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Golf in December? Why not? • D1 DECEMBER 7, 2011

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Coalition’s goal: end homelessness in the next decade Ridgeview By Hillary Borrud The Bulletin

REDMOND — Kyle Holdsworth graduated from Redmond High School in June and, like many young people his age, the 18-yearold plans to attend college.

His senior year, however, was anything but typical. A year ago, he became homeless. It took a couple of months for him to find out about The LOFT shelter for homeless and runaway youths in Bend. “I was homeless for about two

months before I found the LOFT, and I was still trying to attend school,” Holdsworth said. For awhile, he said, he “couch-surfed.” “You go from friend to friend, until you’ve exhausted that resource.” Local government officials and

nonprofits hope to improve and expand services for youths like Holdsworth and the rest of the homeless population in Central Oregon. Tuesday, they launched a plan to end homelessness in the next decade. See Homeless / A5

• Redmond’s new high school placed in 4A; will be 6th team in the Central Oregon league

70TH ANNIVERSARY

5 myths about Pearl Harbor

By Erik Hidle The Bulletin

The Associated Press file photo

President Franklin D. Roosevelt called Dec. 7, 1941, “a date which will live in infamy.” And that day, when the Japanese launched a surprise attack on the U.S. naval base at Pearl Harbor, has indeed lived in infamy for 70 years. Yet even as the memory of the attack has lasted, so have the misperceptions surrounding it. On this anniversary, here are a few worth dispelling.

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The government had no knowledge of a potential attack before Dec. 7, 1941.

On Dec. 7, Japan attacked only Pearl Harbor.

The U.S. military responded quickly and decisively.

JapaneseAmericans were the only citizens rounded up after Pearl Harbor.

The attack convinced the public that the U.S. should enter World War II.

Within 48 hours of the attack, more than 1,000 JapaneseAmericans, German-Americans and Italian-Americans, all considered “enemy aliens,” were detained by the FBI. By the end of the war, the government had interned, detained or restricted the movements of hundreds of thousands of people. Though JapaneseAmericans made up the majority of the roughly 120,000 people sent to internment camps, more than 11,000 German-Americans were interned as well. An estimated 600,000 ItalianAmericans were considered “enemy aliens” and kept under restrictions. Foreign diplomats from Germany, Japan and Italy were also rounded up and held. The Japanese, though, were dealt with most harshly. Days after Dec. 7, Attorney General Francis Biddle ordered all Japanese-Americans to surrender their cameras and broadcasting devices to local police stations. Their bank accounts were frozen, and they faced travel restrictions, among many other limitations. The FBI and the Army called for every Japanese individual to be incarcerated for the duration of the “emergency.” However, Biddle urged Roosevelt to show restraint.

The attack persuaded Americans to support entering just part of the war, not all of it. Before Pearl Harbor, the United States was largely isolationist, and there was almost no call to get involved in another European war. The America First movement, backed by public figures including Charles Lindbergh and Walt Disney, was growing in popularity. Its supporters had announced plans to participate in every congressional race in 1942 and support the most isolationist candidate, Republican or Democrat. After the attack, the America First movement came to a halt. In the papers of Secretary of War Henry Stimson, archivists discovered a draft declaration of war against Japan, Germany and Italy for Roosevelt to deliver to Congress on Dec. 8. But that was scrapped, and FDR asked for a declaration of war against only Japan. The attack on Pearl Harbor awoke America from its isolationist slumber and bolstered its charge into the Pacific war, but it did not spur entry into the European war. That happened when Germany and Italy declared war on the United States on Dec. 11, compelling Roosevelt to respond in kind — thus committing America to a world war.

Beyond the obvious signs of Japan’s increasing aggression — including its sinking of an American naval vessel in the Yangtze River and its alliance with fascist Italy and Nazi Germany — various specific war warnings had been sent by Washington to military commanders in the Pacific for some days before Dec. 7. The War Department had been intercepting and analyzing secret cables between Tokyo and the Japanese Embassy in Washington and thought at one point the Japanese would attack Hawaii on Nov. 30. A Hawaii newspaper even warned of that in a blaring headline. On Dec. 4, Roosevelt received a confidential memo from the Office of Naval Intelligence detailing Japanese espionage efforts. The possible outbreak of war is mentioned, followed shortly by this: “In anticipation of possible open conflict with this country, Japan is vigorously utilizing every available agency to secure military, naval and commercial information, paying particular attention to the West Coast, the Panama Canal and the Territory of Hawaii.” These were just general warnings, however, and a huge Japanese armada was able to travel thousands of miles to Hawaii undetected.

Though the attack on Pearl Harbor was the most crippling and caused the most American losses, Japanese forces also struck the Philippines, Wake Island, Guam, Malaya, Thailand and Midway that day. The Philippines campaign lasted until January 1942, when the country fell to the Japanese. In the Pacific, Wake Island was shelled by Japanese aircraft and ships until Dec. 11, when the Japanese attempted the first of two invasions before the island finally fell. Guam was bombed and later invaded on Dec. 10. Malaya (now Malaysia) was invaded and fell early the following year. The invasion of Thailand lasted only a few hours before that country surrendered in December 1941. Other than Hawaii, Midway was the only target on Dec. 7 not to fall under Japanese control. Those days were among the darkest of the Pacific war. Britain lost two huge battleships in a matter of minutes to aerial bombardment, and Winston Churchill wrote in his memoirs that their sinking was his lowest point of the entire war. The Japanese actions that day effectively crippled British naval strength in the Pacific.

For months after Pearl Harbor, the United States suffered defeat after defeat in the Pacific theater. Rumors swept the country on Dec. 8 that the Navy was in pursuit of the attacking Japanese fleet, but these were false. Gen. Douglas MacArthur, in command of the Army garrison in the Philippines, sent Roosevelt a telegram pleading for naval assistance, including for U.S. subs to target the Japanese vessels delivering troops, but the requests went unanswered. There was little assistance to offer the beleaguered general, and the Philippines fell. The first significant U.S. offensive did not come until February 1942, when the Pacific fleet began attacks on the Gilbert and Marshall islands. Before that, the first engagement of Japanese and U.S. forces actually resulted in an American victory. Several hours before the air attack on Pearl Harbor, Japan deployed twoman submarines, or “midget subs,” against the base. The USS Ward, a destroyer on patrol outside the harbor, made first contact with a Japanese sub. It sank the vessel, resulting in two Japanese casualties and no U.S. losses.

— Special to The Washington Post from Craig Shirley, author of “December 1941: 31 Days That Changed America and Saved the World”

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Vol. 108, No. 341, 34 pages, 6 sections

TODAY’S WEATHER

INDEX Calendar Classified Comics

E3 F1-4 E4-5

High will join hybrid conference

Crosswords E5, F2 Dear Abby E3 Editorials C4

Horoscope E3 Obituaries C5 Shopping E1-6

Sports D1-6 Stocks B4-5 TV & Movies E2

Sunny and mild High 50, Low 18 Page C6

REDMOND — Redmond’s new high school will join the Intermountain Conference next year, creating a six-team league for athletics and activities across Central Oregon. The executive board of Inside the Oregon School Activi- • Intermountain Conference ties Association finalized at a glance, A5 the decision Monday night, placing the new Ridgeview High in Class 4A, moving Redmond High School from 6A to 5A and putting the schools in the IMC with Crook County, Bend, Mountain View and Summit. The conference’s new structure starts with the 2012-13 school year. “This is what we expected to hear,” said Brent Walsh, athletic director for the Redmond School District. “We actually wanted Redmond High School to go down to 4A as well. While we will have the students for a 5A school next year, we expect in two years that both of our high schools will have the student numbers of 4A schools.” In its first year of operations, Ridgeview will not offer senior classes. Walsh said once all four grades are offered at both schools, each will have enrollment lower than 870, which is the cutoff between 4A and 5A classifications. See Conference / A5

Despite economy, shoppers splurge on holiday decor By Chris Burritt Bloomberg News

GREENSBORO, N.C. — Peggy Curtis spent Thanksgiving week out of work, the first layoff in her 37 years making cigarettes in a Reidsville, N.C., factory. Instead of moping, she went shopping for holiday decorations at Home Depot. “The economy is tough, but that’s not going to stop me,” said Curtis, 58, whose $600 spree so far includes enough lights to illuminate nine Crape Myrtle shrubs. “I love Christmas.” With little to cheer about these days — 8.6 percent unemployment, fears of European contagion — Americans are splurging on LED lights, 16-foot-tall inflatable Santas and pre-decorated artificial trees. This year U.S. consumers will spend $6 billion on decorations, the most in at least seven years, according to the National Retail Federation, which began tracking the data in 2005. See Decorations / A5

Saundra Sovick / The Jonesboro (Ark.) Sun

Holiday decoration sales are projected to climb this year. More than 68 percent of U.S. consumers will indulge this year, according to one report. That would be the highest level in three years.

TOP NEWS AFGHAN BOMBS: Dozens killed, A3 BLAGOJEVICH: Sentencing today, A3


A2 THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2011

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Hot on the trail of Goldilocks

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HAPPENINGS Estimated habitable zone

Habitable zones

Mailing

Scientists seek planets orbiting stars at the right distance to support life. Class A star

Orbit of Mars

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Oregon Lottery results

Sun (G)

F

Birth of the Sun HABITABLE ZONE

2 billion years ago

Sun

Today 2 billion years in the future

Time

4 billion years 0

1 A.U.

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A sliding scale MASS The chart at right OF STAR shows the estimated 3 times mass of Sun habitable zone for different stars, and highlights known exoplanets of HD Sun 85512, in the constellation HD 85512 7 Vela, and Gliese ‰10 mass of Sun 581, in Libra. Vela Astronomers Gliese 581 stress that 3 ‰10 mass distant of Sun exoplanets will Libra require more than a good orbit 1 ‰10 mass to support life. of Sun

CLASS OF STAR

A F G K

b

e

b

c

g d (unconfirmed)

Distance from star: 1‰10

LE

f

Earthlike planets Rocky planets within this zone are of special interest to planet hunters. 10

1 A.U. (Distance from Earth to Sun)

New York Times News Service

Sources: “How to Find a Habitable Planet,” by James Kasting; Annual Review of Astronomy and Astrophysics; Astronomy & Astrophysics; “Life in the Universe,” by Jeffrey O. Bennett and Seth Shostak; NASA

By Dennis Overbye New York Times News Service

CAMBRIDGE, Mass. — What does Goldilocks want? At least four times in the past few years, astronomers have announced they had found planets orbiting other stars in the sweet spot known as the habitable zone — not too hot, not too cold — where water and thus, perhaps, life are possible. In short, a planet fit to be inhabited by the biochemical likes of us, a socalled Goldilocks planet. “Sooner or later, Kepler will find a lukewarm planet with a size making it probably Earthlike,” said Geoffrey Marcy of the University of California, Berkeley, who spends his time tracking down candidates identified by NASA’s Kepler telescope. “We’re no more than a year away” from such a discovery, he said. Sara Seager, a planetary astronomer at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, put it this way: “We are on the verge of being those people who will be remembered.” All this has brought to the fore a question long debated by geologists, chemists, paleontologists and cosmologists turned astrobiologists, namely: What does life really need to get going, flourish and evolve on some alien rock? The answer depends on who we expect to be living there. We might dream of green men with big eyes, ants with hive minds, or even cuddly octopuses as an antidote to cosmic loneliness; but what we are most likely to find, a growing number of scientists say, is alien pond slime. “If you reran Earth’s history, how many times would you get animals?” asked Donald Brownlee, an astronomer at the University of Washington. He and a colleague, the paleontologist Peter Ward, made a case that we live on a lucky planet in their 1999 book, “Rare Earth.” Even warm and wet is a rare condition, however, occurring now on only one of

MEGA MILLIONS

Planet discovered in the sweet spot WASHINGTON — A newly discovered planet is eerily similar to Earth and is sitting outside our solar system in what seems to be the ideal place for life, except for one hitch. It’s a bit too big. The planet is smack in the middle of what astronomers call the Goldilocks zone, that hard-to-find place that’s not too hot, not too cold, where water, which is essential for life, doesn’t freeze or boil. And it has a shopping mall-like surface temperature of near 72 degrees, scientists say. The planet’s confirmation was announced Monday by NASA along with other discoveries by its Kepler telescope, which was launched on a planet-hunting mission in 2009. That’s the first planet confirmed in the habitable zone for Kepler, which had already found Earthlike rocky planets elsewhere. Twice before astronomers have announced a planet found in that zone, but neither has been as promising. “This is a phenomenal discovery in the course of human history,” Geoff Marcy of the University of California, Berkeley, one of the pioneers of planet-hunting outside our solar system, said in an email. “This discovery shows that we Homo sapiens are straining our reach into the universe to find planets that remind us of home. We are almost there.” The new planet — named Kepler-22b — shares key aspects with Earth. It circles a star that could be the twin of our sun and at just about the same distance. The planet’s year of 290 days is even close to ours. It likely has water and rock. The only trouble is the planet’s a bit big for life to exist on the surface. The planet is about 2.4 times the size of Earth. It could be more like the gas-and-liquid Neptune with only a rocky core and mostly ocean. “It’s so exciting to imagine the possibilities,” said Natalie Batalha, the Kepler deputy science chief. Floating on that “world completely covered in water” could be like being on an Earth ocean, and “it’s not beyond the realm of possibility that life could exist in such an ocean,” Batalha said in a phone interview. Because its size implies that it’s closer to Neptune in composition than Earth, “I would bet my telescope that there is no hard, rocky surface to walk on,” Marcy said. Kepler can’t find life itself, just where the conditions might be right for it to thrive. And when astronomers look for life elsewhere, they’re talking about everything from microbes to advanced intelligence that can be looking back at us. The planet is 600 light-years away. Each light year is 5.9 trillion miles. It would take a space shuttle about 22 million years to get there. — The Associated Press

the eight official planets in our solar system and three of the several dozen moons. Mars was once wet, but it is now a desert. And after billions of dollars spent exploring Mars and the remains of space probes littering the planet, we still do not know if a single microbe ever lived there. But nobody really knows how rare or common are plan-

ets like Earth and its brand of life.

Looking for ‘just right’ A blue-ribbon committee of chemists convened by the National Academy of Sciences concluded that there was only one ironclad requirement for life, besides energy: a place warm enough for chemical reactions to go on. So, determining how

DID YOU HEAR?

The numbers drawn Tuesday night are:

7 21 29 35 49 39 x4

AB

Jupiter Saturn

Note: Stars and planets not drawn to scale.

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The estimated jackpot is now $100 million.

IT

M

Smaller, dimmer stars have relatively small habitable zones but are numerous and long lived. About 90 percent of stars are K or M class. Class K, G and F stars are thought to be the best candidates for harboring habitable planets.

TIDAL LOCKING Locked to a star DISTANCE Planets left of this line tend to orbit with one side always facing a star, a process called tidal locking. Such a planet Earth Mars might have one side too Mercury Venus hot for surface life, and NE one side too cold. ZO B HA

M

K

The sun is a class G star, a type that makes up about 7 percent of all stars. Earth orbits near the inner edge of the habitable zone, and Venus and Mars may come close, depending on optimistic or conservative estimates for the habitable zone.

Large class F stars are also rare, making up only 2 percent of all stars. But with a lifetime of several billion years, the stars provide ample time for life to form, making them tempting targets for planet hunters.

Massive class A stars are about 20 times brighter than the Sun, with wide habitable zones. But the stars are rare and short-lived, leaving only a billion years for orbiting planets to form and for life to develop.

1 Astronomical Unit (A.U.) Distance from Earth to Sun

Earth Venus Mercury

At right, halos show the relative sizes of habitable zones around different classes of stars.

An aging sun Stars brighten with age, and as the Sun ages, its habitable zone will continue to shift outward. In several billion years Earth’s water will evaporate away.

Conservative

Optimistic

OUR ADDRESS Street

Discoveries, breakthroughs, trends, names in the news — things you need to know to start your day.

Santa to his Unionville yard early Saturday in a trash bag that also contained the money and note. He says the anonymous note makes it clear that the person who returned the Santa wasn’t the thief who took it and two 6-foot-tall penguins this past week.

The penguins are still missing. The typed note states that: “Returning your property is the right thing to do, and apologies for the thief who took it in the first place.” McClaren says he plans to use the $100 to buy more decorations.

IN HISTORY Highlights: In 1941, the Imperial Japanese navy launched a surprise attack on the U.S. Navy base at Pearl Harbor in Hawaii as part of a plan to pre-empt any American military response to Japan’s planned conquest of Southeast Asian territories; the raid, which claimed some 2,400 American lives, prompted the United States to declare war against Japan the next day. In 1972, America’s last moon mission to date was launched as Apollo 17 blasted off from Cape Canaveral. Ten years ago: Taliban forces abandoned their last bastion in Afghanistan, fleeing the southern city of Kandahar. Five years ago: President George W. Bush gave a chilly response to the Iraq Study Group’s proposals for reshaping his policy, objecting to talks with Iran and Syria, refusing to endorse a major troop withdrawal and vowing no retreat from embattled U.S. goals in the Mideast. One year ago: WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange surrendered to authorities in London, where he was jailed for nine days before being freed on bail as he fought extradition to Sweden for questioning in a rape investigation.

BIRTHDAYS Actor Eli Wallach is 96. Linguist and political philosopher Noam Chomsky is 83. Baseball Hall of Famer Johnny Bench is 64. Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine, is 59. Basketball Hall of Famer Larry Bird is 55. Singer Aaron Carter is 24. — From wire reports

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Stolen Santa returned with $100, note The Associated Press UNIONVILLE, Ind. — A southern Indiana man has gotten an early Christmas gift: A 16-foot-tall inflatable Santa Claus stolen from his yard has been returned with $100 and a note of apology. Jason McClaren said someone returned the deflated

warm a planet’s atmosphere keeps it — through assumptions, calculations or just plain guesses — has been crucial in reaching a verdict about its potential habitability. This is how it has gone with the potential Goldilocks planets orbiting Gliese 581, a small cool red star about 20 light-years from here in the constellation Libra that has been at the center of exoplanet fantasies and speculation for the past few years. Depending on whom you talk to, it has five or six planets, three of which have at one time or another been claimed to be habitable. (Wilhelm Gliese, for whom the star was named, was a Danish astronomer who cataloged nearby stars, most of them dim red dwarfs like this one.) The first in what would become a chain of potential Goldilocks planets, identified in 2007, was close enough within the small star Gliese 581’s shrunken habitable zone to have a warm surface. But astronomers took a closer look at Gliese 581c, as it is called, and concluded that if the planet’s geology and atmosphere resembled those of Earth, it would be a stifling greenhouse, no place to set solar sail for. In September, what some astronomers called the best and smallest Goldilocks candidate yet was announced. About 3.6 times as massive as the Earth, it circles a faint orange star in Vela known as HD 85512 at a distance of some 24 million miles, about a quarter of the Earth’s distance from the Sun. The star was also cataloged by the Danish astronomer as Gliese 370. Kaltenegger and her colleagues calculated that this planet would be habitable if it had an Earthtype geology and at least 50 percent cloud cover. The brute reality, astronomers admit, is that even if there are thousands or millions of habitable planets in the galaxy, only a few hundred of them are within range of any telescope that will be built in the conceivable future.

• Rod Blagojevich, the former governor of Illinois, is expected to speak on his own behalf before the federal judge who will decide his sentence for 18 felony corruption convictions, including trying to sell or trade the Senate seat that President Barack Obama left behind when he moved to the White House, A3 • The Republican Jewish Coalition hosts a Republican presidential forum in Washington, D.C. • House Republicans will hold a closed-door meeting to discuss a Democratic plan to extend a payroll tax reduction, A3 • Greece’s Parliament votes on an austerity budget, following a five-day debate. The majority of lawmakers is expected to vote for the new budget, which has been backed by all three parties in the country’s new coalition government. • NATO foreign ministers meet in Brussels to discuss the war in Afghanistan and other ongoing operations. • The Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs subcommittee holds a hearing on homegrown terrorism, focusing on the threat to military communities inside the United States.

Details at www.nwxevents.com

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T S N   B

SCORES KILLED IN BOMBINGS IN 3 AFGHAN CITIES

FAA chief quits after drunk driving arrest WASHINGTON — FAA administrator Randy Babbitt resigned Tuesday as head of the Federal Aviation Administration following his arrest over the weekend on charges of drunken driving. Babbitt was about halfway through a fiveBabbitt year term. Deputy FAA Administrator Michael Huerta will serve as acting administrator. Industry officials and lawmakers said they expect Huerta to continue in the post through next year since the White House probably will want to avoid a possible nomination fight before the presidential election. In recent months, Huerta has been leading the FAA’s troubled NextGen effort to transition from an air traffic control system based on World War II-era radar technology to one based on satellite technology. Babbitt, 65, was arrested Saturday night in Fairfax City, Va., by a patrolman who said the nation’s top aviation official was driving on the wrong side of the road.

GOP split on Dems’ payroll tax cut plan WASHINGTON — A Republican Party that has for decades benefited from a commitment to lower taxes is now finding itself on the defensive on the issue, as members face a deep split over a Democratic plan to extend a payroll tax reduction. What might normally be a no-brainer for most congressional Republicans is being resisted by many tea party-conscious members who oppose what they consider a short-term gimmick that would worsen the federal deficit and siphon money from Social Security. Republican leaders fear that the party, which has spent the past year fighting Democrats’ proposals to raise taxes on the wealthy, cannot now allow the payroll tax to increase without handing Democrats a powerful election-year argument that the GOP supports lower taxes only for the rich.

Obama in Kansas: Middle class at stake OSAWATOMIE, Kan. — Declaring the American middle class in jeopardy, President Barack Obama on Tuesday outlined a populist economic vision that will drive his reelection bid, insisting the United States must reclaim its standing as a country in which everyone can prosper if provided “a fair shot and a fair share.” While never making an overt plea for a second term, Obama’s offered his most comprehensive lines of attack against the candidates seeking to take his job, only a month before Republican voters begin choosing a presidential nominee. He also sought to inject some of the long-overshadowed hope that energized his 2008 campaign, saying: “I believe America is on its way up.” In small-town Osawatomie, in a high school gym where patriotic bunting lined the bleachers, Obama presented himself as the one fighting for shared sacrifice and success against those who would gut government and let people fend for themselves.

GOP filibuster blocks judicial confirmation Senate Republicans on Tuesday filibustered the nomination of Caitlin Halligan to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit, blocking a nominee President Obama tapped last year to serve on one of the country’s most powerful courts. The final roll call vote on cutting off debate was 54-45. Sen. Lisa Murkowski, R-Alaska, joined all 53 members of the Democratic caucus in voting to move ahead with Halligan’s nomination, leaving the former New York state solicitor general six votes short of the 60 needed to end debate. Sen. Orrin Hatch, R-Utah, who has never voted to filibuster a judicial nomination, voted “present.” — From wire reports

Blagojevich’s lawyers, wife: ‘Be merciful’ on sentence By Bob Secter, Jeff Coen and John Chase Chicago Tribune

Bonn, Germany, that had been viewed as an opportunity for Afghanistan to cement longterm support from the West. But the conference fell considerably short of the objectives that officials had envisioned because Taliban insurgents and Pakistani diplomats did not attend. Critics of Pakistan were quick to read both Monday’s boycott and Tuesday’s bombings as a signal from the Pakistanis, delivered by Lashkare-Jhangvi, that Afghanistan could not ignore Pakistan. The actual intentions of those behind Tuesday’s attacks remained murky, however, not least because of the tangled history of Lashkar-e-Jhangvi. Throughout the day, the official count of the dead climbed as more and more of the nearly 200 wounded people died of horrific injuries. In one hospital, five infants were among 14 victims declared dead on arrival. Every hospital in Kabul, the capital, took in victims.

CHICAGO — Two things were clear Tuesday by the close of the first day of Rod Blagojevich’s sentencing hearing: the former Illinois governor was likely going to be hit with a stiff sentence and his legal team had Blagojevich aba ndoned its early hope of him avoiding prison altogether. At the same time, Blagojevich’s lawyers went to lengths to portray their client as an extraordinarily devoted family man at heart as well as a sensitive, caring politician who deserves leniency. ���Be merciful,” Blagojevich’s wife, Patti, wrote to U.S. District Judge James Zagel in excerpts from a letter read in court. “Be merciful,” Blagojevich’s lawyer, Aaron Goldstein, repeated as he closed a lengthy argument that for the first time acknowledged wrongdoing by Blagojevich but also sought to minimize the damage it caused. Blagojevich has yet to speak on his own behalf; that will come today before Zagel formally decides on how long his punishment is to last for convictions on 18 criminal counts involving the attempted sale of a U.S. Senate seat, illegal shakedowns for campaign cash and lying to federal agents. But Zagel made it clear that he plans to take a hardline approach to interpreting sentencing guidelines, siding with prosecutors in their calculation that Blagojevich hoped to squeeze more than $1.6 million in campaign cash from schemes on which he was convicted. Prosecutors are asking for a sentence of 15 to 20 years in prison for Blagojevich.

Owner to pay $209 million in W.Va. coal mine explosion

U.S. backs gay rights abroad

Bryan Denton / New York Times News Service

A woman walks away from the site of a suicide attack in Kabul, Afghanistan, on Tuesday. At least 63 people were killed and scores wounded after bombers struck Shiite religious observances on Tuesday in three cities, detonating explosives amid crowds of worshipers in the first such sectarian attacks in a decade of war in Afghanistan.

Pakistani extremists claim responsibility By Rod Nordland New York Times News Service

KABUL, Afghanistan — A Pakistan-based extremist group claimed responsibility for a series of coordinated attacks aimed at Afghan Shiites on Tuesday, in what many feared was an attempt to further destabilize Afghanistan by adding a new dimension of strife to a country that, though battered by a decade of war, has been free of sectarian conflict. The attacks, among the war’s deadliest, struck three Afghan cities — Kabul, Kandahar and Mazare-Sharif — almost simultaneously and killed at least 63 Shiite worshippers on Ashura, which marks the death of Shiite Islam’s holiest martyr. Targeted strikes by Sunnis against Shiites are alien to Afghanistan. So it was no surprise to Afghans when responsibility was

By Sabrina Tavernise and Clifford Krauss New York Times News Service

In what officials say is the largest settlement ever in a government investigation of a mine disaster, Alpha Natural Resources agreed to pay $209 million in restitution and civil and criminal penalties for the role of its subsidiary, Massey Energy, in a mine explosion last year that killed 29 men in West Virginia. The deal includes $46.5 million for the families of the victims and those who were injured in the blast, and includes terms that protect Alpha — but not individual Massey executives — from criminal prosecution, said Steven Ruby, an assistant U.S. attorney for the Southern District of West Virginia. But for the families of the miners killed in the accident — the worst such disaster in

“It’s a blessing,” said Thomas Haynesworth after his release in Richmond, Va. “Twentyseven years ... I never gave up.” Steve Helber The Associated Press

claimed by a Sunni extremist group from Pakistan, where Sunnis and Shiites have been energetically killing one another for decades. The group, Lashkar-eJhangvi, had not previously claimed or carried out attacks in Afghanistan, however, and its emergence fueled suspicions that al-Qaida, the Taliban or Pakistan’s spy agency — or some combination of those three — had teamed up with the group to send the message that Afghanistan’s future stability remained deeply tenuous and indeed dependent on the cooperation of outside forces. “Never in our history have there been such cruel attacks on religious observances,” President Hamid Karzai said in a statement. “The enemies of Afghanistan do not want us to live under one roof with peace and harmony.” The timing of the attacks was especially pointed, coming a day after an international conference on Afghanistan in

40 years — the settlement was justice denied. Many were hoping for criminal charges against the people who ran Massey, the company that, according to the federal government’s own review, knowingly put their relatives in harm’s way. “Families believe that senior executives should be prosecuted, but they don’t have any great faith that they will be, and that’s what they are afraid of,” said Mark Moreland, a lawyer who represents the families of two victims. Federal prosecutors say they are trying to do just that, pursuing cases against a number of individuals involved in the explosion. But industry observers warned that because of weak mining safety laws, prosecutors face a steep uphill battle pursuing the biggest prize — criminal convictions of the powerful people who ran Massey. Under the federal mine act, safety violations, with the ex-

ception of falsifying records, are categorized as misdemeanors. That limitation that could make it hard to build a case against senior managers, like Don Blankenship, the former chief executive of Massey, lawyers said. “Until someone goes to jail, there will be no justice done here,” said Cecil Roberts, president of United Mine Workers of America International. Only the mine’s security chief at the time of the blast, Hughie Stover, is facing criminal charges so far. Still, many argued that the disaster brought a turning point in the way federal inspectors from the Mine Safety and Health Administration dealt with the industry. “We have certainly seen a change,” said Keith Heasley, a professor of mining engineering at West Virginia University. “They have stepped up their enforcement, and they are issuing more paper.”

