a community for Mac owners.” To make up for Johnson’s stock options at Apple, he will receive restricted Penney stock worth $50 million as of Monday’s close. With the jump in stock price, it was worth more than $58 million by market close Tuesday.

Seeking leniency, insider trader’s lawyers cite love affair By Peter Lattman New York Times News Service

NEW YORK — Danielle Chiesi, the former beauty queen turned convicted Wall Street trader, deserves a light prison sentence because her crimes were the result of a tortured love affair with her boss, her lawyers said. A lawyer for Chiesi laid out his case for leniency in a court filing late Monday that at times read more like a Harlequin ro-

mance novel than it did a legal brief. “The punishment due for the conduct at issue here should be mitigated once it is recognized as the manifestation of the psychological and emotional forces impacting on Danielle Chiesi, rather than the result of greed and venality,” said Alan Kaufman, the lawyer. Federal prosecutors countered the defense’s argument by calling Chiesi the “consummate Wall

Kialoa Continued from B1 She said Kialoa Paddles also contracts with three companies — one in Talon, one in Bingen, Wash., and one in China — that together employ another 85 people who work at least part of the time manufacturing parts for Kialoa Paddles. “So far this year our sales are up 43 percent, compared to this time last year,” said Meg Chun. Dave Chun said his paddle designs, combined with decisions to expand from their base of outrigger paddles into building paddles for stand-up paddle boarding and dragon boat racing, propelled sales growth. “Design is such a large part of our company that it occupies one of the owners full time,” he said. The Chuns attribute sales growth and improving profitability partly to a decision in 2009 to participate in a lean manufacturing program made possible by a $25,000 grant from the Oregon Business Development Department’s Oregon Manufacturing Extension Partnership. “The grant was a $25,000 match. They gave us a $25,000 grant for consulting, and we put in $25,000 in labor,” said Meg Chun.

Street insider” who engaged in a “broad and far-reaching” criminal scheme. They asked Judge Richard Holwell to sentence her to as many as three years and 10 months in prison. Her sentencing is set for June 30. Chiesi pleaded guilty in January to participating in an insider-trading conspiracy with Raj Rajaratnam, the Wall Street investor who was found guilty by a jury last month. Her lawyers blamed her ac-

At the Kialoa Paddle’s carbon fiber paddle assembly plant in Bend, Justin Baker cuts an angle on a carbon fiber shaft in preparation for gluing on a carbon fiber blade. The lightweight carbon fiber paddles are popular among racers, according to Kialoa owners David and Meg Chun. Ed Merriman The Bulletin

She said adopting the lean manufacturing practices allowed Kialoa to be flexible in responding to the fast-growing sport of stand-up paddle boarding when the company was suddenly hit with a flood of orders. The Oregon Business Development Department reported on its Business Oregon website (www. oregon4biz.com) that OMEP also helped Kialoa identify and

eliminate waste during production, leading to a production efficiency improvement of 20 to 30 percent, and that adopting buildto-order methods reduced standard lead time from two weeks to one day. The lean manufacturing improvements resolved previous out-of-stock issues and resulted in sales increases of 55 to 79 percent in July and August 2010

tions in part on Mark Kurland, her boss at New Castle and lover for almost 20 years. Her “emotional and financial well-being were inextricably linked with Kurland,” her lawyer said. Kurland pleaded guilty to insider-trading crimes in January 2010 and was sentenced to 27 months in prison. Chiesi’s lawyers argued that her sentence should be less than that. Chiesi’s lawyers said that although Chiesi trafficked in in-

The basics What: Kialoa Paddles Inc. Owners: Dave and Meg Chun Address: 747 S.E. Business Way, Suite 6, Bend Phone: 541-382-5355 Website: www.Kialoa.com

over 2009 levels, and saved 10 Oregon jobs, according to the OBDD. Chun said people who race outriggers, stand-up paddle boards and dragon boats want durable, lightweight paddles that slice through the water. “Racers are fitness-minded, so performance is very important to people who buy Kialoa paddles. Therefore we must keep striving to improve the product,” Dave Chun said. “We are always exploring new materials.” Chun said his sustainability goal for Kialoa is to build paddles that will never break or wear out and wind up in a landfill. Chun said his newest designs involve a combination of carbon fiber and thermoplastics. “We are not complacent. We are always looking for the next new thing,” Chun said. “The popularity of paddle boarding has just exploded in

side information from corporate tipsters while at New Castle, she never paid for information and never traded in her own account. She instead shared it with Kurland, her lawyer said. “Dani was, and will say today that she still is, in love with him,” he said. “She resists the idea that Kurland used her for his own purposes, and the truth of that long relationship is probably far more complicated than any of us can know.”

the last five or six years,” he said. “It is the fastest-growing paddle sport in the world right now.” Stand-up paddle boarding is gaining a following in Central Oregon and other parts of the United States, in Japan, France, South America and other countries. Chun said it provides a surfboard experience similar to surfing that originated in the Pacific islands and later expanded into skateboarding, snowboarding and windsurfing, according to Chip Booth, who owns the Stand-up Paddle Board shop in Bend with his wife, Lainey. “Everybody wants a Kialoa paddle,” said Booth. “They are a great local company that is known worldwide.” In March, Gov. John Kitzhaber visited Kialoa’s headquarters in Bend, where he pointed to Kialoa Paddles as an example of a company that benefitted from the OMEP program and is creating jobs needed to fuel economic recovery in Oregon. “Kialoa Paddles is a good example of a small Oregon business working with a state agency to help grow their business,” Kitzhaber said during his March visit to Bend. Ed Merriman can be reached at 541-617-7820 or emerriman@ bendbulletin.com.

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B USI N ESS

THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, June 15, 2011 B3

A W Value of health initiatives proves hard to tally Preventive efforts lack quantifiable measures, making them a tough sell

ers are offering coverage, which means fewer workers have access to employer-sponsored plans. Also, overall workers’ wages haven’t kept pace with rising health care premiums, which means that fewer workers are likely to enroll in health plans. Add to that the evolution from full-time payroll jobs to self-employment, contract and temporary work, and even fewer workers have ties to employmentbased health coverage. All told, that means employers — whether by financial incentives or penalties — are able to influence an increasingly smaller share of workers’ health habits and expenses.

By Diane Stafford McClatchy-Tribune News Service

The knots of walkers stepping out from Western Extralite for a lunchtime stroll through Kansas City’s West Bottoms are doing something healthy for themselves. But it’s also hoped they’re doing something good for the company’s bottom line by holding down health care costs. “I think we’re making a difference with employee health,” says Phil Levy, human resource manager at the family-owned company that distributes electrical and data-communication products. “But we’re soft on quantifiable measures yet for us to know the results.” Hope. Think. Don’t yet know. Those words pop up a lot when employers talk about employee benefits programs that include “wellness” initiatives. Most employers that have begun the programs — offering financial carrots or sticks to encourage employees to exercise, eat healthier diets and do preventive health screening to catch problems before they become major — agree on this: It’s hard to measure something that hasn’t happened. “Trying to measure cost avoidance is hard,” said Melissa Campbell, benefits and human resource operations manager at American Century, which has encouraged employee wellness since the early 1990s. “It’s not what we saved, it’s what costs we didn’t incur.” And there lies the wellness challenge. In a business world focused on quantifiable returns on investment, it’s still hard to convince many employers that employee wellness programs are worth the cost, especially when startup costs exceed measurable savings at the outset.

‘Moving the mark’ At Cerner Corp., home to one of the most comprehensive employee wellness programs in the nation, health information technology is the company’s stock in trade. As much as any employer anywhere, “We have the foundation to evaluate these health status measures,” said Christa Roberts, a registered nurse who leads the company’s health and wellness strategy. The company has invested in an on-site health clinic, pharmacy, fitness center, in-house health screenings, health coaches, healthy cafeteria foods, weight loss and walking challenges. Cerner says it sees a return on investment in the fact that over the last four years, its average premium increase for health insurance has been about 3.5 percent, well below the national average. And it has raised its deductible only once in the last five years. “We’re moving the mark,” Roberts said about employee health. “We’ve been running the program since 2006. In the next couple of years, we may be looking at savings.” Renya Spak, a health and benefits consultant at Mercer’s Total Health Management business,

Incremental value

Jill Toyoshiba / Kansas City Star

Western Extralite developed “Walking Works” to encourage fitness and bring down health care costs. Jeanie Murff, from left, Anji Anderson and Ashley Schroeder walked for about a mile near their office in Kansas City, Mo., last month. said there’s no industrywide guarantee that if an employer invests in an on-site gym or sponsors walking challenges or stocks the company the cafeteria with healthy food that there will be immediate savings in lower employee health costs. “But over a three-year period,” she said, “we’re comfortable talking about a return on investment of three to one.”

Searching for savings The search for savings in the employee benefits neck of the woods is a high priority for any employer that continues to sponsor employee health insurance plans. Flirtations with health maintenance organizations, with changing insurers, with different “consumer-driven” insurance plans that put more employee skin in the game haven’t done enough to produce the sought-after savings. “Unfortunately, most Kansas City-area employers haven’t established a strong enough economic base to work from,” said Jim Clay, chief executive of SRA Benefits, a broker consultant that provides “integrated wellness management” advice to clients. “This is very, very complicated stuff. It’s hard to get to a number on savings from wellness programs, especially if (employers) are changing networks in an effort to find lower premium costs,” Clay said. Clay has been advising Western Extralite for several years. Since June 2007, he said, the company has lowered its per-employee claims costs by 7 percent. That’s a victory, given that the trend has been annual increases of 7 to 9 percent across companies, he said. The PricewaterhouseCoopers Health Industries Group released its medical costs outlook on May 18, alerting companies to expect an 8.5 percent increase in their 2012 health care costs. “We know if we can move people to a lower health risk category, we’re going to save money,” Clay said. “The question is whether you can measure it.”

‘Evidence-based’ health care That’s where the Kansas City Collaborative expects to make a

A national snapshot • Two-thirds of organizations have some kind of wellness strategy. • Employers spend anywhere from $10 to $3,000 a year per employee on incentives. • Asking employees to fill out health-risk assessments is the most common incentive. • Among organizations with programs, two-thirds don’t measure outcomes to justify costs. • Among organizations that have no program, one-fourth say it’s not an employer’s role.

WHERE THE HEALTH CARE DOLLARS GO • 15 percent of the population drives 85 percent of the cost • 5 percent of the population drives 60 percent of the cost • 25 percent of the population has no claims costs — which doesn’t necessarily mean they’re healthy. It could mean they’re not getting costeffective preventive care. Source: Buck Consultants’ global wellness survey Source: SRA Benefits Source: University of Michigan Health Management Research Center study, published 2006

difference. The 3-year-old coalition of 17 of the area’s largest employers has dived into “evidence-based” health care — a discipline that intends to quantify the benefits of preventive efforts. What that means is that they’re more closely tracking their health insurance and health-related programs, their employee incentives, and their costs to find out what works. They intend to pinpoint what strategies actually lower health care costs. “It’s to use employers’ investments in health to get healthier employees ... to get more productivity and, over time, to reduce costs,” said William Bruning, chief executive of the Mid-America Coalition on Health Care. “It isn’t just the goal to lower

insurance claims and pharmacy costs but to better manage absences, to have fewer illnesses and injuries. In general, it’s to get a more effective employee.” Specific data have yet to come. “There’s a long time between intervention and results,” Bruning acknowledged. The recession caused a record drop in employment-based health insurance for workingage Americans, according to the nonprofit, nonpartisan Employee Benefit Research Institute. The slide in work-based coverage has continued since 2000. In 2009, the most recent year in the institute’s study, 52 percent of workers received health benefits through their jobs. Paul Fronstin, researcher at the institute, said fewer employ-

Sprint put its toe in the wellness waters in 2005, and soon found that “it’s hard to make changes in the direction you’re going when you’re not getting timely information about your claims,” said Collier Case, director of health and productivity. Sprint did all the expected cost-control things — making changes in its employee health plan designs and increasing deductibles — as well as sponsoring smoking-cessation and exercise programs. The company now is working with OptumHealth, its thirdparty wellness provider, to “capture the impact of our interventions on a real-time basis,” Case said.

For example, Sprint is aiming to put a dollar value on an employee who goes through a quitsmoking program and remains smoke-free for six months. Some studies peg that kind of annual savings at $1,800 in lower medical costs and increased productivity, he said. “We know there’s incremental value. We want to know what it is,” Case said. Based on an internal study, Sprint found that employee participants in its program actually cost more in their first year of use. As in other companies, a first-year program generally incurs higher costs because it captures employees who hadn’t been getting preventive care checkups before. Often, that amounts to onefourth of the employee population, consultants say. So in 2009, when Sprint really ramped up its program, its costs were higher than in 2008. “But the people who were participants in our wellness programs in 2009 had decreasing health care costs in 2010, while those who didn’t participate in our wellness program didn’t have decreasing costs in 2010,” Case said.

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B USI N ESS

B4 Wednesday, June 15, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

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D 37.73 +1.14 0.68 8.03 +.14 1.82 92.18 +2.22 1.82 76.15 +1.84 48.93 +.85 53.12 +.72 0.42 43.47 +.78 3.19 +.15 1.50 49.78 +1.10 0.18 15.81 +.29 2.91 +.06 27.40 +.20 124.82 +6.79 0.60 72.34 +1.38 0.28 38.33 +.37 36.70 +.93 1.36 66.43 -.27 0.56 11.10 +.22 0.80 19.48 +.01 0.79 11.28 +.26 0.70 11.00 +.13 0.04 12.36 +.14 0.04 10.80 -.17 1.80 45.70 +.17 1.16 +.04 2.80 62.59 +.93 0.52 26.92 +.26 2.08 59.46 +1.06 3.37 -.07 25.75 +.57 67.84 +.74 0.36 17.34 +.22 22.52 -.72 50.48 -1.31 0.76 110.53 +1.61 20.34 +.90 0.32 23.07 +.60 0.48 43.91 +.52 26.43 +1.03 1.24 58.69 +.66 2.40 52.28 +2.03 1.27 -.02 21.39 +1.20 3.40 +.22 0.10 6.11 +.15 0.76 83.38 +.06 1.64 86.25 +1.19 54.43 +1.22 0.20 32.14 +.86 0.24 7.11 +.18 0.96 32.69 +.51 0.32 32.30 +.26 75.11 +.82 0.30 46.15 +1.12 0.60 30.13 +1.31 32.53 +.28 42.97 +1.23 4.01 +.01 1.77 -.04 94.88 +3.10 0.10 5.91 -.14 25.89 +.02 0.80 19.81 +.37 .71 +.03 2.66 7.03 -.09 1.20 -.02 4.55 +.39 1.46 29.90 +.57 1.04 9.75 +.15 42.08 +2.42 5.50 192.56 +3.63 1.42 18.61 -.16 0.64 10.13 -.06 0.32 4.24 +.05 1.36 10.05 +.10 0.40 17.02 +.42 0.60 15.78 +.39 16.62 +.13 22.35 +.59 2.09 28.19 +.15 1.68 74.64 +1.70 9.65 -.46 0.80 7.41 +.04 17.95 -.02 70.84 +3.46 0.04 6.33 +.14 2.00 103.15 +1.50 6.74 +.07 7.94 +.21 0.60 11.46 +.22 1.05 30.00 +.49 8.90 1.67 20.60 +.39 24.16 +.85 0.44 19.70 +.57 26.94 +.33 7.66 +.07 1.59 +.08 0.56 23.91 +.55 1.32 27.69 +.09 0.60 44.59 +.99 3.66 88.30 -.13 0.36 33.16 +.86 0.60 22.36 +.57 35.74 -.88 1.47 -.01 6.75 +.01 23.09 +.38 0.52 32.18 +.99 0.56 18.88 +.56 10.24 +.11 0.34 8.50 +.12 10.87 +.39 0.32 25.39 +.25 0.28 9.98 +.67 18.69 +.26 0.05 18.42 +1.28 0.20 24.21 +.93 0.80 40.54 +1.08 0.10 91.71 -.03 0.49 37.60 +.64 1.00 67.52 +.63 0.20 21.78 +.32 24.28 +.68 7.53 +.15 0.84 17.59 +.68 0.40 24.20 -.16 0.40 26.21 +.39 2.14 +.14 0.40 154.40 +4.26 22.55 +.09 1.16 77.38 +1.27 0.04 50.41 +1.15 42.80 +.42 5.49 1.12 34.15 +.17 5.60 274.78 +2.76 0.84 19.57 +.22 38.19 +1.26 7.39 +.19 5.91 239.71 +2.38 18.02 +.05 1.44 74.47 +1.17 0.76 20.56 +1.06 0.34 8.60 +.22 22.74 +1.28 21.75 +.28 0.50 37.91 +.60 24.24 +1.19 0.60 36.42 +.94 0.72 38.75 +.62 0.12 58.94 +3.12 10.38 +.30 6.25 -.10 0.63 9.35 +.11 16.85 +.57 18.49 +.07 0.62 18.09 +.18 7.58 +.20 20.60 +.51 0.04 6.54 +.13 5.70 -.06 6.29 +.06 15.55 +.12 1.29 -.06 1.96 64.76 +.67 0.40 25.20 -.01 15.26 +1.75 45.95 +2.17 1.16 34.05 +.13 3.48 79.52 +1.08 1.30 76.36 +1.51 0.36 40.64 +1.04 1.20 62.20 +1.38 10.15 +1.01 0.20 48.43 -1.63 0.04 6.16 +.11 0.30 11.88 -.02 1.52 13.59 +.30 1.72 +.01 0.80 145.28 +5.52 0.86 43.90 +.24 27.46 -.01 20.99 +.05 28.43 +1.42 1.00 35.89 +.62 1.00 37.25 +.49 0.72 49.37 +1.08 35.35 +.56 29.94 +.70 6.06 +.58 0.60 43.79 +2.76 53.05 +.56 1.84 97.86 +2.42 0.04 15.25 +.28 41.39 +.64 0.43 19.04 +.40 0.36 5.03 +.14 .53 -.00 0.24 48.01 +1.13 9.13 +.01 58.06 -.24 2.07 -.11 3.64 29.59 +.26 3.14 -.04 3.16 +.16 7.86 +.27 1.89 19.38 +.14 0.80 35.01 +.99 33.95 +.79 0.79 18.84 +.12 1.56 13.64 +.01 12.25 +.28 20.11 +.31 0.01 20.71 +.11 0.92 34.38 +.01 14.87 +.46 2.90 40.11 +.26 6.13 +.05 79.89 +.18 32.68 +1.83 38.38 -.54 118.46 +2.46 36.61 -.72 39.36 +.56 3.84 +.16 46.15 +1.53 55.96 +.50 53.76 +.50 16.60 +.65

Nm Cheesecake ChelseaTh Chemtura n CheniereEn CheniereE ChesEng Chevron ChicB&I Chicos ChildPlace Chimera ChinaBAK ChinaBiot ChinaCEd ChinaDir ChinaInfo CKanghui n ChinaLife ChinaMed ChiMYWd n ChinaMble ChinaNGas ChiNBorun ChinaPStl ChinaRE ChinaSecur ChinaShen ChinaSun ChinaTcF ChinaUni ChiValve ChinaYuch ChiCache n Chipotle Chiquita Chubb ChungTel n ChurchD s CIBER CienaCorp Cimarex CinciBell CinnFin Cinemark Cintas Cirrus Cisco Citigp pfN Citigrp rs Citigp wtB CitzRepB h CitrixSys Clarcor CleanDsl rs CleanEngy Clearwire ClevBioL h CliffsNRs Clorox CloudPeak Coach CobaltIEn CocaCola CocaCE Coeur CoffeeH CogdSpen CognizTech Cogo Grp CohStQIR Coinstar ColdwtrCrk Colfax ColgPal CollctvBrd ColonPT ColumLabs Comcast Comc spcl Comerica CmcBMO CmclMtls CmwReit rs CmtyBkSy CmtyHlt CommVlt CBD-Pao s CmGnom n CompPrdS CompSci Compuwre ComstkRs Comtech Comverge Con-Way ConAgra ConchoRes ConcurTch Conns ConocPhil ConsolEngy ConEd ConstantC ConstellA ConstellEn ContlRes Continucre Cnvrgys ConvOrg h CooperCo Cooper Ind CooperTire Copart Copel CoreLab s CoreLogic CorinthC CornPdts Corning CorpOffP CorrectnCp Cosan Ltd Costco Cott Cp CousPrp Covance CovantaH CoventryH Covidien CowenGp CrackerB Cray Inc Credicp CSVS2xVxS CredSuiss Cree Inc CreXus Crocs CrssCtryHl CrosstexE CrwnCstle CrownHold Ctrip.com CubicEngy CubistPh CullenFr Cummins Curis CurEuro CurrCda CurtisWrt Cyberonics Cyclacel Cymer CypSemi CypSharp CytRx h Cytec Cytokinet Cytori DCT Indl DG FastCh DHT Hldgs DNP Selct DPL DR Horton DSW Inc DTE DUSA Daktronics DanaHldg Danaher Darden Darling DaVita DeVry DeanFds DeckOut s Deere DejourE g Delcath Delek Dell Inc DeltaAir DeltaPtr h Deluxe DemMda n DenburyR Dndreon DenisnM g Dennys Dentsply Depomed DeutschBk DB AgriDL DBGoldDL DBGoldDS DevelDiv DevonE Dex One Diageo DiaOffs DiamRk DianaCon n DianaShip DiceHldg DicksSptg Diebold DigitalRlt DigRiver Dillards Diodes DirecTV A DrxTcBull DrSCBr rs DirFnBr rs DirLCBr rs DrxEMBull DrTcBear rs DREBear rs DrxEBear rs DrxSOXBll DirEMBear DrxFnBull Dir30TrBear DrxREBull DirxSCBull DirxLCBull DirxEnBull Discover DiscCm A

D 30.78 +.60 4.90 +.37 17.60 +.10 8.63 +.21 1.70 16.91 -.25 0.35 28.98 +.66 3.12 100.60 +1.67 0.20 36.04 +1.39 0.20 14.19 +.35 45.60 +.65 0.66 3.55 +.02 1.03 -.07 3.78 -.10 4.64 +.25 .91 -.03 1.95 +.08 23.91 -.09 0.91 51.24 +.28 8.08 +.86 5.25 -.12 1.93 44.94 2.97 +.13 4.95 +1.03 1.04 +.14 5.23 +.12 4.46 +.06 2.83 +.05 1.92 +.05 4.34 +.05 0.12 21.10 +.24 3.39 +.48 1.50 19.45 +1.47 7.61 +.54 276.77 +5.87 12.75 +.26 1.56 63.66 +.14 34.14 +.25 0.68 40.00 +.13 5.16 +.01 18.86 +.35 0.40 85.54 +.23 2.98 +.09 1.60 29.22 +.36 0.84 19.51 +.46 0.49 32.28 +.77 14.13 +.66 0.24 15.08 +.02 1.97 27.60 +.14 0.04 38.78 -.39 .12 .68 -.02 81.54 +1.74 0.42 41.38 +1.34 5.67 +.05 13.04 +.37 3.84 +.02 4.80 -.26 0.56 86.16 +2.67 2.40 67.04 +.28 20.30 +.79 0.90 59.75 +.99 12.74 +.16 1.88 65.61 +.49 0.52 28.74 +.59 24.13 +.79 0.12 12.39 -.94 0.40 5.93 +.11 70.54 -.17 5.44 +.07 0.72 9.38 +.12 48.59 +1.56 1.46 +.07 23.06 +.46 2.32 86.60 +1.26 14.42 +.57 0.60 20.15 +.42 3.40 0.45 23.93 +.22 0.45 22.59 +.20 0.40 34.40 +.77 0.92 41.08 +.33 0.48 13.92 +.37 2.00 24.77 +.30 0.96 23.89 +.49 26.19 +.43 38.22 +.30 0.38 42.24 +.49 16.71 +.78 31.74 +.87 0.80 38.48 +.58 9.56 +.09 28.37 +.22 1.00 23.87 +.25 2.80 -.08 0.40 37.24 +1.18 0.92 24.40 +.09 88.05 +1.51 46.93 +.68 6.39 +.51 2.64 71.87 +1.12 0.40 48.29 +1.14 2.40 52.21 +.12 23.22 +.33 21.58 +.41 0.96 36.94 +.11 61.30 +2.33 4.14 -.01 12.67 +.19 .13 -.01 0.06 74.75 +1.66 1.16 61.02 +.89 0.42 19.67 +.29 44.45 +.61 0.66 25.60 -.06 1.00 104.54 +3.50 16.96 +.08 4.21 +.05 0.64 55.91 +1.97 0.20 18.53 +.25 1.65 31.74 +.45 21.58 +.23 12.32 +.23 0.96 79.24 +.79 8.08 +.26 0.18 8.32 +.05 57.00 +.35 0.30 16.47 +.23 35.07 +.85 0.80 54.13 +.69 3.68 +.08 0.88 47.01 +2.33 6.37 +.34 1.95 91.80 +.35 20.66 -1.40 1.40 40.90 -.28 37.70 -.72 0.74 10.34 +.01 22.65 +.72 7.24 +.31 0.36 11.60 +.60 40.08 -.01 38.18 +.21 41.60 +1.45 .76 +.02 34.43 -.41 1.84 55.65 +.34 1.05 95.87 +2.42 3.26 +.26 0.10 143.92 +.35 0.07 102.64 +.83 0.32 32.06 +.54 26.75 +.68 1.26 48.06 +2.37 0.36 20.77 +.23 2.40 13.15 +.07 .82 +.02 0.50 54.79 +1.64 1.17 +.01 4.82 -.04 0.28 5.10 +.14 29.47 +.49 0.40 3.77 +.12 0.78 9.87 +.03 1.33 30.10 0.15 11.13 +.23 48.05 +1.24 2.35 49.80 +.13 5.99 +.09 0.11 9.80 +.13 16.85 +.55 0.08 52.36 +1.03 1.28 47.55 +.65 18.82 +.74 83.83 +.64 0.24 57.75 +.79 12.77 +.22 81.27 +2.70 1.64 82.00 +1.80 .36 +.01 5.20 +.22 0.15 14.49 +.20 16.12 +.34 9.50 +.24 .60 -.01 1.00 22.94 +.30 14.83 +1.69 19.52 +.43 39.73 +.38 1.85 +.10 3.90 +.08 0.20 36.91 +.30 8.21 +.04 1.07 57.98 +.90 14.36 -.38 48.26 +.62 6.66 -.10 0.16 13.43 +.24 0.68 79.15 +1.64 2.04 2.46 82.84 -.02 0.50 67.84 +.51 0.32 10.13 +.21 7.15 -.02 11.00 +.25 13.49 +.44 36.95 +1.09 1.12 29.99 +.40 2.72 62.10 +.32 30.34 +.34 0.20 50.33 +1.31 23.33 +.35 47.16 +.56 1.35 40.82 +1.55 39.71 -2.74 48.30 -1.04 37.61 -1.57 0.84 36.41 +1.60 23.31 -1.01 13.22 -.63 15.97 -1.00 0.01 44.91 +2.38 18.73 -.93 24.13 +.50 37.36 +1.63 0.39 67.81 +2.96 72.43 +4.26 0.16 76.57 +2.81 0.05 68.71 +3.60 0.24 23.18 +.52 40.48 +.49

Nm

D

DiscCm C DiscLab rs DishNetwk Disney DrReddy DocuSec DolbyLab DollarFn s DollarGen DollarTh DllrTree s DomRescs Dominos Domtar grs DonlleyRR DoralFncl DEmmett Dover DowChm DrPepSnap DragonW g DrmWksA DresserR DryHYSt Dril-Quip DryShips DuPont DuPFabros DukeEngy DukeRlty DunBrad DurectCp DyaxCp Dycom Dynavax Dynegy DynexCap

0.40 0.65

1.97 1.40 1.04 0.52 1.10 1.00 1.28

0.52 1.64 0.48 0.98 0.68 1.44

1.08

Nm 36.45 +.58 1.91 +.01 28.13 +.35 38.59 +.22 34.81 +.48 3.13 -.10 44.14 +.12 21.86 +.54 33.45 +.43 72.43 -7.44 63.13 +.76 47.69 -.14 23.99 +.78 95.49 +1.14 19.74 +.32 1.81 +.01 19.88 +.35 62.71 +1.80 35.58 +.62 41.12 +.35 5.17 +.01 21.42 +.14 50.11 +.75 4.76 +.24 66.29 +1.80 3.92 +.16 50.29 +.79 24.95 +.10 18.54 +.04 13.57 +.19 76.15 +.52 3.00 +.02 2.12 +.12 15.04 +.64 2.58 +.08 5.90 -.02 9.75 +.18

E-F-G-H ECDang n E-House E-Trade eBay EMC Cp EMCOR EMS Tch ENI EOG Res EQT Corp EagleBulk EagleMat EaglRkEn ErthLink EstWstBcp EastChm EKodak EasyLkSInt Eaton s EatnVan EV LtdDur EV TxDiver EVTxMGlo EVTxGBW Ebix Inc EchoStar Ecolab Ecopetrol EdisonInt EducRlty EdwLfSci 8x8 Inc ElPasoCp ElPasoEl ElPasoPpl Elan EldorGld g ElectArts ElsterGp n eMagin Embraer Emcore lf EmersonEl EmpDist EmpirRst h Emulex EnbrEPt s Enbridge s EnCana g EndvrInt rs EndvSilv g EndoPhrm EndurSpec Ener1 Energen Energizer EngyConv EnrgyRec EngyTsfr EngyXXI EnergySol Enerpls g EnerSys EnPro ENSCO Entegris Entergy EntPrPt EntropCom EnzonPhar Epocrates n Equifax Equinix EqLfPrp EqtyOne EqtyRsd EricsnTel EssexPT EsteeLdr EtfSilver EthanAl Evercore EverestRe EvrgrSlr rs ExactSci h ExcelM ExcoRes Exelixis Exelon ExideTc Expedia ExpdIntl Express ExpScripts Express-1 ExterranH ExterranP ExtraSpce ExtrmNet ExxonMbl Ezcorp F5 Netwks FLIR Sys FMC Corp FMC Tch s FNBCp PA FSI Intl FTI Cnslt FactsetR FairIsaac FairchldS FamilyDlr Fastenal s FedExCp FedRlty FedInvst FelCor Ferrellgs Ferro FiberTwr FibriaCelu FidlNFin FidNatInfo FifthStFin FifthThird 51job FinclEngin Finisar FinLine FstAFin n FstBusey FstCwlth FFnclOH FstHorizon FstInRT FMajSilv g FMidBc FstNiagara FstPotom FstRepB n FstSolar FTNDXTc FTDJInet FT ConDis FT ConStap FT Matls FT RNG FT LCCore FirstEngy FstMerit Fiserv FiveStar FlagstBcp Flagstone Fleetcor n Flextrn Flotek FlowrsFds Flowserve Fluor FocusMda FEMSA FootLockr ForcePro FordM FordM wt ForestCA ForestLab ForestOil FormFac Fortinet s Fortress FortuneBr Fossil Inc FosterWhl FranceTel FrankRes FredsInc FMCG s Freescale n FreshMkt n FriendFd n FrontierCm FrontierOil Frontline FuelCell FullerHB FultonFncl Fundtch FurnBrds FushiCopp Fusion-io n

12.88 +2.14 7.80 +.02 14.06 +.46 29.76 -.10 27.09 +.83 28.93 +.68 32.82 +.02 2.67 46.56 +.85 0.64 105.03 +.32 0.88 51.55 +1.10 2.55 +.02 0.40 27.01 +.57 0.60 11.01 +.18 0.20 7.54 +.12 0.20 18.77 +.57 1.88 100.77 +2.03 3.36 +.14 4.71 -.15 1.36 47.41 +1.11 0.72 29.79 +.71 1.25 16.16 +.16 1.16 10.66 +.12 1.14 10.29 +.12 1.21 12.17 +.11 20.81 +.52 32.09 -.57 0.70 55.14 +1.10 1.39 44.81 -.19 1.28 39.12 0.20 8.54 +.20 85.58 +2.00 3.60 -.18 0.04 19.61 +.30 0.88 29.88 +.36 1.76 33.90 -.14 10.56 +.10 0.10 14.30 +.30 23.20 +.41 16.16 -.08 4.60 -.13 0.64 32.12 +1.16 2.27 +.08 1.38 52.66 +1.45 18.91 -.11 .60 +.14 8.35 +.10 2.06 29.95 +.19 0.98 31.82 +.54 0.80 31.98 +.42 13.38 +.33 8.07 +.42 39.29 +.18 1.20 40.96 +.39 1.28 +.07 0.54 57.00 +.67 70.09 +.78 1.19 +.01 2.76 +.17 3.58 47.45 -.01 29.91 +.70 4.65 +.07 2.16 31.11 +.55 32.04 +.74 45.56 +.92 1.40 53.33 +.68 9.16 +.32 3.32 69.37 +.53 2.39 41.56 +.16 7.80 +.45 10.22 +.05 15.92 -1.93 0.64 35.06 +.22 98.58 +2.34 1.50 61.72 -.56 0.88 17.80 +.13 1.47 59.57 +.30 0.37 14.06 +.32 4.16 135.05 +1.71 0.75 99.60 +2.80 35.37 +.85 0.28 19.88 +.52 0.72 34.38 -1.27 1.92 83.89 +.48 .60 -.02 7.44 +.21 3.20 -.03 0.16 19.08 +.18 9.27 +.40 2.10 42.01 +.21 7.24 +.29 0.28 27.72 +.24 0.50 47.28 +.57 20.43 +.55 56.63 +.87 2.53 +.34 20.24 +.62 1.91 24.26 -.06 0.56 20.24 +.37 3.22 +.10 1.88 80.38 +1.15 31.53 +.35 106.64 +2.35 0.24 33.72 +.53 0.60 79.99 +2.61 41.49 +1.34 0.48 10.44 +.21 3.90 +.17 37.49 +.39 1.08 99.90 -4.39 0.08 28.81 +.45 16.06 +.65 0.72 52.71 +.87 0.52 32.26 +.95 0.52 87.43 +1.51 2.68 83.34 +.92 0.96 24.51 +.43 5.33 +.18 2.00 22.52 +.14 12.90 +.34 1.06 -.06 14.00 +.41 0.48 15.11 +.06 0.20 31.57 +.23 1.28 11.78 +.27 0.24 12.47 +.19 48.32 +3.28 24.21 +.64 19.04 +.99 0.20 22.41 +.95 0.24 15.21 +.26 0.16 5.03 +.08 0.12 5.34 +.11 0.48 15.61 +.11 0.04 9.96 +.07 10.75 +.13 17.34 +.87 0.04 11.74 +.35 0.64 13.70 +.01 0.80 14.98 +.39 33.76 +.56 119.30 +2.99 0.10 25.44 +.37 0.04 34.78 +.44 0.09 20.78 +.42 0.22 24.29 +.36 0.38 24.50 +.43 0.05 21.02 +.41 0.25 28.75 +.47 2.20 43.80 +.85 0.64 15.97 +.27 62.60 +.50 5.48 -.21 1.28 +.03 0.16 8.48 -.12 30.16 +.15 7.01 +.08 8.29 +.22 0.90 32.06 +.25 1.28 105.85 +1.33 0.50 63.89 +2.02 28.14 +.90 1.16 62.57 -.12 0.66 22.95 +.55 4.66 +.14 13.43 +.29 4.87 +.25 18.12 +.20 38.92 +.35 26.32 +.31 9.00 +.19 22.89 +.14 4.59 0.76 63.62 +.82 107.72 +.82 31.46 +1.22 1.96 21.05 +.27 1.00 126.01 +3.31 0.20 14.20 +.27 1.00 49.88 +1.55 16.18 -.13 35.51 +1.61 4.15 -.43 0.75 7.86 +.04 0.24 30.72 +1.86 1.20 16.31 +.02 1.46 +.04 0.30 21.33 +.35 0.16 10.62 +.16 0.10 20.28 +2.88 4.23 +.13 5.71 +.24 23.30 +.18 0.25

How to Read the Market in Review He e a e he 2 578 mos ac ve s ocks on he New Yo k S ock Exchange Nasdaq Na ona Ma ke s and Ame can S ock Exchange Mu ua unds a e 415 a ges S ocks n bo d changed 5 pe cen o mo e n p ce Name S ocks a e s ed a phabe ca y by he company s u name no s abb ev a on Company names made up o n a s appea a he beg nn ng o each e e s s D v Cu en annua d v dend a e pa d on s ock based on a es qua e y o sem annua dec a a on un ess o he w se oo no ed Las P ce s ock was ad ng a when exchange c osed o he day Chg Loss o ga n o he day No change nd ca ed by ma k Fund Name Name o mu ua und and am y Se Ne asse va ue o p ce a wh ch und cou d be so d Chg Da y ne change n he NAV YTD % Re Pe cen change n NAV o he yea o da e w h d v dends e nves ed S ock Foo no es – PE g ea e han 99 d – ue ha been a ed o edemp on b ompan d – New 52 wee ow dd – Lo n a 12 mo e – Compan o me ed on he Ame an E hange Eme g ng Compan Ma e p a e g – D dend and ea n ng n Canad an do a h – empo a e mp om Na daq ap a and u p u ng qua a on n – S o wa a new ue n he a ea The 52 wee h gh and ow gu e da e on om he beg nn ng o ad ng p – P e e ed o ue p – P e e en e pp – Ho de owe n a men o pu ha e p e q – C o ed end mu ua und no PE a u a ed – R gh o bu e u a a pe ed p e – S o ha p b a ea 20 pe en w h n he a ea w – T ade w be e ed when he o ued wd – When d bu ed w – Wa an a ow ng a pu ha e o a o u– New 52 wee h gh un – Un n ud ng mo e han one e u – Compan n ban up o e e e hp o be ng eo gan ed unde he ban up aw Appea n on o he name D v dend Foo no es a – E a d dend we e pa d bu a e no n uded b – Annua a e p u o – L qu da ng d dend e – Amoun de a ed o pa d n a 12 mon h – Cu en annua a e wh h wa n ea ed b mo e en d dend announ emen – Sum o d dend pa d a e o p no egu a a e – Sum o d dend pa d h ea Mo e en d dend wa om ed o de e ed – De a ed o pa d h ea a umu a e ue w h d dend n a ea m – Cu en annua a e wh h wa de ea ed b mo e en d dend announ emen p – n a d dend annua a e no nown e d no hown – De a ed o pa d n p e ed ng 12 mon h p u o d dend – Pa d n o app o ma e a h a ue on e d bu on da e Mo a e o abo e mu be wo h $1 and ga ne o e $2 Mu ua Fund Foo no es e – E ap a ga n d bu on – P e ou da quo e n – No oad und p – Fund a e u ed o pa d bu on o – Redemp on ee o on ngen de e ed a e oad ma app – S o d dend o p – Bo h p and – E a h d dend

Sou ce The Assoc a ed P ess and L ppe Nm FutureFuel GATX GMAC CpT GMX Rs GNC n GSI Cmce h GT Solar GTx Inc GabelliET GabGldNR Gafisa SA Gallaghr GameStop Gannett Gap GardDenv Garmin Gartner GascoEngy Gastar grs GaylrdEnt GenProbe GencoShip GenCorp GnCable GenDynam GenElec GenGrPr n GenMarit GenMills GenMoly GenMot n GMot wtA GMot wtB GM cvpfB GenOn En Genpact Gentex GenuPrt GenVec rs Genworth GeoGrp GeoGloblR GaGulf GerberSci Gerdau GeronCp GiantIntac Gildan GileadSci GlacierBc Glatfelter GlaxoSKln Gleacher GlimchRt GlobalCash GlobCrsg GloblInd GlobPay GblXColm s GblXChCon GblX Uran GlbXSilvM Globalstar GlbSpcMet GluMobile GolLinhas GolarLNG GoldFLtd GoldResrc Goldcrp g GoldStr g GoldmanS Goodrich GoodrPet Goodyear Google vjGrace Graco GrafTech GrahamPk Graingr Gramrcy GranTrra g GraphPkg GrtBasG g GrLkDrge GtPanSilv g GtPlainEn GreenDot n GreenMtC GreenbCos Greenhill Greif A Griffon GrifolsSA n Group1 GrubbEllis GrpoFin GpTelevisa Guess GugChinSC GugSolar GulfRes GulfportE HCA Hld n HCC Ins HCP Inc HMS Hld HNI Corp HSBC HSN Inc HainCel Hallibrtn Halozyme HancHld Hanesbrds HanmiFncl HansenMed HansenNat HanwhaSol HarbinElec HarleyD Harman Harmonic HarmonyG HarrisCorp Harsco HartfdFn HartFn pfA HarvNRes Hasbro HatterasF HawaiiEl HawHold HaynesIntl Headwatrs HltCrREIT HltMgmt HlthcrRlty HealthNet HlthSouth HlthSprg HrtlndEx Heckmann Heckmn wt HeclaM Heinz HelixEn HelmPayne HSchein Herbalife s HercOffsh Hersha Hershey Hertz Hess HewlettP Hexcel hhgregg Hibbett HighOne n HighwdPrp Hill-Rom HillenInc HiSoft n HollyCp Hollysys Hologic HomeDp HmFedDE Home Inns HomeProp Honda HonwllIntl HorMan HorizLns Hormel s Hornbeck HorsehdH Hospira HospPT HostHotls HotTopic HovnanE HubbelB

D 0.50 12.25 -.65 1.16 36.24 +.65 25.25 +.10 4.83 +.13 19.69 +.76 29.54 13.35 +1.16 5.51 -.15 0.56 5.95 +.16 1.68 17.42 +.07 0.29 10.13 -.10 1.32 28.36 +.11 26.43 +.18 0.16 13.62 +.32 0.45 17.87 +.37 0.20 79.56 +1.77 2.00 32.84 +.29 37.24 +.70 .23 +.01 3.34 +.09 29.15 +.94 69.26 -.54 6.87 +.41 6.08 +.18 37.95 +1.44 1.88 70.44 +.80 0.60 18.60 +.21 0.40 15.95 +.12 1.49 -.02 1.12 38.28 +.19 4.58 +.19 29.11 +.52 20.12 +.48 14.81 +.48 2.38 46.95 +.60 3.84 +.01 0.18 15.83 +.26 0.48 27.71 +1.43 1.80 50.98 +.94 2.98 +.08 10.34 +.10 23.70 +.53 .47 +.04 26.40 +.76 10.99 0.27 10.42 +.10 4.05 -.04 0.18 7.47 +.17 0.30 34.23 +.68 39.78 -.18 0.52 13.40 +.06 0.36 14.77 +.33 2.11 42.36 +.38 2.18 +.05 0.40 9.42 +.42 2.75 +.06 35.09 +.77 5.54 +.17 0.08 49.68 +.62 0.21 21.59 +.11 0.19 17.48 +.42 0.40 11.85 +.29 0.25 23.37 +.69 1.19 +.09 0.15 21.45 +.65 5.00 +.30 0.12 12.10 +.12 1.00 31.12 +.86 0.19 14.61 +.16 0.48 23.25 +1.04 0.41 47.08 +.88 2.36 -.06 1.40 137.10 -.43 1.16 88.69 +2.11 18.76 +.60 15.02 +.24 508.37 +3.64 43.42 +.85 0.84 48.59 +.94 19.32 +.46 26.28 +.65 2.64 145.69 +2.88 2.76 +.23 6.47 +.17 5.31 +.31 1.85 +.08 0.08 5.50 +.27 3.02 +.16 0.83 20.58 +.08 35.45 +.36 79.84 +3.83 21.31 +.71 1.80 52.96 +1.35 1.68 65.51 -1.53 9.96 -.12 7.25 +.10 0.44 37.27 +1.59 .42 -.01 0.05 12.69 +.42 0.15 23.19 +.86 0.80 41.53 +.95 0.44 27.16 +.50 0.03 6.90 +.24 3.08 +.02 25.85 +1.07 33.54 -.11 0.58 31.69 +.37 1.92 36.37 +.76 73.83 +.67 0.92 23.34 +.77 1.80 50.48 +.23 31.87 +.22 31.59 +.57 0.36 47.89 +1.03 6.46 +.16 0.96 31.08 +.51 27.82 +.68 1.03 +.02 2.72 +.17 72.98 +1.10 6.03 +.89 15.39 -.12 0.50 36.29 +1.47 0.10 43.60 +.56 6.91 +.13 0.07 12.95 +.23 1.00 45.57 +.43 0.82 30.07 +.36 0.40 25.01 +.53 1.81 24.79 +.29 12.95 +.86 1.20 43.57 +.66 4.20 28.89 +.18 1.24 23.84 +.30 5.51 +.07 0.80 54.04 +4.01 2.98 +.07 2.86 51.51 +1.03 10.37 +.27 1.20 20.38 +.12 30.80 +.36 25.73 +.46 42.82 +1.87 0.08 15.99 +.34 5.84 +.08 .45 +.01 7.42 +.21 1.92 53.71 +.38 15.77 +.75 0.28 60.68 +1.79 69.77 +.27 0.50 54.56 +.55 5.50 +.23 0.24 5.30 +.08 1.38 55.12 +.42 15.40 +1.28 0.40 73.36 +1.85 0.48 34.73 +.08 19.99 +.64 14.46 +.41 39.68 +1.33 17.73 +.21 1.70 32.62 +.31 0.45 45.26 +.73 0.76 22.41 +.04 13.70 0.60 63.84 +4.05 9.69 +.99 20.20 +.23 1.00 34.75 +1.49 0.22 10.75 +.11 35.76 +2.13 2.48 60.66 +.57 35.98 -.15 1.33 57.19 +1.48 0.44 15.08 +.20 1.09 +.04 0.51 28.92 +.37 24.89 +.55 11.49 +.25 54.14 +.03 1.80 22.13 +.45 0.08 16.12 +.19 0.28 7.10 +.08 1.96 +.06 1.52 64.70 +1.46

Nm HudsCity HumGen Humana HuntJB HuntBnk Huntsmn HutchT Hyatt Hypercom Hyperdyn

D 0.32 1.00 0.52 0.04 0.40

8.15 -.08 25.99 +.26 79.71 +1.49 44.20 +1.09 6.29 +.08 17.72 +.50 2.35 +.28 39.89 +.54 9.37 +.13 4.35 -.13

I-J-K-L IAC Inter 35.45 +.19 IAMGld g 0.08 20.33 +.52 ICICI Bk 0.63 47.15 +.31 ICO Glb A 2.90 +.06 IDT Corp 0.88 26.07 +.71 IHS Inc 83.13 -.62 II-VI 50.20 +2.45 ING GRE 0.54 8.19 +.11 ING 11.80 +.43 INGPrRTr 0.31 6.17 +.04 ION Geoph 8.74 +.13 IPG Photon 68.65 +1.95 iShGold s 14.90 +.10 iShGSCI 35.96 +.35 iSAstla 0.82 26.06 +.66 iSAstria 0.25 22.96 +.54 iShBraz 2.53 72.68 +.77 iSCan 0.50 31.27 +.56 iShGer 0.29 26.79 +.57 iSh HK 0.45 18.67 +.17 iShItaly 0.33 18.04 +.41 iShJapn 0.14 10.20 +.20 iSh Kor 0.44 63.87 +1.57 iSMalas 0.34 14.96 +.11 iShMex 0.54 60.48 +1.02 iShSing 0.43 13.67 +.10 iSPacxJpn 1.56 47.58 +.97 iSSpain 2.15 41.84 +.84 iSSwedn 0.55 32.41 +.68 iSSwitz 0.32 27.27 +.16 iSTaiwn 0.29 15.39 +.26 iSh UK 0.43 18.03 +.20 iShTurkey 1.28 61.16 -.99 iShSilver 34.67 +.80 iShS&P100 1.09 57.69 +.61 iShDJDv 1.75 52.30 +.76 iShBTips 3.86 110.09 -.30 iShAsiaexJ 0.97 61.68 +.87 iShChina25 0.63 43.13 +.51 iShDJTr 1.05 93.89 +1.66 iSSP500 2.46 129.75 +1.61 iShBAgB 3.87 107.05 -.29 iShEMkts 0.64 47.09 +.70 iShiBxB 5.13 110.42 -.33 iSh ACWI 0.81 47.82 +.57 iSEafeSC 1.35 43.54 +.60 iShEMBd 5.60 108.93 -.05 iSSPGth 1.20 67.70 +.94 iShSPLatA 1.18 50.46 +.63 iSSPVal 1.27 61.03 +.68 iShB20 T 4.01 95.19 -1.46 iShB7-10T 3.20 96.21 -.77 iShIntSelDv 1.30 36.11 +.66 iShB1-3T 0.79 84.30 -.07 iS Eafe 1.42 60.27 +1.05 iSRusMCV 0.91 46.63 +.78 iSRusMCG 0.59 59.55 +1.02 iShRsMd 1.59 106.02 +1.69 iSSPMid 1.00 94.64 +1.67 iShiBxHYB 7.43 89.85 +.56 iShSft 60.91 +.86 iShs SOX 0.31 55.07 +.95 iShNsdqBio 0.51 103.93 +.91 iShC&SRl 1.90 71.56 +1.01 iSSPGlb 1.37 64.74 +.74 iSR1KV 1.25 66.79 +.71 iSMCGth 0.60 106.75 +1.86 iSR1KG 0.76 59.05 +.89 iSRus1K 1.18 71.99 +.93 iSR2KV 1.24 70.84 +1.39 iShBarIntC 4.37 106.77 -.40 iShBarc1-3 2.71 104.90 -.17 iSR2KG 0.53 90.33 +1.99 iShR2K 0.89 79.45 +1.67 iShUSPfd 2.87 39.38 +.11 iSRus3K 1.25 77.12 +1.03 iShDJTel 0.72 24.39 +.23 iShREst 1.98 59.51 +.92 iShDJHm 0.07 12.34 +.28 iShFnSc 0.61 55.21 +.39 iShUSEngy 0.50 42.07 +.82 iShSPSm 0.74 70.39 +1.52 iShBasM 0.93 76.38 +1.58 iShPeru 1.06 40.11 -.36 iShEur350 0.98 42.40 +.59 iSRsMic 0.40 49.39 +.91 iStar 7.65 +.30 ITC Hold 1.34 69.80 +.09 ITT Corp 1.00 55.79 +.77 ITT Ed 82.78 +.68 IconixBr 22.19 +.52 IdenixPh 4.73 +.06 Ikanos 1.40 +.03 ITW 1.36 55.55 +1.00 Illumina 72.25 +1.09 Imax Corp 31.83 +1.13 Immersion 8.12 +.12 Immucor 20.02 -.15 ImunoGn 10.89 -.37 Imunmd 3.70 +.06 ImpaxLabs 20.95 +.25 ImpOil gs 0.44 46.77 +1.17 Incyte 17.59 +.14 IndoTel 1.50 33.77 +.27 Inergy 2.82 35.14 +.24 Infinera 6.30 +.17 InfoSpace 8.95 +.26 Informat 54.60 +.76 InfosysT 1.35 63.64 +.27 IngerRd 0.48 43.94 +1.13 IngrmM 17.40 +.40 Inhibitex 3.79 -.02 InlandRE 0.57 8.76 +.20 Innophos 1.00 46.80 +2.09 Innospec 33.72 +.06 InovioPhm .66 +.02 Inphi n 18.29 +.17 InsitTc 21.90 +.03 Insmed rs 12.51 -.64 IntegLfSci 46.60 +.39 IntgDv 7.92 +.24 IntegrysE 2.72 50.44 +.38 Intel 0.84 21.82 +.44 Intelliph 3.33 -.21 InteractBrk 0.40 15.81 +.13 IntcntlEx 118.57 +2.61 IntCtlHtl 0.35 19.70 +.39 InterDig 0.40 35.80 +.28 Intrface 0.08 18.08 +.58 Intermec 10.46 +.01 InterMune 33.02 +.31 InterNAP 7.79 +.10 IntlBcsh 0.38 16.00 +.13 IBM 3.00 164.12 +.95 Intl Coal 14.59 +.03 IntFlav 1.08 61.99 +.33 IntlGame 0.24 16.62 +.59 IntPap 1.05 27.87 +.30 IntlRectif 25.77 +.49 IntTower g 6.97 +.18 InterOil g 57.77 +1.17 Interpublic 0.24 11.76 +.23 Intersil 0.48 13.26 +.36 IntervalLs 12.82 +.27 IntraLks n 17.71 IntPotash 31.63 +.68 Intuit 50.74 +.36 Invesco 0.49 23.26 +.30 InvMtgCap 3.94 22.09 -.06 InVKSrInc 0.29 5.05 +.09 IridiumCm 8.54 +.29 IronMtn 1.00 32.55 +.30 IronwdPh 15.86 +.83 Isis 8.83 -.10 iSoftStn n 11.29 +.15 IstaPh 7.88 +.34 ItauUnibH 0.67 22.37 +.24 Itron 48.22 +.26 IvanhoeEn 2.05 +.03 IvanhM g 1.48 23.47 +1.30 IvaxDiag .91 +.23 JA Solar 5.38 +.29 JDS Uniph 17.20 +.60 JPMorgCh 1.00 41.61 -.07 JPMAlerian 1.95 36.16 +.12 Jabil 0.28 19.74 +.58 JackInBox 21.07 +.06 JacobsEng 42.61 +1.25 Jaguar g 4.64 +.08 Jamba 2.10 +.01 JamesRiv 19.20 +.49 JanusCap 0.20 9.42 +.20 Jarden 0.35 33.09 +.71 JazzPhrm 27.70 +.80

nc Sa es gu es a e uno c a

Nm Jefferies JetBlue Jiayuan n JinkoSolar JoesJeans JohnJn JohnsnCtl JonesGrp JonesLL JosABnk s JoyGlbl JnprNtwk KB Home KBR Inc KEYW n KIT Digitl KKR n KKR Fn KLA Tnc KT Corp KV PhmA KC Southn Kaydon Kellogg Kemet rs Kendle Kennamtl KeryxBio KeyEngy Keycorp KilroyR KimberR g KimbClk Kimco KindME KindMor n KindMM KindredHlt KineticC Kinross g KnghtCap KnightTr KodiakO g Kohls KongZhg KopinCp KoreaElc KosmosE n Kraft KratonPP KrispKrm Kroger KronosW s Ku6Media Kulicke L&L Engy L-1 Ident L-3 Com LDK Solar LG Display LHC Grp LKQ Corp LML Pay LPL Inv n LSI Corp LTXCrd rs LaZBoy LabCp LaBrnch LamResrch LamarAdv Landstar LVSands LaSalleH Lattice LawsnSft Lazard LeapWirlss LearCorp s LeeEnt LeggMason LeggPlat LenderPS LennarA Lennox LeucNatl Level3 LexiPhrm LexRltyTr Lexmark LbtyASE LibGlobA LibGlobC LibtyMIntA LibMCapA LibtProp LifeTech LifeTFit LifePtH LillyEli LimelghtN Limited Lincare s LincEdSv LincNat Lindsay LinearTch LinkedIn n LinnEngy LionsGt g LithiaMot LiveNatn LivePrsn LizClaib LloydBkg LockhdM Loews Logitech LogMeIn LonePne gn LongweiPI LoopNet Lorillard LaPac Lowes Lubrizol LucasEngy Lufkin lululemn g LumberLiq LyonBas A

D 0.30 21.43 +.50 5.70 +.04 9.92 +.05 24.83 +1.33 .76 +.10 2.28 67.10 +.51 0.64 37.11 +1.04 0.20 10.54 +.22 0.30 91.54 +2.55 46.83 +.91 0.70 87.44 +2.59 30.46 +.55 0.25 11.12 +.47 0.20 36.16 +.95 12.88 +.51 12.60 +.37 0.73 15.84 +.20 0.64 9.91 +.11 1.00 40.62 +.96 18.19 +.09 2.52 -.72 52.96 +1.15 0.76 35.34 +1.43 1.62 54.96 -.45 13.94 +.24 15.16 +.02 0.48 39.35 +1.53 4.53 +.08 16.95 +.47 0.12 8.11 +.11 1.40 39.17 +.56 1.47 +.08 2.80 65.60 +.70 0.72 17.39 +.20 4.56 71.12 -1.70 1.16 29.50 +.05 4.56 64.65 -.30 22.41 +.50 55.66 -.27 0.10 15.45 -.05 11.44 +.38 0.24 16.29 +.22 5.79 +.10 1.00 50.23 +.43 5.01 -.11 4.87 +.23 12.64 -.03 18.35 -.15 1.16 34.26 +.14 37.87 +.15 8.98 +.80 0.42 23.22 -.19 0.60 27.30 +.33 2.86 +.01 11.01 +.70 4.63 +.19 11.43 +.05 1.80 81.11 +1.11 7.34 +.40 14.52 +.03 24.72 +1.13 25.26 +.76 3.37 +.33 34.20 -.23 6.92 +.16 8.83 +.28 10.32 +.54 96.33 +.95 3.64 +.08 44.93 +.72 27.34 +.37 0.20 45.21 +2.03 39.58 +.80 0.44 24.85 +.58 6.16 +.19 11.18 0.64 36.61 +.90 16.22 +.50 0.50 50.50 +2.34 1.01 0.32 31.78 +.64 1.08 23.64 +.50 0.40 24.44 +.64 0.16 17.23 +.37 0.72 44.36 +1.05 0.25 33.72 +.41 2.23 +.03 1.58 +.08 0.46 8.91 +.27 27.52 +.64 0.33 4.98 +.03 41.25 -.08 39.27 +.07 16.74 -.07 80.68 +1.36 1.90 32.38 +.38 51.36 +1.30 35.76 +.85 39.57 +.75 1.96 37.61 +.39 4.51 +.09 0.80 36.85 +.76 0.80 29.11 +.76 1.00 15.02 +.22 0.20 27.52 +1.00 0.34 61.45 +3.38 0.96 32.10 +.85 76.34 +1.07 2.64 38.26 +1.05 6.21 -.01 0.28 17.75 +.31 10.85 +.28 11.75 +.48 5.55 +.17 3.13 +.04 3.00 79.64 +.78 0.25 41.03 +.32 12.06 +.07 38.60 +1.62 11.36 +.11 1.42 +.13 18.47 +.09 5.20 113.59+12.02 7.63 +.38 0.56 22.72 +.67 1.44 134.24 +.04 2.80 -.05 0.50 86.25 +3.08 91.50 +3.60 23.82 +.74 0.10 39.88 +1.58

M-N-O-P M&F Wld M&T Bk MAG Slv g MB Fncl MBIA MCG Cap MDC MDU Res MEMC MER Tele MF Global MFA Fncl MIN h MGIC MGM Rsts MIPS Tech MKS Inst MPG OffTr MSCI Inc Macerich MackCali Macquarie Macys MadCatz g MagelnHl Magma MagnaI gs MagHRes MaidenH Majesco MAKO Srg MgHiYP Manitowoc MannKd ManpwrGp Manulife g MarathonO MarinaB rs MktVGold MktVRus MktVEgypt MktVJrGld MktV Agri MktVIndo s MktVCoal MarkWest MarIntA MarshM MarshIls MStewrt MartMM MarvellT Masco

24.09 +.03 2.80 86.89 +1.72 9.40 +.10 0.04 18.56 +.69 8.29 +.33 0.68 6.21 +.05 1.00 24.93 +.25 0.65 22.38 +.22 9.09 +.42 1.64 +.06 7.45 +.10 0.94 7.98 +.11 0.55 6.32 -.04 6.31 +.24 12.87 +.37 6.48 +.23 0.60 24.92 +.52 2.78 +.17 37.77 +.41 2.00 50.96 +.79 1.80 32.06 +.34 0.80 28.09 +1.88 0.40 27.89 +.76 1.80 +.03 53.82 +1.86 8.03 +.38 1.00 45.97 +.99 6.42 +.15 0.28 9.36 +.23 3.64 -.75 29.00 -.85 0.24 2.39 +.06 0.08 15.77 +.28 3.81 +.01 0.80 55.32 +1.08 0.52 16.67 +.38 1.00 52.01 +2.22 .28 +.02 0.40 53.39 +.87 0.18 39.05 +.61 0.16 16.21 +.42 2.93 34.27 +.90 0.33 53.04 +.66 0.27 30.88 +.32 0.19 46.44 +1.19 2.68 46.86 +.06 0.40 34.62 +.85 0.88 30.09 +.19 0.04 7.80 +.12 4.22 -.05 1.60 82.38 +3.01 14.22 +.11 0.30 12.21 +.38

Nm Mastec MasterCrd Mattel Mattson MaximIntg McClatchy McCorm McDrmInt s McDnlds McGrwH McKesson McMoRn MeadJohn MeadWvco Mechel MecoxL n MedAssets MedcoHlth MedProp MediCo Medicis Medifast Medivation Mednax MedQuist n Medtrnic MelcoCrwn Mellanox MensW MentorGr MercadoL MercerIntl Merck Meredith MergeHlth Meritage Meritor Metalico Methanx MetLife MetLf equn MetLfe pfB MetroPCS Micrel Microchp Micromet MicronT MicrosSys MicroSemi Microsoft Micrvisn MdwGold g MillerEnR Mind CTI MindrayM Mindspeed MinesMgt MitsuUFJ MizuhoFn MobileTele Mohawk Molex MolinaH s MolsCoorB Molycorp n Momenta MoneyGrm Monsanto MonstrWw Montpelr Moodys MorgStan Mosaic MotrlaSol n MotrlaMo n Motricity n Move Inc MuellerWat MurphO Mylan MyriadG NCR Corp NETgear NFJDvInt NII Hldg NPS Phm NRG Egy NV Energy NXP Sem n NYSE Eur Nabors NalcoHld Nanomtr Nanosphere NaraBncp NasdOMX NBkGreece NatFuGas NatGrid NatInstr s NOilVarco NatPenn NatRetPrp NatSemi NatwHP Navios Navistar NektarTh NeoPhoto n Neoprobe NeptuneT g Ness Tech NetLogicM NetApp Netease Netflix NetQin n NtScout NetSolTch NetSpend n NetSuite NetwkEng NeuStar NeutTand Nevsun g NwGold g NewOriEd NY CmtyB NY Times Newcastle NewellRub NewfldExp NewmtM NewpkRes NewsCpA NewsCpB Nexen g NextEraEn NiSource Nicor NielsenH n NikeB 99 Cents NipponTT NoahHld n NobleCorp NobleEn NokiaCp Nomura NordicAm Nordson s Nordstrm NorflkSo NoAmEn g NA Pall g NoestUt NDynMn g NthnO&G NorTrst NthgtM g NorthropG NStarRlt NwstBcsh NovaMeas NovaGld g Novartis NovtlWrls Novavax Novlus NovoNord NSTAR NuSkin NuVasive NuanceCm Nucor NustarEn NutriSyst NvMSI&G2 Nvidia NxStageMd O2Micro OCZ Tech OCharleys OGE Engy OM Group OReillyAu

D 18.45 +.79 0.60 274.12 +6.70 0.92 25.77 +.18 1.75 +.10 0.84 24.88 +.19 2.45 +.05 1.12 49.35 +.57 18.49 +.55 2.44 81.47 +.74 1.00 41.79 +1.04 0.80 84.50 +1.02 15.98 +.49 1.04 65.54 +.44 1.00 32.53 +.52 26.99 +.56 2.94 +.10 13.48 +.46 55.86 -.16 0.80 11.51 +.16 17.34 -.10 0.32 36.96 +.50 22.76 +.90 21.56 +.19 70.77 +1.09 12.87 +.08 0.90 38.40 +.26 11.08 +.41 30.29 +1.03 0.48 32.27 +.95 13.18 +.20 0.32 80.27 +2.96 11.60 +.61 1.52 35.64 +.31 1.02 29.65 +.15 4.97 +.25 21.64 +.58 14.38 +.18 5.72 +.25 0.68 30.05 +1.46 0.74 41.28 +.17 0.94 78.48 +.37 1.63 25.05 +.01 16.50 +.25 0.16 10.63 +.21 1.38 36.51 +.36 5.50 +.04 8.40 +.11 46.94 +.61 20.50 +.67 0.64 24.22 +.18 1.17 +.12 1.86 -.01 5.80 +.01 0.32 2.54 -.08 0.30 26.98 -.01 7.60 +.13 2.00 +.02 4.61 +.11 3.08 +.03 1.06 19.50 +.13 60.50 +.49 0.80 25.72 +.69 26.08 +1.03 1.28 44.73 +.47 50.97 +2.03 18.39 +.20 3.42 +.12 1.12 69.48 +.78 13.45 +.29 0.40 18.42 +.28 0.56 41.62 +.41 0.20 22.80 -.56 0.20 67.34 +1.56 45.80 +.37 24.03 +.75 8.44 +.66 2.09 +.11 0.07 3.74 +.09 1.10 64.89 +.94 22.53 +.44 24.19 -.12 18.14 +.04 41.08 +1.51 1.80 18.62 +.41 40.17 +.41 9.15 +.14 23.74 +.11 0.48 15.54 -.11 25.39 +1.26 1.20 34.61 +.28 25.70 +.69 0.14 26.43 -.24 17.69 +1.09 2.27 +.07 7.43 +.09 24.18 +.38 0.29 1.31 1.42 68.07 +.85 2.92 48.97 +.31 0.40 28.33 +.63 0.44 71.63 +2.55 0.04 6.95 +.12 1.52 24.05 +.23 0.40 24.62 +.03 1.92 41.33 +1.03 0.24 5.06 +.14 55.15 +1.55 7.49 -.06 7.75 -.58 3.65 -.02 3.66 +.21 7.62 +.03 36.82 +.82 49.87 +1.03 42.67 +1.08 261.13 +3.91 4.66 +.64 20.16 +.34 1.35 +.04 7.91 +.14 36.14 +.77 1.04 +.07 25.76 +.12 16.01 -.52 0.06 5.59 +.15 9.10 +.22 105.13 +2.37 1.00 15.65 +.06 7.89 +.11 4.44 +.19 0.32 14.72 +.09 66.40 +.89 0.80 52.31 +.61 8.65 +.07 0.15 16.38 +.13 0.15 17.10 +.14 0.20 21.18 +.65 2.20 55.89 -.01 0.92 19.48 +.13 1.86 53.82 +.50 30.61 -.03 1.24 82.24 +1.73 20.59 +.31 23.95 +.15 11.55 +.89 1.06 38.28 +.23 0.72 86.91 +1.69 0.55 6.26 +.15 4.95 +.06 1.40 22.34 +.13 0.42 51.42 +2.43 0.92 44.20 +1.65 1.60 72.11 +1.52 7.25 +.27 3.74 +.05 1.10 34.07 +.15 9.26 +.09 18.92 +.43 1.12 47.44 +.14 2.69 +.05 2.00 64.47 +.94 0.40 3.97 +.06 0.44 12.12 +.16 10.40 +.10 9.45 +.30 2.53 61.63 +.52 4.98 +.04 2.13 +.01 34.19 +.86 1.82 125.07 +2.32 1.70 44.43 +.17 0.54 36.81 +1.34 34.65 +.92 20.75 +.19 1.45 40.71 +1.25 4.30 63.61 +.03 0.70 13.84 +.54 0.80 9.04 +.06 17.14 +.14 19.46 +.28 6.78 +.10 7.70 +.11 7.47 +.24 1.50 48.60 +.47 39.88 +1.69 60.08 +.58

D

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OasisPet n 27.26 +1.02 OcciPet 1.84 104.78 +2.64 Oceaneer s 0.60 36.90 +.99 Och-Ziff 1.05 13.90 +.27 Oclaro 7.59 +.24 OcwenFn 12.29 +.11 OdysMar 3.17 +.13 OfficeDpt 3.75 +.42 OfficeMax 6.67 +.37 OilSvHT 2.36 146.82 +3.24 OilStates 71.44 +.98 Oilsands g .37 +.01 OldDomF s 35.61 +1.23 OldNBcp 0.28 10.50 +.22 OldRepub 0.70 12.10 +.15 Olin 0.80 22.05 +.69 OmegaHlt 1.52 19.95 +.61 Omncre 0.16 31.30 +.33 Omnicell 14.23 +.95 Omnicom 1.00 45.87 +.58 OmniVisn h 32.17 +1.33 OnSmcnd 10.16 +.22 Oncothyr 7.31 +.22 1800Flowrs 2.37 +.04 OneBeacon 0.84 14.75 +.11 ONEOK 2.08 69.69 +.86 OnyxPh 36.50 +.29 OpenTxt 60.16 +1.74 OpenTable 80.22 +2.12 OpnwvSy 2.28 +.02 OpkoHlth 3.48 +.09 OpntTch 0.48 37.58 -.42 Opnext 2.25 +.08 OptimerPh 12.69 +.03 optXprs 4.50 16.54 +.30 Oracle 0.24 32.08 +.45 OraSure 8.39 +.14 OrbitalSci 17.04 +.34 Orexigen 1.72 -.01 OrientEH 10.09 +.29 Oritani s 0.40 12.51 +.24 OrmatTc 0.16 22.68 +.69 OrsusXel rs 6.53 +1.03 Orthovta 3.83 -.01 OshkoshCp 26.19 +.23 OvShip 1.75 27.10 +.75 OwensMin 0.80 32.90 +.31 OwensCorn 37.14 +.80 OwensIll 29.54 +.36 OxfordInds 0.52 31.04 +.86 Oxigne rsh 3.43 -.11 PDL Bio 0.60 5.93 +.19 PF Chng 0.96 39.38 +.88 PG&E Cp 1.82 41.95 +.24 PHH Corp 19.85 +.27 PMC Sra 7.46 +.17 PMI Grp 1.10 -.02 PNC 1.40 59.86 +.61 PNM Res 0.50 16.15 +.36 PPG 2.28 85.50 +1.66 PPL Corp 1.40 27.25 +.12 PSS Wrld 27.49 +.33 Paccar 0.48 46.89 +1.39 PacerIntl 4.61 +.11 PacEth rs 1.50 +.04 PacSunwr 2.46 +.07 PaciraPh n 11.60 -1.62 PackAmer 0.80 29.15 +.61 PaetecHld 4.48 +.09 PainTher 2.00 8.98 -.14 PallCorp 0.70 54.52 +1.21 PanASlv 0.10 29.51 +.45 Panasonic 0.11 11.74 +.16 Pantry 17.01 +.70 ParagShip 1.96 +.01 ParamTch 21.82 +.62 ParaG&S 3.68 +.11 Parexel 23.30 +.13 ParkDrl 5.70 +.16 ParkerHan 1.48 88.77 +2.24 Parkrvsn h .70 -.03 PartnerRe 2.40 70.19 +.31 PatriotCoal 21.44 +.87 Patterson 0.48 32.47 +.37 PattUTI 0.20 29.19 +.51 Paychex 1.24 30.23 +.36 PeabdyE 0.34 55.47 +2.25 Pebblebrk 0.48 19.60 +.14 Pengrth g 0.84 12.44 +.39 PnnNGm 38.18 +1.17 PennVa 0.23 14.48 +.34 PennVaRs 1.92 25.25 +.42 PennWst g 1.08 23.37 +.22 PennantPk 1.08 11.91 +.18 Penney 0.80 35.37 +5.26 PenRE 0.60 14.87 +.32 Penske 0.28 19.67 +.42 Pentair 0.80 37.89 +.78 PeopUtdF 0.63 12.84 -.07 PepBoy 0.12 10.65 +.30 PepcoHold 1.08 19.23 +.06 PepsiCo 2.06 69.57 +.51 PeregrineP 1.79 +.10 PerfectWld 20.02 +.90 PerkElm 0.28 26.10 +.29 Perrigo 0.28 84.66 +1.55 PetMed 0.50 12.09 +.56 PetChina 4.86 137.91 +1.78 Petrohawk 24.15 +.48 PetrbrsA 1.34 30.26 +.41 Petrobras 1.28 33.36 +.46 PetroDev 30.75 +1.50 PtroqstE 6.81 +.38 PetsMart 0.50 43.97 +.70 Pfizer 0.80 20.58 +.12 PhrmAth 2.89 -.13 PhmHTr 3.34 70.73 +.42 PharmPdt 0.60 26.41 -.01 Pharmacyc 8.88 +.84 Pharmasset 118.98 +2.08 PhilipMor 2.56 68.92 +1.39 PhilipsEl 1.02 26.00 +.45 PhlVH 0.15 63.76 +.68 PhnxCos 2.48 +.09 PhotrIn 9.03 +.26 PiedNG 1.16 29.56 +.17 PiedmOfc 1.26 20.55 +.35 Pier 1 11.40 +.43 PilgrimsP 4.43 +.17 PimCpOp 1.38 20.59 +.47 PimcIncStr 0.90 12.95 +.23 PimcoHiI 1.46 13.32 +.57 PimcoStrat 0.96 11.10 +.39 PinnclEnt 13.44 +.79 PinWst 2.10 43.55 +.42 PionDrill 13.43 +.43 PioNtrl 0.08 85.46 +1.80 PitnyBw 1.48 22.81 +.33 PlainsAA 3.88 61.95 -.14 PlainsEx 35.83 +.58 Plantron 0.20 35.37 +.55 Plexus 32.11 +.38 PlumCrk 1.68 38.98 +.63 PluristemT 2.91 +.09 Polaris 1.80 101.55 +2.82 Polo RL 0.80 122.48 +2.02 Polycom 58.89 +1.75 PolyMet g 1.41 -.02 PolyOne 0.16 14.55 +.44 Polypore 60.44 +1.61 Popular 2.83 +.10 PortGE 1.06 25.27 +.24 PortglTel 3.18 10.30 +.07 Potash s 0.28 55.23 +.91 Potlatch 2.04 34.99 +.84 Power-One 8.05 -.05 PSCrudeDS 48.25 -1.89 PwshDB 30.29 +.21 PS Agri 32.76 -.09 PS USDBull 21.26 -.03 PwShLeis 0.15 18.58 +.35 PSPrivEq 0.37 11.22 +.16 PSFinPf 1.27 18.03 +.04 PwShPfd 0.97 14.32 +.02 PShEMSov 1.53 27.17 +.01 PwShs QQQ 0.39 55.34 +.70 Powrwav 3.07 +.10 Praxair 2.00 102.13 +1.67 PrecCastpt 0.12 153.27 +4.93 PrecDrill 13.76 +.49 PremGlbSv 7.99 +.31 Prestige 12.80 +.31 PriceTR 1.24 57.77 +1.09 priceline 480.72 -1.41 Primerica 0.12 20.93 +.10 PrinctnR h .20 +.01 PrinFncl 0.55 29.21 +.74 PrivateB 0.04 14.24 +.44 ProLogis 1.12 33.44 +.61 ProShtDow 41.61 -.42 ProShtQQQ 33.56 -.46 ProShtS&P 42.05 -.53 PrUShS&P 21.77 -.59 ProUltDow 0.32 59.78 +1.17 PrUlShDow 18.19 -.39 ProUltQQQ 82.92 +2.03 PrUShQQQ rs 54.18 -1.43 ProUltSP 0.39 50.40 +1.26 PrUShtFn rs 64.83 -.93 ProUShL20 33.81 +.97 ProUSL7-10T 38.70 +.57 PrUltSCh25 27.75 -.79 ProUltSEM 30.50 -1.01 ProUltSRE 15.03 -.46 ProUltSOG 30.03 -1.21 ProUltSBM 18.47 -.83 ProUltRE 0.43 57.28 +1.70 ProUltFin 0.05 60.52 +.86 PrUPShQQQ 27.73 -1.09 ProUPShD30 34.44 -1.10 PrUPShR2K 19.52 -1.41 ProUltO&G 0.21 52.31 +1.93 ProUBasM 0.03 48.40 +2.04 ProShtR2K 30.85 -.73 PrUltPQQQ s 75.04 +2.69 ProUltR2K 0.01 43.43 +1.74 ProSht20Tr 42.13 +.64 ProUSSP500 16.87 -.67 PrUltSP500 s 0.11 73.00 +2.68 ProUSSlv rs 18.26 -.91 PrUltCrde rs 46.69 +1.87 PrUShCrde rs 45.25 -1.90 ProUltSGld 23.35 -.34 ProSUltSilv 173.89 +7.87 ProUShEuro 16.94 -.09 Procera rs 9.62 +.17 ProctGam 2.10 64.76 -.01 ProgrssEn 2.48 47.37 +.14 ProgsvCp 1.40 20.35 +.29 ProUSR2K rs 45.65 -2.09 ProspctCap 1.21 11.11 +.21 ProspBcsh 0.70 42.88 +.93 ProtLife 0.64 22.56 +.64 ProvEn g 0.54 8.50 +.41 ProvidFS 0.48 13.26 +.22 Prudentl 1.15 60.36 +.72 PSEG 1.37 31.88 +.28 PubStrg 3.80 111.91 +1.04 PulteGrp 7.24 +.27 PureBio .91 -.12 PMIIT 0.47 5.82 -.32

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C OV ER S T OR I ES

Boomers

as their life expectancy stretched to age 85. Others are heading back to work. Continued from B1 Practically all of them are About 40 percent of female kicking themselves for not doing baby boomers are single now better. “I never thought about retire— up from 30 percent in 1989 — and most never meant to be. ment. No one ever talked about it Nationally, there are about 17 mil- and what I needed to do,” said Kalion single women ages 46 to 64; trina Philips, 62, of Clayton, N.C. about two-thirds of them sepa- “I guess I was stupid about it.” Like Philips, Bette Lee Drake rated from, divorced or buried a didn’t waste much time thinking husband. While many baby boomer about saving for her senior years. Her father was an affluent cattle women stayed home, at least for a time, to raise their children, rancher in Texas and her mother’s the generation brought the first side of the family had money, too. “I never thought sizable number I’d have to work,” of women to the said Drake, 62, workforce. And “I think everyone of Raleigh. “I many thrived, lead- expected these thought I’d be at ing experts to hope home as a wife this generation of women to be and a mother. I women would be different. They had no ambition. better prepared fiI figured I’d be a nancially for their lived differently princess for the senior years. and we hoped rest of my life.” “I think everyDrake’s prince one expected these they could retire didn’t stick women to be dif- differently, too.” around, however, ferent. They lived leaving her as a differently, and — Donna Watkins, single mother of we hoped they financial specialist, three children. could retire dif- ClearPoint Credit Drake’s mother ferently, too,” said Counseling Solutions urged her to go to Donna Watkins, a college to earn a Raleigh-based financial specialist for ClearPoint teaching degree. Drake said she tried to be Credit Counseling Solutions, a nonprofit that has worked with savvy. She moved to a school dismany female baby boomers strug- trict that compensated teachers well and offered a pension. She gling to prepare for retirement. But working wasn’t the sil- bought a house. She saved for her ver bullet. Those who joined the children’s education. After those workforce earned less than their expenses, she had little left in her male counterparts, nationally paycheck. It wasn’t until 15 years ago that about 77 cents to the man’s dollar. And many who devoted their Drake saved her first dime for prime to motherhood find them- retirement. “Retirement? How was I supselves divorced and returning to a workforce that doesn’t have space posed to pay for that, too?” Drake or patience for them. Those wom- asked. “I wish someone had sat me en had less time to build up their Social Security savings or 401(k) down and told me I had to figure this out,” she added. plans.

Sounding the alarm

Poor financial ed

Experts began predicting this land mine for single women nearing retirement years ago. The Federal Reserve Board found in 2001 that only a third of single women had any sort of retirement savings account; at the same time, less than 10 percent of single women had a pension through their jobs. This compared to about two-thirds of married couples and 42 percent of single men having retirement accounts. Now, the turbulent economy has turned those early warnings into full-scale alarms. Even the women who prepared have had their plans derailed. Some eye their retirement savings warily and wonder whether they will outlive the money they set aside for these years, a real possibility

Watkins, the financial counselor, said the older baby boomer women didn’t get the financial lessons their children have, even though they were entering the workforce and earning their own money. “They were poorly educated about their retirement,” Watkins said. “There was this old mythology that women weren’t good with numbers and they shouldn’t fuss over them.” Philips said her retirement plan was her husband. She figured they would rely on his military pension. But he became an ex two years ago, and she said she got none of that. To make matters worse, Philips lost her full-time job months before and has struggled to find

steady work since. Once upon a time, Philips, a former banker, did have a retirement account. The bank where she worked even matched her contributions. But the bank eventually closed its office in her town, leaving her jobless with few prospects. She cashed in her retirement to keep from losing her house. Philips said she’s been turned down from more jobs than she can count. Another challenge: the missing years on her résumé she spent staying at home and raising her daughter. Last month things got so dire that Philips applied for food stamps.

Different priorities Financial planners say single women often get caught saving for big-ticket items other than retirement. The biggest: a child’s education. “They are doing their best to save for their kids’ education,” said Jim Trull, certified financial planner with Keystone Financial Partners. “All of a sudden, they wake up one day and realize they are 55 and have only $100,000 in their 401(k) and they make $70,000 a year.” In 2009, Margaret VanDeCar of Raleigh had a great accounting job and was on track financially to retire in her 60s. Then, a layoff notice landed on her desk. She was 58 and counting heavily on her earnings to fluff her retirement nest egg. “I never anticipated that setback,” said VanDeCar, who divorced her husband 17 years ago. VanDeCar competed with women half her age for open positions. It took 18 months before she landed another accounting job through a connection. “I just never thought about having to navigate a job market at this age,” said VanDeCar, now 59.

New income Many of the single boomer women who had already stepped into retirement are facing the same cold reception as they try to wedge their way back into the job market. Arnita Woodard, 61 of Garner, N.C., took early retirement a decade ago from her management job at Duke Energy. She figured volunteering to take a buyout would spare another employee who still had young children. She had already gotten her son into college. Woodard, a divorcee, imagined finding other work to help supplement her pension. Those jobs were hard to land. Finally, a year ago, Woodard decided to start her own business, offering compan-

THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, June 15, 2011 B5

ionship and organizational help to older seniors. “For me, this is the difference between paying my bills and getting to have some fun,” Woodard said. Drake, the retired teacher, is also looking for the same sort of supplement. She earned $2,200 a month from her pension plan, but she has been nibbling at her savings to cover fun activities and travel. She has already spent the $40,000 profit she made when she sold her house last year. Drake imagined finding work as a substitute teacher. But, with the state budget crisis, those jobs have grown scarce. She did get a job as a clerk at a women’s clothing store, where she earns $8 an hour. Drake figures she spent three times her paycheck shopping. She quit and has vowed to stay out of the mall.

Caught flatfooted For all the single boomers’ efforts to save enough money to cover their expenses in retirement, they are caught flatfooted on a critical issue: long-term care insurance. None of the women in this story have purchased policies that would cover the costs of skilled care help or an assisted living facility if they need it. That is a common trend. The AARP said boomer women are ill-prepared for long-term care needs. According to a survey of boomer women, more than half of female baby boomers do not have a long-term care insurance policy, and two-thirds said they couldn’t afford the premiums, according to the AARP survey. That gap promises to be an enormous problem because these women are expected to live to age 85 or older. Many of the women sheepishly said they’d turn to their children if they needed help. “My son said he’ll take care of me when I get to that point,” said Woodard of Garner. The average cost for an assisted living facility in 2010 was $38,000 a year. A private room in a nursing home was nearly double that. “We’re probably in denial about it,” said VanDeCar, the accountant. “We think we’re the caregivers and we don’t need the care. But I guess that won’t be the case forever.” Drake, the retired teacher, refuses to be a burden to her children. Years ago, she had a stern talk with one of her daughters about how to handle her if she is sick. “I told her to take me to a mountain top and leave me there,” Drake said. “There’s only so much I can worry about and this isn’t one of them.”

Hiring Continued from B1 While big companies are buoyed by record profits, many small businesses, which employ half of the country’s private sector workers, are still struggling to break even. And if the nation’s small companies plan to further delay hiring — or, worse, return to laying off workers, as they now hint they might — there is little hope that the nation’s 14 million idle workers will find gainful employment soon. “Never in the 37-year history of our company have we seen anything at all like this,” said Frank Goodnight, president of Diversified Graphics, a publishing company in Salisbury, N.C. He says there is “no chance” he will hire more workers in the months ahead. “We’re being squeezed on all sides,” he says.

Negative indicators Each month, the National Federation of Independent Business surveys the owners of small businesses about how they are doing and where they think the economy is going. One question asks whether businesses plan to increase or decrease the number of employees in the next three months. Economists then calculate a net hiring figure by subtracting the percentage of companies that plan to downsize from the percentage that plans to expand. In May, the share of companies that planned to shrink their workforces was one percentage point higher than the share of companies that planned to expand them, the first time since last September that this indicator was negative. And even though it was slightly negative, this index, a fairly reliable indicator of hiring decisions, has been trending downward all year. The unemployment rate has been stubbornly high in the last year, primarily because companies have stopped hiring, not laying off more workers. Although layoffs were at a record low in April, the latest monthly data available, Tuesday’s survey suggests that workers may soon be challenged by both sides of the employment ledger. With wages relatively stagnant in recent months, the University of Michigan’s consumer sentiment survey found that workers’ expectations for their families’ income growth over the next year were at a record low. This is the first recovery in

which, seven quarters in, there have been zero gains in aggregate wages and salaries. Stagnant wages, coupled with the recent stock market slide and further declines in housing prices, have left consumers feeling not well-off enough to significantly increase their spending, which would encourage hiring. “One thing you’ve got to understand is that we do not hire workers for the sake of hiring workers. We hire them to do jobs,” Goodnight said. “If we don’t have the work coming in, nothing will make me hire another person.”

Two recoveries When asked about the “single most important problem” facing their businesses, about one in four cited “poor sales,” according to the federation’s survey. Uncertainty over regulations is also mentioned frequently. About a third of businesses blame either “taxes” or “government requirements” for their current troubles, leading some economists to attribute the recent slide in overall business optimism to Washington’s protracted debates over tax policy, financial changes and health care. Meanwhile, larger businesses, sitting on mountains of cash, have been weathering the weak recovery relatively well. The Business Roundtable CEO Economic Outlook survey, also released on Tuesday, is a less closely watched report that relies on responses from the chief executives of larger companies. It found that the number of large companies expecting their U.S. work forces to grow in the next six months far outnumbers those that anticipate shrinkage. “What we’ve had is a tale of two recoveries,” said John Ryding, chief economist at RDQ Economics. “Between large businesses and small businesses, it is literally the best of times and the worst of times.” Several factors have helped larger companies succeed, economists say. Jared Bernstein, a senior fellow at the liberal Center on Budget and Policy Priorities and a former economic adviser to Vice President Joe Biden, said, “Larger businesses have consistently had more going for them in this recovery.” He added: “They have better access to credit markets. They have greater ease in exporting abroad where some economies are growing faster than ours. All that shows up in their profits.”

Market update Northwest stocks Name

Div

PE

YTD Last Chg %Chg

AlskAir Avista BkofAm BarrettB Boeing CascdeB rs CascdeCp ColSprtw Costco CraftBrew FLIR Sys HewlettP HmFedDE Intel Keycorp Kroger Lattice LaPac MDU Res MentorGr Microsoft

... 1.10 .04 .36 1.68 ... .80f .88f .96f ... .24 .48f .22 .84f .12f .42 ... ... .65 ... .64

9 13 20 10 16 20 16 25 25 ... 22 9 ... 10 11 13 13 ... 16 31 6

64.77 +2.17 +14.3 24.46 +.35 +8.6 10.80 -.17 -19.0 14.38 +.44 -7.5 74.64 +1.70 +14.4 11.55 -.81 +36.7 44.30 +1.00 -6.3 59.88 +.45 -.7 79.24 +.79 +9.7 9.68 -.18 +31.0 33.72 +.53 +13.3 34.73 +.08 -17.5 10.75 +.11 -12.4 21.82 +.44 +3.8 8.11 +.11 -8.4 23.22 -.19 +3.8 6.16 +.19 +1.7 7.63 +.38 -19.3 22.38 +.22 +10.4 13.18 +.20 +9.8 24.22 +.18 -13.2

Name

Div

PE

NikeB Nordstrm NwstNG OfficeMax Paccar PlanarSy PlumCrk PrecCastpt Safeway Schnitzer Sherwin StancrpFn Starbucks TriQuint Umpqua US Bancrp WashFed WellsFargo WstCstB rs Weyerh

1.24 .92 1.74 ... .48a ... 1.68 .12 .58f .07 1.46 .86f .52 ... .20 .50f .24 .48f ... .60

20 16 17 11 29 ... 39 22 14 14 18 10 25 10 39 13 13 11 32 ...

Precious metals Metal NY HSBC Bank US NY Merc Gold NY Merc Silver

Price (troy oz.) $1525.00 $1523.80 $35.410

Pvs Day $1515.00 $1515.10 $34.736

Market recap 82.24 44.20 44.22 6.67 46.89 2.89 38.98 153.27 22.21 54.84 82.60 41.04 35.27 11.73 11.29 24.50 15.64 27.02 16.04 20.60

+1.73 +1.65 +.23 +.37 +1.39 +.02 +.63 +4.93 +.02 +1.59 +1.22 +.45 +.37 +.28 +.14 +.19 +.17 +.12 -.06 +.51

-3.7 +4.3 -4.8 -62.3 -18.2 +39.6 +4.1 +10.1 -1.2 -17.4 -1.4 -9.1 +9.8 +.3 -7.3 -9.2 -7.6 -12.8 +13.8 +8.8

Prime rate Time period

NYSE

YTD Last Chg %Chg

Most Active ($1 or more) Vol (00)

Last Chg

BkofAm S&P500ETF SPDR Fncl FordM iShR2K

1663344 1376972 834650 598307 577244

10.80 -.17 129.32 +1.62 15.06 +.08 13.43 +.29 79.45 +1.67

Gainers ($2 or more) VlyNB wt18 ChiNBorun AmrRlty ECDang n MediaGen

Last

Chg %Chg

3.75 +1.08 +40.4 4.95 +1.03 +26.3 3.20 +.62 +24.0 12.88 +2.14 +19.9 3.95 +.59 +17.6

Losers ($2 or more) Name KV PhmA KV PhmB ChinaDEd DollarTh iP SER2K

Last

Chg %Chg

2.52 -.72 -22.2 2.61 -.74 -22.1 2.66 -.29 -9.7 72.43 -7.44 -9.3 34.70 -3.36 -8.8

3.25 3.25 3.25

Nasdaq

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Last Chg

Name

40588 31440 30884 28437 25499

9.45 +.30 6.53 +1.03 2.36 -.06 5.79 +.10 8.63 +.21

Cisco SiriusXM Intel Microsoft PwShs QQQ

Gainers ($2 or more)

Vol (00)

2,551 504 101 3,156 30 28

Last

OrsusXel rs Express-1 EstnLtCap BioTime RareEle g

6.53 +1.03 +18.7 2.53 +.34 +15.5 3.34 +.43 +14.8 4.55 +.39 +9.4 9.86 +.67 +7.3

Chg %Chg

Name

Last

NF EngSv HanwhaSol Fundtch ChiValve PatrkInd

Losers ($2 or more)

Last Chg 15.08 1.96 21.82 24.22 55.34

+.02 +.05 +.44 +.18 +.70

Chg %Chg

2.39 +.39 +19.5 6.03 +.89 +17.3 20.28 +2.88 +16.6 3.39 +.48 +16.5 2.08 +.26 +14.3

Losers ($2 or more)

Name

Last

Chg %Chg

Name

EngySvc un Accelr8 PernixTh ChinaPhH InstFnMkts

3.18 5.65 8.09 2.30 3.45

-.39 -10.9 -.64 -10.2 -.74 -8.4 -.16 -6.5 -.24 -6.5

ChiCera un PaciraPh n Epocrates n SigaTech h BonaFilm n

305 162 37 504 ... 10

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

897627 630232 499069 401478 372257

Gainers ($2 or more)

Name

Last

Diary

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

52-Week High Low Name

Most Active ($1 or more)

Vol (00)

NovaGld g OrsusXel rs GoldStr g KodiakO g CheniereEn

Diary

Percent

Last Previous day A week ago

Amex

Name

Name

Indexes

Chg %Chg

4.00 -.85 -17.5 11.60 -1.62 -12.3 15.92 -1.93 -10.8 10.86 -1.24 -10.2 4.08 -.46 -10.1

Diary 2,036 592 101 2,729 30 66

12,876.00 9,614.32 Dow Jones Industrials 5,565.78 3,872.64 Dow Jones Transportation 441.86 353.53 Dow Jones Utilities 8,718.25 6,355.83 NYSE Composite 2,490.51 1,770.05 Amex Index 2,887.75 2,061.14 Nasdaq Composite 1,370.58 1,010.91 S&P 500 14,562.01 10,596.20 Wilshire 5000 868.57 587.66 Russell 2000

World markets

Last

Net Chg

12,076.11 5,168.14 426.63 8,132.77 2,320.89 2,678.72 1,287.87 13,635.27 793.99

+123.14 +95.56 +2.18 +115.71 +20.91 +39.03 +16.04 +182.16 +16.79

YTD %Chg %Chg +1.03 +1.88 +.51 +1.44 +.91 +1.48 +1.26 +1.35 +2.16

52-wk %Chg

+4.31 +1.20 +5.34 +2.12 +5.09 +.97 +2.40 +2.06 +1.32

+16.06 +15.69 +13.10 +16.35 +23.33 +16.17 +15.48 +16.21 +18.72

Currencies

Here is how key international stock markets performed Tuesday.

Key currency exchange rates Tuesday compared with late Monday in New York.

Market

Dollar vs:

Amsterdam Brussels Paris London Frankfurt Hong Kong Mexico Milan New Zealand Tokyo Seoul Singapore Sydney Zurich

Close

% Change

337.52 2,590.15 3,864.58 5,803.13 7,204.79 22,496.00 35,445.65 20,358.91 3,488.85 9,547.79 2,076.83 3,057.39 4,651.10 5,748.31

+1.04 s +.76 s +1.50 s +.51 s +1.69 s -.05 t +1.28 s +1.38 s +.35 s +1.05 s +1.37 s -.05 t +.35 s +.73 s

Exchange Rate

Australia Dollar Britain Pound Canada Dollar Chile Peso China Yuan Euro Euro Hong Kong Dollar Japan Yen Mexico Peso Russia Ruble So. Korea Won Sweden Krona Switzerlnd Franc Taiwan Dollar

Pvs Day

1.0696 1.6386 1.0331 .002145 .1543 1.4468 .1285 .012420 .084839 .0359 .000923 .1582 1.1848 .0346

1.0621 1.6370 1.0239 .002138 .1542 1.4412 .1284 .012470 .084326 .0357 .000924 .1581 1.1933 .0346

Selected mutual funds YTD Name NAV Chg %Ret Amer Beacon Insti: LgCapInst 19.87 +0.20 +1.9 Amer Beacon Inv: LgCap Inv 18.86 +0.20 +1.8 Amer Century Inv: EqInc x 7.33 +0.01 +2.7 GrowthI 26.42 +0.42 +2.2 Ultra 23.53 +0.36 +3.9 American Funds A: AmcpA p 19.41 +0.23 +3.1 AMutlA p 26.19 +0.28 +4.0 BalA p 18.36 +0.13 +3.5 BondA p 12.36 -0.05 +2.9 CapIBA p 51.90 +0.50 +5.0 CapWGA p 36.98 +0.43 +4.0 CapWA p 21.17 -0.04 +4.6 EupacA p 42.67 +0.50 +3.1 FdInvA p 37.86 +0.53 +3.8 GwthA p 30.96 +0.41 +1.7 HI TrA p 11.43 -0.01 +4.7 IncoA p 17.23 +0.13 +5.1 IntBdA p 13.54 -0.03 +1.9 ICAA p 28.35 +0.32 +1.6 NEcoA p 26.31 +0.30 +3.9 N PerA p 29.34 +0.34 +2.5 NwWrldA 54.97 +0.49 +0.7 SmCpA p 39.14 +0.46 +0.7 TxExA p 12.06 -0.02 +3.9 WshA p 28.51 +0.34 +5.4 Artio Global Funds: IntlEqI r 30.21 +0.44 +0.2 IntEqII I r 12.51 +0.19 +0.4 Artisan Funds: Intl 22.61 +0.25 +4.2 IntlVal r 28.35 +0.23 +4.6 MidCap 35.41 +0.70 +5.3 MidCapVal 21.62 +0.26 +7.7 Baron Funds: Growth 54.03 +0.74 +5.5 Bernstein Fds: IntDur 13.93 -0.05 +3.3 DivMu 14.49 -0.02 +3.1 TxMgdIntl 15.74 +0.20 +0.1

BlackRock A: EqtyDiv 18.24 +0.22 GlAlA r 19.91 +0.14 BlackRock B&C: GlAlC t 18.54 +0.13 BlackRock Instl: EquityDv 18.28 +0.22 GlbAlloc r 20.02 +0.14 Calamos Funds: GrwthA p 54.07 +1.00 Columbia Class A: Acorn t 29.63 +0.56 DivEqInc 10.31 +0.17 Columbia Class Z: Acorn Z 30.58 +0.59 AcornIntZ 40.81 +0.39 ValRestr 50.31 +1.04 Credit Suisse Comm: ComRet t 9.55 +0.03 DFA Funds: IntlCorEq 11.42 +0.15 USCorEq2 11.25 +0.18 Davis Funds A: NYVen A 34.64 +0.33 Davis Funds C & Y: NYVenY 35.04 +0.34 NYVen C 33.39 +0.32 Delaware Invest A: Diver Inc p 9.34 -0.03 Dimensional Fds: EmMCrEq 21.82 +0.21 EmMktV 35.07 +0.28 IntSmVa 17.50 +0.20 LargeCo 10.15 +0.13 USLgVa 21.02 +0.27 US Small 21.88 +0.48 US SmVa 25.64 +0.59 IntlSmCo 17.53 +0.18 Fixd 10.35 -0.01 IntVa 18.54 +0.27 Glb5FxInc 11.19 -0.03 2YGlFxd 10.21 Dodge&Cox: Balanced 72.50 +0.50 Income 13.53 -0.04

+4.5 +2.5 +2.2 +4.6 +2.7 +1.3 +2.4 +2.4 +2.6 +2.2 -0.2 +2.2 +3.1 +3.1 +0.9 +1.0 +0.5 +3.5 -1.0 -2.6 +2.9 +3.3 +5.1 +2.7 +0.4 +3.2 +0.5 +2.9 +2.8 +0.6 +3.8 +3.3

IntlStk 36.18 +0.33 Stock 111.33 +1.13 DoubleLine Funds: TRBd I 11.11 Eaton Vance A: LgCpVal 18.21 +0.20 Eaton Vance I: FltgRt 9.05 GblMacAbR 10.17 +0.01 LgCapVal 18.25 +0.20 FMI Funds: LgCap p 16.34 +0.19 FPA Funds: FPACres 27.98 +0.19 Fairholme 31.68 +0.05 Fidelity Advisor A: NwInsgh p 20.14 +0.27 StrInA 12.64 -0.01 Fidelity Advisor I: NwInsgtI 20.36 +0.28 Fidelity Freedom: FF2010 13.94 +0.07 FF2015 11.65 +0.07 FF2020 14.16 +0.09 FF2020K 13.39 +0.09 FF2025 11.83 +0.10 FF2030 14.13 +0.12 FF2030K 13.77 +0.11 FF2035 11.77 +0.12 FF2040 8.22 +0.08 Fidelity Invest: AllSectEq 12.69 +0.17 AMgr50 15.79 +0.08 Balanc 18.74 +0.12 BalancedK 18.75 +0.13 BlueChGr 46.64 +0.84 Canada 58.29 +1.36 CapAp 26.02 +0.43 CpInc r 9.59 +0.04 Contra 68.54 +0.96 ContraK 68.55 +0.96 DisEq 23.36 +0.32 DivIntl 30.80 +0.40 DivrsIntK r 30.79 +0.39 DivGth 28.87 +0.44

+1.3 +3.7 NA +0.4 +2.8 +1.0 +0.5 +4.7 +4.4 -11.0 +1.1 +4.4 +1.3 +3.0 +3.1 +3.1 +3.1 +3.1 +3.0 +3.1 +3.0 +3.0 +2.7 +2.7 +3.1 +3.2 +2.8 +0.2 +2.7 +4.4 +1.3 +1.4 +3.7 +2.2 +2.2 +1.5

EmrMk 26.08 Eq Inc 45.29 EQII 18.71 Fidel 33.42 FltRateHi r 9.83 GNMA 11.70 GovtInc 10.58 GroCo 87.93 GroInc 18.76 GrowthCoK 87.93 HighInc r 9.07 Indepn 24.77 IntBd 10.73 IntlDisc 33.42 InvGrBd 11.59 InvGB 7.53 LgCapVal 11.85 LevCoStk 29.21 LowP r 40.65 LowPriK r 40.65 Magelln 71.36 MidCap 28.37 MuniInc 12.55 NwMkt r 15.90 OTC 57.47 100Index 8.94 Ovrsea 33.17 Puritn 18.42 SCmdtyStrt 12.75 SrsIntGrw 11.55 SrsIntVal 10.28 SrInvGrdF 11.59 STBF 8.52 SmllCpS r 19.88 StratInc 11.31 StrReRt r 9.89 TotalBd 10.91 USBI 11.49 Value 70.64 Fidelity Selects: Gold r 45.96 Fidelity Spartan: ExtMkIn 38.93 500IdxInv 45.76

+0.36 +0.51 +0.21 +0.54

-0.04 +1.52 +0.22 +1.52 +0.01 +0.51 -0.03 +0.39 -0.04 -0.03 +0.15 +0.57 +0.49 +0.49 +1.07 +0.51 -0.02 +0.88 +0.09 +0.36 +0.16 +0.04 +0.13 +0.14 -0.05 -0.01 +0.41 -0.01 +0.03 -0.04 -0.05 +1.15

-1.0 +2.6 +2.8 +4.0 +1.6 +3.6 +2.4 +5.7 +2.8 +5.8 +4.2 +1.7 +3.1 +1.2 +3.0 +3.3 +3.4 +2.8 +5.9 +6.0 -0.3 +3.4 +4.2 +4.2 +4.6 +2.3 +2.1 +3.2 +0.9 +2.3 +3.4 +3.0 +1.4 +1.4 +4.5 +3.7 +3.4 +2.8 +2.8

+0.67 -10.1 +0.70 +3.3 +0.57 +3.3

IntlInxInv 36.40 +0.50 TotMktInv 37.55 +0.52 Fidelity Spart Adv: 500IdxAdv 45.77 +0.58 TotMktAd r 37.55 +0.51 First Eagle: GlblA 47.93 +0.51 OverseasA 23.28 +0.18 Frank/Temp Frnk A: FedTFA p 11.60 FoundAl p 11.02 +0.08 HYTFA p 9.91 IncomA p 2.22 USGovA p 6.82 -0.02 Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv: GlbBdAdv 13.90 +0.10 IncmeAd 2.21 +0.01 Frank/Temp Frnk C: IncomC t 2.24 Frank/Temp Mtl A&B: SharesA 21.53 +0.17 Frank/Temp Temp A: ForgnA p 7.49 +0.07 GlBd A p 13.94 +0.05 GrwthA p 19.01 +0.20 WorldA p 15.58 +0.16 Frank/Temp Tmp B&C: GlBdC p 13.96 +0.05 GE Elfun S&S: S&S PM 41.03 +0.50 GMO Trust III: Quality 21.10 +0.20 GMO Trust VI: EmgMkts r 13.88 +0.16 Quality 21.11 +0.18 Goldman Sachs A: MdCVA p 36.86 +0.58 Goldman Sachs Inst: HiYield 7.34 MidCapV 37.18 +0.58 Harbor Funds: Bond 12.39 -0.01 CapApInst 38.04 +0.63 IntlInv t 62.70 +0.60 Intl r 63.38 +0.60

+3.8 +3.4 +3.3 +3.4 +3.4 +2.7 +5.1 +5.4 +5.3 +5.0 +2.9 +4.5 +5.1 +4.7 +4.3 +7.3 +4.5 +6.9 +5.0 +4.2 +2.0 +5.5 +2.5 +5.5 +2.7 +4.1 +2.8 +3.2 +3.6 +4.5 +4.7

Hartford Fds A: CpAppA p 33.75 +0.41 Hartford Fds Y: CapAppI 33.79 +0.41 Hartford HLS IA : CapApp 42.50 +0.60 Div&Gr 20.17 +0.20 TotRetBd 11.20 Hussman Funds: StrGrowth 12.35 -0.04 IVA Funds: Wldwide I r 17.26 +0.15 Invesco Funds A: Chart p 16.90 +0.20 CmstkA 16.11 +0.15 EqIncA 8.76 +0.06 GrIncA p 19.62 +0.19 Ivy Funds: AssetSC t 24.27 +0.35 AssetStA p 25.06 +0.37 AssetStrI r 25.29 +0.37 JPMorgan A Class: CoreBd A 11.61 -0.04 JPMorgan Sel Cls: CoreBd 11.61 -0.03 HighYld 8.25 ShtDurBd 11.02 -0.01 USLCCrPls 20.78 +0.24 Janus T Shrs: OvrseasT r 46.59 +0.42 PrkMCVal T 23.26 +0.27 Twenty T 64.07 +0.58 John Hancock Cl 1: LSBalanc 13.23 +0.11 LSGrwth 13.17 +0.15 Lazard Instl: EmgMktI 21.40 +0.20 Lazard Open: EmgMkO p 21.77 +0.19 Longleaf Partners: Partners 30.17 +0.36 Loomis Sayles: LSBondI 14.84 +0.01 StrInc C 15.48 +0.02 LSBondR 14.79 +0.01

-2.5 -2.5 +0.3 +3.4 +2.8 +0.5 +3.2 +4.6 +2.8 +2.4 +2.3 +2.3 +2.7 +2.8 +2.8 +2.9 +4.3 +1.1 +0.5 -8.0 +3.1 -2.5 +3.0 +2.6 -1.7 -1.9 +6.8 +6.3 +6.1 +6.2

StrIncA 15.40 +0.10 Loomis Sayles Inv: InvGrBdY 12.47 -0.02 Lord Abbett A: AffilA p 11.64 +0.15 BdDebA p 7.97 ShDurIncA p 4.60 Lord Abbett C: ShDurIncC t 4.63 -0.01 MFS Funds A: TotRA 14.43 +0.07 ValueA 23.65 +0.23 MFS Funds I: ValueI 23.77 +0.24 Manning&Napier Fds: WldOppA 9.10 +0.10 MergerFd 16.20 +0.10 Metro West Fds: TotRetBd 10.49 -0.03 TotRtBdI 10.49 -0.02 MorganStanley Inst: MCapGrI 39.97 +0.48 Mutual Series: GblDiscA 30.20 +0.20 GlbDiscZ 30.65 +0.24 QuestZ 18.36 +0.11 SharesZ 21.72 +0.17 Neuberger&Berm Inv: GenesInst 48.36 +0.79 Neuberger&Berm Tr: Genesis 50.07 +0.82 Northern Funds: HiYFxInc 7.40 Oakmark Funds I: EqtyInc r 28.69 +0.29 Intl I r 20.01 +0.19 Oakmark r 42.96 +0.51 Old Westbury Fds: GlobOpp 8.10 +0.10 GlbSMdCap 16.11 +0.18 Oppenheimer A: DvMktA p 35.60 +0.30 GlobA p 63.65 +0.81 GblStrIncA 4.30 IntBdA p 6.74 +0.01

+6.5 +5.0 +0.7 +4.8 +2.0 +1.6 +3.3 +4.0 +4.1 +5.7 +2.7 +3.0 +3.2 +7.0 +3.6 +3.8 +3.8 +4.5 +5.2 +5.1 NA +3.4 +3.1 +4.0 +5.1 +4.1 -2.4 +5.4 +4.9 +4.5

MnStFdA 32.47 +0.37 RisingDivA 16.13 +0.21 S&MdCpVl 33.37 +0.51 Oppenheimer B: RisingDivB 14.60 +0.20 S&MdCpVl 28.52 +0.44 Oppenheimer C&M: RisingDvC p 14.55 +0.19 Oppenheimer Roch: RcNtMuA 6.70 Oppenheimer Y: DevMktY 35.26 +0.22 IntlBdY 6.74 +0.01 PIMCO Admin PIMS: TotRtAd 11.02 -0.01 PIMCO Instl PIMS: AlAsetAut r 11.01 AllAsset 12.56 +0.02 ComodRR 9.57 +0.02 DevLcMk r 11.10 +0.10 DivInc 11.61 HiYld 9.39 InvGrCp 10.71 -0.03 LowDu 10.50 RealRtnI 11.65 -0.03 ShortT 9.90 TotRt 11.02 -0.01 PIMCO Funds A: RealRtA p 11.60 TotRtA 11.02 -0.01 PIMCO Funds C: TotRtC t 11.02 -0.01 PIMCO Funds D: TRtn p 11.02 -0.01 PIMCO Funds P: TotRtnP 11.02 -0.01 Perm Port Funds: Permannt 47.94 +0.24 Pioneer Funds A: PionFdA p 41.62 +0.62 Price Funds: BlChip 38.99 +0.63 CapApp 21.16 +0.16 EmMktS 34.61 +0.33 EqInc 24.17 +0.26

+0.2 +4.3 +4.2 +3.8 +3.7 +3.9 +5.5 -2.2 +4.6 +3.0 +4.9 +4.8 +5.8 +5.6 +4.1 +4.3 +4.6 +2.1 +4.8 +1.0 +3.1 +4.6 +2.9 +2.6 +3.0 +3.1 +4.6 +1.8 +2.3 +4.2 -1.9 +2.4

EqIndex 34.82 Growth 32.55 HlthSci 35.13 HiYield 6.86 IntlBond 10.41 Intl G&I 14.11 IntlStk 14.62 MidCap 61.09 MCapVal 24.53 N Asia 19.31 New Era 51.97 N Horiz 35.82 N Inc 9.57 R2010 15.83 R2015 12.27 R2020 16.95 R2025 12.41 R2030 17.80 R2035 12.60 R2040 17.93 ShtBd 4.86 SmCpStk 35.93 SmCapVal 36.49 SpecIn 12.57 Value 24.16 Putnam Funds A: GrInA p 13.72 VoyA p 22.72 Royce Funds: PennMuI r 12.02 PremierI r 21.48 Schwab Funds: 1000Inv r 38.41 S&P Sel 20.22 Scout Funds: Intl 33.35 Selected Funds: AmShD 41.85 Sequoia 141.38 Templeton Instit: ForEqS 21.06 Third Avenue Fds: ValueInst 50.83 Thornburg Fds: IntValA p 29.24

+0.44 +3.2 +0.56 +1.2 +0.39 +16.0 -0.01 +4.5 +5.9 +0.19 +6.0 +0.14 +2.7 +0.94 +4.4 +0.33 +3.5 +0.18 +0.7 +0.91 -0.4 +0.68 +7.0 -0.04 +2.4 +0.09 +3.2 +0.09 +3.2 +0.15 +3.1 +0.13 +3.1 +0.20 +3.0 +0.20 +3.0 +0.22 +2.9 -0.01 +1.3 +0.70 +4.4 +0.73 +1.0 +3.5 +0.26 +3.5 +0.17 NA +0.40 -4.2 +0.23 +3.2 +0.38 +5.6 +0.50 +3.3 +0.26 +3.3 +0.47 +3.0 +0.39 +1.1 +1.58 +9.4 +0.25 +5.0 +0.32 -1.8 +0.31 +4.4

IntValue I 29.90 Tweedy Browne: GblValue 24.50 Vanguard Admiral: BalAdml 21.95 CAITAdm 10.97 CpOpAdl 77.70 EMAdmr r 39.68 Energy 130.33 ExplAdml 71.26 ExtdAdm 42.75 500Adml 119.12 GNMA Ad 10.94 GrwAdm 32.31 HlthCr 58.57 HiYldCp 5.79 InfProAd 26.57 ITBdAdml 11.40 ITsryAdml 11.57 IntGrAdm 63.13 ITAdml 13.57 ITGrAdm 9.98 LtdTrAd 11.09 LTGrAdml 9.47 LT Adml 10.91 MCpAdml 96.59 MuHYAdm 10.30 PrmCap r 70.17 ReitAdm r 83.96 STsyAdml 10.77 STBdAdml 10.63 ShtTrAd 15.91 STIGrAd 10.78 SmCAdm 35.95 TtlBAdml 10.72 TStkAdm 32.51 WellslAdm 54.53 WelltnAdm 55.34 Windsor 46.59 WdsrIIAd 47.65 Vanguard Fds: AssetA 25.15 CapOpp 33.63 DivdGro 15.20

+0.40 +4.6 +0.20 +2.9 +0.13 +3.2 -0.01 +4.2 +1.20 +1.2 +0.42 -0.5 +2.36 +7.8 +1.46 +5.0 +0.79 +3.6 +1.49 +3.3 -0.04 +3.4 +0.48 +2.5 +0.52 +14.3 +4.9 -0.08 +4.7 +3.9 -0.06 +3.3 +0.72 +2.6 -0.01 +4.0 -0.06 +3.7 +1.9 -0.12 +4.0 -0.01 +4.3 +1.56 +4.8 +4.2 +0.96 +2.8 +1.25 +7.8 -0.01 +1.2 -0.02 +1.8 +0.9 -0.02 +1.8 +0.74 +3.4 -0.05 +2.7 +0.44 +3.4 +0.05 +4.7 +0.28 +3.7 +0.56 +2.2 +0.49 +4.6 +0.33 +2.9 +0.48 +1.2 +0.20 +5.7

Energy 69.40 EqInc 21.62 Explr 76.53 GNMA 10.94 GlobEq 18.53 HYCorp 5.79 HlthCre 138.78 InflaPro 13.53 IntlGr 19.83 IntlVal 32.48 ITIGrade 9.98 LifeCon 16.73 LifeGro 22.71 LifeMod 20.14 LTIGrade 9.47 Morg 18.50 MuInt 13.57 PrecMtls r 25.43 PrmcpCor 14.24 Prmcp r 67.61 SelValu r 19.57 STAR 19.68 STIGrade 10.78 StratEq 19.63 TgtRetInc 11.57 TgRe2010 23.02 TgtRe2015 12.80 TgRe2020 22.77 TgtRe2025 13.01 TgRe2030 22.35 TgtRe2035 13.50 TgtRe2040 22.16 TgtRe2045 13.92 USGro 18.83 Wellsly 22.51 Welltn 32.04 Wndsr 13.80 WndsII 26.84 Vanguard Idx Fds: TotIntAdm r 26.94 TotIntlInst r 107.80 500 119.09 MidCap 21.27 SmCap 35.90

+7.7 +6.8 +5.0 +3.3 +3.8 +4.9 +1.24 +14.2 -0.04 +4.7 +0.22 +2.5 +0.36 +1.0 -0.06 +3.6 +0.08 +2.7 +0.25 +2.9 +0.15 +2.9 -0.12 +4.0 +0.40 +2.6 -0.01 +4.0 +0.22 -4.7 +0.20 +3.4 +0.93 +2.8 +0.30 +4.3 +0.12 +3.1 -0.02 +1.8 +0.39 +7.2 +0.02 +3.1 +0.10 +3.2 +0.10 +3.1 +0.16 +3.0 +0.12 +3.1 +0.23 +3.1 +0.20 +3.1 +0.26 +3.1 +0.17 +3.1 +0.30 +3.2 +0.03 +4.6 +0.17 +3.7 +0.20 +2.1 +0.28 +4.6

SmlCpGth

23.01 +0.50 +5.0

SmlCpVl

16.26 +0.32 +1.6

+0.34 +1.40 +1.49 +0.34 +0.80

CorePlus I

+1.30 +0.27 +1.57 -0.04 +0.24

+2.2 +2.3 +3.3 +4.7 +3.3

STBnd

10.63 -0.02 +1.7

TotBnd

10.72 -0.05 +2.6

TotlIntl

16.11 +0.21 +2.2

TotStk

32.50 +0.50 +3.4

Vanguard Instl Fds: BalInst

21.96 +0.14 +3.3

DevMkInst

10.34 +0.13 +3.6

ExtIn

42.75 +0.79 +3.6

FTAllWldI r

96.17 +1.22 +2.5

GrwthIst

32.31 +0.48 +2.5

InfProInst

10.82 -0.04 +4.7

InstIdx

118.29 +1.48 +3.3

InsPl

118.30 +1.50 +3.3

InsTStPlus

29.41 +0.41 +3.5

MidCpIst

21.34 +0.35 +4.8

SCInst

35.95 +0.74 +3.4

TBIst

10.72 -0.05 +2.7

TSInst

32.52 +0.45 +3.4

Vanguard Signal: 500Sgl

98.40 +1.30 +3.3

MidCpIdx

30.48 +0.49 +4.8

STBdIdx

10.63 -0.02 +1.8

TotBdSgl

10.72 -0.05 +2.7

TotStkSgl

31.38 +0.43 +3.4

Western Asset: 10.98 -0.03 +3.6

Yacktman Funds: Fund p

17.55 +0.13 +6.1


B USI N ESS

B6 Wednesday, June 15, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

M  Twins seek to take Facebook lawsuit to Supreme Court By Jessica Guynn Los Angeles Times

SAN FRANCISCO — Facebook’s bid to end litigation with the Winklevoss twins was put on hold this week when the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals suspended all litigation while the brothers file a request with the U.S. Supreme Court. Tyler and Cameron Winklevoss, who allege that Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg stole their idea for the social network-

ing site, are hoping to reverse the federal appeals court decision to uphold a $65 million cash-andstock settlement they reached with Facebook in 2008. They say Facebook duped them because it did not give them an accurate valuation of the shares they would receive. The Winklevosses are fighting Facebook in federal courts in San Francisco and Boston. The Massachusetts court put its case on hold while the California court ruled.

NEWS OF RECORD BANKRUPTCIES Chapter 7 Filed June 7

Christina Long, 1001 S.E. 15th St., Unit 69, Bend Mike Reed, 309 N.W. Hemlock Ct., Redmond Keith W. Engstrom, 20011 S. Alderwood Circle, Bend Christopher D. Larson, 4784 N.E. Vaughn Ave., Terrebonne Christie D. Loomis, 14646 Bear Berry Lane, La Pine Samuel J. Loomis, 339 S.E. Reed Market Rd., Apt L2, Bend Marshall P. and Sarah K. Fox, 2967 N.E. Stanton Ave., #2, Bend Theodore Holland Settlemier, II, P.O. Box 2064, Bend Connie F. McCormack, 4784 N.E. Vaughn Ave., Terrebonne Shannon D. Newman and Tina C. Newman, 3016 N.E. Heather Court, Bend Filed June 9

Malea M. Shockney, P.O. Box 942, Prineville Richard A. and Deborah A. Surrey, P.O. Box 3329, Lapine Linda L. Luna-Mecham, 17815 Bear Paw Lane, Bend Daniel M. Westbrook, 16136 Black Feather Lane, LaPine

Chester E. and Evelyn R. Adamsky, 61164 Benham Road, Bend Filed June 10

Brian L. and Jennifer L. Bascue, 16184 Snowberry Lane, La Pine Filed June 11

Billie S. Baker, 5255 N.W. Homestead Way, Redmond Millie F. Lynch-Harlan, 1330 N.W. Locust, Prineville Jenifer E. Smith, 61839 27th St., Bend Filed June 12

Peter K. Gassner, 21160 Limestone Ave., Bend Filed June 13

Rachel L. Phillips, 21285 E. Highway 20, #159, Bend Mark C. Chambers, P.O. Box 2773, La Pine and Bonita L. Chambers, 52295 Parkway, La Pine Benjamin C. and Jamie L. Vogt, 3836 S.W 35th Place, Redmond Scott D. and Jenifer L. Plattner, 2333 N.E. Mary Rose Place, #1, Bend Donald G. Brown, Jr. and Jennifer K. Niemela-Brown, 1935 N.W. Poplar Ave., Redmond Todd B. and Dina L. Harbert, 2982 S.W. 27th St., Redmond

BUSINESS CALENDAR TODAY BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL WEEKLY MEETING: Starts promptly at 7 a.m.; free; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-550-6603. EXCEL 2007 BEGINNING: Twoafternoon class. Registration required; $59; 1-4 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-3837270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. HOME-BUYING CLASS: Registration required; free; 5:30-9:30 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 2303 S.W. First St., Redmond; 541-318-7506, ext. 109.

THURSDAY BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL WEEKLY MEETING: Starts promptly at 7 a.m.; free; Bend Masonic Center, 1036 N.E. Eighth St.; 541-610-9125. ENTREPRENEUR’S SPOTLIGHT, MAINTAINING BUSINESS SUCCESS: Small Business Association’s monthly web chat. 2011 Rhode Island business person of the year, Kathleen Devlin, will share her success story of building her business, All About Home Care, from one employee to a staff of 68. Questions for the chat can be posted online in advance; free; 10 a.m.; www.sba.gov. HOW TO START A BUSINESS: Registration required; $15; 11 a.m.-1 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Redmond campus, 2030 S.E. College Loop, Redmond; 541-3837290 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. GET STARTED WITH INVESTING: Understand the basics of risk, asset allocation, diversification and feel more confident making investment decisions. Registration required; free; noon-1 p.m.; Charles Schwab & Co., 777 N.W. Wall St., Suite 201, Bend; 541-318-1794, luiz.soutomaior@ schwab.com or www.schwab.com.

FRIDAY TOWN HALL FORUM, 2011 COUNTY

FORECAST BREAKFAST: Deschutes County Administrator Dave Kanner and Commissioners Tammy Baney, Tony DeBone and Alan Unger will answer questions about Deschutes County government. Registration required; $30 for Bend Chamber members, $40 for others; 7:30 a.m.; Bend Golf and Country Club, 61045 Country Club Drive; 541-382-3221 or www.bendchamber.org. OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Preregistration required; $35; 9 a.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com. FREE TAX FRIDAY: Tax return reviews. Call to schedule an appointment; free; 3-4 p.m.; Zoom Tax, 963 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite 100, Bend; 541-385-9666 or www.facebook.com/Zoomtax.

MONDAY FARM AND TRACTOR SAFETY TRAINING: A two-day course for 14to 17-year-olds with classroom work as well as hands-on experience with a variety of tractors and implements. Register by June 10; $50; 8 a.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-548-6088, reaza.mansur@ oregonstate.edu or http://extension. oregonstate.edu/deschutes/. OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Preregistration required; $35; 4 p.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com.

TUESDAY CRISIS COMMUNICATION PLANNING: Agility Recovery and Small Business Association

present a discussion about learning the steps and best practices for developing an emergency communication process; free; 11 a.m.; https://www1.gotomeeting. com/register/748002384. HOW TO START A BUSINESS: Registration required; $15; 6-8 p.m.; Midstate Electric Cooperative, 16755 Finley Butte Road, La Pine; 541-3837290 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu.

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY June 23 BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL WEEKLY MEETING: Starts promptly at 7 a.m.; free; Bend Masonic Center, 1036 N.E. Eighth St.; 541-610-9125. GETTING THE MOST OUT OF SCHWAB.COM: Registration required; free; noon-1 p.m.; Charles Schwab & Co., 777 N.W. Wall St., Suite 201, Bend; 541-318-1794, luiz.soutomaior@ schwab.com or www.schwab.com.

June 22 BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL WEEKLY MEETING: Starts promptly at 7 a.m.; free; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-550-6603. OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Registration required; $35; 9 a.m.; Abby’s Pizza, 1938 S. U.S. Highway 97, Redmond; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com. CENTRAL OREGON VISITORS ASSOCIATION 40TH ANNIVERSARY LUNCHEON: Keynote provided by Peter Yesawich, chairman and chief executive officer of Ypartnership; $30 for Central Oregon Visitor Association members; $40 for others; corporate tables also available; 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m.; The Riverhouse Convention Center, 2850 N.W. Rippling River Court, Bend; 800-800-8334, laura@ visitcentraloregon.com or http:// visitcentraloregon.com/. BEND CHAMBER BUSINESS AFTER HOURS: Celebrate NiswongerReynolds Funeral Home 100 years of service; free; 5 p.m.; NiswongerReynolds Funeral Home, 105 N.W. Irving Ave.; 541-382-3221 or www .bendchamber.org. UNDERSTANDING AND MANAGING CREDIT: Registration required; free; 5:30 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 2303 S.W. First St., Redmond; 541-3187506, ext. 109.

FRIDAY June 24 WORK ZONE FLAGGER CLASS: Covers the fundamental principles of traffic safety and meets the requirements of ODOT’s construction specifications. Registration required; $79; 9 a.m.-2 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. FREE TAX FRIDAY: Tax return reviews. Call to schedule an appointment; free; 3-4 p.m.; Zoom Tax, 963 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite 100, Bend; 541-385-9666 or www.facebook.com/Zoomtax.

SATURDAY June 25 OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Advance reregistration is required; $35; 9 a.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com.

get a room

ALWAYS STIRRING UP SOMETHING GOOD

Self Referrals Welcome Serving Central Oregon Since 1975

7:30 AM - 5:30 PM MON-FRI 8 AM - 3 PM SAT.

Chapter 13 Filed June 7

Peter L. Fracchia, 67237 Harrington Loop Road, Bend

If you have Marketplace events you would like to submit, please contact Marla Polenz at 541-617-7815, e-mail business@bendbulletin.com, or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at www.bendbulletin.com. Please allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication.

541-382-4171 541-548-7707 641 NW Fir Redmond

2121 NE Division Bend

541-706-6900

www.denfeldpaints.com

70 Years of Hearing Excellence

Call 541-389-9690

ATTENTION TOUR OF HOMES™ ADVERTISERS THE CENTRAL OREGON

BUILDERS ASSOCIATION

11

A SHOWCASE OF THE FINEST HOMES IN CENTRAL OREGON JULY 15, 16, 17 AND 22, 23, 24 Fridays: Noon – 6 pm, Saturdays and Sundays: 10 am – 6 pm Official Sponsors:

The Bulletin presents the Official Tour Guide, to be published Wednesday, July 13. Extra copies of the guide will also be distributed at the homes during the Tour.

Reach more than 70,000 adult readers in the official Tour of HomesTM Guide

ADVERTISING DEADLINE: FRIDAY, JUNE 24 Call your Bulletin sales representative today! Space is limited.

541-382-1811


L

Inside

OREGON Public safety funding last budget hurdle for lawmakers, see Page C2. LOCAL SCHOOLS Bend students hold school’s first film festival, see Page C3. WASHINGTON Utility gets the OK to begin removing dam this fall, see Page C6.

C

www.bendbulletin.com/local

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, JUNE 15, 2011

RIVERBEND PARK

IN BRIEF

Life jackets for location: rafting firm strikes deal

AARP offers driver safety courses AARP will offer driver safety courses throughout the summer to residents older than 50 who want to brush up on their driving skills. On June 27 and 28, the course will be held at the Bend Senior Center. Courses will also be offered July 25 and 26 at the center, and Aug. 25 and 26. All courses will run from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. Those interested in enrolling should call 541-388-1133. Courses will also be offered at the Redmond Senior Center on July 11 and 12, and Aug. 9 and 10. These classes will run from 8 a.m. to noon. Those interested in enrolling should call 541-548-6325. The La Pine Fire Hall will also feature the course July 5 and July 6 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Those interested in enrolling at this location should call 541-923-2326. — Bulletin staff report

By Nick Grube The Bulletin

In exchange for providing free life jackets to children during Bend’s summer floating season, Sun Country Tours will get a prime piece of public real estate to rent equipment such as float tubes and paddle boards. As part of an exclusive agreement with the Park & Recreation District, the Bend-based rafting service will be able to set up its rental operations in Riverbend Park from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. starting Saturday and ending Sept. 5. For its role in providing the land, the district will get 10 percent of whatever proceeds Sun Country brings in at the park. And the hope, according to the company’s proposal to the district, is that the money will be directed to riverside trails and park projects. “The only reason why I approved it is because of the safety factor,” Park District Executive Director Don Horton said. “They wanted to find a way to get life jackets in the hands of the people who need them, particularly kids.” Sun Country Tours will give free personal flotation devices, or PFDs, to children ages 12 and younger. For people older than 12, the cost of a life jacket is $2. All tube and paddle board rentals will include life jackets. Sun Country staff will also be available to answer questions about river safety. See River / C5

News of Record on Page C2.

HOW TO CO N TAC T Your state legislators SENATE Sen. Chris Telfer, R-Dist. 27 Phone: 503-986-1727 E-mail: sen.christelfer@state.or.us Sen. Doug Whitsett, R-Dist. 28 Phone: 503-986-1728 E-mail: sen.dougwhitsett@state.or.us Sen. Ted Ferrioli, R-Dist. 30 Phone: 503-986-1950 E-mail: sen.tedferrioli@state.or.us

FUN IN THE FLAGS

HOUSE Rep. Gene Whisnant, R-Dist. 53 Phone: 503-986-1453 E-mail: rep.genewhisnant@state.or.us Rep. Jason Conger, R-Dist. 54 Phone: 503-986-1454 E-mail: rep.jasonconger@state.or.us Rep. Mike McLane, R-Dist. 55 Phone: 503-986-1455 E-mail: rep.mikemclane@state.or.us Rep. John Huffman, R-Dist. 59 Phone: 503-986-1459 E-mail: rep.johnhuffman@state.or.us

Your D.C. delegation U.S. Rep. Greg Walden, R-Ore. Phone: 202-225-6730 Bend office: 541-389-4408 Web: walden.house.gov U.S. Sen. Jeff Merkley, D-Ore. Phone: 202-224-3753 Bend office: 541-318-1298 Web: merkley.senate.gov U.S. Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore. Phone: 202-224-5244 Bend office: 541-330-9142 Web: wyden.senate.gov

Photos by Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Extreme makeover:

Cave edition Upgrades at Lava River Cave speeding toward a July 1 opening By Kate Ramsayer The Bulletin

he cavernous opening, rock formations and crawl spaces at the end of the mile-long Lava River Cave will look the same to the 50,000 or so visitors expected this year. But this spring, the U.S. Forest Service is redoing a number of features at the mouth of the cave, which is located near U.S. Highway 97 south of Bend. It will receive a new entrance and exit route, new parking

T

HOW TO SUBMIT

Construction delays opening “They’re kind of under the gun, because we are open July 1,” McBride said. Construction at the Lava River Cave started in May, delaying the public opening for about a month. “We wanted to limit the construction delay into the season as much as possible,” he said. See Cave / C5

Civic Calendar notices: • E-mail: news@bendbulletin.com • Please write “Civic Calendar” in the subject line and include a contact name and daytime phone number. Obituaries and death notices: • Mail: Obituaries, P.O. Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708 • E-mail: obits@bendbulletin.com Births, engagements, marriages and anniversaries: • Mail information to Milestones, P.O. Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708, within one month of the celebration. • More details: Milestones publishes in Sunday’s Community Life section.

spots, a new walled overlook and more. On Monday morning, crews were smoothing the top layer of a lava-rock wall — a replacement for a chain-link fence that doesn’t quite fit in with the surroundings, said Scott McBride, with the Newberry National Volcanic Monument. Later in the day, workers were scheduled to pave some of the access roads and maybe start grading the trail between parking lots, restrooms and the overlook to meet Americans with Disabilities Act standards.

A sign warns visitors of hazards inside Lava River Cave while it’s closed, including icy conditions and the potential of waking hibernating critters.

Ball rolling on congressional redistricting

Correction

By Andrew Clevenger

In a brief headlined “State commission to vote on La Pine ethics complaint,” which appeared Tuesday, June 14, on Page C1, the date when La Pine Water District Commissioner Brian Earls’ term will expire was reported incorrectly. Earls’ term on the water district expires at the end of June 2013. The Bulletin regrets the error.

WASHINGTON — Now that lawmakers in Salem have redrawn their own district lines, they will turn their attention to tweaking the borders for Oregon’s five congressional districts. Republicans and Democrats have exchanged several versions of proposed maps with new boundaries, but they have yet to really sit down

The Bulletin

and start bargaining in earnest, said Sen. Chris Telfer, R-Bend, who is one of the negotiators. “We basically just really started (on the issue) on Friday. Early on in the session, we threw some maps out there, and then we got sidetracked with getting the state (legislative) maps done,” she said Monday. “We have our work cut out for us.” Still, given lawmakers’ success at

IN CONGRESS

recasting the state lines, Telfer remains optimistic that a deal can be worked out before the legislative session ends. “We just proved all the naysayers wrong today when the governor signed the (redistricting) bill,” she said. If the state legislature doesn’t get a congressional redistricting bill passed before the session ends, they won’t be able to take up the issue again until February 2012. See Districts / C5

Pete Erickson / The Bulletin

Aliyah Spackman, age 21⁄2 and from Redmond, reaches for one of the flags while playing at Centennial Park in Redmond on Tuesday. The flags were out as part of the Flag Day celebration.

Redmond fireworks show short $3,000 By Erik Hidle The Bulletin

Redmond’s Independence Day fireworks show needs an additional $3,000 in donations by the end of the day or the event will fail to launch come July 4. As of Tuesday night, the Redmond Chamber of Commerce had received $4,022.89 in donations from the community to support the event. But that isn’t enough. Charlie Rucker, finance director for the chamber, said the event will be canceled if the full $7,000 isn’t raised today. “The contract needs to be signed (Wednesday) because the fireworks folks need enough notice to get things ready,” Rucker said. “We can’t put on a partial show. We need to reach $7,000.” See Fireworks / C5


C2 Wednesday, June 15, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

N  R POLICE LOG The Bulletin will update items in the Police Log when such a request is received. Any new information, such as the dismissal of charges or acquittal, must be verifiable. For more information, call 541-383-0358. Bend Police Department

Theft — A cellphone was reported stolen at 8:08 a.m. June 10, in the 600 block of Northeast Third Street. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 9:08 a.m. June 10, in the 20400 block of Klahani Drive. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 10:11 a.m. June 10, in the 1500 block of Northwest Fifth Street. Theft — A laptop was reported stolen at 1:31 p.m. June 10, in the 3000 block of North U.S. Highway 97. Theft — A basketball hoop was reported stolen at 2:36 p.m. June 10, in the 60900 block of Amethyst Street. Theft — A theft was reported at 3:50 p.m. June 10, in the 100 block of Southeast Scott Street. Theft — A theft was reported and an arrest made at 5:17 p.m. June 10, in the 61500 block of South U.S. Highway 97. Theft — Clothing was reported stolen and an arrest made at 5:46 p.m. June 10, in the 3100 block of North U.S. Highway 97. DUII — Tamara Lynn Denetclaw, 22, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 10:54 p.m. June 10, in the 600 block of Southwest Powerhouse Drive. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 7:46 a.m. June 11, in the 1200 block of Southwest Wheeler Place. Criminal mischief — Damage to mailboxes was reported at 8:12 a.m. June 11, in the area of Northwest Juniper Street and Northwest Portland Avenue. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 8:32 a.m. June 11, in the 2100 block of Northeast Wells Acres Road. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered and items stolen at 8:53 a.m. June 11, in the 2800 block of Northeast Sandy Drive. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered and items stolen at 9:02 a.m. June 11, in the 2900 block of Northeast Lotno Drive. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered and items stolen at 9:22 a.m. June 11, in the 1000 block of Northeast Hidden Valley Drive. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered and items stolen at 9:44 a.m. June 11, in the 2900 block of Northeast Lotno Drive.

Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered and items stolen at 10:03 a.m. June 11, in the 2800 block of Northeast Lotno Drive. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered and items stolen at 10:14 a.m. June 11, in the 60100 block of Ridgeview Drive. Theft — A bicycle was reported stolen at 10:22 a.m. June 11, in the 21100 block of Reed Market Road. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered and items stolen at 10:26 a.m. June 11, in the 900 block of Northeast Hidden Valley Drive. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered and items stolen at 11:15 a.m. June 11, in the 1200 block of Northeast Ross Road. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered and items stolen at 1:28 p.m. June 11, in the 61500 block of Brosterhous Road. DUII — Kenneth Andrew Davis Jr., 25, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 1:57 p.m. June 11, in the area of Southeast 15th Street and Southeast Tempest Drive. Theft — A bicycle was reported stolen at 5:02 p.m. June 11, in the 1200 block of Northwest Newport Avenue. Criminal mischief — Damage to a vehicle was reported at 11:28 p.m. June 11, in the 1600 block of Northwest Kingston Avenue. DUII — Jay Tyler Ramey, 27, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 3:54 a.m. June 12, in the area of Northeast 12th Street and Northeast Greenwood Avenue. Theft — A theft was reported and an arrest made at 2:14 p.m. June 12, in the 3100 block of North U.S. Highway 97. Criminal mischief — Damage to a vehicle was reported and an arrest made at 6:34 p.m. June 12, in the area of Brookswood Boulevard and Lodgepole Drive. DUII — David Robert Michael Dale, 22, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 8:12 p.m. June 12, in the 100 block of Northwest Oregon Avenue. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered and items stolen at 9:27 p.m. June 12, in the 20100 block of Pinebrook Boulevard. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 8:05 a.m. June 13, in the 2400 block of Northeast Division Street. Redmond Police Department

Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 7:23 p.m. June 13, in the area of Southwest 31st Street and West Antler Avenue. Vehicle crash — An accident

was reported at 5:09 p.m. June 13, in the 2000 block of Southwest Canyon Drive. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 2:49 p.m. June 13, in the 600 block of Southwest Rimrock Way. Theft — A theft was reported and an arrest made at 1:59 p.m. June 13, in the 1300 block of Southwest Kalama Avenue. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 11:10 a.m. June 13, in the 1400 block of Southwest Evergreen Avenue. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 9:52 a.m. June 13, in the 1500 block of West Antler Avenue. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 9:04 a.m. June 13, in the area of Southwest 27th Street and Southwest Wickiup Avenue. Prineville Police Department

Theft — A theft was reported at 9:52 p.m. June 13, in the area of East First Street. Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office

Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 6:13 p.m. June 13, in the 19700 block of Baker Road in Bend. Theft — A firearm and cash were reported stolen at 5:52 p.m. June 13, in the 5300 block of Southwest McVey Avenue in Redmond. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 5:37 p.m. June 13, in the 500 block of South Locust Street in Sisters. Theft — A theft was reported and an arrest made at 9:57 a.m. June 13, in the 62200 block of Chickadee Lane in Bend. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 8:31 a.m. June 13, in the 21700 block of U.S. Highway 20 in Bend. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 8:19 a.m. June 13, in the 20600 block of Pine Vista Drive in Bend. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 4:34 a.m. June 13, in the area of Knott Road and South U.S. Highway 97 in Bend. Oregon State Police

DUII — Alysha Michelle Miller, 20, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 9:55 p.m. June 10, in the area of U.S. Highway 97 near milepost 197. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 2:35 p.m. June 13, in the area of U.S. Highway 97 and State Recreation Road in La Pine.