The Washington Post GENEVA — The Obama administration said Tuesday that it will intensify efforts to fight discrimination against lesbians, gay men, bisexuals and transgender individuals as a major element of its foreign policy. In coordinated actions, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton delivered an impassioned, lengthy speech on the subject to diplomats and activists at the U.N. Human Rights Council here and the White House released a presidential memo ordering all elements of the federal government abroad to “ensure that U.S. diplomacy and foreign assistance promote and protect the human rights of LGBT persons.” President Barack Obama’s directive said he was “deeply concerned by the violence” against LGBT people in many parts of the world.

After 27 years in prison, man exonerated in rapes The Washington Post A Virginia appeals court declared Thomas Haynesworth an innocent man Tuesday, clearing his name and acknowledging that he spent 27 years behind bars for rapes he did not commit. It is the first time the state has issued a “writ of actual innocence” in a rape case without the certainty of DNA evidence. Haynesworth, 46, was supported by Attorney General Ken Cuccinelli and two state prosecutors, all of whom concluded that he was mistakenly identified by a rape victim in 1984.

www.smolichmotors.com

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

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WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

JAPAN’S NUCLEAR CLEANUP

5IF*OUFSNPVOUBJO$POGFSFODF The IMC will include six teams in 2012-13. Bend, Mountain View, Summit and Redmond high schools will be included at the 5A level. Crook County and Ridgeview will compete at the 4A level.

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Redmond High School ....... 5A Ridgeview High School .......4A

Crook County High School .......4A

Huge decontamination effort makes returning home a goal By Martin Fackler

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Conference Continued from A1 The move places the majority of Central Oregon’s high schools in one conference, and when it comes to reducing travel times and costs, Walsh says, “it’s a good thing.� The conference is considered a “hybrid� by the state as it includes both 4A and 5A schools. That means the two 4A schools, Ridgeview and Crook County, and the remaining 5A schools will need to schedule out-ofconference games and events to qualify for playoffs and meet ranking requirements. Cross-classification games aren’t uncommon. In its current form, the IMC requires schools to compete outside the area to meet classification playoff requirements. Redmond competes against 6A schools from five conferences. Crook County, the only 4A school, competes against Roosevelt in Portland to qualify for state playoffs. But that will change next year as the OSAA board moved Roosevelt from 4A to 5A at the Monday meeting. “We’re essentially going to be replacing Roosevelt with Ridgeview,� said Scott Polen, athletic director for the Crook County School District. “That means less travel for the kids and less costs for the district.� Polen said it’s a three-hour bus trip between Prineville and North Portland and transportation costs work out to $1.50 per mile to run a bus with a driver being paid around $22 per hour. Swapping the cross-mountain trek with a drive to Redmond is an appetizing change for the cash-strapped school district, which is known for its fundraising to keep its sports programs afloat.

Decorations Continued from A1 Home Depot, the world’s largest home-improvement retailer, and second-biggest Lowe’s are trying to capitalize on the holidays, boosting orders for trees and decorations to offset sinking demand for appliances amid projections that housing prices will keep falling next year. “This is a business we should own,� Home Depot Chief Financial Officer Carol Tome said by telephone from Atlanta, where the company is based. “We were selling the most trees of any retailer in America, but we weren’t offering the ornaments or the light strings or the tree stands. So we expanded our assortment.� Holiday decor sales may climb 8.1 percent this year, rising for a second consecutive year, according to the Washington-based NRF, citing an October survey of consumers by BIGresearch. More than 68 percent of consumers may indulge, the highest level in three years, the NRF said. Pushing trees, ornaments and lights will help fourthquarter sales at Home Depot and Lowe’s, said Joe Feldman, an analyst at Telsey Advisory Group in New York. Typically the last quarter of the year is the slowest for the home-improvement chains, generating about 22 percent of revenue.

Hot sellers: cool gadgets Shoppers are drawn by new technology, Lowe’s Chairman and Chief Executive Officer Robert Niblock said in an interview. Hot sellers include solar-powered lights, LED bulbs that keep burning even if one breaks and a $99 gadget

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“It’s going to save us a bunch of money,� Polen said. “It’s still going to be very difficult with our (financial) situation, but for most sports this makes sense because we can be competitive with the Bend schools. It doesn’t for football, because it just doesn’t make sense for us to compete against Mountain View, but we can still schedule nonconference games for that. I’m thankful for the situation we will be playing in next year.� Bend schools will also benefit. Football may still require some creative scheduling, but most athletics will play the majority of their games inside the conference. “We’re really happy to see this scenario,� said Dave Hood, athletic director for Mountain View. “For us, the three schools in Bend, it made it really difficult just having three (5A teams) in the conference. We may still have to find five nonconference games in football, but for basketball, volleyball, softball, we can schedule (in conference) and it makes our round-robins a lot easier.� This move could be a precursor for a larger Central Oregon conference in 2014-15. Next year OSAA will begin examining the state’s class and conference system as a whole and potentially making more realignment decisions. Walsh said at that time he hopes to see Madras, Sisters and La Pine, all 4A schools, join the IMC. “That hybrid (conference) would be huge financially for us,� he said. “A few years ago, it was about being competitive, but now, as we look at money and surviving, things have changed. It makes sense.� — Reporter: 541-617-7837, ehidle@bendbulletin.com

that makes lights blink in time with “Jingle Bells� and other carols. Thomas Schuitema, who owns the Broadway Bar & Grill in Grand Rapids, Mich., “had to have� a string of LED lights that create the effect of snow falling down each bulb. They cost $160 and now adorn his restaurant. “They just caught my eye,� said Schuitema, who has been decorating the eatery for 18 of his 54 years. During the past decade, home-improvement stores have taken advantage of their size — 10 times bigger than the typical drugstore — to grab sales with ever-growing displays of trees and inflatable decorations, said Scott Manning, Home Depot’s merchandising vice president in charge of seasonal items. Since selling its first cut tree 26 years ago, Home Depot has given holiday decor more space and stepped up marketing. It displays garlands and ornaments at store entrances and last month gave buyers of more-efficient LED lights a $5 rebate for trading in their old incandescent strands. At a Lowe’s in Greensboro, an inflatable Santa waves and nods at shoppers entering the store. It’s new this year, as is a blow-up Santa and sleigh at Home Depot, which has boosted holiday sales every year through the economic slump, said Jean Niemi, a company spokeswoman. Inflatable Santa gets around. He drives motorcycles and airplanes and helicopters. At Lowe’s, he looms over the entrance to the garden center. Inside the store, up on a shelf, an outhouse door pops open and Santa pops out, with an elf holding his nose.

New York Times News Service

FUTABA, Japan — Futaba is a modern-day ghost town — not a boomtown gone bust, not even entirely a victim of the devastating earthquake and tsunami that leveled other parts of Japan’s northeast coast. The roadway arch at the entrance to the empty town almost seems a taunt. It reads: “Nuclear energy: a correct understanding brings a prosperous lifestyle.� Those who fled Futaba are among the nearly 90,000 people evacuated from a 12-mile zone around the Fukushima Dai-ichi plant and another area to the northwest contaminated when a plume from the plant scattered radioactive cesium and iodine. Now, Japan is drawing up plans for a cleanup both monumental and unprecedented, in the hopes that those displaced can go home. The debate over whether to repopulate the area, if trial cleanups prove effective, has become a proxy for a larger battle over the future of Japan. Supporters see rehabilitating the area as a chance to showcase the country’s formidable

Ko Sasaki / New York Times News Service

A Japanese cleanup crew replaces soil as part of the decontamination effort in Minamisoma. The country is planning a monumental and unprecedented cleanup in the 12-mile zone surrounding the tsunami-ravaged Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear plant, in the hope that the displaced can go home.

determination and superior technical know-how — proof that Japan is still a great power. Critics counter that the effort to clean Fukushima prefecture could end up as perhaps the biggest of Japan’s white-elephant public works projects — and yet another example of post-disaster Japan reverting to the wasteful ways that have crippled economic

growth for two decades. So far, the government is following a pattern set since the nuclear accident, dismissing dangers, often prematurely, laboring to minimize the scope of the catastrophe. Already, the trial cleanups have stalled: The government failed to anticipate communities’ reluctance to store tons of soil to be scraped from contaminated

Homeless Continued from A1 Deschutes County Commissioner Tammy Baney was at first skeptical and believed it was impossible to eliminate homelessness. But others involved in the effort said they needed to have lofty goals to make progress, and Baney ultimately agreed. “Our region didn’t have to do this; we chose to do this,� Baney said. The plan calls for changes in existing practices at local agencies and ideas for initiatives. It also calls for changes to local laws and government policies. The nonprofits and government agencies believe they need to raise $40 million from federal, state and private sources to achieve their goals over the next 10 years, according to the 82-page plan. The project will be overseen by the Homeless Leadership Coalition, a group of local nonprofits and government agencies. Officials from Crook, Deschutes and Jefferson counties, the cities within them and the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs began working on the plan in May 2009. Communities across the nation have adopted similar plans, based on a concept promoted by the National Alliance to End Homelessness.

Thousands of homeless in the region In January, there were about 2,270 homeless people living in Crook, Deschutes and Jefferson counties, according to a one-night count conducted by the Homeless Leadership Coalition. Most of the homeless people — 1,771 — lived in Deschutes County, with 229 in Crook County and 271 in Jefferson County. Former Bend mayor Bruce Abernethy said one goal of the homeless plan is to reduce the stigma and stereotypes associated with homelessness, and that will require efforts of people in the community. Children account for 45 percent of the Central Oregon homeless population, Abernethy said. “These are people going through things through no fault of their own,� he said.

yards and fields. Even a vocal supporter of repatriation suggests that the government has not yet leveled with its people about the seriousness of their predicament. “I believe it is possible to save Fukushima,� said the supporter, Tatsuhiko Kodama, director of the Radioisotope Center at the University of Tokyo. “But many evacuated residents must accept that it won’t happen in their lifetimes.� The Soviet Union did not attempt such a cleanup after the Chernobyl accident of 1986, instead relocating about 300,000 people. “We are different from Chernobyl,� said Toshitsuna Watanabe, 64, the mayor of Okuma, one of the towns that was evacuated. “We are determined to go back.� But quiet resistance has begun to grow, both among those who were displaced and those who fear the country will need to sacrifice too much without guarantees that a multibilliondollar cleanup will provide enough protection.

How to help To get involved in the Central Oregon 10 Year Plan to End Homelessness, call Bruce Abernethy at 541-355-1024 or Kenny LaPoint at 541323-7419 . To obtain a copy of the plan, visit www .cohomeless.org.

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Kyle Holdsworth, 18, packs his bags Tuesday afternoon before moving to Provo, Utah, to study case management at Utah Valley University. Holdsworth lived at the The LOFT in Bend for the last year, after he became homeless. Relatives in Utah recently contacted him and offered to have him come live with them. “I plan on going for four years, then coming back to Bend and apply to work here. I definitely want to pay it forward,� he said.

The Homeless Leadership Coalition wants to secure funding to hire an advocate to help homeless people who qualify for Social Security and disability benefits to navigate the application process. They want to create a “service bank� of professionals willing to provide free or discounted health, legal, veterinary and other services.

Housing options explored The coalition wants to explore whether inexpensive and flexible housing options, such as donated RVs, would

be a good option. And the group wants to provide secure places for homeless individuals to receive mail and help for those who need copies of their birth certificates, Social Security cards and other government identification to get jobs, driver’s licenses and benefits such as food stamps. Often, when people want to open homeless shelters and similar housing, they encounter roadblocks in the form of state land use laws and city and county codes. There can also be a lack of political will to

change group housing laws and strong opposition from neighbors, as occurred in Bend when The Shepherd’s House homeless shelter expanded in 2009 and when two treatment homes for people with mental illnesses opened in 2010, the plan’s authors wrote. The coalition plans to draft model ordinances and policies to make it easier for groups to provide housing for the homeless, with the goal that all Central Oregon cities and counties will adopt them by December 2013. Other proposals are aimed at reducing the number of people who leave the foster care system, county jails, state prisons and local emergency rooms with nowhere to go. Authors of the plan acknowledged they face challenges. “Unfortunately, when the need is greatest, we see our regional emergency shelters facing severe funding difficulties, cutting back on services, reducing staff, and even threatened with closure,� they wrote. “The current deep recession is forecasted to last until 2015-16 or longer, and it is definitely impacting private donors and foundations.� As Abernethy said Tuesday, “Now comes the hard part — implementation.� — Reporter: 541-617-7829, hborrud@bendbulletin.com

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THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2011


BUSINESS

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THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2011

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IN BRIEF Panel: Olympus’ culture ‘rotten’ TOKYO — An outside panel appointed by Olympus to investigate its financial scandal issued a harsh report Tuesday, calling the company’s recently departed management “rotten to the core.” The panel, led by a former Japanese Supreme Court judge, also details the roles it claims were played by three former Nomura bankers in arranging a cover-up, and it says Olympus paid the bankers for their efforts. It also criticizes Olympus’ auditors for failing to expose fraud at the company. The report also says that Olympus had persuaded several banks to submit incomplete financial statements to auditors, in an apparent effort to conceal financial maneuvers that the report says involved at least $1.7 billion and were meant to hide failed investments during the 1990s. There is no indication the banks knew of Olympus’ cover-up, the report said. Olympus’ stock rose 15 percent in Tokyo on Tuesday before the report’s release, on news reports that the panel would deny any mob involvement.

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www.bendbulletin.com/business

CLOSE 12,150.13 CHANGE +52.30 +.43%

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CLOSE 1,258.47 CHANGE +1.39 +.11%

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CLOSE 2.09 CHANGE +2.45%

Judge freezes Bend couple’s assets after fraud complaint By Tim Doran The Bulletin

A federal judge in Illinois has ordered a freeze on the assets of a Bend couple who ran a futures trading business and ordered them to preserve their business records. The Nov. 29 order from U.S. District Judge James Shadid was based on an inves-

tigation by the U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission into Brant and Melissa Rushton and their company, Summit Trading & Capital LLC. In a civil complaint filed Nov. 29 in federal court in Peoria, Ill., the commission alleges Summit Trading and the Rushtons defrauded the

public by misrepresenting their trading program’s profitability, sending false account statements to investors and failing to register Summit Trading with the commission as a commodity pool operator. It also states Brant Rushton failed to properly register. See Complaint / B5

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$1727.90 GOLD CLOSE CHANGE -$2.80

Participants received monthly statements from Summit Trading & Capital, according to the complaint, showing profits from the trading “when in fact, defendants’ actual trading resulted in losses virtually every single month.”

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CLOSE $32.672 CHANGE +$0.366

BUSINESS AND POLITICS

‘Robin Hood’ tax gains support By Steven Greenhouse and Graham Bowley New York Times News Service

Santa Claus — Cliff Snider — gets a kiss on the cheek from Bella Champion, 3, during a Christmas photo shoot in Emerald Isle, N.C., on Nov. 30. When Snider, who’s been playing Santa since he was a teenager, gets a big-ticket request, he typically answers: “There’s an awful lot of children asking for that this year. What else do you want?” Tom Copeland The Associated Press

Got a job in that red sack?

Wizarding World looking west ORLANDO, Fla. — The Wizarding World of Harry Potter is going west. A second park will open at the Universal Studios Hollywood theme park in California, the company revealed Tuesday. Tuesday’s announcement concentrated on Universal Studios Hollywood. On hand were California Gov. Jerry Brown plus actors James and Oliver Phelps — who played the Weasley twins in the films. Details about the Hollywood Potter plan were thin, although a news release boasted it “will be as impressive as what has been created in Orlando.” Hollywood will include a Hogwarts castle and its signature ride: Harry Potter and the Forbidden Journey. No details about a Hogsmeade village, other rides or restaurants were shared. “I am sure that the teams at Universal and Warner Bros. will bring their expertise and attention to detail to Hollywood to make this new experience equally as exciting,” J.K. Rowling, author of the Harry Potter books, said in the release. She was not on stage for the announcement.

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At Work, B3 Stock listings, B4-5

They call it the Robin Hood tax — a tiny levy on trades in the financial markets that would take money from the banks and give it to the world’s poor. And like the mythical hero of Sherwood Forest, it is beginning to capture the public’s imagination. Driven by populist anger at bankers as well as government needs for more revenue, the idea of a tax on trades of stocks, bonds and other financial instruments has attracted an array of influential champions, including the leaders of France and Germany, billionaire philanthropists, former Vice President Al Gore, the consumer activist Ralph Nader, Pope Benedict XVI and the archbishop of Canterbury. See Robin Hood / B5

INVESTMENT

Meet the masters of the bond market By Nathaniel Popper and Walter Hamilton Los Angeles Times

Jae S. Lee / The Associated Press

Sixteen-month-old Fenn Graham cries as he has his pictures taken with Santa at the Mall at Green Hills in Nashville, Tenn.

• Santa Claus is hearing more humble wishes from kids during economic downturn By Martha Waggoner • The Associated Press

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job for their mom or dad. Money for the heating bill. Food or a place to live. Maybe gloves or boots.

More and more, Santas say the children on

their laps are asking for less for themselves — and Santa is promising less as well.

With unemployment high, more homes in foreclosure and the economic outlook dim, many children who visit Santa are all too aware of the struggle to make ends meet. “These children understand the conditions around the home when they ask for stuff,” said Richard Holden, a Santa from Gastonia, N.C. “They understand when there are other children in the fam-

ily, they need to be cautious or thoughtful of them as well.” Cliff Snider, who’s been playing Santa since he was a teenager, agrees. “I think the parents are saying, ‘It’s an economic thing. Just list two to three things you really want,’ ” he said. “Parents are trying to encourage the children to be thrifty.” See Santa Claus / B5

NEW YORK—When the U.S. government needed expert help in evaluating the bonds that caused the 2008 financial crisis, there were only two men it could turn to. Larry Fink, the founder of investment giant BlackRock Inc., and Bill Gross, the founder of Pacific Investment Management Co., are the generally acknowledged kings of the bond universe. Together, the companies they run hold approximately 7.5 percent of all outstanding bonds. The $1.2 trillion managed by BlackRock and the $1.1 trillion at Pimco dwarf the holdings of the next largest bond players, according to data from Pensions & Investments. “They’ve come to be the poster children for the bond market,” said Roy Smith, a professor of financial history at New York University. See Bonds / B5

— From wire reports

Factory orders Total new orders to American factories for all manufactured goods: Seasonally adjusted $460 billion

$450 billion

450 440

EUROPE

Apple, publishers face antitrust investigation over e-book sales By James Kanter New York Times News Service

430 420 410 400 O N D J F MA M J J A S O 2010 2011 Source: Commerce Dept. AP

BRUSSELS — The European antitrust authority said Tuesday that it was investigating possible collusion between Apple and five major publishing houses in the growing market for electronic books. The European Commission said that Apple may have

helped imprints like Penguin, owned by Pearson of Britain, and Harper Collins, owned by News Corp. of the United States, to engage in “anti-competitive practices affecting the sale of e-books.” In particular, the commission said it was “examining the character and terms of the agency agreements entered into” by the publishers

and retailers of e-books, like Apple. The three other imprints named by the commission were Hachette Livre, owned by Lagardere of France; Simon & Schuster, a division of CBS of the United States, and Verlagsgruppe Georg von Holzbrinck of Germany. Apple declined to comment. See E-books / B5

The Associated Press file photo

Visitors look at e-books at a book fair in Frankfurt, Germany. The European Union’s antitrust watchdog said Tuesday it is probing whether Apple and five major publishing houses have colluded to restrict competition in the market for e-books.


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THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2011

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If you have Marketplace events you would like to submit, please contact Marla Polenz at 541-617-7815, email business@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event� at www.bendbulletin.com. Please allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication.

U.S. INDUSTRY

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THURSDAY BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL WEEKLY MEETING: Starts at 7 a.m.; free; Bend Masonic Center, 1036 N.E. Eighth St.; 541-610-9125. BBG BEND BUSINESS GROUP: Weekly meeting. Guests preregister with Matt Bassitt; free; 7:30 a.m.; Phoenix Inn Suites Bend, 300 N.W. Franklin Ave.; 541-323-7000 or www.schwab.com. ADVERTISING FEDERATION ADBITE: Steven Rau of Zoopa will discuss crowdsourcing and how business owners can benefit from the relationships people have with their favorite brands. Deadline for reservations was Wednesday. 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m.; St. Charles Bend, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; 541-385-1992, director@adfedco.org or http:// tinyurl.com/896yvaf. GETTING THE MOST OUT OF SCHWAB.COM: Registration required; free; noon-1 p.m.; Charles Schwab & Co., 777 N.W. Wall St., Suite 201, Bend; 541-318-1794, luiz.soutomaior@schwab.com or www.schwab.com.

FRIDAY BEND CHAMBER TOWN HALL BREAKFAST - STORMWATER, WHERE WILL THE FUTURE FLOW?: Wendy Edde, city of Bend stormwater manager; Craig Chenoweth, city of Bend development services coordinator; and Rodney Weick, DEQ Northwest region water quality manager, will look at the city’s updated stormwater ordinance as well as the issues and impacts associated with stormwater; $30 for Bend Chamber of Commerce members, $40 for others; 7:30-9 a.m.; Bend Golf and Country Club, 61045 Country Club Drive; 541-3827437 or www.bendchamber.org. CENTRAL OREGON REAL ESTATE INVESTMENT CLUB: Free; 11 a.m.; Windermere Real Estate, 1020 S.W. Indian Ave., Redmond; 541-6104006 or bobbleile@windermere .com. FREE TAX FRIDAY: Tax return reviews. Call to schedule an appointment; free; 3-4 p.m.; Zoom Tax, 963 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite 100, Bend; 541-385-9666 or www .facebook.com/Zoomtax.

SATURDAY OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain an alcohol server permit. Preregistration required; $35; 9 a.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com.

TUESDAY BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL HIGH DESERT CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Starts at 7:15 a.m. Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; Bend Honda, 2225 N.E. U.S. Highway 20; 541-420-7377.

WEDNESDAY Dec. 14 OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain an alcohol server permit. Preregistration required; $35; 9

a.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com.

THURSDAY Dec. 15 BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL WEEKLY MEETING: Starts at 7 a.m.; free; Bend Masonic Center, 1036 N.E. Eighth St.; 541-610-9125. BBG BEND BUSINESS GROUP: Weekly meeting. Guests preregister with Matt Bassitt; free; 7:30 a.m.; Phoenix Inn Suites Bend, 300 N.W. Franklin Ave.; 541-323-7000 or www.schwab.com. WINDHAVEN, INVESTMENT MANAGEMENT FOR AN UNPREDICTABLE WORLD: Registration required; free; noon-1 p.m.; Charles Schwab & Co., 777 N.W. Wall St., Suite 201, Bend; 541-318-1794, luiz.soutomaior@ schwab.com or schwab.com.

FRIDAY Dec. 16 CENTRAL OREGON REAL ESTATE INVESTMENT CLUB: Free; 11 a.m.; ServiceMaster Clean, 20806 Sockeye Place, Bend; 541-610-4006 or bobbleile@windermere.com. FREE TAX FRIDAY: Tax return reviews. Call to schedule an appointment; free; 3-4 p.m.; Zoom Tax, 963 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite 100, Bend; 541-385-9666 or www .facebook.com/Zoomtax.

MONDAY Dec. 19 OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain an alcohol server permit. Preregistration required; $35; 9 a.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www .happyhourtraining.com. FORECLOSURE PREVENTION CLASS: Learn about NeighborImpact’s Housing Center tools and services that can assist individuals struggling to pay their mortgages; free; 5:30-7:30 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 2303 S.W. First St., Redmond; 541-318-7506, ext. 109, karenb@neighborimpact.org or www.homeownershipcenter .org. WORRIED ABOUT MAKING HOUSE PAYMENTS?: Learn what to do if you fall behind. Registration required; free; 5:30-7:30 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 2303 S.W. First St., Redmond; 541-318-7506, ext. 109.

TUESDAY Dec. 20 HOW TO START A BUSINESS: Registration required; $15; 11 a.m.-1 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Redmond campus, 2030 S.E. College Loop, Redmond; 541383-7290 or http://noncredit.cocc .edu.

Bend Masonic Center, 1036 N.E. Eighth St.; 541-610-9125. BBG BEND BUSINESS GROUP: Weekly meeting. Guests preregister with Matt Bassitt; free; 7:30 a.m.; Phoenix Inn Suites Bend, 300 N.W. Franklin Ave.; 541-323-7000 or www.schwab.com. GETTING THE MOST OUT OF SCHWAB.COM: Registration required; free; noon-1 p.m.; Charles Schwab & Co., 777 N.W. Wall St., Suite 201, Bend; 541-318-1794, luiz.soutomaior@schwab.com or www.schwab.com.

FRIDAY Dec. 23 CENTRAL OREGON REAL ESTATE INVESTMENT CLUB: Free; 11 a.m.; Windermere Real Estate, 1020 S.W. Indian Ave., Redmond; 541-6104006 or bobbleile@windermere. com.

TUESDAY Dec. 27 OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain an alcohol server permit. Preregistration required; $35; 4 p.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com.

WEDNESDAY Dec. 28 NEIGHBORHOOD NIGHT: NorthWest Crossing businesses and restaurants will offer specials, entertainment and giveaways. Held the last Wednesday of each month; free; 5-8 p.m.; NorthWest Crossing, Mt. Washington and Northwest Crossing drives, Bend.

Chapter 7 Filed Nov. 29

Michael D. Salt and Karen J. Salt, 19201 Apache Road, Bend Craig A. Walker and Linda P.A. Walker, 1550 N.W. Rimrock Drive, Redmond Ana-Ilda A. Flores, 234 S.W. 11th St., Redmond

BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL WEEKLY MEETING: Starts at 7 a.m.; free; Bend Masonic Center, 1036 N.E. Eighth St.; 541-610-9125. BBG BEND BUSINESS GROUP: Weekly meeting. Guests preregister with Matt Bassitt; free; 7:30 a.m.; Phoenix Inn Suites Bend, 300 N.W. Franklin Ave.; 541-323-7000 or www.schwab.com.

FRIDAY Dec. 30 EDWARD JONES COFFEE CLUB: Current market and economic update including current rates; free; 9 a.m.; Ponderosa Coffee House, 61292 S. U.S. Highway 97, Suite 105, Bend; 541-617-8861. CENTRAL OREGON REAL ESTATE INVESTMENT CLUB: Free; 11 a.m.; ServiceMaster Clean, 20806 Sockeye Place, Bend; 541-610-4006 or bobbleile@windermere.com.