Public safety spending last major budget snag Means committee, which is responsible for the budget. SALEM — Most of Oregon’s Buckley said Republicans budget for the next two years backed out on an agreement has been approved or is work- among the three co-chairs to ing its way smoothly through close the hole by approving a the Legislature, but lawmakers package of bills that would save have so far been stumped on money in part by modifying how to finalize a spending plan probation requirements and refor public safety programs. ducing penalties for some firstFilling a $21 million time drug offenders. gap in spending for the Rep. Dennis RichDepartment of Corardson of Central rections is the largest Point, the only Repubremaining obstacle to lican among the three finishing the budget budget co-chairs, said as lawmakers race to there wasn’t support IN THE adjourn the legislative among GOP lawmakLEGISLATURE ers for modifying session, potentially as soon as next week. sentences. Democrats want to “I have no ability loosen some sentences to save to commit my caucus to” votmoney and thought they had ing for something, Richardson enough support to approve it, said. “We’re looking for other but Republicans are balking at alternatives.” that approach. Richardson declined to iden“It’s a serious problem at the tify the bills Republicans are last minute in a very crucial part asking for, saying they’re part of the budget at the last minute,” of private negotiations. Buckley said Rep. Peter Buckley, D-Ash- said Democrats have objected land, a co-chair of the Ways and because the GOP requests in-

By Jonathan J. Cooper The Associated Press

volve bills that aren’t related to public safety. Public safety spending, including prisons, the State Police and prosecutors, accounts for about 17 percent of the state general and lottery funds, the portion of the budget over which lawmakers have the most control. Prisons consume the largest chunk — about $1.3 billion in the current budget. Most public safety spending has been worked out, and all that remains in flux is prisons and police, said Sen. Richard Devlin, D-Tualatin, the third budget committee co-chair. “I’m hopeful that we will reach agreement sometime in the next 48 hours,” Devlin said. The Senate on Tuesday approved a budget for the Oregon Youth Authority, the state’s juvenile corrections agency. The budget cuts about one in five beds for the most serious offenders. Gov. John Kitzhaber had initially proposed cutting nearly half of those beds. The budget now goes to the House.

Dentist to immigrants defends slaying The Associated Press PORTLAND — An unlicensed Oregon dentist on trial for murder has testified that he shot a man in self-defense after the man barged into his house, demanded money and threatened him with a knife. Viktor Gebauer, 81, took the stand in his own defense Monday in Multnomah County Circuit Court to claim that he told Viktor Merezhnikov to leave several times, to no avail, The Oregonian reported. Gebauer, who treated fellow

Russian immigrants at home, said he was threatened before he retreated to hide cash and appointment books and take medication to calm his heart. Gebauer testified that he returned to the waiting room in his home where Merezhnikov was sitting with the TV on. Displaying a handgun, Gebauer again ordered Merezhnikov to leave, warning him he would shoot. “It seemed like he was about to pounce at me,” Gebauer testified through an interpreter. He saw a knife in Merezhnikov’s left hand

for the first time, he said. But prosecutors argue Merezhnikov was only seeking relief for the toothache that persisted for more than a week after Gebauer had removed a crown. Prosecutors also accused Gebauer of planting the knife in the dead man’s hand.

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Today is Wednesday, June 15, the 166th day of 2011. There are 199 days left in the year. TODAY’S HIGHLIGHT IN HISTORY On June 15, 1215, England’s King John put his seal to Magna Carta (“the Great Charter”) at Runnymede. ON THIS DATE In 1219, forces led by King Valdemar II of Denmark defeated the Estonians in the Battle of Lyndanisse. In 1775, the Second Continental Congress voted unanimously to appoint George Washington head of the Continental Army. In 1836, Arkansas became the 25th state. In 1849, James Polk, the 11th president of the United States, died in Nashville, Tenn. In 1864, Secretary of War Edwin M. Stanton signed an order establishing a military burial ground, which became Arlington National Cemetery. In 1904, more than 1,000 people died when fire erupted aboard the steamboat General Slocum in New York’s East River. In 1942, the Albert Camus novel “L’Etranger” (The Stranger) was first published in France. In 1944, American forces began their successful invasion of Saipan during World War II. B29 Superfortresses carried out their first raids on Japan. In 1978, King Hussein of Jordan married 26-year-old American Lisa Halaby, who became Queen Noor. In 1991, Mount Pinatubo in the northern Philippines exploded in one of the biggest volcanic eruptions of the 20th century, killing about 800 people.

T O D AY IN HISTORY

TEN YEARS AGO On the eve of his first meeting with Vladimir Putin, President George W. Bush, in Poland, chastised Russia for suspected nuclear commerce and encouraged the former Cold War rival to help “erase the false lines that have divided Europe.” The Los Angeles Lakers defeated the Philadelphia 76ers 108-96 in Game 5 to win their second straight NBA championship. FIVE YEARS AGO The death toll of U.S. servicemen and women in the Iraq war reached 2,500. A divided Supreme Court made it easier for police to barge into homes and seize evidence without knocking or waiting. House Democrats voted to strip embattled Louisiana Congressman William Jefferson of his seat on the House Ways and Means Committee while a federal bribery investigation ran its course. (Jefferson was later found guilty of taking bribes and is appealing his conviction.) Microsoft Corp. Chairman Bill Gates said he would transition from day-to-day responsibilities at the company to concentrate on the charitable work of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. ONE YEAR AGO In his first Oval Office address, President Barack Obama promised that “we will make BP pay for the damage their company has caused,” describing the massive oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico as a “siege” on the shores of America.

Mexican President Felipe Calderón appealed to his fellow citizens to support the fight against organized crime just hours after troops killed 15 suspected gang members.

TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS Former New York Gov. Mario Cuomo is 79. Rock musician Lee Dorman (Iron Butterfly) is 69. Rock singer-actor Johnny Hallyday is 68. Singer Russell Hitchcock (Air Supply) is 62. Rock singer Steve Walsh (Kansas) is 60. Comedian-actor Jim Belushi is 57. Country singer Terri Gibbs is 57. Actress Julie Hagerty is 56. Rock musician Brad Gillis (Night Ranger) is 54. Baseball Hall-ofFamer Wade Boggs is 53. Actress Eileen Davidson is 52. Bluegrass musician Terry Smith is 51. Actress Helen Hunt is 48. Rock musician Scott Rockenfield (Queensryche) is 48. Actress Courteney Cox is 47. Country musician Tony Ardoin is 47. Country musician Michael Britt (Lonestar) is 45. Contemporary Christian musician Rob Mitchell is 45. Rock musician Jimmy McD is 43. Actor-rapper Ice Cube is 42. Actress Leah Remini is 41. Actor Jake Busey is 40. Bluegrass singer-musician Jamie Johnson is 39. Rock musician T-Bone Willy (Save Ferris) is 39. Actor Neil Patrick Harris is 38. Actor Greg Vaughan is 38. Actress Elizabeth Reaser is 36. Rock singer Dryden Mitchell (Alien Ant Farm) is 35. Rock musician Billy Martin (Good Charlotte) is 30. Actor Denzel Whitaker is 21. THOUGHT FOR TODAY “The times are not so bad as they seem; they couldn’t be.” — John Franklin Carter, American commentator and author (1897-1967)

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THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, June 15, 2011 C3

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Photos by Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Tom Cook watches the student film “It’s as Easy as ABC” with his grandsons Joshua Ellenberger, left, and Jacob Ellenberger during the Juniper Elementary Film Festival last week in Bend.

Bend school puts on its own picture show Juniper Elementary students show their films at inaugural festival By Megan Kehoe The Bulletin

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ameras flashed. Cars snaked around side streets and alleyways. People thronged around the red carpet. There were even signs telling paparazzi to scram. But this wasn’t Hollywood, or even the Tower Theatre. It was Juniper Elementary School in Bend. Last week, Juniper Elementary’s classrooms became a platform for the school’s first film festival. Students, teachers and parents dressed to the nines. There were documentaries, animation movies and even music videos. Students at Juniper Elementary School in Bend presented their Twenty-three mini movies films to classmates and parents during the Juniper Film Festival. showcased student work based on curriculum they had learned in class. class film and edit movies. pressed with what the students “I’m so blown away by the “We had the first movie com- had learned. teachers’ commitment, and by pleted in January, and the last “She’s making movies at home what everybody’s done to make one just finished today,” McDon- now,” Angela Bishop said. “At 8 this happen,” said Scott McDon- ald said. “I’m just excited that years old, she’s able to do more ald, who teaches computer and everyone got their projects done on the computer than I am.” technology skills at Juniper and on time.” Drullinger said that while the at Pilot Butte Middle School. Students used a variety of students enjoyed learning about “You see a lot of learning with movie-making techniques, in- iMovie and how to put a film tothis project.” cluding stop motion. gether, their favorite part was acParents, students and teachMcDonald said he was im- tually making films — or, more ers flooded the pressed with the truthfully, messing up while courtyard area of students’ creativ- making films. the school, where “I’m so blown ity. He is even “Of course, the kids’ favorite a movie screen planning to sub- part was the bloopers reel,” Druland projector away by the mit some of their linger said. “Now, all they want had been set up. teachers’ work to BendFilm to do is make bloopers.” Previews of the for its festival in Madelyn Murnane, 10, helped commitment, 23 movies set to October. make a film about the Oregon dramatic music and by what In Betty Drul- Trail as part of her fourth-grade ran on a continual everybody’s done linger’s third- class project. Students explained loop. grade class, stu- historical stops, such as Chim“I had a good to make this dents made a film ney Rock, along the trail. Madchance to learn happen. You see a about the ABCs of elyn brought her mother, Dena and to play in success. The class Murnane, to the event to show iMovie,” said Will lot of learning with came up with its her what her class had been Price, 11. “It was a this project.” own script about working on. fun project.” ways to be suc“I thought it was really neat,” Will played the — Scott McDonald, cessful, utilizing Murnane said. “Each stop, from role of Thomas technology teacher each letter of the the beginning to the end, was Jefferson in his alphabet, and very educational.” class’s movie, drawing a picture As the sun sank lower in the which focused on the American to go with it. Students shot the sky, the front lawn that had been Revolution. Students created a movie around various parts of packed with parents, teachers music video, changing the words the school, the playground and and students emptied. The festiof the song “Too Late to Apolo- at the base of Pilot Butte. val had been a success. gize,” to address how the coloKatheryn Bishop, 8, a student “It’s great to see these kids nists felt under the oppression in Drullinger’s class, visited her become so tech-savvy,” teacher of King George III, and to show classroom during the film fes- Jill Harrelson said. “It was a that war was imminent. tival to show her mother and great culmination activity that Will said he enjoyed creating younger brother the movie they really shows what we do here at the music video, and ended up lip had created. Juniper.” syncing a lot. “I said that ‘E’ is for everyStudents had been working on one,” said Katheryn. “If everyone Megan Kehoe can be their films throughout the year, works together, everyone wins.” reached at 541-383-0354 or at said McDonald, who helped each Katheryn’s mother was im- mkehoe@bendbulletin.com.

C O N TAC T U S SCHOOL BRIEFS: Items and announcements of general interest. Please include details and contact information. Phone: 541-617-7831 E-mail: pcliff@bendbulletin.com TEEN FEATS: The Bulletin wants to recognize high school students’ achievements off the playing fields. Do you know of teens who have

been recognized recently for their academic achievements or who have won an award or certificate for their participation in clubs, choirs or volunteer groups? If so, please submit the information and a photo. Phone: 541-383-0358 Mail: P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 E-mail: youth@bendbulletin.com

Contact your public officials Find an easily searchable list of contact information for federal, state, county and city officials at www.bendbulletin .com/officials.

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Ban moves the smokers, but it won’t stop them

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entral Oregon Community College has asked the city of Bend to ban smoking on College Way and the adjacent sidewalks through campus. The Bend City Council to-

night is scheduled to discuss enacting such a ban. The City Council must consider this ordinance carefully before banning legal activity on a city street and sidewalks. COCC set up a Tobacco-free Campus Task Force to consider options for controlling tobacco on the Bend campus and satellite campuses. With “Tobacco-free” in the name, you can guess where it was going to end up. The task force considered several options. The campus could keep the current policy, which keeps smokers away from buildings and relegated to parking lots. It considered having smoking huts or shelters for smokers around campus. Those structures would not be enclosed. It considered a tobacco-free campus. And that’s the way COCC is leaning. First, COCC President James Middleton wants to find out what the city might agree to. COCC can’t regulate smoking on the public right of way through campus on College Way and the sidewalks. The city regulates that. Middleton’s concern is that without a city ban, there would be a smoking corridor through the center of campus. Smokers could step out of a campus building, walk toward College Way, hit the city sidewalk and light up. That doesn’t say tobacco-free campus. But there are complications with a ban along College Way. There are enforcement headaches. A ban needs some teeth to be effective, and COCC already has difficulty enforcing its current policy. It surely wouldn’t be the best use of time for Bend Police to do anti-smoking sweeps along College Way. What about someone smoking in a

car on College Way with the windows rolled down? How about rolled up? Would that be banned? The city’s proposed ordinance allows smoking in an “enclosed” vehicle. That’s not really a tobacco-free campus. It’s perhaps a corridor of smoky cars. Many smokers would not quit just because of a ban. They are going to look for where they can smoke, legally and illegally. They may wander off into more remote spots on campus. That may increase the danger of a fire, in some fractional way. Regency Street and Northwest Regency Street, which spur off of College Way, may become known as the Smokers Ways. COCC is not asking that those rights of way have a ban. They might be the closest places smokers could go “on campus” and smoke legally. The residents of the apartments off of Northwest Regency Street may not be so thrilled about the smoke. If the City Council supports a ban, Middleton said he would ask the COCC board that the city’s ban and the tobacco-free campus go into effect at the same time. He said he is not sure what kind of proposal he would bring to the board if the city does not support the ban. If you smoke, we hope you quit. Smoking is bad. Secondhand smoke is not much better. A tobacco-free campus and a ban along College Way could be terrific symbolism. But a ban on the public right of way doesn’t stop smokers. It moves them around.

Not a proud moment A

ny legislative session is going to have arm-twisting, quid pro quo and wheeling and dealing. Legislators should do it in a way that makes Oregonians proud. The Oregon House did something on Monday that will likely make Oregonians cringe. Senate Bill 347 was a simple, narrow bill. It would protect the records of people who get help at Portland’s Gateway Center for Domestic Violence Services. Most domestic violence centers are private nonprofits. Gateway is a public/private partnership. That made the staff nervous that

records of people who use the center could be open to the public.

My Nickel’s Worth Unions are important On June 4, Harold Shrader wrote, “AFSCME … union is just trying to bring the average wage back up so the rest of us don’t feel so poor.” Deschutes County employees represented by the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees have initiated negotiations for a multiyear employee contract. Over the past few years, this same group of employees has given up a cost-of-living allowance, deferred a COLA, reduced working hours and taken several unpaid days in light of the economic slowdown. Most Deschutes County employees enjoy a wage that enables them to live paycheck to paycheck. The benefit package is touted as an incentive when the county goes through the hiring process and is looking for capable public servants. Mr. Shrader, do you have access to the Internet? Try Googling “why unions are important.” Unions, along with individuals fighting in Washington, have set basic standards for wages, education and skill levels for all working Americans and give workers a voice. Workers with purchasing power drive the economy. So the recession lingers. Instead of picking on your fellow middle-class workers, why don’t you direct your anger at the big corporations that are making historically high profits and continue to raise prices and are not hiring back their laid-off workers? These corporations are not giving back to our country.

Instead they use their money to buy influence, send their jobs overseas for cheap labor and look the other way at deplorable working conditions. Geri Hauser Bend

The pluses of less speed Jane Vansandt in her June 1 letter to the editor has yet to notice that there is more to slowing down than just smelling the roses! Not only does one live longer, save money and gas (be green!), but there is so much to see between “here and Biggs Junction.” I have driven that route numerous times and each time I notice something different. There are fascinating old barns, the wind farms off to the right as one heads north and a cemetery on the left. As you wind through the narrow canyons during May, the breeze makes the new green grasses wave gently, and the wild yellow arnica could possibly be blooming. If you’re lucky and there at the right time, you might see a bumblebee-yellow biplane dipping over your head as the pilot exhibits his expertise at crop dusting. Slow down, save gas, live longer and smell whatever might be in bloom. You might live long enough to see that little Maryhill hamlet. And your loved ones. Jane Thompson La Pine

Studded tires not to blame Another call to tax studded tires appeared in a letter on June 3 by Lor-

raine Wilkins. She and her husband have lived here for a year and have jumped on the studded-tire tax bandwagon with only hearsay evidence as to whether studded tires damage our highways. On May 29 all over the front page of The Bulletin was an article about poorquality road construction. Of particular interest was the following: “And of the ODOT officials quoted in documents discussing the problem, none point to studded tires or weather to explain the deterioration they’re seeing.” So finally an honest assessment. To the Wilkinses, pick out a section of highway repaved in the spring or early summer. Before the first set of studded tires ever touches it on Nov. 1, you should see the ruts are already there. Heat will do that. And just for fun, follow an 18-wheeler and see where the inside tires are — right smack dab in the middle of those ruts. James Asp Sunriver

Bring back camels? I read with interest the article “Are wild horses native?” in The Bulletin on June 6. The theory that horses are native to North America because horse ancestors evolved here is interesting. Since the camel’s ancestors also evolved in North America, should we import some of them to live along with the horses? What other species can we bring back? Jim Schultz Hines

SB 347 passed the Senate easily.

Another bill that would keep the identities of handgun license holders private wasn’t moving in the Senate. So supporters added a provision to SB 347 to put the guns issue into the domestic violence bill. The new version of the bill passed the House and is headed back again to the Senate. OK, both are related to public records. But legislators should be ashamed at playing politics with a domestic violence center.

Letters policy

In My View policy

Submissions

We welcome your letters. Letters should be limited to one issue, contain no more than 250 words and include the writer’s signature, phone number and address for verification. We edit letters for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject poetry, personal attacks, form letters, letters submitted elsewhere and those appropriate for other sections of The Bulletin. Writers are limited to one letter or OpEd piece every 30 days.

In My View submissions should be between 600 and 800 words, signed and include the writer’s phone number and address for verification. We edit submissions for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject those published elsewhere. In My View pieces run routinely in the space below, alternating with national columnists. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

Please address your submission to either My Nickel’s Worth or In My View and send, fax or e-mail them to The Bulletin. WRITE: My Nickel’s Worth OR In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-385-5804 E-MAIL: bulletin@bendbulletin.com

Rehab is not an acceptable response for misbehavior By Ruth Marcus The Washington Post

WASHINGTON — he arc of modern scandal is depressingly familiar. Transgression followed by exposure, perhaps accompanied by a fleeting detour into denial. Then tearful confession and, finally, the inevitable journey to rehab. Didn’t you know, from the moment the story broke, that New York Democratic Rep. Anthony Weiner would end up checking himself in somewhere? I don’t begrudge Weiner the therapy — he could no doubt use “professional treatment to focus on becoming a better husband and healthier person,” as his spokeswoman said in announcing that he would seek a leave of absence. But whether or not Weiner manages to hang on, the episode underscores how rehab has become an all-purpose laundromat for irresponsible behavior, an infuriatingly easy substitute for accepting blame and living with consequences. Increasingly, in our Rehab Nation, the concept of sin has been replaced by the language of addiction. Shame has been

T

supplanted by therapeutic intervention. The disease model of misbehavior dictates that there are no bad people, only damaged individuals compelled to commit harmful acts. In this scenario, personal responsibility evaporates and virtue becomes an anachronism. “This is not something that can be treated away,” Weiner said at his tearful news conference. One excruciating week later, Weiner was, yes, getting it treated away. The congressman, his spokeswoman said, “has determined that he needs this time to get healthy.” Excuse me, but this isn’t about Weiner’s health, it’s about his shameful behavior. We live in an age of rehab as reality show — literally. The cable channel VH1 has aired four seasons of “Celebrity Rehab with Dr. Drew,” which spawned a spin-off, “Sex Rehab with Dr. Drew.” If former House Majority Leader Tom DeLay could make it to “Dancing with the Stars,” I’m sure there’s a place on VH1 for Weiner. Especially when it comes to actual addictions, to drugs and alcohol, I’m sure rehab can be a helpful, if not surefire,

RUTH MARCUS remedy. However many times it takes Lindsay Lohan, I hope it works. The Weiner situation is different. I’m skeptical about the entire notion of sex addiction or Internet addiction or whatever addiction might explain Weiner’s behavior. Addiction in these circumstances seems like a highfalutin, after-thefact excuse for self-indulgence and lack of control, whether by Tiger Woods (actual sex) or Weiner (the virtual variety). I know some experts disagree. I’ve read all about dopamine spikes. But being addicted to a substance — with the tangible physical results that withdrawal creates — is different from being addicted to a behavior. Indeed, sex addiction was dropped from the fourth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disor-

ders in 1994. Psychiatrists are debating including a new category, hypersexual disorder, in DSM-V, due out in 2013. Fine, but I am convinced there is more free will involved in quitting sex or gambling than in stopping drinking or drugs. Writing on Time.com, Maia Szalavitz, herself a former heroin and cocaine addict, described the dangers of defining addiction downward. “If anyone can go to rehab when his actions lead to public humiliation, is rehab still a medical treatment or does it become some form of absolution?” she asked. “If every time someone behaves like a jerk and the reason behind it is addiction, doesn’t that mean addiction is just an excuse for bad behavior?” Yes, which may not matter very much if the bad behavior is by an entertainer or an athlete. Not all public figures are subject to equal responsibilities. Anthony Weiner is no Lindsay Lohan. Members of Congress are supposed to be role models, not laughingstocks of late-night television. Certainly other politicians have disgraced themselves — and some of

them (I’m thinking of you, David Vitter) should also be gone. Weiner’s folly, however, has become particularly, embarrassingly public. His behavior, narcissistic and adolescent, is inconsistent with continued service. President Obama, I thought, had it right. “I think he’s embarrassed himself,” he told NBC’s Ann Curry. “I can tell you that if it was me, I would resign. Because public service is exactly that, it’s a service to the public. And when you get to the point where because of various personal distractions, you can’t serve as effectively as you need to … then you should probably step back.” The first line of the House Ethics Manual instructs lawmakers that they should “conduct themselves at all times in a manner that reflects creditably on the House.” Taking pictures of yourself in a towel and sending them to strangers falls short of that standard — however the therapists might help you explain it away. Ruth Marcus is a columnist for The Washington Post.


THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, June 15, 2011 C5

O D Carl Gardner, 83, N   founding member of the Coasters

Clyde Raymond Benke, of Bend

Feb. 20, 1950 - June 12, 2011 Arrangements: Deschutes Memorial Chapel, 541-382-5592 www.deschutesmemorialchapel.com

Services: Service to honor Clyde will be held at a later date. Contributions may be made to:

Bend Spay and Neuter Project, 910 Wilson Ave., Bend, OR 97702.

Laverne Rose Lea Willford, of Prineville April 14, 1927 - June 12, 2011 Arrangements: Whispering Pines Funeral Home, 541-416-9733 Services: In accordance with her wishes, no service will be held.

Patricia Ann Gruzd, of Prineville May 23, 1928 - June 11, 2011 Arrangements: Whispering Pines Funeral Home, 541-416-9733 Services: In accordance with her wishes, no service will be held. Contributions may be made to:

Pioneer Memorial Hospice, 1201 NE Elm St., Prineville, OR 97754.

Obituary Policy Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They may be submitted by phone, mail, e-mail or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541-617-7825. DEADLINES: Death notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and noon on Saturday. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by 1 p.m. Friday for Sunday or Monday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details. PHONE: 541-617-7825 MAIL: Obituaries P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-322-7254 E-MAIL: obits@bendbulletin.com

By Dennis McLellan Los Angeles Times

Carl Gardner, a founding member and lead singer of the Coasters, the R&B vocal group whose memorably amusing hits included “Yakety Yak,” “Charlie Brown” and “Poison Ivy,” has died. He was 83. Gardner, who had heart failure and Alzheimer’s disease, died Sunday in Port St. Lucie, Fla., said his wife, Veta. The Texas-born Gardner was lead tenor vocalist for the Los Angeles-based R&B vocal group the Robins before he and fellow Robins member Bobby Nunn teamed with Billy Guy, Leon Hughes and guitarist Adolph Jacobs — to form the Coasters in 1955. With the songwriting team of Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller writing and producing their records for Atco Records, a division of Atlantic, the Coasters scored their first hit single with “Down in Mexico” in 1956, with Gardner doing the lead vocal. The double-sided hit “Young Blood” and “Searchin’” followed — as did “Yakety Yak,” “Charlie Brown,” “Poison Ivy,” “Along Came Jones,” “Little Egypt” and other hits. The Coasters became known as the “Clown Princes of Rock ‘n’ Roll,” for their humorous storytelling songs and their comedic stage performances. “They were sort of our comedy troupe, and we wrote songs for them and assigned different lines to different singers because they were, like, acting out little plays,” Stoller said on Monday. “Carl was either the romantic lead or he was the straight man,” Stoller said. “He was the barker at the beginning of ‘Little Egypt’ ‘Step right up, folks’ — and that was his persona in the group for those things.” The Coasters would choreograph the songs themselves for their stage shows, and when they performed their routines for him and Leiber in a rehearsal room, “we’d fall down laughing,” Stoller said. Gardner, he said, “had a beautiful voice” and always wanted to sing ballads. “With all these hits, we finally agreed to do an album with the Coasters called ‘One by One,’ and Carl got a chance to do solo performances on songs like ‘Moonlight in Vermont,’ ‘Satin Doll’ and ‘Moonglow.’ “It wasn’t what the public wanted to hear from the Coasters, but he did have a lovely voice. . . . It’s just one of those things: He became famous for

the comedy stuff.” The Coasters underwent personnel changes over the years. But when they became the first vocal group inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1987, the inductees were what is considered the “classic lineup” of Gardner, Guy, Will “Dub” Jones and Cornell Gunter. Born into a poor family in Tyler, Texas, on April 29, 1928, Gardner began singing at an early age. “Singing was his passion,” said Veta Gardner, who became the group’s manager in the late 1980s and wrote the 2007 as-told-to biography of her husband, “Yakety Yak, I Fought Back: My Life With the Coasters.” “Even as a young kid, he had a beautiful voice. They used to call him the town crier because he used to walk and sing. Everybody could hear him sing.” Gardner, who served stint in the Army as a teenager, arrived in Los Angeles in the early ‘50s with a dream of becoming a big-band singer. “He didn’t plan on being a group singer,” his wife said. In 1954, he took over as lead tenor for the Robins, which was then recording for Leiber and Stoller’s small Spark Records label. As a member of the Robins, Gardner sang lead on the hit “Smokey Joe’s Cafe” and also sang on “Riot in Cell Block 9.” Despite the many changes in the Coasters’ personnel over the years, Veta Gardner said, “Carl kept the group going.” The Gardners were involved in legal disputes with a number of other groups calling themselves the Coasters. “I call them fakesters,” said Veta Gardner, describing her husband’s group as “the real deal, because he was singing with them all along.” In 1993, Gardner was diagnosed with cancer of the larynx. “That devastated him, but it didn’t affect his voice,” his wife said. “After three months of treatment with radiation, he was back on the road performing again.” And when her husband had a stroke in 2004, she said, “that didn’t stop him. He was back on stage again.” But in 2005, 50 years after the Coasters had formed, Gardner decided to retire. “He told me, ‘Veta, I don’t have my voice anymore.’ He was getting hoarse a lot; he couldn’t take the high note anymore. He said, ‘I want people to remember how I used to sing.’ ”

James Rahal, 77, infectious-disease expert By Paul Vitello New York Times News Service

NEW YORK — Dr. James J. Rahal, an infectious-disease specialist who raised early alarms about the rise of drugresistant bacteria in hospitals, and who emerged as a leading expert in the treatment of West Nile virus after the Queens community where he worked became the epicenter of a deadly outbreak in 1999, died Saturday in Manhattan. He was 77. The cause was a rare disorder called Rosai-Dorfman disease, said his wife, Barbara Britton. Rahal, a professor of medicine at the Weill Medical Collegeof Cornell University and director of the infectious-diseases division at New York Hospital Medical Center of Queens, was known both as a widely published researcher and as a hands-on physician who asked and answered a lot of questions in treating patients in one of the most ethnically diverse communities in the world. The two roles fused naturally in Rahal’s approach to his work, said Dr. Sherwood Gorbach, a professor of medicine at Tufts University and editor of Clinical Infectious Diseases, the journal in which Rahal published many of his articles. “He had an ability to see the patient in front of him, and at

the same time to see that individual as part of a larger whole,” Gorbach said. In the infectious-disease world, he added, that larger whole includes not only other humans but also the whole living web of animals, insects, viruses, fungi and microbes through which a patient passes on the way to a hospital emergency room. “Jim had an extra perception, an intuitive way of recognizing patterns,” Gorbach said. Rahal was among the first to publish articles raising concerns about the drug-resistant strains of bacteria he began seeing in the early 1990s at New York Hospital Medical Center of Queens. The problem was emerging throughout the country, partly as a result of overuse and misuse of some of the workhorse antibiotics developed after World War II. “But he was talking about it at conferences and publishing papers documenting it before it was widely understood as the serious problem that it was,” said Dr. Louis Rice, chairman of medicine at the Alpert Medical School of Brown University and a specialist in the field. In spring and summer 1999, Rahal found himself absorbed in the puzzle of an unidentified virus that was sending dozens

of people a day into the emergency room at New York Hospital Medical Center of Queens. Some arrived with fevers and body aches, but others had developed infections of the brain like meningitis and encephalitis. Seven people died, and hundreds more were sickened in the New York area during the outbreak. The Centers for Disease Control identified the cause as West Nile virus, an infectious disease of African origin that had never before spread in the Western Hemisphere, and Rahal’s work led to the development of the first effective treatment for it, using interferon. The treatment received provisional approval by the Food and Drug Administration in 2002 and a patent in 2005. James Joseph Rahal Jr. was born on Oct. 14, 1933, in Boston, the oldest of three children. His father was a dentist. His mother, the former Najla Maloof, and father were both children of Lebanese Syrian immigrants. Rahal graduated from Harvard University and Tufts Medical School and trained in the infectious-disease field in New York and Boston before settling in New York in 1969 as an assistant professor of medicine at the New York University School of Medicine.

River Continued from C1 Under Oregon law, all boats must carry a Coast Guard-approved PFD for every person who is onboard or being towed. Children younger than 12 are required to wear PFDs at all times when above board on a moving boat. This includes inflatable rafts and kayaks. It does not include individual air mattresses, inner tubes and floating toys. However, if any of these are tied together, then the law applies. Horton said it’s not uncommon for the park district to enter into similar agreements with private entities operating on public lands, citing the example of Munch and Music in Drake Park. There are also instances where park district recreation programs take place in private facilities, such as at the Central Oregon Indoor Sports Center. He said there are about 30 different partnerships between the

park district and private entities. Sun Country Tours will also provide shuttle service during the days Cascade East Transit doesn’t give rides to floaters who are commuting up and down the Deschutes River. This means a shuttle will run seven days a week. That service, which aims to reduce parking congestion along Drake Park, begins Friday with Cascades East Transit operating the shuttle through the weekend and on Mondays. Sun Country will operate the shuttle Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Prices for the shuttles will be different. The weekend shuttles offered by CET will cost $1.50 for a single ride and $2.50 for an all-day pass. Sun Country Tours will not offer single trip rates, and instead will charge a flat fee of $3 for unlimited rides for a day. Dennis Oliphant, the owner of Sun Country Tours, proposed handing out free life jackets and increasing shuttle service. Oliph-

ant was unavailable for comment Tuesday, but Sun Country Tours representative Scott Warner said the idea is to keep the pilot program going beyond this year. “Nobody knows how much revenue it will generate or whether it will be a real revenue generator,” Warner said. “We hope to see it as a long-term partnership and association with the parks. And our hope is that it does generate revenues because the more it does, the more it creates riverfront projects from the money generated from it.” The company’s agreement with the park district ends Sept. 15. Horton said the district will then evaluate whether the program was a success. “Success will be measured by the number of (personal flotation devices) issued,” he said, “not by the number of tubes being rented.” Nick Grube can be reached at 541-633-2160 or at ngrube@bendbulletin.com.

Photos by Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Bend residents, Rob Hamilton, 38, left, and Kris Aldous, 31, both employees of Kevin Spencer Masonry of Bend, build a rock wall on the cliff side of the entrance path to Lava River Cave on Monday morning.

Cave Continued from C1 The Lava River Cave construction is happening simultaneously with the Oregon Department of Transportation’s construction project on Highway 97, which altered access to the cave. But the Forest Service project, which is funded by a $250,000 grant from the federal highway fund, is also designed to improve the flow of cars and people at the site, McBride said.

Help for bats The changes this year aren’t intended to help only visitors. With “white-nose syndrome” decimating bat populations on the East Coast, the Forest Service is also taking steps to educate the public about the poorly understood disease. Though bat populations in Oregon have not yet been affected, scientists believe that people traveling between caves might spread it. “There’ll be a new step this year for access to the cave,” McBride said. Visitors will have to register before walking down into

District Continued from C1 By that time, the matter is likely to have been decided in the courts where a lawsuit has already been filed in Yamhill County over under-representation. On Friday, the judge in that case denied the state attorney general’s motion to have the case dismissed, she said. “My sense is that the plaintiff right now would prevail,” and the loser has to pay for the winning side’s attorneys’ fees, she said. “Prior years have shown that it can be as much as $1 million coming out of the general fund.” During public meetings, voters have stressed they want communities of interest kept together, she said. For example, Multnomah County is now divided among three different congressional districts,

Forest Service monument manager Scott McBride points out changes to the Lava River Cave area on a map. the cave and answer questions about whether they have been in caves outside of Oregon and Washington, and whether they’re wearing boots or carrying equipment that has been in caves. If visitors have, the Forest Service might ask them to come back with different gear, McBride said — although the agency is considering buying some

equipment that visitors could use. The Forest Service is also considering getting disinfectant, so people who have been in other caves can clean off their gear on site, he said. “We don’t want to close access to the cave,” he said. Kate Ramsayer can be reached at 541-617-7811 or kramsayer@bendbulletin.com.

Fireworks

meaning neighbors can receive vastly different representation and lobbying on their behalf in Washington. Constituents also have said they would like to keep Oregon’s coast more unified, as well as the inland valley, rather than having districts that cut across the state, Telfer said. “The Republican map tries to keep the coast whole, instead of bringing (the district) inland so much.” U.S. Rep. Greg Walden, R-Hood River, said through spokesman Andrew Whelan, that he hopes a bipartisan agreement can be reached on congressional redistricting. “It would be the first time in 100 years if they were to do so, and it would be a remarkable and commendable achievement if they do,” Whelan said.

Continued from C1 Rucker said the shortage in funds “happens every year,” but the chamber finds a way to raise money and put on a show. High Desert Aggregate & Paving is currently the largest contributor with a $2,500 donation. The chamber is asking donations of any amount be delivered to the Redmond Chamber of Commerce, 446 S.W. Seventh St., or Redmond City Hall, 716 S.W. Evergreen St. Checks should be made payable to “Redmond Chamber of Commerce” with “fireworks” listed in the notes section. If a show does not happen this year, the chamber is giving people the option of having their donations returned or saved for 2012.

Andrew Clevenger can be reached at 202-662-7456 or at aclevenger@bendbulletin.com.

Erik Hidle can be reached at 541-617-7837 or at ehidle@bendbulletin.com.


W E AT H ER

C6 Wednesday, June 15, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

THE BULLETIN WEATHER FORECAST

Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LP ©2011.

TODAY, JUNE 15

HIGH Ben Burkel

FORECASTS: LOCAL

STATE Western Ruggs

Condon

Maupin

68/43

65/41

74/45

49/33

Willowdale

Warm Springs

Marion Forks

Mitchell

Madras

67/34

69/35

Camp Sherman 63/29 Redmond Prineville 68/32 Cascadia 65/33 67/33 Sisters 66/31 50s Bend Post 68/32

Oakridge Elk Lake 65/31

55/20

65/29

La Pine

65/28

Fort Rock

Vancouver 61/49

50s

Chemult 63/26

Eugene

City

Missoula 64/41

68/47

Bend

Helena

68/32

Boise

Grants Pass

75/44

74/44

70s

Elko

95/62

65/31

Silver Lake

65/39

60s

Idaho Falls

Redding Christmas Valley

74/45

81/44

Reno

71/32

Partly to mostly sunny.

70s

Crater Lake

Seattle

86/54

San Francisco

80s Salt Lake City

70/59

55/32

82/61

90s

Yesterday Hi/Lo/Pcp

HIGH

Full

68 40

PLANET WATCH

Moon phases Last

New

First

June 15 June 23 July 1

July 7

Wednesday Hi/Lo/W

TEMPERATURE

Astoria . . . . . . . . 60/51/0.00 . . . . . . 65/49/c. . . . . . 65/49/dr Baker City . . . . . . 72/38/0.00 . . . . . 62/38/pc. . . . . . 64/41/pc Brookings . . . . . . 68/49/0.00 . . . . . 69/50/pc. . . . . . 67/52/pc Burns. . . . . . . . . . 73/35/0.00 . . . . . . 65/37/s. . . . . . 66/44/pc Eugene . . . . . . . . 69/52/0.00 . . . . . . 68/47/c. . . . . . 71/47/pc Klamath Falls . . . 78/35/0.00 . . . . . 70/38/pc. . . . . . . 69/41/s Lakeview. . . . . . . 73/36/0.00 . . . . . . 73/40/s. . . . . . . 70/42/s La Pine . . . . . . . . 73/33/0.00 . . . . . . 66/28/s. . . . . . . 64/37/s Medford . . . . . . . 82/51/0.00 . . . . . 79/49/pc. . . . . . 80/51/pc Newport . . . . . . . 59/52/0.00 . . . . . . 55/52/c. . . . . . 57/52/dr North Bend . . . . . 61/54/0.00 . . . . . . 62/48/c. . . . . . 62/49/pc Ontario . . . . . . . . 79/53/0.00 . . . . . . 73/48/s. . . . . . 71/51/pc Pendleton . . . . . . 74/47/0.00 . . . . . 72/46/pc. . . . . . . 68/48/s Portland . . . . . . . 67/54/0.00 . . . . . . 66/51/c. . . . . . . 68/49/c Prineville . . . . . . . 71/36/0.00 . . . . . . 65/33/s. . . . . . . 65/40/s Redmond. . . . . . . 76/37/0.00 . . . . . 69/37/pc. . . . . . . 67/39/s Roseburg. . . . . . . 73/53/0.00 . . . . . 68/48/pc. . . . . . 71/50/pc Salem . . . . . . . . . 69/54/0.00 . . . . . . 66/47/c. . . . . . 70/47/pc Sisters . . . . . . . . . 74/34/0.00 . . . . . . 66/31/s. . . . . . . 67/37/s The Dalles . . . . . . 74/55/0.00 . . . . . 71/51/pc. . . . . . . 72/52/s

Mod. = Moderate; Ext. = Extreme

To report a wildfire, call 911

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is for solar at noon.

0

5 HIGH

MEDIUM 2

4

6

V.HIGH 8

10

POLLEN COUNT Updated daily. Source: pollen.com

LOW

HIGH

LOW

69 39

PRECIPITATION

WATER REPORT

Bend, west of Hwy. 97....Mod. Sisters.................................Low Bend, east of Hwy. 97.......Low La Pine..............................Mod. Redmond/Madras...........Low Prineville ...........................Low

LOW

Partly cloudy.

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73/37 24 hours ending 4 p.m.. . . . . . . . 0.00” Record high . . . . . . . . . . . . .94 in 1987 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.11” Record low. . . . . . . . . . . . . .26 in 1945 Average month to date. . . . . . . . 0.42” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.27” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .41 Average year to date. . . . . . . . . . 5.83” Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.. . . 30.12 Record 24 hours . . . . . . . 0.72 in 1931 *Melted liquid equivalent

FIRE INDEX Thursday Hi/Lo/W

SUNDAY

Mostly cloudy, chance of showers, breezy, LOW cooler.

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . . . .5:35 a.m. . . . . . .9:19 p.m. Venus . . . . . . . .4:24 a.m. . . . . . .7:27 p.m. Mars. . . . . . . . .3:43 a.m. . . . . . .6:27 p.m. Jupiter. . . . . . . .2:43 a.m. . . . . . .4:16 p.m. Saturn. . . . . . . .2:12 p.m. . . . . . .2:07 a.m. Uranus . . . . . . .1:38 a.m. . . . . . .1:51 p.m.

OREGON CITIES

64/43

63/51

66/30

58/22

Calgary

Sunrise today . . . . . . 5:22 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 8:50 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 5:22 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 8:51 p.m. Moonrise today . . . . 9:02 p.m. Moonset today . . . . 5:07 a.m.

LOW

75 43

BEND ALMANAC

Eastern

63/29

HIGH

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

66/51

64/30

LOW

70 37

Portland

Burns

Hampton

HIGH

NORTHWEST

Partly to mostly sunny.

60s

66/28

63/27

LOW

Yesterday’s regional extremes • 82° Medford • 33° La Pine

SATURDAY Partly cloudy and warmer.

Partly cloudy today, with areas of cloudy skies along the coast. Possible showers to the north.

61/29

Brothers

Sunriver

FRIDAY Mostly sunny and mild.

Tonight: Mainly clear and colder.

32

Paulina

65/30

Crescent

Crescent Lake

Mostly cloudy, locally breezy conditions expected. Central

70/36

71/37

64/29

Today: Mainly sunny, cooler, afternoon breezes.

68

Bob Shaw

Government Camp

THURSDAY

MEDIUM

HIGH

The following was compiled by the Central Oregon watermaster and irrigation districts as a service to irrigators and sportsmen. Reservoir Acre feet Capacity Crane Prairie . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46,640 . . . . .55,000 Wickiup. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 177,301 . . . .200,000 Crescent Lake . . . . . . . . . . . . 81,371 . . . . .91,700 Ochoco Reservoir . . . . . . . . . 42,632 . . . . .47,000 Prineville . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149,118 . . . .153,777 River flow Station Cubic ft./sec Deschutes RiverBelow Crane Prairie . . . . . . . . . . . 514 Deschutes RiverBelow Wickiup . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,400 Crescent CreekBelow Crescent Lake . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Little DeschutesNear La Pine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 347 Deschutes RiverBelow Bend . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,954 Deschutes RiverAt Benham Falls . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,990 Crooked RiverAbove Prineville Res. . . . . . . . . . . . . 726 Crooked RiverBelow Prineville Res. . . . . . . . . . . . . 793 Ochoco CreekBelow Ochoco Res. . . . . . . . . . . . . 59.6 Crooked RiverNear Terrebonne . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 940 Contact: Watermaster, 388-6669 or go to www.wrd.state.or.us

Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are high for the day.

S

S

S

S

Yesterday’s U.S. extremes

S

S

Vancouver 61/49 Calgary 64/43 Seattle 63/51

S Saskatoon 75/52

S

S

S

S

S

Winnipeg 73/59

S

S

S S

Quebec 78/55

Halifax 59/48 P ortland Billings To ronto P ortland (in the 48 65/54 76/49 73/61 66/51 St. Paul Green Bay contiguous states): Boston 69/58 66/54 Boise 73/58 Buffalo Rapid City Detroit 75/44 75/58 New York 75/54 • 110° 76/61 83/64 Des Moines Wink, Texas Cheyenne Philadelphia Columbus 77/59 Chicago 80/53 78/64 80/63 • 28° 65/56 Omaha San Francisco Salt Lake Washington, D. C. 81/61 Stanley, Idaho 70/59 City 79/62 Las Denver Louisville 82/61 Kansas City • 3.25” Vegas 85/59 80/66 82/64 St. Louis 104/81 Windom, Minn. Charlotte 82/64 86/65 Albuquerque Los Angeles Oklahoma City Nashville 92/64 76/62 93/71 87/66 Phoenix Atlanta 109/80 Honolulu Little Rock Birmingham 91/71 88/75 Dallas 92/73 Tijuana 96/72 98/76 73/60 New Orleans 93/76 Orlando Houston 97/74 Chihuahua 99/76 103/68 Miami 93/76 Monterrey 103/74 La Paz 100/65 Mazatlan Anchorage 91/71 57/46 Juneau 59/42 Bismarck 76/52

Thunder Bay 68/48

FRONTS

W HITE SALMON RIVER

Utility gets OK to begin removal of dam this fall The Associated Press VANCOUVER — Nearly a century after it was built, the Condit Dam on the White Salmon River is about to be removed, reopening a Columbia River tributary for the passage of salmon and steelhead. An Oregon utility said it has received federal regulatory approval and plans to begin demolishing the dam in late October, The (Vancouver, Wash.) Columbian reported. PacifiCorp, based in Portland, originally planned to remove the dam in 2006 but demolition was repeatedly delayed. The estimated $32 million price tag for the project is nearly double the $17 million the utility expected to pay when PacifiCorp first announced plans to breach the dam in 1999. On Monday, the company notified the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission that it had accepted the terms of its “surrender order,” a document that sets forth the conditions the company must meet to surrender its federal dam license. “Decommissioning the hydroelectric project is now on a fast track,” PacifiCorp spokesman Tom Gauntt said. The utility has also received a critical sediment management permit from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, one of the project’s last major hurdles, Gauntt said. Completed in 1913 and stand-

ing 125 feet tall, Condit will be the second-highest dam ever removed in the United States. Glines Canyon Dam on Washington’s Elwha River, at 210 feet, will be the highest U.S. dam ever removed if it comes down on schedule in September. The plans were welcomed by environmental groups and tribal leaders. “This fall we will see two of the biggest river restoration projects in history, and they’re both in Washington,” said Amy Kober, spokeswoman for the conservation group American Rivers. “It’s an exciting river renaissance.” In a statement, Virgil Lewis of the Yakama Nation Tribal Council called the announcement of the dam’s decommissioning “a momentous and long-awaited day.” “This is an essential step in restoring the ecosystem’s resources and rebuilding the natural balance that supported the Yakama people and a significant tribal fishery for millennia,” Lewis said. Prior to breaching, workers will dynamite a 12-foot by 18foot tunnel through 80 feet of the dam’s 90-foot-thick base. On demolition day, they’ll blast through the final 10 feet. The impounded waters of Northwestern Lake behind the dam will flow through the tunnel at an initial rate of 10,000 cubic feet per second.

The Associated Press

PacifiCorp has received regulatory approval to begin removing the Condit Dam on Washington’s White Salmon River in October, opening the Columbia River tributary to salmon, steelhead and lamprey for the first time in nearly a century.

Yesterday WednesdayThursday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . .106/77/0.00 . .102/74/s . 102/74/pc Akron . . . . . . . . .69/49/0.00 . . .76/59/s . . . .76/61/t Albany. . . . . . . . .67/57/0.02 . 81/56/pc . . . 82/56/s Albuquerque. . . .91/57/0.00 . . .92/64/s . . . 98/59/s Anchorage . . . . .56/47/0.11 . .57/46/sh . . 60/47/pc Atlanta . . . . . . . .93/70/0.00 . . .91/71/s . . 90/69/pc Atlantic City . . . .75/55/0.04 . 78/61/pc . . 78/67/sh Austin . . . . . . . .101/73/0.00 100/75/pc . . 98/76/pc Baltimore . . . . . .79/57/0.00 . 79/62/pc . . 81/69/sh Billings. . . . . . . . .72/55/0.00 . 76/49/pc . . . .69/49/t Birmingham . . . .96/70/0.00 . 96/72/pc . . . 94/72/s Bismarck . . . . . . .68/54/0.32 . 76/52/pc . . 75/58/pc Boise . . . . . . . . . .77/50/0.00 . 75/44/pc . . 69/47/pc Boston. . . . . . . . .60/55/0.04 . . .73/58/c . . . 76/57/s Bridgeport, CT. . .64/57/0.18 . 81/60/pc . . . 77/62/s Buffalo . . . . . . . .66/54/0.08 . . .75/58/s . . 77/60/sh Burlington, VT. . .70/51/0.00 . 79/55/pc . . 83/57/pc Caribou, ME . . . .71/49/0.00 . . .75/47/c . . 76/51/pc Charleston, SC . .91/73/0.00 . . .90/75/t . . . .89/76/t Charlotte. . . . . . .84/65/0.00 . 86/65/pc . . . .88/66/t Chattanooga. . . .88/68/0.00 . . .88/68/t . . . 89/67/s Cheyenne . . . . . .74/50/0.00 . 80/53/pc . . 82/51/sh Chicago. . . . . . . .77/53/0.00 . . .65/56/t . . 76/58/pc Cincinnati . . . . . .80/54/0.00 . . .79/64/t . . . .79/64/t Cleveland . . . . . .67/57/0.00 . . .76/61/s . . . .75/63/t Colorado Springs 82/55/0.01 . . .82/55/s . . 88/54/pc Columbia, MO . .79/64/0.03 . . .80/60/t . . . .86/67/t Columbia, SC . . .93/73/0.00 . . .90/69/s . . . .90/70/t Columbus, GA. . .98/74/0.00 . . .98/72/s . . . .95/71/t Columbus, OH. . .75/54/0.00 . 78/64/pc . . . .77/63/t Concord, NH . . . .61/52/0.00 . . .74/52/c . . 84/53/pc Corpus Christi. . .98/72/0.01 . 94/80/pc . . 88/81/pc Dallas Ft Worth 101/78/0.00 . 98/76/pc . . 97/77/pc Dayton . . . . . . . .76/54/0.00 . . .78/63/t . . . .76/63/t Denver. . . . . . . . .82/53/0.00 . . .85/59/s . . 88/59/pc Des Moines. . . . .73/63/0.07 . . .77/59/t . . 80/65/pc Detroit. . . . . . . . .77/54/0.00 . 76/61/pc . . . .75/62/t Duluth . . . . . . . . .74/50/0.00 . .61/50/sh . . . 60/50/c El Paso. . . . . . . .102/77/0.00 . .103/74/s . . 104/75/s Fairbanks. . . . . . .66/50/0.02 . .65/45/sh . . 70/49/sh Fargo. . . . . . . . . .83/63/0.00 . .72/55/sh . . 76/61/pc Flagstaff . . . . . . .82/39/0.00 . . .82/43/s . . . 78/38/s

Yesterday WednesdayThursday Yesterday WednesdayThursday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . .80/54/0.00 . . .73/58/t . . . .71/58/t Rapid City . . . . . .71/56/0.00 . . .75/54/s . . 77/55/pc Green Bay. . . . . .76/49/0.00 . .66/54/sh . . 70/54/sh Reno . . . . . . . . . .88/56/0.00 . 86/54/pc . . 78/52/pc Greensboro. . . . .82/61/0.00 . 83/64/pc . . . .85/65/t Richmond . . . . . .80/64/0.00 . 78/63/pc . . 83/65/sh Harrisburg. . . . . .74/58/0.00 . 77/56/pc . . . .76/60/t Rochester, NY . . .65/54/0.02 . . .80/57/s . . 80/60/pc Hartford, CT . . . .67/57/0.33 . 78/56/pc . . . 84/57/s Sacramento. . . . .97/58/0.00 . . .92/60/s . . . 89/56/s Helena. . . . . . . . .69/44/0.00 . .65/39/sh . . . 65/46/c St. Louis. . . . . . . .80/65/0.54 . . .82/64/t . . 85/68/pc Honolulu . . . . . . .87/75/0.00 . 88/75/pc . . 88/75/pc Salt Lake City . . .77/54/0.10 . . .82/61/c . . . 77/57/c Houston . . . . . . .99/77/0.00 . 99/76/pc . . 98/76/pc San Antonio . . .100/76/0.00 . 97/76/pc . . 95/77/pc Huntsville . . . . . .94/67/0.00 . 91/67/pc . . . 90/68/s San Diego . . . . . .70/63/0.00 . 72/60/pc . . 68/62/pc Indianapolis . . . .80/59/0.00 . . .75/62/t . . 78/63/pc San Francisco . . .76/51/0.00 . 73/56/pc . . 69/53/pc Jackson, MS . . . .99/67/0.00 . 95/71/pc . . 93/73/pc San Jose . . . . . . .85/55/0.00 . . .89/62/s . . 81/55/pc Madison, WI . . . .77/50/0.00 . . .65/55/t . . 74/56/pc Santa Fe . . . . . . .89/47/0.00 . . .85/54/s . . . 91/52/s Jacksonville. . . . .96/71/0.73 . . .93/75/t . . . .93/76/t Juneau. . . . . . . . .53/50/0.62 . .59/42/sh . . . 65/48/c Kansas City. . . . 92/67/trace . 82/64/pc . . . .87/71/t Amsterdam. . . . .68/54/0.00 . .70/55/sh . . . .72/56/r Lansing . . . . . . . .78/49/0.00 . . .74/59/t . . . .72/58/t Athens. . . . . . . . .80/59/0.00 . . .81/68/c . . . .82/70/t Las Vegas . . . . .103/76/0.00 . .104/81/s . . 102/78/s Auckland. . . . . . .61/54/0.00 . . .60/56/c . . . 59/55/c Lexington . . . . . .77/52/0.00 . . .80/63/t . . 83/65/pc Baghdad . . . . . . .98/77/0.00 . .103/81/s . . 106/82/s Lincoln. . . . . . . . .77/63/0.00 . 84/60/pc . . 88/68/pc Bangkok . . . . . . .91/79/0.00 . . .91/80/t . . . .87/79/t Little Rock. . . . . .96/71/0.00 . . .92/73/t . . 93/72/pc Beijing. . . . . . . . .93/70/0.00 . . .91/71/t . . . .85/66/t Los Angeles. . . . .67/57/0.00 . 76/62/pc . . 70/59/pc Beirut. . . . . . . . . .79/72/0.00 . . .82/72/s . . . 83/73/s Louisville . . . . . . .78/65/0.00 . . .80/66/t . . 85/68/pc Berlin. . . . . . . . . .73/55/0.00 . 73/54/pc . . . .81/61/t Memphis. . . . . . .94/68/0.00 . . .94/73/t . . 95/76/pc Bogota . . . . . . . .64/54/0.00 . 66/52/pc . . . 64/53/c Miami . . . . . . . . .97/75/2.47 . . .93/76/t . . . .93/78/t Budapest. . . . . . .79/55/0.00 . . .79/57/s . . . .81/61/t Milwaukee . . . . .70/53/0.00 . . .63/54/t . . 70/56/sh Buenos Aires. . . .59/36/0.00 . .60/53/sh . . . .62/49/t Minneapolis . . . .80/62/0.40 . . .69/58/t . . . 77/63/c Cabo San Lucas .93/75/0.00 . . .94/75/s . . . 91/71/s Nashville . . . . . . .83/66/0.04 . . .87/66/t . . . 88/70/s Cairo . . . . . . . . . .88/70/0.00 . . .88/69/s . . . 89/67/s New Orleans. . . .95/76/0.00 . 93/76/pc . . 93/77/pc Calgary . . . . . . . .64/46/0.00 . .64/43/sh . . 54/45/sh New York . . . . . .72/60/0.05 . 83/64/pc . . . 81/65/s Cancun . . . . . . . .88/72/0.00 . 89/77/pc . . 86/76/pc Newark, NJ . . . . .70/61/0.09 . 85/61/pc . . 82/63/sh Dublin . . . . . . . . .63/37/0.00 . .64/46/sh . . 61/45/pc Norfolk, VA . . . . .79/70/0.00 . 77/66/pc . . 82/69/sh Edinburgh . . . . . .64/46/0.00 . .68/54/sh . . 61/48/sh Oklahoma City .100/79/0.00 . 93/71/pc . . 95/75/pc Geneva . . . . . . . .77/57/0.00 . 75/50/pc . . . .77/57/t Omaha . . . . . . . .74/64/0.00 . 81/61/pc . . 85/69/pc Harare . . . . . . . . .66/48/0.00 . . .71/50/s . . . 74/51/s Orlando. . . . . . . .98/77/0.08 . . .97/74/t . . . .94/77/t Hong Kong . . . . .91/81/0.00 . . .90/83/t . . . .87/82/t Palm Springs. . .108/72/0.00 . .103/67/s . . . 92/66/s Istanbul. . . . . . . .77/63/0.00 . 79/66/pc . . . 82/67/c Peoria . . . . . . . . .75/59/0.11 . . .74/60/t . . 79/62/pc Jerusalem . . . . . .79/60/0.00 . . .81/62/s . . . 82/61/s Philadelphia . . . .77/59/0.08 . 80/63/pc . . 80/64/sh Johannesburg . . .63/43/0.00 . . .66/47/s . . . 65/39/s Phoenix. . . . . . .106/74/0.00 . .109/80/s . . 108/80/s Lima . . . . . . . . . .70/64/0.00 . 71/64/pc . . 70/65/pc Pittsburgh . . . . . .69/50/0.00 . . .77/55/s . . 79/61/sh Lisbon . . . . . . . . .77/63/0.00 . . .77/63/s . . 78/64/pc Portland, ME. . . .56/51/0.02 . . .65/54/c . . 61/54/pc London . . . . . . . .73/48/0.00 . 68/54/pc . . . .64/50/t Providence . . . . .64/54/0.02 . . .78/56/c . . . 80/56/s Madrid . . . . . . . .88/57/0.00 . . .91/63/s . . 90/61/pc Raleigh . . . . . . . .84/65/0.00 . 84/63/pc . . . .84/66/t Manila. . . . . . . . .90/81/0.00 . . .89/82/t . . . .88/79/t

Yesterday WednesdayThursday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Savannah . . . . .102/72/0.00 . . .93/72/t . . . .94/72/t Seattle. . . . . . . . .63/52/0.00 . .63/51/sh . . 66/52/pc Sioux Falls. . . . . .65/59/0.78 . 77/55/pc . . . .81/63/t Spokane . . . . . . .68/47/0.00 . .65/44/sh . . 66/45/pc Springfield, MO. 89/70/trace . . .85/62/t . . 89/70/pc Tampa . . . . . . . . .91/81/0.00 . . .94/73/t . . . .95/76/t Tucson. . . . . . . .102/63/0.00 . .106/74/s . . 105/72/s Tulsa . . . . . . . . . .94/79/0.00 . 90/72/pc . . 94/76/pc Washington, DC .78/64/0.00 . 79/62/pc . . 81/69/sh Wichita . . . . . . . .86/74/0.00 . 90/66/pc . . . .97/75/t Yakima . . . . . . . .79/45/0.00 . 72/47/pc . . 69/48/pc Yuma. . . . . . . . .105/74/0.00 . .109/72/s . . 107/75/s

INTERNATIONAL Mecca . . . . . . . .108/79/0.00 110/88/pc . . 111/86/s Mexico City. . . . .82/55/0.00 . . .83/57/t . . . .84/59/t Montreal. . . . . . .73/54/0.00 . .84/56/sh . . . 86/68/s Moscow . . . . . . .63/54/0.00 . 68/55/pc . . . .70/54/t Nairobi . . . . . . . .79/61/0.00 . .77/61/sh . . . .76/56/t Nassau . . . . . . . .97/75/0.00 . 88/75/pc . . . 87/74/s New Delhi. . . . .106/79/0.00 . .102/87/t . . 100/85/s Osaka . . . . . . . . .82/68/0.00 . . .78/67/c . . 75/66/sh Oslo. . . . . . . . . . .64/48/0.00 . .66/48/sh . . . 64/52/s Ottawa . . . . . . . .75/52/0.00 . . .81/57/s . . 86/62/pc Paris. . . . . . . . . . .73/63/0.00 . 75/57/pc . . . .70/56/t Rio de Janeiro. . .77/63/0.00 . 71/63/pc . . . 74/62/s Rome. . . . . . . . . .75/57/0.00 . . .79/64/t . . . 81/63/s Santiago . . . . . . .59/36/0.00 . 70/37/pc . . 71/36/pc Sao Paulo . . . . . .64/54/0.00 . 66/52/pc . . . 71/53/s Sapporo. . . . . . . .59/55/0.00 . 61/51/pc . . . 68/52/s Seoul . . . . . . . . . .84/59/0.00 . . .84/65/s . . 83/64/pc Shanghai. . . . . . .73/66/0.00 . . .75/69/r . . . .80/68/t Singapore . . . . . .88/81/0.00 . . .89/78/t . . . .88/77/t Stockholm. . . . . .64/52/0.00 . 68/55/pc . . 73/54/pc Sydney. . . . . . . . .63/59/0.00 . . .64/56/r . . . .63/55/t Taipei. . . . . . . . . .93/79/0.00 . . .90/82/t . . . .88/80/t Tel Aviv . . . . . . . .82/70/0.00 . . .83/70/s . . . 82/69/s Tokyo. . . . . . . . . .73/66/0.00 . . .73/66/c . . 75/67/sh Toronto . . . . . . . .66/54/0.00 . . .73/61/s . . 70/61/sh Vancouver. . . . . .61/54/0.00 . 61/49/pc . . 63/51/pc Vienna. . . . . . . . .75/64/0.00 . . .81/59/t . . 82/63/pc Warsaw. . . . . . . .77/50/0.00 . . .75/54/t . . 73/55/pc


S

D

Tennis Inside Serena Williams returns to the court after a year’s absence, see Page D4.

www.bendbulletin.com/sports

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, JUNE 15, 2011

TEE TO GREEN

NFL

GOLF: OREGON OPEN

NFL, players meet again, push for deal NEW YORK — Don’t break out the tailgate gear just yet. An end to the NFL lockout might not be imminent. It does appear much closer than at any point in the past three months, though. Recent progress in labor talks between the league and players has sparked a new sense of optimism, and team owners have been told to be ready to extend their one-day meetings in Chicago next week. The two sides made progress in labor negotiations held Tuesday at an undisclosed location in Maryland. Those talks will go through at least today and quite possibly to the end of the week. A person with knowledge of the talks told The Associated Press that finalizing an agreement by next week’s owners’ meetings is unlikely. But a framework for a new collective bargaining deal could be presented in Chicago, with further tweaking extending the work stoppage until the end of the month. A new CBA could be in place before the July Fourth weekend, the person added, speaking on condition of anonymity because details of the meeting are not being made public. Another person familiar with the talks told the AP that the owners and players are “headed in the right direction” and that lawyers “are back in the room” after being excluded from sessions the past two weeks. — The Associated Press

IN SID E MLB NL

AL

Giants ............6 D’backs ..........5

Tigers ............4 Indians ...........0

Nationals .......8 Cardinals .......6

Rays ...............4 Red Sox .........0

Phillies...........9 Marlins ..........1

Yankees ....... 12 Rangers .........4

Mets...............4 Braves............3

Blue Jays .......6 Orioles ...........5

Cubs ..............5 Brewers..........4

Angels ...........4 Mariners ........0

Pirates ...........1 Astros ............0

Royals ............7 Athletics.........4

Rockies ..........6 Padres ...........3

White Sox ........ Twins ........ppd.

Reds...............3 Dodgers .........2

Giants hang on to beat Diamondbacks Cody Ross hits a tworun double to lead San Francisco, see Page D3

Busy days for Awbrey Glen pros By Zack Hall The Bulletin

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Golfers clear the ball from a bunker on Kah-Nee-Ta golf course’s 10th hole. The green on the golf course’s signature 17th hole sits across the bridge from the 10th hole.

CENTRAL OREGON GOLF COURSE TOUR

Kah-Nee-Ta Warm Springs track can feel like playing a golfer’s private 18-hole course Editor’s note: This is another in a seasonlong series visiting each public and semiprivate golf course in Central Oregon. WARM SPRINGS — or being such a challenging hole, the par-5 17th at Kah-Nee-Ta High Desert Resort & Casino sure can feel peaceful. Maybe that serenity comes from the sound of the rushing Warm Springs River that runs just to the left of the fairway, and eventually through it. Or maybe it is because the hill to the right seems to block the rest of the course, and indeed the world. Or possibly the solitude felt on the 17th, Kah-Nee-Ta’s best hole, is just in-

F

Breaking down the course

The basics

ZACK HALL dicative of the course in general. Nestled on the floor of a small, steeply walled canyon on the Warm Springs Indian Reservation, Kah-Nee-Ta has a way of making any golfer feel as if he or she is millions of miles from anywhere. About 11 miles from the town of Warm Springs, the course’s geography surely helps create that atmosphere. But the course — though often filled with golf-loving gamblers during weekends — is lightly played during the week. I played a round there on a recent sunny, warm Friday morning, and hardly a soul could be found early in the round. And for me, a speedy golfer to begin with, that meant a round played in less than three hours. Sure, a large group of about three dozen golfers teed off midway through

General information about Kah-Nee-Ta High Desert Resort & Casino Number of holes: 18 Status: Open year-round, weather permitting Location: 6823 Highway 8, Warm Springs Tee times: 541-553-4971 Stats: Par 72, 6,352 yards Greens fees: $45 daily Power cart: $16 Head golf professional: Ryan Davis Course designers: Original nine: William Bell (1972); second nine: Gene “Bunny” Mason (1976) Extras: Putting green, driving range, snack bar Website: www.kahneeta.com

my round, but for the most part playing Kah-Nee-Ta on a weekday feels a lot like playing your very own golf course. See Kah-Nee-Ta / D6

A closer look at Kah-Nee-Ta. For more information on the items below, see Page D6.

DIFFICULTY

STRATEGY

EXTRAS

Kah-Nee-Ta starts off with a relatively easy and straightforward front nine and then gradually becomes more difficult. The course’s hard and fast greens make downhill putts a challenge. But golfers of all skill levels should feel comfortable playing at Kah-Nee-Ta.

Kah-Nee-Ta’s wide fairways offer plenty of opportunities to use a driver. Golfers should play aggressively early in the round to bank low numbers when the course is at its easiest. All five par 5s are reachable in two shots, but the 17th hole should be played with caution.

Kah-Nee-Ta’s driving range sits atop a hill looking over the course, and is affordable at $7 for a large bucket. The course’s putting green is medium-size, but is conveniently placed just off the first tee. The course has a reasonably priced snack bar.

WCL BASEBALL

Tim Fraley was wearing telltale signs of a recently played round of golf: Neatly pressed golf pants, collared shirt, brown leather golf shoes, a plaid hat and sunglasses. But unlike the nearly 100 other golf professionals at Awbrey Glen Golf Club Tuesday who were playing in the Oregon Open Invitational, Fraley was chatting Tim Fraley with a course employee about what to do about a golf cart with one flat tire. He was not complaining about the broken-down Mark cart. Instead, Amberson Fraley was trying to fix the problem just moments after finishing the first round of the Pacific Northwest PGA tournament with a 2-over-par 74. At this tournament, Fraley — along with Awbrey Glen general manager Mark Amberson — is both competitive golfer AND tournament host. So is Fraley more a golfer or a host this week? “I certainly hope a golfer,” replied Fraley, a 39-year-old pro who has worked for Awbrey Glen since 2003. “That means I played good golf to make the cut and do well.” See Pros / D5

Oregon Open Where: Awbrey Glen Golf Club, Bend What: Pacific Northwest PGA golf tournament, 54-hole stroke play Today: Second-round tee times start at 7:30 a.m. and run through 2:30 p.m. Thursday: The field will be cut to 70 players for the final round Admission: Free

SKIING

Elks battle back Skiers take advantage of record snowpack to beat Bells, 5-4 By Wina Sturgeon

New York Times News Service

Bulletin staff report

San Francisco Giants’ Pablo Sandoval, right, and Aubrey Huff celebrate their runs against the Arizona Diamondbacks, Tuesday.

INDEX Scoreboard ................................D2 NHL ...........................................D2 Major League Baseball ..............D3 Tennis ....................................... D4 Prep sports ............................... D4 Tee to Green......................... D5, 6

Pinch-hitter Nick Wagner belted a single in the bottom of the ninth inning to score runner Justin Maffei and halt Bellingham’s ninth-inning rally with a 5-4 West Coast League victory on Tuesday Next up at Vince Genna Stadium. • Bellingham Bellingham was down 4-2 headBells at ing into the top of the ninth before Bend Elks scoring twice to tie the score at 4. Bend loaded the bases for Wag- • When: ner, who entered the contest just Today, prior to his game-winning hit, in 6:35 p.m. the bottom of the ninth. Villanova sophomore Stephen • Radio: KPOV-FM Ostapeck took the victory on the 106.7 mound for Bend after pitching the final two innings and recording two strikeouts. On offense, the Elks’ Derek Blankenship, Cullen Hendrickson and Toby Demello each had two hits. Hendrickson also added two RBIs. Bellingham returns to Genna Stadium tonight to battle the Elks at 6:35 p.m.

LITTLE COTTONWOOD CANYON, Utah — At the base of a slope that at this time of year usually tests the skills of mountain bikers, roughly 60 skiers and snowboarders, hoping to get first tracks on the mountain, waited for the 8 a.m. opening of the tram at Snowbird resort. These were not bitter-enders hoping to eke out runs on a thin swatch of snow. At this northern Utah resort, it is still winter. There is hardly a bare spot on the mountain. Piles of snow line the vast parking lot. With much of the country in the grip of record-high temperatures, it was 31 degrees here Friday morning. Snowbird announced that it will be open for snow sports three days a week until July 4. And it could stay open even later. An unusually heavy winter snowfall and a cold, wet spring have resulted in a record snowpack in much of the mountain regions of the West. See Skiers / D4

Tom Smart / The New York Times

From left: Josh Rieders, his brother Brandon Rieders and their father, Bradley Rieders, ski at Snowbird Ski and Summer Resort in Alta, Utah, last week. An unusually heavy winter snowfall and a cold, wet spring have resulted in a record snowpack in much of the mountain regions of the West.


D2 Wednesday, June 15, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

O  A

SCOREBOARD

TELEVISION TODAY BASEBALL 4 p.m. — MLB, Texas Rangers at New York Yankees, ESPN. 7 p.m. — MLB, Los Angeles Angels at Seattle Mariners, Root Sports.

HOCKEY 5 p.m. — NHL, Stanley Cup finals, Boston Bruins at Vancouver Canucks, NBC.

THURSDAY GOLF 7 a.m. — PGA Tour, U.S. Open, first round, ESPN. Noon — PGA Tour, U.S. Open, first round, NBC. 2 p.m. — PGA Tour, U.S. Open, first round, ESPN.

BASEBALL 9:30 a.m. — MLB, Baltimore Orioles at Toronto Blue Jays or Texas Rangers at New York Yankees, MLB Network. 4 p.m. — MLB, Boston Red Sox at Tampa Bay Rays or New York Mets at Atlanta Braves, MLB Network.

LACROSSE 4:30 p.m. — Major League Lacrosse, Chesapeake Bayhawks at Long Island Lizards, ESPN2.

SOCCER 8 p.m. — MLS, Vancouver Whitecaps at Seattle Sounders (taped), Root Sports.

IN THE BLEACHERS

PREPS BASEBALL ——— 2011 ALL-LEAGUE TEAMS ——— CLASS 4A SKY-EM LEAGUE Player of the year — Jordan Hodges, sr., Sisters Pitcher of the year — Travis Boggs, so., Elmira Coach of the year— Steve Hodges, Sisters First team — Travis Boggs, sr., pitcher, Elmira; Chris Engholm, jr., pitcher, Elmira; Shane Groth, jr., pitcher, Sisters; Joey Morgan, fr., catcher, Sisters; Brian Dunn, sr., catcher, Cottage Grove; Kevin Tuerffs, sr., first base, Cottage Grove; Jordan Hodges, sr., infielder, Sisters; Chade Hise, sr., infielder, Junction City; Gavin Kauffman, sr., infielder, Sweet Home; Eane Rodriguez, so., infielder, Elmira; Erik Carlson, sr., outfielder, Sisters; Justin Erlandson, so., outfielder, Sisters; Colton Holly, so., outfielder, Sweet Home; Jeremy White, jr., outfielder, Sweet Home; Michael Rank, sr., utility, Junction City. Second team — Tanner Errecart, sr., pitcher Junction City; Eli Allen, jr., pitcher, La Pine; Jon Lahey, sr., pitcher, Sisters; Macinzie Keegal, jr., catcher, Elmira; Kyle Winslow, jr., first base, Swet Home; Hunter Hamilton, jr, infielder, Cottage Grove; David Deggelman, sr., infielder, Sweet Home; Brice Keeler, jr., infielder, Elmira; Justin Rice, so., infielder, Sweet Home; Marcus Arends, sr., outfielder, Sisters; Devin Curtis, fr., outfielder, Elmira; Joey Conrad, sr., outfielder, Cottage Grove; Ben Ewing, sr., outfielder, La Pine; Austin Manley, sr., utility, La Pine. Honorable mention — Aaron Selig, jr., first base, Sisters; Tad Doty, fr., infielder, Junction City; Jessep Fay, so., utility, Elmira.

BASKETBALL WNBA

RADIO TODAY BASEBALL 6:30 p.m. — WCL, Bellingham Bells at Bend Elks, KPOV-FM 106.7.

THURSDAY BASEBALL 6:30 p.m. — WCL, Bellingham Bells at Bend Elks, KPOV-FM 106.7 Listings are the most accurate available. The Bulletin is not responsible for late changes made by TV or radio stations.

S   B Auto racing • Waltrip, Yarborough make NASCAR Hall of Fame: The wait is over for Cale Yarborough and Darrell Waltrip. The championship-winning drivers with a bumpy personal connection are headed to the NASCAR Hall of Fame. Yarborough and Waltrip got in on their third try, headlining the third five-member class announced Tuesday. They’re joined by eight-time series champion crew chief Dale Inman, nine-time Modified champion Richie Evans and pioneering driver and owner Glen Wood. Yarborough, who led with 85 percent of the vote by the 55person panel, won 83 races and three consecutive titles (1976-78). Only Jimmie Johnson’s current streak of five titles is longer. Waltrip, who received 82 percent of the vote, won 84 races, tied for third all time, and collected series championships in 1981, ’82 and ’85.

Baseball • Yankees’ Jeter goes on DL with strained right calf: Derek Jeter went on the 15-day disabled list Tuesday because of a strained right calf, an untimely setback for the New York Yankees star as he pursues 3,000 career hits. The Yankees put the All-Star shortstop on the DL for the first time since 2003, making the move prior to their game against Texas. Jeter limped off the field Monday night, four innings after he got his 2,994th hit. Jeter and his teammates hoped he would be able to get the historic hit at Yankee Stadium. New York has three games left against Texas on this homestand, then goes on a six-game road trip to Wrigley Field in Chicago, and Cincinnati.

WOMEN’S NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION All Times PDT ——— Eastern Conference W L Pct Indiana 3 1 .750 Chicago 2 1 .667 Connecticut 2 1 .667 New York 2 2 .500 Washington 1 2 .333 Atlanta 1 3 .250 Western Conference W L Pct San Antonio 3 0 1.000 Minnesota 3 1 .750 Los Angeles 2 1 .667 Seattle 1 1 .500 Phoenix 0 2 .000 Tulsa 0 5 .000 ——— Tuesday’s Games Indiana 82, Tulsa 74 Atlanta 79, New York 58 Thursday’s Game Connecticut at Washington, 7 p.m.

GB — ½ ½ 1 1½ 2 GB — ½ 1 1½ 2½ 4

HOCKEY NHL NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE Playoffs All Times PDT ——— STANLEY CUP FINALS (Best-of-7) (x-if necessary) Vancouver 3, Boston 3 Wednesday, June 1: Vancouver 1, Boston 0 Saturday, June 4: Vancouver 3, Boston 2 (OT) Monday, June 6: Boston 8, Vancouver 1 Wednesday, June 8: Boston 4, Vancouver 0 Friday, June 10: Vancouver 1, Boston 0 Monday, June 13: Boston 5, Vancouver 2 Today, June 15: Boston at Vancouver, 5 p.m.

WEST COAST LEAGUE ——— League standings East Division

Kitsap BlueJackets Bend Elks Corvallis Knights Klamath Falls Gems Cowlitz Black Bears Tuesday’s Games Bend 5, Bellingham 4 Kelowna 5, Kitsap 4 Wenatchee 10, Cowlitz 2 Walla Walla 6, Klamath Falls 4 Today’s Games Bellingham at Bend, 6:35 p.m. Kelowna at Kitsap, 6:35 p.m. Wenatchee at Cowlitz, 6:35 p.m. Klamath at Walla Walla, 7:05 p.m.

Basketball

College NCAA College World Series At TD Ameritrade Park Omaha Omaha, Neb. All Times PDT Double Elimination x-if necessary Saturday, June 18 Game 1 — North Carolina (50-14) vs. Vanderbilt (52-10), 11 a.m. Game 2 — Texas (49-17) vs. Florida (50-17), 4 p.m. Sunday, June 19 Game 3 — California (37-21) vs. Virginia (54-10), 11 a.m. Game 4 — South Carolina (50-14) vs. Texas A&M (4720), 4 p.m. Monday, June 20 Game 5 — Game 1 loser vs. Game 2 loser, 11 a.m. Game 6 — Game 1 winner vs. Game 2 winner, 4 p.m. Tuesday, June 21 Game 7 — Game 3 loser vs. Game 4 loser, 11 a.m. Game 8 — Game 3 winner vs. Game 4 winner, 4 p.m. Wednesday, June 22 Game 9 — Game 5 winner vs. Game 6 loser, 4 p.m. Thursday, June 23 Game 10 — Game 7 winner vs. Game 8 loser, 4 p.m. Friday, June 24 Game 11 — Game 6 winner vs. Game 9 winner, 11 a.m. Game 12 — Game 8 winner vs. Game 10 winner, 4 p.m. Saturday, June 25 x-Game 13 — Game 6 winner vs. Game 9 winner, 11 a.m. x-Game 14 — Game 8 winner vs. Game 10 winner, 4 p.m.

SOCCER MLS

BASEBALL WCL

Wenatchee AppleSox Walla Walla Sweets Bellingham Bells Kelowna Falcons West Division

Bend 001 010 111 — 5 10 3 Pulido, Spear (7), Ochoa (8) and Grubb. Jahnke, Snyder (6), Wilson (6), Ostapeck (8) and Demello. W — Ostapeck. L — Ochoa. 2B — Bend: Hendrickson, Christian. Bellingham: Hastings.

W 10 6 3 1

L 1 3 5 6

W 8 4 3 3 2

L 3 3 5 6 6

Tuesday’s Summary

MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCER All Times PDT Today’s Game Toronto FC at New England, 5 p.m. Friday’s Game San Jose at Sporting Kansas City, 5:30 p.m.

TENNIS ATP ASSOCIATION OF TENNIS PROFESSIONALS ——— AEGON International Tuesday At Devonshire Park Eastbourne, England (Premier) Surface: Grass-Outdoor Singles Men First Round Kevin Anderson (6), South Africa, def. Alexander Slabinsky, Britain, 7-5, 6-3. Donald Young, United States, def. Daniel Cox, Britain, 6-1, 7-5. Rainer Schuettler, Germany, def. Sergiy Stakhovsky (5), Ukraine, 6-3, 6-2. Illya Marchenko, Ukraine, def. Frederico Gil, Portugal, 6-1, 6-3. Somdev Devvarman, India, def. Guillermo Garcia-Lopez (4), Spain, 6-3, 6-4. Kei Nishikori, Japan, def. Evgeny Kirillov, Russia,

• Bobcats hire Cho as GM; promote Higgins: The Charlotte Bobcats have hired former Portland general manager Rich Cho for the same job and are promoting Rod Higgins to president of basketball operations. The team announced the move late Monday, just over a week before the NBA draft and three weeks after Cho was fired by the Trail Blazers. Cho was on the job in Portland less than a year, but brokered a trade with Higgins and the Bobcats in February that sent Gerald Wallace to the Blazers. In Charlotte, he’ll assist Higgins and owner Michael Jordan in the basketball operations of a franchise that’s made the playoffs just once in seven seasons. Cho became the NBA’s first Asian GM last year when he was hired away from Oklahoma City’s front office.

Elks 5, Bells 4

Soccer

By Greg Beacham

• U.S. beats Guadeloupe, advances to Gold Cup quarters: Jozy Altidore scored in the ninth minute as the United States held out Guadeloupe 1-0 on Tuesday in Kansas City to reach the Gold Cup quarterfinals. The U.S. finished second in Group C with six points, and will face Group B winner Jamaica in the quarterfinals on Sunday. The United States needed only a draw to advance after Panama and Canada drew 1-1 in Tuesday’s early game.

VANCOUVER, British Columbia — The past two weeks are likely to be a vivid blur in the memories of Tim Thomas, Roberto Luongo and the players who staggered off their final cross-continent flights Tuesday to put a merciful end to the Stanley Cup finals. The Vancouver Canucks have traded home victories of increasing intensity with the Boston Bruins for six games, with their veteran goalies dueling before a backdrop of bites, taunts, dangerous injuries and gut-wrenching road losses. The Presidents’ Trophy-winning Canucks and the profoundly resilient Bruins will play their 107th and final game when their draining seasons finally end in Game 7 tonight. Both teams are ready to enjoy their drastically shortened summers, but nobody can bear the thought of coming this far without drinking from the Stanley Cup. “Everything in the past is in the past,” Vancouver center Ryan Kesler said. “If we win tomorrow, we become legends.” Although they’ve lost three of their past four to the surging Bruins, the Canucks are ready to reap their reward for grinding out the NHL’s best regular-season record. They get to play Game 7 at home — and home-ice advantage means more than anybody expected in a series that’s otherwise been utterly unpredictable. The home team has won every game to date, but Boston has done it better than the favored Canucks. While the Bruins blew out Vancouver by a combined 17-3, the Canucks eked out three onegoal victories. The Canucks still can win their first NHL title after flopping in their first attempt Monday in Boston, while the Bruins are closing strong in their at-

Cycling • FBI wants tape of Hamilton-Armstrong meeting: The FBI has contacted a Colorado restaurant to get surveillance tapes of a conversation between seventime Tour de France winner Lance Armstrong and former teammate Tyler Hamilton over the weekend. Armstrong and Hamilton ran into each other at a restaurant in Aspen on Saturday night, a few weeks after Hamilton went on “60 Minutes” to accuse Armstrong of doping and encouraging his teammates to use performance-enhancing drugs as well. Hamilton attorney Chris Manderson said his client was rattled by some of Armstrong’s comments. “It was aggressive and intimidating and we thought it should be reported to federal investigators,” Manderson told The Associated Press. Armstrong and one of his lawyers said the conversation was uneventful. • Hushovd wins fourth stage of Tour of Switzerland: World champion Thor Hushovd won the fourth stage of the Tour of Switzerland on Tuesday, and Damiano Cunego of Italy retained the overall lead. Hushovd edged third-stage winner Peter Sagan of Slovakia to clock 4 hours, 46 minutes, 5 seconds for the 123-mile trek from Grindelwald to Huttwil. Italy’s Marco Marcato won a mass sprint for third place. The fifth stage today is a 130-mile route from Huttwil to Tobel-Taegerschen. —From wire reports

Bellingham

000 001 102

— 4 10

3

7-5, 6-1. Olivier Rochus, Belgium, def. Lleyton Hewitt, Australia, 6-2, 3-0, retired. Jo-Wilfried Tsonga (1), France, def. Denis Istomin, Uzbekistan, 6-2, 7-5. Janko Tipsarevic (3), Serbia, vs. James Ward, Britain, 6-3, 4-6, susp., darkness. UNICEF Open Tuesday At Autotron Rosmalen Den Bosch, Netherlands (Intl.) Surface: Grass-Outdoor Singles Men First Round Jesse Huta Galung, Netherlands, def. Julian Reister, Germany, 6-2, 3-6, 7-5. Jarkko Nieminen (5), Finland, def. Maximo Gonzalez, Argentina, 7-5, 6-1. Alex Bogomolov Jr., United States, def. Jeremy Chardy (7), France, 3-6, 6-4, 7-6 (7). Santiago Giraldo, Colombia, def. Michael Russell, United States, 7-6 (4), 6-3. Xavier Malisse (3), Belgium, def. Alejandro Falla, Colombia, 6-3, 6-1. Robin Haase, Netherlands, def. Mischa Zverev, Germany, 6-3, 6-4. Second Round Ivan Dodig (4), Croatia, def. Andreas Haider-Maurer, Austria, 6-4, 6-3. Teymuraz Gabashvili, Russia, def. Javier Marti, Spain, 7-6 (6), 6-3. Wimbledon Qualifying Tuesday At Bank of England Sports Ground Roehampton, England Singles Men Second Round Cedrik-Marcel Stebe, Germany, def. Alexander Kudryavtsev (28), Russia, 5-7, 6-4, 6-2. Roberto Bautista-Agut, Spain, def. Liam Broady, Britain, 6-1, 6-2. Frank Dancevic, Canada, def. Danai Udomchoke, Thailand, 6-1, 6-4. Marco Crugnola, Italy, def. Gregoire Burquier, France, 6-3, 6-3. Marc Gicquel, France (12), def. Bastian Knittel, Germany, 6-4, 6-4. Edouard Roger-Vasselin (29), France, def. Vasek Pospisil, Canada, 6-4, 7-5. Simone Bolelli (13), Italy, def. Simon Stadler, Germany, 6-3, 6-1. Jerzy Janowicz, Poland, def. Oliver Golding, Britain, 7-6 (3), 6-1. Ryan Harrison (14), United States, def. Laurent Rochette, France, 6-3, 6-3. Go Soeda (16), Japan, def. Marton Fucsovics, Hungary, 6-4, 6-3. Grega Zemlja, Slovenia, def. Julio Silva, Brazil, 6-4, 6-4. Flavio Cipolla (9), Italy, def. Daniel Munoz-de la Nava, Spain, 2-6, 6-3, 6-4. Igor Sijsling, Netherlands, def. Ivan Navarro, Spain, 6-7 (9), 6-1, 7-5. Lukasz Kubot (2), Poland, def. Kristijan Mesaros, Croatia, 6-2, 4-6, 6-4. Conor Niland, Ireland, def. Greg Jones, Australia, 4-6, 7-5, 6-2. Nikola Mektic, Croatia, def. Andrey Kuznetsov, Russia, 6-1, 7-6 (5). Bernard Tomic, Australia, def. Robert Farah, Colombia, 6-1, 6-4. Jean-Rene Lisnard, Monaco, def. Rogerio Dutra da Silva (21), Brazil, 6-4, 4-6, 6-4. Chris Guccione, Australia, def. Thomas Schoorel (4),

Netherlands, 7-6 (5), 6-2. Marinko Matosevic (30), Australia, def. Guillaume Rufin, France, 6-4, 6-4. Guillermo Olaso, Spain, def. Ivo Minar (15), Czech Republic, 7-5, 5-7, 6-4. Ruben Bemelmans, Belgium, def. Yuichi Sugita, Japan, 3-6, 6-4, 16-14. Marco Chiudinelli, Switzerland, def. Steve Darcis (6), Belgium, 6-3, 3-0, retired. Karol Beck (17), Slovakia, def. Frederik Nielsen, Denmark, 7-6 (0), 6-2. Rik de Voest (32), South Africa, def. Amer Delic, Bosnia-Herzegovina, 6-4, 7-6 (4). Martin Fischer (27), Austria, def. Alex Kuznetsov, United States, 6-4, 6-2. Kenny de Schepper, France, def. Matthew Ebden, Australia, 7-6 (5), 7-6 (4). Lukas Lacko (20), Slovakia, def. Fritz Wolmarans, South Africa, 6-2, 6-7 (5), 10-8. Andreas Beck (25), Germany, def. Jamie Baker, Britain, 6-3, 7-6 (5). David Goffin, Belgium, def. Uladzimir Ignatik, Belarus, 3-6, 6-1, 7-5. Augustin Gensse, France, def. Charles-Antoine Brezac, France, 7-6 (2), 3-6, 6-3. Jurgen Zopp, Estonia, leads Ricardo Hocevar, Brazil, 6-4, susp., darkness. Women First Round Zuzana Kucova, Slovakia, def. Julia Cohen, United States 6-4 6-2 Erika Sema, Japan, def. Ana Vrljic, Croatia 6-4 6-4 Noppawan Lertcheewakarn, Thailand, def. Kumiko Iijima, Japan 6-1 7-5 Olga Savchuk, Ukraine, def. Sacha Jones, New Zealand 7-6 (8) 6-2 Irina Falconi (4), United States, def. Anna-Lena Groenefeld, Germany 6-3 6-0 Chang Kai-chen (19), Taiwan, def. Elitsa Kostova, Bulgaria 6-4 6-0 Mona Barthel, Germany, def. Alexandra Cadantu, Romania 6-4 7-5 Valeria Savinykh (24), Russia, def. Michaella Krajicek, Netherlands 6-4 6-4 Ekaterina Ivanova, Russia, def. Han Xinyun, China 7-6 (5) 6-3 Alexa Glatch, United States, def. Renata Voracova, Czech Republic (11) 6-4 6-4 Misaki Doi (17), Japan, def. Madison Brengle, United States 3-6 6-1 6-4 Tamarine Tanasugarn (5), Thailand, vs. Cagla Buyukakcay, Turkey Caroline Garcia, France, def. Sally Peers, Australia 6-0 7-6 (6) Eva Birnerova (9), Czech Republic, def. Anne Kremer, Luxembourg 6-4 6-4 Galina Voskoboeva, Kazakhstan, def. Magda Linette, Poland 7-5 6-3 Kristyna Pliskova, Czech Republic, def. Laura Thorpe, France 6-3 6-2 Nathalie Agnes Piquion, France, def. Mandy Minella (22), Luxembourg 6-3 3-6 6-4 Arina Rodionova, Russia, def. Sesil Karatantcheva, Kazakhstan 6-3 5-7 6-2 Nina Bratchikova, Russia, def. Ioana Raluca Olaru, Romania 6-0 7-6 (7) Kurumi Nara (18), Japan, def. Lenka Jurikova, Slovakia 6-4 6-3 Kathrin Woerle, Germany, def. Maria Irigoyen, Argentina 2-6 6-4 6-2 Nuria Llagostera Vives (1), Spain, def. Tatjana Malek, Germany 6-3 6-3 Silvia Soler-Espinosa (20), Spain, def. Yuliya Beygelzimer, Ukraine 7-5 6-4 Melanie South, Britain, def. Liana Ungur, Romania 6-4 6-4 Casey Dellacqua, Australia, def. Heidi El Tabakh, Canada 6-3 7-5 Camila Giorgi, Italy, def. Samantha Murray, Britain 6-1 6-3 Marina Erakovic, New Zealand, def. Chan Yung-jan (2), Taiwan 6-2 6-1 Yvonne Meusburger (16), Austria, def. Tara Moore, Britain 6-2 6-2 Stephanie Dubois (23), Canada, def. Anna Fitzpatrick, Britain 6-1 6-1 Sophie Ferguson, Australia, def. Masa Zec-Peskiric, Slovenia 6-3 7-6 (4) Sloane Stephens (12), United States, def. Jade Windley, Britain 6-1 6-4 Lesia Tsurenko (15), Ukraine, def. Francesca Stephenson, Britain 6-0 6-1 Anna Floris, Italy, def. Iryna Bremond (10), France 3-6 6-1 6-3 Aleksandra Wozniak, Canada, def. Urszula Radwanska (21), Poland 6-4 6-3 Maria Elena Camerin (7), Italy, def. Aleksandra Krunic, Serbia 6-2 6-1 Estrella Cabeza Candela, Spain, def. Corinna Dentoni, Italy 6-2 6-0 Junri Namigata (13), Japan, def. Kristina Kucova, Slovakia 6-3 6-3 Lindsay Lee-Waters, United States, def. Alexandra Panova, Russia, 6-4, 7-5. Regina Kulikova, Russia, def. Ajla Tomljanovic, Croatia, 6-0, 6-7 (4), 2-0, retired. Mariya Koryttseva, Ukraine, def. Laura Natalie Siegemund, Germany, 6-4, 7-5. Stephanie Foretz Gacon (14), France, def. Eirini Georgatou, Greece, 6-2, 6-0. Edina Gallovits-Hall (6), Romania, def. Florencia Andre Molinero, Argentina, 6-1, 6-2. Beatriz Garcia Vidagany, Spain, def. Lara ArruabarrenaVecin, Spain, 6-2, 5-7, 6-0. Vitalia Diatchenko, Russia, def. Julia Glushko, Israel, 6-1, 6-4. Arantxa Rus (3), Netherlands, def. Olivia Sanchez, France, 6-4, 6-4. Tetiana Luzhanska, Ukraine, def. Lenka Wienerova, Slovakia, 6-2, 7-6 (2). Elena Bogdan, Romania, def. Lu Jing-Jing, China, 6-3, 3-6, 9-7. Carla Suarez Navarro (8), Spain, def. Stefanie Voegele, Switzerland, 6-7 (4), 7-6 (2), 6-2.

WTA WOMEN’S TENNIS ASSOCIATION ——— AEGON International Tuesday At Devonshire Park Eastbourne, England (Premier) Surface: Grass-Outdoor Singles Women First Round Ana Ivanovic, Serbia, def. Julia Goerges, Germany, 6-4, 6-3. Elena Baltacha, Britain, def. Aravane Rezai, France, 6-2, 6-1. Ekaterina Makarova, Russia, def. Mirjana Lucic, Croatia, 6-1, 3-6, 6-4. Serena Williams, United States, def. Tsvetana Pironkova, Bulgaria, 1-6, 6-3, 6-4. Francesca Schiavone (4), Italy, def. Kaia Kanepi, Estonia, 7-6 (7), 6-1. Marion Bartoli (6), France, def. Lucie Safarova, Czech Republic, 6-3, 3-6, 7-6 (7). Bojana Jovanovski, Serbia, def. Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova, Russia, 7-6 (9), 6-4. Vera Zvonareva (1), Russia, def. Heather Watson, Britain, 6-3, 6-3. Daniela Hantuchova, Slovakia, def. Zheng Jie, China, 6-4, 6-4. Li Na (2), China, def. Tamira Paszek, Austria, 7-5, 6-4. UNICEF Open Tuesday At Autotron Rosmalen Den Bosch, Netherlands (Intl.) Surface: Grass-Outdoor Women First Round Johanna Larsson, Sweden, def. Rebecca Marino, Canada, 7-5, 7-5. Sara Errani, Italy, def. Kiki Bertens, Netherlands, 7-6 (6), 6-1. Jelena Dokic, Australia, def. Alla Kudryavtseva, Russia, 6-0, 6-4. Roberta Vinci (7), Italy, def. Polona Hercog, Slovenia, 6-4, 6-2. Second Round Kimiko Date-Krumm, Japan, def. Lourdes Dominguez Lino, Spain, 7-6 (3), 6-0. Romina Oprandi, Italy, def. Kim Clijsters (1), Belgium, 7-6 (5), 6-3.

DEALS Transactions BASEBALL American League BALTIMORE ORIOLES—Announced the resignation of pitching coach Mark Connor. Named Rick Adair pitching coach and Terry Crowley interim bullpen coach. BOSTON RED SOX—Activated OF Darnell McDonald from the 15-day DL. Optioned INF Drew Sutton to Pawtucket (IL). NEW YORK YANKEES—Placed SS Derek Jeter on the 15-day DL. Called up INF Ramiro Pena from Scranton/ Wilkes-Barre (IL). TORONTO BLUE JAYS—Optioned RHP Kyle Drabek to Las Vegas (PCL). Selected the contract of RHP Zach Stewart from New Hampshire (EL). National League ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS—Signed OF Justin Bianco, RHP Cody Geyer, LHP Michael Blake, INF Carter Bell, INF Tyler Bream, C Steven Rodriguez and C Zach Jones. CHICAGO CUBS—Activated OF Reed Johnson from the 15-day DL. Optioned OF Tyler Colvin to Iowa (PCL). FLORIDA MARLINS—Activated SS Hanley Ramirez from the 15-day DL. Placed OF Scott Cousins on the 15-day DL. HOUSTON ASTROS—Fired pitching coach Brad Arnsberg. Named Doug Brocail pitching coach. SAN DIEGO PADRES—Recalled LHP Wade LeBlanc from Tucson (PCL). Optioned RHP Anthony Bass to San Antonio (Texas). WASHINGTON NATIONALS—Reinstated 3B Ryan Zimmerman from the 15-day DL. Optioned RHP Craig Stammen to Syracuse (IL). BASKETBALL National Basketball Association CHARLOTTE BOBCATS—Promoted Rod Higgins to director of basketball operations. Named Rich Cho general manager. LOS ANGELES CLIPPERS—Exercised their option on F Blake Griffin, G Eric Bledsoe and F Al-Farouq Aminu. Extended a qualifying offer to C DeAndre Jordan. SACRAMENTO KINGS—Waived G Jermaine Taylor. HOCKEY National Hockey League CALGARY FLAMES—Announced the purchase of the Calgary Roughnecks of the National Lacrosse League. OTTAWA SENATORS—Named Paul MacLean coach and signed him to a three-year contract. TORONTO MAPLE LEAFS—Re-signed D Carl Gunnarsson to a two-year contract.

FISH COUNT Upstream daily movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead, and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Monday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 2,965 1,085 187 47 The Dalles 2,374 754 22 5 John Day 1,900 790 14 1 McNary 1,359 639 12 1 Upstream year-to-date movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead, and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Monday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 200,454 65,063 6,873 2,315 The Dalles 141,064 48,577 1,645 794 John Day 116,143 46,687 2,971 1,779 McNary 108,891 35,851 2,738 1,590

H O C K E Y: S TA N L E Y C U P

Canucks, Bruins ready to finish off epic finals The Associated Press

Darryl Dyck / The Associated Press

Boston Bruins goalie Tim Thomas laughs as he speaks to reporters in Vancouver, British Columbia, Tuesday. tempt to end a 39-year Stanley Cup drought. “When we’re in the garage or driveway playing as a kid and you’re fantasizing ... you’re saying to yourself, ‘Game 7 of the Stanley Cup finals,’ ” said Thomas, the likely Conn Smythe Trophy winner after allowing just eight Vancouver goals in six games. “You’re not saying Game 6, you know? So this is really what every kid dreams about.” Thomas and the Bruins will attempt to become the first team in NHL history to win a Game 7 three times in the same postseason after beating Montreal and Tampa Bay earlier. The Original Six franchise has never played a Game 7 in the finals, not even while losing its last five trips to the championship round since 1972. Vancouver was stretched to the limit by defending champion Chicago in the first round. The Canucks were here in 1994, when Mark Messier’s New York Rangers beat them 3-2 in Game 7 — and Vancouver hadn’t been back to the finals since. Both teams have played under playoff stress this spring, but no pressure in hockey can match

the intensity of a close third period in Game 7 of the finals, when one superb play or a single mistake can change a player’s reputation forever. Anybody who fears that scenario didn’t show it after Tuesday’s workouts at Rogers Arena. “This is playoff hockey at its finest,” Vancouver center Manny Malhotra said. “No one wants to budge on home ice. This entire series has been a full playoff experience, filled with a lot of different types of games.” And nobody exemplifies this series’ strange duality better than Luongo. Vancouver’s enigmatic goalie has been outstanding at home, allowing just two goals in three games while posting two 10 shutouts, but the Canucks’ $10 million man was horrific in Boston, giving up 15 goals in slightly more than four periods while getting pulled twice, including from Game 6. Perhaps after one final head-clearing walk on the Vancouver seawall, his meditation of choice before two key victories this postseason, he’ll get his last chance at redemption on the same ice where he backstopped Canada to Olympic gold last year. “We’re going to put what happened (in Game 6) behind us as soon as possible, and get ready for obviously what is going to be a dream, playing in Game 7 of the Stanley Cup finals,” Luongo said Monday. “I’ve been in those situations before. I know how to handle it. I’ll be ready for it.” The series’ exhausting travel schedule — Boston has made five cross-continent flights, while Vancouver had a mere four — hasn’t ratcheted down the intensity late in games. The Canucks exude a confidence that must be rooted in their strong regular season, not their years of playoff struggles before this breakthrough. Daniel Sedin even guaranteed a Game 7 victory to the Vancouver Sun.


THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, June 15, 2011 D3

MA JOR L E AGUE BA SE BA L L AL BOXSCORES Yankees 12, Rangers 4 Texas Kinsler 2b Andrus ss J.Hamilton lf Mi.Young dh A.Beltre 3b A.Blanco 3b N.Cruz rf Moreland 1b Torrealba c Gentry cf Totals

AB 5 4 4 4 3 1 3 4 3 4 35

R 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 4

H BI BB 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 2 0 1 1 1 0 8 4 2

SO 1 0 2 1 1 0 2 2 0 0 9

Avg. .230 .275 .280 .305 .265 .171 .225 .304 .253 .236

New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Gardner lf-cf 4 3 3 1 1 0 .282 Granderson cf 4 2 2 4 0 0 .282 An.Jones lf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .212 Teixeira dh 4 1 1 2 0 1 .250 Al.Rodriguez 3b 4 1 2 2 0 0 .288 Cano 2b 4 1 1 1 0 0 .284 R.Pena 2b 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Posada 1b 4 1 1 0 0 1 .227 Swisher rf 3 2 2 1 1 1 .227 E.Nunez ss 4 1 2 1 0 0 .233 Cervelli c 4 0 0 0 0 1 .176 Totals 36 12 14 12 2 5 Texas 000 220 000 — 4 8 0 New York 061 203 00x — 12 14 0 LOB—Texas 6, New York 3. 2B—Gentry (4), Teixeira (10), Al.Rodriguez (14), Posada (8), Swisher (11). HR—Swisher (6), off Kirkman; Granderson (21), off Tateyama; Cano (13), off Tateyama. RBIs—Andrus (29), Mi.Young 2 (42), Gentry (4), Gardner (16), Granderson 4 (51), Teixeira 2 (49), Al.Rodriguez 2 (42), Cano (42), Swisher (28), E.Nunez (8). SB—Gardner (14). Runners left in scoring position—Texas 2 (J.Hamilton, Kinsler); New York 3 (Al.Rodriguez, Cano, Cervelli). Runners moved up—Andrus, J.Hamilton. GIDP— Teixeira, Cervelli. DP—Texas 2 (Andrus, Kinsler, Moreland), (Kinsler, Andrus, Moreland). Texas IP H R ER BB Ogando L, 7-1 1 2-3 6 6 6 1 Kirkman 2 2-3 3 3 3 1 Tateyama 1 2-3 3 3 3 0 Rhodes 1 1 0 0 0 Bush 1 1 0 0 0 New York IP H R ER BB Sabathia W, 8-4 7 8 4 4 0 Ayala 1 0 0 0 0 Pendleton 1 0 0 0 2 Inherited runners-scored—Kirkman 1-0. HBP—by Kirkman (Teixeira). T—3:18. A—43,457 (50,291).

SO NP ERA 1 53 2.71 1 56 6.91 1 38 4.38 1 11 4.96 1 5 4.73 SO NP ERA 6 109 3.28 1 14 1.33 2 27 2.25 1-0, Tateyama

Blue Jays 6, Orioles 5 (11 innings) Baltimore Hardy ss Markakis rf Ad.Jones cf Guerrero dh Wieters c D.Lee 1b Scott lf 1-Pie pr-lf Mar.Reynolds 3b Andino 2b Totals

AB 6 5 5 4 5 4 4 1 4 4 42

R H 1 3 0 3 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 1 3 0 1 1 1 0 0 5 13

BI 1 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 1 5

BB 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 4

SO 2 1 2 0 0 1 0 0 2 1 9

Avg. .296 .249 .295 .281 .276 .223 .251 .247 .204 .258

Toronto AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Y.Escobar ss 5 1 3 1 1 0 .284 C.Patterson lf 6 0 1 1 0 2 .278 Bautista rf 3 1 1 0 3 1 .338 Lind 1b 4 1 2 2 2 0 .331 Arencibia c 5 0 1 0 0 0 .238 Encarnacion dh 5 0 0 0 0 0 .263 A.Hill 2b 5 2 3 1 0 0 .247 R.Davis cf 5 0 1 0 0 2 .247 J.Nix 3b 4 1 1 0 0 2 .188 Totals 42 6 13 5 6 7 Baltimore 100 000 220 00 — 5 13 1 Toronto 101 200 100 01 — 6 13 1 No outs when winning run scored. 1-ran for Scott in the 8th. E—Andino (7), Janssen (1). LOB—Baltimore 10, Toronto 13. 2B—Hardy 2 (8), Markakis (6), Lind (7), Arencibia (9), A.Hill (12). HR—Wieters (6), off Rzepczynski; A.Hill (2), off Accardo; Lind (12), off Uehara. RBIs—Hardy (20), Ad.Jones (36), Wieters 2 (30), Andino (4), Y.Escobar (25), C.Patterson (29), Lind 2 (39), A.Hill (27). SF—Ad.Jones, Andino. Runners left in scoring position—Baltimore 6 (Guerrero 2, Andino 3, Ad.Jones); Toronto 8 (Arencibia, J.Nix, Encarnacion 3, Lind 3). Runners moved up—Markakis, C.Patterson. GIDP— Ad.Jones. DP—Toronto 1 (Camp, A.Hill, Lind). Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Jakubauskas 5 1-3 7 4 4 4 2 101 5.09 M.Gonzalez 2-3 0 0 0 1 1 12 6.75 Accardo 1 3 1 1 0 1 21 4.50 Ji.Johnson 2 2 0 0 1 1 31 2.54 Uehara L, 1-1 1 1 1 1 0 2 13 2.43 Toronto IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA C.Villanueva 6 7 3 3 2 3 98 3.25 Frasor H, 5 1 1 0 0 0 0 24 2.96 Rzepczynski 0 1 2 2 1 0 9 3.58 Janssen 1 1 0 0 0 3 18 2.93 Rauch 2 2 0 0 1 3 38 3.86 Camp W, 1-1 1 1 0 0 0 0 8 4.31 C.Villanueva pitched to 2 batters in the 7th. Rzepczynski pitched to 2 batters in the 8th. Uehara pitched to 1 batter in the 11th. Inherited runners-scored—M.Gonzalez 2-0, Frasor 22. IBB—off Jakubauskas (Bautista). HBP—by Jakubauskas (J.Nix). WP—Jakubauskas, Frasor. T—3:47. A—15,592 (49,260).

Rays 4, Red Sox 0 Boston Ellsbury cf Pedroia 2b Ad.Gonzalez 1b Youkilis 3b Ortiz dh C.Crawford lf Saltalamacchia c J.Drew rf Scutaro ss Totals

AB 3 4 4 4 3 3 3 3 2 29

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

H BI BB 1 0 1 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 5 0 3

SO 0 1 0 1 0 1 2 0 0 5

Avg. .318 .258 .347 .259 .321 .243 .246 .229 .277

Tampa Bay AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Damon dh 4 0 1 0 0 0 .281 Zobrist 2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .266 Joyce rf 4 1 1 0 0 0 .327 Longoria 3b 1 2 0 0 2 0 .250 Kotchman 1b 3 0 2 1 1 0 .342 B.Upton cf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .216 Jaso c 4 0 1 1 0 0 .235 Ruggiano lf 4 1 2 1 0 1 .372 Brignac ss 1 0 0 0 2 0 .170 Totals 29 4 7 3 5 2 Boston 000 000 000 — 0 5 0 Tampa Bay 000 011 02x — 4 7 0 LOB—Boston 5, Tampa Bay 7. 2B—Damon (12), Joyce (16). HR—Ruggiano (3), off Wakefield. RBIs— Kotchman (15), Jaso (15), Ruggiano (9). Runners left in scoring position—Boston 3 (C.Crawford 2, Youkilis); Tampa Bay 5 (Zobrist 3, Jaso, Ruggiano). GIDP—Ellsbury, Youkilis 2, B.Upton. DP—Boston 2 (Scutaro, Pedroia, Ad.Gonzalez), (Ellsbury, Scutaro, Pedroia, Ad.Gonzalez); Tampa Bay 3 (Brignac, Zobrist, Kotchman), (Shields, Brignac, Kotchman), (Longoria, Zobrist, Kotchman). Boston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Wkefield L, 3-2 7 4 2 1 5 2 119 4.39 Hottovy 0 2 2 2 0 0 14 7.71 Aceves 1 1 0 0 0 0 7 3.21 Tampa Bay IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Shields W, 6-4 9 5 0 0 3 5 110 2.60 Hottovy pitched to 3 batters in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored—Aceves 2-1. HBP—by Hottovy (Longoria). WP—Wakefield. PB—Saltalamacchia 2. T—2:24. A—20,972 (34,078).

Tigers 4, Indians 0 Cleveland G.Sizemore dh C.Santana c Brantley cf A.Cabrera ss Choo rf O.Cabrera 2b T.Buck lf LaPorta 1b Hannahan 3b Totals

AB 4 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 28

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

H BI BB SO 0 0 0 4 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 0 1 12

Avg. .246 .220 .283 .297 .231 .242 .236 .242 .228

Detroit A.Jackson cf Kelly 3b Boesch rf

AB 4 5 3

R 1 1 1

H BI BB 2 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 1

Avg. .258 .248 .283

SO 0 0 0

Worth 2b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .368 Mi.Cabrera 1b 2 1 1 1 1 0 .316 V.Martinez dh 3 0 1 0 1 0 .318 Dirks lf 4 0 3 2 0 1 .258 Avila c 3 0 0 1 0 1 .296 Santiago ss 3 0 0 0 1 1 .237 Raburn 2b 3 0 1 0 0 1 .203 C.Wells rf 1 0 1 0 0 0 .247 Totals 32 4 11 4 5 4 Cleveland 000 000 000 — 0 2 1 Detroit 003 000 10x — 4 11 0 E—O.Cabrera (6). LOB—Cleveland 3, Detroit 11. RBIs—Mi.Cabrera (46), Dirks 2 (9), Avila (36). SB—A.Jackson (10), Mi.Cabrera (1), Dirks (2). SF— Mi.Cabrera, Avila. Runners left in scoring position—Detroit 8 (V.Martinez, Raburn 3, Avila 2, Kelly, Worth). Runners moved up—A.Jackson. GIDP—A.Cabrera, Avila. DP—Cleveland 1 (O.Cabrera, A.Cabrera, LaPorta); Detroit 1 (Mi.Cabrera, Santiago). Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO Msterson L, 5-5 6 1-3 7 4 2 5 4 R.Perez 2-3 1 0 0 0 0 J.Smith 1 3 0 0 0 0 Detroit IP H R ER BB SO Vrlander W, 8-3 9 2 0 0 1 12 Inherited runners-scored—R.Perez 2-1. Verlander (C.Santana). PB—C.Santana. T—2:24. A—28,128 (41,255).

NP ERA 109 3.16 4 1.37 12 1.35 NP ERA 117 2.66 HBP—by

Angels 4, Mariners 0 Los Angeles Aybar ss Tor.Hunter rf Abreu dh V.Wells lf H.Kendrick 2b Branyan 1b a-Trumbo ph-1b Conger c Bourjos cf Romine 3b Totals

AB 5 5 3 4 4 3 1 3 4 4 36

R 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 4

H BI BB 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 9 4 2

SO 0 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 6

BB 1 BB 1 1 0

SO 6 SO 5 0 1

NP 128 NP 108 22 8

ERA 2.06 ERA 3.53 1.91 3.00

SO 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 2

Avg. .283 .272 .289 .273 .306 .385 .221 .243 .235

Royals 7, Athletics 4 Kansas City A.Gordon lf Me.Cabrera cf Hosmer 1b Francoeur rf Butler dh Moustakas 3b Treanor c Getz 2b A.Escobar ss Totals

AB 6 5 4 2 4 3 2 3 5 34

R H 0 1 1 0 1 2 2 0 0 1 2 2 0 1 0 0 1 3 7 10

BI 0 0 1 1 2 0 1 0 2 7

BB 0 1 1 2 1 1 2 1 0 9

Oakland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Crisp cf 5 0 1 1 0 1 .256 Pennington ss 3 0 0 0 2 2 .266 Matsui dh 5 2 2 1 0 0 .221 Willingham lf 5 0 1 0 0 2 .234 C.Jackson rf 3 0 0 0 1 0 .250 S.Sizemore 3b 3 1 2 1 1 0 .268 K.Suzuki c 3 0 0 0 1 0 .232 Barton 1b 3 0 0 0 1 0 .213 J.Weeks 2b 4 1 1 0 0 0 .320 Totals 34 4 7 3 6 5 Kansas City 010 120 021 — 7 10 2 Oakland 000 110 020 — 4 7 1 E—A.Escobar (6), Moustakas (1), Barton (8). LOB—Kansas City 13, Oakland 9. 2B—Butler (16), A.Escobar (11). 3B—J.Weeks (3). HR—Matsui (5), off Duffy. RBIs—Hosmer (22), Francoeur (41), Butler 2 (31), Treanor (11), A.Escobar 2 (16), Crisp (21), Matsui (26), S.Sizemore (9). SB—Francoeur 2 (9), A.Escobar (9). CS—A.Gordon (4). S—Moustakas, Treanor, Getz. SF—Francoeur. Runners left in scoring position—Kansas City 8 (Getz, Butler 2, A.Gordon, A.Escobar 2, Me.Cabrera 2); Oakland 3 (K.Suzuki, Willingham, J.Weeks). Runners moved up—A.Gordon, Treanor, A.Escobar. GIDP—C.Jackson. DP—Kansas City 2 (Francoeur, Francoeur, Treanor), (Getz, A.Escobar, Hosmer); Oakland 1 (K.Suzuki, K.Suzuki, Pennington). Kansas City IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Duffy W, 1-2 6 4 2 2 4 2 104 5.04 G.Holland H, 4 1 2-3 3 2 1 0 1 31 0.63 Crow H, 6 1-3 0 0 0 1 0 7 1.42 Soria S, 10-15 1 0 0 0 1 2 20 4.80 Oakland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Cahill L, 6-5 4 1-3 4 4 4 7 0 96 3.42 Breslow 1 2-3 2 0 0 0 2 34 3.76 Wuertz 1 0 0 0 1 0 15 2.21 Devine 1 2 2 2 0 0 19 2.84 Balfour 1 2 1 1 1 0 26 2.86 Inherited runners-scored—Crow 1-0, Breslow 3-0. WP—G.Holland, Cahill 2. T—3:25. A—11,439 (35,067).

NL BOXSCORES Cubs 5, Brewers 4 (10 innings) Milwaukee R.Weeks 2b Morgan cf Braun lf Fielder 1b McGehee 3b 1-C.Gomez pr Hawkins p Dillard p C.Hart rf Y.Betancourt ss Lucroy c Gallardo p a-Counsell ph Estrada p Braddock p Jo.Wilson 3b Totals

AB 6 6 5 2 5 0 0 0 4 5 3 2 0 0 0 1 39

R H 1 3 1 2 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 11

BI 1 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

BB 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 6

SO 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 5

AMERICAN LEAGUE East Division Boston New York Tampa Bay Toronto Baltimore Central Division Detroit Cleveland Chicago Kansas City Minnesota West Division Texas Seattle Los Angeles Oakland

W 39 37 36 33 30 W 37 35 33 30 26 W 36 34 33 28

L 27 28 31 34 34 L 30 30 35 37 39 L 32 34 36 40

Pct .591 .569 .537 .493 .469 Pct .552 .538 .485 .448 .400 Pct .529 .500 .478 .412

Avg. .282 .333 .306 .300 .229 .216 ----.273 .232 .272 .171 .221 .250 --.286

Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Fukudome rf 4 1 1 0 0 2 .296 S.Castro ss 5 1 3 2 0 1 .309 Ar.Ramirez 3b 3 1 1 2 1 0 .278 C.Pena 1b 3 0 0 0 1 2 .216 DeWitt lf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .275 Marmol p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Samardzija p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Soto c 4 1 1 1 0 2 .219 Je.Baker 2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .351 Re.Johnson cf 3 0 1 0 0 0 .365 J.Russell p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .125 C.Carpenter p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Montanez lf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .286 R.Wells p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .222 R.Lopez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Campana cf 2 1 1 0 0 0 .244 Totals 35 5 8 5 2 12 Milwaukee 002 100 010 0 — 4 11 0 Chicago 000 000 130 1 — 5 8 3 One out when winning run scored. a-sacrificed for Gallardo in the 8th. 1-ran for McGehee in the 9th. E—R.Wells (2), S.Castro 2 (14). LOB—Milwaukee 13, Chicago 5. 2B—R.Weeks (16), Fukudome (11), S.Castro (18), Re.Johnson (9), Campana (2). HR—Soto (5), off Gallardo; Ar.Ramirez (5), off Estrada. RBIs—R.Weeks (30), Braun (49), Fielder (59), McGehee (25), S.Castro 2 (30), Ar.Ramirez 2 (29), Soto (15). SB—Morgan (3), Braun (16), C.Gomez (15), Jo.Wilson (1). S—Counsell, Fukudome. SF—Fielder.

NATIONAL LEAGUE GB — 1½ 3½ 6½ 8 GB — 1 4½ 7 10 GB — 2 3½ 8

Tuesday’s Games Detroit 4, Cleveland 0 N.Y. Yankees 12, Texas 4 Toronto 6, Baltimore 5, 11 innings Tampa Bay 4, Boston 0 Chicago White Sox at Minnesota, ppd., rain Kansas City 7, Oakland 4 L.A. Angels 4, Seattle 0

Avg. .288 .228 .295 .192 .308 .161 .251 .227 .243 .200

Seattle AB R H BI BB SO Avg. I.Suzuki rf 4 0 2 0 0 0 .265 Ryan ss 4 0 0 0 0 2 .256 Smoak 1b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .248 A.Kennedy 2b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .275 Cust dh 2 0 0 0 1 1 .214 Olivo c 3 0 0 0 0 0 .233 Carp lf 3 0 2 0 0 1 .267 Halman cf 3 0 0 0 0 2 .381 Figgins 3b 3 0 1 0 0 0 .192 Totals 30 0 5 0 1 6 Los Angeles 400 000 000 — 4 9 0 Seattle 000 000 000 — 0 5 1 a-doubled for Branyan in the 8th. E—I.Suzuki (3). LOB—Los Angeles 7, Seattle 4. 2B—Aybar (12), Trumbo (13), Bourjos (10), I.Suzuki (10). RBIs—Tor.Hunter (34), H.Kendrick (23), Branyan (2), Bourjos (14). Runners left in scoring position—Los Angeles 5 (Romine 2, Tor.Hunter, Bourjos 2); Seattle 2 (Ryan, A.Kennedy). GIDP—Aybar, Ryan, Halman. DP—Los Angeles 2 (Romine, H.Kendrick, Branyan), (Aybar, H.Kendrick, Branyan); Seattle 1 (A.Kennedy, Ryan, Smoak). Los Angeles IP H R ER Weaver W, 8-4 9 5 0 0 Seattle IP H R ER Fister L, 3-8 7 7 4 4 Laffey 1 2 0 0 J.Wright 1 0 0 0 PB—Olivo. T—2:22. A—17,634 (47,878).

STANDINGS, SCORES AND SCHEDULES WCGB — — 2 5 6½ WCGB — 2 5½ 8 11 WCGB — 4½ 6 10½

L10 9-1 6-4 7-3 4-6 5-5 L10 7-3 2-8 6-4 5-5 8-2 L10 4-6 4-6 3-7 1-9

Str L-1 W-1 W-1 W-1 L-3 Str W-2 L-1 W-2 W-2 W-2 Str L-3 L-2 W-2 L-3

Home 19-13 21-17 15-16 16-17 20-18 Home 21-13 20-12 16-17 21-20 9-16 Home 20-13 18-17 15-20 14-16

Away 20-14 16-11 21-15 17-17 10-16 Away 16-17 15-18 17-18 9-17 17-23 Away 16-19 16-17 18-16 14-24

East Division Philadelphia Atlanta New York Florida Washington Central Division Milwaukee St. Louis Cincinnati Pittsburgh Chicago Houston West Division San Francisco Arizona Colorado Los Angeles San Diego

Today’s Games Cleveland (Carmona 3-8) at Detroit (Penny 5-5), 4:05 p.m. Texas (D.Holland 5-1) at N.Y. Yankees (Nova 5-4), 4:05 p.m. Baltimore (Arrieta 8-3) at Toronto (R.Romero 5-6), 4:07 p.m. Boston (Beckett 5-2) at Tampa Bay (Hellickson 7-4), 4:10 p.m. Chicago White Sox (Floyd 6-5) at Minnesota (Pavano 3-5), 5:10 p.m. Kansas City (Hochevar 4-6) at Oakland (Outman 1-1), 7:05 p.m. L.A. Angels (E.Santana 3-6) at Seattle (Bedard 3-4), 7:10 p.m.

W 41 38 33 32 31 W 38 38 36 33 27 25 W 38 37 32 31 30

L 26 30 34 34 36 L 30 30 33 33 39 43 L 29 31 35 38 39

Pct .612 .559 .493 .485 .463 Pct .559 .559 .522 .500 .409 .368 Pct .567 .544 .478 .449 .435

GB — 3½ 8 8½ 10 GB — — 2½ 4 10 13 GB — 1½ 6 8 9

Tuesday’s Games Philadelphia 9, Florida 1 Washington 8, St. Louis 6 N.Y. Mets 4, Atlanta 3 Chicago Cubs 5, Milwaukee 4, 10 innings Pittsburgh 1, Houston 0 Colorado 6, San Diego 3 San Francisco 6, Arizona 5 Cincinnati 3, L.A. Dodgers 2

WCGB — — 4½ 5 6½ WCGB — — 2½ 4 10 13 WCGB — 1 5½ 7½ 8½

L10 7-3 6-4 7-3 1-9 6-4 L10 6-4 5-5 6-4 6-4 4-6 2-8 L10 6-4 5-5 5-5 4-6 4-6

Str W-4 L-2 W-1 L-4 W-4 Str L-2 L-4 W-2 W-2 W-2 L-1 Str W-2 L-1 W-1 L-2 L-1

Home 25-12 17-14 15-17 15-22 15-12 Home 25-9 18-12 20-15 15-18 14-19 13-23 Home 19-12 20-14 16-18 15-18 14-26

Away 16-14 21-16 18-17 17-12 16-24 Away 13-21 20-18 16-18 18-15 13-20 12-20 Away 19-17 17-17 16-17 16-20 16-13

Today’s Games Florida (Villanueva 0-0) at Philadelphia (K.Kendrick 3-4), 10:05 a.m., 1st game Cincinnati (Tr.Wood 4-4) at L.A. Dodgers (Billingsley 5-5), 12:10 p.m. San Diego (Latos 4-7) at Colorado (Chacin 7-4), 12:10 p.m. Florida (Ani.Sanchez 6-1) at Philadelphia (Halladay 9-3), 4:05 p.m., 2nd game St. Louis (McClellan 6-2) at Washington (L.Hernandez 3-8), 4:05 p.m. N.Y. Mets (Gee 7-0) at Atlanta (T.Hudson 5-5), 4:10 p.m. Milwaukee (Narveson 3-4) at Chicago Cubs (Zambrano 5-3), 5:05 p.m. Pittsburgh (Morton 6-3) at Houston (Happ 3-8), 5:05 p.m. San Francisco (Bumgarner 2-8) at Arizona (J.Saunders 3-6), 6:40 p.m.

American League roundup

National League roundup

• Tigers 4, Indians 0: DETROIT — Justin Verlander nearly pitched another no-hitter, taking his latest bid into the eighth inning to lead Detroit past Cleveland and into first place in the AL Central. With two no-hitters already on his resume, including one in Toronto last month, Verlander (8-3) struck out a season-high 12 and dominated the slumping Indians until Orlando Cabrera lined a clean single to center with one out in the eighth for his 2,001st career hit. • Rays 4, Red Sox 0: ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — James Shields pitched his AL-leading third shutout for Tampa Bay to end first-place Boston’s ninegame winning streak. In addition to cutting into their deficit in the AL East standings, the third-place Rays ruined a Tropicana Field homecoming for Carl Crawford, who signed a $142 million, seven-year contract with Boston after helping Tampa Bay win the division two of the past three seasons. • Yankees 12, Rangers 4: NEW YORK — Curtis Granderson homered and drove in four runs, Eduardo Nunez — filling in for an injured Derek Jeter — sparked a six-run second inning with an RBI single and the New York Yankees beat Texas. Robinson Cano and Nick Swisher also connected in the Yankees’ first game since Jeter was placed on the 15-day disabled list for the first time since 2003 because of a strained right calf. • Blue Jays 6, Orioles 5: TORONTO — Adam Lind homered leading off the 11th inning to give Toronto a victory over Baltimore that snapped a four-game losing streak. The Blue Jays have won 15 straight at home against Baltimore since Aug. 7, 2009. • Angels 4, Mariners 0: SEATTLE — Jered Weaver threw a five-hitter for his second shutout of the season and finally got some run support on the road thanks to a four-run first inning as the Los Angeles Angels won consecutive games for the first time since late May with a win over Seattle. • Royals 7, Athletics 4: OAKLAND, Calif. — Alcides Escobar had three hits and two RBIs, Danny Duffy pitched six innings for his first major league win and Kansas City beat Oakland to spoil the home debut of Athletics interim manager Bob Melvin. Mike Moustakas singled twice and scored both times, and Billy Butler added a two-run double while helping the Royals to their fourth victory in five games.

• Giants 6, Diamondbacks 5: PHOENIX — Cody Ross had a two-run double and scored on a double steal in the fifth inning to help San Francisco build a five-run lead, then hold on for a win over Arizona to stay atop the NL West. The Giants took advantage of an off-kilter Josh Collmenter (4-2) to lead 5-0 after five innings, but starter Matt Cain (6-4) nearly gave it all back over the next two. • Nationals 8, Cardinals 6: WASHINGTON — Ryan Zimmerman hit a run-scoring double in his return from the disabled list to spark a six-run seventh-inning as Washington beat St. Louis. Zimmerman had missed 58 games because of an injured abdominal muscle. • Mets 4, Braves 3: ATLANTA — Jose Reyes had three hits, two steals, an RBI and scored two runs to lead the New York Mets. Jair Jurrjens (8-3), who began the night with the best ERA in the majors at 1.82, set season highs with five walks while allowing eight hits and four runs in 5 1⁄3 innings. • Phillies 9, Marlins 1: PHILADELPHIA — Cole Hamels pitched seven dominant innings to become the NL’s second nine-game winner and Domonic Brown hit two of Philadelphia’s season-high five homers. Hamels (9-2) allowed one run and three hits to tie teammate Roy Halladay and Boston’s Jon Lester for most wins in the majors. • Pirates 1, Astros 0: HOUSTON — Jeff Karstens pitched three-hit ball into the seventh and five relievers finished Pittsburgh’s four-hitter. Garrett Jones drove in the game’s only run with a single to right field in the second inning. Karstens (4-4) struck out three and walked none in 6 2⁄3 innings. • Cubs 5, Brewers 4: CHICAGO — Chicago’s Starlin Castro looped a one-out single to right in the 10th inning to score Tony Campana from third base. The winning run capped a late comeback as Jeff Samardzija (5-2), the last of six Cubs pitchers, won his second straight game in relief. • Rockies 6, Padres 3: DENVER — Juan Nicasio had a career-high nine strikeouts in six innings and Chris Iannetta hit a three-run homer, helping Colorado end a three-game skid with a win over San Diego. The Rockies moved to 3-3 on their season-long 10-game homestand. • Reds 3, Dodgers 2: LOS ANGELES — Johnny Cueto pitched seven sharp innings, Joey Votto hit a tiebreaking single in the eighth and Cincinnati beat the Los Angeles Dodgers.

Note: Tuesday’s Chicago White Sox/Minnesota Twins game was postponed because of rain. No makeup date has been announced.

Runners left in scoring position—Milwaukee 9 (Gallardo, Lucroy 2, McGehee 2, Y.Betancourt 2, Braun, Morgan); Chicago 1 (S.Castro). GIDP—Y.Betancourt. DP—Chicago 1 (Ar.Ramirez, C.Pena). Milwaukee IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Gallardo 7 3 1 1 2 10 109 3.76 Estrada BS, 3-3 1-3 3 3 3 0 0 9 4.65 Braddock 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 9 2.19 Hawkins 1 0 0 0 0 1 13 0.55 Dillard L, 1-1 1-3 2 1 1 0 0 5 2.70 Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA R.Wells 6 8 3 2 3 2 95 5.63 R.Lopez 1 1 1 1 2 1 28 6.35 J.Russell 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 4 5.35 C.Carpenter 2-3 1 0 0 0 1 13 0.00 Marmol 1 1 0 0 0 1 22 2.90 Smrdzija W, 5-2 1 0 0 0 1 0 14 4.06 R.Lopez pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored—J.Russell 1-0, C.Carpenter 1-1. T—3:20. A—39,151 (41,159).

Pirates 1, Astros 0 Pittsburgh AB R Tabata lf 5 0 Cedeno ss 4 0 A.McCutchen cf 3 0 Walker 2b 4 1 G.Jones rf 4 0 Watson p 0 0 Ti.Wood p 0 0 Veras p 0 0 Hanrahan p 0 0 Overbay 1b 2 0 McKenry c 3 0 Br.Wood 3b 3 0 Karstens p 3 0 Resop p 0 0 Paul rf 0 0 Totals 31 1

H BI BB SO 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 1 0 1 2 2 0 0 1 2 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 6 1 5 11

Avg. .267 .221 .292 .256 .245 --------.233 .000 .223 .087 --.259

Houston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Bourn cf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .276 Barmes ss 4 0 0 0 0 0 .212 Pence rf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .320 Ca.Lee lf-1b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .269 Keppinger 2b 3 0 1 0 0 1 .297 Wallace 1b 2 0 1 0 0 0 .313 a-Bourgeois ph-lf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .368 C.Johnson 3b 3 0 1 0 0 2 .232 Corporan c 2 0 0 0 0 0 .182 b-M.Downs ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .275 Towles c 0 0 0 0 0 0 .205 Norris p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .083 Del Rosario p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Escalona p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Michaels ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .182 Fe.Rodriguez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 30 0 4 0 1 4 Pittsburgh 010 000 000 — 1 6 0 Houston 000 000 000 — 0 4 1 a-lined out for Wallace in the 8th. b-walked for Corporan in the 8th. c-flied out for Escalona in the 8th.

E—Corporan (1). LOB—Pittsburgh 9, Houston 4. RBIs—G.Jones (20). SB—A.McCutchen (12), G.Jones (3). CS—G.Jones (2). S—McKenry. Runners left in scoring position—Pittsburgh 4 (Karstens, McKenry, G.Jones, Tabata); Houston 2 (C.Johnson, Bourn). GIDP—Wallace. DP—Pittsburgh 1 (Overbay, Cedeno, Karstens). Pittsburgh IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Karstens W, 4-4 6 2-3 3 0 0 0 3 87 2.66 Resop H, 7 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 3 4.25 Watson H, 2 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 3 0.00 Ti.Wood 0 1 0 0 1 0 9 0.00 Veras H, 12 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 11 3.29 Hnrhn S, 18-18 1 0 0 0 0 0 6 1.42 Houston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Norris L, 4-5 7 6 1 1 2 9 109 3.48 Del Rosario 1-3 0 0 0 1 0 9 4.20 Escalona 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 7 1.64 Fe.Rodriguez 1 0 0 0 2 1 23 2.31 Ti.Wood pitched to 2 batters in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored—Resop 1-0, Veras 2-0, Escalona 1-0. IBB—off Fe.Rodriguez (Paul), off Norris (Br.Wood). WP—Norris. Balk—Karstens. T—2:41. A—29,712 (40,963).

Nationals 8, Cardinals 6 St. Louis Theriot ss Rasmus cf Pujols 1b Berkman lf Y.Molina c A.Brown rf 1-Jay pr-rf Schumaker 2b Descalso 3b J.Garcia p Batista p Miller p Motte p M.Boggs p e-M.Hamilton ph Totals

AB 3 5 3 3 4 3 1 4 4 3 0 0 0 0 1 34

Washington AB Werth rf 4 Desmond ss 4 Zimmerman 3b 5 Morse 1b 5 Espinosa 2b 5 W.Ramos c 4 Ankiel cf 0 a-Bernadina ph-cf 3 Maya p 2 Mattheus p 0 b-Bixler ph 1 H.Rodriguez p 0 c-I.Rodriguez ph 0 Clippard p 0 Storen p 0 Hairston Jr. lf 3 d-L.Nix ph-lf 0 Totals 36

R 2 1 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6

H BI BB 2 0 2 2 0 0 1 2 2 1 2 2 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 9 6 6

R H 1 2 1 1 1 1 2 2 1 3 1 2 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 13

BI 1 0 1 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 6

BB 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 4

SO 0 2 1 0 0 0 1 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 7

Avg. .296 .268 .275 .318 .306 .250 .307 .236 .243 .069 ------.000 .130

SO 0 1 2 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 8

Avg. .240 .234 .333 .303 .221 .248 .204 .256 .000 --.179 --.200 .000 --.233 .296

St. Louis 200 130 000 — 6 9 2 Washington 000 101 60x — 8 13 0 a-singled for Ankiel in the 2nd. b-struck out for Mattheus in the 6th. c-was intentionally walked for H.Rodriguez in the 7th. d-walked for Hairston Jr. in the 7th. e-flied out for M.Boggs in the 9th. 1-ran for A.Brown in the 5th. E—Theriot 2 (13). LOB—St. Louis 7, Washington 9. 2B—Rasmus (12), Zimmerman (1), Morse (10). HR—Pujols (15), off Maya; Berkman (17), off Maya. RBIs—Pujols 2 (42), Berkman 2 (48), Y.Molina (26), A.Brown (1), Werth (24), Zimmerman (5), Morse (37), Espinosa (36), Bernadina (9), L.Nix (26). Runners left in scoring position—St. Louis 3 (Schumaker 2, Berkman); Washington 5 (Maya, Zimmerman, Bixler, Desmond 2). Runners moved up—Morse. GIDP—Y.Molina, Zimmerman, Bernadina. DP—St. Louis 2 (Theriot, Schumaker, Pujols), (Schumaker, Pujols, Theriot); Washington 2 (Maya, Morse), (Desmond, Espinosa, Morse). St. Louis IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA J.Garcia 6 8 2 2 1 7 107 3.18 Batista L, 3-2 2-3 4 5 5 1 0 23 3.81 Miller BS, 2-3 0 0 1 1 1 0 6 2.92 Motte 1-3 1 0 0 1 1 21 2.22 M.Boggs 1 0 0 0 0 0 12 3.18 Washington IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Maya 4 2-3 9 6 6 2 2 90 6.86 Mattheus 1 1-3 0 0 0 1 2 21 0.00 Rdriguez W, 2-1 1 0 0 0 1 1 16 2.00 Clippard H, 17 1 0 0 0 0 2 12 1.82 Storen S, 16-17 1 0 0 0 2 0 18 2.29 Miller pitched to 2 batters in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored—Miller 2-1, Motte 3-2, Mattheus 2-0. IBB—off Miller (I.Rodriguez), off Storen (Pujols), off Maya (Pujols). HBP—by Miller (Bernadina). WP—Miller. T—3:27. A—26,739 (41,506).

Mets 4, Braves 3 New York AB R Jos.Reyes ss 5 2 Harris lf 2 1 Pridie lf 1 0 Beltran rf 4 0 Dan.Murphy 3b 4 0 Pagan cf 3 0 Duda 1b 4 0 Thole c 4 0 Fr.Rodriguez p 0 0 R.Tejada 2b 4 1 Niese p 2 0 Beato p 0 0 Byrdak p 0 0 c-Hairston ph 1 0 Isringhausen p 0 0 R.Paulino c 0 0 Totals 34 4

H BI BB 3 1 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 2 1 1 0 0 1 1 1 2 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 9 4 7

SO 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 4

Avg. .346 .229 .238 .286 .300 .245 .152 .237 .000 .310 .100 ----.255 --.324

Atlanta Schafer cf Uggla 2b C.Jones 3b

H BI BB 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0

SO 0 1 0

Avg. .222 .181 .261

AB 4 4 4

R 0 1 0

Hinske 1b-lf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .268 Ale.Gonzalez ss 4 1 1 0 0 1 .264 D.Ross c 3 1 2 1 0 0 .319 Proctor p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Kimbrel p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --d-Conrad ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .184 Mather rf 3 0 1 1 1 0 .232 Ma.Young lf 2 0 1 0 0 1 .208 a-McCann ph-c 1 0 0 0 0 1 .301 Jurrjens p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .115 Sherrill p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Di.Hrnndez ph-1b1 0 0 0 0 1 .273 Totals 33 3 6 3 1 8 New York 102 001 000 — 4 9 0 Atlanta 010 000 110 — 3 6 0 a-struck out for Ma.Young in the 7th. b-struck out for Sherrill in the 7th. c-popped out for Byrdak in the 8th. d-struck out for Kimbrel in the 9th. LOB—New York 13, Atlanta 4. 2B—D.Ross (2). HR—Uggla (9), off Isringhausen. RBIs—Jos.Reyes (27), Beltran (40), Pagan (15), Duda (4), Uggla (19), D.Ross (10), Mather (9). SB—Jos.Reyes 2 (22), Harris (2), Beltran (2). S—Niese. SF—Duda. Runners left in scoring position—New York 6 (Duda, Thole 2, Dan.Murphy, R.Tejada 2); Atlanta 1 (Di.Hernandez). New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Niese W, 6-5 6 1-3 5 2 2 0 4 95 3.46 Beato 0 0 0 0 1 0 4 4.10 Byrdak H, 3 2-3 0 0 0 0 2 9 4.41 Isrnghsen H, 14 1 1 1 1 0 0 13 3.18 Rdrgez S, 19-20 1 0 0 0 0 2 13 2.81 Atlanta IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Jurrjens L, 8-3 5 1-3 8 4 4 5 3 104 2.13 Sherrill 1 2-3 1 0 0 0 0 25 2.50 Proctor 1 0 0 0 0 0 6 1.69 Kimbrel 1 0 0 0 2 1 23 3.27 Beato pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored—Beato 1-0, Byrdak 2-0, Sherrill 2-0. HBP—by Kimbrel (Thole). WP—Niese. PB—Thole. T—3:03. A—32,161 (49,586).

Rockies 6, Padres 3 San Diego AB R H Denorfia rf 4 1 1 Bartlett ss 4 0 2 Headley 3b 5 1 4 Ludwick lf 5 0 1 Rizzo 1b 4 0 0 Maybin cf 4 1 2 Hundley c 4 0 0 Alb.Gonzalez 2b 3 0 1 Frieri p 0 0 0 b-Cantu ph 1 0 0 Scribner p 0 0 0 LeBlanc p 2 0 0 Neshek p 0 0 0 Forsythe 2b 2 0 0 Totals 38 3 11

BI 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

BB 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

SO 1 1 1 3 3 1 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 14

Avg. .305 .261 .281 .261 .176 .265 .231 .200 --.194 --.000 --.149

Colorado AB R H BI BB SO Avg. C.Gonzalez cf 4 0 1 0 1 0 .277 Nelson 2b 4 1 1 0 1 0 .318 Helton 1b 5 1 2 1 0 1 .316 Tulowitzki ss 4 1 2 0 0 0 .273 Wigginton 3b 3 0 2 1 1 0 .259 Blackmon lf 4 1 2 1 0 1 .290 Spilborghs rf 2 1 0 0 1 1 .241 Iannetta c 3 1 1 3 1 0 .234 Nicasio p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .222 a-E.Young ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .220 Lindstrom p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Brothers p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Street p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Totals 33 6 11 6 5 5 San Diego 100 100 001 — 3 11 0 Colorado 000 303 00x — 6 11 0 a-popped out for Nicasio in the 6th. b-fouled out for Frieri in the 8th. LOB—San Diego 11, Colorado 9. 2B—Maybin 2 (8), Alb.Gonzalez (3), Tulowitzki (15), Wigginton (11), Blackmon (1). HR—Denorfia (5), off Nicasio; Iannetta (9), off Neshek. RBIs—Denorfia (11), Ludwick (41), Alb.Gonzalez (14), Helton (30), Wigginton (21), Blackmon (3), Iannetta 3 (28). SB—Bartlett 2 (12), Nelson (2), Tulowitzki (6), Blackmon (4). CS—Tulowitzki (2). Runners left in scoring position—San Diego 7 (Rizzo 4, Ludwick, LeBlanc, Forsythe); Colorado 5 (Spilborghs, Nicasio, Helton, Brothers 2). Runners moved up—Cantu, Iannetta. GIDP—Nelson. DP—San Diego 1 (LeBlanc, Bartlett, Rizzo). San Diego IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA LeBlanc L, 0-2 4 2-3 7 3 3 1 2 94 4.26 Neshek 1 2 3 3 2 0 24 3.57 Frieri 1 1-3 2 0 0 2 2 30 2.43 Scribner 1 0 0 0 0 1 11 2.25 Colorado IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Nicasio W, 2-1 6 6 2 2 1 9 108 3.38 Lindstrom 2-3 2 0 0 1 1 21 2.67 Brothers H, 2 1 1-3 1 0 0 0 2 20 3.60 Street 1 2 1 1 0 2 17 3.69 Inherited runners-scored—Neshek 1-0, Frieri 1-0, Brothers 3-0. HBP—by Frieri (Spilborghs), by Nicasio (Bartlett). T—3:33. A—35,045 (50,490).