SATURDAY

Dec. 22

HOMEBUYING CLASS: Registration required; free; 5:30-9:30 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 20310 Empire Ave., Suite A110, Bend; 541-3187506, ext. 109.

Filed Nov. 30

Linda J. Bauer, 2816 N.E. Cordata Drive, Bend Julie L. Lea, 20581 Scarlet Sage Way, Bend Michael W. Brown and Michele D. Brown, 20680 Flintlock Court, Bend James E. Edgerly and Anita K. Edgerly, P.O. Box 1233, Prineville John L. Ayres, P.O. Box 864, La Pine LaVonne M. Whitcomb, 20184 Merriewood Lane, Bend Deanna L. Chapel, 63617 Hunters Circle, Bend Lawrence F. Brown, 14500 S.W. Noah Butte Drive, Terrebonne Bruce E. Merrell and Carla J. Merrell, P.O. Box 2086, Sisters

Filed Dec. 1

Richard Micheal Doerr, 742 S.E. Sun Lane, Bend Karl F. Matous, 2938 S.W. 24th Court, Redmond Aaron D. Olson and Samantha Tesoro Olson, 62724 Larkview Road, Bend Damaris I. Zelaya, 808 N.E. Meadowlark Lane Space 11, Madras Jacqueline M. Richter, 3200 S.W. Peridot Ave., Redmond Filed Dec. 2

William L. Glaspey and Lorna J. Glaspey, 53746 Otter Drive, La Pine Tyler A. Crye and Rochelle L. Crye, 19895 Quail Pine Loop, Bend Amy M. McCoy, 61365 Robin Hood Lane, Bend Desmond A. O’Donnell and Heidi Anna O’Donnell, 2961 N.W. Bordeaux Lane, Bend

Bloomberg News

SOUTHFIELD, Mich. — The U.S. auto industry is seeing demand recover faster than anticipated, with carmakers headed toward their best annual performance in three years at sales of 12.8 million vehicles. Consumers entered this year’s final month demanding models ranging from big pickups to luxury sedans to fuel-sipping hybrids after pushing November’s sales to the fastest monthly pace since the government’s “cash for clunkers� trade-in program in August 2009. General Motors and Chrysler Group, two years removed from bankruptcy, have been taking share from disasterstricken Toyota and Honda. U.S. buyers are replacing their cars after delaying new-vehicle purchases as long as possible, and they are snapping up F-Series pickups and Prius hybrids as consumer confidence in the economy jumps. That means the automakers haven’t had to resort to fire-sale prices to goose demand. “The industry has managed production levels to where demand was this year and didn’t get ahead of itself,� said Jeff Schuster, a Troy, Mich.-based analyst for LMC Automotive.

“With inventory now being replenished, it’s not a situation where we’re seeing too much production or seeing heavy incentive use.� Spending on marketing promotions averaged less than $2,700 a vehicle throughout the industry, down about $74 from a year ago, according to LMC and J.D. Power & Associates. Consumer confidence surged in November by the most in more than eight years, and the portion of consumers planning to buy a new vehicle within six months climbed to the highest since April, data from The Conference Board showed Nov. 29. The average age of cars and light trucks on the road today has risen to 10.6 years old, Jenny Lin, Ford’s senior U.S. economist, said on a conference call last week. “We are going to see more and more of this pent-up demand realized,� Lin told analysts and reporters. She cited declining gasoline prices for providing “relief� to consumers, who responded with purchases of sport utility vehicles and pickups. If December matches November’s 14 percent increase in industrywide deliveries, auto sales would exceed the 12.7 million sales total that was the average estimate of analysts surveyed in August.

Dec. 29

Jan. 7

James C. Eubanks, 55540 Gross Drive, Bend Chester J. Dzienis Jr. and Christine H. Dzienis, 62668 Larkview Road, Bend Randy E. Silvey and Megan L. Silvey, 17064 Kasserman Drive, Bend

Bloomberg News

By Craig Trudell and Keith Naughton

ALWAYS STIRRING UP SOMETHING GOOD

N  R

BANKRUPTCIES

By Chris Fournier

THURSDAY

THURSDAY BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL WEEKLY MEETING: Starts at 7 a.m.; free;

Canadian Demand for cars currency recovering faster rebounds than anticipated

Filed Dec. 5

Jordan C. Thale, 1223 Stadium Drive, Bend Margaret A. Atchison, 250 N.W. Franklin Ave. #102, Bend Pamela G. Starr, 70 S.W. Century Dive Suite 100-255, Bend Justin H. Andersen, P.O. Box 6742, Bend Susan L. Marshall, 2600 N.E. Forum #89, Bend Raymond Frank Jr. and Tiffany L. Frank, 839 S.W. Cascade Ave., Redmond Filed Dec. 6

Steven R. Oakley and Tracy L. Oakley, 63187 Peale St., Bend Chapter 13 Filed Nov. 30

David A. Stephenson, 1600 S.W. Simpson St. #71, Bend Janis W. Carman, 3166 S.W. Savannah Court, Redmond Robert W. Breadon Jr. and Deborah J. Breadon, 480 S.W. 32nd Court, Redmond Filed Dec. 2

Jesse L. Alexander and Pamella J. Alexander, 16040 Waddell Road, La Pine

Serving Central Oregon Since 1975

7:30 AM - 5:30 PM MON-FRI 8 AM - 3 PM SAT.

541-382-4171 541-548-7707 2121 NE Division Bend

641 NW Fir Redmond

www.denfeldpaints.com

HALIFAX, Nova Scotia — Canada’s dollar is turning into a haven for foreign-exchange investors shunning European turmoil and seeking the safety of the U.S. without the budget deficits or political gridlock. While the currency has lost 2.9 percent since the start of the year, the most among 10 currencies tracked in Bloomberg Correlation Weighted Indexes, it’s up 2.1 percent in the past three months. Only the U.S. dollar, up 5.5 percent, and the yen, 2.1 percent higher, have strengthened more. Canada’s economy is growing at 3 percent, twice the average pace of Group of Seven and euro-area nations. Finance Minister Jim Flaherty pledged his Conservative Party government will eliminate the budget deficit, forecast at C$31 billion this fiscal year, by 2015. The U.S. deficit is $1.3 trillion, or 9.6 percent of output. Canada’s budget deficit is 4.3 percent of output.


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

B3

A W More graduates finding home a good launch pad

HOLIDAY FRUGALITY

By Donna Gehrke-White (South Florida) Sun Sentinel

Abel Uribe / Chicago Tribune

Employees of Breakwater Trading have appetizers at their company holiday party at Morton’s Steakhouse in Chicago on Friday.

Step off, Ebenezer! Company parties stage small comeback By Emily Bryson York Chicago Tribune

CHICAGO — Nancy Wright, president of Chicago’s Blue Plate catering, remembers a time not too long ago when corporate clients spared no expense for the holidays. “You’d go from ballroom to ballroom, and each would be grander than the next,” she said. “It was an annual occasion you looked forward to on so many levels.” Five years ago, six-figure parties weren’t unheard of, and part of an accepted yearend ritual to boost employee morale. But the recession and waves of layoffs put a quick end to high times, with pricey bashes falling out of favor in 2008 and 2009. Just like millions of American households that have felt the economic pinch, companies have adjusted their holiday plans, opting for simpler, smaller celebrations. At the onset of another holiday season, spirits remain subdued, yet caterers and restaurants do cite improvements in party business from last year, which also was an improvement over 2009. “(Clients have) realized they need to start entertaining again, but doing it in a way that’s appropriate,” Wright said, adding that businesses that once spent $50,000 on a party have dropped to about $15,000. Companies now consider entertaining in the office, perhaps in the lobby, with heavy appetizers rather than a full meal, maybe inviting clients, but not spouses.

‘Out of fashion’ David Brandt, director of catering at Chicago’s Palmer House hotel, has a starker view of corporate holiday parties: “They’ve gone out of fashion with the recession, and I don’t think — frankly — they’re going to come back.” Events by number are down about 25 percent from five years ago, he said, and spending per guest has also declined, by about 23 percent. Brandt pointed to decreased alcohol offerings as a leading reason for lower spending, as clients remain worried about incurring liability from accidents. Allan Thompson, director of administration at Mayer Brown, a Chicago-based law firm, said his firm actually found savings by holding an off-site party. The firm had traditionally held its party inhouse, renting plates, glasses and linens, and bringing in catered food. Holding the party outside saved money and has been more fun for employees, Thompson said. This year’s event, at Hotel Allegro Chicago, will consist of beer, wine and appetizers, starting at 4 p.m. “There won’t be champagne flowing or anything like that,” Thompson said, adding that the firm has been looking at “all of our expenses.” Walgreen spokesman Mi-

FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. — More young adults are finding home is, indeed, sweet. They are returning to live with Mom and Dad while they get started in careers and begin saving for their own digs. Some also are paying down college loans, starting their first savings accounts as adults and setting aside money for retirement. Many under age 24 say they have been influenced by the Great Recession that struck while they were still in school. “I miss my independence,” said Teresa Shum. She moved back to her family’s Pembroke Pines, Fla., house after graduating from the University of Florida last spring and starting work as a publicist. But, she said, “It makes more sense to save money before moving out” — cash that could help her afford her own home. Shum said she’s able to set aside about $1,000 a month. She’s not alone. The U.S. Census Bureau found that in just four years, the number of young adults — ages 20 to 29 — living with their parents has increased from 27 percent in 2007 to 30 percent in 2011. Nearly half of those who are 20 to 24 years old now live with Mom and Dad. In South Florida, probably even more 20-some-

“I miss my independence, (but) it makes more sense to save money before moving out” — Teresa Shum, graduate, University of Florida

things live at home than the national average because of the bad economy that makes it hard to get a job and the large number of Hispanic and Caribbean families favor grown kids living at home until marriage, said Jorge Salazar-Carrillo, an economics professor who directs the Center of Economic Research at Florida International University. His daughter returned home after she lost her job, he said. Plenty of other young South Floridians, however, are living with their family to save for their own future home. Alex Seaman, a 22-year-old firefighter-paramedic, wants to save enough for a down payment on a house. He thinks he’ll reach that goal in another year or two, as long as he lives at his parents’ home in Plantation, Fla. He’s also started to put away money for his retirement. “I’m fortunate to have a career and can save some money,” Seaman said. He knows it would take a lot longer to save for a down payment if he had to rent an apartment. Economist Salazar-Carrillo said rent, utilities, cable TV, insurance and other expens-

es can eat most of a starting income. He also said many young people don’t want to scrimp. This is not a generation to forego fun, Salazar-Carrillo said. “Those 26 and under have their own ideas of consumption,” he said. “That includes a car, some weekend splurge money,” as much as $200 a weekend. He disagreed with some analysts who say the increased number of young people living at home is hurting the economy because they are not spending on furniture and other goods to start a new household. They are choosing to spend their money elsewhere, especially on entertainment, Salazar-Carrillo said. The young adults returning home said they help their parents at home. Estee Pinzon, a 2010 Loyola University graduate who is now a digital media specialist in Plantation, chauffeurs her younger brother and sister from their Parkland home to soccer practice and other after-school activities. “She’s an extra hand in the house,” said her mother, Grace Pinzon, who now has the flexibility of working late or traveling because Estee is there to watch the two younger children.

William DeShazer / Chicago Tribune

Pastry chef Louella Ann Caringal decorates cookies at Blue Plate with Ashley Harriger, right, in Chicago on Nov. 30.

Self Referrals Welcome

70 Years of Hearing Excellence

“(Clients have) realized they need to start entertaining again, but doing it in a way that’s appropriate.” — Nancy Wright, president, Blue Plate catering

chael Polzin said the Deerfield, Ill.-based pharmacy chain traditionally held an in-office lunch on Christmas Eve, when employees generally work a half-day. He said Walgreen stopped holding the lunch several years ago when the company became too big to host everyone at headquarters. The decision wasn’t motivated by savings, Polzin said, and there’s been no effort to revive the event. “I think everyone’s happy to spend the extra time with their families on Christmas Eve,” he said. At Morton’s Restaurant Group, seasonal party business is up double digits from 2010, said Roger Drake, senior vice president, marketing and communications. The highbrow, dinner-centric steakhouse chain has also made a nod to the shifting mores for the holidays. “Some companies, because of budgetary constraints, are going to have to do a lunch,” Drake said, which results in a lower average check.

‘Snack-size’ events Smaller functions and menus also have been beneficial for Corner Bakery Cafe, with the chain’s holiday catering business increasing for each of the past two years. “Maybe (businesses) spend smarter than they did in the go-go days of ’05, ’06, ’07,” said Jim Vinz, president and chief operating officer. And while they won’t sacrifice quality, he said, businesses are “looking to feed greater number of people with more snack-size portions.” In addition to boosting employee morale, companies say such events are an important tool for networking. The newly renovated Chicago offices of Wagstaff Worldwide, a Los Angeles-based PR firm focused on the hospitality industry, will host between 100 and 150 guests later this month, primarily clients and media. “It’s going to be sort of a

spirited, elegant cocktail reception,” said Jim Lee, vice president at Wagstaff, adding that the firm considered live entertainment but will likely opt for an iPod playlist. Lee said the office’s 14 employees also celebrate with an annual holiday dinner at a restaurant.

The big events Of course, for some employers, the desire for a bigger splash remains. At the Chicago offices of Olson, a Minneapolis-based advertising and PR firm, the company holds an annual holiday bash including spouses or significant others, a full bar and an in-office omelet breakfast the following morning for employees to rehash the festivities. “It’s a reason to celebrate a good year, and every year a reason to thank not only our employees but spouses or significant others,” said Pete Marino, president of Olson. “They are an important part of enabling our people to do the work, and travel a lot.” If it came down to excluding spouses to save money, Marino said, “I’m not sure we’d have a party.” Then there’s Wauconda, Ill.based MBX Systems, which has hosted an overnight party, including hotel stay, for the past seven years. The company has 100 employees and spends nearly $50,000 on the holiday party, considering it important for employee morale. This year’s bash will be at the Hotel Allegro Chicago. Karen Niziolek, senior coordinator of sales and events at MBX, said the company has hired a DJ to perform during dinner, and Blues Brothers impersonators will mingle during the cocktail hour and perform after dinner. “Employees do spend a lot of time at work, and management really wants to make sure they feel valued,” she said. “We have a budget and work within the budget but don’t want to skimp out.”

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B4

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2011

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Consolidated stock listings C

A-B-C-D AAR 0.30 ABB Ltd 0.64 ABM 0.56 ACE Ltd 1.50 AES Corp AFLAC 1.32 AGCO AGIC Cv 1.08 AGL Res 1.80 AK Steel 0.20 vjAMR vjAMR 39 AOL ASML Hld 0.58 AT&T Inc 1.72 ATP O&G AU Optron 0.14 AVI Bio AVX Cp 0.30 Aarons 0.06 Aastrom AbtLab 1.92 AberFitc 0.70 AbdAsPac 0.42 Abiomed Abraxas AcaciaTc Accenture 1.35 AccoBrds AccretivH Accuray Accuride n Achillion AcmePkt ActiveNt n ActivePwr ActivsBliz 0.17 Actuant 0.04 Acxiom AdeonaPh AdobeSy AdolorCp Adtran 0.36 AdvAmer 0.25 AdvAuto 0.24 AdvATch lf AdvEnId AMD AdvSemi 0.11 AdvOil&Gs Adventrx AdvActBear AecomTch Aegion Aegon AerCap Aeropostl AEterna g Aetna 0.70 AffilMgrs Affymax Affymetrix Agilent Agnico g 0.64 Agrium g 0.11 AirProd 2.32 Aircastle 0.60 Airgas 1.28 AkamaiT Akorn AlskAir AlaskCom 0.86 Albemarle 0.70 AlcatelLuc Alcoa 0.12 Alere AlexBld 1.26 AlexREE 1.96 AlexcoR g Alexion s Alexza AlignTech Alkermes AllegTch 0.72 Allergan 0.20 AlliData AlliancOne AlliBGlbHi 1.20 AlliBInco 0.48 AlliBern 1.44 AlliantEgy 1.70 AlldNevG AlldWldA 1.50 AllosThera AllotComm AllscriptH Allstate 0.84 AlonUSA 0.16 AlphaNRs AlpGPPrp 0.60 AlpTotDiv 0.66 AlpAlerMLP 1.00 AlteraCp lf 0.32 AlterraCap 0.56 Altisrce n Altria 1.64 Alumina 0.28 AlumChina 0.04 AmBev s 1.16 Amarin Amazon Amdocs Amedisys Ameren 1.60 Ameresco Amerigrp AMovilL s 0.28 AmApparel AmAssets n 0.84 AmAxle AmCampus 1.35 ACapAgy 5.60 AmCapLtd AEagleOut 0.44 AEP 1.88 AEqInvLf 0.12 AmExp 0.72 AFnclGrp 0.70 AGreet 0.60 AmIntlGrp AmSupr AmTower 0.35 AmWtrWks 0.92 Ameriprise 0.92 AmeriBrgn 0.52 AmCasino 0.42 Ametek s 0.24 Amgen 1.12 AmkorT lf Amphenol 0.06 Amylin Amyris Anadarko 0.36 Anadigc AnalogDev 1.00 Ancestry Andrsons 0.44 AngiesL n AnglogldA 0.22 ABInBev 1.16 Anixter Ann Inc Annaly 2.51 AntaresP Anworth 0.95 Aon Corp 0.60 A123 Sys Apache 0.60 AptInv 0.48 ApolloGrp ApolloInv 1.12 Apple Inc ApldEner h ApldMatl 0.32 AMCC Approach Aptargrp 0.88 AquaAm 0.66 ArcelorMit 0.75 ArchCap s ArchCoal 0.44 ArchDan 0.70 ArcosDor n 0.12 ArenaPhm AresCap 1.44 AriadP Ariba Inc ArkBest 0.12 ArmHld 0.15 ArmourRsd 1.32 ArmstrW s 13.74 Arris ArrowEl ArubaNet AsburyA AscenaRtl AshfordHT 0.40 Ashland 0.70 AsiaInfoL AspenIns 0.60 AspenTech AsscdBanc 0.04 AsdEstat 0.68 Assurant 0.72 AssuredG 0.18 AstoriaF 0.52 AstraZen 2.70 athenahlth Athersys AtlPwr g 1.14 AtlasEngy 0.96 AtlasPpln 2.16 Atmel ATMOS 1.38 AtwoodOcn AuRico g Aurizon g AutoNatn Autodesk Autoliv 1.80 AutoData 1.58 AutoZone Auxilium AvagoTch 0.44 AvalRare n AvalonBay 3.57 AvanirPhm AveryD 1.00 AviatNetw AvisBudg Avista 1.10 Aviva 41 2.06 Avnet Avon 0.92 Axcelis AXIS Cap 0.92 B&G Foods 0.92 BB&T Cp 0.64 BBCN Bcp

17.84 18.81 21.38 70.24 12.07 44.80 45.93 8.86 40.93 8.68 .70 4.51 14.07 41.62 29.17 7.37 4.65 .71 13.09 26.91 2.15 54.54 49.17 7.07 20.60 3.64 34.06 59.17 9.61 23.00 4.16 6.31 7.07 34.63 13.29 .67 12.38 22.86 12.92 1.11 27.96 4.69 32.57 9.33 70.09 5.75 10.35 5.66 4.62 4.70 .62 24.42 21.31 15.98 4.52 11.16 16.70 1.74 41.35 97.19 5.38 4.26 36.98 43.49 70.89 82.82 12.18 76.39 28.23 10.77 70.87 5.26 53.74 1.60 9.92 23.07 43.34 67.54 6.93 65.05 1.03 24.85 15.74 49.89 84.17 103.07 2.83 14.35 8.13 13.47 42.32 32.58 57.82 1.28 17.73 19.36 27.12 8.69 24.88 5.51 4.55 16.18 36.84 22.64 49.63 28.76 5.79 11.97 35.10 7.65 191.99 28.18 11.60 32.31 12.90 57.33 24.02 .55 20.42 8.88 39.45 28.83 7.06 14.60 39.74 11.28 48.56 36.29 17.45 24.06 4.09 59.24 31.65 46.94 36.44 18.30 42.86 57.89 4.67 45.50 10.79 10.95 81.54 2.29 35.87 23.17 42.65 14.01 46.83 59.70 62.62 25.05 16.29 2.77 6.51 46.19 2.13 97.38 21.66 50.14 7.25 390.95 .08 11.09 7.25 32.88 50.71 22.17 19.30 37.51 16.33 29.60 21.82 1.88 15.76 11.66 34.38 19.32 27.48 7.17 42.10 10.40 37.00 21.61 20.57 28.38 8.18 57.11 8.73 26.24 18.17 10.72 15.80 39.92 12.75 8.15 45.84 61.00 2.08 13.20 25.12 35.16 9.19 33.23 42.09 9.25 5.80 36.24 34.78 55.22 52.14 337.81 17.60 30.81 3.13 122.58 2.57 27.72 1.78 11.94 25.37 24.50 31.00 17.03 1.38 30.91 23.22 23.54 9.34

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BCE g 2.07 BE Aero BGC Ptrs 0.68 BHP BillLt 2.02 BHPBil plc 2.02 BJsRest BMC Sft BP PLC 1.68 BPZ Res BRE 1.50 BRFBrasil 0.35 BabckWil Bacterin Baidu BakrHu 0.60 BallCp s 0.28 BallyTech BcBilVArg 0.61 BcoBrades 0.80 BcoSantSA 0.84 BcoSBrasil 1.65 BcSanChile 3.29 BcoChile 3.66 BcpSouth 0.04 BkofAm 0.04 BkAm pfE 1.02 BkAm pfH 2.05 BkAm pfJ 1.81 BkAm wtA BkAm wtB BkAML pfQ 2.16 BkAML pfH 0.77 BkHawaii 1.80 BkIreld rs BkMont g 2.80 BkNYMel 0.52 BkNova g 2.08 Bankrate n BarcUBS36 BarcGSOil BarcBk prD 2.03 Barclay 0.36 Bar iPVix Bard 0.76 BarnesNob Barnes 0.40 BarrickG 0.60 BasicEnSv Baxter 1.34 BaytexE g 2.64 BeacnRfg Beam Inc 0.76 BeazerHm BebeStrs 0.10 BectDck 1.80 BedBath Belden 0.20 Belo 0.20 Bemis 0.96 Berkley 0.32 BerkH B BerryPet 0.32 BestBuy 0.64 BigLots BBarrett BioRefLab BioFuelE h BiogenIdc BioMarin BioMedR 0.80 Bionovo rsh BioSante BlkHillsCp 1.46 BlkRKelso 1.04 BlackRock 5.50 BlkBldAm 1.56 BlkCrAll4 0.92 BlkDebtStr 0.32 BlkEnhC&I 1.44 BlkGlbOp 2.28 BlkIT 0.44 BlkIntlG&I 1.36 BlkRlAsst 1.09 BlkRsCmdy 1.40 Blackstone 0.40 BlockHR 0.60 Blount BlueCoat BdwlkPpl 2.11 BobEvans 1.00 Boeing 1.68 Boise Inc 0.40 BonTon 0.20 BoozAllenH BorgWarn BostPrv 0.04 BostProp 2.00 BostonSci BttmlnT BoydGm BradyCp 0.74 Brandyw 0.60 Braskem 1.05 BreitBurn 1.74 BrigStrat 0.44 BrigExp Brightpnt Brigus grs Brinker 0.64 Brinks 0.40 BrMySq 1.36 BristowGp 0.60 Broadcom 0.36 BroadrdgF 0.64 BroadSoft Broadwd h BrcdeCm Brookdale BrkfldAs g 0.52 BrkfInfra 1.40 BrkfldOfPr 0.56 BrooksAuto 0.32 BrwnBrn 0.34 BrownShoe 0.28 BrownFB 1.40 BrukerCp Brunswick 0.05 Buckeye 4.10 BuckTch 0.24 Buckle 0.80 Buenavent 0.56 BuffaloWW BungeLt 1.00 C&J Egy n CA Inc 0.20 CBL Asc 0.84 CBOE 0.48 CBRE GRE 0.54 CBRE Grp CBS B 0.40 CEC Ent 0.88 CF Inds 1.60 CH Robins 1.16 CIT Grp CLECO 1.25 CME Grp 5.60 CMS Eng 0.84 CNA Fn 0.40 CNH Gbl CNO Fincl CNOOC 6.42 CPFL En s 1.60 CSG Sys CSX s 0.48 CTC Media 0.88 CVB Fncl 0.34 CVR Engy CVS Care 0.50 CYS Invest 2.20 Cabelas CblvsNY s 0.60 Cabot 0.72 CabotO&G 0.12 CACI Cadence CalDive CalaCvHi 1.02 CalaCvOp 1.14 CalaStrTR 0.63 CalAmp Calgon Calix CallGolf 0.04 CallonPet Calpine CAMAC En Cambrex CamdenPT 1.96 Cameco g 0.40 CameltInfo Cameron CampSp 1.16 CdnNRy g 1.30 CdnNRs gs 0.36 CP Rwy g 1.20 CdnSolar CanoPet CapOne 0.20 CapitlSrce 0.04 CapFdF rs 0.30 CapsteadM 1.78 CpstnTrb h CarboCer 0.96 CardnlHlth 0.86 CardiumTh Cardtronic CareFusion CareerEd CaribouC Carlisle 0.72 CarMax Carnival 1.00 CarpTech 0.72 Carrizo Carters Caseys 0.60 CashAm 0.14 CatalystH Caterpillar 1.84 CathayGen 0.04 Cavium CedarRlty 0.36 CelSci Celanese 0.24 Celestic g Celgene CellTher rsh Cellcom 4.10 Celsion Cemex Cemig pf 1.89 CenovusE 0.80 Centene CenterPnt 0.79 CnElBras pf 0.03 CnElBras lf 1.56 CentEuro CFCda g 0.01 CentAl CntryLink 2.90 Cenveo

C 39.58 38.89 6.20 76.11 62.75 47.69 35.22 43.56 3.47 47.89 21.06 22.49 2.22 131.25 52.80 35.11 37.76 8.95 17.31 7.96 8.18 66.58 77.09 10.08 5.78 18.44 22.98 21.20 2.54 .48 23.09 16.88 42.14 4.91 57.18 19.89 47.49 17.69 43.61 25.73 23.45 11.84 40.54 85.89 15.77 24.74 51.20 18.96 51.69 55.39 19.35 52.16 2.47 7.64 73.87 61.88 33.80 6.00 29.64 33.33 78.15 43.99 28.13 37.72 38.59 12.48 .72 112.14 33.59 17.93 .34 2.56 33.04 8.90 173.46 20.66 12.26 3.79 12.60 14.15 7.39 7.69 11.75 14.38 14.82 15.13 15.12 17.88 27.25 33.19 70.87 6.19 3.37 16.02 70.13 7.94 94.91 5.59 22.09 6.62 32.00 8.71 16.13 17.98 15.65 36.48 10.16 1.31 23.78 25.75 33.12 46.82 30.10 22.21 36.99 .78 5.55 16.25 27.70 26.16 15.39 10.12 21.46 8.90 80.88 12.32 18.45 63.40 31.86 41.03 37.97 62.81 62.79 20.19 21.48 14.86 26.24 6.92 16.58 26.23 33.15 146.82 68.54 34.25 35.94 248.84 20.87 26.19 40.62 6.31 198.52 26.61 15.13 21.83 9.93 10.09 18.99 38.27 13.40 24.86 14.87 33.60 85.80 56.60 10.91 2.43 11.73 11.45 8.57 4.71 14.54 7.59 5.63 5.11 15.25 1.15 7.12 57.57 18.76 2.27 54.11 32.95 77.69 37.76 63.20 2.74 .13 45.68 6.47 11.17 12.63 1.11 138.67 41.03 .30 27.38 24.87 7.36 13.02 43.90 31.33 34.11 53.00 29.08 40.62 52.72 49.12 52.29 95.96 14.52 32.46 3.47 .30 46.19 8.04 62.21 1.30 16.30 2.03 5.00 17.42 32.80 37.95 19.68 14.23 9.66 5.04 22.27 10.12 36.20 3.14