AB 4 4 4 3 5 4 5 3 0 0 0 1 0 1 34

R H 1 1 0 2 1 1 2 1 0 1 2 2 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 11

BI 0 0 1 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 5

BB 1 0 1 2 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 6

SO 1 0 0 1 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 7

Avg. .254 .267 .310 .235 .261 .268 .224 .206 --.000 --.100 .000 .111

Arizona AB R H BI BB SO Avg. R.Roberts 3b 4 0 0 1 0 0 .256 K.Johnson 2b 4 0 0 0 1 1 .214 J.Upton rf 4 0 2 1 1 2 .281 S.Drew ss 5 1 1 0 0 2 .291 C.Young cf 2 1 1 0 2 0 .251 Montero c 4 1 1 3 0 0 .282 Nady 1b 4 1 1 0 0 0 .267 G.Parra lf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .275 Collmenter p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .154 a-Miranda ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .244 Heilman p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Paterson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Burroughs ph 1 1 1 0 0 0 .286 Vasquez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Da.Hernandez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --d-Bloomquist ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .250 Totals 33 5 8 5 5 5 San Francisco 100 130 100 — 6 11 0 Arizona 000 013 100 — 5 8 1 a-walked for Collmenter in the 5th. b-doubled for Paterson in the 7th. c-fouled out for Affeldt in the 8th. d-grounded out for Da.Hernandez in the 9th. E—C.Young (1). LOB—San Francisco 10, Arizona 8. 2B—Schierholtz (8), C.Ross 2 (12), J.Upton (17), S.Drew (15), Nady (9), Burroughs (1). HR—Montero (8), off Cain. RBIs—P.Sandoval (15), Schierholtz (20), C.Ross 2 (21), Cain (2), R.Roberts (29), J.Upton (34), Montero 3 (36). SB—J.Upton (12). CS—B.Crawford (3). S—Burriss, Cain 2, Collmenter. SF—R.Roberts. Runners left in scoring position—San Francisco 6 (C.Ross, Schierholtz, Torres, Burriss, B.Crawford, P.Sandoval); Arizona 5 (R.Roberts, Montero, S.Drew 3). SF IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Cain W, 6-4 6 2-3 8 5 5 2 4 105 3.61 Affeldt H, 7 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 4 4.10 Romo 0 0 0 0 1 0 7 2.29 Ja.Lopez H, 10 1 0 0 0 0 0 9 2.81 Wlson S, 19-21 1 0 0 0 2 1 25 2.61 Arizona IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Clmenter L, 4-2 5 8 5 5 3 4 97 1.86 Heilman 1 2-3 2 1 1 1 1 27 7.50 Paterson 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 4 3.24 Vasquez 1 1 0 0 1 0 18 3.33 Da.Hernandez 1 0 0 0 1 1 13 2.90 Romo pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored—Affeldt 1-0, Ja.Lopez 1-0, Paterson 1-0. WP—Cain, Br.Wilson. T—3:15. A—23,746 (48,633).

Reds 3, Dodgers 2 Cincinnati Stubbs cf B.Phillips 2b Votto 1b Bruce rf Rolen 3b Heisey lf R.Hernandez c 1-Leake pr Hanigan c Janish ss Cueto p a-Cairo ph Ondrusek p

AB 4 5 4 3 4 4 2 0 0 4 2 1 0

R 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0

H BI BB 3 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0

SO 0 1 2 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

1 0 0 0 34 3

1 0 9

0 0 3

0 0 3

0 .236 0 --5

Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg. D.Gordon ss 4 1 2 0 0 0 .323 Carroll 2b 3 0 0 0 1 1 .315 Ethier rf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .314 Kemp cf 3 1 1 0 1 1 .332 Loney 1b 4 0 1 1 0 1 .257 2-Oeltjen pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .250 Uribe 3b 3 0 1 0 0 1 .222 Hawksworth p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Elbert p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --MacDougal p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Blake ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .262 Barajas c 4 0 0 0 0 0 .226 Gwynn Jr. lf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .222 Kershaw p 2 0 1 0 0 0 .290 Miles 3b 1 0 1 0 0 0 .299 Totals 32 2 7 1 2 7 Cincinnati 000 100 011 — 3 9 2 Los Angeles 100 000 001 — 2 7 1 a-singled for Cueto in the 8th. b-singled for Ondrusek in the 9th. c-struck out for MacDougal in the 9th. 1-ran for R.Hernandez in the 9th. 2-ran for Loney in the 9th. E—B.Phillips (2), Cueto (1), Carroll (5). LOB—Cincinnati 8, Los Angeles 5. 2B—Rolen (13), Heisey (4), Uribe (9). RBIs—Stubbs (30), Votto (43), Rolen (23), Loney (25). SB—Stubbs 2 (20), D.Gordon (3), Kemp (16), Oeltjen (2). S—Stubbs. Runners left in scoring position—Cincinnati 5 (Votto, Janish, Rolen, B.Phillips 2); Los Angeles 3 (Ethier, Barajas 2). GIDP—Rolen, Kemp. DP—Cincinnati 1 (Rolen, B.Phillips, Votto); Los Angeles 1 (D.Gordon, Carroll, Loney). Cincinnati IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Cueto W, 4-2 7 5 1 0 1 5 102 1.68 Ondrusek H, 8 1 1 0 0 0 1 14 1.82 Crdero S, 14-16 1 1 1 1 1 1 22 1.67 Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Kershaw 7 4 1 1 2 4 104 3.28 Hwksrth L, 1-2 1-3 2 1 1 0 0 11 3.27 Elbert 1-3 1 0 0 0 1 7 5.19 MacDougal 1 1-3 2 1 1 1 0 19 2.28 Inherited runners-scored—Elbert 2-1, MacDougal 2-0. IBB—off Kershaw (R.Hernandez). T—3:02. A—39,233 (56,000).

Phillies 9, Marlins 1 Florida AB H.Ramirez ss 4 Cishek p 0 Bonifacio cf 4 Morrison lf 4 G.Sanchez 1b 4 Stanton rf 4 J.Buck c 4 Infante 2b 4 Helms 3b 3 Volstad p 2 Mujica p 0 a-O.Martinez ph-ss 1 Totals 34

R 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

H BI BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 1 1

SO 2 0 1 0 0 1 2 1 0 0 0 1 8

Avg. .205 --.285 .295 .311 .259 .230 .258 .222 .200 --.150

Philadelphia AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Rollins ss 5 2 2 2 0 0 .259 Victorino cf 5 2 3 0 0 1 .288 Utley 2b 3 1 2 2 1 0 .278 1-W.Valdez pr-2b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .240 Howard 1b 2 1 1 2 2 0 .249 Polanco 3b 3 0 0 1 0 0 .305 Ibanez lf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .246 Do.Brown rf 4 2 2 2 0 0 .250 Ruiz c 4 1 1 0 0 0 .243 Hamels p 3 0 0 0 0 1 .242 Herndon p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Totals 34 9 11 9 3 3 Florida 100 000 000 — 1 6 0 Philadelphia 202 112 10x — 9 11 1 a-struck out for Mujica in the 8th. 1-ran for Utley in the 6th. E—Howard (1). LOB—Florida 7, Philadelphia 5. 2B—Victorino (8), Utley (4). HR—Howard (14), off Volstad; Utley (3), off Volstad; Do.Brown (3), off Volstad; Rollins (5), off Volstad; Do.Brown (4), off Mujica. RBIs— G.Sanchez (42), Rollins 2 (23), Utley 2 (10), Howard 2 (55), Polanco (38), Do.Brown 2 (11). SF—Polanco. Runners left in scoring position—Florida 4 (Stanton, Infante, Morrison, Helms); Philadelphia 2 (Ibanez, Howard). Runners moved up—G.Sanchez. Florida IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Volstad L, 2-7 5 2-3 10 8 8 2 2 113 6.07 Mujica 1 1-3 1 1 1 1 0 18 3.24 Cishek 1 0 0 0 0 1 17 0.00 Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Hamels W, 9-2 7 3 1 1 1 6 99 2.49 Herndon 2 3 0 0 0 2 33 4.79 Hamels pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored—Mujica 1-0, Herndon 1-0. IBB—off Volstad (Howard). T—2:33. A—45,424 (43,651).

LEADERS

Giants 6, Diamondbacks 5 San Francisco Torres cf Burriss 2b P.Sandoval 3b Huff 1b Schierholtz rf C.Ross lf B.Crawford ss Whiteside c Romo p Ja.Lopez p Br.Wilson p Cain p Affeldt p c-C.Stewart ph-c Totals

b-F.Lewis ph Cordero p Totals

Avg. .269 .282 .332 .283 .241 .284 .311 .280 .258 .228 .067 .275 ---

Through Tuesday’s Games ——— AMERICAN LEAGUE BATTING—AdGonzalez, Boston, .347; Bautista, Toronto, .338; Joyce, Tampa Bay, .327; Konerko, Chicago, .322; Ortiz, Boston, .321; Ellsbury, Boston, .318; VMartinez, Detroit, .318. RUNS—Granderson, New York, 56; Bautista, Toronto, 53; MiCabrera, Detroit, 49; Ellsbury, Boston, 49; AdGonzalez, Boston, 45; Boesch, Detroit, 44; Ortiz, Boston, 42; AlRamirez, Chicago, 42; Zobrist, Tampa Bay, 42. RBI—AdGonzalez, Boston, 60; Konerko, Chicago, 52; Granderson, New York, 51; Teixeira, New York, 49; Beltre, Texas, 48; Quentin, Chicago, 47; MiCabrera, Detroit, 46. HITS—AdGonzalez, Boston, 94; Ellsbury, Boston, 85; ACabrera, Cleveland, 80; MiYoung, Texas, 80; Konerko, Chicago, 79; Ortiz, Boston, 77; MeCabrera, Kansas City, 76; AGordon, Kansas City, 76; AlRamirez, Chicago, 76. DOUBLES—AdGonzalez, Boston, 22; Ellsbury, Boston, 21; AGordon, Kansas City, 20; Quentin, Chicago, 20; Zobrist, Tampa Bay, 20; MiCabrera, Detroit, 18; Ortiz, Boston, 18; Youkilis, Boston, 18; MiYoung, Texas, 18. TRIPLES—Bourjos, Los Angeles, 6; Crisp, Oakland, 5; Granderson, New York, 5; AJackson, Detroit, 5; CCrawford, Boston, 4; RDavis, Toronto, 4; Gardner, New York, 4; Zobrist, Tampa Bay, 4. HOME RUNS—Bautista, Toronto, 21; Granderson, New York, 21; Teixeira, New York, 19; Ortiz, Boston, 17; Quentin, Chicago, 17; Konerko, Chicago, 16; NCruz, Texas, 15. STOLEN BASES—Ellsbury, Boston, 24; Andrus, Texas, 19; Crisp, Oakland, 19; RDavis, Toronto, 18; ISuzuki, Seattle, 16; Aybar, Los Angeles, 14; Fuld, Tampa Bay, 14; Gardner, New York, 14; BUpton, Tampa Bay, 14. PITCHING—Lester, Boston, 9-2; Scherzer, Detroit, 8-2; Arrieta, Baltimore, 8-3; Verlander, Detroit, 8-3; Sabathia, New York, 8-4; Weaver, Los Angeles, 8-4; 6 tied at 7. STRIKEOUTS—Verlander, Detroit, 105; FHernandez, Seattle, 103; Shields, Tampa Bay, 98; Weaver, Los Angeles, 96; Price, Tampa Bay, 89; Lester, Boston, 87; Haren, Los Angeles, 87. SAVES—League, Seattle, 18; CPerez, Cleveland, 16; Valverde, Detroit, 16; MaRivera, New York, 16; Walden, Los Angeles, 15; Farnsworth, Tampa Bay, 14; Feliz, Texas, 13. NATIONAL LEAGUE BATTING—JosReyes, New York, .346; Kemp, Los Angeles, .332; Votto, Cincinnati, .332; Pence, Houston, .320; Berkman, St. Louis, .318; Helton, Colorado, .316; Carroll, Los Angeles, .315. RUNS—JosReyes, New York, 49; Stubbs, Cincinnati, 49; Braun, Milwaukee, 48; RWeeks, Milwaukee, 48; Kemp, Los Angeles, 47; Pujols, St. Louis, 47; Votto, Cincinnati, 47. RBI—Fielder, Milwaukee, 59; Kemp, Los Angeles, 56; Howard, Philadelphia, 55; Pence, Houston, 50; Braun, Milwaukee, 49; Berkman, St. Louis, 48; Bruce, Cincinnati, 48. HITS—JosReyes, New York, 97; Pence, Houston, 88; SCastro, Chicago, 85; Kemp, Los Angeles, 83; Votto, Cincinnati, 82; Polanco, Philadelphia, 79; GSanchez, Florida, 79. DOUBLES—Beltran, New York, 20; Coghlan, Florida, 20; CJones, Atlanta, 19; Montero, Arizona, 19; Pence, Houston, 19; JosReyes, New York, 19; CYoung, Arizona, 19. TRIPLES—JosReyes, New York, 11; Rasmus, St. Louis, 6; Victorino, Philadelphia, 6; Bourn, Houston, 5; SCastro, Chicago, 5; Fowler, Colorado, 5; Bonifacio, Florida, 4; SDrew, Arizona, 4; Espinosa, Washington, 4. HOME RUNS—Kemp, Los Angeles, 20; Fielder, Milwaukee, 19; Berkman, St. Louis, 17; Bruce, Cincinnati, 17; Stanton, Florida, 16; Pujols, St. Louis, 15; Braun, Milwaukee, 14; Howard, Philadelphia, 14. STOLEN BASES—Bourn, Houston, 27; JosReyes, New York, 22; Stubbs, Cincinnati, 20; Desmond, Washington, 18; Braun, Milwaukee, 16; Kemp, Los Angeles, 16; Bourgeois, Houston, 15; CGomez, Milwaukee, 15. PITCHING—Hamels, Philadelphia, 9-2; Halladay, Philadelphia, 9-3; Gallardo, Milwaukee, 8-3; Jurrjens, Atlanta, 8-3; Hanson, Atlanta, 8-4; Correia, Pittsburgh, 8-5; 8 tied at 7.


D4 Wednesday, June 15, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

TENNIS: WIMBLEDON

PREP NOTEBOOK

A rusty Serena manages a win in return at Eastbourne By Caroline Cheese

Bend athletes place at California track meet over the past weekend

The Associated Press

Bulletin staff report

EASTBOURNE, England — Playing tennis again after recovering from blood clots in her lungs and two foot operations, Serena Williams slipped and fell in the final game of her match at Eastbourne. She got up immediately and carried on the point, although she lost it. But it was not long before the 13-time Grand Slam champion was a winner once more. After nearly a year off the WTA Tour, Williams regrouped after a slow start to defeat Bulgaria’s Tsvetana Pironkova 1-6, 6-3, 6-4 Tuesday in the first round of a Wimbledon warmup. Williams was briefly worried about tweaking the right foot that was in a cast for 10 weeks. “I felt a little something. I got a little nervous,” she said. “I was like, ‘Oh.’ Then I thought this is grass. You know, you’re really moving. You’re stopping, you’re going. If I can survive this, especially with this long match, I’ll be good.” Wearing a pink dress she said was inspired by French actress Brigitte Bardot, Williams walked onto the court to the song “I’m The World’s Greatest,” chosen by organizers. She was given a warm welcome when introduced to a stadium three-quarters full. She initially looked nothing like the player who lifted the 2010 Wimbledon trophy in her last tournament. Her movement was uncertain, and she appeared not to trust her groundstrokes or her usually dominant serve. She held for the first time at 5-0 down, with the help of her first ace. Williams reeled off the first three games of the second set to take control. Despite squandering a 2-0 lead in the last set, she broke again and victory was secure. “How difficult was the first set? It wasn’t too difficult, it wasn’t long,” Williams said. “It was over really fast. And I thought, well hopefully I can get some momentum. I think I was just a little anxious and missing a tremendous amount of shots.” Williams hadn’t played since July after cutting her foot on glass at a restaurant in Germany. She had surgery twice and later was diagnosed with pulmonary embolisms. By the time she served out the match after two hours on court, the 29-year-old American was breathing heavily. She drew a warning for too much time between points. Williams thought the rebuke too harsh and wondered “whether I had been gone so long that they changed it.” Still, despite the struggle, Williams enjoyed her return. “After everything I’ve been through, it’s all fun to me now,” she said. “It’s all a bonus.” And not breaking a nail during the fall was a plus. “It’s definitely not cool on my nails if I fall,” she said. “I can potentially break one

FOLSOM, Calif. — Summit senior-to-be Lucinda Howard paced a contingent of Bendarea athletes at the Golden West Track Meet at Folsom (Calif.) High School last Saturday. Howard, who placed second in the high jump at the Class 5A state track meet in May, finished third at the Golden West meet, clearing 5 feet, 5 inches. Howard’s teammate at Summit, Sarah Taylor, tied for sixth by clearing 5-03. Recent Mountain View graduate Mikhaila Thornton placed fourth in the 800-meter race, turning in a time of 2 minutes, 20.64 seconds. Summit senior-to-be Kira Kelly added a fourth-place finish in the 3,200 (11:09.70) for the Central Oregon girls squad that made the trip. Travis Neuman, who will be a junior this fall at Summit, produced the top finish for the group of area boys that competed at Golden West. Neuman grabbed fourth place in the 3,200, turning in a time of 9:31.12.

Kirsty Wigglesworth / The Associated Press

Serena Williams plays a return to Tsvetana Pironkova during their singles tennis match at the Eastbourne International grass court tennis tournament in Eastbourne, England, Tuesday. and that makes me really upset. I have three weeks to get through without breaking a nail.” Williams, unseeded because she has been away so long, looked unsure during warmups. And her play spilled into the match — she dropped the first set in 27 minutes. Her sister, Venus, who returned from a hip injury after five months away, began her match Monday with two double-faults. Serena opened her first service game with one of her own. Pironkova, who reached the semifinal at Wimbledon last year but had won only four matches this year, capitalized on fierce groundstrokes. After trailing 4-0, Williams smacked her racket into the turf in disgust. On winning her first game to make it 51, the former top-ranked player heard the rare sound of sympathetic applause. Her opponent then took the set with a forehand winner. Soon Williams began to look — and sound — like her old self. She greeted winners, and an improving first serve, with cries of “C’mon.” Leading 5-3 in the second set, she trailed 0-30 but responded with a 120 mph ace down the middle and a 114 mph ace out wide. Williams was still below her best in the third set, and Pironkova’s flat groundstrokes continued to do damage. She rallied to 2-2, but Williams immediately broke again and served it out at 5-4. Next up is a repeat of the 2010 Wimbledon final against top-seeded Vera Zvonareva, a 6-3, 6-3 winner over British wild card

Heather Watson. “She’s a great player and I have nothing to lose,” Williams said. “I’m going to go in there and do what I can do. Whatever happens, happens.” In other matches, Ana Ivanovic advanced to a second-round match against Venus Williams with a 6-4, 6-3 win over Julia Goerges of Germany. The former No. 1-ranked Serb won her last two events of 2010, but she has lost in the first round in four of her 10 tournaments this season. Her semifinal last week in Birmingham was her first of the year. “I don’t expect myself to go out there and play great every match,” Ivanovic said. “I just expect myself to work hard. But it’s hard. I do have to think about going back to basics.” Defending champion Ekaterina Makarova labored to a 6-1, 3-6, 6-4 win over Croatian qualifier Mirjana Lucic. French Open runner-up Francesca Schiavone advanced with a 7-6 (7), 6-1 win over Kaia Kanepi. On the men’s side, top-seeded Jo-Wilfried Tsonga won his first-round match against Denis Istomin 6-2, 7-5, a day after losing the delayed Queen’s final to Andy Murray. A foot injury forced former Wimbledon champion Lleyton Hewitt to quit his match against Olivier Rochus while trailing 6-2, 3-0. Fourth-seeded Guillermo Garcia-Lopez lost 6-3, 6-4 to Somdev Devvarman of India. Sixth-seeded Kevin Anderson defeated Alexander Slabinsky of Britain, and American qualifier Donald Young beat Daniel Cox 6-1, 7-5.

Skiers Continued from D1 Bob Bonar, the general manager at Snowbird, said the mountain received more than 775 inches of snow this season, well above its average of 500. “We even got 20 inches of powder over Memorial Day weekend, and our current average base is more than 15 feet,” Bonar said. “The holiday may not even be the end. We may stay open a few weekends longer if the snow stays good.” But if the giant snowpack remains a boon to skiers at Snowbird and at Snowbasin Resort about 70 miles to the north, it has been problematic to others. Ed Chauner, director of the Intermountain Cup Mountain Bike Racing Series, said he had to change the site of a race last month because the original site, Sundance Resort, still had 10 feet of snow. A race planned at Snowbird on July 2 is also in jeopardy because, Chauner says, “there’s still 20 feet of snow on parts of the course.” “All this weather is killing us,” Chauner said. “No one can get out and train during the week, because its been so cold and wet. If they can’t train, they don’t come out to race. Our rider numbers have been way down.” The La Nina phenomenon is behind the weather anomaly, said Lindsay Storrs, a meteorologist at KUTV in Salt Lake City. In a La Nina year, she said, cooler than normal water temperatures in the Pacific off the coast of Chile lead to cooler and wetter weather in winter and spring in the western United States. “Troughs develop along the West Coast of the U.S. when this occurs,” Storrs said. “That allows storms to continuously drop out of the Gulf of Alaska, giving the western U.S. above-average precipitation.” Snowbird’s full parking lot is testimony to the attraction of this season’s late snow.

Tom Smart / The Associated Press

Eric Jucker looks down the terrain of the Mineral Basin at Snowbird Ski and Summer Resort in Alta, Utah, last week. “I have skied for 72 years, and I’ve never skied snow like this in June,” said Eric Jucker, 75, a Swiss citizen who travels back and forth from Laguna Beach, Calif., to Salt Lake City. Martin Martinov, a Bulgarian biophysicist living in Park City, Utah, got off the tram Friday and said, “I’ve never seen snow like this that you didn’t have to hike to get to at this time of year.” The record conditions are even attracting out-of-towners. Bradley Rieders of Woodbury, N.Y., traveled to Snowbird with his sons, 23 and 26. “We came out here to ski and golf on the same day,” Rieders said. “We flew all the way out here just for that. The weather is beautiful, the skiing is fantastic, it’s paradise, just unbelievable.” Snowbird has its large tram and two lifts operating, offering access to every run on the mountain. By extending the closing date to July 4, it will be open 202 days this season, a record by one day. “There are places on the mountain that will probably retain snow all summer long,” said Emily Moench, the resort’s communications manager. The fact that summer is still a long way off for Utah’s Wasatch

Mountains works out well for the U.S. freestyle team, which is training at Snowbird. Scott Rawles, the head moguls coach, said the team was saving money by not having to travel to South America. Winter in the Southern Hemisphere doesn’t usually begin until August, and the only available snow in June and July is on glaciers crowded with the national teams of other countries. “That is huge for us,” he said. But just as the snow has hampered Chauner’s mountain bike series, it has even had an adverse effect on the overall operations at Snowbird, which likes to present itself as a four-season destination. The resort would normally be starting summer activities by now. “Aside from the fact that the weather is cold and wet, the Alpine Slide track is buried under many feet of snow,” Moench said, referring to a popular summer attraction. Jeff Robins, chief executive of the Utah Sports Commission, which works to attract major sporting events to the state, said the unusual weather had been particularly disruptive in the north. “We’re seeing the golf season

starting later this year,” he said, “and the weather has created issues for the spring sports that are typically played in high school and college — from tennis to track and field, soccer, baseball, softball, the weather has created challenges for competitions typically held in spring. It’s not just snow in the mountains, but rain that is affecting recreational activities like fishing, kayaking, camping, mountain biking and hiking.” While the delay for northern Utah’s summer activities will have an economic impact on the state, it may be the least problematic of the overall weather effects. “The snowpack we have right now is 525 percent of normal,” said Brian McInerney, the hydrologist for the National Weather Service in Utah. “The lowerlevel snowpack from 7,500 to 6,000 feet is already gone, but the mid-elevation snow from about 7,500 to 9,000 feet is still there.” He added: “Our soils were already saturated starting in March due to a heavy rainfall in early spring. Now, if you try to ride or hike on these soils, they will still be wet, still be saturated. If you use the trails at all, especially for mountain biking, it’s going to screw them up.” The most serious consequence of the huge snowpack in the Wasatch Mountains may be lurking well below the summits, especially if the weather changes rapidly to the typically hot northern Utah temperatures of late June and July. “Once it starts going, the inertia of melting snowpack goes pretty fast,” McInerney said. The speed of the melt has state officials concerned about flooding. Some rivers have already breached their banks and inundated homes and hundreds of acres of farmland. And though snow-riders are still loving the snow, it remains a threat, a vast rush of water just waiting to pour down on the valleys below.

Five Outlaws named to all-league baseball first team SISTERS — After winning the Sky-Em League with a 141 record, five baseball players from Sisters High were named to the all-Sky-Em first team. Infielder Jordan Hodges — the senior standout was selected as the league’s player of the year — senior pitcher Shane Groth, freshman catcher Joey Morgan, senior outfielder Erik Carlson and sophomore outfielder Justin Erlandson each were named to the first team. Additionally, Sisters coach Steve Hodges was the 2011 Sky-Em League coach of the year. For the rest of the allSky-Em baseball teams, see Scoreboard on Page D2. Summit grad wins college track award MONMOUTH — Brett Campbell, a 2010 graduate of Summit High who just completed his freshman year at Western Oregon University, has been named the Greater Northwest Athletic Conference’s outdoor track and field freshman of the year. Campbell won the men’s 110-meter hurdles at the GNAC Outdoor Championships and helped WOU take third in the 400-

meter relay at the conference championships. Ex-Mountain View golfer named to Pac-10 all-academic team CORVALLIS — Chelsey Lind, a graduate of Bend’s Mountain View High who is a sophomore at Oregon State University, has received Pacific-10 Conference all-academic honorable mention. In order to be eligible for Pac-10 all-academic teams, student-athletes must have a grade-point average of 3.0 or higher and must be a starter or regular contributor on their athletic team. Lind played in eight of the Beavers’ 11 tournaments this season, which included a tie for 13th at the Washington National Individual Championship. Bend High grad posts win at national collegiate horse show LEXINGTON, Ky. — Kymala Lovisone, a graduate of Bend High and a junior at Oregon State University, won the Individual Rider Championship for Advanced Western Horsemanship at this year’s Intercollegiate Horse Show Association’s National Championship in May. Lovisone advanced to the IHSA national event after winning the IHSA’s Western Semifinals in Amarillo, Texas, on March 26. Grizzlies looking for volleyball coach GILCHRIST — Gilchrist High has an opening for a head varsity volleyball coach this fall. For more information, contact Gilchrist athletic director James Anding at 541-419-8958.

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Champ Continued from D6 More than four decades after McDermott’s decline, Pisano spent the better part of a year playing on weekends with the two-time champion (he also won in 1912), who remains the youngest person to win the U.S. Open. They played hour after hour of golf without really saying a word. “It was two different worlds,” Pisano said. “He knew his golf. He could talk golf to you — ‘I cut that one a little, turned that one over.’ Talking about anything other than that, practically, he was not able to do that. It was ‘Yes,’ ‘No,’ and that was about it.” McDermott used old clubs with hickory shafts, a woodshafted Bobby Jones putter and a double-overlap grip in which only eight fingers touched the club. He was 5-foot-8, weighed maybe 130 pounds but could swing as hard and hit the ball as far as any of them back in his day. He had what was described as a “wristy” swing, one that would be frowned upon in this day and age, where the players and their swings all seem to come out of a factory. But in an era well before golf coaches and swing gurus and video, McDermott learned his game in the dirt on the practice fields near his home in Philly. Had the game — and the hype — been what it is now, McDermott might have been trumpeted as the leader of “The Next Generation of American Golf.” Instead, he was part of America’s first generation, alongside Walter Hagen and Francis Ouimet, the 1913 U.S. Open winner whose victory is widely credited for giving golf its popular start in the United States. Hagen and Ouimet went on to long, successful careers. McDermott’s was all but over by 1916. It started unraveling three years before. After crushing the greats of the sport — Brits Alex Smith, Harry Vardon and Ted Ray — at a U.S. Open tuneup tournament in Shawnee, Pa., McDermott was quoted as saying: “We hope our foreign visitors had a good time, but we don’t think they did, and we are sure they won’t win the National Open.” It was a show of brashness and bravado that fit McDermott’s personality, but he claimed his words had been taken out of context, that he had only been joking. The USGA, shocked by the behavior, considered barring McDermott from the U.S. Open but let him play. But the damage had been done. According to a New York Times account, McDermott “worried greatly over the affair and has almost broken down under the strain.” Meanwhile, McDermott’s financial picture had grown worse, as the investments he made with his earlier U.S. Open winnings sank. In 1914,

Pros Continued from D1 With Pacific Northwest PGA staff administering the details of the competition, 188 pro and amateur golfers in the field and about 50 Awbrey Glen volunteers and staff helping, the Oregon Open is more complicated than many might think. Amberson and Fraley are receiving plenty of help, they said. But when they are not trying to grind out birdies on the course, Amberson and Fraley are overseeing much of the tournament. “It’s certainly not easier,” Fraley said, comparing this year’s tournament with previous Oregon Opens when he was just a competitor. “But when you have a great staff and a great crew, it certainly makes things less stressful.” Fraley arrived at 6 a.m. Tuesday. Amberson arrived at 6:30 a.m. They set up the registration tables and got the food and beverage area open and ready to go. By 7:15 a.m., Fraley and Amberson were working on their games for their 8:30 a.m. tee time. Once on the course, both were met with perfect conditions: sunny and warm with only a light breeze. Fraley played well but struggled to make putts, he said. Amberson’s game was off — he fired a 7-over-par 79. Did either have trouble compartmentalizing their two functions once on the course? “You learn how to separate that,” Amberson said of his

hoping to climb back atop the golf world, he headed across the Atlantic for the British Open, but missed the ferry and train he needed to catch to get to qualifying. His return home on the Kaiser Wilhelm II was disrupted early when a grain carrier hit the ship in the English Channel. The ship made it back to land in Britain, but not before McDermott and a number of other passengers were sheltered in lifeboats. “Physically, McDermott was OK, but his mind was fragile,” Bill Fields wrote in a stirring account of McDermott’s life in Golf World magazine. “Everything had hit within a year,” McDermott’s sister, Gertrude, is quoted as saying in the magazine. “First the stock failure, then the awful results of the Shawnee tournament, then the Open and finally that wreck.” McDermott played in the 1914 U.S. Open but finished ninth. “The indomitable — some would say abrasive — self-confidence that had always marked his demeanor was nowhere in evidence,” wrote James Finegan in “A Centennial Tribute to Golf in Philadelphia.” That turned out to be McDermott’s final major. Later that year, his parents checked him into a mental hospital for the first time. In June 1916, his mother committed him to the State Hospital for the Insane in Norristown, Pa., where, according to Golf World, she was ordered to pay $1.75 a week “for support of said lunatic in said Hospital, until further notice.” McDermott dabbled in golf for the rest of his life — on a six-hole course built on the grounds of the hospital, in a few more professional tournaments and on outings such as the ones he made to Overbrook during the summers of 1956 and ’57. Pisano was a pretty good pro himself and a student of the game. He played in four U.S. Opens, beginning in 1962, when Jack Nicklaus won his first major, beating Arnold Palmer in a playoff at Oakmont. Pisano said the scene of McDermott walking through the door at Overbrook more than 40 years after his U.S. Open win wouldn’t hold a candle to watching Palmer or Nicklaus walk into any golf club today. “No, because, basically, I don’t think too many people knew he was there,” Pisano said. “It was always in the afternoon. Nine holes. Whatever notoriety he had was strictly of a local nature. When he came to the course, I’m not sure anybody recognized him. I knew him. But I’m a whole different story. Golf was my business. I don’t think there was any hoopla about it.” McDermott died in 1971, again virtually unnoticed. The inscription on his simple gravestone, an easy one to miss at the expansive Holy Cross Cemetery in Yeadon, Pa., reads: “First American Born Golf Champion 1911 — 1912.”

dual roles. “That’s the advantage of having a good, seasoned crew here and having guys who know what they’re supposed to do. Once I started warming up I wasn’t worried about what was going on. “Maybe I should have, then maybe I would have played better.” If being the Oregon Open’s hosts has an advantage, it is that both Fraley and Amberson, who has worked for Awbrey Glen since its inception in 1993, know the course better than any other golfer in the field. But working from dawn until dusk negates much of that. “I can’t really say it’s an advantage when you have to work before and after your round,” Fraley said. “It cancels itself out, because you know the home course. You know all the nuances, where you can and can’t be on the course, and you know the greens. Unfortunately, today I didn’t make any birdies.” Fraley ate lunch at Awbrey Glen’s restaurant with his family visiting from Sacramento, Calif. Amberson feasted on pizza in a golf cart near the course’s driving range. And after lunch it was back to work until the evening. Competing and hosting makes for a long day. But Amberson said it is all worth it. “It’s fun to put on a show,” Amberson said. “The hardest part is trying to live up to your own expectations of playing at your own golf course, and I didn’t do that today.” Zack Hall can be reached at 5 4 1 -6 1 7 -7 8 6 8 or at z hall@ bendbulletin.com.

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THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, June 15, 2011 D5

GOLF SCOREBOARD LOCAL The Bulletin welcomes contributions to its weekly local golf results listings and events calendar. Clearly legible items should be faxed to the sports department, 541-385-0831, e-mailed to sports@bendbulletin.com, or mailed to P.O. Box 6020; Bend, OR 97708.

State Event OREGON OPEN INVITATIONAL Tuesday at Awbrey Glen Golf Club Par 72 First Round Top 25 Bryan Stevens (Mark Bass Golf School) Brian Nosler (Dick’s Sporting Goods) Russell Grove (Avondale G&TC) Tyler Simpson (Trysting Tree GC) Tim Feenstra (Broadmoor GC) Ryan Malby (Village Greens GC) Cameron Fife (Persimmon CC) Bruce Stewart (Arrowhead GC) Greg Chianello (The Reserve Vineyards) Ryan Benzel (Pro Golf - Lynnwood) Reid Martin (Everett G&CC) Ian Dahl (Mint Valley GC) Casey King (Tokatee GC) Nick Ellis (Wenatchee G&CC) Nick Sherwood (Spring Hill CC) John Kawasoe (Astoria G&CC) Dylan Goodwin (Harbour Pointe GC) Bob Rannow (Sandpines GL) Rob Gibbons (Arrowhead GC) Derek Berg (Glendale CC) Taylor Porter (Avondale G&TC) Alex Moore (Trysting Tree GC) Eric Fiskum (Illahe Hills CC) Jeff Neeley (Harbour Pointe GC) Colin Tucker (Langdon Farms GC) Bill Winter (Columbia Edgewater CC) Eric McCardle (Whidbey G&CC) Tyler Nelson (Columbia Edgewater CC) Glen Griffith (Spring Hill CC) Dick Bartholomew (Tualatin CC) Jeff Marsh (Orchard Hills CC) James Chrisman (Awbrey Glen GC) Locals T33 Clayton Moe (Tetherow GC) Louis Bennett (Broken Top Club) Jesse Heinly (Tetherow GC) T47 Charles Kingsbaker (Black Butte Ranch) Ron Seals (Awbrey Glen GC) Tim Fraley (Awbrey Glen GC) T63 Dan Ostrin (Widgi Creek GC) T77 Tom Baker (Black Butte Ranch) Brad Mombert (Bend G&CC) T92 Harry Paik (Awbrey Glen GC) T117 Jeff Fought (Black Butte Ranch) Mark Amberson (Awbrey Glen GC) T129 Daniel Wendt (Brasada Ranch) T137Jim Wilkinson (Broken Top Club) T140 Pat Huffer (Crooked River Ranch) Andy Heinly (Tetherow GC) T148 Erik Nielsen (Bend G&CC) T154 Charles Cushman (Broken Top Club) Ross Kranz (Tetherow GC) T161 Jeff Ward (Juniper GC) Charlie Rice (Bend G&CC) George Mack Jr. (Black Butte Ranch) Mark Vukanovich (Broken Top Club) 182 Bill Widmer (Eagle Crest Resort)

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Club Results AWBREY GLEN Men’s Game, June 11 Net Better Ball 1, Tom Carrico/Ken Waskom, 63. 2, Robert Cone/Brock Olson, 63. Skins — Tom Carrico, Nos., 14, 17; Ken Waskom, No. 10; Robert Cone, No. 11. BEND GOLF AND COUNTRY CLUB Ladies’ Golf Association, June 1 Stroke Play Championship Flight — Gross: 1, Karen Stanard, 79. Net: 1, Karen Pagen, 73. A Flight — Gross: 1, Debbie Kerr, 87. 2, Madeline Henderson, 96; Judy Boulety, 96. Net: 1, Janet Windman, 73. 2, Debbi Smolich, 77. B Flight — Gross: 1, Mari Tank, 95. Net: 1, Pam Caine, 73. C Flight — Gross: 1, Jo Frew, 103. 2, Margaret Martens, 104. Net: 1, Deborah Cox, 72. 2, Nancy Weaver, 75. D Flight — Gross: 1, Nancy Eldredge, 111. Net: 1, Ruth Taylor, 77. Nine-Hole Flight — Gross: 1, Dugan Lumpkin, 59. Net: 1, Linda Beccio, 45.5. Men’s Daily Game, June 9 Sweet Sixteen First Flight (9 handicaps or less) — Gross: 1 (tie), Mike Smolich, 64; Franz Miller, 64. Net: 1 (tie), Brian Mikkelborg, 59; Brett Evert, 59; Tom Archey, 59; Tom Dunderdale, 59. Second Flight (10-14) — Gross: 1, Mark Hagenbaugh, 65. 2, Mike Groat, 68. Net: 1, Gene Powell, 56. 2, Mac Ryder, 57. 3, Mike Rippet, 58. 4, Ron Estes, 59. Third Flight (15 and higher) — Gross: 1, Ron Tokuyama, 71. 2, Steve Pistole, 74. Net: 1, Richard Morehead, 50. 2 (tie), Ed Williams, 56; Sid Smith, 56. 4, Bob Thye, 58. DESERT PEAKS Wednesday Twilight League, June 8 Team Match Play Standings The Good, Bad & Ugly, 33-25. Brunoe Logging, 30-18. Try To Farms, 23-25. Cental Oregon Insurance, 27-21. Earnest Electric, 21-27. Gruner Chevrolet, 31-17. Oregon Embroidery, 17-31. Billy Baroo’s, 17-31. Schmidt House, 19-29. Willow Creek Driving Range, 23-25. Bel Air Funeral Home, 29-19. Good Old Boys, 24-24. Shielding International, 25-23. Keith Manufacturing, 17-31. KPs — Flight 1: Loy Petersen. Flight 2: Kurt Ocker, Gary Burtis. Flight 3: Jens Lovtang. LDs — Flight 1: Francisco Morales, Johnathan Sharp. Flight 2: Gary Burtis, Chuck McGraw. Flight 3: Jim Ellsbury. Thursday Men’s Club, June 9 Net Throw Out One Hole 1 (tie), Mike Funk, 56; Dick Pliska, 56. 3 (tie), George Jones, 60; Bob Prince, 60. KP — George Jones. LD — Joe Kirkwood. Friday Night Couples, June 10 Chapman 1, Ed McDaniel & Juanice Schram, 31.1. 2, Scott Ditmore & Vicki Moore, 32.1. 3, Bruce & Jeanette Houck. Sunday Group Play, June 12 Stroke Play Gross: 1, Chuck Schmidt, 71. 2, Ed McDaniel, 73. 3 (tie), Jim Bauman, 75; Francisco Morales, 75. Net: 1, Scott Ditmore, 64. 2, Kurt Ocker, 66. 3, Vicki Moore, 67. THE GREENS AT REDMOND Men’s Club, June 9 Net Stroke Play A Flight — Nine Holes: 1, Jerry Kuchta, 27.5. 2 (tie), Ken Ennor, 28; Bob Grabar, 28. 4, Don O’Malley, 29. 18 Holes: 1, Steve Adamski, 54. 2, Norm Olson, 55. 3, Bob Grabar, 56. 4, Jerry Kuchta, 57. B Flight — Nine Holes: 1, Louie Rogerson, 25. 2, Kent Leary, 27.5. 3 (tie), Jerry Aarons, 28.5; Art Tassie, 28.5. 18 Holes: 1 (tie), Jerry Aarons, 59; Mike Frier, 59; Kent Leary, 59. 4 (tie), Phil Backup,

60; Arlie Holm, 60. KPs — Jeff Strauser, No. 1; Phil Weimar, No. 7; Tom Zowney, No. 10; Ron White, No. 12. Golfer of the Week — Louie Rogerson. MEADOW LAKES Men’s Association Member/Guest, June 11 Shamble Best Ball A Flight — Gross: 1, Caleb Henry/Jared Lambert, 66. , Zach Lampert/Chuck Wilcox, 67. Net: 1, Jim Montgomery/Coy Scroggins, 56. 2 (tie), Clay Smith/Jake Shinkle, 60; Paul Adams/Gregg Johnson, 60; Les Bryan/Dave Garwood, 60. B Flight — Gross: 1 (tie), Dewey Springer/Ron Meredith, 74; George Lienkaemper/Bob Lind, 74; Scott Grasle/Mike Mishler, 74. Net: 1, J.W. Miller/Dale Johnson, 57. 2, Jon Wilber/Jim Williams, 59. KPs — A Flight: Caleb Henry, No. 4; Ryan Criazzo, No. 8; Jeff Storm, No. 13; Clay Smith, No. 17. B Flight: Coy Scoggins, No. 4; Dewey Springer, No. 8; Coy Scroggins, No. 13; George Lienkaemper, No. 17. Skins — Gross: Caleb Henry/Jared Lambert, No. 12; Gene Taylor/John Lanning, No. 18. Net: Jake Shinkle/Clay Smith, No. 1; George Lienkaemper/Bob Lind, No. 5; Gene Taylor/John Lanning, No. 16. Horserace — 1, Gene Taylor/John Lanning. 2, Zach Lampert/ Rob Dudley. 3, Paul Adams/Gregg Johnson. Men’s League, June 12 Stroke Play Gross: 1, Zach Lampert, 71. 2 (tie), Dave Garwood, 74; Dustin Conklin, 74. Net: 1 (tie), John Novak, 67; Dennis Willings, 67. 3 (tie), Howard Zangari, 69; Dewey Springer, 69. 5, Les Bryan, 70. Skins — Gross: Dave Garwood, No. 9; Bob Kelly, No. 10; Zach Lampert, No. 11; Todd Goodew, No. 17. Net: Steve Kidder, No. 13; Jon Wilber, No. 12; Dewey Springer, No. 16; Todd Goodew, No. 17. Couples Golf League, June 12 Las Vegas Scramble 1, Don Bedient/Verna Bedient/Gene Taylor/Sharon Taylor, 37. 2, Garry Peterson/Karen Peterson/Richard Koon/Kathy Koon, 37. KPs — Richard Koon, No. 8. RIVER’S EDGE Men’s Club, June 7 Stroke Play Gross: 1, Kevin Rueter, 72. 2, Hi Becker, 82. 3 (tie), Wayne Johnson, 88; John Appel, 88. 5 (tie), Mike Eklund, 90; Dave Fiedler, 90. 7, David Loadman, 91. 8 (tie), Dave Bryson, 92; Rich Robertson, 92. 10; (tie), Jerry Egge, 93; Steve Langenberg, 93; Gary Mack, 93. Net: 1 (tie), Appel, 71; Doug King, 71. 3, Loadman, 72. 4, Fiedler, 73. 5 (tie), Bryson, 74; Eklund, 74; Roy Fullerton, 74; Flip Houston, 74. 9 (tie), Becker, 75; Johnson, 75; Egge, 75; Mack, 75; Jim Buck, 75; Dick Carroll, 75; Chuck Mackdanz, 75; Stan Brock, 75. 27th Annual Riverhouse Tournament, June 11-12 36-Hole Scramble Gross: 1, Mike Garoutte/Rich Taylor/Jim Dover/Todd Wilson, 117. 2, Jeff Stevens/Jarrell Wilhelmsen/Erik Snyder/Jon Matthys, 120. 3, Chris Cox/Jeremy Cox/Kevin Guadagno/Billy Holm, 122. Net: 1, Wayne Purcell/Matt Steele/Tracey Thompson/Gary Bell, 85. 2, Greg Gentry/Greg Hawthorne/Roy Ryberg/Wayne Murray, 90. 3, Gary Berkey/Steve Berkey/Rick Mehlhoff/Ron Marcheck, 90.

Hole-In-One Report May 26 WIDGI CREEK Kirk Sandburg, Bend No. 2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128 yards. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-iron June 11 EAGLE CREST RIDGE Mike Meeks, Orting, Wash. No. 6. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126 yards. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-iron June 12 WIDGI CREEK Neil Pedersen, Bend No. 5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126 yards. . . . . . . . . . pitching wedge June 12 EAGLE CREST CHALLENGE David Tatone, Canby No. 14. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 130 yards. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-iron June 13 CROSSWATER Randy Guthrie, Oro Valley, Ariz. No. 7. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 177 yards. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-hybrid

Calendar The Bulletin welcomes contributions to its weekly local golf events calendar. Items should be mailed to P.O. Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708; faxed to the sports department at 541-385-0831; or e-mailed to sports@bendbulletin.com. ——— LEAGUES Tuesdays — The Men’s Club at River’s Edge Golf Course in Bend plays weekly tournaments. Members of the men’s club and others interested River’s Edge Golf Club men with an established USGA handicap are invited to participate. For more information or to register, call River’s Edge at 541-389-2828. Tuesdays — The Ladies League at Lost Tracks Golf Club plays weekly at 9 a.m. All women golfers are welcome. For more information, call the pro shop at 541-385-1818. Tuesdays — Black Butte Ranch Women’s Golf Club accepts women golfers of all levels. Cost to join is $40 plus green fees for the 2011 season. For more information or to register, call the Big Meadow golf shop at 541-595-1500. Tuesdays — Ladies of the Greens women’s golf club at The Greens at Redmond golf course play weekly from May through October. New members are welcome. For more information or to register, call Lynn Holm at 541-388-2656. Wednesdays — The Women’s Club at River’s Edge Golf Course plays weekly in tournaments that tee off at 9:30 a.m. Members are welcome and should sign up by the preceding Saturday for the tournaments. For more information, or to register, call River’s Edge at 541-389-2828. Wednesdays — Men’s Golf Association at Meadow Lakes Golf Course plays weekly at 5 or 5:30 p.m. All men are welcome. Cost is $35 plus $30 handicapping fee. Nightly green fee is $7. For more information, call Zach Lampert at 541-447-7113. Wednesdays — Juniper Ladies Golf Club plays weekly between 8 a.m. and 10 a.m. All women players welcome. For more information visit www.juniperladies.com. Wednesdays — Men’s Golf Association at Meadow Lakes Golf Course plays weekly at 5 or 5:30 p.m. All men are welcome. For more information, call Zach Lampert at 541-447-7113. Wednesdays — Ladies Club at Desert Peaks in Madras. Times vary each week. Cost is $20 to join and weekly games are held. For more information, call Desert Peaks at 541-475-6368. Wednesdays — Men’s club at Aspen Lakes Golf Course in Sisters plays every Wednesday morning. Cost is $60 to sign up for the year, and weekly 18-hole games are held. For more information, call Aspen Lakes at 541-549-4653. Wednesdays — Men’s club at Sunriver Resort plays weekly tournaments at the Meadows or Woodlands courses with shotgun starts around 9 a.m. Cost is $55 for annual membership. For more information, e-mail Don Olson at d.s.olson@msn.com or go to www.srmengolf.com. Wednesdays — Women’s club at Sunriver Resort plays weekly tournaments at the Meadows or Woodlands courses with shotgun starts around 9 a.m. There are both 9-hole and 18-hole groups. For more information, e-mail (for 9-hole) Linda Salzer at lsalzer@chamberscable.com for nine-hole group, or Joni Cloud, at joni.cloud9898@gmail.com for 18-hole group. Thursdays — Ladies League at Meadow Lakes Golf Course plays weekly at 9 a.m. All women players welcome. For more information, call Linda Richards at 503-577-5983. ——— CLINICS OR CLASSES Wednesdays — Junior golf camp at Aspen Lakes Golf Course

Golf Clinic Fundraiser! Open to the public at Pronghorn

July 18, 2011 5:30 - 7:00 pm $20 Donation Wine, Beer and Bottled Water Provided SEATING IS LIMITED

Ian Baker-Finch

541-322-6024

British Open Champ CBS Golf Analyst

Call to reserve your seat.

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Devin’s Destiny is a non-proit 501(c)(3) organization solely funded by private donations.

in Sisters. The eight-week camp, which will be held every Wednesday from June 15 through Aug. 3, is designed for golfers between ages 7 and 17 years old. Camp will include lessons on etiquette, and golf from tee to green. Classes will be held from 8:30-10 a.m. each day. Cost is $200. For more information or to register, visit www.aspenlakes.com or call 541-549-4653. Mondays through Fridays — Junior half-day camps at the PGA Tour Academy at Pronghorn Club near Bend are open to boys and girls of all skill levels, ages 7-13. Camp runs 9 a.m.-noon daily, and campers will work on golf fundamentals including stance and grip, with emphasis on rules and etiquette. Cost is $295. Camp dates: June 20-June 24 and July 11-15. For more information, visit www.pgatourcamps.com or call 877-611-1911. June 20-23 — Junior golf clinic at Meadow Lakes Golf Course in Prineville for golfers of all ability levels ages 7-17. Clinic split into one-hour shifts each morning, and classes are divided by age. Registration begins in May. Cost is $15 and includes games, prizes, and limited golf privileges after completion of the clinic. For more information or to register, call the Meadow Lakes golf shop at 541-447-7113. Mondays, Tuesdays — Two-day junior golf clinics at Widgi Creek Golf Club in Bend begin on June 20. Instructional camps open for golfers ages 6 to 16. Camps are scheduled to run 1:30-3 p.m. or 3:30-5 p.m. Camp dates: June 20-21, July 11-12, July 2526, Aug. 8-9, Aug. 22-23. Cost is $49 per student. To register or for more information, call Widgi Creek at 541-382-4449 or e-mail Widgi assistant golf pro Josh Bowles at jbowles@pga.com. Mondays through Fridays — Pee Wee Golf Clinics at Juniper Golf Course are open to beginning golfers ages 5-7. Classes begin at noon each day and are expected to last between 30 to 40 minutes each. Camp dates: June 20-24, June 27-30, July 11-14, July 18-21, July 25-28, Aug. 1-4. Cost is $25 per student. For more information or to register, call Juniper pro Stuart Allison at 541548-3121 or email him at pro@stuartallisongolf.com. Mondays or Wednesdays — Junior Golfer Classes at Juniper Golf Course are open to golfers ages 8-17 from June 20 through Aug. 3. Classes for beginners are scheduled from 1:30-2:45 p.m.; intermediate golfers from 3:30-4:45 p.m. Cost is $75 and classes are limited to 20 students. For more information or to register, call Juniper pro Stuart Allison at 541-548-3121 or email him at pro@ stuartallisongolf.com. Mondays and Wednesdays — Tournament Player Classes at Juniper Golf Course are open to advanced golfers ages 8-17 from June 20 through Aug. 3. Classes begin at 5 p.m. Cost is $35 and classes are limited to four students. For more information or to register, call Juniper pro Stuart Allison at 541-548-3121 or email him at pro@stuartallisongolf.com. Wednesdays — Sunriver Resort will host junior golf camps every Wednesday from June 22 through Aug. 17. Conducted by Sunriver’s instructional staff, camps run from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. and include instruction on all phases of the game, as well as lunch and a nine-hole playing lesson. Cost is $125. For more information or to register, visit www.sunriver-resort.com or call Mike Palen, Sunriver’s director of instruction, at 541-788-4249. Fridays and Saturdays — Junior golf camp for advanced golfers at Eagle Crest Resort in Redmond. Camps are designed to prepare experienced golfers for competitive golf. Camps are scheduled to run 3-4:30 p.m. on Fridays and Saturdays. Camp dates: June 24-25, July 8-9, July 22-23, Aug. 5-6, Aug. 19-20. Cost is $50 per student. To register or for more information, contact Eagle Crest director of instruction Tam Bronkey at 541-504-3879 or email him at tamb@eagle-crest.com. Mondays through Fridays — Junior full-day camps at the PGA Tour Academy at Pronghorn Club near Bend are open to boys and girls of all skill levels, ages 9-16. Camps runs 9 a.m.-4 p.m. daily, and campers will work on putting, chipping, bunker play and the full swing. Nine holes of golf accompanied by instructors each day also included. Cost is $595 and includes all golf activities, lunch daily and amenity package. Camp dates: June 27-July 1 and July 18-22. For more information, visit www.pgatourcamps.com or call 877-611-1911. Mondays through Wednesdays — Three-day junior golf camps at Black Butte Ranch begin on June 13. (A camp is also scheduled for Tuesday, July 5, through Thursday, July 7, following the July Fourth holiday.) Instructional camp tailored to the age and abilities of each student. Sessions run 2-3:30 p.m. each day for golfers ages 6-9, 2-4:30 p.m. for ages 10-17. Class sizes limited to 15 golfers. Cost is $100 for ages 6-9; $160 for ages 10-17. For more information or to register, visit www.blackbutteranch.com or call 541-595-1500. Tuesdays through Thursdays — Ladies-only golf school at Black Butte Ranch creates a comfortable learning environment for women golfers of all skill levels. Three-day school runs from 9-11:30 a.m. each day. Dates for school include July 12-14, July 19-21, July 26-28, and Aug. 2-4. Cost is $425 and includes lunch, nine holes of golf each day, and on-course instruction. For more information or to register, visit www.blackbutteranch.com or call 541-595-1500. Wednesdays through Fridays — Adult-child three-day golf camp at Black Butte Ranch. Camp includes two hours of instruction each day and one round of golf. Classes from 9 to 11 a.m. each day. Cost is $350 and includes instruction for one adult and one child. Additional children $150 each. Camp dates: Aug. 10-12, Aug. 1719. For more information or to register, visit www.blackbutteranch. com or call 541-595-1500. ——— TOURNAMENTS June 16-17 — The Central Oregon Open at Eagle Crest Resort in Redmond is a four-person scramble tournament at the Ridge and Resort courses to benefit the Ronald McDonald House Charities. Tournament begins at 8 a.m. Cost is $125 per player or $500 per team and includes green fees, cart and barbecue lunch. Deadline to register is June 1. Sponsorship opportunities available. All proceeds benefit Ronald McDonald House Charities of Central Oregon. For more information or to register, call 541-318-4950, e-mail mardibruce@bendbroadband.com, or download the registration form at www.centraloregonopen.com. June 17 — Leadership Bend’s Chip-in for Children 100-Hole Golf Marathon at Tetherow Golf Club in Bend. Event begins at 7:30 a.m., and object is to finish as many golf holes as possible, up to

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100. Cost to play is $2,500 per person, which includes golf, cart, prizes, breakfast, lunch, snacks and three-course dinner for two. Proceeds from the event benefit Central Oregon youth programs and children’s charities including Cascade Youth and Family Services, YouthBuild (First Story), Family Access Network, Healthy Beginnings, and Children First for Oregon. For more information on sponsorship opportunities, visit www.bendchamber.org/LSBgolfmarathon. June 17 — Aspen Lakes Outlaw Open at Aspen Lakes Golf Course in Sisters is a tournament fundraiser for the Sisters High School football team. Four-person scramble begins with a 1 p.m. shotgun. Steak dinner and auction following the round. Register as a team or individually. Entry fee is $125 per player. Includes green fees, cart and dinner. For more information, call Suzanne Lind at 541-549-4045 or e-mail her at suzanne.lind@sisters.k12.or.us. June 17-19 — Best of Bend Best Ball at Pronghorn Club in Bend, the Club at Brasada Ranch in Powell Butte, and Tetherow Golf Club in Bend. Tournament is an amateur two-man best ball. The first round starts with a 1 p.m. shotgun start at Pronghorn, followed by 9 a.m. starts at Brasada and Tetherow. Cost is $550 per golfer or $1,100 per team and includes three rounds of golf, cocktail reception, lunch, and an awards dinner. For more information visit www.bestofbendbestball.com or call tournament coordinator Stein Swenson at 541-318-5155. June 18-19 — Central Oregon Scramble is a three-person scramble at Juniper Golf Course in Redmond. For more information, call 541-548-3121, or download an entry form at www.playjuniper. com. June 19 — Father-Son-Daughter Golf Tourney at Meadow Lakes Golf Course in Prineville. Scotch Ball Tournament begins at 9 a.m. For more information or to register, call Meadow Lakes at 541-447-7113. June 20 — Central Oregon Junior Golf Association tournament at Widgi Creek Golf Club in Bend. Tee times begin at 8 a.m. For more information, call Woodie Thomas at 541-598-4653, e-mail cojga@ hotmail.com, or visit www.cojga.com. June 23 — Central Oregon Golf Tour event at Black Butte Ranch’s Big Meadow course. The Central Oregon Golf Tour is a competitive golf series held at golf courses throughout Central Oregon. Gross and net competitions open to all amateur golfers of all abilities. Prize pool awarded weekly, and membership not required. For more information or to register: 541-633-7652, 541-318-5155, or www.centraloregongolftour.com. June 24-26 — 2011 Mirror Pond Men’s Amateur Invitational, Central Oregon’s oldest golf tournament, at Bend Golf and Country Club attracts top amateur male golfers from Oregon and beyond for 36 holes of individual stroke-play competition over two days. A practice round is scheduled for June 24, followed by tournament play on both Saturday and Sunday. Invited guest entry fee is $220 and includes practice round, tee prize, hosted tournament dinner, stroke-play event, and additional contests. The field is limited to the first 140 paid entries. Players can register in three divisions: regular (age 18 and older), senior (age 50 and older) and super senior (age 65 and older). To register, call the Bend G&CC golf shop at 541382-2878, e-mail at bendgolfshop@bendgolfclub.com or visit www. bendgolfclub.com. June 25 — The Central Oregon Builders Association is hosting two golf tournaments in one day at River’s Edge Golf Course in Bend. Four-person shamble tees off with a 7:30 a.m. shotgun start. Four-person scramble tees off at 1:30 p.m. Cost is $125 per person or $450 per team to play in one tournament, or $200 per person or $800 per team to play in both tournaments. Fee includes lunch, tee and raffle prizes. Proceeds to benefit the COBA Government Affairs Program. For more information or to register, call Andy High at 541389-1058, or e-mail him at andyh@coba.org. June 25 — Golf Channel Am Tour event at Widgi Creek Golf Club in Bend. The Am Tour’s Central Oregon chapter is a competitive golf series held at different Central Oregon golf courses. Flighted tournaments open to all amateur golfers of all abilities and prize pool awarded to both gross and net winners. Membership information: 541-389-7676 or www.thegolfchannel.com/amateurtour. June 25 — St. Thomas Academy Golf Tournament at Eagle Crest Resort’s Challenge Course in Redmond. Scramble begins with 8:30 a.m. shotgun. Cost is $75 per player or $300 per team and includes green fees, cart and barbecue lunch. Individual contests and prizes also included. All proceeds go to educational materials for the children at St. Thomas Academy in Redmond. For more information or to register, call St. Thomas at 541-548-3785. June 25 — The 17th Annual Three Sisters Open Women’s Golf Tournament at Eagle Crest Resort’s Resort Course in Redmond. The team scramble begins with an 8 a.m. shotgun start and is for women golfers of all abilities. Proceeds will benefit Quota International of Central Oregon and Bend Women’s Scholarship Fund. Cost is $100 per player and includes golf, use of a cart, continental breakfast, lunch, tee gift and prizes. Space is limited and entries will be accepted on a first-come basis. For more information or to register, call Kathy Wuest at 541-382-2421 or e-mail her at kwuest@lumbins.com. June 27 — Central Oregon Junior Golf Association tournament at Crooked River Ranch. Tee times begin at 8 a.m. For more information, call Woodie Thomas at 541-598-4653, e-mail cojga@hotmail. com, or visit www.cojga.com. June 27-July 1 — Rolex Tournament of Champions at Crosswater Club in Sunriver. American Junior Golf Association tournament features top boys and girls from around the country and beyond to play in 72 holes of stroke play with a 54-hole cut. For more information, call the AJGA at 770-868-4200 or visit www.ajga.org.


T EE

D6 Wednesday, June 15, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

TO

G R EEN 17 and 18.

The 515-yard par-5 17th hole is not only the best hole at KahNee-Ta, it is among the better par 5s in Central Oregon. It is the only hole on the course that brings together all of KahNee-Ta’s natural attributes: a hill, native vegetation, some trees and, of course, the Warm Springs River.

clubhouse, atop a hill overlooking the golf course. Kah-Nee-Ta also has a medium-size practice putting green. The clubhouse has a pro shop with golf clubs and gear to purchase, and during the summer the course opens a reasonably priced snack bar. For those who want to do more than just golf, Kah-Nee-Ta’s casino is just up the hill from the course. And the resort has both a hotel and RV park, with pools, horseback riding and tennis.

Strategy

Value

Golfers should take advantage of Kah-Nee-Ta’s early holes, which play relatively short and have few hazards to ward away aggressive play. The back side forces golfers to be more careful, though all three par 5s are reachable. In general, golfers should play approach shots below the hole to increase the frequency of uphill putts. The greens at Kah-Nee-Ta are hard and relatively fast, making any downhill putt particularly treacherous.

Kah-Nee-Ta keeps its pricing relatively simple. At $45 during the summer for the general public, Kah-Nee-Ta is neither a great bargain nor overpriced. Hotel guests can play the course for $35. And after 1 p.m., the course offers the use of a cart for free for both hotel guests and the general public. For those golfers who live nearby, Kah-Nee-Ta offers one of the least expensive season pass deals in Central Oregon — for $425, a golfer can play unlimited rounds all year.

Favorite hole

G W PGA TOUR U.S. OPEN Site: Bethesda, Md. Schedule: Thursday-Sunday. Course: Congressional Country Club, Blue Course (7,574 yards, par 71). Purse: TBA ($7.5 million in 2010). Winner’s share: TBA ($1.35 million in 2010). Television: ESPN (Thursday-Friday, 7 a.m.-noon, 2-4 p.m.) and NBC (Thursday-Friday, noon-2 p.m.; Saturday, 11 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sunday, 10:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m.). Last year: Northern Ireland’s Graeme McDowell become the first European in 40 years to win the U.S. Open, beating France’s Gregory Havret by a stroke at Pebble Beach. McDowell finished with a 3-over 74 for an even-par 284 total. Last week: Harrison Frazar won the St. Jude Classic for his first PGA Tour title, beating Robert Karlsson with a par on the third hole of a playoff. ... England’s Robert Rock won the Italian Open for his first European Tour victory. Notes: Tiger Woods, sidelined by leg injuries, is missing the tournament for the first time since 1994. Woods’ caddie, Steve Williams, is working for Adam Scott. ... Congressional also hosted the U.S. Open in 1964 (Ken Venturi) and 1997 (Ernie Els) and the 1976 PGA Championship (Dave Stockton). The PGA Tour has held 10 tournaments at Congressional. ... Top-ranked Luke Donald will play the first rounds with No. 2 Lee Westwood and No. 3 Martin Kaymer. Phil Mickelson, the last U.S. major winner when he took the 2010 Masters, is in a group with Dustin Johnson and Rory McIlroy. ... The 2012 tournament will be played at The Olympic Club in San Francisco. ... The Travelers Championship is next week in Connecticut, followed by the AT&T National at Aronimink in Pennsylvania.

NATIONWIDE WICHITA OPEN Site: Wichita, Kan. Schedule: Thursday-Sunday. Course: Crestview Country Club, North Course (6,959 yards, par 71). Purse: $600,000. Winner’s share: $108,000. Television: None. Last year: Venezuela’s Jhonattan Vegas won his first Nationwide Tour title, closing with a 7-under 64 to overcome a six-stroke deficit and beat Roberto Castro by a stroke. Vegas won the PGA Tour’s Bob Hope Classic this year. Last week: Kyle Thompson won the Rex Hospital Open in Raleigh, N.C., birdieing the final hole for a one-stroke victory over Scott Brown, Troy Kelly and Martin Flores. Thompson also won the 2007 tournament. Notes: The tournament is in its 22nd season. It is one of four remaining events from the inaugural 1990 season. ... The Mexico Open is next week.

EUROPEAN TOUR SAINT-OMER OPEN Site: Lumbres, France. Schedule: Thursday-Sunday. Course: Aa Saint-Omer Golf Club (6,846 yards, par 71). Purse: $867,750. Winner’s share: $144,625. Television: None. Last year: Austria’s Martin Wiegele won his first European Tour title, closing with a 3-under 69 for a two-stroke victory. Last week: England’s Robert Rock led wire-to-wire in the Italian Open for his first European Tour title, finishing at 21 under for a one-stroke victory. Notes: Dutch architect Johan Frederik Dudok van Heel designed the course. ... The BMW International Open is next week in Germany, followed by the French Open.

LPGA TOUR Next event: LPGA Championship, June 23-26, Locust Hill Country Club, Pittsford, N.Y. Last week: Top-ranked Yani Tseng won the LPGA State Farm Classic for her second victory of the year and seventh tour title in four years. Cristie Kerr, three strokes back, finished second for the third straight event.

CHAMPIONS Next event: Dick’s Sporting Goods Open, June 24-26, En-Joie Golf Course, Endicott, N.Y. Last week: Mark Wiebe won the Greater Hickory Classic, beating James Mason with a par on the third hole of a playoff. Mason missed a 4-foot par putt on the hole. ——— All Times PDT

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Golfers finish their round on the 18th green at Kah-Nee-Ta golf course. The front side of holes are in the background.

Kah-Nee-Ta Continued from D1 “Sometimes we’re not THIS busy during the week,” said Cruz Bocanegra, a Kah-Nee-Ta assistant professional who joined me for part of my round. “It can be tough to get people to drive up here for the day.” Not only can Kah-Nee-Ta be a breeze to play, its greens are usually hard and relatively fast. That makes for an enjoyable round of golf even if Kah-Nee-Ta is not a particularly consistent course, which uniquely offers five par 5s and five par 3s to get to a par of 72. Kah-Nee-Ta’s two nines are distinctly different from each other. The front nine, designed by William Bell in 1972, is straightforward (other than an elevated green on No. 5 and an elevated tee on No. 6) and offers plenty of room to miss with fairways that generally run parallel to one another. The longer, tougher back nine, designed by longtime Central Oregon golf pro Gene “Bunny” Mason, is far more interesting. At 3,372 yards, the back side is nearly 400 yards longer than the front nine. And the 174-yard par-3 10th hole — with water trouble right and hill difficulties left — makes for an uncomfortable start to the back side and a tough par. The back nine wraps around a meadow, and unlike the front nine, brings the Warm Springs River into play. No more is it so than on the 515-yard 17th hole. The fairway is generous enough from the tee box. But the river, not to mention a group of

Kah-Nee-Ta SCORECARD Hole No. 1 No. 2 No. 3 No. 4 No. 5 No. 6 No. 7 No. 8 No. 9 Out

Par Yardage Par 3 144 yards Par 5 486 yards Par 3 207 yards Par 4 392 yards Par 4 334 yards Par 5 491 yards Par 4 348 yards Par 3 160 yards Par 4 418 yards Par 35 2,980 yards

No. 10 Par 3 174 yards No. 11 Par 5 515 yards No. 12 Par 4 368 yards No. 13 Par 4 335 yards No. 14 Par 5 488 yards No. 15 Par 4 390 yards No. 16 Par 3 218 yards No. 17 Par 5 515 yards No. 18 Par 4 369 yards Out Par 37 3,372 yards *All distances from back tees

trees, can be reached for golfers who lose tee shots to the left. And a hill to the right cuts off the view of the right side of the fairway. A good drive makes the tiny green, which is protected well, reachable in two shots. But any long approach will require a tough carry over the river, which cuts through the fairway about 75 yards in front of the green. “It’s not a tough hole if you play it intelligently,” Bocanegra said moments before teeing off. “It’s a 3-iron, 7-iron and wedge in for me. But that’s not fun.”

I imagine golf is tons of fun if you hit it like Bocanegra, who drilled a drive 390 yards at an Oregon PGA tournament last year. On this day, he smoked a drive dead center of the fairway. And with a tricky 200-yard shot over the Warm Springs River, Bocanegra stuck the ball pin high just off the green. He nearly chipped in from there, leaving him a tap-in for birdie. I didn’t fare as well. My tee shot went into the left rough, behind a tree, leaving me with little choice but to chip out sideways into the fairway. Intelligence not really being a strong point of my game, I followed that with a 3-wood that barely made it over the far bank of the river about 230 yards away. That left me in an unkempt portion of rough about 75 yards to pay dirt. I was just happy I found the ball, and eventually I made bogey. It turns out that for the rest of us, the 17th hole is a bit tougher.

The Associated Press

BETHESDA, Md. — Johnny McDermott arrived at the golf course without fanfare — virtually unnoticed, to be more precise — dropped off by his sister near the front door. The assistant golf pro at the Overbrook Golf Club was scheduled to meet McDermott at the door, take him to the course and play nine holes, the way they did every Saturday and Sunday when the weather was good. “It was him and me and one caddie and that was it,” said the golf pro, Jerry Pisano, who worked at Overbrook, one of the very first country clubs on this side of the Atlantic, situated near the Main Line just outside Philadelphia. “No real conversation to speak of, except maybe a little bit about golf. I was always interested in trying to figure out his past, what happened to him over in Europe, but I never could get

Photo courtesy USGA Museum

This undated image shows Johnny McDermott, winner of the U.S. Open golf championship in 1911 and 1912.

Zack Hall can be reached at 541-617-7868 or at zhall@ bendbulletin.com.

Kah-Nee-Ta’s driving range sits across the street from the

Difficulty of course Kah-Nee-Ta is generally an easy course to play, with some moderate to difficult holes. At 6,352 yards from the back tees, Kah-Nee-Ta is relatively short. And the first four holes of the course are straightforward and open. After playing to a tough elevated green on the fifth hole and off an elevated tee box on the par-5 sixth hole, the front nine flattens out again. Things get more difficult on the par-4 ninth hole, which forces a carry over a pond to reach the green. The back side is more challenging, particularly at Nos. 10, 14, 16,

Mystery shrouds U.S. Open Champ from 100 years ago By Eddie Pells

Extras

Johnny McDermott set the standard for American golf. At 19, the diminutive kid from West Philly became the first American to win the U.S. Open in a sport dominated by the British. This year marks the 100th anniversary of McDermott’s groundbreaking win. But even today, a century later, McDermott’s sudden rise and equally quick fall remain a mystery to most. Within five years of his crowning moment, he was all but gone from professional golf, assigned to a home for mentally ill patients, driven crazy — legend has it — by a series of mishaps that cut short a career that could have been for the ages. See Champ / D5

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any definitive answers.” Very few could. But before Arnie had an army or Nicklaus had won any of his 18 majors or Tiger turned golf into front-page news, Shouldn’t life be more fun? At Tetherow, it is. Tetherow encourages families with children of all ages to learn the game of golf. Play a round on our fun Wee Links Par-3 course designed by one of Bend’s own, David McLay Kidd. You can hit the links every Monday from now through Labor Day from 5:30 - 7:30 pm. $20 Adults, $10 Children Includes golf and BBQ dinner


S

Inside

‘Happily Divorced’

SAVVY SHOPPER

Rita Moreno makes her TV comeback on Fran Drescher’s new TV Land series, Page E2

Dear Abby

Never get between a man and his ...

hair care?

Immigrant irked when Hollywood’s depiction of romance does not match reality, see Page E2

SHOPPING IN BRIEF Antique store map available online Antique lovers rejoice, as there is a new resource for locating Bend antique stores. An antique store map is now available online in PDF form through the Downtown Bend Business Association. The map is produced regularly by Trivia Antiques, a downtown Bend shop, and is also available at all the stores listed on the map. Fourteen stores are on the map. Shoppers should note two things that are out of date on the present edition. One is that two antique stores, Iron Horse Second Hand Store and Moon Creek Antiques, merged recently. They are in the Iron Horse location under the Iron Horse name. The other is that there is at least one new antiques store that isn’t on the map. Indian Summer is located at 1900 N.E. Division St. in Bend. Go to the Web address below, scroll down and click on the Bend Antiques Shops link. That goes to another page, with a link in red that says “Get the map here.” Contact: www.downtown bend.org.

• Television • Comics • Calendar • LAT crossword • Sudoku • Horoscope

www.bendbulletin.com/savvyshopper

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, JUNE 15, 2011

INSIDE

E

HELPING YOU MAKE GOOD BUYING DECISIONS

Forgo the typical Father’s Day fare and treat dad at the salon By Heidi Hagemeier The Bulletin

C

all it a cliché, but I’ll go ahead and say it: There are few shopping tasks as tough as finding a Father’s Day gift. Of course this is not universally true. But in my highly scientific survey of girlfriends, the Father’s Day conundrum is real and twofold. First, if men want it, they go get it. Worse, if they want it and haven’t already bought it, we don’t want to shop for it. I remember asking my dad for tips before shopping for one Father’s Day, and he replied that he wanted a shock collar for the dog. Um, right. You go handle that yourself. If you’re lucky, you have a Best Friend Bat Phone, like one of my girlfriends. Before she buys a Father’s Day gift for her husband (like so many of us do on our child’s behalf), she e-mails his buddy an SOS. He responds with a code from the Cabela’s catalog. Which brings me to my point. You enjoy the pampering and products of a salon, so why wouldn’t he? See Salon / E6

Photos by Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Stylist Kindra Greene gives Adam Beyer, of Bend, a haircut at Element 909 in downtown Bend. Element 909 staff said more men in Central Oregon are warming up to the idea of a salon-style experience.

A tool for every job ...

Lotions and scrubs Male skin tends to be dryer and more sensitive than women’s, so many products feature moisturizers. Moisturizing products range from basic lotions to eye creams.

Lahaina Galleries celebrates 35 years Block out June 26. Lahaina Galleries in Bend’s Old Mill District is throwing a party for its 35th anniversary and 10 artists will be on hand for the event. The artists — considered world-class, according to the gallery — are from around the globe and will be showcasing their new works, ranging from paintings to carved gem sculptures to Taiwanese leather sculpture. In attendance will be Alexei Butirskiy, Thomas Leung, James Scoppettone, Andreas Nottebohm, Liu Miao Chan, Hisashi Otsuka, Donna Young, Lyle Sopel and Alessio and Marcello Bugagiar. The event will take place from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the gallery, located at 425 S.W. Powerhouse Drive. Light refreshments will be served and it’s free to attend. Contact: www.lahainagalleries .com or 541-388-4404.

Resort discounts to support nonprofits Interested in a “staycation?” Powell Butte destination resort Brasada Ranch is offering overnight discounts through August. The program is called Ranch Rewards. Those who mention Ranch Rewards when making a reservation will receive 15 percent off the resort’s best overnight rates. The resort is also waiving its minimum two-night stay requirement. Overnight guests receive reduced green fees at The Canyons Gold Course at the resort, dropping from $125 to $85. The course is only available to members and resort guests. In addition to the discount, Brasada Ranch will donate the equivalent of 15 percent of the total amount spent at the time of checkout to two local nonprofit organizations. One organization is The Center Foundation, which offers a variety of services to student athletes in the Bend-La Pine and Sisters school districts. The other is the Central Oregon Environmental Center, based in Bend, which conducts sustainability programs and education. Contact: www.brasada.com/ reward or 866-373-4882. — Heidi Hagemeier, The Bulletin

Shampoos and conditioners

Styling gels, sprays and creams

Though some products are the same for both men and women — just repackaged — others are designed to meet a man’s specific hair care needs and, if marketing is to be believed, women’s desires.

There are plenty of options when it comes to styling products for men, and many suit specific styles and types of hair.

Photo illustration by Jenn Montgomery and Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Chicago may put a lid on How to maximize hotel latest environmental trend TRAVEL

By Monica Eng Chicago Tribune

CHICAGO — Just as Chicago consumers get the hang of reusable grocery bags, a new movement has sprouted to make local grocery shopping even greener: reusable containers. Called BYOC — bring your own container — by its fans, the process involves carrying glass jars and bottles, plastic tubs, and even cloth bags to the market to fill with bulk foods. To eco-conscious consumers, who can already shop this way elsewhere in the U.S., the practice reduces waste, avoids ad-

vertising, reuses resources, facilitates the purchase of whole foods and saves money. But to Chicago’s Department of Public Health, the practice also can mean danger and potential liability if someone gets sick from cross-contamination. “We don’t ... allow folks to bring in their own containers to restaurants, delis or any other place, for that matter,” said Cort Lohff, medical director for environmental health at the Chicago Department of Public Health. “We are worried about people bringing in containers that are not cleaned very well and then contaminating any

surface that they might touch with that.” Lohff said his objection is based on a section of the city’s municipal code that states: “All food shall be protected from contamination ... and so shall all food equipment,” including containers. Lauren Yucan, who opened Real Naked Foods in Chicago this spring with BYOC as its foundation, said she is aware of the city’s stance but has talked with the local inspector and is hoping the cleanliness of her store and supportive customers will win over the city. See BYOC / E6

loyalty programs, benefits

By Doreen Hemlock Sun Sentinel

Hotel loyalty programs are getting easier to use and more generous, often with no blackout dates, and consumers are flocking to them to earn free hotel rooms, room upgrades and many other perks. To get the most from the rewards programs, experts suggest you focus on the hotel chain you use and like, get a cobranded credit card and use the services of that chain’s business partners such as airlines or car rental companies to rack up

points faster and possibly jump to a higher rewards status. “The frequent-flier program has devalued. It’s hard to get a flight for free. With hotels, you can redeem the points much more easily,” said Anne Banas, executive editor of Smarter Travel, explaining the growing popularity of programs now offered by all major chains and even groups of independent hotels. Experts and frequent travelers differ over which hotel loyalty program is best. See Loyalty / E6


T EL EV ISION

E2 Wednesday, June 15, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Film fan wonders if Moreno ‘Happily’ returns to television romance is a dream ‘Happily Divorced’ By Rick Bentley

McClatchy -Tribune News Service

Dear Abby: I come from a Third World country and live as a legal alien in San Francisco. I grew up reading great American authors, watching American TV and Hollywood movies, so I thought I had a good understanding about your Western societal structure. I have made many friends in this wonderful city, but the women here drive me crazy. I am a romantic at heart, but not desperate. However, my gestures are often misunderstood. One time I gave a feminist/radical girl a book about the feminist movement and she freaked out. She said she wasn’t looking for anything serious and didn’t want me to expect anything from her. Abby, it was just a book, not a diamond ring. I was in a relationship for four months. It was fine, until I told her I was madly in love with her. She freaked out and said she didn’t want to get tied down. I was dumbfounded and heartbroken. A few months later, I started dating again and met an incredible woman who made my heart skip a beat. I enjoyed being with her so much I sent flowers to her workplace. She freaked out, too. Am I being completely ignorant to believe in romance? Or is there something wrong with ME? — California Dreamer Dear Dreamer: There isn’t anything “wrong” with you, but I suspect you’re coming on a bit too strong, too quickly. Life in the United States isn’t the way it’s depicted in novels, television and Hollywood movies. Getting to know someone takes time — so take more time before declaring you’re madly in love. And the next time you feel the urge to give someone flowers, send them to her home because some professional women prefer to keep their private lives separate from where they work. Dear Abby: My husband of 27 years has been having chemo-

DEAR ABBY therapy for lymphoma off and on for two years. Friends and neighbors call him often. However, not one of them has ever asked me how I’m doing. I understand the awkwardness of emotional conversations, but it deeply disappoints me that people act as though my husband’s cancer doesn’t affect me. What’s the best way for us to care for each other? We are all so fragile and vulnerable. — Hurting Too In Hawaii Dear Hurting Too: I agree. The answer is for people to realize that life-threatening diseases affect the entire family, not just the patient. In your case, if someone asks how your husband is doing, you should say, “‘John’ is doing well so far, but his illness has been very stressful for me. Thanks for asking.” It may start the conversation you want to have. However, if it doesn’t, you should check out the American Cancer Society’s website, www .cancer.org, which lists the location of support groups everywhere. It would be helpful for you emotionally and spiritually to join a group of caregivers who are coping with what you have been experiencing. Dear Abby: An acquaintance recently announced that she’s pregnant. None of us were aware that she was in a relationship. Is there a polite way to find out who the father is? — Just Curious In New Mexico Dear Curious: I can think of two ways: The first is to wait for her to tell you. The other is to just ask.

FRESNO, Calif. — Rita Moreno shows no signs of slowing down. Not only does the 79-yearold Emmy, Oscar, Grammy and Tony winner return to television tonight in the new TV Land series “Happily Divorced,” she’s getting ready to do a one-woman stage show about her life. And what a life it’s been. Moreno’s sassy performances and explosive dancing opened the doors for Hispanic actors. After her Oscar-winning work in the 1961 film “West Side Story,” there was an increase in baby girls named Rita and Anita (her character in the movie). “I don’t think people have a clue of what it was like,” Moreno says. “They don’t have a clue about the indignation I faced just trying to be a working actor. It’s changed but I keep thinking about what Ricardo Montalban said. He told me, ‘The door is ajar but not open all the way.’” That’s why Moreno keeps working. It’s been easy to keep going, especially when she lands roles like the one in “Happily Divorced.” Moreno plays Fran Drescher’s mother in the series about a Los Angeles florist (Drescher), whose 18-year marriage ends when her husband (John Michael Higgins) announces he’s gay. The worst part: He can’t afford to move out. The casting reunites Drescher and Moreno, who played a nasty gym teacher on an episode of Drescher’s

When: 10:30 tonight Where: TV Land

Courtesy TV Land

“Happily Divorced” premieres on TV Land tonight. The show stars, clockwise from top left: Tichina Arnold, Robert Walden, Rita Moreno, Valente Rodriguez, Fran Drescher and John Michael Higgins.

range from classic films like “Singin’ in the Rain” to the PBS children’s series “The Electric Company,” where she screamed the opening line, “Hey, You Guys!.” A whole new generation discovered Moreno when she played Sister Peter Marie Reimondo, a nun trained as a psychologist, in the gritty HBO prison series “Oz.” “I always thought that it was just this small role, but I’ve had more young men stop me to say that I talked them out of criminal life,” Moreno says. The 60-plus years she’s been acting serves as the fodder for the one-woman show Moreno will begin working on after the first season of “Happily Divorced” finishes. The show will debut at the Berkeley Repertory Theater Sept. 7. Moreno is open to taking the show on the road, if it’s a success. “I’m having the time of my life. I’m turning into Betty White,” Moreno says with a huge laugh.

2nd Street Theater presents: “The Nanny.” “I went to the audition and happily Fran was there so I got to audition with her. I hate auditions but this was the most won-

derful audition experience I ever had. I never felt so comfortable,” Moreno says. Moreno began working professionally in 1950. Her credits

Find It All Online bendbulletin.com

Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby .com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

BIG (Bend Improv Group) With special guest comedians: Jake Woodmansee Stan Whiton Tickets are $8 available in advance at www.2ndstreetheater.com 220 NE Lafayete Bend OR 541-312-9626

BendSpineandPain.com (541) 647-1646

Bob Schumacher 541.280.9147 www.schumacherconstructioninc.com

Friday June 17, 2011 8pm

May contain adult content & launguage

BD-Bend/Redmond/Sisters/Black Butte (Digital); PM-Prineville/Madras; SR-Sunriver; L-La Pine; * Sports programming may vary

WEDNESDAY PRIME TIME 6/15/11 BROADCAST/CABLE CHANNELS

BD PM SR L ^ KATU KTVZ % % % % KBNZ & KOHD ) ) ) ) KFXO * ` ` ` , , KPDX KOAB _ # _ # ( KGW # KTVZDT2 , CREATE 3-2 3-2 173 3-2 OPB HD 3-1 3-1 3-1 3-1

5:00

5:30

6:00

6:30

7:00

7:30

KATU News at 5 ABC World News KATU News at 6 (N) ’ Å Jeopardy! (N) ‘G’ Wheel of Fortune 2011 Stanley Cup Final Boston Bruins at Vancouver Canucks Game 7. From Rogers Arena in Vancouver, B.C. (N) KOIN Local 6 at 5 News KOIN Local 6 at 6 Evening News Old Christine Scrubs ‘14’ Å The Nate Berkus Show ‘PG’ Å KEZI 9 News ABC World News Entertainment The Insider ‘PG’ America’s Funniest Home Videos Two/Half Men Two/Half Men The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ Old Christine Old Christine The Office ’ ‘14’ The Office ‘PG’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ Electric Comp. Fetch! With Ruff Travelscope ‘G’ Nightly Business PBS NewsHour (N) ’ Å 2011 Stanley Cup Final Boston Bruins at Vancouver Canucks Game 7. From Rogers Arena in Vancouver, B.C. (N) King of Queens King of Queens That ’70s Show That ’70s Show Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ Cooking Class Scandinavian Steves Europe Travels-Edge Garden Smart ‘G’ This Old House Official-Fest Steves’ Europe Travelscope ‘G’ Nightly Business PBS NewsHour ’ Å

8:00

8:30

9:00

9:30

The Middle ‘PG’ The Middle ‘PG’ Modern Family Modern Family To Be Announced Undercover Boss ’ ‘PG’ Å Criminal Minds Valhalla ’ ‘14’ The Middle ‘PG’ The Middle ‘PG’ Modern Family Modern Family So You Think You Can Dance The dancers perform for the judges. (N) ‘PG’ News on PDX-TV Burn Notice Sins of Omission ‘PG’ Secrets of the Dead ’ ‘PG’ NOVA Musical Minds ’ ‘PG’ To Be Announced America’s Next Top Model ’ ‘PG’ America’s Next Top Model ’ ‘14’ For Your Home Katie Brown Lap Quilting ‘G’ Painting Wild Secrets of the Dead ’ ‘PG’ NOVA Musical Minds ’ ‘PG’

10:00

10:30

ABC News Special Caught in the Act Blue Bloods Privilege ’ ‘14’ Å ABC News Special Caught in the Act News Channel 21 TMZ (N) ’ ‘PG’ Burn Notice Lesser Evil ‘PG’ Å Great Lodges of the National Parks Dateline NBC ’ ‘PG’ Å House of Payne Meet the Browns Test Kitchen Lidia’s Italy ‘G’ Great Lodges of the National Parks

11:00

11:30

KATU News at 11 (11:35) Nightline News Jay Leno News Letterman KEZI 9 News (11:35) Nightline Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ King of Queens King of Queens Oregon Experience ‘G’ News Jay Leno Roseanne ‘PG’ Roseanne ‘PG’ Cooking Class Scandinavian Oregon Experience ‘G’

BASIC CABLE CHANNELS

A&E AMC ANPL BRAVO CMT CNBC CNN COM COTV CSPAN DIS DISC ESPN ESPN2 ESPNC ESPNN FAM FNC FOOD FX HGTV HIST LIFE MSNBC MTV NICK ROOT SPIKE SYFY TBN TBS TCM TLC TNT TOON TRAV TVLND USA VH1

Bounty Hunter The First 48 Alias; Duel ‘14’ Å The First 48 Waterworld ‘14’ Å Beyond Scared Straight ‘14’ Å Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Gene Simmons Family Jewels ‘PG’ 130 28 18 32 Bounty Hunter (10:45) ››› “The Mummy” (1999) Brendan Fraser. A mummy ›› “Batman Returns” (1992, Action) Michael Keaton, Danny DeVito, Michelle Pfeiffer. The Catwoman and the Penguin join forces ››› “The Mummy” (1999, Adventure) Brendan Fraser, Rachel Weisz, John Hannah. A mummy seeks 102 40 39 against Batman. Å revenge for a 3,000-year-old curse. Å seeks revenge for a 3,000-year-old curse. Å Air Jaws: Sharks of South Africa ’ Maneaters Sharks ’ ‘PG’ Å River Monsters: The Lost Reels ‘PG’ Swamp Wars Cannibal Gator ‘PG’ Finding Bigfoot Swamp Ape ’ ‘PG’ Swamp Wars Cannibal Gator ‘PG’ 68 50 26 38 Wild Kingdom Manta Queen ’ ‘PG’ Top Chef Masters Date Night ‘14’ Top Chef Masters ‘14’ Å Housewives/NJ Housewives/NJ Top Chef Masters ‘14’ Å Top Chef Masters (N) Å Rocco’s Dinner Party (N) ‘14’ 137 44 Extreme Makeover: Home Edition Extreme Makeover: Home Edition CMT Music Awards 2011 ’ ‘PG’ Å Ron White’s Celebrity Salute to the Troops ‘PG’ 190 32 42 53 The Singing Bee ’ ‘PG’ Å Crime Inc. Counterfeit Goods Crime Inc. Counterfeit Goods Mad Money Crime Inc. Counterfeit Goods Crime Inc. Counterfeit Goods Trade FX Ninja Kitchen 51 36 40 52 American Greed Sholom Rubashkin Piers Morgan Tonight (N) Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Å Piers Morgan Tonight Anderson Cooper 360 Å Anderson Cooper 360 Å 52 38 35 48 In the Arena (N) Daily Show Colbert Report Chappelle Show Chappelle Show South Park ‘MA’ South Park ‘MA’ South Park ‘MA’ Jon Benjamin Daily Show Colbert Report 135 53 135 47 (4:56) South Park (5:26) Tosh.0 ‘14’ Gabriel Iglesias: Hot and Fluffy ‘14’ Bend La Pine U of O Today Bend City Council Work Session Bend City Council (N) (Live) Epic Conditions Word Travels ’ Paid Program Visions of NW Ride Guide ‘14’ Outside Presents 11 Capital News Today Today in Washington 58 20 12 11 Tonight From Washington Wizards-Place Phineas and Ferb Good-Charlie Suite/Deck Suite/Deck Good-Charlie Shake It Up! ‘G’ ››› “Enchanted” (2007, Fantasy) Amy Adams, Patrick Dempsey. Å Suite/Deck Suite/Deck 87 43 14 39 Shake It Up! ‘G’ Cash-Chicago Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ Cash-Chicago MythBusters Lethal littering. ’ ‘PG’ MythBusters Fixing a Flat ‘PG’ Å MythBusters Dirty Dozen (N) ’ ‘PG’ Deception With Keith Barry (N) ‘PG’ MythBusters Fixing a Flat ‘PG’ Å 156 21 16 37 Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ Baseball Tonight (N) (Live) Å SportsCenter (N) (Live) Å Baseball Tonight NFL Live (N) SportsCenter (N) (Live) Å SportsCenter (N) (Live) Å 21 23 22 23 (4:00) MLB Baseball Texas Rangers at New York Yankees (N) (Live) Å The Fab Five Å SportsNation Å NASCAR Now SportsNation Å Football Live SportsNation Å 22 24 21 24 SportsNation Å Golf 1992 U.S. Open Film Å Golf 1995 U.S. Open. Å Golf From Bethesda, Md. Å 1999 U.S. Open Official Film Å Golf Å 2001 U.S. Open Official Film Å 23 25 123 25 Golf 1991 U.S. Open Film Å SportsCenter (N) SportsCenter (N) SportsCenter (N) SportsCenter (N) SportsCenter (N) SportsCenter (N) Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express 24 63 124 Still Standing ’ Still Standing ’ America’s Funniest Home Videos › “Coyote Ugly” (2000, Romance-Comedy) Piper Perabo, Adam Garcia. The Nine Lives of Chloe King ‘PG’ The 700 Club (N) ‘G’ Å 67 29 19 41 Gilmore Girls Debutante ball. ’ ‘PG’ Hannity (N) On the Record, Greta Van Susteren The O’Reilly Factor Å Hannity On the Record, Greta Van Susteren Glenn Beck 54 61 36 50 The O’Reilly Factor (N) Å 5 Ingredient Fix Best Dishes 30-Minute Meals Iron Chef America Neal Fraser. Chopped Best of the Best ‘G’ Food Network Star Pizza from a culinary point of view. Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive 177 62 98 44 B’foot Contessa (3:30) ››› “Slumdog Millionaire” Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Two/Half Men ››› “Iron Man” (2008, Action) Robert Downey Jr. A billionaire dons an armored suit to fight criminals. ››› “Superman Returns” (2006) 131 Get It Sold ‘G’ My First Place My First Place Hunters Int’l House Hunters Property Virgins Property Virgins Income Property Property Brothers ‘G’ Å Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l House Hunters 176 49 33 43 Get It Sold ‘G’ American Pickers ‘PG’ Å American Pickers ‘PG’ Å How the States Got Their Shapes 101 Gadgets That Changed the World (N) ‘PG’ Å Modern Marvels ‘PG’ Å 155 42 41 36 American Pickers ‘PG’ Å Unsolved Mysteries ‘14’ Å Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ The First 48 ‘14’ Å The First 48 ‘14’ Å Vanished With Beth Holloway ‘PG’ How I Met How I Met 138 39 20 31 Unsolved Mysteries ‘14’ Å The Rachel Maddow Show (N) The Ed Show (N) The Last Word The Rachel Maddow Show The Ed Show Hardball With Chris Matthews Å 56 59 128 51 The Last Word That ’70s Show That ’70s Show That ’70s Show Teen Wolf Pack Mentality ’ ‘PG’ The Real World ’ ‘14’ Å The Real World ’ ‘14’ Å The Real World (N) ’ ‘14’ Å The Real World ’ ‘14’ Å 192 22 38 57 The Seven ‘PG’ SpongeBob The Penguins iCarly Carly is suspicious of her boyfriend. ’ ‘G’ Å My Wife and Kids My Wife and Kids George Lopez ’ George Lopez ’ That ’70s Show That ’70s Show The Nanny ‘PG’ The Nanny ‘PG’ 82 46 24 40 SpongeBob Bensinger Mariners Pre. MLB Baseball Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim at Seattle Mariners From Safeco Field in Seattle. (N) (Live) Mariners Post. The Dan Patrick Show (N) MLB Baseball 20 45 28* 26 World Poker Tour: Season 9 (5:22) Gangland Hell House ’ ‘14’ (6:34) Gangland Root of All Evil ‘14’ (7:44) Jail ’ ‘14’ Å (8:22) Jail ’ ‘14’ (9:01) Jail ’ ‘14’ (9:39) Jail ’ ‘14’ Å (10:18) Jail ‘14’ (10:56) Jail ‘14’ UFC Unleashed 132 31 34 46 (4:11) Gangland Star Trek: Enterprise Harbinger ‘PG’ Ghost Hunters ’ ‘PG’ Å Ghost Hunters Lemp Mansion ‘PG’ Haunted Collector (N) Hollywd-Trsr Hollywd-Trsr (11:01) Haunted Collector 133 35 133 45 Haunted Collector Å Behind Scenes Grant Jeffrey Just Paula Jack Van Impe Praise the Lord Å Easter Exper. Jesse Duplantis Thru History Changing-World Praise the Lord Å 205 60 130 Love-Raymond King of Queens King of Queens Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ Meet the Browns Meet the Browns House of Payne House of Payne House of Payne House of Payne Conan (N) 16 27 11 28 Love-Raymond ››› “God’s Little Acre” (1958, Drama) Robert Ryan, Tina Louise, Aldo Ray. Tempted (9:15) ››› “A Face in the Crowd” (1957, Drama) Andy Griffith, Patricia Neal, Anthony Franciosa. A home- ›››› “Touch of ››› “The Night of the Hunter” (1955, Suspense) Robert Mitchum, Shelley Winters, 101 44 101 29 Lillian Gish. Children run away from corrupt preacher. Å by Griselda, Georgia farmer Ty Ty digs for treasure. spun philosopher becomes an overnight sensation. Å Evil” (1958) Extreme Coupon Extreme Coupon 178 34 32 34 Extreme Coupon Extreme Coupon Extreme Coupon Extreme Coupon Extreme Coupon Extreme Coupon Extreme Coupon Extreme Coupon Extreme Coupon Extreme Coupon Toddlers & Tiaras (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å Bones The Knight on the Grid ‘14’ The Mentalist A girl is suspect. ‘14’ The Mentalist Red Handed ’ ‘14’ Franklin & Bash Jennifer of Troy ‘14’ Men of a Certain Age (N) ‘MA’ Å Franklin & Bash Jennifer of Troy ‘14’ 17 26 15 27 Bones Boy in the Time Capsule ‘14’ MAD ‘PG’ Looney Tunes Scooby-Doo Johnny Test ‘Y7’ Johnny Test ‘Y7’ Hole in the Wall Would Happen Destroy Build King of the Hill King of the Hill American Dad ’ American Dad ’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ 84 Border Patrol (N) Border Patrol (N) Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v Food Man v Food Bert-Conqueror Bert-Conqueror Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ 179 51 45 42 Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations Sanford & Son Sanford & Son Sanford & Son All in the Family All in the Family All in the Family Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Hot in Cleveland Happily Divorced Happily Divorced Hot in Cleveland 65 47 29 35 Good Times ‘PG’ The Jeffersons NCIS Naval officers targeted. ’ ‘PG’ NCIS Bete Noir ’ ‘PG’ Å NCIS Mind Games ’ ‘PG’ Å NCIS A missing staff sergeant. ‘PG’ NCIS Bored housewives. ‘14’ Å NCIS Marine Down ’ ‘PG’ Å 15 30 23 30 NCIS My Other Left Foot ‘PG’ Å 100 Greatest Hip Hop Songs ’ ‘14’ 100 Greatest Hip Hop Songs ’ ‘14’ ›› “Johnson Family Vacation” (2004, Comedy) Cedric the Entertainer. Single Ladies ’ ‘14’ Basketball Wives ’ ‘14’ 191 48 37 54 100 Greatest Hip Hop Songs ’ ‘14’ PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS

(4:20) ›› “2 Fast 2 Furious” 2003 (6:15) ›› “D3: The Mighty Ducks” 1996 Emilio Estevez. ’ ‘PG’ Å ›› “Predator 2” 1990, Science Fiction Danny Glover. ’ ‘R’ Å (9:50) ››› “Ransom” 1996, Suspense Mel Gibson. ’ ‘R’ Å ›› “Eyewitness” 1981, Suspense William Hurt. ‘R’ Å ››› “Blood Feud” 1983, Drama Robert Blake, Cotter Smith, Edward Albert. Å ››› “Hoffa” 1992 Jack Nicholson. Corruption taints Teamsters union boss Jimmy Hoffa. ‘R’ Thrillbillies ‘14’ Thrillbillies ‘PG’ Thrillbillies ‘14’ Ellismania ‘14’ Ellismania ‘14’ Thrillbillies ‘14’ The Daily Habit Cubed ‘14’ Hometown Throwdown Ellismania ‘14’ Thrillbillies ‘14’ The Daily Habit Cubed ‘14’ (4:00) Live From the U.S. Open (N) Live From the U.S. Open 19th Hole Live From the U.S. Open Live From the U.S. Open The Waltons The Lost Sheep ‘G’ Little House on the Prairie Fagin ‘G’ Little House on the Prairie ‘G’ Å Little House on the Prairie ‘G’ Å Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ (4:30) › “Anaconda” 1997 Jennifer Lopez, ›› “X-Men Origins: Wolverine” 2009, Action Hugh Jackman, will.i.am. Wolverine Game of Thrones Tywin and Jaime pre- Game of Thrones The Pointy End Robb Game of Thrones Baelor Ned makes a Real Time With Bill Maher Comic JaneHBO 425 501 425 10 Ice Cube. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å becomes involved with the Weapon X program. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å pare for battle. ’ ‘MA’ Å rallies his father’s allies. ‘MA’ decision. ’ ‘MA’ Å ane Garofalo. ’ ‘MA’ Å ››› “Valhalla Rising” 2009, Action Mads Mikkelsen, Gary Lewis. ‘NR’ ››› “Valhalla Rising” 2009, Action Mads Mikkelsen, Gary Lewis. ‘NR’ ›› “Beyond Re-Animator” 2003, Horror Jeffrey Combs, Jason Barry. ‘R’ “The Woods” 2005, Horror ‘R’ IFC 105 105 ›› “It’s Complicated” 2009, Romance-Comedy Meryl Streep, Steve Martin. A divor- ›› “Devil” 2010 Chris Messina. Elevator passengers become ›› “Wild Things” (4:00) ›› “The Jackal” 1997, Suspense (6:05) ›› “Cirque du Freak: The Vampire’s Assistant” 2009 John C. Reilly. A sideMAX 400 508 7 Bruce Willis. ’ ‘R’ Å show vampire turns a teenager into one of the undead. Å cee is caught between her ex and an architect. ’ ‘R’ Å trapped with a demonic entity. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å 1998 ‘R’ Locked Up Abroad Tokyo ‘14’ Locked Up Abroad ‘14’ Locked Up Abroad (N) ‘14’ Locked Up Abroad Tokyo ‘14’ Locked Up Abroad ‘14’ Locked Up Abroad ‘14’ Geo Bee 2011 Geo Bee 2011 NGC 157 157 Dragon Ball Z Kai Dragon Ball Z Kai Avatar: Airbender Avatar: Airbender Avatar: Airbender Avatar: Airbender Dragon Ball Z Kai Dragon Ball Z Kai OddParents OddParents Fanboy-Chum Fanboy-Chum Dragon Ball Z Kai Dragon Ball Z Kai NTOON 89 115 189 Shooting USA Å Cowboys Amer. Guardian Amer. Rifleman Impossible Shots Best Defense Shooting Gallery Shooting USA Å Amer. Rifleman Amer. Guardian Impossible Shots Cowboys OUTD 37 307 43 Nurse Jackie Bat- Inside NASCAR (4:15) ›› “Leaves of Grass” 2009 Edward ›› “Twilight” 2008, Romance Kristen Stewart, Robert Pattinson. iTV. A teen is caught United States of › “Next Day Air” 2009 Donald Faison. A delivery man gives a Inside NASCAR ››› “We Were SHO 500 500 Tara Crunchy Ice ting Practice ‘MA’ (iTV) (N) ‘PG’ Norton. iTV. ’ ‘R’ Å up in an unorthodox romance with a vampire. ’ ‘PG-13’ package of drugs to the wrong people. ‘R’ Å (iTV) ‘PG’ Soldiers” Car Warriors Best of CW ‘14’ Å Car Warriors ’66 Mustang ‘14’ Car Science ‘14’ Car Science ‘PG’ Car Warriors Best of CW ‘14’ Å Car Warriors ’66 Mustang ‘14’ Car Science ‘14’ Car Science ‘PG’ NASCAR Race Hub SPEED 35 303 125 (4:25) ›› “Eat Pray Love” 2010, Drama Julia Roberts. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å (6:50) ›› “G-Force” 2009 Bill Nighy. ’ ‘PG’ Å (8:28) ›› “The Scorpion King” 2002 The Rock. Å Camelot Reckoning ’ ‘MA’ Å The Pillars of the Earth ‘MA’ Å STARZ 300 408 300 “Fatal Secrets” 2009 Dina Meyer. A woman seeks help after her › “Unbeatable Harold” 2006 Gordon Michaels. A new waitress › “Hardball” 2001, Drama Keanu Reeves, Diane Lane, John Hawkes. A gambler “Coach” 2010, Comedy Hugh Dancy. A slacker coaches a ›› “Finding TMC 525 525 lover becomes malicious. ’ ‘R’ Å captures an assistant manager’s fancy. ‘PG-13’ coaches a youth baseball team to work off a debt. ’ ‘PG-13’ Amanda” 2008 middle-school soccer team. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å Heads-Up Poker Hockey Central Lord Stanley ›› “American Flyers” (1985, Drama) Kevin Costner, David Grant. WEC WrekCage Å ›› “American Flyers” (1985, Drama) Kevin Costner, David Grant. VS. 27 58 30 Braxton Family Values ‘14’ Å Braxton Family Values ‘14’ Å Braxton Family Values ‘14’ Å Braxton Family Reunion Å Bridezillas Erica’s nasty attitude. ‘14’ Ghost Whisperer Heart & Soul ‘PG’ The Locator ‘G’ The Locator ‘PG’ WE 143 41 174 ENCR 106 401 306 FMC 104 204 104 FUEL 34 GOLF 28 301 27 HALL 66 33 103 33


THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, June 15, 2011 E3

CALENDAR TODAY PUPPET SHOW: Penny’s Puppet Productions presents “Basil the Bookworm’s Trip Around the World” part of Familypalooza; free; 10:30 a.m.; La Pine Public Library, 16425 First St.; 541-617-7099 or www.deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. PUPPET SHOW: Penny’s Puppet Productions presents “Basil the Bookworm’s Trip Around the World”; part of Familypalooza; free; 2 p.m.; Sunriver Area Public Library, 56855 Venture Lane; 541-617-7099 or www.deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. BEND FARMERS MARKET: Free; 3-7 p.m.; Drake Park, eastern end; 541-408-4998 or www .bendfarmersmarket.com. “THE METROPOLITAN OPERA, MADAMA BUTTERFLY”: Starring Patricia Racette, Marcello Giordani and Dwayne Croft in an encore presentation of Puccini’s masterpiece; opera performance transmitted in high definition; $15; 6:30 p.m.; Regal Old Mill Stadium 16, 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-382-6347. BEND ELKS GAME: The Elks play Bellingham; $5-$9; 6:35 p.m.; Vince Genna Stadium, Southeast Fifth Street and Roosevelt Avenue; 541312-9259 or www.bendelks.com. REDWOOD SON: The Portlandbased folk act performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-3825174 or www.mcmenamins.com. “SEX, DRUGS & RICK ‘N’ NOEL”: Cascades Theatrical Company presents a play about a worker who enrolls in college and learns about life and himself; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www .cascadestheatrical.org. TOMMY EMMANUEL: The Grammynominated fingerstyle guitarist performs; $34-$45; 7:30 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre .org. “TICK, TICK ... BOOM!”: Innovation Theatre Works presents the autobiographical musical by Jonathan Larson about an aspiring writer struggling to make it in New York; $20, $18 students and seniors; 8 p.m.; Bend Performing Arts Center, 1155 S.W. Division St.; 541-5046721 or www.innovationtw.org.

THURSDAY PUPPET SHOW: Penny’s Puppet Productions presents “Basil the Bookworm’s Trip Around the World”; part of Familypalooza; free; 10:30 a.m.; Sisters Public Library, 110 N. Cedar St.; 541-617-7099 or www .deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. GOOD CHAIR, GREAT BOOKS: Read and discuss “Little Bee” by Chris Cleve; bring a lunch; free; noon; La Pine Public Library, 16425 First St.; 541312-1092 or www .deschuteslibrary .org/calendar. JAMS FOR JOPLIN: Live music benefits the Red Cross locally and in the greater Ozarks; $10 in advance, $12 at the door; 6 p.m., doors open 5 p.m.; Boondocks Bar & Grill, 70 N.W. Newport Ave., Bend; 541-388-6999. WINE TASTING AND YAPPY HOUR: With wine, appetizers, a silent auction, trick contests and more; proceeds benefit Greyhound Pet Adoption Northwest; $20; 6-8 p.m.; Eastside Bend Pet Express, 420 N.E. Windy Knolls Drive; 800-767-5139 or www.gpa-nw.org. CLEAR SUMMER NIGHTS: Singersongwriter Brett Dennen performs, with Dawes; $20; 6:30 p.m., doors open 5:30 p.m.; Athletic Club of Bend, 61615 Athletic Club Drive; 541-385-3062 or www .athleticclubofbend.com.

BEND ELKS GAME: The Elks play Bellingham; $5-$9; 6:35 p.m.; Vince Genna Stadium, Southeast Fifth Street and Roosevelt Avenue; 541312-9259 or www.bendelks.com. “SEX, DRUGS & RICK ‘N’ NOEL”: Cascades Theatrical Company presents a play about a worker who enrolls in college and learns about life and himself; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www .cascadestheatrical.org. “TICK, TICK ... BOOM!”: Innovation Theatre Works presents the autobiographical musical by Jonathan Larson about an aspiring writer struggling to make it in New York; $20, $18 students and seniors; 8 p.m.; Bend Performing Arts Center, 1155 S.W. Division St.; 541-504-6721 or www.innovationtw .org.

FRIDAY BEND FARMERS MARKET: Free; 2-6 p.m.; St. Charles Bend, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; 541-408-4998 or www .bendfarmersmarket.com. REDMOND FRIDAY FARMERS MARKET: Free admission; 3-7 p.m.; Redmond Greenhouse, 4101 S. U.S. Highway 97; 541-604-5156 or redmondfridaymarket@gmail.com. SISTERS FARMERS MARKET: 3-7 p.m.; North Ash Street and West Main Avenue; www .sistersfarmersmarket.com. SISTERS WINE & BREW FESTIVAL: Wineries and breweries of the Pacific Northwest offer selections of their products; live music, cooking demos, art vendors and more will be on hand; free admission; 3-9 p.m.; Village Green Park, 335 S. Elm St.; 541-385-7988, info@ specialized-events.com or www .sisterswineandbrew.com. VFW DINNER: A dinner of roast beef; proceeds benefit local veterans; $7; 5 p.m.; VFW Hall, 1503 N.E. Fourth St., Bend; 541-389-0775. “PETER AND THE WOLF”: Bendbased Academie de Ballet Classique presents a ballet adaptation of the musical about a boy and his animal friends; $11.50 in advance, $13.50 day of show, free ages 5 and younger; 6:30 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-3170700 or www.towertheatre.org. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Rick Steber reads from his book “Caught in the Crosshairs”; free; 6:30 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 422 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-526-1491. JAZZ AT THE OXFORD: Featuring a performance by jazzfusion pioneer Jeff Lorber, with Patrick Lamb; $40; 6:30 and 9:15 p.m.; The Oxford Hotel, 10 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-382-8436 or www .oxfordhotelbend.com. BEND ELKS GAME: The Elks play Tumwater; $5-$9; 6:35 p.m.; Vince Genna Stadium, Southeast Fifth Street and Roosevelt Avenue; 541-3129259 or www.bendelks.com. “ALICE IN WONDERLAND”: Redmond School of Dance presents the classic story in ballet form; $12, $5 ages 11 and younger; 7 p.m.; Redmond High School, 675 S.W. Rimrock Way; 541-548-6957 or www.redmondschoolofdance.com. “THE LION, THE WITCH AND THE WARDROBE”: The Children’s Theater Co. presents C.S. Lewis’ tale of four children transported to Narnia; $5; 7 p.m.; The Bridge Church of the Nazarene, 2398 W. Antler Ave., Redmond; 541-460-3024, childrenstheater@me.com or www .childrenstheatercompany.net. TOGETHER, WE TOO CAN CHANGE

Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

OUR WORLD: The Terpsichorean Dance Studio presents a dance recital interpreting history throughout the ages; proceeds benefit the studio’s scholarship fund; $9 in advance, $10 at the door; 7 p.m.; Summit High School, 2855 N.W. Clearwater Drive, Bend; 541322-3300. “SEX, DRUGS & RICK ‘N’ NOEL”: Cascades Theatrical Company presents a play about a worker who enrolls in college and learns about life and himself; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www .cascadestheatrical.org. “TICK, TICK ... BOOM!”: Innovation Theatre Works presents the autobiographical musical by Jonathan Larson about an aspiring writer struggling to make it in New York; $20, $18 students and seniors; 8 p.m.; Bend Performing Arts Center, 1155 S.W. Division St.; 541-5046721 or www.innovationtw.org. HIPPY FIASCO: Nathan Moore and his band perform folksy jams; reservations requested; $10; 8 p.m., doors open 7:30 p.m.; Largent Studio House Concert, Bend; 541-420-4165 or moonmountainramblers@gmail .com. LAST BAND STANDING: A battle of the bands competition featuring local acts; tickets must be retrieved at participating venues; free; 8 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; Century Center, 70 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; http:// url.bb/LBS11. EDDIE VALIANT: Pop and hip-hop performance, with Abadawn and Northorn Lights; free; 9 p.m.; Madhappy Lounge, 850 N.W. Brooks St., Bend; 541388-6868. ZEPPARELLA: The San Franciscobased female Led Zeppelin tribute band performs, with Tony G; $15 plus fees in advance, $18 at the door; 9 p.m., doors open 8 p.m.; Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-7882989 or www.randompresents.com.

SATURDAY DIAMONDS IN THE ROUGH: Featuring a garage and tack sale, silent auction, adoption fair, pony rides and more; proceeds benefit Equine Outreach; donations accepted; 8 a.m.-5 p.m.; Equine Outreach Ranch, 63220 Silvis Road, Bend; 541419-4842 or www.equineoutreach .com. GARAGE SALE FUNDRAISER: With a diaper drive; proceeds benefit Bend’s Community Center; donations accepted; 8 a.m.-2 p.m.; Coldwell Banker Morris Real Estate, 486 S.W. Bluff Drive, Bend; 541-382-4123. YARD SALE FUNDRAISER: Proceeds benefit the Natural Mind Dharma Center; free; 8 a.m.-2 p.m.; Repeat Performance Sports, 507 N.W. Colorado, Bend; 541-610-5333, dpnsyrnyk@gmail.com or www .naturalminddharma.org. PRINEVILLE FARMERS MARKET: Free; 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.; Prineville City Plaza, 387 N.E. Third St.; 503739-0643. BEND PADDLEBOARD CHALLENGE: Competitive paddleboard courses in three heats; with gear demonstrations; registration required to compete; proceeds benefit the Bend Paddle Trail Alliance and the Bend Recreation Foundation Scholarship Fund; $15-$25, free for spectators; 9 a.m., 8 a.m. registration; Riverbend Park, Southwest Columbia Street and Southwest Shevlin Hixon Drive; 541-639-2655, Info@ BendPaddleboardChallenge.com or www.BendPaddleboardChallenge.com.

BOOK AND DRESS SALE FUNDRAISER: Proceeds benefit What I Wore; free admission; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; 1489 N.W. Jackpine Ave., Redmond; 541-504-1201. CLASSIC CAR EXPO: A show of classic cars restored to their original condition; proceeds benefit Friends with Flowers; free, $10 to enter a car; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Cascade Village Shopping Center, 63455 N. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-388-1495. ALPACA SHEARING FESTIVAL AND CAR SHOW: Featuring live music, demonstrations, a barbecue, a silent auction, a classic-car show and adoptable animals; proceeds benefit the Humane Society of Redmond; donations accepted, $20-$25 to enter a car; 10 a.m.-3 p.m.; Crescent Moon Ranch, 70397 Buckhorn Road, Terrebonne; 541-923-7620, alondra_or@hotmail.com or www .redmondhumane.org. CENTRAL OREGON SATURDAY MARKET: Featuring arts and crafts from local artisans; free admission; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; parking lot across from Bend Public Library, 600 N.W. Wall St.; 541-420-9015 or www .centraloregonsaturdaymarket.com. RHYTHM AND RHYME FESTIVAL FOR YOUNG CHILDREN: Featuring readings, rhyme creation, music and other activities for children; free; 10 a.m.-noon; Sisters Elementary School, 611 E. Cascade Ave.; 541280-9686 or linda@together-forchildren.org. RIDE FOR TWO RIVERS: Cycling event features 51-mile or 25-mile rides beginning and ending at the ranch; proceeds benefit the National Forest Foundation’s Tale of Two Rivers conservation site; $100 for 51-mile route, $50 for 25-mile route, $25 ages 17 and younger; 10 a.m.; Black Butte Ranch, milepost 93, U.S. Highway 20, Sisters; 503-241-0467. SUMMER SHOOTOUT MARBLE TOURNAMENT: Learn to play marbles and then play in a tournament, with lawn games, a picnic and more; registration required; proceeds benefit the Deschutes County Historical Society; $10; 10 a.m.; Des Chutes Historical Museum, 129 N.W. Idaho Ave., Bend; 541-389-1813 or www .deschuteshistory.org. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: An illustration display, with readings and talks from children’s book authors and illustrators Patricia Wilson, Sharon Bean, Kai Strand and KC Snider; free; 10:30 a.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-420-1625 or sawatkinds@ hotmail.com. SISTERS WINE & BREW FESTIVAL: Wineries and breweries of the Pacific Northwest offer selections of their products; live music, cooking demos, art vendors and more will be on hand; free admission; 11 a.m.-8 p.m.; Village Green Park, 335 S. Elm St.; 541-3857988, info@specialized-events.com or www.sisterswineandbrew.com. 50 YEARS OF PEACE CORPS: Speak with volunteers who lived and worked in Africa, Asia, the South Pacific and more; free; 1 p.m.; Sunriver Area Public Library, 56855 Venture Lane; 541-312-1081 or www .deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: D. Hilleren talks about the novel “Battered Earth”; free; 4-6 p.m.; Dudley’s Bookshop Cafe, 135 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-749-2010. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Heather Sharfeddin talks about her book “Damaged Goods”; free; 5 p.m.; Sunriver Books & Music, Sunriver Village Building 25C; 541-593-2525 or sunriverbooks@sunriverbooks.com. POETHOUSE BENEFIT: Featuring live music and hors d’oeuvres, followed by a dance and costume party; proceeds benefit PoetHouse Art; $5; 5 p.m.; PoetHouse Art, 55 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-728-0756.

M T For Wednesday, June 15

REGAL PILOT BUTTE 6 2717 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend, 541-382-6347

BRIDESMAIDS (R) 2, 4:40, 7:20 CAVE OF FORGOTTEN DREAMS (G) 2:25, 4:25, 6:55 THE HANGOVER PART II (R) 2:45, 5:10, 7:35 MEEK’S CUTOFF (PG) 2:15, 4:50, 7:10 MIDNIGHT IN PARIS (PG-13) 2:20, 4:35, 7:05 WINTER IN WARTIME (R) 2:05, 4:30, 7

REGAL OLD MILL STADIUM 16 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend, 541-382-6347

BRIDESMAIDS (R) 1:25, 4:15, 7:15, 10:10 FAST FIVE (PG-13) 12:15, 3:35, 6:35, 10:15 THE HANGOVER PART II (R) 12:45, 2, 3:45, 5, 6:45, 8, 9:40, 10:35 JUDY MOODY AND THE NOT BUMMER SUMMER (PG) 12:35, 3:30, 6:30, 9:30 KUNG FU PANDA 2 (DP — PG) 1:30, 4:30, 7:25, 9:50 KUNG FU PANDA 2 3-D (PG)

12:30, 3:15, 6:15, 9:20 THE METROPOLITAN OPERA: MADAMA BUTTERFLY (no MPAA rating) 6:30 PIRATES OF THE CARIBBEAN: ON STRANGER TIDES (PG-13) 1:15, 4:25, 7:30, 10:30 PIRATES OF THE CARIBBEAN: ON STRANGER TIDES 3-D (PG13) 12:05, 3:05, 6:05, 9:25 SUPER 8 (PG-13) 1:05, 4:05, 7:05, 10:05 SUPER 8 (DP — PG-13) 1:55, 4:55, 7:55, 10:40 THOR (PG-13) 1:40 THOR 3-D (PG-13) 10:20 WATER FOR ELEPHANTS (PG13) 12:20, 3:20, 6:20, 9:45 X-MEN: FIRST CLASS (PG-13) Noon, 12:55, 3, 3:55, 6, 6:55, 9:15, 9:55 X-MEN: FIRST CLASS (DP — PG13) 1:45, 4:45, 7:45, 10:45 EDITOR’S NOTE: Movie times in bold are open-captioned showtimes. EDITOR’S NOTE: There is an additional $3.50 fee for 3-D movies. EDITOR’S NOTE: Digitally projected shows (marked as DP) use one of several different technologies to provide maximum fidelity. The result is a picture with clarity, brilliance and color and a lack of

scratches, fading and flutter.

MCMENAMINS OLD ST. FRANCIS SCHOOL 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend, 541-330-8562

(After 7 p.m. shows 21 and over only. Under 21 may attend screenings before 7 p.m. if accompanied by a legal guardian.) LIMITLESS (PG-13) 6 THE LINCOLN LAWYER (R) 9 RIO (G) 3

REDMOND CINEMAS 1535 S.W. Odem Medo Road, Redmond, 541-548-8777

THE HANGOVER PART II (R) 4:15, 6:45, 9:15 KUNG FU PANDA 2 (PG) 4:45, 7, 9:15 SUPER 8 (PG-13) 4, 6:30, 9 X-MEN: FIRST CLASS (PG-13) 5:15, 8:30

SISTERS MOVIE HOUSE 720 Desperado Court, Sisters, 541-549-8800

BRIDESMAIDS (R) 5, 7:45 THE HANGOVER PART II (R) 5:30, 8 KUNG FU PANDA 2 (PG) 5:15

PIRATES OF THE CARIBBEAN: ON STRANGER TIDES (PG-13) 7:30 X-MEN: FIRST CLASS (PG-13) 4:45, 7:30

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‘Real Housewives’ cast sued in fight at Dominican bar By Todd Lighty and Stacy St. Clair Chicago Tribune

CHICAGO — “Real Housewives of New Jersey” cast members beat up and injured a Chicago-area police officer and his cousin during a brawl earlier this year at a posh Dominican resort, two lawsuits filed Monday allege. Adolfo Arreola, a sworn officer with the University of Illinois at Chicago’s police department, suffered a broken arm, blurred vision, cuts and bruises after some members of the cast “savagely beat, kicked, punched, scratched, jumped” on him and smashed glass on his head, according to the lawsuits. His cousin Jason Gomez suffered a broken leg and a torn MCL after he came to Arreola’s defense. The cousins’ lawsuits — filed in New York and Miami — allege that they and their families were dancing and socializing in a Hard Rock Hotel & Casino bar in Punta Cana on Feb. 23 when Jersey Housewife Teresa Giudice sprayed champagne on Arreola’s mother-in-law and mocked the 53-year-old woman as she tried to wipe the alcohol from her eyes. The complaints state that after Arreola confronted Giudice, he was attacked by cast members that included her husband, Joe, and Albert and Christopher Manzo, the sons of show matriarch Caroline Manzo.

Boost in ratings All three men have supporting roles on the popular reality show, which follows the conflict-riddled lives of five ItalianAmerican women from northern New Jersey. Since the program’s debut two years ago, the cast’s public melees and physical altercations have fueled gossip sites and the show’s ratings in near equal measure. The Giudices and other cast members could not be immedi-

ately reached for comment. Bravo, the cable channel that airs the show, is named in the New York complaint, as well. Thomas Demetrio, an attorney repesenting Arreola and Gomez, has asked Bravo and the show’s production company to preserve any video taken of the fight. A spokeswoman for Bravo said the network and the cast members decline to comment on the accusations.

Also suing hotel The cousins also sued the Hard Rock Hotel’s parent company in Miami, alleging negligent security and intentional infliction of emotional distress. Ricardo Cata, a lawyer for the hotel’s operator, said he had not seen any lawsuit but said the hotel did nothing wrong. “Our position is the hotel did everything it was supposed to do and responded appropriately and took care of the guests in the appropriate manner,” Cata said. While in the Dominican Republic, the cousins signed an agreement not to sue, but their lawyer said they did so under duress. In their lawsuits, the cousins allege that the cast and crew had been served “excessive amounts of alcohol” at the bar and became “intoxicated, belligerent and rowdy” — a scene reminiscent of a recent episode in which Joe Giudice and his brother-in-law scuffled at a lavish christening party. With 2.8 million viewers, that May 16 episode marked the biggest season premiere in Bravo history. Arreola, 42, told the Chicago Tribune that his family had flown to the Dominican Republic to attend a vow renewal ceremony for his wife’s aunt and uncle, who were celebrating their 40th wedding anniversary. Shortly after midnight Feb. 23, he and several family members went to a hotel lounge and found seats near the VIP section where the cast was being filmed.

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Emma Watson looking to grow past ‘Harry Potter’ By John Carucci

“I want to live like Patti,” she said of the singer-songwriter, viNEW YORK — Emma Watson sual artist and poet. is preparing for the next The 21-year old rechapter of her life. mains close with coThe “Harry Potter” stars Daniel Radcliffe actress acknowledges and Rupert Grint, and that she needs to find recently flew to New her way out of the York to see Radcliffe bubble, which she deperform on Broadway scribes in part as the in “How to Succeed in safe world of life on the Business Without Reset of the successful Emma ally Trying.” Watson film franchise. Watson plays HermWatson says in the ione Granger for the July issue of Vogue maglast time when the franazine that she wants to explore chise’s last film, “Harry Potter more of her creative side, and cites and the Deathly Hallows: Part Patti Smith as a role model. 2,” is released in July.

The Associated Press


E4 Wednesday, June 15, 2011 • THE BULLETIN TUNDRA

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HEART OF THE CITY

SALLY FORTH

FRAZZ

ROSE IS ROSE

STONE SOUP

LUANN

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM

DILBERT

DOONESBURY

PICKLES

ADAM

WIZARD OF ID

B.C.

SHOE

GARFIELD

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PEANUTS

MARY WORTH


THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, June 15, 2011 E5 BIZARRO

DENNIS THE MENACE

SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively. SOLUTION TO YESTERDAY’S SUDOKU

CANDORVILLE

H BY JACQUELINE BIGAR

GET FUZZY

NON SEQUITUR

SAFE HAVENS

SIX CHIX

ZITS

HERMAN

HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Wednesday, June 15, 2011: This year, in many ways you are like a pendulum, swinging back and forth. You find your emotions subject to mood swings. You often see the pros and cons of a situation. Intellectually, you can argue both sides of an issue. Others could comment on your changeability, but that flux is only a function of opening up spiritually, emotionally and intellectually. If you are in a relationship, you often feel either guilt or resentment — results of not giving enough or giving too much. You will learn to balance all of these oppositions if you don’t fight them. If you are single, you might find a suitor for all your different moods. Know that you are in a phase, and the person you choose today might not be the same person you would choose in a year. SAGITTARIUS can be challenging. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHHH The push and pull of what you need to accomplish, mixed with others’ requests, could keep you moving at a fast clip. You have enthusiasm and insight, which is why others look to you. Confusion surrounds communication. Tonight: Juggle away. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHHH You relate strongly to others today, especially about finances — yours and theirs! A relationship discussion could get itself mired in quicksand if

you’re not careful. Would it not be better to postpone this talk? Tonight: Chatting the night away. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHHH Defer to others, as it might be the best way to handle the present combustible energy. Nevertheless, you are likely to have your ego drawn into the push and pull of the Full Moon. Confusion will be the end result. Make no decisions. Tonight: Play it easy. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHH Dive into a project with focus. If you are stressing out about a situation, you will let go eventually. Your focus also will help you accomplish a lot more quite quickly. Avoid personalizing a situation. Tonight: R and R. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHH You juggle many different people’s concerns. You might not be sure of the best way to go in several different situations. Do yourself a favor: Don’t worry. Don’t allow a supervisor to trigger your temper! Tonight: Midweek break. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHH Head home early if you so desire. Don’t put yourself in the position of being overwhelmed or tired. Sometimes, in times of stress, it is best to be less available. Let everything land as it should. Tonight: Make it easy, LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHH You might want to rethink a personal matter before making a definitive statement. You might have had enough of a back-andforth conversation. Perhaps there is no resolution just yet. Know what you want. Tonight: Out and about.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHHH You might want to move forward with a project but cannot because of a financial situation. Many different opinions could come forward, making a decision close to impossible. Postpone it, and you will like the end results. Tonight: Treat yourself on the way home. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHH Your personality melts another person’s resistances. The wave of frustration and irritation could be hard to handle, even if you want this openness. Listen to your inner voice when dealing with others. Tonight: Be spontaneous. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)’ HHH Don’t respond to a sense of pressure or that someone cannot follow through on a project without your help. You need some downtime, as others need time filling in for you. Tonight: Vanish while you can. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHHH You might want to rethink a friendship that is creating a lot of pressure. A meeting also could be a source of irritation. Try to look at the positives, and you’ll find that everything falls into place. Eye your long-term objectives. Tonight: Where the action is. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHH Assume the lead on a project and stay tuned in to what is important. There could be a great deal of instability at present, making you wonder which way is up. Trust your initial judgments, and stay on course. Tonight: A must appearance. © 2010 by King Features Syndicate


C OV ER S T OR I ES

E6 Wednesday, June 15, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

BYOC

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Erica Boismenu of Element 909 in Bend pulls a beer out of the refrigerator for a client. The salon is open to women as well, but caters to men.

Salon Continued from E1 Men who manicure are not just the frou-frou stuff of Manhattan anymore. Lani Van Duzer has been in the Central Oregon salon world for 20 years and opened her own shop, Blue Star Salon, in downtown Bend a year ago. She said more Central Oregon men than ever before are covering up gray, getting highlights and enjoying massages. Male public figures — actors, musicians and athletes — openly do these things, Van Duzer said. Thus it has trickled down to Central Oregon, where men now feel more comfortable walking into shops that don’t sport a blueand-red-striped pole. A salon gift certificate, she said, is a good introduction. And it’s something they would never get for themselves, but just might enjoy. “You can look at it as giving somebody permission, or just as an excuse to try something different,” she said. And really, if your man were to put those crammed-into-bikeshoes feet up for a pedicure, he just might appreciate it. “As women,” she continued, “we can help support our boyfriends or husbands and say, ‘If you want to do it, it’s OK.’”

Men’s products It’s not that men don’t care about their appearance. From salons to Safeway, there are plenty of man-oriented grooming goods on the shelves. Among the most popular men’s items at the Macy’s Clinique counter in Bend are the facial scrub and the facial soap, said employee Oksana Kazakova. A kit with facial scrub, shaving cream and post-shave healer, as well as travel sizes of the three products, is selling quickly right

Loyalty Continued from E1 Smarter Travel has named InterContinental Hotel Group’s Priority Club Rewards as its editor’s pick this year. That’s because the chain has more than 4,500 hotels located in every major U.S. metro area and many international markets. It offers brands at a range of prices, from Candlewood Suites to Holiday Inn to InterContinental. The points needed for free rooms and other perks are relatively easier to earn than other programs. And the chain offers generous promotion programs, especially for summer, said Banas.

‘A solid choice’ For budget travelers, Smarter Travel also finds Wyndham Rewards “a solid choice,” with more than 6,500 hotels under such brands as Days Inn, Howard Johnson, Super 8, Travelodge and Wyndham. Marriott rewards recently took the most honors at the Frequent Traveler Awards, including “Program of The Year” for both the Americas and Europe/Africa. More than one million people from nearly every country worldwide cast online ballots for the honors. Travelers liked, for example, that Marriott rewards are easy to redeem, have no blackout dates and can be used for airlines, cruises, car rentals and more. In South Florida, frequent traveler Peter Quinter, an international lawyer, loves Starwood’s Preferred Guest program, which offers rewards at Westin, Shera-

now and is a good bet for Father’s Day at $47.50 a pop. Product offerings also go beyond the basics. Men can pick up at the Clinque counter a tube of eye cream for $24. Part of the male-product push is certainly marketing. Axe, a popular man-oriented brand available in local grocery stores, lures consumers on its Igniting Citrus 2-in-1 shampoo and conditioner bottle ($5.99) with pictures featuring a woman and man demonstrating the results of the product. In Step 1, the woman’s gaze beams in on the man’s healthy head of hair. By Step 2, their arms are wrapped around each other. Beneath the pictures the directions say, “Wash, attract, repeat.” American Crew’s version of hair spray, retailing at about $14 in local grocery stores, is labeled Grooming Spray. Kazakova said sometimes there is no difference between the male and female product besides packaging. One Clinique moisturizer, for instance, is fairly similar for both sexes. For women, it’s called Dramatically Different Moisturizing Lotion. It’s M Lotion for men. But some products for men are definitely different from those for women. Clinique’s toner for men is stronger than for women, Kazakova said. Erica Boismenu of Element 909, a male-oriented Aveda salon in downtown Bend, said — in addition to different scents and packaging — the product chemistry is often different. A man’s perspiration is different from a woman’s, for instance. Also, what men do with their hair leads to different needs. One Axe hair cream, called Buzzed Look, contains SPF 15 sunscreen. Male skin also can be more itchy and sensitive than a female’s, Boismenu said. Aveda’s products for men target that. The Aveda

ton, W, Four Points and other brands. Quinter stays so often he holds platinum status and finds it rewards him more handsomely than high-status programs he’s previously used at Hilton and Marriott. Quinter works the program to maximize rewards. Starwood lets him qualify for free rooms based either on points or stays, so he paid for his less expensive stays in U.S. hotels and then took free nights at more expensive spots like Rome, Florence and Milan during his recent anniversary trip to Italy. He also racks up points for everyday spending on his American Express-Starwood co-branded credit card. Business coach Nancy Proffitt, founder of Proffitt Management Solutions of West Palm Beach, prefers the Hilton program, which eases her stays at her favored hotel, Hampton Inn, part of the Hilton group. She likes the program less for the rewards and more to underscore the consistency of the hotel rooms and the service that make her a frequent visitor at Hampton Inn anyway.

Extra perks “When you’re in the room three to five minutes, you know you’re going to get a call: Is your room adequate? Have you found everything you need?,” Proffitt said. It helps that being a frequent visitor brings her extra perks: a newspaper at the door, express check-out and a follow-up call after checkout. She also redeems points to get free rooms for vacations, she said. Whichever program you focus on, take advantage of its special promotions and tie-ins with

website says its Aveda Men Pure Performance Shampoo, which retails at $18 for a 300 ml bottle, reduces scalp oiliness, greasiness, dryness and itchiness.

Making men comfortable Van Duzer said some men already know all about using products and eagerly seek salon services. She jokingly calls them the “peacock men.” Then there are those who want to look good, but don’t want to schedule appointments weeks in advance or have their names and the word facial in the same sentence. A pedicure might be a nice Father’s Day introduction to the salon world, Van Duzer said. A basic, 40-minute pedicure costs $35 at Blue Star Salon. Van Duzer pointed out that Bob Marley died of a skin cancer that started on his foot. “It’s not just getting your toes painted, there’s maintenance and there’s a pretty awesome foot massage when you get a pedicure,” she said. “It’s not just about beauty, it’s about health.” A gift certificate is a good idea, Boismenu said, because men can opt for something like a hot towel shave, which costs $30 at Element 909. They can read Rolling Stone and watch sports on television during the visit. “I think a lot of men are less comfortable coming into a salon,” she said, “so we want them to feel as comfortable as possible.” She said sometimes men start with haircuts, then work up to services like blending the gray in their hair or body waxing. And like a number of salons and barbershops in Bend, at Element 909 they can enjoy their time with a complimentary beer in hand. Heidi Hagemeier can be reached at 541-617-7828 or at hhagemeier@bendbulletin.com.

other business partners, advises blogger Brian Kelly, founder of ThePointsGuy.com, a website focused on travel points and rewards.

Stay informed Sign up for e-mail alerts with the chains you use to learn about their special offers, and also keep up with trends by checking such sites as flyertalk.com where frequent travelers share tips, added Kelly. South Florida hotel executives say it pays to be a frequent-guest program member for more than just points from the chains. Individual hotels often pamper loyal visitors with added perks. The Best Western Plus Oakland Park Inn in Fort Lauderdale often gives its frequent guests a free welcome cocktail or snacks or bottled water in the room. It also tries to reserve a repeat guest’s favorite room for their stay, complete with the extra towels or type of coffee or tea that the guest prefers, said the hotel’s director of sales Maria Andreatta. Guests on the Best Western rewards program now represent as many as half the guests at the hotel, a portion that keeps rising, said chief executive Walter Johnson. Even so, hotel analysts say millions more travelers could sign up for hotel programs and cash in. A 2010 study of U.S. leisure travelers found 69 percent of respondents were members of airline frequent-flyer programs. Yet just 50 percent were members of hotel chain frequent-guest programs, according to YPartnership/Harrison Group research.

Continued from E1 “People in the neighborhood have been overwhelmingly receptive to the concept of BYOC,” said Yucan, who was inspired by a popular BYOC store in London called Unpackaged. “(Before I started), a lot of people said, ‘Oh, what about contamination?’ But I told them they should be more worried about the chemicals, additives, preservatives and carcinogens in their foods than someone possibly sneezing near the dry oats. I think that contamination (from bulk food dispensers) is the least of your concerns when you are talking about healthful foods.” The problem with bringing containers to the store, according to Health Department spokesman Jose Munoz, is the threat of contamination. “This is a situation where there is no store personnel who has any control over the situation; all the actions are taken by the consumer,” Munoz wrote in an e-mail. “The consumer fills his/her own jar with the dry oats; as the consumer is taking the action, absent any oversight or involvement by store personnel, there is potential for the consumer’s jar to contaminate the oats in the container.”

Larger grocers Although Whole Foods grocery stores in New York; Los Angeles; Boulder, Colo.; Austin, Texas; Louisville, Ky.; San Francisco; Columbus, Ohio; and Cleveland, to name a few, allow customers to bring in containers, the Whole Foods stores in Chicago do not. Chicago-based Whole Foods spokeswoman Kate Klotz cites safety and logistical issues, noting that “a handful of our stores may have done this in the past, but overall, we unfortunately can’t honor it.” At San Francisco’s Rainbow Grocery, which allows customers to tote away not only dry goods but ravioli, tofu, pickles and olive oil, staff say they have never seen a container-related health problem. “We have been doing it for as long as I have been here,

and that’s 11 years,” said Jennifer Stocker, a member of Rainbow’s public relations committee. “It’s a pretty simple system. We don’t check people’s containers when they come in to make sure they are clean. That would be impossible. It’s just on the honor system, and when you go through the cash register, you say if it’s a used container.”

Liability issue Indeed, liability issues give some Chicago businesses pause when clients ask to reuse containers. At Spice House in Old Town and Evanston, Ill., managers say customers often arrive with jars, asking for refills. “We tell them we can’t, because it would be a health code violation,” said Spice House assistant manager Tracy Turoczy. “So instead, we sell a refill bag that they can empty into their jars. It’s a licensing issue, from what I understand, and it would be a liability.” But is it a liability risk for the business? Bill Marler, one of the nation’s leading attorneys for food-borne illness cases, said he’s not so sure. During his 20 years in the field, Marler said, he has never heard of a lawsuit involving someone who became ill after dispensing food into their own container, “and I have heard a lot of cases.” Although he doesn’t think the practice presents a big risk to the

store selling the product or to the consumer, Marler said he thinks “it is wise for people to wash their containers thoroughly before they put food in them.” Ideally, a business would have control of all containers, he said, “but the chances of having any liability are really small, and the liability they would have if multiple people got sick from that food is the same as they would have had selling it in their own containers.” Couldn’t someone sue the health department for not enforcing a strict code? “Health departments always think they are going to get sued,” Marler said, “but they’re almost never sued by victims. The people who sue them are the businesses they shut down.”