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Cepheid Cerner s CerusCp ChRvLab ChrmSh ChartInds CharterCm ChkPoint Checkpnt Cheesecake ChelseaTh Chemed 0.64 Chemtura CheniereEn ChesEng 0.35 ChesGran n Chevron 3.12 ChicB&I 0.20 Chicos 0.20 ChildPlace Chimera 0.57 ChinaLife 0.91 ChinaMed ChinaMble 2.04 ChinaSun ChinaUni 0.12 Chipotle Chiquita Chubb 1.56 ChurchD s 0.68 CienaCorp Cigna 0.04 Cimarex 0.40 CinciBell CinnFin 1.61 Cinemark 0.84 Cintas 0.54 Cirrus Cisco 0.24 Citigrp rs 0.04 CitzRpB rs CitrixSys CityNC 0.80 CleanEngy CleanH s ClearChOut Clearwire ClickSft 0.32 CliffsNRs 1.12 Clorox 2.40 CloudPeak Coach 0.90 CobaltIEn CocaCola 1.88 CocaCE 0.52 Codexis Coeur CoffeeH 0.12 CogdSpen 0.40 CognizTech CohStQIR 0.72 Coinstar ColdwtrCrk Colfax ColgPal 2.32 CollctvBrd ColonPT 0.60 ColBnkg 0.32 ColumLabs ColSprtw 0.88 Comcast 0.45 Comc spcl 0.45 Comerica 0.40 CmcBMO 0.92 CmclMtls 0.48 CmwREIT 2.00 CmtyBkSy 1.04 CmtyHlt CommVlt CBD-Pao 0.39 CmplGnom CompPrdS CompSci 0.80 Compuwre ComstkRs Comtech 1.10 Comverse Con-Way 0.40 ConAgra 0.96 ConchoRes ConcurTch Conns ConocPhil 2.64 ConsolEngy 0.40 ConEd 2.40 ConstantC ConstellA ConstellEn 0.96 ContlRes Cnvrgys CooperCo 0.06 Cooper Ind 1.16 CooperTire 0.42 CopaHold 1.64 Copart Copel 1.00 CoreLabs 1.00 CoreLogic CorinthC CornPdts 0.64 CorOnDm n Corning 0.30 CorpOffP 1.65 CorrectnCp Cosan Ltd 0.28 Costco 0.96 CousPrp 0.18 Covance CovantaH 0.30 CoventryH Covidien 0.90 CowenGp CrackerB 1.00 Crane 1.04 Credicp 1.95 CSVS2xVxS CSVelIVSt s CredSuiss 1.40 CrSuiHiY 0.32 Cree Inc CreXus 1.00 Crocs Crossh g rs CrosstexE 0.40 CrosstxLP 1.24 CrwnCstle CrownHold Ctrip.com CubeSmart 0.28 CubistPh CullenFr 1.84 Cummins 1.60 CumMed CurEuro 0.25 CurJpn Cyberonics Cyclacel h Cymer CypSemi 0.36 CytRx h Cytec 0.50 Cytori DCT Indl 0.28 DDR Corp 0.32 DFC Gbl s DHT Hldgs 0.12 DNP Selct 0.78 DR Horton 0.15 DSW Inc 0.60 DTE 2.35 DanaHldg Danaher 0.10 Darden 1.72 Darling DaVita DeVry 0.30 DealrTrk DeanFds DeckrsOut Deere 1.64 DejourE g Delek 0.15 Dell Inc DelphiAu n DelphiFn 0.48 DeltaAir DeltaPtr rs Deluxe 1.00 DemMda n DemandTc DenburyR Dndreon DenisnM g Dennys Dentsply 0.22 Depomed DeutschBk 1.07 DBGoldDL DBGoldDS DevonE 0.68 Dex One h DexCom Diageo 2.63 DiamondF 0.18 DiaOffs 0.50 DiamRk 0.32 DianaShip DiceHldg DicksSptg 0.50 Diebold 1.12 DigitalGen DigitalRlt 2.72 DigRiver DigitalGlb Dillards 0.20 DirecTV A DxRssBull rs DREBear rs Dx30TBr rs DxEMBll rs 6.10 DxFnBull rs DrxTcBull 0.84 DrSCBr rs DirFnBr rs DirLCBr rs DirDGldBr DirDGldBll DrxTcBear DrxEnBear DrxSOXBll DirEMBear DrxREBull 0.05 DirxSCBull DirxLCBull DirxEnBull Discover 0.24 DiscCm A DiscCm C DishNetwk 2.00 Disney 0.60 DrReddy 0.65

C 34.33 61.06 3.15 28.87 4.52 62.28 52.97 54.25 11.84 28.54 5.42 50.52 11.19 9.68 25.68 19.91 104.36 39.47 10.60 55.00 2.68 40.77 2.57 48.33 .64 21.31 331.43 8.67 68.08 44.51 11.50 43.17 70.07 3.16 29.64 20.34 30.52 16.73 18.73 29.75 11.17 73.23 42.83 13.15 61.36 11.89 2.50 9.56 72.23 65.60 20.65 63.09 10.89 66.68 26.20 5.95 28.87 9.00 3.83 69.89 8.17 43.11 .94 31.65 90.54 14.74 19.24 18.59 2.26 54.36 23.19 22.96 25.89 37.32 14.69 16.68 26.76 18.76 49.12 37.42 3.11 35.15 25.34 8.65 19.32 31.06 6.38 28.94 25.52 103.10 52.18 12.35 72.54 40.80 59.01 24.88 19.38 39.87 71.44 12.42 59.83 56.49 13.77 64.77 45.44 20.43 117.09 13.73 2.45 51.76 17.90 13.88 21.12 21.19 12.13 88.06 6.01 45.44 14.63 31.75 44.69 2.72 49.17 47.77 106.01 42.75 5.88 25.25 2.95 25.68 9.89 15.41 .37 13.08 16.06 43.52 33.14 25.15 10.03 37.58 50.98 96.70 3.11 133.48 126.77 31.63 .83 47.30 19.18 .35 46.86 2.59 4.86 11.55 18.63 1.06 10.91 12.68 47.64 52.60 12.62 48.01 41.82 13.93 75.65 35.36 26.47 10.55 106.18 78.38 .34 11.11 15.86 22.13 28.03 8.47 .55 22.48 8.03 8.57 16.86 8.66 1.47 3.52 36.05 4.85 39.99 59.19 4.59 67.02 1.42 8.43 85.12 27.94 61.28 9.25 7.80 8.31 39.65 30.24 12.16 64.92 15.15 15.73 48.69 47.20 38.53 46.24 77.28 86.31 65.95 40.24 26.87 38.64 30.00 32.09 31.31 15.31 11.12 29.50 18.18 47.19 46.73 61.57 50.29 24.38 41.84 38.04 26.90 36.83 30.30

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1.97 1.40 0.60 1.04 0.52 1.26 1.00 1.28 0.48 0.12 1.64 0.48 1.00 0.68 1.44

1.08

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D

OfficeMax OilSvHT 1.82 OilStates OldDomFrt OldNBcp 0.28 OldRepub 0.70 Olin 0.80 OmegaHlt 1.60 Omncre 0.16 Omnicell Omnicom 1.00 OmniVisn OnSmcnd Oncothyr OneBeacon 0.84 ONEOK 2.24 OnyxPh OpenTxt OpenTable OpnwvSy OpkoHlth OpntTch 0.48 Opnext OptimerPh Oracle 0.24 OraSure OrbitalSci Orbitz Orexigen OrientEH OrionMar OshkoshCp OvShip 0.88 OwensMin 0.80 OwensCorn OwensIll OxfordInds 0.52 PDL Bio 0.60 PF Chng 0.96 PG&E Cp 1.82 PHH Corp PMC Sra PNC 1.40 PNM Res 0.50 PPG 2.28 PPL Corp 1.40 PSBPk pfO 1.88 PSS Wrld PVH Corp 0.15 PacWstBc 0.72 Paccar 0.72 PacBiosci PacEth rs PacSunwr PaciraPh n PackAmer 0.80 PallCorp 0.70 PanASlv 0.10 Panasonic 0.12 Pandora n PaneraBrd PapaJohns ParPharm ParamTch ParaG&S Parexel ParkDrl ParkerHan 1.48 Parkwy 0.30 PartnerRe 2.40 PatriotCoal Patterson 0.48 PattUTI 0.20 Paychex 1.28 PeabdyE 0.34 Pebblebrk 0.48 Pegasys lf 0.12 Pengrth g 0.84 PnnNGm PennVa 0.23 PennVaRs 2.00 PennWst g 1.08 PennantPk 1.12 Penney 0.80 PenRE 0.60 Penske 0.36 Pentair 0.80 PeopUtdF 0.63 PepBoy 0.12 PepcoHold 1.08 PepsiCo 2.06 PeregrineP PerfectWld PerkElm 0.28 Perrigo 0.32 PerryEllis PetSmart 0.56 PetChina 5.34 PetrbrsA 1.34 Petrobras 1.26 PetroDev PtroqstE Pfizer 0.80 PhrmAth Pharmacyc Pharmsst s Pharmerica PhilipMor 3.08 PhilipsEl 1.02 PhnxCos PhotrIn PiedNG 1.16 PiedmOfc 1.26 Pier 1 PilgrimsP PimIncStr2 0.78 PimcoHiI 1.46 PinnclEnt PinnaclFn PinWst 2.10 PionDrill PioNtrl 0.08 PitnyBw 1.48 Pixelwrks PlainsAA 3.98 PlainsEx Plantron 0.20 PlatGpMet PlatUnd 0.32 PlumCrk 1.68 Polaris s 0.90 Polycom s PolyMet g PolyOne 0.16 Polypore Popular PortGE 1.06 PortglTel 3.18 PostPrp 0.88 Potash s 0.28 Potlatch 1.24 Power-One PSCrudeDS PwshDB PS Agri PS Oil PS USDBull PwSClnEn 0.09 PwShDiv 0.37 PwShHiYD 0.33 PwSIntlDv 0.62 PSFinPf 1.25 PS SP LwV 0.39 PShNatMu 1.12 PwShPfd 0.95 PShEMSov 1.51 PwShs QQQ 0.41 Powrwv rs Praxair 2.00 PrecCastpt 0.12 PrecDrill PremGlbSv Presstek h PriceTR 1.24 PrSmrt 0.60 priceline PrimoWtr Primoris 0.12 PrinctnR h PrinFncl 0.70 PrivateB 0.04 ProAsr 1.00 ProLogis 1.12 ProShtDow ProShtQQQ ProShtS&P PrUShS&P ProUltDow 0.28 PrUlShDow PrUShMC rs ProUltQQQ PrUShQQQ rs ProUltSP 0.31 PrUShtFn rs ProSShFn ProUShL20 PrUltSCh25 ProUltSEM ProUltSOG ProUltSBM ProUltRE 0.60 ProUltFin 0.15 PrUPShQQQ ProUPShD30 PrUPShR2K ProUltO&G 0.06 ProUBasM PrUPR2K s ProShtR2K PrUltPQQQ s ProUltR2K ProSht20Tr ProUSSP500 PrUltSP500 s0.03 ProSUltGold PrUltVixST ProUSSlv rs PrUltCrde rs PrUShCrde rs ProUltSGld ProUltSlv s ProUShEuro Procera rs ProctGam 2.10 PrognicsPh ProgrssEn 2.48 ProgrsSft s ProgsvCp 1.40 ProUSR2K rs PrUShEu rs PrUltSRE rs ProspctCap 1.22 ProspBcsh 0.78 Protalix ProtLife 0.64 ProvEn g 0.54 ProvidFS 0.48 Prudentl 1.45 PSEG 1.37 PubStrg 3.80 PulteGrp

C 5.01 125.53 76.71 39.85 11.45 9.15 19.27 18.02 33.59 16.75 44.36 12.15 8.20 8.16 15.02 83.14 42.40 55.79 38.26 1.69 4.99 37.85 1.02 12.65 31.73 9.85 14.67 3.99 1.75 7.51 6.04 21.05 10.37 29.97 28.98 20.45 40.42 6.18 30.93 38.61 14.71 5.48 54.97 18.70 85.44 29.78 25.38 23.91 74.84 18.88 40.36 2.50 1.33 1.31 8.76 25.57 54.88 24.71 9.18 10.27 141.62 36.99 32.24 20.72 2.68 19.50 6.96 83.87 10.02 64.85 10.33 30.25 21.30 29.70 38.24 18.96 30.75 10.67 37.01 6.05 24.93 18.95 10.78 33.30 9.93 20.62 36.98 12.61 11.19 19.85 64.65 1.21 11.56 19.10 100.83 14.72 49.18 129.88 26.05 28.10 36.94 7.09 20.23 1.26 15.14 128.13 15.36 75.58 20.28 1.72 6.04 33.06 16.54 13.42 6.06 9.24 12.30 10.23 15.75 46.65 11.50 94.40 19.00 2.00 67.26 36.59 35.21 1.09 34.25 36.11 61.45 16.87 1.10 11.09 48.80 1.37 24.74 6.57 39.57 43.54 30.58 4.38 39.76 27.78 28.70 28.99 22.10 5.55 14.85 9.06 14.78 16.49 25.33 24.06 13.81 27.28 57.08 2.08 102.44 162.03 11.14 8.40 .53 57.84 69.85 479.10 2.93 14.99 .12 25.47 9.76 79.84 28.37 39.22 30.80 40.57 19.48 59.30 15.64 37.82 84.87 43.85 46.49 60.67 37.74 19.63 28.36 32.36 25.12 17.50 47.18 44.41 18.93 26.08 13.35 46.06 35.09 51.70 29.59 72.55 35.67 32.48 13.40 60.57 97.54 16.27 12.05 43.13 37.78 16.42 60.22 19.02 17.06 64.84 7.46 53.79 21.28 18.86 38.63 45.63 40.39 9.38 40.20 5.39 22.54 9.72 13.03 51.41 32.65 129.12 6.48

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N m

D

PMIIT PPrIT

0.35 0.36

4.86 5.08

C

N m

-.02 -.01

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Q-R-S-T QEP Res 0.08 QIAGEN QiaoXing h Qihoo360 n QlikTech Qlogic Qualcom 0.86 QualityS s 0.70 QuanexBld 0.16 QuantaSvc QntmDSS QuantFu rs Quepasa QstDiag 0.68 QuestRM g QuestSft Questar 0.65 Questcor QuickLog QksilvRes Quiksilvr RAIT rs 0.24 RF MicD RIT Tech RLJ Lodg n 0.60 RPC s 0.40 RPM 0.86 RSC Hldgs RTI Biolog RTI IntlM Rackspace RadianGrp 0.01 RadioShk 0.50 Ralcorp RLauren 0.80 RAM En h Rambus RamcoG 0.65 Randgold 0.20 RangeRs 0.16 RaptorPhm RareEle g RJamesFn 0.52 Rayonier s 1.60 Raytheon 1.72 RealD RealPage RltyInco 1.74 RedHat ReddyIce h Rdiff.cm RedwdTr 1.00 RegalBel 0.72 RegalEnt 0.84 RgcyCtrs 1.85 RegncyEn 1.82 Regenrn RegionsFn 0.04 Regis Cp 0.24 ReinsGrp 0.72 RelStlAl 0.48 RenaisRe 1.04 ReneSola Renren n RentACt 0.64 Rentech RepubAir RepubSvc 0.88 RschMotn ResMed ResoluteEn ResrceCap 1.00 RetailOpp 0.48 RevettMin RexEnergy ReynAmer 2.24 RhinoRes 1.92 Richmnt g RightNow RioTinto 1.17 RitchieBr 0.45 RiteAid RiverbedT RobtHalf 0.56 RockTen 0.80 RockwlAut 1.70 RockColl 0.96 RockwdH Rollins s 0.28 Roper 0.44 RosttaG rs RosettaR RossStrs 0.88 Rovi Corp Rowan RoyalBk g 2.16 RBScotlnd RylCarb 0.40 RoyDShllB 3.36 RoyDShllA 3.36 RoyGld 0.60 RoyaleEn Rubicon g RubiconTc RubyTues rue21 Ryder 1.16 RdxSPEW 0.66 Ryland 0.12 S1 Corp SAIC SAP AG 0.82 SBA Com SCANA 1.94 SEI Inv 0.24 SK Tlcm SLGreen 1.00 SLM Cp 0.40 SM Energy 0.10 SpdrDJIA 3.16 SpdrGold SpdrEuro50 1.57 SpdrIntRE 3.53 SP Mid 1.64 S&P500ETF 2.46 SpdrBiot Spdr Div 1.73 SpdrHome 0.31 SpdrS&PBk 0.26 SpdrLehHY 4.20 SpdrNuBST 0.38 SpdrNuBMu 0.96 SpdrLe1-3bll SpdrS&P RB0.39 SpdrRetl 0.49 SpdrOGEx 0.50 SpdrOGEq 0.28 SpdrMetM 0.42 SPX Cp 1.00 STEC STMicro 0.40 STR Hldgs SVB FnGp SXC Hlth SabaSoftw SabraHltc 1.28 Safeway 0.58 StJoe StJude 0.84 Saks Salesforce SalixPhm SallyBty SamsO&G SanderFm 0.68 SanDisk SandRdge SandRdg n 0.72 SangBio Sanmina Sanofi 1.82 Sanofi rt Santarus Sapient 0.35 SaraLee 0.46 SaratogaRs Satcon h SavientPh Schlmbrg 1.00 Schnitzer 0.07 SchSTUSTr 0.22 Schwab 0.24 SciGames ScorpioTk Scotts 1.20 ScrippsNet 0.40 SeabGld g SeadrillLtd 3.14 SeagateT 0.72 SealAir 0.52 Sealy SearsHldgs Seaspan 0.75 SeattGen SelCmfrt SelectvIns 0.52 SemGroup SemiHTr 2.15 SempraEn 1.92 Semtech SenHous 1.52 SensataT Sensient 0.84 Sequans n Sequenom ServiceCp 0.20 SvcSourc n SvArts rsh ShandaGm 1.02 Shanda ShawGrp Sherwin 1.46 ShipFin 1.56 Shire 0.40 Shutterfly SiderurNac 0.81 Siemens 4.04 SifyTech SigaTech h SigmaDsg SigmaAld 0.72 SignatBk SignetJwlrs 0.40 SilganHld 0.44 SilicGrIn SilicnImg SilcnLab Slcnware 0.28 SilvStd g SilvWhtn g 0.18 SilvrcpM g 0.10 SimonProp 3.60 Sina Sinclair 0.48 SinoClnEn Sinovac SiriusXM

32.36 14.88 .75 18.21 29.86 14.94 54.83 36.63 15.34 20.88 2.73 1.46 3.85 57.70 2.72 19.30 19.43 43.05 2.97 8.29 3.18 4.60 6.26 4.47 16.35 19.38 23.60 11.92 4.38 25.98 43.20 2.39 11.20 82.01 150.63 1.06 7.80 9.43 106.38 70.74 5.65 5.15 30.96 41.84 45.64 9.54 25.94 33.41 50.55 .42 8.06 10.53 51.08 13.77 37.24 23.68 54.44 4.16 16.20 51.50 49.86 72.93 1.78 3.66 35.88 1.60 3.79 27.15 17.03 25.42 13.61 5.53 11.22 5.39 15.85 41.63 22.33 11.71 42.93 52.59 20.05 1.19 26.74 27.48 57.06 77.27 54.61 42.04 22.20 84.67 .25 53.93 92.99 27.06 33.79 48.11 7.12 27.68 73.06 71.06 80.55 4.47 4.01 9.80 7.12 23.75 52.96 46.84 15.83 9.72 12.15 58.83 41.48 43.61 16.76 14.48 67.70 13.16 79.21 121.39 168.18 31.32 33.74 162.26 126.26 65.06 53.74 17.15 19.52 38.30 24.34 23.45 45.85 23.82 53.17 56.36 36.91 54.70 62.82 8.90 6.25 8.96 46.96 55.70 7.69 10.72 20.71 14.49 36.95 9.73 123.32 44.04 20.00 1.73 51.32 50.37 7.75 19.14 2.77 8.90 35.00 1.32 3.02 12.04 18.94 5.90 .73 2.31 76.65 48.67 50.45 12.22 8.34 5.31 44.47 41.37 21.90 35.85 16.40 18.29 1.93 59.99 11.01 17.20 20.59 16.84 26.63 31.10 53.58 23.92 21.88 31.74 36.93 4.03 3.98 10.30 14.85 .39 4.29 40.08 24.00 86.30 12.14 101.52 27.81 8.76 101.70 4.27 1.94 6.47 65.52 59.36 45.24 38.14 14.37 5.08 42.69 4.38 14.34 33.52 7.41 122.84 62.72 10.98 1.35 2.73 1.79

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D

C 44.09 39.23 13.05 16.10 5.17 4.58 3.11 39.85 1.09 24.97 76.67 51.99 56.10 33.89 52.04 23.14 32.90 12.99 45.90 2.88 16.10 15.37 7.29 32.07 2.68 17.68 32.10 44.72 31.46 42.01 8.54 37.69 3.21 29.64 14.74 19.88 15.37 21.75 2.61 14.92 15.13 11.08 13.24 25.57 36.36 34.72 33.71 31.97 39.30 71.28 13.18 34.06 26.02 35.12 20.06 3.36 66.77 14.88 1.06 2.63 43.73 48.90 18.36 40.27 26.01 13.51 7.59 1.00 80.24 30.44 8.42 36.42 6.26 31.89 11.63 28.20 5.13 48.53 39.80 5.71 18.53 30.64 39.35 37.26 7.02 5.42 7.80 2.60 18.03 30.05 7.45 8.02 21.50 8.74 8.71 31.09 9.36 3.79 15.99 16.19 9.73 32.60 30.50 27.49 1.40 1.14 29.11 27.40 19.91 10.20 16.41 32.71 18.65 8.58 1.64 25.31 63.52 33.53 11.30 18.63 12.94 14.25 1.56 39.06 13.31 27.94 2.93 38.41 38.46 7.67 53.66 3.06 6.38 18.27 61.68 1.15 16.15 51.14 38.40 33.26 3.86 11.02 2.57 9.80 19.20 7.83 11.56 9.60 27.37 18.85 26.64 4.07 7.48 31.77 53.93 38.28 4.68 .72 29.84 .18 52.61 13.61 16.56 18.12 34.87 23.31 17.11 22.45 9.43 39.23 40.05 30.12 29.24 30.42 14.55 18.83 47.18 53.05 7.37 26.73 23.89 31.38 15.55 82.13 28.41 51.13 68.97 62.68 34.72 43.02 21.29 22.95 16.45 10.04 21.30 43.74 72.16 51.81 20.29 .66 64.32 2.36 67.11 73.36 41.86 54.61 1.34 7.08 45.48 55.35 26.19 64.86 .18 18.89 5.99 .23 19.69 44.12 7.89 29.65

N m

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WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Complaint Continued from B1 Investors — referred to in the complaint as participants — provided at least $854,000 to Summit Trading & Capital, according to the document. Neither the Rushtons nor a Bend attorney who represented them earlier this year could be reached for comment Tuesday. According to the commission’s complaint, Summit Trading & Capital was started in Illinois and dissolved last year. However, records show a move to Bend in 2007, with a location on Northwest Champion Circle as its last principal address. The Rushtons, who also moved to Bend, founded the company and served as its principals, according to the complaint. Summit operated as a commodity pool operator, which solicits or accepts funds for trading commodities futures contracts — which are essentially agreements to buy or sell something at a specific price in the future. Historically, commodity trading involved wheat, rice, corn and other agricultural products, according to the commission. Over the last 20 years, it has expanded to include crude oil, foreign currencies, government securities, electricity and even the weather. According to the regulatory agency, neither Summit Trading nor either of the Rushtons has ever been registered with the commission in any capac-

E-books Continued from B1 In a statement, Pearson said it did “not believe it has breached any laws, and will continue to fully and openly cooperate with the commission.” HarperCollins said that it was “cooperating fully with the investigation.” Until recently, a variety of retailers including major bookshop chains had the power to set the price of books. But that system began to change when the publishers, possibly with the help of Apple — which markets its popular iPad that also serves as an ebook reader — took greater control over the power to set prices, according to European officials. Those changes may have kept the prices of e-books

ity. Companies or individuals who handle customers’ money or give trading advice must be registered, the commission states. The Rushtons had a trading account with a futures merchant, a company that takes the orders for futures trading. Prospectuses from Summit said one of its trading pools — based on a stock index futures — averaged 11 profitable months per year and another — trading in ag products, metals, stock indexes and currencies — had a nearly 87 percent net return, according to the commission’s complaint. But the trading account showed losses in 63 out of 69 months between January 2006 and September, the complaint stated, and the Rushtons made 275 withdrawals out of the trading account into individual accounts held by Brant Rushton or into joint bank accounts. Participants received monthly statements from Summit Trading & Capital, according to the complaint, showing profits from the trading “when in fact, defendants’ actual trading resulted in losses virtually every single month.” The U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission wants the court to impose penalties, order restitution and ban any future trading, according to the complaint. In his order, the judge scheduled a hearing for Dec. 13 in Peoria. — Reporter: 541-383-0360, tdoran@bendbulletin.com

higher than they might otherwise have been in a fully competitive market, the officials said. The decision to open the case followed surprise inspections at the offices of companies in the sector in March, and the commission said it would treat the case “as a matter of priority.” European officials are now expected to investigate further to determine whether Apple and the publishers deliberately set out to influence prices, and whether consumers have been paying too much for e-books. The European Commission, the executive body of the European Union, can fine companies found to have breached the bloc’s competition rules up to 10 percent of their global annual sales, and it can require them to change their business practices, if they find wrongdoing.