Not the only city Chicago is not the only municipality to frown on BYOC. Nancy Depippo, who co-owns Poppy’s Market and Cafe in Brevard, N.C., said her local health department nixed the practice at her store. “People would like to bring reused deli containers for us to refill, but the health department won’t allow it,” she said. “They wash and bring back our containers and they say fill it up with, say, chicken salad, but we can’t. Rules change county to county, and I guess you play with the cards you are dealt wherever you live.”


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Gardening Supplies & Equipment

www.twodudesflyfishing.com

Mossberg 12g pump, wood stock shotgun, 28” bbl, with case, $200. 541-647-8931

BarkTurfSoil.com

Remington Wingmaster Model 870, refinished stock, $200, 541-728-1036.

Pool Table 8’, 1” slate, Oak cab., leather pockets, all acces, nice! $800. 541-408-2199

S&W 1500 7mm bolt hunting rifle, walnut stock, w/3x9 scope, $425. 541-647-8931

Vaccuum Cleaner, Kirby, used very little, like new, $500, 541-389-1086.

US ARMY COLT 1911, made in 1918, issued leather holster, $1750 OBO, 541-728-1036

Wanted - paying cash for Hi-fi audio & studio equip. McIntosh, JBL, Marantz, Dynaco, Heathkit, Sansui, Carver, NAD, etc. Call 541-261-1808

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Building Materials

Instant Landscaping Co. BULK GARDEN MATERIALS Wholesale Peat Moss Sales

541-389-9663

JUNIPER TIES & BOARDS Full Measure Timbers “ Rot Resistant ” Raised Bed Garden Projects Instantlandscaping.com 541-389-9663 For newspaper delivery , call the Circulation Dept. at 541-385-5800 To place an ad, call 541-385-5809 or email classified@bendbulletin.com

Wanted: Collector seeks high quality fishing items. Call 541-678-5753, 503-351-2746

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Health and Beauty Items Fatigue, insomnia, cold hands, skin dryness, chronic pain? •Current treatments offering no relief? • Been told to “Live with it”? •Tired of taking drugs that don’t fix the problem or make it worse? There is Hope! Call for FREE DVD Thyroid Health Secrets Revealed. Call 866-700-1414 and find out how to get better today!

Cabinet Refacing & Refinishing. Save Thousands!

Hummingbirds Are Back!

Most jobs completed in 5 days or less. Best Pricing in the Industry.

541-647-8261 La Pine Habitat RESTORE Building Supply Resale Quality at LOW PRICES 52684 Hwy 97 541-536-3234 Open to the public .

The Hardwood Outlet Wood Floor Super Store

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Computers

THE BULLETIN requires computer advertisers with mulGENERATE SOME excitement in tiple ad schedules or those your neighborhood! Plan a COLT IV Series 80-.380 auto., selling multiple systems/ garage sale and don't forget never fired, in box, $650 software, to disclose the to advertise in classified! OBO. 541-728-1036. name of the business or the 541-385-5809. Cowboy Shooters: Lawrence term "dealer" in their ads. leather bandoliers, holsters, Private party advertisers are Late 40’s Vanity, excellent conshotgun, pistol. defined as those who sell one dition, curved glass mirror, 541-389-1392 computer. $180. 541-279-4634

Poultry, Rabbits, and Supplies

WHEN BUYING FIREWOOD...

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UTAH + OR CCW: Oregon and Utah Concealed License Class. Saturday June 18 9:30 a.m. at Madras Range. $65 Utah, $100 OR+UT. Includes Utah required photo, Call Paul Sumner (541)475-7277 for prereg, email and info

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Fuel and Wood

• Receipts should include,

“Come fishing with the Locals”

Forum Center, Bend 541-617-8840 www.wbu.com/bend SUPER TOP SOIL www.hersheysoilandbark.com Screened, soil & compost mixed, no rocks/clods. High humus level, exc. for flower beds, lawns, gardens, straight screened top soil. Bark. Clean fill. Deliver/you haul. 541-548-3949.

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Lost and Found

• Laminate from .79¢ sq.ft. • Hardwood from $2.99 sq.ft. 541-322-0496

Farm Market

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• A cord is 128 cu. ft. 4’ x 4’ x 8’

Over 40 Years Experience in Carpet Upholstery & Rug Cleaning Call Now! 541-382-9498 CCB #72129 www.cleaningclinicinc.com

9 7 7 0 2

NOTICE TO ADVERTISER Found Clothes on hangers, S. Since September 29, 1991, Huntington Rd, La Pine, 6/11, advertising for used woodcall to ID, 541-536-5072. stoves has been limited to models which have been Find It in certified by the Oregon Department of Environmental The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809 Quality (DEQ) and the fed325 eral Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as having Found Hi-Point semi-auto pistol Hay, Grain and Feed Hwy 97 betwn LaPine & Sunmet smoke emission stanriver. Call to ID 541-350-4416 Hay for Sale - Grass & dards. A certified woodstove Grass/Alfalfa mix, 3 tie and may be identified by its cer- Found Ring: NE Bend, 6/5, call 3x4 bales. Call 541-548-3086 tification label, which is perto describe and identify, manently attached to the 541-312-0188. Wheat Straw: Certified & Bedstove. The Bulletin will not ding Straw & Garden Straw; knowingly accept advertising Lost Cat, Grey tabby, female, Barley Straw; Compost; short hair, missing 6/6, SE for the sale of uncertified 541-546-6171. Bend, 541-318-6030 woodstoves.

541-389-6655

McKenzie and Willamette River Guided Fly Fishing Tours.

Pickup camper top, for full size Sponsors needed for vet bill for pickup & boat loader for Logan, who was run over. A pickup canopy, free, English Bulldog, 3-yr old female, woman saw the injured cat & 541-389-1086. red/white, spayed, gorgeous took him to a vet clinic, who & very sweet. To approved refused to help under the 208 home only. $500. Please call Good Samaritan policy & 541-419-3924. turned them away. CRAFT Pets and Supplies was called & rushed Logan to Free German Shepherd Puppy, a vet. He was badly hurt & 6 mo., female, to good home, The Bulletin recommends may lose a leg, but 2 days 541-350-7832. extra caution when later it is obvious he wants to German Shepherd AKC pups, purchasing products or live & deserves a chance. No $700. 509-406-3717 services from out of the owner can be found, so he www.sbhighdesertkennels.com area. Sending cash, checks, will be available for adoption or credit information may when he recovers. Thank you German Shepherd Purebred Pups be subjected to fraud. For for supporting the work of all colors avail, shots, micromore information about an Cat Rescue, Adoption & Foschipped, $400+, 208-404-9434 advertiser, you may call the ter Team, www.craftcats.org, www.smsgsd.com Oregon State Attorney PO Box 6441, Bend 97708, General’s Office Consumer Kittens/cats avail. thru rescue 541-389-8420, 598-5488. Protection hotline at group, 389-8420, 647-2181. 1-877-877-9392. Kitten foster home 815-7278. Toy Poodle Puppies for sale. Little Girl $300 and Little Boy Altered, shots, ID chip, more. $200 Plus Senior Discount For hours, directions, photos, home raised and spoiled. 541 etc. see www.craftcats.org. 771-0522 LAB PUPS AKC, black & yellow, Aquarium for fish, 150 gal., Yorkie pups, cute & playful titled parents, performance saltwater, self contained, ready for great homes! Shots pedigree, OFA cert hips & el$300, 541-389-2636. /docks, $550. 541-536-3108 bows, $500. 541-771-2330 www.royalflushretrievers.com

Lhasa Apso 2 yr. female, house broken, crate trained, loves children, to approved home only, $150, 541-548-0747

C h a n d l e r

Furniture & Appliances METAL BED FRAME fits twin or double, $10. 541-383-4231

ITEMS FOR SALE 201 - New Today 202 - Want to buy or rent 203 - Holiday Bazaar & Craft Shows 204 - Santa’s Gift Basket 205 - Free Items 208 - Pets and Supplies 210 - Furniture & Appliances 211 - Children’s Items 212 - Antiques & Collectibles 215 - Coins & Stamps 240 - Crafts and Hobbies 241 - Bicycles and Accessories 242 - Exercise Equipment 243 - Ski Equipment 244 - Snowboards 245 - Golf Equipment 246 - Guns & Hunting and Fishing 247 - Sporting Goods - Misc. 248 - Health and Beauty Items 249 - Art, Jewelry and Furs 251 - Hot Tubs and Spas 253 - TV, Stereo and Video 255 - Computers 256 - Photography 257 - Musical Instruments 258 - Travel/Tickets 259 - Memberships 260 - Misc. Items 261 - Medical Equipment 262 - Commercial/Office Equip. & Fixtures

Monday - Friday 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Saturday 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Found Camera, corner of Westview & 15th in Bend, 6/13, call to ID, 541-318-8789. Found child's house key w/keychain, Deschutes Memorial Chapel & Gardens 6/8. Call to identify, 541-382-5592.

LOST

DOG

$500 REWARD FOR RETURN "CHIRPA" - 8 year old female, gray Pekingese Shih Tzu. Lost in The Greens in SW Redmond on Sunday 5/29. OK to call anytime!! CALL 541-414-4424

Lost Orange Cat, long hair, fluffy very friendly, ‘Tigger’, Tumalo area, Cline Falls Hwy 1 mi. N. of Tumalo store & High Ridge Dr., 4/15, Reward, 541-385-0194. REMEMBER: If you have lost an animal, don't forget to check The Humane Society in Bend, 541-382-3537 Redmond, 541-923-0882 Prineville, 541-447-7178; OR Craft Cats, 541-389-8420.

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Auction Sales GW Auction

FREE Red Frizzle Bantam, three 541-617-9501

roosters, months.

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Horses and Equipment Ranch Bred, Breeding Stock and their AQHA Reg. yearlings. 1 Reg- TB Mare, & her 4 yr. old filly w/90 days on her - fast, barrel, performance, race, 541-388-2706,541-610-5028 Saddles, new, 15-16.5” parade & pleasure, $350-$495, call 541-416-1083,541-280-7657

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Livestock & Equipment GOATS for sale: Nubian wether and Boer doe, Call 541-548-1857

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Farmers Column 10X20 STORAGE BUILDINGS for protecting hay, firewood, livestock etc. $1496 Installed. 541-617-1133. CCB #173684. kfjbuilders@ykwc.net

Estate sale of life collection A farmer that does it right & is on time. Power no till seed400+ radios, etc. Sat. June ing, disc, till, plow & plant 18, 9 am, Klamath Falls, OR. new/older fields, haying serInfo: www.777auction.com vices, cut, rake, bale, Gopher control. 541-419-4516 Haying Contractor will mow rake & bale for percentage, or will buy standing hay. Call 541-948-2125

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Meat & Animal Processing 1/4 Angus Beef, no hormones or antibodies, farm raised, $2.70/lb, incl. Cut & wrap, avail. 6/27, 541-504-1470,541-280-6130


F2 Wednesday, June 15, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

541-385-5809 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

AD PLACEMENT DEADLINES

PLACE AN AD

Edited by Will Shortz

Monday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Mon. Wednesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Tues. Thursday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Wed. Friday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Thurs. Saturday Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:00am Fri. Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:00 Fri. Sunday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. PRIVATE PARTY RATES Starting at 3 lines *UNDER $500 in total merchandise 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16.00

Place a photo in your private party ad for only $15.00 per week.

Garage Sale Special

OVER $500 in total merchandise 4 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $17.50 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $23.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $32.50 28 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $60.50

4 lines for 4 days. . . . . . . . . $20.00

(call for commercial line ad rates)

A Payment Drop Box is available at Bend City Hall. CLASSIFICATIONS BELOW MARKED WITH AN (*) REQUIRE PREPAYMENT as well as any out-of-area ads. The Bulletin reserves the right to reject any ad at any time.

CLASSIFIED OFFICE HOURS: MON.-FRI. 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. SATURDAY by telephone 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

*Must state prices in ad

is located at: 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, Oregon 97702 PLEASE NOTE: Check your ad for accuracy the first day it appears. Please call us immediately if a correction is needed. We will gladly accept responsibility for one incorrect insertion. The publisher reserves the right to accept or reject any ad at anytime, classify and index any advertising based on the policies of these newspapers. The publisher shall not be liable for any advertisement omitted for any reason. Private Party Classified ads running 7 or more days will publish in the Central Oregon Marketplace each Tuesday.

Employment

400 421

Schools and Training TRUCK SCHOOL www.IITR.net Redmond Campus Student Loans/Job Waiting Toll Free 1-888-438-2235

454

Looking for Employment I provide housekeeping & caregiving svcs, & have 20+ yrs experience. 541-508-6403

Sell an Item

FAST! If it's under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classifieds for

$10 - 3 lines, 7 days $16 - 3 lines, 14 days (Private Party ads only)

280

Estate Sales Estate Downsize Sale Fri-Sat, June 17th & 18th, 9-4, 3391 NE 29th St., Redmond Antiques, all wood furniture, patio set, marble dressers w/ mirrors, oriental rugs, chipper, rollaway bed, collectibles,silver dishes, books & baskets, etc.

ESTATE

SALE-

ANTIQUES++ Thousands of items priced to sell. Victrola, records, Franciscan Ware, crystal, china, furniture, lamps, clocks, silver plate, ornaments, toys, books, musical instruments, stoves, dog kennel, scales, traps, camp/hunt items, cameras, typewriters, crocks, 1941 Chevy Sedan, 1963 Impala SS. CASH/CREDIT CARD ONLY. (5% fee on credit cards) Friday/Saturday, 6/17-18th, 9-4--4804 S. Briar Rd, Powell Butte. Follow signs off Hwy 26 from post office or grange hall. Household furniture and goods; outdoor items; miscellaneous; all must go. 353 NE Latigo Lane, Prineville (Hwy 126, North on Main to right on Rawhide, right on Buckboard, left on Latigo). Fri. & Sat., June 17 &18, 9 to 5.

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Sales Northwest Bend Apt. Complex Sale: at 8-2, Discovery Park Lodge - N. Side, 2868 Northwest Crossing Dr. (across from Summit HS). Tools, furniture, appl,clothes books, bake sale!

CASCADE VILLAGE PARK SALESat. 9-2, 14+ Homes participating. Off 97 & Cooley Rd. Take Ranch Village Rd to Valentine St., 1st St. in Park. Fri-Sat. 9-4, 64756 Old Bend/ Redmond Hwy. Delta Orbital spindle sander, 3-pt tractor blade + post, gun hard case, tools, S/S sink, hsehld, misc.

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Sales Southwest Bend DRW - 18992 Baker Rd. Fri. & Sat., 8:30am -4:30pm. Large items - furniture to small. Don’t Miss!

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Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

CAUTION

READERS:

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly. Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state.

Dental Assistant

Bend Dental Group is looking for an enthusiastic team player to join our busy practice and amazing staff. The ideal candidate would need to possess the following qualifications: EFDA Cert., digital x-ray, Eaglesoft, treatment planning, sterilization, time mgmt, and excellent communication/custom service skills. This is a full time position with benefits. Please e-mail cover letter and resume to pams@benddentalgroup.co m.

We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320 For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075 If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Kevin O’Connell Classified Department Manager The Bulletin

541-383-0398

Dental Assistant Full Time DA needed in our Bend office. Schedule is 4 10-hour days/ week. OR X-Ray/ EFDA required. 2+ years exp preferred. Come join our dedicated team! Competitive pay & excellent benefits! Apply Online: www.willamettedental.com

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DO YOU NEED A GREAT EMPLOYEE RIGHT NOW? Call The Bulletin before 11 a.m. and get an ad in to publish the next day! 385-5809. VIEW the Classifieds at: www.bendbulletin.com

DRIVER Dedicated route, west coast, home 3 nights a week. Refrigerated. Call 541-815-9404

Drivers: Local moving company seeks Class A Drivers. Top pay, benefits; experience preferred. Please call weekdays: 541-383-3362.

PHARMACY TECHNICIAN

Bi-Mart is seeking an energetic and friendly individual to join our pharmacy staff as a FULL TIME pharmacy technician. Must be Nationally Certified and retail experience preferred. Apply in person at your: Redmond Bi-Mart, 1727 Odem Medo Rd. Redmond, OR. EOE Drug Free Workplace

PROPERTY MAINTENANCE Caretaker, Live-in, needed Emulsion Mill Operator for managing & operating Must be experienced. Wage equipment on property for DOE. Apply in person at Alprivate residence & hangar. bina Asphalt at 400 NW Paul Experience needed in landJasa Way, Madras. scaping, irrigation, fence repair, detailing & maintaining vehicles; handyman, craftsField Data Collector man, plumbing & some elecPerform fieldwork & computer trical. Able to operate small reporting for a national ingas equipment. Person must dustry leader. No exp. Paid be hands-on, professional, training. Performance based discrete; have good verbal, pay, $12/hr., PT. Apply at written & computer skills. www.muellerreports.com Strong organizational skills, 800/875-8339 ext 347 self motivated, taking pride in their work and enjoying Looking for experienced conbeing part of a team. Salary crete finishers. Need to be DOE + benefits. Email rewilling to travel. Good wages, sume to 401k, and health insurance. PMLHRdepartment For more information please @hotmail.com call 541-318-6200

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Sales Southwest Bend Sales Southwest Bend Sales Northeast Bend Sales Southeast Bend Sunrise Village Neighborhood Garage Sale Fri-Sat, June 1718, 9am-3pm, Clubhouse Parking lot, 19560 Sunshine Way. Something for everyone! THE MOTHER OF ALL GARAGE SALES! Sat. 6/18, 8-2 in parking lot at Coldwell Banker Morris Real Estate, 486 SW Bluff Drive. Lots of stuff! Benefit for Bend Community Center. Call 541-382-4123 for more info. This & That Sale: Fri.-Sat, 9-3, 60940 Amethyst, Household, gardening books, antique glassware, toddler/baby items, furniture, back packs, small tents, fly tying items,

YARD SALE FUNDRAISER. Natural Mind Dharma Center, 345 SW Century Drive, #2, behind Repeat Performance Sports. Saturday, June 18, 8am to 2pm. For more info, contact (541) 610-5333.

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Sales Northeast Bend Cedar Creek Townhomes 15th Annual Multi-Family Garage Sale - Fri & Sat, June 17 & 18, 8am-5pm, 1050 NE Butler Market Rd, corner of 8th & Butler Mkt.

“The Mother of All Garage Sales & Diaper Drive” Saturday, June 18, 2011 8:00 am - 2:00 pm Coldwell Banker Morris is hosting “The Mothers of All Garage Sales & Diaper Drive”. All proceeds are going to The Bend Community Center and the homeless community that they serve. 5 Ways You Can Help: 1. Donate a package of diapers* 2. Donate garage sale items to be sold on June 18th 3. Shop at the Garage Sale 4. Eat lunch or dinner at the Pastini and mention the Coldwell Banker Morris Pasta-thon on Mon. or Tues., June 20, 2011. 5. Direct donation to Bend Community Center. *All donations are being accepted at Coldwell Banker Morris Real Estate, 486 SW Bluff Drive in the Old Mill District or call with any questions 541-382-4123. (For tax purposes, we can give you a receipt for your donation).

HH F R E E HH Garage Sale Kit Place an ad in The Bulletin for your garage sale and receive a Garage Sale Kit FREE! KIT INCLUDES: • 4 Garage Sale Signs • $1.00 Off Coupon To Use Toward Your Next Ad • 10 Tips For “Garage Sale Success!” • And Inventory Sheet PICK UP YOUR GARAGE SALE KIT AT: 1777 SW Chandler Ave. Bend, OR 97702

Garage Sale: Fri.-Sat. 7-4, 9th & Norton, Armoire, canning, bike, linens, books, knickknacks, twin mattress, lamps, gardening, videos, bike rack, Singer featherweight machine, quilting stuff. GARAGE SALE - Fri.-Sat.., June 17-18, 8am-5pm Collectibles, housewares, washer/dryer, vintage electronics, tools, DVDs & more! 1050 NE Butler Market Rd., #48 (corner 8th & Butler Mkt)

Fri. & Sat. 8-4, misc. glass and dishes, hundreds of records, furn. and more, good stuff! 11 mile marker, east on Hwy 20 turn right on Rickard, 1st driveway on left. Check out the classiieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily Moving/Garage Sale: Fri. & Sat. 8-3, tools, tools, tools! ladders, saws, edger, trunks, golf travel bag, 10” TV, small tables, linens, computer table, lamps, kitchen items, too much to list, no junk. Cash only. From S. Albertson’s go E. on Murphy Rd. to Tapadera, left to 20240 Gains Ct.

Moving Sale - Inside! 1001 SE 15th, #94, Fri & Sat., 8-3. Furniture & LOTS MORE! Multi-Family Garage Sale: Fri.-Sat. 8-3, on Via Sandia between Cottonwood & Magnolia, old wood windows, steel stakes, antique glass, Kitchen Aid mixer, more!

Ranch Hand - Seeking full time ranch hand for smoke free workplace. Duties include operating tractors, hay equipment, sprinkler irrigation, fence repair, feeding cattle. Experience with horses & mechanical repair helpful. Houseing & utilities provided. Send resume & references to 89037 Hwy 293, Madras, OR 97741 or e-mail jams@wildblue.net Remember.... Add your web address to your ad and readers on The Bulletin's web site will be able to click through automatically to your site. RESTAURANT

LINE COOKS Experience necessary. Full-time. Pay is based on experience. To apply, please mail resume to:

P.O. Box 400 Redmond, OR97756 Need Help? We Can Help! REACH THOUSANDS OF POTENTIAL EMPLOYEES EVERY DAY! Call the Classified Department for more information: 541-385-5809

E M P L O Y M E N T 4 1 0 - P r i v a t e I n s t r u c ti o n 4 2 1 - S c h o o ls a n d Tr a i n i n g 4 5 4 - L o o ki n g f o r E m p l o y m 4 7 0 - D o m e s ti c & I n - H o m e 4 7 6 - E m p l o y m e n t O p p o rt u 4 8 6 - I n d e p e n d e n t P o s iti o n

e nt P o s iti o n s n iti e s s

FIN 5 0 7 5 1 4 5 2 8 5 4 3 5 5 8 5 7 3

A N C E A N D B U SIN E S S - R e a l E s t a t e C o n tr a c t s -In s ura n c e - L o a n s a n d M o rt g a g e s - Sto cks a n d B o n d s - B u si n e s s I n v e st m e n ts - B u s i n e s s O p p o r t u n iti e s

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Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Finance & Business

Sales Telephone prospecting position for important professional services. Income potential $50,000. (average income 30k-35k) opportunity for advancement. Base & Commission, Health and Dental Benefits. Will train the right person. Fax resume to: 541-848-6403 or call Mr. Green 541-330-0640.

500

Sales Associate Mercedes Benz of Bend is seeking a motivated individual to join our team as a Sales Associate. No experience needed, will train. This is a great place to grow if you are a current sales professional. Apply in person, 61440 S. Hwy 97, Bend. Sales - Retail Silverado Jewelry Gallery is now accepting resumes for full and/or part time retail sales positions. Applicants must have retail sales experience, enjoy working with people, and have a strong eye for detail and fashion. Salary and benefits are depending on experience. Resumes accepted at Silverado Jewelry Gallery, located at 1001 NW Wall St., Bend, OR., please ask for Harmony or Heather. No phone calls or emails please.

Sales - Independent Contractor

NEED A SUMMER JOB? If you can answer YES To these questions, WE WANT YOU 1. Do ur friends say u talk 2 much? 2. Do u like 2 have fun @ work? 3. Do u want 2 make lots of $$$? 4. R u available afternoons & early evenings?

Work Part-Time with Full-Time Pay Ages 13 & up welcome

DON'T LAG, CALL NOW

OREGON NEWSPAPER SALES GROUP 541-306-6346

The Bulletin Recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

www.oregonfreshstart.com

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classiieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days (Private Party ads only)

1515 NW TEAK AVE., 6/17 & 18, 9-5. treadmill, convection oven, kitchenware, breadmaker, tools, clothes and much more!

Huge Multi-Family/Moving Sale: Fri.-Sat., 9-3, Deck fur- Multi-family Sale - Fri & Sat, niture & outdoor items, book6/17-18, 8-3. Clothes, fishcases, appl., computer stand, ing, household, books & furniture, bed sets, Sail board more. 2821 SW Cascade Ave. & equip., paintball gun & equip., rugs, TV’s, bikes, tires. Once a Year Garage Sale 63330 Old Deschutes Rd. “The Cliffs of Redmond” 18th St. & Nickernut Place/CliffHuge Multi-Family Sale! Furniside Way. Gates open 9amture, kids’ toys, clothing, crib, 4pm Fri & Sat., June 17th & changing table, strollers, 18th. Quality furniture, books, washer, tack, tools, beautiful French armoire, snowshoes, hair station, pedi signed pictures, silver, art, stool, treated landscape timantiques, glassware, linens, bers, household items...too unique patio & yard items, much to list! Fri., June 17, upscale clothing, books, tools, 8-4. 23135 Alfalfa Market Rd. childrens toys & clothing.

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Sales Other Areas

2 Family Estate Sale: Fri. & Clothing, housewares, fabric, skis & accessories, golf clubs, Sat., 8-3, 1009 SE CastleChristmas items, some colwood Dr, Antiques, collectibles & more. 5755 Hadlectibles, misc, furniture, dock Rd., CRR, June 17-18, 8 additional contents of am-2pm, 548-6594. large storage unit.

BANK TURNED YOU DOWN? Private party will loan on real estate equity. Credit, no problem, good equity is all you need. Call now. Oregon Land Mortgage 388-4200.

FREE BANKRUPTCY EVALUATION

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WARNING The Bulletin recommends you use caution when you provide personal information to companies offering loans or credit, especially those asking for advance loan fees or companies from out of state. If you have concerns or questions, we suggest you consult your attorney or call CONSUMER HOTLINE, 1-877-877-9392.

Volunteers in Medicine: Opening for Full Time Director of Development. Complete job posting and instructions: www.vim-cascades.org

Sales Redmond Area

Sales Southeast Bend

528

Loans and Mortgages

541-385-5809

visit our website at

541-382-3402 LOCAL MONEY We buy secured trust deeds & note, some hard money loans. Call Pat Kelley 541-382-3099 extension 13.

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

The Bulletin 573

Business Opportunities Elk Lake Lodge One-quarter ownership for sale. Includes year-round cabin usage. $525,000. Courtesy to Brokers. Call 541-390-6776


To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, June 15, 2011 F3 650

Houses for Rent NE Bend

RENTALS 603 - Rental Alternatives 604 - Storage Rentals 605 - Roommate Wanted 616 - Want To Rent 627 - Vacation Rentals & Exchanges 630 - Rooms for Rent 631 - Condo/Townhomes for Rent 632 - Apt./Multiplex General 634 - Apt./Multiplex NE Bend 636 - Apt./Multiplex NW Bend 638 - Apt./Multiplex SE Bend 640 - Apt./Multiplex SW Bend 642 - Apt./Multiplex Redmond 646 - Apt./Multiplex Furnished 648 - Houses for Rent General 650 - Houses for Rent NE Bend 652 - Houses for Rent NW Bend 654 - Houses for Rent SE Bend 656 - Houses for Rent SW Bend 658 - Houses for Rent Redmond 659 - Houses for Rent Sunriver 660 - Houses for Rent La Pine 661 - Houses for Rent Prineville 662 - Houses for Rent Sisters 663 - Houses for Rent Madras 664 - Houses for Rent Furnished 671 - Mobile/Mfd. for Rent 675 - RV Parking 676 - Mobile/Mfd. Space

Rentals

682 - Farms, Ranches and Acreage 687 - Commercial for Rent/Lease 693 - Office/Retail Space for Rent REAL ESTATE 705 - Real Estate Services 713 - Real Estate Wanted 719 - Real Estate Trades 726 - Timeshares for Sale 732 - Commercial/Investment Properties for Sale 738 - Multiplexes for Sale 740 - Condo/Townhomes for Sale 744 - Open Houses 745 - Homes for Sale 746 - Northwest Bend Homes 747 - Southwest Bend Homes 748 - Northeast Bend Homes 749 - Southeast Bend Homes 750 - Redmond Homes 753 - Sisters Homes 755 - Sunriver/La Pine Homes 756 - Jefferson County Homes 757 - Crook County Homes 762 - Homes with Acreage 763 - Recreational Homes and Property 764 - Farms and Ranches 771 - Lots 773 - Acreages 775 - Manufactured/Mobile Homes 780 - Mfd. /Mobile Homes with Land 634

642

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend

Apt./Multiplex Redmond

Beautiful 2 Bdrms in quiet complex, park-like setting. No pets/smoking. Near St. Charles.W/S/G pd; both w/d hkup + laundry facil. $610$650/mo. 541-385-6928.

600

Call for Specials!

630

Rooms for Rent Room for Rent, $300+1/3 util. +$300 Dep. Nice Redmond. Dezeray 541-610-9766 STUDIOS & KITCHENETTES Furnished room, TV w/ cable, micro. & fridge. Util. & linens. New owners, $145-$165/wk. 541-382-1885

631

Limited numbers available 1, 2 and 3 bdrms. W/D hookups, patios or decks, Mountain Glen, 541-383-9313 Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc.

Apt./Multiplex NW Bend

1100 sq ft, 2 Bdrm, 1½ bath downtown townhome with patio. Home biz OK. 111 NW Hawthorne #6. $795/mo incl water/garbage. 541-388-4053

1550 NW Milwaukee W/D hookup. $615/mo. Large 2 Bdrm, 1 Bath, Gas heat. W/S/G Pd. No Pets. Call us at 541-382-3678 or

Avail. 6/25, Furnished 1 bdrm. condo at 7th Mtn., all utils+ cable & wifi paid, deck, pools, hot tubs, $700+dep., no smoking/pets, 541-979-8940

Visit us at www.sonberg.biz

632

Apt./Multiplex General The Bulletin is now offering a MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home or apt. to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

634

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend

Alpine Meadows Townhomes 1, 2 and 3 bdrm apts. Starting at $625.

541-330-0719 Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc.

Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale

personals Seeking info of suspicious activity involving lt blue GMC mini pickup w/black lumber rack, areas of: NE Watt Way; Juniper Rd; NE 4th/Greenwood; and/or Hwy 20/27th St. Call 541-848-0288 Thank you St. Jude & Sacred Heart of Jesus. j.d.

Studios $375 1 Bdrm $400 Free Move-in Rent! • Lots of amenities. • Pet friendly • W/S/G paid THE BLUFFS APTS. 340 Rimrock Way, Redmond Close to schools, shopping, and parks! 541-548-8735 Managed by

Renovated 2 bdrm., 1 bath, blocks from St. Charles & Pilot Butte. W/S/G paid. Laundry onsite. Parking. No pets/ smoking.$625. 541-410-6486

Condo / Townhomes For Rent

Long term townhomes/homes for rent in Eagle Crest. Appl. included, Spacious 2 & 3 bdrm., with garages, 541-504-7755.

SPRING BLAST!

GSL Properties

DELUXE 2 BEDROOM $495 per mo.

Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS SHEVLIN APARTMENTS Near COCC! Newer 2 Bdrm 1 Bath, granite, wood floors, underground parking/storage area, laundry on site, $650/mo. 541-480-3666

Where buyers meet sellers. Every day thousands of buyers and sellers of goods and services do business in these pages. They know you can’t beat The Bulletin Classified Section for selection and convenience - every item is just a phone call away.

incl. storage room and carport, smoke free bldg., fenced dog run, on-site laundry, close to schools, park and shopping. O BSIDIAN APARTMENTS www.redmondrents.com 541-923-1907

648

Houses for Rent General

To place your ad, visit www.bendbulletin.com or call 541-385-5809

654

Houses for Rent SE Bend A quiet 4 bdrm, 2 bath, 1748 sq.ft., living room w/wood stove, newer carpet & inside paint, pellet stove, big 1/2 acre fenced lot, dbl garage w/opener. $1195. 541-480-3393,541-610-7803

700 745

Homes for Sale Foreclosures For Sale All Central OR Avail. Buy on the Court steps w/Cashier’s Checks Oregon Group Realty, LLC 541-948-4397

The Bulletin To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

NOTICE: All real estate advertised here in is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or intention to make any such preferences, limitations or discrimination. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of this law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis. The Bulletin Classified

541-322-7253

757

860

870

Crook County Homes

Motorcycles And Accessories

Boats & Accessories

BY OWNER-Prineville Traditional Sale - Not Short Sale! In the heart of town (Knowledge St.) close to all schools, churches, shopping. 1996 ranch style, 3 bdrm (split plan), 2 bath, tile kitchen counters, upgraded kitchen appl., carpet, & linoleum, gas FA w/AC, large fully fenced lot, gated access to RV parking w/30 amp hookup. $111,000. Courtesy to brokers. 541-749-0024. Call The Bulletin At 541-385-5809. Place Your Ad Or E-Mail At: www.bendbulletin.com

762

Homes with Acreage Fleetwood 1512 sq ft double wide on 1.34 acres, Crooked River Ranch. Heat pump, 2 bdfrms, den, 2 full baths, sepa guest room & garage w/ 1/2 bath. Great view. $126,500. Call for appointment, 541-923-0574

Boats & RV’s

800 850

Snowmobiles

Summer Price Yamaha 600 Mtn. Max 1997 Now only $850! Sled plus trailer package $1550. Many Extras, call for info, 541-548-3443.

860

Motorcycles And Accessories

Like Brand New Harley Davidson Heritage Softail, 2009. 682 miles, 7 yr extended warranty, upgraded pipes, engine guard bar. Bike has been lowered; mint cond. Upgraded seat. $15,500. 541-420-5855

Need help ixing stuff around the house? Call A Service Professional and ind the help you need. www.bendbulletin.com

763

Recreational Homes and Property Elk Lake Lodge One-quarter ownership for sale. Includes year-round cabin usage. $525,000. Courtesy to Brokers. Call 541-390-6776

A Newer 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, 1168 sq.ft., newer paint & carpet, patio, large lot, RV parking, dbl. garage, w/opener, $850, 541-480-3393, 541-610-7803 Clean 4 Bdrm + den, 2 bath, 14920 SW Maverick Rd, CRR. No smoking; pets negotiable. $900/mo. + deposits. Call 541-504-8545; 541-350-1660

Eagle Crest gated 3 Bdrm 2½ bath home w/3-car garage & workshop. Reverse living, pvt hot tub, beautiful mountain views, 2200 sq ft. Pool, tennis & exercise facilities. $1400/mo + security dep and utils/maintenance. Lease w/option; owner may carry. Call 541-923-0908.

661

Houses for Rent Prineville

750 Eagle Crest ~ Owner will carry with down. Gated 3 bedroom, 2½ bath home with 3-car garage & workshop. Reverse living, private hot tub, beautiful mountain views, 2200 sq ft. Enjoy Eagle Crest’s pool, tennis & exercise facilities. $399,000. Call 541-923-0908.

Harley Davidson Heritage Softail Classic 2006, Vance-Hines pipes, crash bar w/foot pegs, Power Command, Stage 1 backrest w/luggage rack, Dyno-tune, all work performed by Jerry’s Custom Cycle, exc. cond, $13,900 OBO. 541-549-4834, 588-0068

773

Acreages 2 Adjacent 1-Acre Lots in Oregon Water Wonderland off Century Dr., 55405 Gross Dr. S., 1 lot w/septic, $49,000, 1 without, $39,000, will carry and/or build to suit, 541-698-7720.

What are you looking for? You’ll find it in The Bulletin Classifieds Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

865

ATVs

POLARIS PHOENIX 2005, 2X4, 200cc, new rear end, new tires, runs excellent, $1800 OBO, 541-932-4919.

Yamaha YFZ450 Sport ATV 2008 Blue, Low hours very clean, freshly serviced. $3950. Will consider offers. See at JD Powersports, Redmond. 541-526-0757 • Richard 541-419-0712

Boats & Accessories

Harley Davidson Police Bike 2001, low mi., custom bike very nice.Stage 1, new tires & brakes, too much to list! A Must See Bike! $8800 OBO. 541-383-1782

Redmond Homes

KTM 400 EXC Enduro 2006, like new cond, low miles, street legal, hvy duty receiver hitch basket. $4500. 541-385-4975

870

658

Houses for Rent Redmond

PUBLISHER'S NOTICE All real estate advertising in 4 Bdrm., 2 bath, 2032 sq.ft. this newspaper is subject to mobile in Prineville, 40x36’ the Fair Housing Act which shop, 2.28 fenced acres, makes it illegal to advertise setup for horses, pets al"any preference, limitation or lowed, hot tub, private well, discrimination based on race, $950/mo., deposits neg., call color, religion, sex, handicap, 541-416-2557. familial status, marital status or national origin, or an in687 tention to make any such Commercial for preference, limitation or disRent/Lease crimination." Familial status includes children under the Office / Warehouse age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant 1792 sq.ft. & 1680 sq.ft. women, and people securing spaces, 827 Business Way, custody of children under 18. Bend. 30¢/sq.ft.; 1st mo. + This newspaper will not $300 dep. 541-678-1404 knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is Office/Warehouse located in SE Bend. Up to 30,000 sq.ft., in violation of the law. Our competitive rate, readers are hereby informed 541-382-3678. that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are avail- The Bulletin offers a LOWER, able on an equal opportunity MORE AFFORDABLE Rental basis. To complain of disrate! If you have a home to crimination call HUD toll-free rent, call a Bulletin Classified at 1-800-877-0246. The toll Rep. to get the new rates and free telephone number for get your ad started ASAP! the hearing impaired is 541-385-5809 1-800-927-9275. Warehouse/Office space, 1235 sq ft, large roll-up door. Advertise your car! 20685 Carmen Lp. No triple Add A Picture! net; $500/mo, 1st + dep. Reach thousands of readers! 541-480-7546; 541-480-7541 Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

Thousands of ads daily in print and online.

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Crooked River Ranch, 5 acres horse property fenced, 2 bdrm., 2 bath, W/D hookup, $800 plus deps. 541-420-5197,209-402-3499

636

Beautiful 1 bdrm, 2 bath fully furnished Condo, $695, $400 dep., near downtown & college, completely renovated, 2 verandas, no pets/smoking, all amenities, pics avail. by request. W/S/G/elec./A/C & cable included, Available now. call 541-279-0590 or cheritowery@yahoo.com

3 Bdrm, 2 bath, 1200 sq.ft., big wood stove, util. room, 1/2 acre lot, RV parking, dbl garage w/openers, $895. 541-480-3393 or 610-7803 4 BDRM., 3 BATH, 2150 sq.ft. home, incl. 500 sq.ft. office on site, no garage, avail. 7/1, $1200, No smoking. 509-947-9662. A newer 3 bdrm, 2 bath, 1590 sq. ft, gas fireplace, great room, huge oversize dbl. garage w/openers, big lot, $1195, 541-480-3393 or 610-7803

Real Estate For Sale

Harley Davidson Ultra Classic 2008, clean, 15K mi, lots of upgrades, cstm exhaust, dual control heated gloves & vest, luggage accessories, $15,500 OBO. 541-693-3975

Harley Davidson Ultra Classic 1999, $15,000 or trade for late model fiberglass camper, 541-416-1083,541-280-7657

541-385-5809 ***

875

Watercraft

2 Wet-Jet personal water crafts, new batteries & covers, “SHORE“ trailer, incl spare & lights, $2450 for all. Bill 541-480-7930. Ads published in "Watercraft" include: Kayaks, rafts and motorized personal watercrafts. For "boats" please see Class 870. 541-385-5809

KAYAK 17’ NW Pursuit, blue/white. rudder, good cond., $2500 new; sell $350. 541-593-9771.

12” Sea Nymph Aluminum Boat, motor & trailer, clean outfit, $500, 541-617-8610.

Kayak, 18’ Necky, Tesla, white/ blue/red, 26” width, rudder, good cond., $2400 new; sell $350. 541-593-9771.

17½’ 2006 BAYLINER 175 XT Ski Boat, 3.0L Merc, mint condition, includes ski tower w/2 racks - everything we have, ski jackets adult and kids several, water skis, wakeboard, gloves, ropes and many other boating items. $11,300 OBO . 541-417-0829

Sea Kayaks - His & Hers, Eddyline Wind Dancers, 17’, fiberglass boats, all equip incl., paddles, personal flotation devices, dry bags, spray skirts, roof rack w/towers & cradles -- Just add water, $1850/boat Firm. 541-504-8557.

880

Motorhomes 17.5’ Bayliner 175, 135HP merc, perfect cond., Bimini Top, Lawrence fish finder, all safety equip., Kay trailer w/breakaway tongue, $8000 OBO, 541-350-2336.

20.5’ 2004 Bayliner 205 Run About, 220 HP, V8, open bow, exc. cond., very fast w/very low hours, lots of extras incl. tower, Bimini & custom trailer, $19,500. 541-389-1413

Find It in The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

Used out-drive parts Mercury OMC rebuilt marine motors: 151 $1595; 3.0 $1895; 4.3 (1993), $1995. 541-389-0435

20.5’ Seaswirl Spyder 1989 H.O. 302, 285 hrs., exc. cond., stored indoors for life $11,900 OBO. 541-379-3530

Beaver Patriot 2000, Walnut cabinets, solar, Bose, Corian, tile, 4 door fridge., 1 slide, w/d, $89,900. 541-215-5355

Beaver Santiam 2002, 2 slides, 48K, immaculate, 330 Cummins diesel, $75,000. Call for details: 541-504-0874

Best Buy Hurricane 32’ 2007, 12K mi., Cherry Wood, leather, queen, 2 slides, 2 tv’s 2 air, jacks, camera, like new, non smoker, $61,000, 541-548-5216.

CHECK YOUR AD Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes in- Harley Dyna FXDWG 1998, custom paint, lots of chrome, structions over the phone are head turner, be loud & proud, misunderstood and an error $7500, 541-280-9563 can occur in your ad. If this happens to your ad, please contact us the first day your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we Honda Gold Wing GL can. R..E Deadlines are: 1100, 1980. 23,000 Weekdays 11:00 noon for miles, full dress plus next day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for helmets, $3500 or Sunday and Monday. best offer. 541-385-5809 Thank you! Call 541-389-8410 The Bulletin Classified ***

GAS

Powell Butte: 6 acres, 360° views in farm fields, septic approved, power, OWC, 10223 Houston Lake Rd., $114,900, 541-350-4684. Just bought a new boat? Sell your old one in the classiieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates! 541-385-5809

SAVER!

Honda Trail 90 1969, Yellow, very nice, dual spd. trans, rack, street legal, $1995, 541-318-5010

25’ Catalina Sailboat 1983, w/trailer, swing keel, pop top, fully loaded, $11,000, call for details, 541-480-8060 Ads published in the "Boats" classification include: Speed, fishing, drift, canoe, house and sail boats. For all other types of watercraft, please see Class 875. 541-385-5809

GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809.

Dodge Brougham Motorhome, 1977, Needs TLC, $1995, Pilgrim Camper 1981, Self contained, Cab-over, needs TLC, $595, 541-382-2335 or 503-585-3240. Gulfstream Scenic Cruiser 36 ft. 1999, Cummins 330 hp. diesel, 42K, 1 owner, 13 in. kitchen slide out, new tires, under cover, hwy. miles only, 4 door fridge/freezer icemaker, W/D combo, Interbath tub & shower, 50 amp. propane gen & more! $55,000. 541-948-2310.

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

The Bulletin

775

Manufactured/ Mobile Homes 1992 dbl. wide Nashua, 1040 sq.ft., good shape, 2+bdrm, 2 bath, $6800 left on assumable loan. Must be moved. In Madras 541-475-2143.

693

Ofice/Retail Space The Bulletin is now offering a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE for Rent Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin An Office with bath, various Classified Rep. to get the sizes and locations from new rates and get your ad $200 per month, including started ASAP! 541-385-5809 utilities. 541-317-8717

Honda VT700 Shadow 1984, 23K, many new parts, battery charger, good condition, $3000 OBO. 541-382-1891

Houseboat 38 x10, triple axle trailer incl. 20’ cabin, 12’ rear swim deck plus 6’ covered front deck. Great price! $14,500. 541-788-4844

Hurricane 2007 35.5’ like new, 3 slides, generator, dark cabinets, Ford V10, 4,650 mi $64,900 OBO. 541-923-3510

FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT! The Bulletin Classiieds

Call 541-385-5809 to promote your service • Advertise for 28 days starting at $140 (This special package is not available on our website) Barns

Debris Removal

Handyman

Home Improvement

Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care

M. Lewis Construction, LLC

JUNK BE GONE

"POLE BARNS" Built Right! Garages, shops, hay sheds, arenas, custom decks, fences, interior finish work, & concrete. Free estimates . See Facebook Business page, search under M. Lewis Construction, LLC CCB#188576•541-604-6411

l Haul Away FREE For Salvage. Also Cleanups & Cleanouts Mel 541-389-8107

ERIC REEVE HANDY SERVICES

Kelly Kerfoot Construction: 28 years exp. in Central OR, Quality & Honesty, from carpentry & handyman jobs, to quality wall covering installations & removal. Senior discounts, licenced, bonded, insured, CCB#47120 Call 541-389-1413 or 541-410-2422

NOTICE: OREGON Landscape Contractors Law (ORS 671) requires all businesses that advertise to perform Land scape Construction which in cludes: planting, decks, fences, arbors, water-fea tures, and installation, repair of irrigation systems to be li censed with the Landscape Contractors Board. This 4-digit number is to be in cluded in all advertisements which indicate the business has a bond, insurance and workers compensation for their employees. For your protection call 503-378-5909 or use our website: www.lcb.state.or.us to check license status before con tracting with the business. Persons doing landscape maintenance do not require a LCB license.

fifi’s Hauling & More. Yard clean up, fuel reduction, con struction & misc. clean up, 10 yd. hyd. trailers, 20 ft. flatbed, 541-382-0811.

Building/Contracting

Concrete / Paving

NOTICE: Oregon state law requires anyone who contracts for construction work to be licensed with the Construction Contractors Board (CCB). An active license means the contractor is bonded and insured. Verify the contractor’s CCB license through the CCB Consumer Website

Old World Cobblestone Inc. Paver Installation Specialists Ask about special Spring Prices! oldworldcobblestoneinc.com 541-408-6947 • CCB 82623

CCB#180420

FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT! The Bulletin Classiieds

Electrical Services Quality Builders Electric

Concrete Construction JJ&B Construction - Quality Concrete work, over 30 yrs experience. Sidewalks, RV Pads, Driveways... Call Grant, 541-279-3183 • CCB190612 K.A. Veltman Concrete L L C Custom Concrete Work Foundations and Flatwork No Job Too Big or Too Small! 541-923-2168 • CCB #191425

Computer/Cabling Install QB Digital Living •Computer Networking •Phone/Data/TV Jacks •Whole House Audio •Flat Screen TV & Installation 541-280-6771 www.qbdigitalliving.com CCB#127370 Elect Lic#9-206C

• Remodels • Home Improvement • Lighting Upgrades • Hot Tub Hook-ups 541-389-0621 www.qbelectric.net CCB#127370 Elect Lic#9-206C

Excavating Levi’s Dirt Works:RGC & CGC Residential & Commercial subcontracting for all your dirt & excavation needs. • Small & large jobs for contractors & home owners by the job - or hour. • Driveway grading (low cost get rid of pot holes & smooth out your driveway) • Custom pads large & small • Operated rentals & augering • Wet & dry utilities • Concrete CCB#194077 541-639-5282.

Handyman Service Repair & Remodel We Move Walls Small jobs welcome. Another General Contractor, Inc. CCB# 110431. 541-617-0613, 541-390-8085

All types remodeling/handyman Decks, Painting, Carpentry Randy Salveson, 541-306-7492

www.hirealicensedcontractor.com

or call 503-378-4621. The Bulletin recommends checking with the CCB prior to contracting with anyone. Some other trades also require additional licenses and certifications.

Home & Commercial Repairs, Carpentry-Painting, Pressure-washing, Honey Do's. Small or large jobs. On-time promise. Senior Discount. All work guaranteed. 541-389-3361 or 541-771-4463 Bonded & Insured CCB#181595

Margo Construction LLC Since 1992 • Pavers •Carpentry •Remodeling • Decks • Window/Door Replacement • Int/Ext Paint CCB 176121 • 541-480-3179 I DO THAT! Home Repairs, Remodeling, Professional & Honest Work. Rental Repairs. CCB#151573 Dennis 541-317-9768

Home Improvement

Landscaping, Yard Care

J. L. SCOTT LAWN & LANDSCAPE MAINTENANCE Does your lawn have snow mold problems? We can help! SPECIAL 20% OFF Thatching & Aeration Weekly Maintenance • Thatching • Aeration • Lawn Over-seeding Bark • Clean-ups Commercial / Residential Senior Discounts

Providing full service maintenance for over 20 years! FREE AERATION & FERTILIZATION with new seasonal Mowing Service!

“Because weekends WERE NOT made for yard work!”

541-382-3883 Since 1978

YUCK I do not want to clean gutters again! Then Call B&R 541-389-8008 1-800-580-8008 and we will! ccb#103411

Nelson Landscape Maintenance Serving Central Oregon Residential & Commercial • Sprinkler activation & repair • Thatch & Aerate • Spring Clean up • Weekly Mowing & Edging •Bi-Monthly & monthly maint. •Flower bed clean up •Bark, Rock, etc. •Senior Discounts

Call The Yard Doctor for yard maint., thatching, sod, hydroseeding, sprinkler sys, water features, walls, more! Allen 541-536-1294 LCB 5012 Collins Lawn Maintenance Weekly Services Available Aeration, One-time Jobs Bonded & Insured Free Estimate. 541-480-9714

Painting, Wall Covering WESTERN PAINTING CO. Richard Hayman, a semi-retired painting contractor of 45 years. Small Jobs Welcome. Interior & Exterior. Wallpapering & Woodwork. Restoration a Specialty. Ph. 541-388-6910. CCB#5184

Remodeling, Carpentry RGK Contracting & Consulting 30+Yrs. Exp. •Additions/Remodels/Garages •Replacement windows/doors remodelcentraloregon.com 541-480-8296 CCB189290

Bonded & Insured 541-815-4458 LCB#8759 Ferris Building & Landscape Maintenance Remodeling, Pole Barns, Landscape Maint., Tree Service & Haul Away. CCB #68496 Harry Ferris 541-408-2262 Summer Maintenance! Monthly Maint., Weeding, Raking, One Time Clean Up, Debris Hauling 541-388-0158 • 541-420-0426 www.bblandscape.com Spring Clean Up! Aerating, thatching, lawn restoration, Vacation Care. Free aeration with full season agreement, Call Mike Miller, 541-408-3364

Rooing AMERICAN ROOFING Quick, efficient, quality work New • Re-roofs • Repairs Free Estimates CCB #193018 Call Jorge - 541-497-3556

Tile, Ceramic Steve Lahey Construction Tile Installation Over 20 Yrs. Exp. Call For Free Estimate 541-977-4826•CCB#166678

541-385-5809


F4 Wednesday, June 15, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809 882

Fifth Wheels

AUTOS & TRANSPORTATION 908 - Aircraft, Parts and Service 916 - Trucks and Heavy Equipment 925 - Utility Trailers 927 - Automotive Trades 929 - Automotive Wanted 931 - Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories 932 - Antique and Classic Autos 933 - Pickups 935 - Sport Utility Vehicles 940 - Vans 975 - Automobiles

BOATS & RVs 805 - Misc. Items 850 - Snowmobiles 860 - Motorcycles And Accessories 865 - ATVs 870 - Boats & Accessories 875 - Watercraft 880 - Motorhomes 881 - Travel Trailers 882 - Fifth Wheels 885 - Canopies and Campers 890 - RV’s for Rent 880

880

881

Motorhomes

Motorhomes

Travel Trailers

Cedar Creek 2006, RDQF. Loaded, 4 slides, 37.5’, king bed, W/D, 5500W gen., fireplace, Corian countertops, skylight shower, central vac, much more, like new, $39,900, please call 541-330-9149.

Winnebago Class C 2003, 28’, tow pkg, gen, 2 slides, awning, V-10 Ford 450, one owner, non-smkg, exc care, see to appreciate! $34,000 541-815-4121 541-593-7257 Winnebago Sightseer 30B Class A 2008 $79,500 OBO Top of the line! cell 805-368-1575

Marathon V.I.P. Prevost H3-40 Luxury Coach. Like new after $132,000 purchase & $130,000 in renovations. Only 129k orig. mi. 541-601-6350. Rare bargain at just $97,400. Look at : www.SeeThisRig.com

Storage Cover for Class A, 3740’, zipper sides, never used, in box, $225, 541-617-1249.

Winnebago 32VS 2000, Class A Adventurer. Super slide, 31K mi., new Toyo tires, 11 1/2 ft. overall height, perfect cond,$37,999. 541-312-8974 Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale

Winnebago Access 31J 2008, Class C, Near Low Retail Price! One owner, nonsmoker, garaged, 7,400 miles, auto leveling jacks, (2) slides, upgraded queen bed, bunk beds, microwave, 3-burner range/oven, (3) TVs, and sleeps 10! Lots of storage, maintained, and very clean! Only $76,995! Extended warranty available! Call (541) 388-7179.

Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS

881

Travel Trailers

Fun Finder Model 189FBS, 2008, 7’ wide w/slide; 19’ long, sleeps 5, excellent condition, 3400# dry, $10,500. Call Fred, 541-516-1134

HOLIDAY RAMBLER IMPERIAL 35’ 1993, queen size walk around bed, full bath, FSC, solid oak interior, good condition, price reduced $5995 541-604-1349 JAYCO 31 ft. 1998 slideout, upgraded model, exc. cond. $10,500. 1-541-454-0437.

Komfort 31’ 2006, Model, 271TS. Like new, only used 4x. 14’ slide-out, 27” TV, AM/FM/CD stereo, DVD player & surround sound. 21” awning, couch w/queen hideabed, AC, heavy duty hitch w/sway bars, daylight shades, pwr front jack, & more! $25,000. 541-382-6731

Springdale 29’ 2007, slide, Bunkhouse style, sleeps 7-8, excellent condition, $16,900, 541-390-2504

Weekend Warrior Toy Hauler 28’ 2007, Gen, fuel station,exc.

Cougar 30’ 2004, 2 slides, clean, exc. condition, new tires, $13,500, 360-901-5922.

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1/3 interest in Columbia 400, located at Sunriver. $138,500. Call 541-647-3718

The Bulletin

and in excellent condition. Only $18,000! (541) 410-9423, (541) 536-6116.

cond. sleeps 8, black/gray interior, used 3X, $29,900. 541-389-9188. Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

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Mobile Suites, 2007, 36TK3 with 3 slide-outs, king bed, ultimate living comfort, quality built, large kitchen, fully loaded, well insulated, hydraulic jacks and so much more.$59,500. 541-317-9185 Advertise your car! Add A Picture! Reach thousands of readers!

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

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Trucks and Heavy Equipment Chevrolet 3500 Service Truck, 1992, 4x4, automatic, 11-ft storage bed. Liftgate, compressor & generator shelf inside box, locked storage boxes both sides of bed, new tires, regular maintenance & service every 3K miles, set up for towing heavy equip. $4495 obo. 541-420-1846

GMC 6000 dump truck 1990. 7 yard bed, low miles, good condition, new tires! ONLY $4500 OBO. 541-593-3072

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Fifth Wheels MONTANA 3585 2008, exc. cond., 3 slides, king bed, lrg LR, Arctic insulation, all options $39,500. 541-420-3250

885 Alpha “See Ya” 30’ 1996, 2 slides, A/C, heat pump, exc. cond. for Snowbirds, solid oak cabs day & night shades, Corian, tile, hardwood. $14,900. 541-923-3417. Cardinal 34.5 JRL (40’) 2009, 4 slides, convection oven + micro., dual A/C, fireplace, extra ride insurance (3 yr. remaining incl. tires), air sleeper sofa + queen bed, $52,900 OBO, must see to appreciate, 406-980-1907, Terrebonne

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Utility Trailers

Antique and Classic Autos

Antique and Classic Autos

Pickups

12 ft. Hydraulic dump trailer w/extra sides, dual axle, steel ramps, spare tire, tarp, excellent condition. $6500 firm. 541-419-6552

Chrysler 300 Coupe 1967, 440 engine, auto. trans, ps, air, frame on rebuild, repainted original blue, original blue interior, original hub caps, exc. chrome, asking $9000 or make offer. 541-385-9350.

Aircraft, Parts and Service

Hitchhiker II 2000 32’ 2 slides, very clean

JAYCO SENECA 2008 36MS, fully loaded, 2 slides, gen., diesel, 8k miles, like new cond., $109,000 OBO. Call for details 1-541-556-8224.

Autos & Transportation

Canopies and Campers

When ONLY the BEST will do! 2003 Lance 1030 Deluxe Model Camper, loaded, phenomenal condition. $17,500. 2007 Dodge 6.7 Cummins Diesel 3500 4x4 long bed, 58K mi, $34,900. Or buy as unit, $48,500. 541-331-1160

Carri-Lite Luxury 2009 by Carriage, 4 slideouts, inverter, satellite sys, frplc, 2 flat scrn TVs. $65,000. 760-644-4160

GMC Ventura 3500 1986, refrigerated, w/6’x6’x12’ box, has 2 sets tires w/rims., 1250 lb. lift gate, new engine, $5500, 541-389-6588, ask for Bob. Pettibone Mercury fork lift, 8000 lb., 2-stage, propane, hard rubber tires. $4000 or Make offer. 541-389-5355. Towmaster Equipment Trailer, 14,000 lb capacity. Tandemn axle, 4-wheel brakes, 18’ bed, heavy duty ramps, spare tire mounted, side mounted fork pockets, all tires in good condition. $4295 or best offer. 541-420-1846.

Truck with Snow Plow! Chevy Bonanza 1978, runs good. $4800 OBO. Call 541-390-1466.

Big Tex Landscaping/ ATV Trailer, dual axle flatbed, 7’x16’, 7000 lb. GVW, all steel, $1400. 541-382-4115, or 541-280-7024.

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Corvette 1956, rebuilt 2006, 3 spd.,

Ford T-Bird 1955, White soft & hard tops, new paint, carpet, upholstery, rechromed, nice! $32,000. 541-912-1833

International Travel All 1967,

exc. cond., 4WD, new tires, shocks, interior seat cover, everything works, 121K orig. mi.,original operators manual and line setting ticket incl. $5000 OBO, 503-559-4401

2, 4 barrel, 225 hp. Matching numbers $62,500, 541-280-1227.

Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories We Buy Scrap Auto & Truck Batteries, $10 each Also buying junk cars & trucks, (up to $500), & scrap metal! Call 541-912-1467

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Antique and Classic Autos

Dodge pickup 1962 D100 classic, original 318 wide block, push button trans, straight, runs good, $1250 firm. Bend, 831-295-4903

Chevrolet ½-ton 1979 4x4, 350 eng, 86K miles, recent overhaul eng & trans, great cond, $1800. 541-409-1849

Mercury Monterrey 1965, Exc. All original, 4-dr. sedan, in storage last 15 yes., 390 High Compression engine, new tires & license, reduced to $2850, 541-410-3425.

Chevy 3/4 Ton 1989, 4x4, 100K miles, 350 engine, Great cond. $3900. Call 541-815-9939

Call The Bulletin At 541-385-5809. Place Your Ad Or E-Mail At: www.bendbulletin.com Dodge 3500 2009, 4X4, Turbo Diesel, 48K, loaded, $36,500, 541-416-2365, 541-788-9500

Ford 3/4 Ton 1990, Cadillac El Dorado 1977, very beautiful blue, real nice inside & out, low mileage, $2500, please call 541-383-3888 for more information.

Ford 2 Door 1949, 99% Complete, $12,000, please call 541-408-7348.

Plymouth Barracuda 1966, original car! 300 hp, 360 V8, centerlines, (Original 273 eng & wheels incl.) 541-593-2597

MUST SELL 70 Monte Carlo All original, beautiful, car, completely new suspension and brake system, plus extras. $5000 obo. 541-593-3072 Chevy Corvette 1980, yellow, glass removable top, 8 cyl., auto trans, radio, heat, A/C, new factory interior, black, 48K., exc. tires, factory aluminum wheels, asking $7500, will consider fair offer & possible trade, 541-385-9350. Need help ixing stuff around the house? Call A Service Professional and ind the help you need. www.bendbulletin.com

People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Day through

Ford Mustang Coupe 1966, original owner, V8, automatic, great shape, $9000 OBO. 530-515-8199

541-389-5355

Garage Sales

Garage Sales Find them in The Bulletin Classifieds!

Chevy

Wagon

1957,

4-dr., complete, $15,000 OBO, trades, please call 541-420-5453.

www.83porsche911sccabriolet. com

Ford Mustang 1969 Coupe Must Sell $3,000 obo. 1 owner; car has been parked since 1972. Very low mi., blue on blue with all parts complete, matching numbers. Body work completed & in primer state. Rebuilt trans; 6 long block rebuilt, still at shop, add $2065, making total $5065. 541-514-4228.

Garage Sales Chevy Corvette Coupe 2006, 8,471 orig miles, 1 owner, always garaged, red, 2 tops, auto/paddle shift, LS-2, Corsa exhaust, too many options to list, pristine car, $37,500. Serious only, call 541-504-9945

Porsche 1983 911SC Cabriolet. Info:

UNBELIEVABLE Ford 2-Dr. Sedan 1951, exc., original, ready to cruise, $8500, 541-388-0137.

541-385-5809

351 V-8, manual, 4WD, Lariat, 137K, exc. cond., $2750 OBO, 541-447-3327.

Ford F-150 2006 LOOKS BRAND NEW! Supercab Lariat 5.4L V8 eng.,approx. 20K mi! 4 spd auto, rear wheel drive. Black w/lots of extras: Trailer tow pkg, Custom bedliner, Pickup bed extender, Tan leather trimmed captain chairs, only $18,000. 541-318-7395

The Bulletin Classifieds

WILLYS JEEP 1956 New rebuilt motor, no miles, Power Take-off winch. Exc. tires.

Asking $3,999 or make offer.

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Pickups CHEVROLET 1970, V-8 automatic 4X4 3/4 ton. Very good condition, lots of new parts and maintenance records. New tires, underdash air, electronic ignition & much more. Original paint, truck used very little. $4900, John Day, 541-575-3649

Ford F-250 1992, 4X4,460 eng, steel flatbed, headache rack, ~10K on new trans, pro grade tires, $2600, 541-815-7072.

FORD Pickup 1977, step side, 351 Windsor, 115,000 miles, MUST SEE! $3800. 541-350-1686

CHEVROLET 1970, V-8 automatic 4X4 3/4 ton. Very good condition, lots of new parts and maintenance records. New tires, underdash air, electronic ignition & much more. Original paint, truck used very little. $4900, John Day, 541-575-3649

Free Classified Ads! No Charge For Any Item Under

$

00

200

1 Item*/ 3 Lines*/ 3 Days* - FREE! and your ad appears in PRINT and ON-LINE at bendbulletin.com

CALL 541-385-5809 FOR YOUR FREE CLASSIFIED AD *Excludes all service, hay, wood, pets/animals, plants, tickets, weapons, rentals and employment advertising, and all commercial accounts. Must be an individual item under $200.00 and price of individual item must be included in the ad. Ask your Bulletin Sales Representative about special pricing, longer run schedules and additional features. Limit 1 ad per item per 30 days.

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To receive this special offer, call 541-385-5809 Or visit The Bulletin office at: 1777 SW Chandler Ave.


To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, June 15, 2011 F5

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Pickups

Vans

Automobiles

Chevrolet 1-ton Express Cargo Van, 1999, with tow pkg., good condition, $4200. 541-419-5693

Ford Mustang Convertible LX 1989, V8 engine, white w/red interior, 44K mi., exc. cond., $6995, 541-389-9188.

International Flat Bed Pickup 1963, 1 ton dually, 4 spd. trans., great MPG, could be exc. wood hauler, runs great, new brakes, $1950. 541-419-5480.

Toyota Tacoma 2002, X-Cab, 4X4, 145K, 5-spd. manual trans., 3.4L V-6, loaded, $10,995. 541-598-5111.

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Sport Utility Vehicles

Chevrolet Avalanche 2002, 4WD, 130K miles, green, sunroof, tow pkg, leather. $7500. 541-707-0157 CHEVY SUBURBAN LT 2005 • 4WD, 68,000 miles. • Great Shape. • Original Owner.

$19,450! 541-389-5016 evenings.

CHEVY ASTRO EXT 1993 All Wheel Drive mini van, 3 seats, rear barn doors, white, good tires and wheels. Pretty interior, clean, no rips or tears. Drives excellent!!!. Only $2500. (541) 318-9999 or (541) 815-3639

Chevy Gladiator 1993, great shape, great mileage, full pwr., all leather, auto, 4 captains chairs, fold down bed, fully loaded, $3950 OBO, call 541-536-6223. Plymouth Grand Caravan 1995, Wheelchair Van, 99K, runs good, snows tires incl, $6500, paid $12,500 3 yrs. ago, 541-382-0818 Just bought a new boat? Sell your old one in the classiieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates! 541-385-5809

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Automobiles

Ford Explorer 1999 XLT V6 4.0L 106K, 4WD,CD, tape deck, tow bar, auto, fully loaded $4995, Peter 541-408-0877

Grand Laredo

Cherokee 1998, 6 cyl.,

4L, 180K mi., new tires & battery, leather & alloy, ask $3450, Bill, 541-480-7930.

Audi S4 2005, 4.2 Avant Quattro, tiptronic, premium & winter wheels & tires, Bilstein shocks, coil over springs, HD anti sway, APR exhaust, K40 radar, dolphin gray, ext. warranty, 56K, garaged, $30,000. 541-593-2227

Mercury Mountaineer 1999

leather, full power, running boards, cd, only 56k mi. Vin# J36326 $7,997 541-598-3750 DLR# 0225

West of 97 & Empire, Bend

Porsche Cayenne 2004, 86k, immac.,loaded, dealer maint, $19,500. 503-459-1580.

Porsche Cayenne Turbo 2008, AWD, 500HP, 38K mi., exc. cond, meteor gray, 2 sets of wheels and new tires, fully loaded, $59,750 firm. 541-480-1884

KIA Amanti 2005, silver, exc. condition, 57,500 mi., leather, sliding moonroof, heated seats, auto windows, locks, seats. Infinity 6 disc premium sound system, new tires, brakes last fall. Beautiful inside & out. $10,700. 541-977-5838.

New body style, 30,000 miles, heated seats, luxury sedan, CD, full factory warranty. $23,950.

Like buying a new car! 503-351-3976.

Mercedes GL450, 2007 All wheel drive, 1 owner, navigation, heated seats, DVD, 2 moonroofs. Immaculate and never abused. $27,950. Call 503-351-3976

Saab 9-3 SE 1999 $2700, 541-419-5060.

Mercury Mountaineer 1997 V8 5.0L Engine AWD Automatic 169K miles $3895, Peter 541.408.0877

Jaguar SV6 2000 4-dr. Has new: tires, brakes, rotors, calipers, radio, battery. AC great! 84K mi, like new, $7500. 541-923-2595

Mitsubishi 3000 GT 1999, auto., pearl white, very low mi. $9500. 541-788-8218.

Buick Park Avenue 1996, loaded, 27 mpg,

Jeep Wrangler 2004, right hand drive, 51K, auto., A/C, 4x4, AM/FM/CD, exc. cond., $14,500. 541-408-2111

Infiniti J30 1993 118.6K miles. 1 owner. Great shape. 4 separate studded tires on wheels incl. $3200. 541-382-7451

MERCEDES C300 2008 Audi A4 1999, dark blue, V6 2.8L, runs great. Sunroof, CD changer, studded tires incl. $4,500. Jeff, 541-980-5943

Honda CRV 2007 AWD 18mpg City/26 Hwy! 62k mi, MP3, multi-disc CD, sunroof, tow pkg, $17,500. 541-389-3319

Jeep Grand Cherokee Special Edition, 2004, 4x4, V8, 91K, Auto, AC,541-598-5111 $8895

FORD TAURUS LX 98 with 74K miles, gold color, one owner, non smoker, 27 mpg, V-6 motor, nice car and almost new! $3900 541-318-9999 or 541-815-3639

Buicks -Nice luxury cars, 30 mpg highway. 1995 Limited LeSabre, 111k, $3900, gold; 1998 Custom LeSabre, 91k at $4500, silver; 2005 LeSabre Custom 84k, $6900; 2006 Lucerne, 76k, $7900. Call 541-318-9999 or 541-815-3639.

Chysler La Baron Convertible 1990, Good condition, $3800, 541-416-9566

Ford Focus SE, 2001, 4-dr, 5-spd, 37 mpg, 94K miles, silver in color, power windows & doorlocks, keyless entry, AC, dual airbags, cruise control, CD. Maintained extremely well, runs & drives great, non-smoker, always garaged, $5400 OBO. 541-350-9938

convertible, 2 door, Navy with black soft top, tan interior, very good condition. $5200 firm. 541-317-2929.

SUBARUS!!! Nice clean and fully serviced . Most come with 3 year, 36,000 mile warranty. Call The Guru: 382-6067 or visit us at www.subaguru.com

Volvo

C70-T5,

2010

Convertible Hardtop, 11,500 mi., Celestial Blue w/Calcite Cream leather int. Premium & Climate pkgs. Warranty & Service to 10/2014. KBB SRP $33,540. Reduced! Now $29,900 OBO. 541-350-5437 Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subject to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

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Legal Notices

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Legal Notices

Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE City of Bend Request for Proposals Parking Management and Enforcement Services The City of Bend requests proposals to provide parking management and enforcement services for the Bend Downtown Parking District. Sealed proposals must be submitted by July 6, 2011, 3:00 PM, at City Hall, 710 NW Wall Street, 2nd Floor, Bend, Oregon, 97701, Attn.: Gwen Chapman, Purchasing Manager. Proposals will not be accepted after deadline. The outside of the package containing the proposal shall identify the proposer and the project: "Parking Management and Enforcement Services". Solicitation packets may be obtained from Central Oregon Builder's Exchange (COBE) at www.plansonfile.com (click on Public Works) or 1902 NE 4th Street, Bend, Oregon. Proposers must register with COBE as a document holder to receive notice of addenda. This can be done on the COBE website or by phone at 541-389-0123. Proposers are responsible for checking the website for the issuance of any addenda prior to submitting a proposal. Proposal results are available from COBE. The City of Bend reserves the right to: 1) reject any or all proposal not in compliance with public solicitation procedures and requirements, 2) reject any or all proposals in accordance with ORS 279B.100, 3) select consultant on the basis of the proposals or to conduct interviews with the highest qualified proposers after scoring, 4) seek clarifications of any or all proposals, and 5) to select the proposal which appears to be in the best interest of the City. Published: June 15, 2011 Gwen Chapman Purchasing Manager 541-385-6677 LEGAL NOTICE DESCHUTES COUNTY ROAD DEPARTMENT BEND, OREGON INVITATION TO BID 2011 FOR THE MANUFACTURE AND DELIVERY OF ONE (1) NEW AND UNUSED CURRENT MODEL LOADER MOUNTED SNOW BLOWER Sealed bids will be received at the Deschutes County Road Department, 61150 SE 27th Street, Bend, Oregon 97702, until but not after, 2:00 p.m. on June 28, 2011 at which time all bids for the above-entitled public works project will be publicly opened and read aloud. The proposed work consists of the following: The Manufacture and Delivery Of One (1) New and Unused Current Model, Loader Mounted Snow Blower. Specifications and other bid documents may be inspected and obtained at the Deschutes County Road Department, 61150 S.E. 27th Street, Bend, Oregon 97702 or the Deschutes County website, www.deschutes.org. Inquiries pertaining to these specifications shall be directed to Randy McCulley, Equipment Manager, telephone (541) 604-6917. IMPORTANT: Prospective bidders downloading/accessing website-posted project specifications and other bid documents MUST complete and submit the Contact Information Form provided on the website, or contact the Road Department by telephone at (541) 388-6581, to provide contact information, to receive follow-up documents (addenda, clarifications, etc). Failure to provide contact information to the Road Department will result in proposer disqualification. Only those requesting project specifications directly from the Road Department and those notifying the Road Department website access to the project specifications will receive follow-up documents (addenda, clarifications, etc). Bids shall be made on the forms furnished by the County, incorporating all contract documents, addressed and mailed or delivered to Tom Blust, Department Director, 61150 SE 27th Street, Bend, Oregon 97702 in a sealed envelope plainly marked "BID FOR ONE (1) NEW AND UNUSED LOADER MOUNTED SNOW BLOWER" and the name and address of the bidder. No bid will be received or considered by Deschutes County unless the bid contains a statement by the bidder that the provisions of ORS 279C.840 are to be complied with. Each bid must contain a statement as to whether the bidder is a resident bidder, as defined in ORS 279A.120 (1) (b). Oregon law requires the contract be awarded to the lowest responsive bidder who provides recycled materials instead of non-recycled materials pursuant to ORS 279A.125. The award of the contract and purchase of this equipment unit is subject to approval of the 2011/2012 Fiscal Year Budget by the Deschutes County Board of Commissioners. Subject to budget approval, the contract will be awarded no earlier than July 1, 2011 and at a regularly scheduled meeting of the Board of County Commissioners.

541-385-5809

Deschutes County may reject any bid not in compliance with all prescribed bidding procedures and requirements, and may reject for good cause any or all bids upon a finding of Deschutes County it is in the public interest to do so. The

protest period for this procurement is seven (7) calendar days. TOM BLUST Department Director PUBLISHED: DAILY JOURNAL OF COMMERCE: June 15, 2011 & June 22, 2011 THE BEND BULLETIN: June 15, 2011 & June 22, 2011 LEGAL NOTICE Notice of Meeting Accountable Behavioral Health Alliance (ABHA) Governing Board Thursday, June 23, 2011, 10:00 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Black Butte Ranch Meeting Room: The Sparks Room 13899 Bishops Cap, Black Butte Ranch, Oregon 97759 The Accountable Behavioral Health Alliance (ABHA) Governing Board will meet at the time and location stated above for the purpose of adopting an annual budget for fiscal year 2011-2012 in the amount of $22,359,940. This is a public meeting where deliberations of the Governing Board will take place. Any person may appear and speak to the Governing Board at the time designated on the agenda. This meeting location is accessible to persons with disabilities. Contact Brenda Larecy, Administrative Assistant, ABHA Administrative Office, 310 NW Fifth Street, Suite 206, Corvallis, OR 97330, weekdays between 8:30 am and 5 pm or call 541-753-8997 for copy of proposed budget and agenda or to request an interpreter for the hearing impaired or for other accommodations for person with disabilities. Requests should be made at least 48 hours before the meeting. The Board will adjourn to EXECUTIVE SESSION pursuant to ORS 192.660(2)(i), Executive Director Performance Review. Seth Bernstein, Ph.D. Executive Director Legal Notice On June 18, 2011, at 10:00 am at 257 SE 2nd St., Alliance Storage, LLC, will handle the disposition of the entire contents of Units #235 5x5 Natalie Flinn, #54 5x10 RoseAnn Sodja, #309 5x10 Brad Simpson, #533 8x10 Mary Johnson, #209 10x20 Vincent & Katie Herbert, #212 10x20 Brian Hayes, to satisfy said lien of the above named. Check out the classiieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

LEGAL NOTICE PREMIER WEST BANK, an Oregon banking institution, Plaintiff, v. STEPHEN TRONO, STEPHEN J. ROMANIA, and THE TRONO GROUP, LLC, an Oregon Limited Liability Company, TRONO DEVELOPMENT, INC., an Oregon corporation, RIVER BEND MASTER OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., an Oregon domestic non-profit corporation, FREEHOLD CAPITAL PARTNERS, LLC, a foreign limited liability company, FREEHOLD LICENSING, LTD, a Texas limited partnership, FCP REALTY INTERESTS II, LLC, a Nevada limited liability company, PETER M. THOMAS, MCINTOSH ENTERPRISES, INC., a Florida corporation, HARRY G. "SKIP" SMITH, an individual, and LAYNE ALLEN I, LLC, a California limited liability company, Defendants. Case No.: 10CV0235SF Notice is hereby given that I will on July 14, 2011, at 11:00 a.m. at the front, west, entrance to the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, Oregon, sell, at public oral auction to the highest bidder, for cash, the following real property, known as 721 SW Industrial Way, Bend, Oregon 97702, to wit, Lot Two (2) in Block Two (2) of Mill "A" Area of Shevlin Center Second Addition, City of Bend, Deschutes County Oregon. Said sale is made under an Amended Writ of Execution in Foreclosure issued out of the Circuit Court of the State of Oregon for the County of Deschutes, dated May 25, 2011, to me directed in the above-entitled action wherein Premier West Bank as plaintiff, recovered Limited General Judgment on February 24, 2011, against The Trono Group, LLC as defendant. BEFORE BIDDING AT THE SALE, A PROSPECTIVE BIDDER SHOULD INDEPENDENTLY INVESTIGATE: (a)The priority of the lien or interest of the judgment creditor; (b)Land use laws and regulations applicable to the property; (c)Approved uses for the property; (d)Limits on farming or forest practices on the property; (e)Rights of neighboring property owners; and (f)Environmental laws and regulations that affect the property. LARRY BLANTON Deschutes County Sheriff By Jinnie L. Willard, Civil Technician Published in Bend Bulletin Date of First and Successive Publications: June 8, 2011; June 15, 2011; June 22, 2011 Date of Last Publication June 29, 2011 Attorney: Joseph E. Kellerman, OSB #92199 Hornecker, Cowling, Hassen & Heysell, LLP 717 Murphy Road

Medford, OR 97504 (541) 779-8900 Conditions of Sale: Only U.S. currency and/or cashier's checks made payable to Deschutes County Sheriff's Office will be accepted. Payment must be made in full immediately upon the close of the sale. LEGAL NOTICE Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by Gene Cota and Merta Cota, Grantor(s), to First American Title trustee, in favor of National City Mortgage, as beneficiary, recorded 1/14/2008, in the Records of Deschutes County, Oregon as Instrument No. 2008-01725, which was subsequently assigned to Green Tree Servicing, LLC on March 23, 2010 under Instrument No. 2010-11846, and Katrina E. Glogowski being the successor trustee, covering the following described real property situated in the above-mentioned county and state, to wit: APN: 199021; Lot 24 of Boyd Acres View Estates Phase 3, Deschutes County, Oregon; Commonly known as 20705 Nicolette Drive, Bend, OR 97701. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to section 86.753(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes. The default for which foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: monthly payments of $1357.46 beginning on Nov., 2010; plus late charges of $203.61; plus advances of $0.00; together with title expenses, costs, trustee's fees and attorneys' fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: The sum of $210640.00 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.63% per annum from Nov., 2010 until paid; plus advances of $0.00; together with title expenses, costs, trustee's fees and attorneys' fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. Whereof, notice is hereby given that Katrina E. Glogowski, the undersigned trustee will on 08/05/2011 at the hour of 11:00 am standard time, as established by ORS 187.110, at the at the front entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend OR, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest

which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing Obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. Notice is hereby given that reinstatement or payoff quotes requested pursuant to ORS 86.757 and 86.759 must comply with that statute. Due to potential conflicts with federal law, persons having no record legal or equitable interest in the subject property will only receive information concerning the sale status and the opening bid. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. Dated: March 22, 2011 by: /s/ Katrina E. Glogowski, successor trustee, 2505 Third Ave., Ste. 100, Seattle, WA 98121 (206) 903-9966. LEGAL NOTICE Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by Emily P. Meeks and Jimmy Meeks, Grantor(s), to First American Title Insurance Company of Oregon trustee, in favor of National City Mortgage, as beneficiary, recorded 10/02/2007, in the Records of Deschutes County, Oregon as Instrument No. 2007-53284, which was subsequently assigned to Green Tree Servicing, LLC on March 23, 2010 under Instrument No. 2010-11821, and Katrina E. Glogowski being the successor trustee, covering the following described real property situated in the above-mentioned county and state, to wit: APN: 190576; Lot 19 in Block 74 of Bend Park, City of Bend, Deschutes County, Oregon; Commonly known as 396 SE Dell Lane, Bend, OR 97702. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to section

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE: YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED THAT THE AMOUNT OF YOUR INDEBTEDNESS TO THE BENEFICIARY, THEIR SUCCESSORS IN INTEREST AND/OR ASSIGNEES AS RECITED BELOW, AS OF THE DATE OF THIS NOTICE/LETTER, IS $150,976.09. INTEREST FEES AND COSTS WILL CONTINUE TO-ACCRUE AFTER THE DATE OF THIS NOTICE/LETTER. UNLESS YOU DISPUTE THE VALIDITY OF THE DEBT OR ANY PORTION THEREOF WITHIN 30 DAYS AFTER RECEIVING NOTICE OF THIS DOCUMENT, THIS OFFICE WILL ASSUME THE DEBT TO BE VALID. IF YOU NOTIFY THIS OFFICE IN WRITING WITHIN THE 30-DAY PERIOD THAT THE DEBT OR ANY PORTION THEREOF IS DISPUTED, VERIFICATION OF THE DEBT WILL BE OBTAINED AND WILL BE MAILED TO YOU. UPON WRITTEN REQUEST WITHIN 30 DAYS, THE NAME AND ADDRESS OF THE ORIGINAL CREDITOR, IF DIFFERENT FROM THE CURRENT CREDITOR, WILL BE PROVIDED. NOTICE: WE ARE A DEBT COLLECTOR. THIS COMMUNICATION IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR PURPOSES OF DEBT COLLECTION. Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by James P. Diner and Robin L. Diner, as tenants by the entirety, as grantor, to U.S. Bank Trust Company, National Association, as trustee, in favor of U.S. Bank National Association ND, as beneficiary, dated June 29, 2005, recorded July 5, 2005, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as Recording Number 2005-42434, covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: Lot 63, Block 19, Oregon Water Wonderland Unit 2, Deschutes County, Oregon. Note: Although not insured, any conveyance or encumbrance of the record title should include the following: Together with a 1/1045th undivided interest as tenants in common in the following described parcels: Parcels E, F, G, H and I. Together with that certain 27 x 56, Skyline manufactured home bearing VIN No. 67910697KAB, and more fully described in that certain Application to Exempt document filed with the Recorder of Deschutes County, Oregon on December 28, 2000 under Volume 2000, Page 52196. 1.Monthly Payments: Delinquent Monthly Payments Due from 9/5/2010 through 4/5/2011: 8 payment(s) at $880.13. Total Payments: $7,041.04; Late Charges: 6 late charge(s) at $4.01 for each monthly payment not made within 15 days of its due date. Total Late Charges: $264.06; Property inspection: $95.00; Advances/Escrow: $3483.00. THE SUM OWING ON THE OBLIGATION SECURED BY THE TRUST DEED: $10,883.10. 2.Delinquent Real Property Taxes, if any. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: Unpaid balance is $148,476.09 as of April 13, 2011. In addition there are attorney's fees and foreclosure costs which as of the date of this notice are estimated to be $2,500.00. Interest, late charges and advances for the protection and preservation of the property may accrue after the date of this notice. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, David A. Weibel, on August 24, 2011 at the hour of 11:00 am, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the front entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, in the City of Bend, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the said trust deed together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), paying all advances authorized under the trust deed, including all costs and expenses incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, and by curing any other default complained of therein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word “grantor” includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words “trustee” and “beneficiary” include their respective successors in interest, if any. DATED: April 19, 2011. David A. Weibel, Trustee. For Information Call: Bishop, White, Marshall & Weibel, P.S., 720 Olive Way, Suite 1301, Seattle, WA 98101, (206) 622-7527.

86.753(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes. The default for which foreclosure is made is grantor’s failure to pay when due the following sums: monthly payments of $1000.38 beginning on Dec., 2010; plus late charges of $0.00; plus advances of $0.00; together with title expenses, costs, trustee’s fees and attorneys’ fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: The sum of $218019.17 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.88% per annum from Dec., 2010 until paid; plus advances of $0.00; together with title expenses, costs, trustee’s fees and attorneys’ fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. Whereof, notice is hereby given that Katrina E. Glogowski, the undersigned trustee will on 7/22/2011 at the hour of 11:00 am standard time, as established by ORS 187.110, at the at the front entrance to the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, OR, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee’s and attorney’s fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. Notice is hereby given that reinstatement or payoff

quotes requested pursuant to ORS 86.757 and 86.759 must comply with that statute. Due to potential conflicts with federal law, persons having no record legal or equitable interest in the subject property will only receive information concerning the sale status and the opening bid. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word “grantor” includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words “trustee” and “beneficiary” include their respective successors in interest, if any. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder’s sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. Dated: March 14, 2011 by: /s/ Katrina E. Glogowski, successor trustee, 2505 Third Ave., Ste. 100, Seattle, WA 98121 (206) 903-9966. LEGAL NOTICE Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by Guy H. Walter and Belinda A. Walter, Grantor(s), to Amerititle trustee, in favor of National City Mortgage, as beneficiary, recorded 3/23/2007, in the Records of Deschutes County, Oregon as Instrument No. 2007-17207, which was subsequently assigned to Green Tree Servicing, LLC on March 23, 2010 under Instrument No. 2010-11764, and Katrina E. Glogowski being the successor trustee, covering the following described real property situated in the above-mentioned county and state, to wit: APN: 111460; Lot Fourteen (14), Block V, excepting a portion thereof, and a portion of Lot - See Exhibit A; Commonly known as 19205 Choctaw Rd., Bend, OR 97702. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to section 86.753(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes. The default for which foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: monthly payments of $1196.06 beginning on Jan, 2011; plus late charges of $239.20; plus advances of $0.00; together with title expenses, costs, trustee's fees and attorneys' fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and pre-

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by Michael J. Vandehey and Teresa A. Vandehey, as grantor to AmeriTitle, as Trustee, in favor of American General Financial Services (DE), Inc., as Beneficiary, dated July 22, 2005, recorded July 25, 2005, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 2005, at Page 47786, beneficial interest now held by Springleaf Financial Services, INC formerly known as American General Financial Services, INC., D/B/A American General Financial Services (DE), INC as covering the following described real property: See complete Legal Description attached hereto as Exhibit "A". EXHIBIT "A" LEGAL DESCRIPTION: A parcel of land located in the Southwest Quarter Southeast Quarter (SW1/4 SE 1/4) of Section Sixteen (16), Township Eighteen (18) South, Range Twelve (12), East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon, being more particularly described as follows: Beginning at the East 1/16 corner between Sections. 16 and 21, Township 18 S., R. 12, E.W.M, Deschutes County, Oregon; thence North 00°15'27" East, 1223.23 feet to the true point of beginning of this description; thence South 89°43'00" West, 185.19 feet to the Easterly right of way of Sipchen Road; thence along a curve to the left having a radius of 353.49 feet, a central angle of 7°57'28", the long chord of Which bears North 42°36'50" West, 49.06 feet: to the Easterly right of way of the Burlington Northern Railroad; thence along a curve to the left having a radius of 2009.86 feet, a central angle of 2°06'18", the long chord of which bears North 30°08'31" East, 73.90 feet: thence North 89°43"00" East, 181.75 feet; thence South 00°15'27" West, 100.00 feet to the true point of beginning. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 60872 Brosterhous Road, Bend, OR 97702. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $830.00, from August 15, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $173,039.95, together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.75% per annum from July 15, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on August 25, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. Dated: 04-21-2011 By: /s/:Kelly D. Sutherland KELLY D. SUTHERLAND Successor Trustee SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC 5501 N.E. 109th Court, Suite N Vancouver, WA 98662 www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa Telephone: (360) 260-2253 Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647 S&S 11-106302


F6 Wednesday, June 15, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

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payment penalties/premiums, if applicable. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: The sum of $145089.09 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.75% per annum from Jan, 2011 until paid; plus advances of $0.00; together with title expenses, costs, trustee's fees and attorneys' fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. Whereof, notice is hereby given that Katrina E. Glogowski, the undersigned trustee will on 08/19/2011 at the hour of 11:00 am standard time, as established by ORS 187.110, at the front entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, OR, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. Notice is hereby given that reinstatement or payoff quotes requested pursuant to ORS 86.757 and 86.759 must comply with that statute. Due to potential conflicts with federal law, persons having no record legal or equitable interest in the subject property will only receive information concerning the sale status and the opening bid. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. Dated: April 4, 2011 by: Katrina E. Glogowski, successor trustee, 2505 Third Ave., Ste. 100, Seattle, WA 98121 (206) 903-9966. LEGAL NOTICE Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by Brice McMorris and Sharon McMorris, Grantor(s), to First American Title trustee, in favor of National City Mortgage, as beneficiary, recorded 12/27/2006, in the Records of Deschutes County, Oregon as Instrument No. 2006-84123, which was subsequently assigned to Green Tree Servicing, LLC on March 22, 2010 under Instrument No. 2010-11445, and Katrina E. Glogowski being the successor trustee, covering the following described real property situated in the above-mentioned county and state, to wit: APN: 109631; Lot 43 in Block SS of Deschutes River Woods, Deschutes County, Oregon; Commonly known as 19108 Pumice Butte Rd., Bend, OR 97702. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to section 86.753(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes. The default for which foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: monthly payments of $1867.44 beginning on Dec., 2010; plus late charges of $186.74; plus advances of $0.00; together with title expenses, costs, trustee's fees and attorneys' fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: The sum of $308052.35 together with interest thereon at the rate of 5.75% per annum from Dec., 2010 until paid; plus advances of $0.00; together with title expenses, costs, trustee's fees and attorneys' fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. Whereof, notice is hereby given that Katrina E. Glogowski, the undersigned trustee will on 07/29/2011 at the hour of 11:00 am standard time, as established by ORS 187.110, at the at the front entrance to the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, OR, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or

had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. Notice is hereby given that reinstatement or payoff quotes requested pursuant to ORS 86.757 and 86.759 must comply with that statute. Due to potential conflicts with federal law, persons having no record legal or equitable interest in the subject property will only receive information concerning the sale status and the opening bid. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. Dated: March 15, 2011 by: /s/ Katrina E. Glogowski, successor trustee, 2505 Third Ave., Ste. 100, Seattle, WA 98121 (206) 903-9966. LEGAL NOTICE Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by Cortney Brummond and James Brummond, Grantor(s), to Amerititle trustee, in favor of National City Mortgage, as beneficiary, recorded 9/18/2007, in the Records of Deschutes County, Oregon as Instrument No. 2007-50610, which was subsequently assigned to Green Tree Servicing, LLC on March 23, 2010 under Instrument No. 2010-11816, and Katrina E. Glogowski being the successor trustee, covering the following described real property situated in the above-mentioned county and state, to wit: APN: 182697; Lot Seventeen (17), Block Ten (10), HAYDEN VILLAGE PHASE VI, Deschutes County, Oregon; Commonly known as 3127 SW Quartz Pl., Redmond, OR 97756. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to section 86.753(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes. The default for which foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: monthly payments of $1116.73 beginning on Dec., 2010; plus late charges of $111.66; plus advances of $22.01; together with title expenses, costs, trustee's fees and attorneys' fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: The sum of $173597.23 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.38% per annum from Dec., 2010 until paid; plus advances of $22.01; together with title expenses, costs, trustee's fees and attorneys' fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. Whereof, notice is hereby given that Katrina E. Glogowski, the undersigned trustee will on 07/29/2011 at the hour of 11:00 am standard time, as established by ORS 187.110, at the at the front entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, OR, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. Notice is hereby given that reinstatement or payoff

quotes requested pursuant to ORS 86.757 and 86.759 must comply with that statute. Due to potential conflicts with federal law, persons having no record legal or equitable interest in the subject property will only receive information concerning the sale status and the opening bid. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. Dated: March 18, 2011 by: /s/ Katrina E. Glogowski, successor trustee, 2505 Third Ave., Ste. 100, Seattle, WA 98121 (206) 903-9966. LEGAL NOTICE Sealed bids will be received by the Administrative School District #1 - Bend La Pine Schools at 520 NW Wall Street Room 330, Bend, Oregon 97701 until 2:00 PM on June 30, 2011 for the construction of the Bear Creek Elementary Boiler Replacement Project. The scope of work includes but is not limited to : Removal of 1 (one) boiler and associated heat exchangers, demolition of steam piping, installation of 2 (two) Aerco hot water boilers and associated pumps and hydronic piping. A MANDATORY pre-bid conference and project site-visit will be held on June 23, 2011 at 10:00 AM at Bear Creek Elementary, 51 SE 13th Street, Bend, OR 97701. Bidding Documents will be available for examination during the bidding period at the Maintenance Office located at 1410 SE Wilson Avenue, Bend, OR 97701, (541) 383-6060. For all other document locations please reference our advertisement for bid at www.fordgraphics.com LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by Raymond E. Tisdale, an unmarried man and Judith A. Beaumonte, an unmarried woman, as grantor to AmeriTitle, as Trustee, in favor of Mid Oregon Federal Credit Union, its successors and/or assigns, as Beneficiary, dated August 15, 1997, recorded August 20, 1997, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 458, at Page 2915, as Instrument No. 97-29719, beneficial interest having been assigned to PHH Mortgage Corporation, as covering the following described real property: Lot Seven (7), Block EEE, Deschutes River Woods, Deschutes County, Oregon. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 60223 Turquoise Road, Bend, OR 97702. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $286.56, from January 1, 2011, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $32,206.72, together with interest thereon at the rate of 7.75% per annum from December 1, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on August 25, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In con-

struing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. Dated: 04-22-2011 By: /s/:Kelly D. Sutherland KELLY D. SUTHERLAND Successor Trustee SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC 5501 N.E. 109th Court, Suite N Vancouver, WA 98662 www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa Telephone: (360) 260-2253 Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647 S&S 11-106471

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0191741032 T.S. No.: 10-10689-6 Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust dated as of November 24, 2003 made by, AURELIO GARCIA GARCIA, A MARRIED MAN AS HIS SEPARATE PROPERTY, as the original grantor, to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON, as the original trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR ACTION MORTGAGE COMPANY, as the original beneficiary, recorded on November 26, 2003, as Instrument No. 2003-81907 of Official Records in the Office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, Oregon (the "Deed of Trust"). The current beneficiary is: WELLS FARGO BANK NA, (the "Beneficiary"). APN: 111406 LOT ONE HUNDRED FIFTY-NINE (159), BLOCK PP, DESCHUTES RIVER WOODS, RECORDED MARCH 22, 1962, IN PLAT BOOK 6, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON Commonly known as: 19074 CHOCTAW RD., BEND, OR Both the Beneficiary and the Trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default(s) for which the foreclosure is made is that the grantor(s): failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; together with other fees and expenses incurred by the Beneficiary; and which defaulted amounts total: $12,138.33 as of May 31, 2011. By this reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: The sum of $116,404.88 together with interest thereon at the rate of 5.87500% per annum from May 1, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all Trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the Beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust-Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as the duly appointed Trustee under the Deed of Trust will on October 3, 2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution of the Deed of Trust, together with any interest which the grantor or his successor(s) in interest acquired after the execution of the Deed of Trust, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the Trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred}, together with the costs, Trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Deed of Trust, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 1920 Main Street, Suite 1120, Irvine, CA 92614 949-252-4900 FOR SALE INFORMATION CALL: 714.730.2727 Website for Trustee's Sale Information: www.lpsasap.com In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Deed of

Trust, the words "Trustee" and "Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: June 1, 2011 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee Michael Busby, Authorized Signature ASAP# 4011847 06/08/2011, 06/15/2011, 06/22/2011, 06/29/2011 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by Kenneth D. Purvis and Mary K. Purvis, as tenants by the entirety, as grantor to AmeriTitle, as Trustee, in favor of Silver Falls Bank, as Beneficiary, dated October 28, 2004, recorded November 5, 2004, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 2004, at Page 66444, beneficial interest having been assigned to EverBank, as covering the following described real property: Lot Two Hundred (200), in Crossroads Third Addition, Deschutes County, Oregon. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 14597 Bluegrass Loop, Sisters, OR 97759. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $863.35, from November 1, 2010, and monthly payments in the sum of $1,856.08, from December 1, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $134,688.40, together with interest thereon at the rate of 5.625% per annum from October 1, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on September 8, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the ex-

ecution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. Dated: 05-06-2011 By: /s/:Kelly D. Sutherland KELLY D. SUTHERLAND Successor Trustee SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC 5501 N.E. 109th Court, Suite N Vancouver, WA 98662 www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa Telephone: (360) 260-2253 Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647 S&S 11-106258

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by Delores A. Carroll, an unmarried woman, as grantor to AmeriTitle, as Trustee, in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, FA, as Beneficiary, dated January 26, 2007, recorded January 31, 2007, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 2007, at Page 06434, beneficial interest having been assigned to U.S. Bank National Association, as Trustee, successor in interest to Bank of America, National Association as Trustee as successor by merger to Lasalle Bank, National Association as Trustee for WaMu Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates Series 2007-OA4 Trust, as covering the following described real property: See complete Legal Description attached hereto as Exhibit "A". EXHIBIT "A" LEGAL DESCRIPTION: A parcel of land in Block "A" of the Replat of a portion of the REDMOND TOWNSITE COMPANY'S FIRST ADDITION, Deschutes County, Oregon, more particularly described as follows: Beginning at the Northeast corner of Block "A"; thence South 0° 20' 45" East, a distance of 119.00 feet to the true point of beginning; thence continuing South 0° 20' 45" East, a distance of 81.00 feet; thence South 89° 07' 14" West, along the South edge of a rock wall, a distance of 100.00 feet; thence North 0° 20' 45" West, a distance of 81.66 feet; thence North 89° 30' 00" East, a distance of 100.00 feet to the true point of beginning. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 125 S.W. Canyon Drive, Redmond, OR 97756. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $1,123.08, from December 1, 2009, monthly payments in the sum of $1,182.62, from March 1, 2010, monthly payments in the sum of $1,218.22, from October 1, 2010, and monthly payments in the sum of $1,282.23, from March 1, 2011, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $217,873.81, together with interest thereon at the rate of 4.207% per annum from November 1, 2009, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on September 2, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. Dated: 04-29-2011 By: /s/:Kelly D. Sutherland KELLY D. SUTHERLAND Successor Trustee SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC 5501 N.E. 109th Court, Suite N Vancouver, WA 98662 www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa Telephone: (360) 260-2253 Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647 S&S 10-105551

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx9040 T.S. No.: 1316872-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Kenneth R. Erickson, An Unmarried Man, as Grantor to Amerititle, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. As Nominee For Lehman Brothers Bank, Fsb, A Federal Savings Bank, as Beneficiary, dated July 14, 2005, recorded July 21, 2005, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2005-46981 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Parcel one (1) of partition plat no. 2004-82, Deschutes County, Oregon Commonly known as: 21164 Reed Market Rd. Bend OR 97702. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due July 1, 2010 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $851.46 Monthly Late Charge $.00. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations se-

cured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $143,402.39 together with interest thereon at 7.125% per annum from June 01, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on August 30, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than

such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: April 25, 2011. Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-379287 05/25, 06/01, 06/08, 06/15

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S.#: OR-11-435984-NH Reference is made to that certain deed made by, JENNIFER M. BAILEY, A/K/A JENNIFER BAILEY, AN UNMARRIED WOMAN as Grantor to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., ("MERS"), AS NOMINEE FOR BANK OF THE WEST, as Beneficiary, dated 3/26/2008, recorded 4/23/2008, in official records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon in book/ reel/ volume number xxx at page number xxx fee/ file/ instrument/ microfile/ reception number 2008-17783,, covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 140756 LOT ELEVEN (11), BLOCK FIVE (5), FOREST VIEW, RECORDED JUNE 10, 1971, IN CABINET A, PAGE 364, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 52711 SUNRISE BLVD. LA PINE, OR 97739 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantors: The installments of principal and interest which became due on 11/1/2010, and all subsequent installments of principal and interest through the date of this Notice, plus amounts that are due for late charges, delinquent property taxes, insurance premiums, advances made on senior liens, taxes and/or insurance, trustee's fees, and any attorney fees and court costs arising from or associated with the beneficiaries efforts to protect and preserve its security, all of which must be paid as a condition of reinstatement, including all sums that shall accrue through reinstatement or pay-off. Nothing in this notice shall be construed as a waiver of any fees owing to the Beneficiary under the Deed of Trust pursuant to the terms of the loan documents. Monthly Payment $1,378.27 Monthly Late Charge $68.91 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $178,378.26 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.5000 per annum from 10/1/2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on 9/19/2011 at the hour of 11:00:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, FRONT ENTRANCE OF THE COURTHOUSE, 1164 N.W. BOND STREET, BEND, OR County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. For Sale Information Call: 714-730-2727 or Login to: www.fidelityasap.com In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Pursuant to Oregon Law, this sale will not be deemed final until the Trustee's deed has been issued by FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY. If there are any irregularities discovered within 10 days of the date of this sale, that the trustee will rescind the sale, return the buyer's money and take further action as necessary. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee, or the Mortgagee's Attorney. NOTICE TO RESIDENTIAL TENANTS The property in which you are living is in foreclosure. A foreclosure sale is scheduled for 9/19/2011. Unless the lender who is foreclosing on this property is paid, the foreclosure will go through and someone new will own this property. The following information applies to you only if you occupy and rent this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The information does not apply to you if you own this property or if you are not a residential tenant. If the foreclosure goes through, the business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out. The buyer must first give you an eviction notice in writing that specifies the date by which you must move out. The buyer may not give you this notice until after the foreclosure sale happens. If you do not leave before the move-out date, the buyer can have the sheriff remove you from the property after a court hearing. You will receive notice of the court hearing. FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES YOU TO BE NOTIFIED IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THIS PROPERTY AS A RESIDENTIAL DWELLING UNDER A LEGITIMATE RENTAL AGREEMENT, FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU A NOTICE IN WRITING A CERTAIN NUMBER OF DAYS BEFORE THE BUYER CAN REQUIRE YOU TO MOVE OUT. THE FEDERAL LAW THAT REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU THIS NOTICE IS EFFECTIVE UNTIL DECEMBER 31,2012. Under federal law, the buyer must give you at least 90 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If you are renting this property under a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), you may stay until the end of your lease term. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 90 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 90 days left. STATE LAW NOTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS IF THE FEDERAL LAW DOES NOT APPLY, STATE LAW STILL REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU NOTICE IN WRITING BEFORE REQUIRING YOU TO MOVE OUT IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THE PROPERTY AS A TENANT IN GOOD FAITH. EVEN IF THE FEDERAL LAW REQUIREMENT IS NO LONGER EFFECTIVE AFTER DECEMBER 31, 2012, THE REQUIREMENT UNDER STATE LAW STILL APPLIES TO YOUR SITUATION. Under state law, if you have a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), the buyer must give you at least 60 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 30 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 30 days left. If you are renting under a month-to-month or week-to-week rental agreement, the buyer must give you at least 30 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. IMPORTANT: For the buyer to be required to give you a notice under state law, you must prove to the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale that you are occupying and renting this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The name and address of the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale is shown on this notice under the heading "TRUSTEE". You must mail or deliver your proof not later than 8/20/2011 (30 days before the date first set for the foreclosure sale). Your proof must be in writing and should be a copy of your rental agreement or lease. If you do not have a written rental agreement or lease, you can provide other proof, such as receipts for rent paid. ABOUT YOUR SECURITY DEPOSIT Under state law, you may apply your security deposit and any rent you paid in advance against the current rent you owe your landlord. To do this, you must notify your landlord in writing that you want to subtract the amount of your security deposit or prepaid rent from your rent payment. You may do this only for the rent you owe your current landlord. If you do this, you must do so before the foreclosure sale. The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale is not responsible to you for any deposit or prepaid rent you paid to your landlord. ABOUT YOUR TENANCY AFTER THE FORECLOSURE SALE The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale may be willing to allow you to stay as a tenant instead of requiring you to move out. You should contact the buyer to discuss that possibility if you would like to stay. Under state law, if the buyer accepts rent from you, signs a new residential rental agreement with you or does not notify you in writing within 30 days after the date of the foreclosure sale that you must move out, the buyer becomes your new landlord and must maintain the property. Otherwise, the buyer is not your landlord and is not responsible for maintaining the property on your behalf and you must move out by the date the buyer specifies in a notice to you. YOU SHOULD CONTINUE TO PAY RENT TO YOUR LANDLORD UNTIL THE PROPERTY IS SOLD TO ANOTHER BUSINESS OR INDIVIDUAL OR UNTIL A COURT OR A LENDER TELLS YOU OTHERWISE. IF YOU DO NOT PAY RENT, YOU CAN BE EVICTED. AS EXPLAINED ABOVE, YOU MAY BE ABLE TO APPLY A DEPOSIT OR RENT YOU PREPAID AGAINST YOUR CURRENT RENT OBLIGATION. BE SURE TO KEEP PROOF OF ANY PAYMENTS YOU MAKE AND OF ANY NOTICE YOU GIVE OR RECEIVE CONCERNING THE APPLICATION OF YOUR DEPOSIT OR PREPAID RENT. IT IS UNLAWFUL FOR ANY PERSON TO TRY TO FORCE YOU TO LEAVE YOUR HOME WITHOUT FIRST GOING TO COURT TO EVICT YOU. FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR RIGHTS, YOU MAY WISH TO CONSULT A LAWYER. If you believe you need legal assistance, contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice. If you do not have enough money to pay a lawyer or are otherwise eligible, you may be able to receive legal assistance for free. Information about whom to contact for free legal assistance is included with this notice. Oregon State Bar: (503) 684-3763; (800) 452-7636 Legal assistance: www.lawhelp.org/or/index.cfm Dated: 5/13/2011 FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as trustee 818 Stewart Street, Suite 800 Seattle, WA 98101 Signature By: u Brooke Frank, Assistant Secretary Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington as agent for FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 For Non-Sale Information:_ Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 Fax: 619-645-7716 If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right's against the real property only. THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. ASAP# 3998700 06/01/2011, 06/08/2011, 06/15/2011, 06/22/2011


To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, June 15, 2011 F7

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0155544174 T.S. No.: 11-01221-8 Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust dated as of August 18, 2006 made by, DEBRA J. LACHANCE SPICER AND DAVID H. SPICER, as the original grantor, to AMERITITLE, as the original trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR GROUP ONE LENDING, A DIVISION OF NORTHWEST MORTGAGE GROUP, INC., as the original beneficiary, recorded on August 23, 2006, as Instrument No. 2006-57637 of Official Records in the Office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, Oregon (the "Deed of Trust"). The current beneficiary is: HSBC Bank USA, National Association as Trustee for Wells Fargo Asset Securities Corporation, Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2006-18, {the "Beneficiary"). APN: 194639 LOT SIXTEEN (16) OF RIVER'S EDGE VILLAGE, PHASE V, CITY OF BEND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 2841 NW FAIRWAY HEIGHTS DRIVE, BEND, OR Both the Beneficiary and the Trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default(s) for which the foreclosure is made is that the grantor(s): failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; together with other fees and expenses incurred by the Beneficiary; and which defaulted amounts total: $31,343.28 as of May 27, 2011. By this reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: The sum of $432,868.87 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.50000% per annum from August 1, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all Trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the Beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as the duly appointed Trustee under the Deed of Trust will on October 3, 2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution of the Deed of Trust, together with any interest which the grantor or his successor(s) in interest acquired after the execution of the Deed of Trust, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the Trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, Trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Deed of Trust, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 1920 Main Street, Suite 1120, Irvine, CA 92614 949-252-4900 FOR SALE INFORMATION CALL: 714.730.2727 Website for Trustee's Sale Information: www.lpsasap.com TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF SALE In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Deed of Trust, the words "Trustee" and 'Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 06/01/2011 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee Michael Busby, Authorized Signature ASAP# 4011927 06/08/2011, 06/15/2011, 06/22/2011, 06/29/2011 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by Kenneth P. Delunas and Jan E. Delunas, as grantor to U.S. Bank of Washington, N.A., as Trustee, in favor of U.S. Bancorp Mortgage Company, as Beneficiary, dated September 25, 1992, recorded October 13, 1992, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 279, at Page 0243, as Instrument No. 92-33938, beneficial interest having been assigned to JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, successor in interest to Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, as Receiver for Washington Mutual Bank, as covering the following described real property: Homesite No. 154 of Glaze Meadow Homesite Section, Sixth Addition, Black Butte Ranch, Deschutes County, Oregon. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 13967 Hedge Nettle, Black Butte Ranch, OR 97759. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the de-

fault for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $1,796.07, from February 1, 2011, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $108,409.33, together with interest thereon at the rate of 7.875% per annum from January 1, 2011, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on September 16, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. Dated: 05-13-2011 By: /s/:Kelly D. Sutherland KELLY D. SUTHERLAND Successor Trustee SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC 5501 N.E. 109th Court, Suite N Vancouver, WA 98662 www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa Telephone: (360) 260-2253 Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647 S&S 08-101271 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by David I. Epstein, as grantor to First American Title Ins. Co., as Trustee, in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, as Beneficiary, dated June 6, 2006, recorded June 15, 2006, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 2006, at Page 41453, beneficial interest now held by JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, successor in interest to Washington Mutual Bank as covering the following described real property: Lot 13 of Forest Meadow, Phase 1, City of Bend, Deschutes County, Oregon. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 61198 Forest Meadow Place, Bend, OR 97702. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $2,199.50, from February 1, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $398,400.00, together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.625% per annum from January 1, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the un-

dersigned trustee will on August 26, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. Dated: 04-22-2011 By: /s/:Kelly D. Sutherland KELLY D. SUTHERLAND Successor Trustee SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC 5501 N.E. 109th Court, Suite N Vancouver, WA 98662 www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa Telephone: (360) 260-2253 Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647 S&S 10-104649 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx0713 T.S. No.: 1323088-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by James L. Thill, as Grantor to Deschutes County Title Co., as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., ("mers") As Nominee For Homecomings Financial Network, Inc., as Beneficiary, dated August 22, 2006, recorded August 28, 2006, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2006-58974 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: The north half of the south half of lot two in section 30, township 15 south, range 13 east of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 3698 SW Helmholtz Way Redmond OR 97756. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due July 1, 2010 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $3,555.47 Monthly Late Charge $160.78. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $792,545.00 together with interest thereon at 3.375% per annum from June 01, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on August 30, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together

with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: April 25, 2011. Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-379281 05/25, 06/01, 06/08, 06/15 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by Kirk D. Kowalke, as grantor to Western Title Company, as Trustee, in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, as Beneficiary, dated March 13, 2006, recorded March 15, 2006, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 2006, at Page 17918, beneficial interest now held by JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, successor in interest to Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, as Receiver for Washington Mutual Bank as covering the following described real property: See complete Legal Description attached hereto as Exhibit "A". EXHIBIT "A" Lot 61, CASCADE VIEW ESTATES, PHASE 7. EXCEPTING THEREFROM the following described parcel: BEGINNING at the comer common to Lots 61 and 60, CASCADE VIEW ESTATES, Phase 7, and Lot 5, Block 7, SOUTH HEIGHTS ADDITION; thence along the South line of said Lot 61, North 89°39'54" West, 119.00 feet to the Northeast right-of-way of SW Cascade Vista Drive; thence along said right-of-way, North 27°15'23" West, 31.36 feet; thence leaving said right-of-way, North 72°00'11" East 97.01 feet to the line common to said Lots 61 and 60; thence along said common line, South 35°03'42" East, 71.52 feet to the point of beginning. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 3848 S.W. 35th Place, Redmond, OR 97756. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $1,600.83, from February 1, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has

declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $340,000.00, together with interest thereon at the rate of 5.65% per annum from January 1, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on August 30, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. Dated: 04-27-2011 By: /s/:Kelly D. Sutherland KELLY D. SUTHERLAND Successor Trustee SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC 5501 N.E. 109th Court, Suite N Vancouver, WA 98662 www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa Telephone: (360) 260-2253 Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647 S&S 10-104638

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by Barbara A. Hartnett, as grantor to First American Title Insurance Co., as Trustee, in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, as Beneficiary, dated September 17, 2004, recorded September 23, 2004, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 2004, at Page 57189, beneficial interest having been assigned to Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. as Trustee for Wamu Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates Series 2005-PR1 Trust, as covering the following described real property: LOT 14 OF HOLLIDAY PARK THIRD ADDITION, PHASE 1, CITY OF BEND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 2586 N.E. Robinson Street, Bend, OR 97701. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $856.06, from December 1, 2009, and monthly payments in the sum of $793.99, from November 1, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $167,879.01, together with interest thereon at the rate of 3.232% per annum from November 1, 2009, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on August 16, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FMB-108725 NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, CHARLES V. SANDERSON III AND HELEN L. SANDERSON, AS TENANTS BY THE ENTIRETY, as grantor, to PACIFIC NORTHWEST TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR INDYMAC BANK, F.S.B., A FEDERALLY CHARTERED SAVINGS BANK, as beneficiary, dated 2/23/2007, recorded 3/6/2007, under Instrument No. 2007-13501, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Trustee of the IndyMac INDX Mortgage Trust 2007-AR5, Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2007-AR5 under the Pooling and Servicing Agreement dated March 1, 2007. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: THE WESTERLY HALF OF LOT FIVE, BLOCK TWO, FIRST ON THE HILL SITES, IN DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 19479 WEST CAMPBELL ROAD BEND, OR 97702 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of May 16, 2011 Delinquent Payments from January 01, 2011 S payments at $ 2,862.16 each $14,310.80 (01-01-11 through 05-16-11) Late Charges: $642.70 Beneficiary Advances: $33.00 Suspense Credit: $0.00 TOTAL: $14,986.50 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $465,668.55, PLUS interest thereon at 6.625% per annum from 12/01/10 to 1/1/2012, 6.625% per annum from 1/1/2012, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on September 16, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 5/16/2011 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By KAREN JAMES, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206)340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com ASAP# 3999230 05/25/2011, 06/01/2011, 06/08/2011, 06/15/2011

feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. Dated: 04-14-2011

By: /s/:Kelly D. Sutherland KELLY D. SUTHERLAND Successor Trustee SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC 5501 N.E. 109th Court, Suite N Vancouver, WA 98662 www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa Telephone: (360) 260-2253 Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647 S&S 10-104094 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by Soni J. Kennedy and, Jeff S. Kennedy, as grantor to Western Title Company, as Trustee, in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, FA, as Beneficiary, dated February 16, 2007, recorded February 27, 2007, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 2007, at Page 11756, beneficial interest having been assigned to U.S. Bank National Association, as Trustee, successor in interest to Bank of America, National Association as Trustee as successor by merger to Lasalle Bank, National Association as Trustee for WaMu Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates Series 2007-OA3 Trust, as covering the following described real prop-

erty: Lot 2, OAKVIEW, PHASE VII, Deschutes County, Oregon. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 2827 N.E. Hope Drive, Bend, OR 97701. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $1,489.48, from April 1, 2010, monthly payments in the sum of $1,475.95, from February 1, 2011, and monthly payments in the sum of $1,566.61, from April 1, 2011, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $305,408.21, together with interest thereon at the rate of 3.413% per annum from March 1, 2010, together with

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Legal Notices

Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FMB-109625 NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, RAYMOND JAY HAYES, as grantor, to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR AMERICAN MORTGAGE NETWORK, INC., DBA AMERICAN MORTGAGE NETWORK OF OREGON, as beneficiary, dated 11/22/2006, recorded 12/4/2006, under Instrument No. 2006-79425, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by ONEWEST BANK, FSB. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: Real property in the County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, described as follows: THAT PORTION OF THE SOUTH HALF OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER (S1/2 SW1/4) OF SECTION 32, TOWNSHIP 14 SOUTH, RANGE 13, EAST OF THE WILLAMETTE MERIDIAN, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON, MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF SAID SOUTH HALF OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER (S1/2 S W1/4); THENCE EASTERLY ALONG THE NORTH LINE OF SAID SOUTH HALF OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER (S1/2 SW1/4) A DISTANCE OF 800 FEET TO A POINT WHICH IS MARKED BY AN IRON ROD; THENCE SOUTHERLY ON A LINE PARALLEL TO AND 800 FEET EAST OF THE WEST LINE OF SAID SECTION TO THE CENTER LINE OF CENTRAL OREGON IRRIGATION DISTRICT LATERAL C-23 AS NOW LOCATED, WHICH POINT IS THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE NORTHERLY ALONG SAID LINE PARALLEL TO AND 800 FEET EAST OF THE WEST LINE OF SAID SECTION A DISTANCE OF 360 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO A POINT WHICH IS 310 FEET SOUTH OF THE ABOVE-DESCRIBED IRON PIN ON THE NORTH LINE OF SAID SOUTH HALF OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER (S1/2 SW1/4); THENCE EASTERLY 552 FEET, MORE OR LESS, ON A LINE TO A POINT ON THE EAST LINE OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER (SW1/4 SW1/4) OF SAID SECTION WHICH IS 268 FEET SOUTH OF THE NORTH LINE OF SAID SOUTH HALF OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER (S1/2 SW1/4); THENCE EASTERLY ON THE SAME BEARING AS THE LAST ABOVE DESCRIBED LINE 260 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE WEST RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF NORTHWEST MARKET ROAD AS NOW LOCATED OVER SAID PREMISES; THENCE SOUTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID WEST RIGHT OF WAY LINE 73 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO ITS INTERSECTION WITH THE CENTER LINE OF CENTRAL OREGON IRRIGATION DISTRICT LATERAL C-23; THENCE WESTERLY ALONG THE CENTER LINE OF SAID C. O. I. D. LATERAL C-23 TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. Tax Parcel Number: 128563 The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 3535 NORTHWEST WAY REDMOND, OR 97756 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of June 6, 2011 Delinquent Payments from February 01, 2011 5 payments at $1,773.66 each $8,868.30 (02-01-11 through 06-06-11) Late Charges: $443.40 Beneficiary Advances: $22.00 Suspense Credit: $0.00 TOTAL: $9,333.70 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $248,473.98, PLUS interest thereon at 7.250% per annum from 1/1/2011, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on October 7, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. NOTICE TO RESIDENTIAL TENANTS: The property in which you are living is in foreclosure. A foreclosure sale is scheduled for October 7, 2011. Unless the lender who is foreclosing on this property is paid, the foreclosure will go through and someone new will own this property. The following information applies to you only if you occupy and rent this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The information does not apply to you if you own this property or if you are not a residential tenant. If the foreclosure goes through, the business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out. The buyer must first give you an eviction notice in writing that specifies the date by which you must move out. The buyer may not give you this notice until after the foreclosure sale happens. If you do not leave before the move-out date, the buyer can have the sheriff remove you from the property after a court hearing. You will receive notice of the court hearing. FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES YOU TO BE NOTIFIED IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THIS PROPERTY AS A RESIDENTIAL DWELLING UNDER A LEGITIMATE RENTAL AGREEMENT, FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU NOTICE IN WRITING A CERTAIN NUMBER OF DAYS BEFORE THE BUYER CAN REQUIRE YOU TO MOVE OUT. THE FEDERAL LAW THAT REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU THIS NOTICE IS EFFECTIVE UNTIL DECEMBER 31, 2012. Under federal law, the buyer must give you at least 90 days notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If you are renting this property under a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), you may stay until the end of your lease term. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 90 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 90 days left. STATE LAW NOTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS: IF THE FEDERAL LAW DOES NOT APPLY, STATE LAW STILL REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU NOTICE IN WRITING BEFORE REQUIRING YOU TO MOVE OUT IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THE PROPERTY AS A TENANT IN GOOD FAITH. EVEN IF THE FEDERAL LAW REQUIREMENT IS NO LONGER EFFECTIVE AFTER DECEMBER 31, 2012, THE REQUIREMENT UNDER STATE LAW STILL APPLIES TO YOUR SITUATION. Under state law, if you have a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), the buyer must give you at least 60 days notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 30 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 30 days left. If you are renting under a month-to-month or week-to-week rental agreement, the buyer must give you at least 30 days notice in writing before requiring you to move out. IMPORTANT: For the buyer to be required to give you notice under state law, you must prove to the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale that you are occupying and renting this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The name and address of the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale is shown on this notice under the heading "TRUSTEE". You must mail or deliver your proof not later than 9/7/2011 (30 days before the date first set for the foreclosure sale). Your proof must be in writing and should be a copy of your rental agreement or lease. If you do not have a written rental agreement or lease, you can provide other proof, such as receipts for rent you paid. ABOUT YOUR SECURITY DEPOSIT Under state law, you may apply your security deposit and any rent you paid in advance against the current rent you owe your landlord. To do this, you must notify your landlord in writing that you want to subtract the amount of your security deposit or prepaid rent from you rent payment. You may do this only for the rent you owe you current landlord. If you do this, you must do so before the foreclosure sale. The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale is not responsible to you for any deposit or prepaid rent you paid to your landlord. ABOUT YOUR TENANCY AFTER THE FORECLOSURE SALE The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale may be willing to allow you to stay as a tenant instead of requiring you to move out. You should contact the buyer to discuss that possibility if you would like to stay. Under state law, if the buyer accepts rent from you, signs a new residential rental agreement with you or does not notify you in writing within 30 days after the date of the foreclosure sale that you must move out, the buyer becomes your new landlord and must maintain the property. Otherwise, the buyer is not your landlord and is not responsible for maintaining the property on your behalf and you must move out by the date the buyer specifies in a notice to you. YOU SHOULD CONTINUE TO PAY RENT TO YOUR LANDLORD UNTIL THE PROPERTY IS SOLD TO ANOTHER BUSINESS OR INDIVIDUAL OR UNTIL A COURT OR A LENDER TELLS YOU OTHERWISE. IF YOU DO NOT PAY RENT, YOU CAN BE EVICTED. AS EXPLAINED ABOVE, YOU MAY BE ABLE TO APPLY A DEPOSIT YOU MADE OR PREPAID RENT YOU PAID AGAINST YOUR CURRENT RENT OBLIGATION. BE SURE TO KEEP PROOF OF ANY PAYMENTS YOU MAKE AND OF ANY NOTICE YOU GIVE OR RECEIVE CONCERNING THE APPLICATION OF YOUR DEPOSIT OR YOUR PREPAID RENT. IT IS UNLAWFUL FOR ANY PERSON TO TRY TO FORCE YOU TO LEAVE YOUR HOME WITHOUT FIRST GOING TO COURT TO EVICT YOU. FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR RIGHTS, YOU MAY WISH TO CONSULT A LAWYER. If you believe you need legal assistance, contact the Oregon State Bar at 800-452-7636 and ask for lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice. If you do not have enough money to pay a lawyer and are otherwise eligible, you may be able to receive legal assistance for free. Information about whom to contact for free legal assistance may be obtained through Safenet at 800-SAFENET. DATED: 6/6/2011 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By: KAREN JAMES, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206)340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com ASAP# FNMA4016351 06/15/2011, 06/22/2011, 06/29/2011, 07/06/2011


F8 Wednesday, June 15, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

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Legal Notices

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all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on September 7, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. Dated: 05-04-2011 By: /s/:Kelly D. Sutherland KELLY D. SUTHERLAND Successor Trustee SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC 5501 N.E. 109th Court, Suite N Vancouver, WA 98662 www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa Telephone: (360) 260-2253 Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647 S&S 10-105596 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx1841 T.S. No.: 1323151-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Allison K. Suran, Scott W. Suran, as Grantor to Amerititle, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., ("mers"), As Nominee For American Brokers Conduit, as Beneficiary, dated June 14, 2007, recorded June 25, 2007, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2007-35543 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot three (3), block one (1), Pohaku Ranch, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 20497 Pohaku Rd. Bend OR 97701. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due December 1, 2010 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $2,637.94 Monthly Late Charge $108.71. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $703,593.29 together with interest thereon at 7.250% per annum from November 01, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on August 30, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or

had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: April 25, 2011. Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-379283 05/25, 06/01, 06/08, 06/15 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by Geoffrey W. Hays and Kellene S. Hays, as tenants by the entirety, as grantor to Deschutes County Title Company, as Trustee, in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, as Beneficiary, dated April 1, 2006, recorded April 10, 2006, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 2006, at Page 24425, beneficial interest now held by JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, successor in interest to Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, as Receiver for Washington Mutual Bank as covering the following described real property: Lot Six in Block Four of Crestridge Estates, Deschutes County, Oregon. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 7145 N.W. Poplar Drive, Redmond, OR 97756. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $2,417.35, from September 1, 2009, monthly payments in the sum of $2,536.23, from February 1, 2010, and monthly payments in the sum of $2,418.92, from February 1, 2011, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $417,000.00, together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.025% per annum from August 1, 2009, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on September 16, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in

interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. Dated: 05-13-2011 By: /s/:Kelly D. Sutherland KELLY D. SUTHERLAND Successor Trustee SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC 5501 N.E. 109th Court, Suite N Vancouver, WA 98662 www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa Telephone: (360) 260-2253 Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647 S&S 10-103954 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0215859422 T.S. No.: 11-00480-6 Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust dated as of July 20, 2009 made by, RICHARD G. COPE AND KIMBERLY A. COPE, as the original grantor, to ROBERT W. KRAFT, as the original trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR ACCESS NATIONAL MORTGAGE CORPORATION, as the original beneficiary, recorded on July 28, 2009, as Instrument No. 2009-32057 of Official Records in the Office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, Oregon (the "Deed of Trust"). The current beneficiary is: Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., (the "Beneficiary"). APN: 140394 LOT TWENTY-ONE (21), BLOCK TWENTY-SIX (26), TALL PINES FIFTH ADDITION, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON Commonly known as: 15884 BUSHBERRY CT, LA PINE, OR Both the Beneficiary and the Trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default(s) for which the foreclosure is made is that the grantor(s): failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; and which defaulted amounts total: $19,880.53 as of June 6, 2011. By this reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: The sum of $322,616.59 together with interest thereon at the rate of 5.00000% per annum from September 1, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all Trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the Beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as the duly appointed Trustee under the Deed of Trust will on October 7, 2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution of the Deed of Trust, together with any interest which the grantor or his successor(s) in interest acquired after the execution of the Deed of Trust, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the Trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due {other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, Trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Deed of Trust, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 1920 Main Street, Suite 1120, Irvine, CA 92614 949-252-4900 FOR SALE INFORMATION CALL: 714.730.2727 Website for Trustee's Sale Information: www.lpsasap.com In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Deed of Trust, the words "Trustee" and "Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: June 8, 2011 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee Michael Busby, Authorized Signature ASAP# 4018338 06/15/2011, 06/22/2011, 06/29/2011, 07/06/2011

541-385-5809

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: XXXX3826 T.S. No: 1319652-09 Reference is made to that certain deed made by ROBERT J. TRAPNELL AND PATRICIA B. TRAPNELL, AS CO-TRUSTEES OF THE TRAPNELL LIVING TRUST DATED JANUARY 7, 2002 as Grantor to AMERTITLE OLD MILL BRANCH, as Trustee, in favor of ING BANK, FSB as Beneficiary, dated June 21, 2007, recorded June 26, 2007, in official records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON in book/reel/volume No. XX at page No. XX, fee/file/instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2007-35735 covering the following described real property situated in the said County and State, to-wit: LOT NINETY-SEVEN (97), PARKS AT BROKEN TOP, PHASE 3, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 61508 CULTUS LAKE COURT BEND OR 97702 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due October 1, 2010 of interest only and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $3,508.59 Monthly Late Charge $0.00 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being following, to-wit; The sum of $748,441.65 together with interest thereon at the rate of 5.625% per annum, from September 01, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, CAL-WESTERN RECONVEYANCE CORPORATION the undersigned trustee will on August 29, 2011 at the hour of 11:00am, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, at At the front entrance of the Courthouse 1164 N.W. Bond Street Bend OR City of BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying the entire amount then due, together with the costs, trustee's fees and attorney's fees and by curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default, at any time not later than five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust

deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: April 22, 2011 CAL-WESTERN RECONVEYANCE CORPORATION 525 EAST MAIN STREET P.O. BOX 22004 EL CAJON CA 92022-9004 CAL-WESTERN RECONVEYANCE CORPORATION Signature/By: ASAP# 3980318 05/25/2011, 06/01/2011, 06/08/2011, 06/15/2011 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by Mark Dickens, as grantor to Deschutes County Title Company, as Trustee, in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, as Beneficiary, dated April 14, 2006, recorded May 1, 2006, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 2006, at Page 29739, beneficial interest having been assigned to U.S. Bank National Association, as Trustee, successor in interest to Bank of America, National Association as Trustee as successor by merger to Lasalle Bank, National Association as Trustee for WaMu Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates Series 2006-AR7 Trust, as covering the following described real property: Lot Thirty-Six, Block Eight, Highland Addition, Deschutes County, Oregon. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 28 N.W. Allen Road, Bend, OR 97701. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $4,096.59, from April 1, 2009, monthly payments in the sum of $4,144.36, from May 1, 2009, monthly payments in the sum of $4,404.31, from June 1, 2009, monthly payments in the sum of $3,985.75, from May 1, 2010, and monthly payments in the sum of $4,265.19, from June 1, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $965,399.71, together with interest thereon at the rate of 4.258% per annum from March 1, 2009, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on September 1, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before

the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt.

curred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $96,716.33, together with interest thereon at the rate of 5.775% per annum from January 1, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on August 30, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the

trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party

through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. Dated: 04-27-2011 By: /s/:Kelly D. Sutherland KELLY D. SUTHERLAND Successor Trustee SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC 5501 N.E. 109th Court, Suite N Vancouver, WA 98662 www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa Telephone: (360) 260-2253 Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647 S&S 10-104639 PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF REGULAR BOARD OF TRUSTEES MEETING The Four Rivers Vector Control District will hold a regular Board Meeting on 16 JUNE 2011, at 7:00 p.m., at 56478 Solar Drive, Bend, OR 97707. Topics of discussion are general business. PUBLIC NOTICE The Four Rivers Vector Control District will be applying an adult mosquito control insecticide within the district and in Sunriver on some evenings throughout the summer. The product is applied with an ultra low volume fog to dispense a synthetic derivative of chrysanthemum flower that is very target specific to Mosquitos. The product is labeled by the Environmental Protection Agency for residential and recreation areas. People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Day through

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. #: OR-11-432416-NH

NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, BRETT KEMP, A SINGLE MAN, as grantor, to WESTERN TITLE & ESCROW CO., as Trustee, in favor of INDYMAC BANK, F.S.B., as beneficiary, dated 5/1/2006, recorded 5/4/2006, under Instrument No. 2006-30869, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as trustee of IndyMac Residential Mortgage-Backed Trust, Series 2006-L2, Residential Mortgage-Backed Certificates, Series 2006-L2. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: PARCEL 2, PARTITION PLAT NO. 2004-49, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON, NOW KNOWN AS LOT THREE (3), LAZY RANCH EAST, RECORDED MARCH 26, 2009 IN CABINET H. PAGE 918, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 16670 JORDAN ROAD SISTERS, OR 97759 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of April 8, 2011 Delinquent Payments from December 01, 2010 5 payments at $ 1,536.11 each $ 7,680.55 (12-01-10 through 04-08-11) Late Charges: $ 305.67 Beneficiary Advances: $ 22.00 Suspense Credit: $ 0.00 TOTAL: $ 8,008.22 *** Loan will mature in 06/01/2011 *** ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $300,951.73, PLUS interest thereon at 6.125% per annum from 11/1/2010, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. THIS LOAN WILL MATURE ON 6/1/2011. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on August 11, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 4/8/2011 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee KAREN JAMES, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1 st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206)340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com

Reference is made to that certain deed made by, DON J. LOPEZ AND KERI LOPEZ, HUSBAND AND WIFE AS JOINT TENANTS as Grantor to FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as trustee, in favor of WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., as Beneficiary, dated 6/22/2007, recorded 6/25/2007, in official records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon in book/ reel/ volume number - at page number - fee/ file/ instrument/ microfile/ reception number 2007-35578,, covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 248490 LOT 5 IN SILVER RIDGE P.U.D., CITY OF BEND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON Commonly known as: 20988 SEDONIA LANE. BEND, OR 97702 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantors: The installments of principal and interest which became due on 10/1/2009, and all subsequent installments of principal and interest through the date of this Notice, plus amounts that are due for late charges, delinquent property taxes, insurance premiums, advances made on senior liens, taxes and/or insurance, trustee's fees, and any attorney fees and court costs arising from or associated with the beneficiaries efforts to protect and preserve its security, all of which must be paid as a condition of reinstatement, including all sums that shall accrue through reinstatement or pay-off. Nothing in this notice shall be construed as a waiver of any fees owing to the Beneficiary under the Deed of Trust pursuant to the terms of the loan documents. Monthly Payment $2,975.00 Monthly Late Charge $148.75 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $595,000.00 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.0000 per annum from 9/1/2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on 9/16/2011 at the hour of 11:00:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, FRONT ENTRANCE OF THE COURTHOUSE, 1164 N.W. BOND STREET, BEND, OR County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. For Sale Information Call: 714-730-2727 or Login to: www.fidelityasap.com In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Pursuant to Oregon Law, this sale will not be deemed final until the Trustee's deed has been issued by FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY. If there are any irregularities discovered within 10 days of the date of this sale, that the trustee will rescind the sale, return the buyer's money and take further action as necessary. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee, or the Mortgagee's Attorney. NOTICE TO RESIDENTIAL TENANTS The property in which you are living is in foreclosure. A foreclosure sale is scheduled for 9/16/2011. Unless the lender who is foreclosing on this property is paid, the foreclosure will go through and someone new will own this property. The following information applies to you only if you occupy and rent this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The information does not apply to you if you own this property or if you are not a residential tenant. If the foreclosure goes through, the business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out. The buyer must first give you an eviction notice in writing that specifies the date by which you must move out. The buyer may not give you this notice until after the foreclosure sale happens. If you do not leave before the move-out date, the buyer can have the sheriff remove you from the property after a court hearing. You will receive notice of the court hearing. FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES YOU TO BE NOTIFIED IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THIS PROPERTY AS A RESIDENTIAL DWELLING UNDER A LEGITIMATE RENTAL AGREEMENT, FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU A NOTICE IN WRITING A CERTAIN NUMBER OF DAYS BEFORE THE BUYER CAN REQUIRE YOU TO MOVE OUT. THE FEDERAL LAW THAT REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU THIS NOTICE IS EFFECTIVE UNTIL DECEMBER 31, 2012. Under federal law, the buyer must give you at least 90 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If you are renting this property under a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), you may stay until the end of your lease term. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 90 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 90 days left. STATE LAW NOTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS IF THE FEDERAL LAW DOES NOT APPLY, STATE LAW STILL REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU NOTICE IN WRITING BEFORE REQUIRING YOU TO MOVE OUT IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THE PROPERTY AS A TENANT IN GOOD FAITH. EVEN IF THE FEDERAL LAW REQUIREMENT IS NO LONGER EFFECTIVE AFTER DECEMBER 31, 2012, THE REQUIREMENT UNDER STATE LAW STILL APPLIES TO YOUR SITUATION. Under state law, if you have a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), the buyer must give you at least 60 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 30 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 30 days left. If you are renting under a month-to-month or week-to-week rental agreement, the buyer must give you at least 30 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. IMPORTANT: For the buyer to be required to give you a notice under state law, you must prove to the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale that you are occupying and renting this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The name and address of the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale is shown on this notice under the heading "TRUSTEE". You must mail or deliver your proof not later than 8/17/2011 (30 days before the date first set for the foreclosure sale). Your proof must be in writing and should be a copy of your rental agreement or lease. If you do not have a written rental agreement or lease, you can provide other proof, such as receipts for rent paid. ABOUT YOUR SECURITY DEPOSIT Under state law, you may apply your security deposit and any rent you paid in advance against the current rent you owe your landlord. To do this, you must notify your landlord in writing that you want to subtract the amount of your security deposit or prepaid rent from your rent payment. You may do this only for the rent you owe your current landlord. If you do this, you must do so before the foreclosure sale. The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale is not responsible to you for any deposit or prepaid rent you paid to your landlord. ABOUT YOUR TENANCY AFTER THE FORECLOSURE SALE The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale may be willing to allow you to stay as a tenant instead of requiring you to move out. You should contact the buyer to discuss that possibility if you would like to stay. Under state law, if the buyer accepts rent from you, signs a new residential rental agreement with you or does not notify you in writing within 30 days after the date of the foreclosure sale that you must move out, the buyer becomes your new landlord and must maintain the property. Otherwise, the buyer is not your landlord and is not responsible for maintaining the property on your behalf and you must move out by the date the buyer specifies in a notice to you. YOU SHOULD CONTINUE TO PAY RENT TO YOUR LANDLORD UNTIL THE PROPERTY IS SOLD TO ANOTHER BUSINESS OR INDIVIDUAL OR UNTIL A COURT OR A LENDER TELLS YOU OTHERWISE. IF YOU DO NOT PAY RENT, YOU CAN BE EVICTED. AS EXPLAINED ABOVE, YOU MAY BE ABLE TO APPLY A DEPOSIT OR RENT YOU PREPAID AGAINST YOUR CURRENT RENT OBLIGATION. BE SURE TO KEEP PROOF OF ANY PAYMENTS YOU MAKE AND OF ANY NOTICE YOU GIVE OR RECEIVE CONCERNING THE APPLICATION OF YOUR DEPOSIT OR PREPAID RENT. IT IS UNLAWFUL FOR ANY PERSON TO TRY TO FORCE YOU TO LEAVE YOUR HOME WITHOUT FIRST GOING TO COURT TO EVICT YOU. FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR RIGHTS, YOU MAY WISH TO CONSULT A LAWYER. If you believe you need legal assistance, contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice. If you do not have enough money to pay a lawyer or are otherwise eligible, you may be able to receive legal assistance for free. Information about whom to contact for free legal assistance is included with this notice. Oregon State Bar: (503) 684-3763; (800) 452-7636 Legal assistance: www.lawhelp.org/or/index.cfm Dated: 5/10/2011 FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as trustee 818 Stewart Street, Suite 800 Seattle, WA 98 Signature By Brooke Frank, Assistant Secretary Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington as agent for FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 For Non-Sale Information: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 Fax: 619-645-7716 If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right's against the real property only. THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations.

ASAP# 3997203 05/25/2011, 06/01/2011, 06/08/2011, 06/15/2011

ASAP# 3994828 05/25/2011, 06/01/2011, 06/08/2011, 06/15/2011

Dated: 04-28-2011 By: /s/:Kelly D. Sutherland KELLY D. SUTHERLAND Successor Trustee SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC 5501 N.E. 109th Court, Suite N Vancouver, WA 98662 www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa Telephone: (360) 260-2253 Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647 S&S 09-102822 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by Anthony J. Aceti, as grantor to AmeriTitle, as Trustee, in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, as Beneficiary, dated December 1, 2005, recorded December 5, 2005, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 2005, at Page 83384, beneficial interest now held by JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, successor in interest to Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, as Receiver for Washington Mutual Bank as covering the following described real property: Lot Fifty-Six (56), Phase 4, Huntington Meadows Phases 3 and 4, Deschutes County, Oregon. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 16436 Cassidy Court, La Pine, OR 97739. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $465.45, from February 1, 2010, and monthly payments in the sum of $455.65, from January 1, 2011, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees in-

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FMB-107783

Bulletin Daily Paper 06/15/11  

The Bulletin Daily print edition for Wednesday June 15, 2011

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