Santa Claus Continued from B1 And the 64-year-old Snider does his best to help out. When he gets a bigticket request, he typically responds: “There’s an awful lot of children asking for that this year. What else do you want?” At the Charles W. Howard Santa Claus School, Santas learn lines like, “Wow, that’s a big gift. Is there anything else you might like?” These days, though, Santas are having to use it less and less. “I think it’s becoming more popular not to have that long list,” said Tom Valent, dean of the Howard Santa school in Midland, Mich., which gets more than 3,000 letters to Santa a year and just graduated its 75th class. “Families are teaching their children to be as much of a giver as a receiver.” Starlight Fonseca has been teaching her five children, ages 5 to 14, “that we’re not the only ones who

Bonds Continued from B1 The gregarious Fink, 59, and the more reserved Gross, 67, have very different personalities and run very different companies. Fink’s asset management company, based in New York, has a much broader business model than Gross’ more focused operation in Newport Beach, Calif. Both men created upstart behemoths in a financial industry that tends to favor experience. Gross was one of Fink’s first big clients when he began trading bonds, and Fink used Gross as an adviser when BlackRock launched in 1989. Their views have shaped the returns of the countless individual investors, pension funds and sovereign wealth funds parking money in bond funds run by Pimco and BlackRock. But their views have also

AlskAir Avista BkofAm BarrettB Boeing CascdeBcp CascdeCp ColSprtw Costco CraftBrew FLIR Sys HewlettP HmFedDE Intel Keycorp Kroger Lattice LaPac MDU Res MentorGr Microsoft

Div PE ... 1.10 .04 .44f 1.68 ... 1.00f .88 .96 ... .24 .48 .22 .84 .12 .46f ... ... .67f ... .80f

11 14 ... 12 14 6 11 20 27 14 20 7 ... 11 7 12 16 ... 16 19 9

YTD Last Chg %Chg 70.87 25.37 5.78 19.38 70.87 4.47 47.97 54.36 88.06 6.45 26.36 28.18 10.55 25.35 7.33 23.72 6.86 7.52 20.99 12.84 25.66

-.21 -.36 -.01 +.03 -.22 ... +.12 +1.50 +.86 -.15 -.10 +.06 -.06 +.34 -.08 +.04 -.10 -.23 +.07 -.07 -.04

+25.0 +12.7 -56.7 +24.6 +8.6 -47.1 +1.5 -9.9 +21.9 -12.7 -11.4 -33.1 -14.0 +20.5 -17.2 +6.1 +13.2 -20.5 +3.6 +7.0 -8.1

Name NikeB Nordstrm NwstNG OfficeMax Paccar PlanarSy PlumCrk PrecCastpt Safeway Schnitzer Sherwin StancrpFn Starbucks TriQuint Umpqua US Bancrp WashFed WellsFargo WstCstB rs Weyerh

Precious metals Metal NY HSBC Bank US NY Merc Gold NY Merc Silver

Price (troy oz.) $1729.00 $1727.90 $32.672

had more geopolitical consequences. Although bonds have traditionally been overshadowed by stocks, the U.S. is coming off of a financial crisis caused largely by mortgagebacked bonds. And there are new fears about plunging values in European government bonds shoving the global economy back into a recession. As the world grapples with these problems, the opinions of Gross and Fink have defined the debate and sometimes swayed bond prices. Their dominance has raised concerns among some critics who say it is dangerous for two companies to control such a large share of the bond market. But their relationship has more often than not been defined by their contrasting views. Their differences were in full relief recently when Gross and Fink made a rare public appearance together, at an event for other alumni of UCLA’s Anderson business school. Gross laid out his pessimistic outlook, fretting that growth

in developed countries could be weighed down for years by debt problems in Europe and high unemployment in the U.S. Fink said he sees “all the same problems, and the problems are enormous.” But he’s more optimistic because the underlying “vitality” that fed the success of U.S. companies such as Apple and Facebook remains intact. “I agree with almost everything Bill is saying, except my conclusions are generally less bearish than his,” Fink said. One point on which the two men agreed: The public’s outrage at Washington and Wall Street is legitimate. “I’m actually very happy with Occupy Wall Street,” said Fink. “I’m going to admit it as part of the financial community: We let down a lot of people.” “How can one not sympathize with their predicament?” Gross said of working Americans. “To not have sympathy with Main Street, as opposed to Wall Street, that would simply be to have blinders” on.

YTD Last Chg %Chg

21 96.25 -.35 +12.7 15 47.36 -.77 +11.8 20 47.08 +.06 +1.3 9 5.01 +.08 -71.7 17 40.36 -.18 -29.6 ... 1.95 -.08 -5.8 31 36.11 -.20 -3.6 21 162.03 -2.48 +16.4 12 20.71 -.02 -7.9 12 48.67 +.52 -26.7 18 86.30 +.70 +3.0 11 36.36 +.59 -19.5 27 43.73 -.47 +36.1 9 4.82 +.05 -58.8 23 12.63 ... +3.7 12 26.21 +.27 -2.8 13 13.36 +.03 -21.0 10 26.65 -.09 -14.0 18 16.54 +.12 +17.3 20 17.08 +.02 -9.8

Prime rate

Pvs Day

Time period

Percent

$1722.00 $1730.70 $32.306

Last Previous day A week ago

3.25 3.25 3.25

Robin Hood Continued from B1 “We all agree that a financial transaction tax would be the right signal to show that we have understood that financial markets have to contribute their share to the recovery of economies,” the chancellor of Germany, Angela Merkel, told her parliament recently. So far, the broader debt crisis engulfing the eurozone nations has pushed discussion of the tax into the background. But if European leaders can agree on a plan that calms the financial markets, they would be in a stronger position to enact a levy, analysts said. “There is some momentum behind this,” said Simon Tilford, chief economist of the Center for European Reform in London. “If they keep the show on the road, they probably will attempt to run with this.” The Robin Hood tax has also become a rallying point for labor unions, nongovernmental organizations and the Occupy Wall Street movement, which view it as a way to claw back money from the top 1 percent to help the other 99 percent. Enacting such a tax still faces many hurdles, however — most notably, skepticism from leaders in the United States and Britain, home to some of the world’s most important financial exchanges. British officials fear that unless the tax is worldwide, trading will flee London’s huge markets to countries with no tax. The Obama administration has also been lukewarm, expressing sympathy but saying it would be difficult to execute, could drive trading overseas and would hurt pension funds and individual investors in addition to banks.

desertorthopedics.com Bend Redmond 541.388.2333 541.548.9159

Market recap

Div PE 1.44f .92 1.78f ... .72a ... 1.68 .12 .58 .07 1.46 .89f .68f ... .28f .50 .24 .48 ... .60

of the questions kids were asking about unemployed parents or having to move. “Let’s all hope your dad will find a new job, or you will get into a new home,” is one recommended response. “Acknowledge the problem, give them a positive response and say, ‘Santa loves you, too. Maybe I could get something special for you,’ ” said Connaghan. “It’s that quick, usually. But the hope is that when the child leaves, he feels a little better.” Holden remembers one child returned a year later and “said she wanted to thank Santa for getting her some help when they didn’t have food or a place to stay.” Someone had overheard the conversation with Santa and helped the family. “There’s more to being a Santa Claus than you think there is,” Holden said. “You don’t just go ‘ho, ho, ho,’ pat them on the back of the head and send them on their way. You get involved with them. ... You just make sure they feel loved and they feel special when they leave your lap.”

Bob Schumacher 541.280.9147 www.schumacherconstructioninc.com

Northwest stocks Name

have to cut things back. We’re not the only ones struggling.” The 31-year-old mother and her husband, Jose, had been relying on a stipend from the University of Texas law school that Fonseca lost when an illness made it impossible for her to keep her grades up. Fonseca tells her kids that “to make it fair for everyone, Santa has to cut back for everyone. ... We paint it in a way that Santa is doing the best he can to make everybody happy at Christmas.” It’s especially hard for the oldest children. “They were two little kids who used to be excited about Christmas, and now they know every gift under the tree should have gone to the utility company,” she said. “It shouldn’t be that way, but that’s where we are now.” Tim Connaghan, who runs the International University for Santa Claus in Riverside, Calif., conducts an annual survey among the 500 Santas he employs. The economy has become such a big issue that Connaghan asked them for advice on how to handle some

B5

NYSE

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

BkofAm S&P500ETF GenElec SPDR Fncl Pfizer

2458703 1390900 816342 555475 521989

Last Chg 5.78 126.26 16.72 13.18 20.23

-.01 +.04 +.39 +.01 +.39

Gainers ($2 or more) Name

Last

Chg %Chg

Frontline 4.20 +.66 +18.6 DrxRsaBear 34.07 +5.31 +18.4 ComstkRs 19.32 +2.43 +14.4 Orbitz 3.99 +.48 +13.7 CSVS2xPall 56.42 +6.02 +11.9

Losers ($2 or more)

Amex

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

CheniereEn NwGold g GrtBasG g AntaresP GoldStr g

Last Chg

38945 9.68 -.23 33398 10.65 +.05 32630 1.01 +.05 30877 2.77 -.05 30361 2.12 +.05

Gainers ($2 or more) Name

Last

Chg %Chg

SaratogaRs NewConcEn GtPanSilv g BovieMed ComstkMn

5.90 +1.19 +25.3 2.08 +.18 +9.5 2.38 +.20 +9.2 2.40 +.19 +8.7 2.03 +.16 +8.6

Losers ($2 or more) Last

Last

Chg %Chg

Name

ET2xNGIn DxRssBull rs Dynegy Darden GettyRlty

7.87 38.53 2.71 41.82 13.12

-2.22 -8.75 -.44 -5.91 -1.78

-22.0 -18.5 -14.0 -12.4 -11.9

Protalix 5.39 -.80 -12.9 Medgenic n 2.82 -.29 -9.3 WhiteRiv 20.75 -1.75 -7.8 TasmanM g 2.16 -.17 -7.3 Aerosonic 2.88 -.21 -6.8

1,532 1,486 106 3,124 79 13

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Diary

Nasdaq

Most Active ($1 or more) Name Intel Microsoft PwShs QQQ MicronT Cisco

Vol (00)

Last Chg

483861 458769 358513 313922 284796

25.35 +.34 25.66 -.04 57.08 -.16 5.65 -.08 18.73 -.06

Gainers ($2 or more) Name

Last

Chg %Chg

Oncothyr ModusLink FstFnB wt CalAmp FFBArk rs

8.16 +1.02 +14.3 5.04 +.59 +13.3 4.65 +.54 +13.1 4.71 +.51 +12.1 5.46 +.56 +11.4

Losers ($2 or more)

Name

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Indexes

Chg %Chg

Name

Last

ChinaMed AtlCstFn h FstSecur rs NobltyH lf Affymax

2.57 -.81 -24.0 2.15 -.39 -15.4 3.10 -.56 -15.3 6.16 -1.07 -14.8 5.38 -.88 -14.1

Diary

Chg %Chg

Diary 248 199 37 484 15 4

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

1,088 1,400 157 2,645 36 45

52-Week High Low

Name

12,876.00 10,404.49 5,627.85 3,950.66 459.94 381.99 8,718.25 6,414.89 2,490.51 1,941.99 2,887.75 2,298.89 1,370.58 1,074.77 14,562.01 11,208.42 868.57 601.71

Dow Jones Industrials Dow Jones Transportation Dow Jones Utilities NYSE Composite Amex Index Nasdaq Composite S&P 500 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

Last

Net Chg

%Chg

YTD %Chg

52-wk %Chg

12,150.13 4,983.92 448.35 7,539.32 2,272.90 2,649.56 1,258.47 13,227.15 746.78

+52.30 -38.11 +.86 +8.31 +7.62 -6.20 +1.39 +5.28 -.25

+.43 -.76 +.19 +.11 +.34 -.23 +.11 +.04 -.03

+4.95 -2.41 +10.71 -5.33 +2.92 -.12 +.07 -1.00 -4.70

+6.96 -1.50 +13.31 -2.59 +8.15 +1.97 +2.84 +1.68 -2.31

World markets

Currencies

Here is how key international stock markets performed yesterday. Market Close % Change

Key currency exchange rates Friday compared with late Thursday in New York. Dollar vs: Exchange Rate Pvs Day

Amsterdam Brussels Paris London Frankfurt Hong Kong Mexico Milan New Zealand Tokyo Seoul Singapore Sydney Zurich

t t t s t t t t t t t t t s

Australia Dollar Britain Pound Canada Dollar Chile Peso China Yuan Euro Euro Hong Kong Dollar Japan Yen Mexico Peso Russia Ruble So. Korea Won Sweden Krona Switzerlnd Franc Taiwan Dollar

-3.5 +13.0

WdsrIIAd 46.10 +0.10 Vanguard Fds: AssetA 24.13 CapOpp 31.40 +0.06 DivdGro 15.35 +0.04 Energy 65.55 -0.13 EqInc 21.58 +0.09 Explr 72.83 -0.22 GNMA 11.17 +0.01 GlobEq 16.55 -0.06 HYCorp 5.64 +0.01 HlthCre 132.07 +0.20 InflaPro 14.33 -0.03 IntlGr 17.26 -0.06 IntlVal 28.32 -0.12 ITIGrade 10.02 -0.01 LifeCon 16.37 -0.02 LifeGro 21.54 -0.02 LifeMod 19.50 -0.01 LTIGrade 10.12 -0.06 Morg 18.05 -0.05 MuInt 13.88 +0.05 PrecMtls r 23.88 -0.12 PrmcpCor 13.74 +0.04 Prmcp r 65.20 +0.21 SelValu r 18.90 -0.03 STAR 19.15 -0.03 STIGrade 10.63 StratEq 18.74 -0.05 TgtRetInc 11.65 -0.01 TgRe2010 23.07 -0.03 TgtRe2015 12.65 -0.01 TgRe2020 22.30 -0.02 TgtRe2025 12.63 -0.01 TgRe2030 21.52 -0.02 TgtRe2035 12.88 -0.01 TgtRe2040 21.11 -0.01 TgtRe2045 13.26 -0.01 USGro 18.49 -0.05 Wellsly 22.76 +0.01 Welltn 31.32 +0.04 Wndsr 12.92 +0.01 WndsII 25.97 +0.06 Vanguard Idx Fds:

304.80 2,086.05 3,179.63 5,568.72 6,028.82 18,942.23 37,071.17 15,848.21 3,291.49 8,575.16 1,902.82 2,749.24 4,321.60 5,228.09

-.10 -1.48 -.68 +.01 -1.27 -1.24 -.09 -.49 -.29 -1.39 -1.04 -.61 -1.32 +.33

1.0260 1.5605 .9909 .001949 .1577 1.3414 .1287 .012870 .074311 .0319 .000886 .1485 1.0803 .0331

1.0276 1.5644 .9832 .001946 .1574 1.3401 .1287 .012859 .073922 .0324 .000887 .1479 1.0863 .0331

Selected mutual funds YTD Name NAV Chg %Ret Amer Beacon Inv: LgCap Inv 18.01 +0.02 -2.8 Amer Century Inv: EqInc 7.20 +0.02 +1.7 GrowthI 26.04 -0.06 +0.8 Ultra 23.46 -0.02 +3.6 American Funds A: AmcpA p 19.01 -0.01 +1.3 AMutlA p 25.72 +0.01 +3.4 BalA p 18.32 +0.01 +3.9 BondA p 12.50 -0.01 +5.7 CapIBA p 49.20 -0.10 +1.4 CapWGA p 32.58 -0.14 -7.0 CapWA p 20.65 +3.8 EupacA p 36.63 -0.23 -11.5 FdInvA p 35.82 -0.03 -1.4 GovtA p 14.63 -0.01 +7.0 GwthA p 29.45 -0.05 -3.3 HI TrA p 10.68 +0.02 +1.5 IncoA p 16.67 +0.01 +3.8 IntBdA p 13.59 -0.01 +3.3 ICAA p 27.31 -1.7 NEcoA p 24.35 -0.11 -3.9 N PerA p 26.98 -0.04 -5.7 NwWrldA 48.08 -0.30 -11.9 SmCpA p 34.05 -0.17 -12.4 TxExA p 12.38 +0.04 +8.7 WshA p 28.30 +0.05 +5.8 Artisan Funds: Intl 20.31 -0.10 -6.4 MidCap 34.61 -0.27 +2.9 MidCapVal 21.47 -0.03 +6.9 Baron Funds: Growth 51.71 -0.23 +2.6 Bernstein Fds: IntDur 14.09 -0.02 +6.0 DivMu 14.69 +0.04 +6.0 TxMgdIntl 13.20 -0.03 -16.1 BlackRock A: EqtyDiv 18.03 +0.04 +4.2 GlAlA r 18.92 +0.01 -1.8 BlackRock B&C:

GlAlC t 17.60 BlackRock Instl: EquityDv 18.08 +0.04 GlbAlloc r 19.02 Calamos Funds: GrwthA p 51.02 -0.13 Cohen & Steers: RltyShrs 58.55 -0.09 Columbia Class A: DivrBd 5.00 TxEA p 13.49 +0.03 Columbia Class Z: Acorn Z 29.00 -0.10 AcornIntZ 35.24 -0.19 LgCapGr 12.55 -0.09 ValRestr 46.23 Credit Suisse Comm: ComRet t 8.49 +0.02 DFA Funds: IntlCorEq 9.59 -0.04 USCorEq1 10.87 USCorEq2 10.69 Davis Funds A: NYVen A 32.94 +0.05 Davis Funds Y: NYVenY 33.36 +0.05 Delaware Invest A: Diver Inc p 9.29 -0.02 Dimensional Fds: EmMCrEq 18.13 -0.15 EmMktV 27.92 -0.28 IntSmVa 14.34 -0.08 LargeCo 9.97 +0.02 USLgVa 19.38 +0.01 US Small 20.73 -0.01 US SmVa 23.63 IntlSmCo 14.66 -0.08 Fixd 10.34 IntVa 15.40 -0.04 Glb5FxInc 11.20 2YGlFxd 10.22 Dodge&Cox: Balanced 67.75 +0.06 Income 13.31 -0.02

-2.5 +4.5 -1.6 -4.4 +1.5 +5.2 +10.3 -2.7 -11.7 +1.1 -7.7 -9.1 -12.9 -0.3 -1.7 -4.1 -3.8 +4.9 -17.2 -21.8 -15.4 +2.0 -2.6 -2.5 -7.3 -13.2 +0.6 -14.0 +4.1 +0.8 -1.8 +3.7

IntlStk 30.77 -0.06 Stock 102.03 +0.16 DoubleLine Funds: TRBd I 11.07 TRBd N p 11.07 Dreyfus: Aprec 40.66 +0.05 Eaton Vance A: LgCpVal 17.10 +0.01 Eaton Vance I: FltgRt 8.80 GblMacAbR 9.88 LgCapVal 17.15 +0.01 FMI Funds: LgCap p 15.43 +0.02 FPA Funds: NwInc 10.75 FPACres 27.35 -0.04 Fairholme 25.65 +0.11 Federated Instl: TotRetBd 11.33 Fidelity Advisor A: NwInsgh p 20.08 -0.04 StrInA 12.36 Fidelity Advisor I: NwInsgtI 20.32 -0.04 Fidelity Freedom: FF2010 13.55 -0.01 FF2015 11.31 -0.01 FF2015K 12.56 -0.01 FF2020 13.62 -0.02 FF2020K 12.88 -0.02 FF2025 11.25 -0.01 FF2025K 12.92 -0.02 FF2030 13.37 -0.02 FF2030K 13.04 -0.02 FF2035 11.00 -0.01 FF2040 7.67 -0.01 FF2040K 13.08 -0.02 Fidelity Invest: AllSectEq 12.08 -0.03 AMgr50 15.17 -0.03 AMgr20 r 12.91 -0.02 Balanc 18.29 -0.02

-13.8 -4.1 NA NA +6.5 -5.3 +2.0 -0.1 -5.1 +1.8 +2.2 +3.0 -27.9 +5.6 +0.8 +3.9 +1.1 +0.1 +0.1 +0.1 -0.9 -0.8 -2.0 -1.9 -2.5 -2.4 -3.7 -3.9 -3.8 -2.3 -0.2 +2.5 +1.7

BalancedK 18.29 BlueChGr 43.71 Canada 50.90 CapAp 25.20 CpInc r 8.75 Contra 68.74 ContraK 68.79 DisEq 21.57 DivIntl 26.26 DivrsIntK r 26.22 DivGth 26.37 Eq Inc 41.19 EQII 17.16 Fidel 31.60 FltRateHi r 9.65 GNMA 11.89 GovtInc 10.83 GroCo 86.09 GroInc 18.17 GrowthCoK86.15 HighInc r 8.61 IntBd 10.82 IntmMu 10.36 IntlDisc 28.27 InvGrBd 11.70 InvGB 7.67 LgCapVal 10.72 LowP r 36.12 LowPriK r 36.11 Magelln 64.04 MidCap 27.27 MuniInc 12.91 NwMkt r 15.96 OTC 57.20 100Index 8.95 Puritn 17.84 SAllSecEqF12.11 SCmdtyStrt 9.29 SrsIntGrw 10.40 SrsIntVal 8.38 SrInvGrdF 11.70 STBF 8.49 StratInc 11.06 TotalBd 10.92

-0.02 -0.19 +0.27 -0.02 +0.01 -0.16 -0.15 -0.02 -0.09 -0.09 -0.03 +0.11 +0.04 -0.06

-0.01 -0.41 +0.01 -0.41 -0.01 +0.02 -0.11 -0.01 -0.01 +0.01 -0.11 -0.11 -0.10 -0.11 +0.04 -0.01 -0.39 +0.02 -0.02 -0.02 +0.04 -0.04 -0.03 -0.01

-0.01

+1.8 +0.1 -11.1 -0.4 -2.3 +1.6 +1.7 -2.9 -11.3 -11.1 -7.0 -5.6 -4.7 -1.5 +1.2 +7.5 +7.1 +3.5 +0.5 +3.7 +2.0 +5.4 +6.8 -13.2 +6.9 +7.0 -6.5 +0.6 +0.8 -10.1 -0.6 +9.3 +7.2 +4.1 +2.4 +0.9 -2.0 -10.7 -7.9 -15.7 +7.0 +1.7 +4.1 +6.5

USBI 11.72 -0.01 +6.8 Value 63.81 -0.10 -6.2 Fidelity Selects: Gold r 48.58 +0.41 -4.9 Fidelity Spartan: ExtMkIn 36.62 -0.08 -2.8 500IdxInv 44.72 +0.05 +2.0 IntlInxInv 31.46 -0.19 -10.3 TotMktInv 36.73 +0.01 +1.1 Fidelity Spart Adv: 500IdxAdv 44.72 +0.05 +2.0 TotMktAd r 36.74 +0.02 +1.1 First Eagle: GlblA 46.68 -0.09 +0.7 OverseasA 21.84 -0.09 -3.6 Forum Funds: AbsStrI r 11.03 +0.02 +1.9 Frank/Temp Frnk A: FedTFA p 12.03 +0.04 +10.6 FoundAl p 10.10 -0.01 -2.0 HYTFA p 10.18 +0.04 +10.9 IncomA p 2.07 +1.4 RisDvA p 34.41 +0.04 +6.0 USGovA p 6.91 +0.01 +6.3 Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv: GlbBdAdv 12.86 -1.0 IncmeAd 2.06 +1.5 Frank/Temp Frnk C: IncomC t 2.09 +0.8 Frank/Temp Mtl A&B: SharesA 19.91 +0.03 -2.7 Frank/Temp Temp A: ForgnA p 6.33 -0.05 -9.3 GlBd A p 12.89 -1.2 GrwthA p 16.95 -0.07 -4.7 WorldA p 14.27 -0.06 -3.8 Frank/Temp Tmp B&C: GlBdC p 12.91 -0.01 -1.7 GE Elfun S&S: S&S PM 39.71 -0.02 -1.3 GMO Trust III: Quality 21.91 +0.06 +10.6 GMO Trust IV: IntlIntrVl 19.55 -0.03 -8.7

GMO Trust VI: EmgMkts r 11.75 -0.12 Quality 21.92 +0.06 Goldman Sachs Inst: HiYield 6.89 MidCapV 34.26 -0.06 Harbor Funds: Bond 12.15 CapApInst 38.07 -0.07 Intl r 55.16 +0.06 Hartford Fds A: CpAppA p 30.08 -0.03 Hartford HLS IA : CapApp 38.34 -0.06 Div&Gr 19.52 +0.06 TotRetBd 11.52 -0.01 Hussman Funds: StrGrowth 12.66 -0.02 IVA Funds: Wldwide I r16.62 -0.03 Invesco Funds A: Chart p 16.37 -0.02 CmstkA 15.23 +0.02 EqIncA 8.28 GrIncA p 18.45 +0.04 Ivy Funds: AssetSC t 22.87 -0.14 AssetStA p 23.69 -0.15 AssetStrI r 23.94 -0.14 JPMorgan A Class: CoreBd A 11.82 -0.01 JPMorgan Sel Cls: CoreBd 11.81 -0.01 HighYld 7.74 +0.01 ShtDurBd 10.98 USLCCrPls 20.19 -0.03 Janus T Shrs: OvrseasT r 37.74 -0.17 PrkMCVal T22.17 -0.01 John Hancock Cl 1: LSBalanc 12.53 -0.01 LSGrwth 12.35 -0.01 Lazard Instl: EmgMktI 18.58 -0.14

-13.1 +10.8 +1.3 -5.2 +2.4 +3.7 -8.9 -13.1 -9.5 +0.2 +6.0 +3.0 -0.6 +1.2 -2.2 -2.3 -3.2 -3.6 -2.9 -2.7 +6.4 +6.6 +1.5 +1.6 -2.3 -25.5 -1.8 -1.7 -3.8 -14.3

Longleaf Partners: Partners 26.98 +0.03 -2.1 Loomis Sayles: LSBondI 14.08 +0.03 +3.6 StrInc C 14.61 +0.03 +2.5 LSBondR 14.02 +0.02 +3.2 StrIncA 14.53 +0.03 +3.3 Loomis Sayles Inv: InvGrBdY 12.12 +4.6 Lord Abbett A: AffilA p 10.61 +0.02 -7.6 BdDebA p 7.60 +3.0 ShDurIncA p4.53 +2.6 Lord Abbett C: ShDurIncC t 4.56 +1.9 Lord Abbett F: ShtDurInco 4.53 +2.7 MFS Funds A: TotRA 14.04 +1.7 ValueA 22.56 +0.05 MFS Funds I: ValueI 22.66 +0.04 +0.2 Manning&Napier Fds: WldOppA 7.46 -0.05 -12.8 MergerFd 16.01 +1.5 Metro West Fds: TotRetBd 10.41 -0.01 +4.5 TotRtBdI 10.41 -0.01 +4.8 MorganStanley Inst: MCapGrI 36.10 -0.23 -3.3 Mutual Series: GblDiscA 27.43 +0.01 -3.6 GlbDiscZ 27.84 +0.01 -3.4 SharesZ 20.11 +0.03 -2.4 Neuberger&Berm Inv: GenesInst 49.12 -0.14 +6.9 Northern Funds: HiYFxInc 6.98 NA Oakmark Funds I: EqtyInc r 28.06 +0.04 +1.2 Intl I r 17.07 -0.08 -12.1 Oakmark 42.18 +0.05 +2.1 Old Westbury Fds: GlobOpp 7.08 -7.0

GlbSMdCap14.22 -0.07 Oppenheimer A: DvMktA p 30.99 -0.25 GlobA p 56.39 -0.06 GblStrIncA 4.07 IntBdA p 6.34 MnStFdA x 32.04 -0.18 RisingDivA 15.87 +0.03 S&MdCpVl30.03 Oppenheimer B: RisingDivB 14.36 +0.03 S&MdCpVl25.57 +0.01 Oppenheimer C&M: RisingDvC p14.31 +0.03 Oppenheimer Roch: RcNtMuA 6.74 +0.04 Oppenheimer Y: DevMktY 30.74 -0.24 IntlBdY 6.34 PIMCO Admin PIMS: TotRtAd 10.86 +0.03 PIMCO Instl PIMS: AlAsetAut r 10.62 AllAsset 12.02 -0.01 ComodRR 7.83 +0.01 DivInc 11.25 EmgMkCur10.13 HiYld 8.94 +0.01 InvGrCp 10.58 -0.01 LowDu 10.33 +0.01 RealRtnI 12.22 -0.02 ShortT 9.76 -0.01 TotRt 10.86 +0.03 PIMCO Funds A: RealRtA p 12.22 -0.02 TotRtA 10.86 +0.03 PIMCO Funds C: TotRtC t 10.86 +0.03 PIMCO Funds D: TRtn p 10.86 +0.03 PIMCO Funds P: TotRtnP 10.86 +0.03 Perm Port Funds: Permannt 48.17 -0.05

-6.3 -15.0 -6.6 +0.5 +0.1 -1.1 +3.2 -6.3 +2.3 -7.0 +2.4 +9.1 -14.8 +0.3 +3.0 +3.4 +2.7 -4.2 +3.5 -2.9 +2.9 +5.9 +1.4 +11.4 +0.2 +3.2 +11.0 +2.8 +2.1 +2.9 +3.1 +5.2

Pioneer Funds A: PionFdA p 39.14 +0.02 Price Funds: BlChip 39.32 -0.14 CapApp 20.91 +0.03 EmMktS 30.08 -0.34 EqInc 23.03 +0.03 EqIndex 34.03 +0.04 Growth 32.42 -0.12 HlthSci 33.02 -0.10 HiYield 6.44 +0.01 IntlBond 10.01 +0.01 Intl G&I 12.08 -0.07 IntlStk 12.95 -0.05 MidCap 58.54 -0.31 MCapVal 22.62 -0.02 N Asia 17.35 -0.23 New Era 46.57 -0.09 N Horiz 36.26 -0.20 N Inc 9.67 -0.01 OverS SF r 7.67 -0.04 R2010 15.49 -0.02 R2015 11.92 -0.02 R2020 16.37 -0.03 R2025 11.91 -0.02 R2030 17.00 -0.04 R2035 11.98 -0.02 R2040 17.03 -0.04 ShtBd 4.81 SmCpStk 34.70 -0.06 SmCapVal 36.09 +0.08 SpecIn 12.30 Value 22.82 +0.04 Putnam Funds A: GrInA p 12.84 +0.02 Royce Funds: PennMuI r 11.35 +0.01 PremierI r 20.70 +0.01 Schwab Funds: 1000Inv r 37.68 +0.02 S&P Sel 19.96 +0.02 Scout Funds: Intl 28.88 -0.03 Selected Funds:

-3.7 +3.1 +3.0 -14.7 -1.4 +1.8 +0.8 +9.0 +1.8 +3.1 -9.2 -9.0 -4.6 -9.5 -10.7 +8.3 +5.2 -8.0 +1.0 +0.3 -0.4 -1.1 -1.6 -2.0 -2.2 +1.3 +0.8 -0.1 +3.4 -2.2 -4.4 -2.6 +1.7 +1.3 +2.0 -10.3

AmShD 39.98 +0.04 Sequoia 145.32 -0.04 Templeton Instit: ForEqS 18.23 -0.08 Thornburg Fds: IntValA p 24.67 -0.12 IntValue I 25.23 -0.12 Tweedy Browne: GblValue 22.53 -0.04 Vanguard Admiral: BalAdml 21.86 CAITAdm 11.24 +0.03 CpOpAdl 72.57 +0.14 EMAdmr r 33.81 -0.31 Energy 123.14 -0.23 ExtdAdm 40.21 -0.10 500Adml 116.39 +0.13 GNMA Ad 11.17 +0.01 GrwAdm 32.33 -0.04 HlthCr 55.75 +0.08 HiYldCp 5.64 +0.01 InfProAd 28.14 -0.07 ITBdAdml 11.78 -0.02 ITsryAdml 12.09 -0.02 IntGrAdm 54.97 -0.20 ITAdml 13.88 +0.05 ITGrAdm 10.02 -0.01 LtdTrAd 11.12 +0.01 LTGrAdml 10.12 -0.06 LT Adml 11.21 +0.03 MCpAdml 91.33 -0.32 MuHYAdm 10.59 +0.02 PrmCap r 67.70 +0.22 ReitAdm r 79.15 -0.07 STsyAdml 10.84 STBdAdml 10.64 -0.01 ShtTrAd 15.91 STIGrAd 10.63 SmCAdm 34.10 -0.04 TtlBAdml 10.98 -0.01 TStkAdm 31.51 +0.01 WellslAdm 55.15 +0.03 WelltnAdm 54.10 +0.07 Windsor 43.61 +0.04

-8.8 -11.1 -10.8 -5.4 +4.0 +8.7 -5.5 -15.2 +1.8 -2.6 +2.0 +7.3 +3.2 +8.8 +5.8 +13.2 +9.3 +8.9 -10.6 +8.3 +6.3 +3.3 +14.0 +9.3 -0.9 +9.4 -0.8 +3.5 +2.2 +2.8 +1.5 +1.7 -1.9 +6.8 +1.2 +7.9 +3.0 -3.7

+2.3 -0.7 -5.5 +7.8 +1.7 +8.1 -0.1 +7.2 -7.3 +5.7 +8.7 +13.2 -10.8 -11.9 +6.2 +1.5 -1.7 +0.5 +13.9 +0.1 +8.2 -10.5 -0.2 -0.9 +0.7 +1.3 +1.6 +2.3 +5.1 +3.4 +1.9 +0.9 +0.1 -0.7 -1.6 -1.8 -1.8 +1.3 +7.8 +2.9 -3.7 +2.2

TotIntAdm r23.17 -0.09 TotIntlInst r92.70 -0.37 TotIntlIP r 92.73 -0.36 500 116.36 +0.13 MidCap 20.10 -0.07 SmCap 34.03 -0.04 SmlCpGth 21.92 -0.05 SmlCpVl 15.33 STBnd 10.64 -0.01 TotBnd 10.98 -0.01 TotlIntl 13.85 -0.05 TotStk 31.50 +0.01 Vanguard Instl Fds: BalInst 21.86 DevMkInst 8.96 -0.02 ExtIn 40.21 -0.10 FTAllWldI r 82.89 -0.30 GrwthIst 32.33 -0.04 InfProInst 11.46 -0.03 InstIdx 115.62 +0.13 InsPl 115.63 +0.13 InsTStPlus 28.51 +0.01 MidCpIst 20.18 -0.07 SCInst 34.10 -0.04 TBIst 10.98 -0.01 TSInst 31.52 +0.02 Vanguard Signal: 500Sgl 96.14 +0.11 MidCpIdx 28.82 -0.10 STBdIdx 10.64 -0.01 TotBdSgl 10.98 -0.01 TotStkSgl 30.41 +0.01 Western Asset: CorePlus I 11.04 -0.01 Yacktman Funds: Fund p 17.54 +0.05 Focused 18.74 +0.05

-12.1 -12.1 -12.0 +1.9 -1.0 -2.1 -4.2 +2.7 +6.6 -12.1 +1.1 +4.0 -10.2 -2.5 -11.7 +3.2 +13.2 +2.0 +2.0 +1.2 -0.9 -1.9 +6.8 +1.2 +2.0 -0.9 +2.8 +6.8 +1.2 +5.8 +6.0 +6.0


B6

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2011

VISIT: bendbulletin.com to view past issues

YOUR AWARDWINNING HOME & LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE A locally written magazine devoted to the latest trends and techniques in interior design, home building, remodeling, and landscaping ... especially those that relect the best of Central Oregon’s creative lifestyle.

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LOCALNEWS

News of Record, C2 Editorials, C4

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2011

LOCAL BRIEFING Bomb threat unfounded A device destroyed by the Oregon State Police bomb squad at a Redmond apartment complex Tuesday posed no danger to the public, Redmond police said. Police spent much of the day at the Chaparral Apartments on Southwest Rimrock Drive after contacting a man who made threatening remarks. Police then discovered a suspicious device inside his apartment. While the man claimed the device was a bomb, it was found to be harmless when destroyed. Sgt. Bob Duff said the man associated with the device suffers from mental problems, and was taken into custody for observation.

www.bendbulletin.com/local

Water project foes form PAC • Committee organizers want new city councilors who will revise Bend’s $68.2M upgrade By Nick Grube The Bulletin

Some opponents of Bend’s Bridge Creek water project are hoping to shake up next year’s City Council elections. They recently formed a political action committee with the purpose of supporting Bend City Council candidates who oppose the $68.2 million project.

Four council seats are up for election in November, and if the PAC can get its candidates in office those individuals would hold the majority on the seven-person board. Eileen Woodward is the PAC’s treasurer. She said she started the committee because she believes the project’s price tag is too high for ratepayers and that the current council

hasn’t listened to the concerns of citizens. “They seem dead set on going forward with the surface water plan,” Woodward said. “Our group thought that the only way to catch their attention is to go ahead and run some candidates against them and get people (on the council) who will review and revise that plan.”

There’s been a lot of opposition to the city’s Bridge Creek project, both for its cost and its potential impact on Tumalo Creek. The project will replace two aging water pipelines with a single, 10-mile-long conduit, add a water filtration system and include a hydropower component to generate energy. See PAC / C2

Building walls for a better future

The Deschutes National Forest is seeking candidates for two positions following the retirements of the Redmond Air Center manager and Sisters District ranger. Redmond Air Center Manager Dan Torrence is retiring after 35 years with the Forest Service, while Bill Anthony, Sisters District ranger, is retiring after 32 years with the agency. Special Projects Coordinator Rod Bonacker will be acting district ranger, and Supervisory Training Specialist Renee Beams will be the acting Redmond Air Center manager.

Pile burning will continue to take place at many Central Oregon locations into the winter. The burns will take place along U.S. Highway 97 near La Pine, U.S. Highway 31 south of La Pine, Pine Mountain east of Bend and several locations south of Sisters. No road closures are anticipated.

Bethlehem Inn awarded $20,000 The Bethlehem Inn has been awarded a $20,000 grant from the Safeco Foundation. The money will help support the Bethlehem Inn’s Families First Program, which helps homeless families in Central Oregon. — Bulletin staff reports

Have a story idea or submission? Contact us!

The Bulletin

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

F

irst Story and Heart of Oregon YouthBuild personnel secure a wall for a low-income family home during a ceremony Tuesday morning in Redmond. The combined programs help at-risk youths gain job

skills by building the home, which then becomes a reality for a low-income family.

Bend adds an State deciding if hurt tot hour of parking should return to mother for the holidays By Scott Hammers The Bulletin

Bulletin staff report Bend added an extra hour of free parking in its downtown parking garage during the holiday shopping season. The four-hour time limit began Nov. 25 and will extend through the rest of the year. After that, the time limit will revert back to three free hours. People wanting to park in the garage longer than the four-hour limit will still need to pay $5 for an all-day pass. Street parking is still limited to two free hours. The Mirror Pond parking lot will also operate normally. Brad Emerson, the Bend special projects manager, said the city used to extend the time limit for free downtown street parking from two hours to three hours during the holidays. He said that practice ended in 2006 after the Centennial Parking Garage Plaza opened.

By Dylan J. Darling

Corralling a fastgrowing water weed and stopping its spread from four Central Oregon lakes will take indepth surveys, a variety of aquatic plant treatments and a focused education effort, weed managers learned at a Tuesday workshop in Bend. Already dealing with Eurasian watermilfoil in Washington and Idaho, an irrigation district manager and a weed control company owner gave this advice to about 50 private, county, state and federal officials who handle weed problems. And Eurasian watermilfoil, a slimy green underwater weed, can become a big problem. “It just starts to dominate the water body,” said Deb Mafera, invasive plant project manager for the U.S. Forest Service.

The Oregon Department of Human Services is investigating whether a 2year-old boy who was badly injured last week should be returned to his mother when he is released from the hospital. Mason Jae Vernon, of Bend, was hospitalized Nov. 29 when the boy’s mother, 19-year-old Sarah Elizabeth Vernon, brought him to St. Charles Bend with what police described as “serious injuries.” He was subsequently flown to Randall Children’s Hospital at Legacy Emanuel in Portland, where he was in good condition Tuesday evening. Bend Police have been investigating the incident in an attempt to determine if Mason’s injuries are the result of an accident or abuse. Information as to the specifics of his injuries have not been released. On Tuesday, Bend Police Lt. Ben Gregory said DHS is also looking into

the matter, but that he was unaware of the status of the agency’s investigation. A DHS spokesman did not return a call for comment Tuesday. Gregory said police are continuing to try to track down neighbors who may have seen or heard anything on the day Mason was injured. Tuesday evening, detectives were scheduled to meet with doctors who treated the boy to go over medical reports, he said. A man arrested the day Mason was injured at the house where Mason and Sarah Vernon live is still being held at the Deschutes County Jail. Jeffrey Scott Neeley was arrested for assaulting Sarah Vernon in June, and was taken into custody last week for having contact with her in violation of a court order. Neeley is scheduled to appear in court Dec. 13 for a hearing to consider revoking his probation. — Reporter: 541-383-0387, shammers@bendbulletin.com

Growing up from shallow lake or river bottoms, where water is slow-moving, Eurasian watermilfoil forms mats on the surface. The mats block out sunlight, disrupting the growth of native plants and changing the food supply for fish. The plant also can tangle around boat propellers and ensnare swimmers. “When it gets really severe, there have been accidents and drownings,” Mafera said.

Varied attack Contending with Eurasian watermilfoil at Moses Lake, a Central Washington reservoir, Curt Carpenter, manager for the Moses Lake Irrigation and Rehabilitation District, said such a plan will be varied to be effective. “We use dredge, mechanical harvest, herbicide and hand pulling — there is more than one tool you have to use to be successful,” Carpenter said. Over the past four years, he said, the district has cut the amount of Eurasian watermilfoil from about 860 acres to about 130 acres in the 6,800-acre lake. A onetime aquarium plant, Eurasian watermilfoil likely entered Northwest waters by people pouring out fish tanks in the early 1970s. See Weeds / C2

5th-grader in tune with music, hoops By Megan Kehoe

Call a reporter: Bend ................541-633-2160 Redmond ........ 541-617-7837 Sisters............. 541-617-7837 La Pine ........... 541-383-0348 Sunriver ......... 541-383-0348 Deschutes ...... 541-617-7829 Crook ............. 541-504-2336 Jefferson ....... 541-504-2336 Salem ..............541-419-8074 D.C. .................202-662-7456 Education .......541-633-2161 Public Lands ....541-617-7812 Public Safety ....541-383-0387 Projects .......... 541-617-7831

Officials learn what it takes to combat lake weed

Blocks sunlight

$20,000 goes to Bend foundation

Pile burning continues

INVASIVE SPECIES

The Bulletin

Deschutes Forest officials retire

The Education Foundation for Bend-La Pine Schools has received a $20,000 grant from the Fred Meyer Fund. The money will go toward purchasing classroom equipment such as interactive SMARTboards, iPods, iPads and software. Teachers will be able to apply for the grants in March.

C

Obituaries, C5 Weather, C6

The Bulletin

OUR SCHOOLS, OUR STUDENTS Educational news and activities, and local kids and their achievements. • School Notes and submission info, C2

John Fawcett, 11, has been playing the violin almost his entire life. He started playing when he was 2. Now he’s playing with the Central Oregon Symphony. “It’s a very creative instrument,” said John, a fifth-grader at St. Francis School in Bend. “You can do a lot of stuff on it. If you like music, it’s a good instrument to play.” John also plays for the Cascades Classical Music Foundation, and

last year was a gold medalist in the strings division of the organization’s regional competition, competing against musicians of all ages. He practices about an hour a day, and can discuss composers and pieces of music with ease. His favorite composer is Beethoven. When he was 9, his family went on a trip to Poland, Austria and Germany, and John got to see Beethoven’s grave in Vienna. See Schools / C2

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

John Fawcett, 11, sits with his bass guitar in the music room at St. Francis School in Bend on Tuesday morning.


C2

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2011

N  R   POLICE LOG The Bulletin will update items in the Police Log when such a request is received. Any new information, such as the dismissal of charges or acquittal, must be verifiable. For more information, call 541-383-0358. Bend Police Department Redmond Police Department

Theft — A theft was reported and an arrest made at 12:45 p.m. Dec. 5, in the 300 block of Northwest Oak Tree Lane. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 12:06 p.m. Dec. 5, in the area of Southwest Sixth Street and Southwest Evergreen Avenue. Theft — Mail was reported stolen at 11:48 a.m. Dec. 5, in the 600 block of Northwest Canyon Drive.

Prineville Police Department

Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 6:56 a.m. Dec. 5, in the area of North Main Street. Theft — A theft with a loss of $2,740 was reported at 9:13 a.m. Dec. 5, in the area of Northeast Third Street. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 2:20 p.m. Dec. 5, in the area of Northeast Deedie Court. Oregon State Police

Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 9:44 a.m. Dec. 6, in the area of East state Highway 380 near milepost 45. Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office

Theft — A tractor was reported stolen at 11:22 a.m. Dec. 5, in the 1800 block of South U.S. Highway 97.

DUII — Kathryn Deanne Powers, 64, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 9:50 p.m. Dec. 5, in the area of West state Highway 126 near milepost 108.

Criminal mischief — Damage to a window was reported at 8:38 a.m. Dec. 5, in the 800 block of Southwest 12th Street.

Burglary — A burglary was reported at 2:04 p.m. Dec. 5, in the 16400 block of William Foss Road, La Pine.

Burglary — A burglary was reported at 9:03 a.m. Dec. 5, in the 51400 block of Highway 97 in La Pine.

BEND FIRE RUNS Friday 9:56 p.m. — Brush or brushand-grass mixture fire, 64281 Deschutes Market Rd. 16 — Medical aid calls. Saturday 2:24 p.m. — Smoke odor reported, 63465 U.S. Highway 97. 21 — Medical aid calls. Sunday 2:01 p.m. — Smoke odor reported, 18575 Century Dr. 2:21 p.m. — Unauthorized burning, 598 N.E. Tracker Ct. 3:20 p.m. — Chimney or flue fire, 61171 Cottonwood Dr. 15 — Medical aid calls. Monday 3:52 p.m. — Cooking fire, 65 S.W. Roosevelt Ave. 6:33 p.m. — Smoke odor reported, Brookswood Boulevard. 28 — Medical aid calls.

P O For The Bulletin’s full list, including federal, state, county and city levels, visit www.bendbulletin.com/officials.

CONGRESS U.S. Senate

Sen. Jeff Merkley, D-Ore.: 107 Russell Senate Office Building Washington, D.C. 20510 Phone: 202-224-3753 Web: http://merkley.senate.gov Bend office: 131 N.W. Hawthorne Ave., Suite 208 Bend, OR 97701 Phone: 541-318-1298 Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore. 223 Dirksen Senate Office Building Washington, D.C. 20510 Phone: 202-224-5244 Web: http://wyden.senate.gov Bend office: 131 N.W. Hawthorne Ave., Suite 107 Bend, OR 97701 Phone: 541-330-9142 U.S. House of Representatives

Rep. Greg Walden, R-Hood River 2182 Rayburn House Office Building Washington, D.C. 20515 Phone: 202-225-6730 Web: http://walden.house.gov/ Bend office: 1051 N.W. Bond St., Suite 400 Bend, OR 97701 Phone: 541-389-4408 Fax: 541-389-4452

STATE OF OREGON Gov. John Kitzhaber, Democrat 160 State Capitol, 900 Court St. Salem, OR 97301 Phone: 503-378-4582 Fax: 503-378-6872 Web: http://governor.oregon.gov Secretary of State Kate Brown, Democrat 136 State Capitol Salem, OR 97301 Phone: 503-986-1616 Fax: 503-986-1616 Email: oregon.sos@state.or.us Superintendent of Public Instruction Susan Castillo 255 Capitol Street N.E. Salem, Oregon 97310 Phone: 503-947-5600 Fax: 503-378-5156 Email: superintendent.castillo @state.or.us Web: www.ode.state.or.us Treasurer Ted Wheeler, Democrat 159 Oregon State Capitol 900 Court St. N.E. Salem, OR 97301 Phone: 503-378-4329 Email: oregon.treasurer @state.or.us Web: www.ost.state.or.us

Weeds Continued from C1 It’s spread from Washington to Idaho and now to Oregon, likely by clinging to the underside of boats hauled from one lake to another, said Dave Kluttz, owner of Lakeland Restoration Services in Priest River, Idaho. In determining how to handle the plant, he said weed managers will want to figure out how best to preserve the native plants already in a lake while ridding it of the Eurasian watermilfoil. “It’s a lot like spraying a lawn for dandelions,� Kluttz said. He said aquatic herbicides are key to clearing lakes of the weed. The Central Oregon lakes harboring Eurasian watermilfoil are surrounded by public land, Mafera said, meaning there could be years of envi-

Attorney General John Kroger, Democrat 1162 Court St. N.E. Salem, OR 97301 Phone: 503-378-4400 Fax: 503-378-4017 Web: www.doj.state.or.us Labor Commissioner Brad Avakian 800 N.E. Oregon St., Suite 1045 Portland, OR 97232 Phone: 971-673-0761 Fax: 971-673-0762 Email: boli.mail@state.or.us Web: www.oregon.gov/boli

LEGISLATURE Senate

Sen. Ted Ferrioli, R-District 30 (includes Jefferson, portion of Deschutes) 900 Court St. N.E., S-323 Salem, OR 97301 Phone: 503-986-1950 Email: sen.tedferrioli@state.or.us Web: www.leg.state.or.us/ferrioli Sen. Chris Telfer, R-District 27 (includes portion of Deschutes) 900 Court St. N.E., S-423 Salem, OR 97301 Phone: 503-986-1727 Email: sen.christelfer@state.or.us Web: www.leg.state.or.us/telfer Sen. Doug Whitsett, R-District 28 (includes Crook, portion of Deschutes) 900 Court St. N.E., S-303 Salem, OR 97301 Phone: 503-986-1728 Email: sen.dougwhitsett@state. or.us Web: www.leg.state.or.us/whitsett House

Rep. Jason Conger, R-District 54 (portion of Deschutes) 900 Court St. N.E., H-477 Salem, OR 97301 Phone: 503-986-1454 Email: rep.jasonconger@state. or.us Web: www.leg.state.or.us/conger Rep. John Huffman, R-District 59 (portion of Jefferson) 900 Court St. N.E., H-476 Salem, OR 97301 Phone: 503-986-1459 Email: rep.johnhuffman@state. or.us Web: www.leg.state.or.us/huffman Rep. Mike McLane, R-District 55 (Crook, portion of Deschutes) 900 Court St. N.E., H-385 Salem, OR 97301 Phone: 503-986-1455 Email: rep.mikemclane@state.or.us Web: www.leg.state.or.us/mclane Rep. Gene Whisnant, R-District 53 (portion of Deschutes County)

ronmental review before any herbicides are added to the water. “It’s nothing we can go out and do in the next year — so what are we going to do in the meantime?� Mafera said. Already known to be in East Lake and Crane Prairie and Haystack reservoirs, a survey of about 35 Central Oregon bodies of water this year revealed that Eurasian watermilfoil is in Suttle Lake as well. Next year the Central Oregon Aquatic Task Force — made up of officials from the Oregon Department of Agriculture, U.S. Forest Service, Bureau of Reclamation, Portland General Electric and the Crooked River Weed Management Area — plans to do about $12,000 worth of more surveys. The surveys would check 30 more bodies of water for the weed and examine how wide-

900 Court St. N.E., H-471 Salem, OR 97301 Phone: 503-986-1453 Email: rep.genewhisnant@state. or.us Web: www.leg.state.or.us/whisnant

DESCHUTES COUNTY 1300 N.W. Wall St. Bend, OR 97701 Web: www.deschutes.org Phone: 541-388-6571 Fax: 541-382-1692 County Commission

Tammy Baney, R-Bend Phone: 541-388-6567 Email: Tammy_Baney@ co.deschutes.or.us Alan Unger, D-Redmond Phone: 541-388-6569 Email: Alan_Unger@co.deschutes. or.us Tony DeBone, R-La Pine Phone: 541-388-6568 Email: Tony_DeBone@ co.deschutes.or.us

CROOK COUNTY 300 N.E. Third St. Prineville, OR 97754 Phone: 541-447-6555 Fax: 541-416-3891 Email: administration@co.crook.or.us Web: co.crook.or.us Crook County Judge Mike McCabe Phone: 541-447-6555 Email: mike.mccabe@co.crook. or.us County Court

Ken Fahlgren Phone: 541-447-6555 Email: ken.fahlgren@co.crook.or.us Seth Crawford Phone: 541-447-6555 Email: seth.crawford@co.crook. or.us

JEFFERSON COUNTY 66 S.E. D St. Madras, OR 97741 Phone: 541-475-2449 Fax: 541-475-4454 Web: www.co.jefferson.or.us

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Fifth-grader John Fawcett walks with his bass guitar back to his classroom at St. Francis School in Bend on Tuesday morning. Fawcett also plays the piano and violin.

Schools Continued from C1 He also admires Mozart and Chopin. In addition to violin, he plays piano, bass guitar and sings, and is in the school’s marching band. John is passionate about basketball. This year, he’s playing on both St. Francis’ fifth- and sixth-grade teams. “I like the way the game flows,� John said. “And I like how it feels when you shoot the ball correctly. I like hearing that swish.�

spread Eurasian watermilfoil is at East and Suttle lakes and Crane Prairie and Haystack reservoirs, said Berta Youtie, coordinator of the Crooked River Weed Management Area. “We want to do more indepth surveys of those four lakes,� she said. — Reporter: 541-617-7812, ddarling@bendbulletin.com

John Fawcett, 11 Fifth-grader at St. Francis School Favorite Movie: “Back to the Future� Favorite TV show: “SpongeBob SquarePants� Favorite book: “Red Pyramid� Favorite piece of music: The “Winter� concerto of Vivaldi’s “Four Seasons.� Favorite classes: Physical education and social studies

— Reporter: 541-383-0354, mkehoe@bendbulletin.com

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Teen feats: Kids recognized recently for academic achievements or for participation in clubs, choirs or volunteer groups. (Please submit a photo.) Phone: 541-383-0358 Email: youth@bendbulletin.com Mail: P.O. Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708

School briefs: Items and announcements of general interest. Phone: 541-633-2161 Email: pcliff@bendbulletin.com

Other school notes: College announcements, military graduations or training completions, reunion announcements. Phone: 541-383-0358 Email: bulletin@bendbulletin.com

PAC Continued from C1 A number of former mayors have spoken out against the project, and last month joined with many other conservationists and business leaders to deliver a petition to City Hall asking the council to slow down and re-evaluate its options. In particular, those people want the city to consider getting water from wells. Groundwater provides about half the city’s water supply, the majority of it during the summer when demand is highest. Woodward said there’s been some interest from a few opponents about running for City Council, though she declined to say who they are. She said one reason for starting the PAC now is to give potential donors an opportunity to write off their contributions on their 2011 taxes. Even though the name of the PAC is “Stop SWIPing Ratepayer Dollars� (with “SWIP� standing for “surface water improvement project�), Woodward said she has issues with other spending habits at the

Student profiles: Know of a kid with a compelling story? Phone: 541-383-0354 Email: mkehoe@bendbulletin.com

city. She said the city hires too many consultants to do work that could be done in-house for less. “The surface water improvement project is just kind of the tip of the iceberg as a way the city is doing business,� Woodward said. Other people associated with the committee include Bob Woodward and Bruce Aylward, an economist who has been one of the most vocal opponents of the project. Both are named as PAC directors. According to campaign finance information from the Oregon Secretary of State’s Office, the PAC had not raised any money as of Tuesday.

The four councilors whose seats are up for election are Mayor Jeff Eager, Tom Greene, Jim Clinton and Kathie Eckman. Of the four, only Clinton has voted against the Bridge Creek project. Greene has announced he will not run for re-election, and instead is vying for a spot on the Deschutes County Commission. — Reporter: 541-633-2160, ngrube@bendbulletin.com

856 NW Bond • Downtown Bend • 541-330-5999 www.havenhomestyle.com

Did you know ... The COCC Community Learning Winter Schedule is here?

County Commission

Mike Ahern, John Hatfield, Wayne Fording Phone: 541-475-2449 Email: commissioner@co. jefferson.or.us

Born in South Dakota, John moved to Bend with his family when he was 1. His mother is of Polish descent, and he says he enjoys Polish traditions, especially around the holidays. Both parents are doctors. He has one younger brother. John says he wants to become a veterinarian or dog trainer. He’s also considering a career in music, and wants to keep playing basketball. “If I could play basketball in college, that would be sweet,� John said.

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Sign up for Community Learning, Business Learning or Professional Development classes today. Register online or by phone. http://noncredit.cocc.edu 541.383.7270


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

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UO students reject fee for new projects EUGENE — Students at the University of Oregon have voted against a new fee to renovate and expand the student union and recreation center. It would have been $100 per term. Student body President Ben Eckstein says more than 4,200 students voted last week, and 57 percent were against the Erb Memorial Union work, 52 percent against the recreation center work. Eckstein told the Eugene Register-Guard newspaper that students absorbed a 9 percent tuition increase this year, and the new fee may have been too much. The projects were expected to cost $160 million, with $112 million from bonds repaid from the fee revenue.

Jeremy Ruark / The Seaside Signal

Emergency responders carry an injured female surfer to a waiting ambulance in Seaside on Tuesday after she was bitten while surfing at Seaside Cove. Authorities are trying to determine if the bite was from a shark.

Surfer bitten by unknown animal The Associated Press PORTLAND — A woman surfing off the Oregon coast suffered a bite to her lower leg, and authorities are trying to determine whether a shark is responsible. The woman surfing at Seaside suffered blood loss and damage to her surfboard, but rescuers said her injuries did not appear to be life-threatening. Another surfer helped the

woman to shore, witnesses told KGW-TV. Other surfers waved down Capt. Joey Daniels of Seaside Fire and Rescue and two other responders just after 9 a.m. Tuesday and found the woman lying on the beach. A physician was attempting to stop the bleeding, Daniels said. Climbing down from the rocky shore, Daniels found unusual wounds on the woman’s leg.

“You could tell there were punctures and stuff that weren’t normal,” Daniels said. “She had some lowerleg tears, rips, lacerations. It didn’t look like a lot of blood was lost.” The surfer was taken by ambulance to a Seaside hospital, where a spokeswoman said the injured woman asked the hospital not to identify her. She later was taken to a Portland hospital.

Seaside Fire and Rescue said in a news release that they had not pinpointed what kind of animal bit the woman. The place where the attack took place, Seaside’s “cove,” is a popular North Oregon Coast surfing spot. It’s also the place where Douglas Niblack said a shark rose under his longboard in October and he found himself on its back for several seconds.

Defense in murder trial blames meth use The Associated Press ALBANY — Lawyers for a Linn County man accused of murder are arguing that he stabbed his mother in the neck because of a psychotic break from years of methamphetamine use. Defense lawyers say there’s no dispute about what happened on Oct. 23, 2009 — only a question of the mental health of Josh Lee Shaddon, 33. Shaddon is accused of killing Gerlene Thorne, 48, in their Brownsville home, south of Albany. She was found at the foot of stairs with multiple wounds. He fled but was arrested shortly afterward and remained jailed without bail. Prosecutor Heidi Sternhagen rested her case Monday. Defense attorneys Clark Willes and Karen Johnson Zorn have begun their arguments in the non-jury trial before Judge Thomas McHill, the Albany Democrat-Herald newspaper reported. The defense wants McHill to find Shaddon guilty of the reduced charge of manslaughter by diminished capacity or guilty of murder except for insanity. Sternhagen contended that Shaddon was clear-headed and deliberately stabbed his mother. “He chose his actions,” she said. “This is not a case of a defendant being delusional.” One defense witness, counselor Karen Sangiovanni, testified she saw Shaddon before his mother’s death. “He failed to see things accurately” and wanted to get inpatient help, she said. “He felt overwhelmed and couldn’t stay focused. I saw he was extremely paranoid and felt persecuted.” Sandy Minta, a licensed psychologist who talked with Shaddon before his mother’s death, testified he told her he began to hear and see things after he stopped using methamphetamine in July 2009. She said Shaddon refused medication because of his paranoia.

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Willamette locks closed indefinitely WEST LINN — The Corps of Engineers says the Willamette Falls Locks are closed indefinitely. A spokesman for the corps’ Portland division, Scott Clemans, told The Oregonian newspaper the agency doesn’t have the money to make needed repairs. The 138-year-old locks had been operating one day a month. They were shut down last week because corrosion left some of the gates near failure. The closure stranded two dredges, three tugboats and four barges owned by Wilsonville Concrete Products on the upper portion of the

Willamette River. The locks were built in 1873. They have seven gates and four chambers to raise or lower vessels around Willamette Falls at West Linn.

Wilsonville council avoids layoffs WILSONVILLE — The Wilsonville City Council approved spending cuts of more than $1 million that avoid layoffs. The Oregonian newspaper reported that Monday’s vote accepts recommendations from City Manager Bryan Cosgrove. They include turning over operations of the wastewater treatment plant to a contractor, cutting back on supplies and services, reducing overtime and leaving two vacant positions unfilled.

Springfield OKs gay rights protections SPRINGFIELD — The Springfield City Council quickly and unanimously approved an ordinance Monday protecting gays and lesbians from discrimination. The charter amendment adds “sexual orientation” to the list of protected classes, which include race, religion, age, disability and national origin. City Attorney Joe Leahy told The Register-Guard newspaper the gay amendment was a housekeeping matter to restore a clause mistakenly left out when the discrimination section of the charter was redrafted. — From wire reports


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THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2011

E Deschutes-FEMA squabble stalls fire prevention

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The Bulletin AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER

B  M C G B  J C  R  C

Chairwoman Publisher Editor-in-Chief Editor of Editorials

he federal government wants Deschutes County to give back $328,000 because it says the county didn’t follow a grant requirement.

The county says the requirement was unclear, and it shouldn’t have to pay the money back. Deschutes has decided to fight the demand for repayment, with letters, appeals to congressmen and a planned meeting in D.C. next month between Federal Emergency Management Agency representatives and Deschutes County Commissioner Tammy Baney. It all concerns wildfire prevention. Deschutes and Crook counties were awarded a $1.3 million grant from FEMA in 2007 to clear 1,200 acres, including 630 in Deschutes and 570 in Crook, according to Deschutes County Forester Joe Stutler. Deschutes thought it could use the money for clearing projects anyplace within its Community Wildfire Protection Plan Area, but FEMA says it had to be used only in much smaller so-called “action areas.� Deschutes proceeded to clear about 4,000 acres, far more than the grant was designed to cover, but some of them were not within the action areas. FEMA didn’t notice, however, despite regular reports from Deschutes County and repeat visits to review the work. When it finally did notice in the fall of 2010, the dispute began and the work came to a halt.

“The important part of the story to me is that we did great work for less than expected,� Baney told The Bulletin, “and in looking for government efficiencies, I think that’s in the right direction.� While the conflict goes on, wildfire prevention work financed by FEMA is stalled. Clearing financed by subsequent FEMA grants to Deschutes, Crook and Klamath counties is also blocked. We’re in no position to judge if the paperwork supports the contentions on either side of this argument. But one thing is clear: Deschutes was awarded money designed to clear 630 acres, which it did, but it also cleared nearly 3,400 acres more. For that it should be penalized? Clearly a misunderstanding occurred, but FEMA took an awfully long time to notice. It authorized payments, which gave the county no reason to doubt its understanding of what was permitted. The amount of $328,000 is a fraction of a drop in the bucket to FEMA, and it’s counterproductive to spend lots of time and effort on what appears to be a simple misunderstanding. Worst of all, important work of wildfire prevention is stalled until the bureaucracy can come to some conclusion.

Compromise works for new zone in Redmond

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edmond officials have a vision for 70 acres on the city’s east side, one that came a step closer to reality in mid-November after officials worked with those in the neighborhood to create something everyone could live with. It’s the kind of compromise that gives government a good name. Officials had two goals for the property. The larger chunk, closer to the railroad, is home to existing manufacturing business, much of which was already in place when city zoning became a reality years ago. Because it does not fit current zoning standards, owners have difficulty expanding their businesses when they need to. The area also already includes some housing. At the same time, City Manager David Brandt says, officials believe the city’s ultimate economic health lies not with the steel mills of the world, but with small manufacturers, jewelry makers, bicycle makers and the like. Yet those people sometimes have trouble acquiring the capital they need to build new facilities and continue to live elsewhere. A 44-lot subdivision separated

from the largely developed larger piece will become the first bare land in the city that specifically requires both a small manufacturing business and a dwelling on a single lot. The idea, Brandt says, is to give small manufacturers and artisans a place to get established at lower cost than might be the case if they have to live elsewhere. Retail sales in the zone will be allowed only as an adjunct of the manufacturing businesses there. Meanwhile, a large parcel that separates the two manufacturing areas was left out of the zone change because homeowners already there objected to it. And, officials agreed, the new zone will not allow for stand-alone office space. Zone changes all too often become a nightmare for those living on the land affected by the new rules, as lot sizes and usages shift in ways they don’t like. That’s not likely to be the case here, where city officials went out of their way to assure that the concerns of all were addressed. The result is a demonstration of what officials and neighbors can accomplish, if all are willing to try.

Curry has itself to blame By Thomas Huxley his letter is regarding the Nov. 13 Bulletin front page “Special Reportâ€? titled “Curry: a county going broke,â€? and a similar article in the Curry Coastal Pilot on Nov. 16 titled “Curry: a county in crisis.â€? Neither of these articles that together total nearly 5,000 words ever mention the subject of county growth, employee compensation or benefits. It is toward that end that the following facts are provided. • Over the past decade, Curry County’s population has effectively grown zero percent, remaining at about 21,200. According to Curry County Payroll & Fiscal Year Appropriation Budgets: • County average employee numbers increased 14 percent during the two-year period of fiscal years 2007-2008 to 2009-2010, from 191 to 217. • Total general fund appropriations increased 33 percent during the four-year period of fiscal years 2007-2008 to 2010-2011, from $7,593,397 to $10,079,461. • Sheriff general fund appropriations increased 39 percent during the four-year period of fiscal years 2007-2008 to 2010-2011, from $2,846,600 to $3,960,401. In June 2008, the county negotiated a three-year contract with the Service Employees International Union (SEIU) resulting in total wage increases of approximately 21 percent plus an increase of $152 per month toward employee health insurance premiums. A similar agreement was negotiated with the Teamsters local union beginning in July 2010.

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IN MY VIEW In July 2011, Curry County divested its Department of Home Health and Hospice (HHH) at a loss estimated at between $50,000 and $500,000. Last month citizens received the following response from commissioners to a question asked in August 2011: “The (wage) increase for HHH had to do with a market salary study that they (HHH) did that showed that their clinical staff was underpaid compared to market. Salary schedules were implemented with the 2008/2009 Master Payroll ....â€? A random check of several personnel confirmed a 24 percent wage increase. Now let’s look at the compensation/benefits currently provided to Curry County employees and who pays for them. Employee pays: • Social Security & Medicare and FICA: 7.65 percent of base wage/month. Curry County (taxpayer) pays per employee: • Health insurance premium: $1,000 to $1,085 per month. Increases to $1,160 July 1, 2012. • Health insurance premium: When husband and wife are both employed, premium is doubled. • Years of service bonus: 10 years 2.5 percent of base wage; 20 years 5 percent of base wage per month. • PERS (Public Employee Retirement System): 14 percent (average) of gross wage per month. • PERS employee portion paid by county: 6 percent of gross wage per month. • PERS Tier I employees guar-

anteed 8 percent annual return on their retirement account. • MSA (Medical Savings Account — Teamsters only): $50 per month. • 12 paid holidays per year. • 12 to 25 paid vacation days per year depending on years of service. • 12 paid sick days per year that may be accrued if not used. In a Pilot news article published Nov. 2, 2011, titled “Home Health & Hospice transition going well,â€? former county Director Lori Kent refers to changes in the new employee benefit packages that were necessary once the department became a private entity. “Under the county, regular employees had health insurance coverage for the employee and family members. With CHHH, employees are required to pay a greater portion of their health care coverage,â€? she said. “As a nonprofit organization, employees are not eligible for PERS (Public Employees Retirement System). While a retirement program has been established, the majority of the funding of the accounts is through employee contributions,â€? Kent said. “The PERS program was an excellent benefit for our employees. Unfortunately, agencies such as ours cannot sustain the high costs of such a benefit, and they really don’t exist in the nongovernment sector,â€? she said. Why then should taxpayers be burdened with costs that no other employment sector can afford? Oregon counties and state government have an addiction to growing bigger, an insatiable appetite for our tax dollars, and are not too big to fail. — Thomas Huxley lives in Harbor.

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We welcome your letters. Letters should be limited to one issue, contain no more than 250 words and include the writer’s signature, phone number and address for verification. We edit letters for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject poetry, personal attacks, form letters, letters submitted elsewhere and those appropriate for other sections of The Bulletin. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

In My View submissions should be between 550 and 650 words, signed and include the writer’s phone number and address for verification. We edit submissions for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject those published elsewhere. In My View pieces run routinely in the space below, alternating with national columnists. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

Please address your submission to either My Nickel’s Worth or In My View and send, fax or email them to The Bulletin. Write: My Nickel’s Worth / In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 Fax: 541-385-5804 Email: bulletin@bendbulletin.com

Grandstanding politicians are to blame, not the 1% By Bradley Schiller Los Angeles Times

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he class war is on. It’s the 99 percent of “us� versus the 1 percent of “them.� In the rhetoric of this war, we are fighting the 1 percent because they possess most of the nation’s wealth, bankroll their handpicked political candidates, control the banks and get million-dollar paychecks and billiondollar bailouts; yet they don’t pay enough taxes or invest their wealth in creating American jobs. They’re the “millionaires and billionaires� President Obama has called out as needing to pony up more for progressive reforms of our health care, banking, tax and political systems. They are the enemy of “us� — the 99 percent who toil at low-wage jobs, hold underwater mortgages, face foreclosures, suffer recurrent and protracted job layoffs and plant closings, and yet pay our fair share of taxes.

But there’s a flaw in this strategy. The Occupy Wall Street movement envisions the 1 percent as a monolithic cadre of entrenched billionaires who have a firm and self-serving grip on all the levers of the economy. But a closer look at that elite group reveals how untrue that perspective is. Forbes magazine compiles a list of the richest 400 Americans every year. To get on that list, you must have at least $1 billion of wealth. They are the creme de la creme of the 1 percent — indeed, the top 0.0000013 percent (!) of Americans. So who are these dastardly people? The late Steve Jobs was in that elite club this year. In his earlier days, Jobs would have been camped out with the OWS crowd, probably passing around a joint. Should we count him as one of “us� or one of “them�? (And you can’t use your iPhone or iPad to vote “them.�) Then there’s 27-year-old Mark Zuckerberg (No. 14 on the Forbes list),

whose Facebook innovation enables the OWS movement to communicate so easily. He and five other Facebook entrepreneurs just joined the Forbes 400 this year. We’d also quickly recognize among “them� Sergey Brin, Larry Page and Eric Schmidt, who became billionaires developing Google. And, as they are sipping a latte to keep warm, the OWS campers should also reflect on whether Howard Schultz, Starbucks’ founder and No. 330 on the Forbes list, is with “us� or “them.� Even more to the point is that all of these club-400 elites were once just like “us.� Jobs worked on the first Apple computer in a garage on a shoestring budget. He had vision, not wealth, to propel him to fame and fortune. Oprah Winfrey (No. 139) rose from poverty to TV queen through determination, hard work and a couple of lucky breaks. Even Warren Buffett, No. 2 on the Forbes list, started out looking very much like just an-

other hardworking middle-class kid with good Midwestern values. These storied rises from “rags to riches� are what make America the unique and prosperous nation it is. Some critics would have us believe that the American dream is dead. But that’s a view purveyed by those without the vision, the grit, the energy or the single-minded determination to build a better mousetrap. That’s the entrepreneurial spirit that drives competitive markets, that not only makes the American dream come true for some (the 1 percent) but also improves life for the many (the 99 percent). What really motivates the OWS movement is not resentment against the 1 percent but a sense of futility in grappling with a weak economy. With unemployment hovering around 9 percent, and with all the recurrent plant closings, foreclosures and cutbacks in public services, there is a lot of anger to vent. But class war-

fare isn’t the solution. Our frustrations are more the product of Washington than Wall Street. We have been promised a lot and received little. Obama (who made millions in book royalties the last few years) sowed the seeds of disillusionment when he overpromised what his February 2009 stimulus package could deliver. A series of policy failures and political deadlocks has left people feeling disenfranchised and forgotten. Calling out millionaires and billionaires as the culprits in this economic saga is disingenuous and ultimately self-defeating. Those 1 percenters are not an avaricious “them� but in reality the most entrepreneurial of “us.� If we had more of them and fewer grandstanding politicians, we would all be better off. — Bradley Schiller is a professor of economics at the University of Nevada-Reno and the author of “The Economy Today.� He wrote this for the Los Angeles Times.


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

NORTHWEST NEWS

O    D N   William ‘Bill’ Albert Bradford Cook, of La Pine Aug. 2, 1930 - Dec. 2, 2011 Arrangements: Baird Memorial Chapel of La Pine, 541-536-5104 www.bairdmortuaries.com Services: A Celebration of Life will be held on Sat., Dec. 17, 2011, at 1:00 p.m., at the La Pine Senior Center, 16450 Victory Way, La Pine, OR 97739. A potluck will immediately follow. Contributions may be made to:

Partners In Care Hospice, 2075 NE Wyatt Ct., Bend, OR 97701 www.partnersbend.org

Florence E. Wilson, of Prineville March 7, 1920 - Dec. 5, 2011 Arrangements: Redmond Memorial Chapel, 541-548-3219 www.redmondmemorial.com

Services: Graveside service at Deschutes Memorial Gardens, Thursday, Dec. 8, 2011, at 1:30 p.m. Visitations at Redmond Memorial Chapel, Thursday, Dec. 8, 2011, from 11:00 a.m. - Noon.

Judy Helena (Chaffee) Newman, of Prineville Sept. 8, 1944 - Dec. 4, 2011 Arrangements: Whispering Pines Funeral Home, 541-416-9733 Services: In accordance with her wishes, no service will be held. Contributions may be made to:

Pioneer Memorial Hospice, 1201 NE Elm St., Prineville, OR 97754, 541-447-2510.

Maurice Norman, of Prineville April 14, 1918 - Dec. 3, 2011 Arrangements: Baird Funeral Home, 541-382-0903 www.bairdmortuaries.com Services: A Celebration of life will be held on Sat., Jan. 7, 2012, at the First Baptist Church, 450 SE Fairview St., Prineville. Time to be announced at a later date. A reception will immediately follow. Contributions may be made to:

Redeemer House Ministries, P.O. Box 304, Grenada, CA 96038.

Obituary policy Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They may be submitted by phone, mail, email or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541-617-7825. Deadlines: Death Notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and noon Saturday. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by 1 p.m. Friday for Sunday or Monday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details. Phone: 541-617-7825 Email: obits@bendbulletin.com Fax: 541-322-7254 Mail: Obituaries P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708

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Bundy Dec. 11, 1941 - Nov. 21, 2011 Bill Bundy passed away at age 69, from complications of chronic lung and heart disease. Bill was a 30-year Bend resident, and was an active entrepreneur and real estate developer, developing the Sunset View EsBill Bundy tates and Lost Tracks property, running a Yamaha/Kawasaki store and owning an antiques store, among other ventures. Bill was also an avid collector of classic cars, and participated in auctions and shows around the country. Bill was born in Santa Monica, California and attended Santa Monica High School. It was during this time he worked part-time as a valet at the legendary Romanoff’s restaurant in Hollywood and parked cars for such celebrities as Frank Sinatra, Ava Gardner, Natalie Wood, and many others. These interactions influenced Bill greatly. His first job after high school was in his uncle’s machine shop, after which he landed a job in construction and quickly became a foreman. In 1964, he bought into the Allied Interstate Development Corporation which installed the first computer and credit card systems for Wells Fargo and other top banks, employing up to 230 people by the time he sold the company in 1980. During this time, Bill also bought and raced thoroughbred horses quite successfully and also owned a thoroughbred training facility in Southern California. Bill was known for his great sense of humor, his keen business sense and his generosity, and willingness to help out his friends and family. Though he never had children of his own, he was a father figure to his step-children and several children of family friends. Bill is survived by his brother, Dennis; nephews, Todd and Chad Bundy; great-nephew, Garrett Reese, his aunt, Josie Bundy, and cousins, John Hinkel, Jim Bundy, Rhonda and Jennifer Del Castillo, and Lisa Jewel. A Celebration of Bill’s life will be held at the Old Stone Church, 157 NW Franklin Ave., in Bend, on Saturday, December 10, at 10 a.m. In lieu of flowers, Bill asked that donations be made to Partners In Care/Hospice at 2075 NE Wyatt Ct., Bend, OR 97701.

D E  Deaths of note from around the world: Bill Tapia, 103: Ukulele virtuoso known as the “Duke of Uke� who was credited with putting the ukulele on the map. Died Friday in his sleep in Westminster, Calif. Hubert Sumlin, 80: Blues guitarist whose soulful licks and crackling solos were featured on scores of hits for singer Howlin’ Wolf during the 1950s and 1960s and who influenced later work by Eric Clapton, Jimi Hendrix and Stevie Ray Vaughan. Died Sunday in Wayne, N.J. He had congestive heart failure. Stanley Robertson, 85: Broke color barriers as a pioneering black network television program executive at NBC in the 1960s and ’70s and later as a movie studio production executive. Died Nov. 16 of an apparent heart attack at his Los Angeles home. Elisabeth Young-Bruehl, 65: Philosopher, psychoanalyst and biographer known for her lives of two influential women, Hannah Arendt and Anna Freud. Died of pulmonary embolism Thursday near her home in Toronto. Bill McKinney, 80: Character actor whose most recognizable performance was as a menacing hillbilly in the 1972 film “Deliverance.� Died of esophageal cancer Thursday in Van Nuys, Calif. — From wire reports

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Friedman captured essence of Broadway in photos By Bruce Weber New York Times News Service

Leo Friedman, whose photograph of an ebullient Carol Lawrence and Larry Kert as lovebirds chasing down a Manhattan street became the enduring emblem of the musical “West Side Story� and the signature image of a career spent taking pictures of actors in action, died FEATURED Friday at his home OBITUARY in Las Vegas. He was 92. The cause was complications of pneumonia, said his son, Eric. Friedman was a ubiquitous presence in and around New York theaters in the 1950s and 1960s, a peak period of Broadway glamour that coincided with the expanded professional use of 35 millimeter photography, which made still pictures better able to depict movement. Friedman, whose ambition as a boy had been to act, made it his specialty to capture actors in rehearsal or in performance or in motion for his camera — in other words, acting. A freelancer, he shot for magazines and newspapers, for press agents and producers. Often, when hired to take the official photographs of a show, he’d be an audience of one as the actors, after a full performance, would run the show backward for him, scene by scene. By his son’s count, Friedman photographed more than 800 shows, including “Silk Stockings,� “My Fair Lady,� “Barefoot in the Park,� “Fiddler on the Roof,� “Cabaret� and “Coco.� He shot Laurence Olivier hoofing in “The Entertainer,� Barbra Streisand’s Broadway debut in “I Can Get It for You Wholesale,� Lucille Ball marching with a bass drum in “Wildcat,� Sammy Davis Jr. mugging behind a hat during a photo call; Richard Burton as Hamlet and his wife, Elizabeth Taylor, smooching on the set; Gwen Verdon and Bob Fosse, back to front in a dancers’ clinch in a rehearsal studio, their cigarettes symmetrically poised between their lips; and a dazzling Lena Horne in a white dress during a production number from “Jamaica.� In one especially remarkable shot, he caught Eli Wallach, having been tossed by Zero Mostel in the 1961 production of Ionesco’s absurdist comedy “Rhinoceros,� in midair, his arms outstretched, his feet splayed and flying upward, the sole of one shoe pointed directly at the camera. “Eli Wallach is flying through the air, and I just clicked that shutter and I got him right in the center of the whole thing with Zero pushing him,� Friedman said in a radio interview this year. “That’s a really great picture.� The “West Side Story� shot, which became the cover of the cast album, came after Friedman had tried several settings and ended up along a row of tenements on West 56th Street. “I made a mark on the street, and I said to Carol: ‘I want Larry chasing you up the street. When you hit that mark, don’t look at me down here, look up, with your head up,� he recalled. “And that’s what I took.� Friedman, the son of Jewish immigrants from Eastern Europe, was born in Brooklyn in 1919.

Don Ryan / The Associated Press

Deb Austin, right, who has received an eviction notice, speaks in front of her house surrounded by other homeowners, neighbors and demonstrators in Portland on Tuesday. Following tactics by Occupy Wall Street demonstrators in Seattle, Portland and Oakland, protesters across the country are staging “Occupy Homes� actions nationally to try to stop foreclosures.

Occupy protests move into foreclosed homes By Manuel Valdes The Associated Press

SEATTLE — The Occupy Wall Street protests are moving into the neighborhood. Finding it increasingly difficult to camp in public spaces, Occupy protesters across the country are reclaiming foreclosed homes and boarded-up properties, signaling a tactical shift for the movement against wealth inequality. Groups in more than 25 cities held protests Tuesday on behalf of homeowners facing evictions. In Atlanta, protesters held a boisterous rally at a county courthouse and used whistles and sirens to disrupt an auction of seized houses. In New York, they marched through a residential neighborhood in Brooklyn carrying signs that read “Foreclose on banks, not people.� Southern California protesters rallied around a family of six that reclaimed the home they lost six months ago in foreclosure. “It’s pretty clear that the fight is against the banks, and the Occupy movement is about occupying spaces. So occupying a space that should belong to homeowners but belongs to the banks seems like the logical next step for the Occupy movement,� said Jeff Ordower, one of the organizers of Occupy Homes.

Continuing crisis The events reflect the protesters’ lingering frustration over the housing crisis that has sent millions of homes into foreclosure after the burst of the housing bubble that helped cripple the country’s economy. Nearly a quarter of all U.S. homeowners with mortgages are now underwater, representing nearly 11 million homes, according to CoreLogic, a real estate research firm. Protesters say that banks and financial firms own abandoned foreclosed houses that could be housing people. Seattle has become a leader in the anti-foreclosure movement as protesters took over a formerly boarded-up duplex last month. They painted the bare wood sidings with green, black and red paint, and strung up a banner that says

“Occupying a space that should belong to homeowners but belongs to the banks seems like the logical next step.� — Jeff Ordower, Occupy Homes organizer

“Occupy Everything — No Banks No Landlords.� While arrests have already been made in a couple of squatting cases in Seattle and Portland, it remains to be seen how authorities will react to this latest tactic. In Portland, police spokesman Sgt. Pete Simpson said he’s aware that the movement called for people to occupy foreclosed homes, but said it’s difficult to distinguish between the people who would squat in homes as a political statement and those that do it for shelter. “The vacant property issue is of concern in cities nationwide,� Simpson said. “We’ll treat them all as trespassers.� In Seattle, protesters took over a boarded-up warehouse slated for demolition last weekend. In an announcement, the protesters said they planned to make the warehouse into a community center, and hosted a party the night they opened the building. Police moved in soon after, arresting 16 people in the process of clearing it out. Seattle police spokesman Sgt. Sean Whitcomb said his department sees squatting in private properties as the same violation of trespassing Occupy Seattle made when it camped in a downtown park. “It’s no different than when people were trespassing (in the park),� Whitcomb said. “We went nights and days, letting people camp in the park. We relied on education and outreach, rather than enforcing the law to the letter.� Atlanta protesters took a more aggressive approach in trying to disrupt the home auction. The auction went on but the whistles and sirens

made it difficult for the auctioneers to communicate, said Occupy Atlanta spokesman Tim Franzen. “We don’t know how many homes we saved for one more month during the holiday season,� he said. “It was kind of a Christmas gift to the people.�

Moving back in In Riverside, Calif., Art de los Santos arrived in a U-Haul with assorted furniture and about three dozen supporters at his former three-bedroom, three bathroom home. He broke the lock and moved back in. Reclaiming his old home is his last resort to get the attention of bank JP Morgan Chase after he applied three times for a loan modification to no avail. “I’m getting down to my last option,� he said. “Nothing seems to work. Maybe if I protest, it’ll get their attention.� The home, which was foreclosed on, is sitting empty while he, his wife and four children, ages 7 to 11, are squeezed into an Orange County rental apartment. He’s also renting a storage unit. “It’s sad because you have all these memories there,� said the 46-year-old. “My kids were running around the neighborhood on their bikes. It’s a nice little community.� Tom Kelly, spokesman for JPMorganChase, had no immediate knowledge of de los Santos’ case and could not comment, but noted that he is trespassing. New York protesters introduced members of a homeless family at the end of their rally and said they plan renovate and clean up the house so the family can live in a house they said had been abandoned by a bank. In Portland, a press conference was held at the home of a woman facing foreclosure next March. She vowed to stay in her house until authorities take her out. “We belong here,� said Deb Austin, who said she fell behind in payments after a cancer diagnosis and after her husband lost her second job. “And we’re not leaving.�

Ashland hotel under investigation after toxic water discharged into storm drain McClatchy-Tribune News Service ASHLAND — A downtown Ashland hotel is under investigation for illegally discharging water containing potentially fish-killing toxics into Ashland Creek when its heating and air-conditioning system malfunctioned recently, authorities said. The Ashland Springs Hotel’s heating and air-conditioning unit overflowed on Nov. 19, causing water treated with algae-killing chemicals to flush out of the unit, down a drain and into the street outside the hotel, authorities said. The water then flowed into a city storm drain that flows directly into Ashland Creek near the Main Street bridge, city officials said.

The water contains chemicals listed by the federal Environmental Protection Agency as toxic and labeled as such on the containers, Ashland police Sgt. Bob Smith said. The white, foamy discharge was first discovered by Steve Ross, Southern Oregon University’s co-director of campus public safety, and later that day by an Ashland police officer, who traced it to the hotel, Smith said. The discharge was then stopped, Smith said. The hotel or an individual there could face a charge of placing offensive substances in water, which is a Class A misdemeanor punishable by a fine of up to $6,250, Assistant City Attorney Doug Mc-

Geary said Monday. Hotel General Manager Don Anway said the there were two incidents of water flowing into the storm drain that day — once during the malfunction and later when hotel maintenance crews were cleaning up. The system had not yet been permanently fixed to ensure no repeat of the incident, but hotel managers were looking into it, said Anway, who was out of state when the spill occurred. Neither police nor city officials at the time contacted the state Department of Environmental Quality or the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife about the spill, officials from those agencies said.


THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2011

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W E AT H ER FOR EC A ST Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LP ©2011.

TODAY, DECEMBER 7 Tonight: Partly cloudy.

Today: Mainly sunny start, partly cloudy finish, mild.

HIGH Ben Burkel

THURSDAY

LOW

50

Bob Shaw

Astoria 47/35

49/38

Cannon Beach 48/39

44/31

51/33

Salem

48/37

46/23

44/32

Prineville 47/19 Sisters Redmond Paulina 43/15 48/17 50/18 Sunriver Bend

Eugene 42/32

49/39

47/15

Oakridge

Cottage Grove

47/17

42/35

Coos Bay

Crescent

50/35

Silver Lake

45/12

Port Orford 54/36

Gold Beach 51/38

Unity 37/18

43/21

Vale 37/22

45/15

Juntura

Burns Riley

EAST Ontario Partly to mostly 36/21 cloudy today. Clear to partly cloudy Nyssa tonight. 36/21

41/20

42/16

41/17

Yesterday’s state extremes

Jordan Valley Frenchglen

41/19

45/19

• 55°

Paisley

Redmond

46/20

47/20

Klamath Falls 46/19

Ashland

55/35

Hampton

44/17

Chiloquin

Medford

35/29

Brookings

John Day

CENTRAL Partly to mostly cloudy today. Clear to partly cloudy tonight.

39/22

• 6° Burns

Fields

Lakeview

McDermitt

44/24

44/19

43/17

-30s

-20s

Yesterday’s extremes (in the 48 contiguous states):

-10s

0s

Vancouver 41/32

10s

Calgary 21/4

20s

30s

Saskatoon 17/-2

Seattle 44/34

Partly cloudy.

HIGH LOW

Partly cloudy.

HIGH LOW

46 16

HIGH LOW

45 18

41 14

BEND ALMANAC

PLANET WATCH

TEMPERATURE

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . .6:33 a.m. . . . . . 4:01 p.m. Venus . . . . . .9:43 a.m. . . . . . 6:25 p.m. Mars. . . . . .11:16 p.m. . . . . 12:34 p.m. Jupiter. . . . . .2:08 p.m. . . . . . 3:39 a.m. Saturn. . . . . .3:07 a.m. . . . . . 2:09 p.m. Uranus . . . .12:58 p.m. . . . . . 1:03 a.m.

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend 24 hours ending 4 p.m.. . . 0.00” High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55/19 Record high . . . . . . . . 66 in 1937 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . 0.00” Average month to date. . . 0.30” Record low. . . . . . . . . . 4 in 1972 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.76” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 Average year to date. . . . 10.25” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.30.30 Record 24 hours . . .2.26 in 1981 *Melted liquid equivalent

Sunrise today . . . . . . 7:26 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 4:27 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 7:27 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 4:27 p.m. Moonrise today . . . . 2:33 p.m. Moonset today . . . . 4:44 a.m.

Moon phases Full

Last

New

First

Dec. 10 Dec. 17 Dec. 24 Dec. 31

OREGON CITIES

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX

Yesterday Hi/Lo/Pcp

Wednesday Thursday Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W

Astoria . . . . . . . .44/29/0.00 Baker City . . . . . .38/11/0.00 Brookings . . . . . .54/36/0.00 Burns. . . . . . . . . . .44/6/0.00 Eugene . . . . . . . .34/27/0.00 Klamath Falls . . .46/13/0.00 Lakeview. . . . . . .45/10/0.00 La Pine . . . . . . . .54/10/0.00 Medford . . . . . . .48/21/0.00 Newport . . . . . . .48/32/0.00 North Bend . . . . .48/27/0.00 Ontario . . . . . . . .37/14/0.00 Pendleton . . . . . .47/19/0.00 Portland . . . . . . .36/31/0.00 Prineville . . . . . . .52/23/0.00 Redmond. . . . . . .55/14/0.00 Roseburg. . . . . . .48/27/0.00 Salem . . . . . . . . .32/25/0.00 Sisters . . . . . . . . .55/14/0.00 The Dalles . . . . . .47/21/0.00

. . . . .47/35/c . . . . .47/32/pc . . . .38/19/pc . . . . . .38/19/s . . . . .55/35/s . . . . .56/48/pc . . . . .41/14/s . . . . . .37/12/s . . . .42/32/pc . . . . . . 41/32/f . . . .46/19/pc . . . . . .44/19/s . . . . .44/19/s . . . . . .42/18/s . . . . .48/14/s . . . . . .39/16/s . . . .35/29/pc . . . . .37/31/pc . . . .49/37/pc . . . . .53/34/pc . . . .47/36/pc . . . . .49/34/pc . . . . .36/21/s . . . . . .38/19/s . . . . .41/21/c . . . . . .42/22/s . . . . .45/33/c . . . . . .44/29/s . . . . .47/19/s . . . . . .42/17/s . . . .49/17/pc . . . . . .43/15/s . . . . . 41/32/f . . . . .41/35/pc . . . .43/35/pc . . . . .43/28/pc . . . . .48/17/s . . . . . .40/19/s . . . . .42/27/c . . . . . .45/25/s

City

SKI REPORT

The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is for solar at noon.

1

LOW 0

MEDIUM 2

4

HIGH 6

Ski report from around the state, representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday: Snow accumulation in inches Ski area Last 24 hours Base Depth Anthony Lakes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . .30-32 Hoodoo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Mt. Ashland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Mt. Bachelor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . . . 33 Mt. Hood Meadows . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . . . 38 Mt. Hood Ski Bowl . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . .21-30 Timberline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . . . 53 Warner Canyon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Willamette Pass . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report

V.HIGH 8

PRECIPITATION

10

ROAD CONDITIONS Snow level and road conditions representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday. Key: T.T. = Traction Tires.

Pass Conditions I-5 at Siskiyou Summit . . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires I-84 at Cabbage Hill . . . . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Aspen, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 . . . . . .14-18 Hwy. 20 at Santiam Pass . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Mammoth Mtn., California . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . .18-24 Hwy. 26 at Government Camp. . Carry chains or T. Tires Park City, Utah . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . . . 21 Hwy. 26 at Ochoco Divide . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Squaw Valley, California . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . .8-17 Hwy. 58 at Willamette Pass . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Sun Valley, Idaho. . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . . . 20 Hwy. 138 at Diamond Lake . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Taos, New Mexico. . . . . . . . . . . .0-0 . . . . . .43-54 Hwy. 242 at McKenzie Pass . . . . . . . . Closed for season Vail, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . . . 18 For links to the latest ski conditions visit: For up-to-minute conditions turn to: www.skicentral.com/oregon.html www.tripcheck.com or call 511 Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS -40s

SUNDAY

Mainly sunny.

43 14

WEST Fog, then partly to mostly cloudy today. Fog and low clouds tonight.

45/17

Grants Pass 38/26

38/19

Christmas Valley

Chemult

41/32

Baker City

Brothers 47/14

Fort Rock 48/16

45/13

40/8

Roseburg

50/18

La Pine 48/14

Crescent Lake

46/35

Bandon

46/21

38/14

35/15

Mitchell 49/20

45/15

50/39

Florence

Madras

Camp Sherman

37/19

Joseph

Granite Spray 44/19

Warm Springs

Corvallis Yachats

41/22

Enterprise 38/15

Union

40/21

Condon

43/24

48/22

42/34

35/19

La Grande

43/22

Willowdale

Albany

Newport

49/37

Wallowa

41/21

Ruggs

39/22

Maupin

43/35

Pendleton

40/23

Wasco

42/27

Hermiston 39/19

Arlington

39/27

Government Camp 39/22

43/35

Lincoln City

Biggs The Dalles

Sandy 45/33

McMinnville

39/20

44/31

Hillsboro Portland 45/33

Tillamook

Umatilla

Hood River

SATURDAY

Mainly sunny.

HIGH LOW

18

FORECAST: STATE Seaside

FRIDAY

40s

Winnipeg 17/1

50s

60s

Thunder Bay 23/4

70s

80s

90s

100s 110s

Quebec 32/27

Halifax 49/36 P ortland Billings To ronto Portland Green Bay 47/32 32/16 33/27 45/33 St. Paul • 85° 29/20 Boston 27/12 Inverness, Fla. 48/38 Rapid City Buffalo Detroit New York Boise 34/15 39/32 37/28 40/21 54/38 • -27° Des Moines Philadelphia Cheyenne Laramie, Wyo. 30/19 Chicago Washington, D. C. 56/37 37/15 36/28 51/36 Omaha San Francisco • 1.57” Columbus Salt Lake 29/19 56/47 42/27 City Birmingham, Ala. Las Denver Louisville 33/17 Kansas City Vegas 41/18 44/28 37/21 St. Louis 52/36 39/24 Albuquerque Los Angeles Charlotte Oklahoma City Nashville Little Rock 35/19 67/43 62/36 45/25 44/27 45/26 Phoenix Atlanta 60/38 Honolulu 50/31 Birmingham 81/69 Dallas Tijuana 47/30 51/28 64/42 New Orleans 54/39 Houston Orlando Chihuahua 51/31 80/53 57/24 Miami 82/64 Monterrey La Paz 60/40 77/59 Mazatlan Anchorage 83/54 29/22 Juneau 28/22 Bismarck 24/5

FRONTS

ROOFING THE HEAVENS

Yesterday WednesdayThursday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . . . .29/24/0.00 . . . 50/27/s . . 53/27/s Akron . . . . . . . . . .41/37/0.07 . .39/25/pc . 34/26/pc Albany. . . . . . . . . .57/41/0.17 . . . 48/31/r . 42/27/pc Albuquerque. . . . . .30/9/0.00 . .35/19/pc . 41/23/pc Anchorage . . . . . .32/29/0.00 . . .29/22/c . 31/19/sn Atlanta . . . . . . . . .70/61/0.24 . . . 50/31/r . . 52/35/s Atlantic City . . . . .66/58/0.03 . . . 59/40/r . . 45/35/s Austin . . . . . . . . . .44/34/0.00 . . . 52/30/s . . 56/37/s Baltimore . . . . . . .63/55/0.19 . . . 51/35/r . . 44/30/s Billings . . . . . . . . .34/16/0.00 . .32/16/pc . 29/13/sn Birmingham . . . . .65/48/1.57 . .47/30/sh . . 52/31/s Bismarck. . . . . . . . 28/-4/0.00 . . . . 24/5/c . . 13/4/pc Boise . . . . . . . . . . .39/19/0.00 . .40/21/pc . . 39/20/s Boston. . . . . . . . . .61/50/0.07 . . . 48/38/r . 45/34/sh Bridgeport, CT. . . .57/51/0.31 . . . 50/38/r . . 47/33/s Buffalo . . . . . . . . .39/37/0.28 . .39/32/pc . 36/29/pc Burlington, VT. . . .45/34/0.26 . . 42/29/rs . 39/27/pc Caribou, ME . . . . .43/30/0.42 . .32/19/sn . 32/15/sn Charleston, SC . . .77/55/0.00 . .72/45/sh . . 61/39/s Charlotte. . . . . . . .69/58/0.00 . . . 62/36/r . . 54/32/s Chattanooga. . . . .62/54/1.39 . . . 47/27/r . . 47/30/s Cheyenne . . . . . . . 28/-5/0.00 . . .37/15/c . 29/11/sn Chicago. . . . . . . . .37/29/0.00 . .36/28/pc . 33/22/sn Cincinnati . . . . . . .40/37/0.00 . .42/25/pc . . 40/26/s Cleveland . . . . . . .40/38/0.11 . . 40/31/rs . 36/30/pc Colorado Springs . 31/-5/0.00 . .45/19/pc . 34/15/pc Columbia, MO . . .26/23/0.10 . .38/22/pc . 38/23/pc Columbia, SC . . . .77/59/0.00 . . . 68/40/r . . 59/33/s Columbus, GA. . . .71/63/0.32 . .54/32/sh . . 55/34/s Columbus, OH. . . .42/37/0.05 . .42/27/pc . 38/25/pc Concord, NH. . . . .61/43/0.07 . . . 48/32/r . 43/25/sn Corpus Christi. . . .50/42/0.00 . . . 57/39/s . . 62/53/s Dallas Ft Worth. . .38/31/0.00 . . . 51/28/s . . 53/32/s Dayton . . . . . . . . .36/32/0.00 . .41/24/pc . 37/26/pc Denver. . . . . . . . . . 30/-5/0.00 . .41/18/pc . . 31/15/c Des Moines. . . . . .24/16/0.00 . .30/19/pc . 31/15/sn Detroit. . . . . . . . . .37/32/0.00 . .37/28/pc . 34/27/sn Duluth. . . . . . . . . . 20/-1/0.00 . . .23/8/pc . . 19/3/pc El Paso. . . . . . . . . .36/18/0.00 . . . 44/22/s . . 51/28/s Fairbanks. . . . . . . 23/-12/0.00 . . . . . 8/5/c . 20/15/sn Fargo. . . . . . . . . . . .31/6/0.00 . .28/10/pc . . 15/4/pc Flagstaff . . . . . . . . .34/0/0.00 . . . . 35/7/s . . 41/11/s

Yesterday WednesdayThursday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . . .33/29/0.00 . .36/25/pc . 32/24/sn Green Bay. . . . . . .29/19/0.00 . .29/20/pc . 28/14/pc Greensboro. . . . . .66/60/0.01 . . . 60/38/r . . 51/30/s Harrisburg. . . . . . .61/51/0.23 . . . 48/32/r . 40/28/pc Hartford, CT . . . . .56/48/0.29 . . . 47/33/r . 43/27/pc Helena. . . . . . . . . . .34/8/0.00 . . . 31/6/sn . . 28/12/c Honolulu. . . . . . . .83/71/0.02 . . . 81/69/s . . 82/69/s Houston . . . . . . . .44/37/0.00 . . . 51/31/s . . 57/36/s Huntsville . . . . . . .50/45/0.56 . .43/28/sh . . 47/28/s Indianapolis . . . . .36/33/0.00 . .38/25/pc . 38/26/pc Jackson, MS . . . . .43/39/0.08 . .47/26/pc . . 53/27/s Jacksonville. . . . . .80/54/0.00 . .77/40/sh . . 63/49/s Juneau. . . . . . . . . .35/30/0.00 . . . 28/22/s . .35/33/rs Kansas City. . . . . .28/18/0.00 . .37/21/pc . 36/21/pc Lansing . . . . . . . . .32/28/0.00 . .36/24/pc . 33/23/sn Las Vegas . . . . . . .47/28/0.00 . . . 52/36/s . . 56/38/s Lexington . . . . . . .44/37/0.24 . . .41/27/c . 41/26/pc Lincoln. . . . . . . . . . 18/-3/0.00 . . .30/17/c . 29/12/sn Little Rock. . . . . . .40/33/0.01 . . . 45/26/s . . 51/28/s Los Angeles. . . . . .60/41/0.00 . . . 67/43/s . . 66/46/s Louisville. . . . . . . .43/37/0.01 . .44/28/pc . 42/29/pc Madison, WI . . . . .30/24/0.00 . .30/17/pc . 28/16/pc Memphis. . . . . . . .39/35/0.00 . .43/28/pc . . 48/29/s Miami . . . . . . . . . .80/67/0.00 . .82/64/pc . . 76/67/s Milwaukee . . . . . .33/26/0.00 . .32/24/pc . 29/20/pc Minneapolis . . . . .19/12/0.00 . .27/12/pc . . 18/3/pc Nashville. . . . . . . .44/41/0.33 . .44/27/pc . . 47/28/s New Orleans. . . . .68/48/0.14 . .54/39/sh . . 56/39/s New York . . . . . . .61/58/0.11 . . . 54/38/r . . 47/32/s Newark, NJ . . . . . .62/54/0.15 . . . 57/37/r . 46/31/pc Norfolk, VA . . . . . .74/60/0.00 . . . 68/45/r . . 53/33/s Oklahoma City . . .28/23/0.00 . . . 45/25/s . . 50/25/s Omaha . . . . . . . . . .19/2/0.00 . . .29/19/c . 28/13/sn Orlando. . . . . . . . .80/58/0.00 . .80/53/pc . . 69/54/s Palm Springs. . . . .60/33/0.00 . . . 67/42/s . . 67/43/s Peoria . . . . . . . . . .37/33/0.01 . .36/22/pc . 36/22/sn Philadelphia . . . . .63/57/0.15 . . . 56/37/r . . 45/31/s Phoenix. . . . . . . . .56/36/0.00 . . . 60/38/s . . 62/41/s Pittsburgh . . . . . . .52/39/0.05 . . .38/26/c . 35/26/pc Portland, ME. . . . .57/48/0.24 . . . 47/32/r . 43/26/sh Providence . . . . . .61/48/0.09 . . . 50/35/r . 46/30/sh Raleigh . . . . . . . . .72/60/0.00 . . . 63/42/r . . 54/31/s

Yesterday WednesdayThursday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Savannah . . . . . . .78/52/0.00 . .72/44/sh . . 62/40/s Seattle. . . . . . . . . .38/28/0.00 . . .44/34/c . . 43/32/s Sioux Falls. . . . . . . 21/-3/0.00 . .33/11/pc . . . 21/3/c Spokane . . . . . . . .38/22/0.00 . . .34/20/c . 33/18/pc Springfield, MO . .27/21/0.03 . .38/21/pc . . 43/23/s Tampa. . . . . . . . . .79/63/0.00 . .79/53/pc . . 68/56/s Tucson. . . . . . . . . .51/28/0.00 . . . 58/32/s . . 60/34/s Tulsa . . . . . . . . . . .35/25/0.00 . . . 43/21/s . . 47/24/s Washington, DC . .61/55/0.21 . . . 51/36/r . . 45/33/s Wichita . . . . . . . . .30/16/0.01 . .40/20/pc . 39/21/pc Yakima . . . . . . . . .42/14/0.00 . . .37/20/c . . 40/20/s Yuma. . . . . . . . . . .59/43/0.00 . . . 65/36/s . . 68/41/s

INTERNATIONAL Amsterdam. . . . . .46/37/0.00 . .45/40/sh . 47/42/sh Athens. . . . . . . . . .68/57/0.00 . .60/51/sh . . 59/44/s Auckland. . . . . . . .73/61/0.00 . .67/59/pc . 68/56/pc Baghdad . . . . . . . .64/34/0.00 . . . 65/38/s . . 64/35/s Bangkok . . . . . . not available . .89/76/sh . . .90/75/t Beijing. . . . . . . . . .39/28/0.00 . .37/22/sh . . 30/12/s Beirut . . . . . . . . . .66/52/0.00 . .67/55/pc . 63/54/sh Berlin. . . . . . . . . . .41/36/0.00 . .40/34/sh . 41/36/pc Bogota . . . . . . . . .63/52/0.00 . .64/52/sh . 63/51/sh Budapest. . . . . . . .45/23/0.00 . . .44/36/c . 38/33/sh Buenos Aires. . . . .88/57/0.00 . . . 84/62/s . . 84/61/s Cabo San Lucas . .72/59/0.00 . . . 78/59/s . . 79/57/s Cairo . . . . . . . . . . .68/52/0.00 . . . 71/54/s . . 69/53/s Calgary . . . . . . . . .50/32/0.00 . . . 21/4/sf . 24/20/pc Cancun . . . . . . . . .82/70/0.00 . .81/68/sh . 80/68/sh Dublin . . . . . . . . . .46/36/0.00 . .44/38/pc . 51/41/sh Edinburgh. . . . . . .39/30/0.00 . .41/34/pc . 47/38/sh Geneva . . . . . . . . .45/39/0.00 . . . 44/38/r . 45/34/pc Harare. . . . . . . . . .82/61/0.00 . .81/63/pc . 85/63/pc Hong Kong . . . . . .75/66/0.00 . . .77/69/c . 76/65/pc Istanbul. . . . . . . . .59/55/0.00 . . . 53/45/r . 50/39/pc Jerusalem . . . . . . .60/30/0.00 . . . 64/42/s . 60/42/sh Johannesburg. . . .77/61/0.00 . . . 81/62/t . . .80/62/t Lima . . . . . . . . . . .73/66/0.00 . . .73/63/c . . 72/63/c Lisbon . . . . . . . . . .63/50/0.00 . . . 64/46/s . 66/49/pc London . . . . . . . . .45/37/0.00 . .47/38/pc . 51/43/sh Madrid . . . . . . . . .59/39/0.00 . . . 58/34/s . . 60/36/s Manila. . . . . . . . . .86/75/0.00 . . . 86/76/t . . .85/76/t

Mecca . . . . . . . . . .91/70/0.00 . . . 92/68/s . . 91/68/s Mexico City. . . . . .77/43/0.00 . .76/44/pc . 75/44/pc Montreal. . . . . . . .41/34/0.00 . . 32/26/sf . 29/18/pc Moscow . . . . . . . .45/32/0.00 . .32/25/pc . 31/26/pc Nairobi . . . . . . . . .77/61/0.00 . . . 76/60/t . 75/58/pc Nassau . . . . . . . . .84/70/0.00 . .83/73/pc . 82/73/sh New Delhi. . . . . . .81/59/0.00 . . . 80/56/s . . 79/56/s Osaka . . . . . . . . . .54/43/0.00 . . .58/45/c . 55/44/sh Oslo. . . . . . . . . . . .32/23/0.00 . .25/19/pc . . 25/20/s Ottawa . . . . . . . . .32/30/0.00 . . 31/25/sf . 28/20/pc Paris. . . . . . . . . . . .46/41/0.00 . .48/40/sh . . 48/40/c Rio de Janeiro. . . .86/73/0.00 . . . 81/72/t . . .83/72/t Rome. . . . . . . . . . .61/46/0.00 . .60/45/pc . . 59/45/s Santiago . . . . . . . .79/55/0.00 . .86/55/pc . 86/54/pc Sao Paulo . . . . . . .75/63/0.00 . . . 79/63/t . . .82/66/t Sapporo . . . . . . . .34/30/0.00 . . 31/24/sf . 26/16/sn Seoul. . . . . . . . . . .45/32/0.00 . . .44/36/c . .38/28/rs Shanghai. . . . . . . .61/55/0.00 . . . 60/50/r . 52/42/sh Singapore . . . . . . .90/75/0.00 . . . 87/75/t . . .89/76/t Stockholm. . . . . . .34/25/0.00 . . 33/28/rs . .36/28/rs Sydney. . . . . . . . . .64/55/0.00 . .68/61/sh . 67/60/sh Taipei. . . . . . . . . . .75/68/0.00 . . . 84/71/t . 73/62/sh Tel Aviv . . . . . . . . .68/45/0.00 . .70/50/pc . 66/50/sh Tokyo. . . . . . . . . . .50/45/0.00 . .53/45/sh . 54/44/sh Toronto . . . . . . . . .36/34/0.00 . .33/27/pc . .33/25/sf Vancouver. . . . . . .37/30/0.00 . . .41/32/c . . 42/30/s Vienna. . . . . . . . . .45/34/0.00 . . . 40/34/r . 40/37/sh Warsaw. . . . . . . . .37/32/0.00 . . 37/32/rs . . 37/31/c

USFS draws line against invasive species By The Associated Press The U.S. Forest Service is intensifying its efforts to protect national forests from invasive species and diseases that kill trees, promote wildfires and threaten water supplies. Agriculture Deputy Undersecretary for Natural Resources Arthur “Butch”

Kyle Mills / Lewiston Tribune

A blue sky surrounds roofers as they cling to the steep pitch of Trinity Lutheran Church in Lewiston, Idaho, on Monday.

Find Your Dream Home In Real Estate Every Saturday In

Yesterday WednesdayThursday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Rapid City . . . . . . . 35/-4/0.00 . .34/15/sn . 22/12/sn Reno . . . . . . . . . . .45/15/0.00 . .46/23/pc . . 49/20/s Richmond . . . . . . .71/58/0.00 . . . 61/38/r . . 51/30/s Rochester, NY . . . .43/37/0.24 . .38/30/pc . 35/29/pc Sacramento. . . . . .58/30/0.00 . . . 59/36/s . . 60/38/s St. Louis. . . . . . . . .35/30/0.00 . .39/24/pc . 39/26/pc Salt Lake City . . . .33/15/0.00 . .33/17/pc . 34/20/pc San Antonio . . . . .45/35/0.00 . . . 54/31/s . . 59/38/s San Diego . . . . . . .62/41/0.00 . . . 64/47/s . . 62/48/s San Francisco . . . .54/39/0.00 . . . 57/44/s . . 58/47/s San Jose . . . . . . . .61/35/0.00 . . . 61/40/s . . 61/42/s Santa Fe . . . . . . . . 22/-3/0.00 . . . 34/13/s . . 37/16/s

Blazer said Tuesday that invasive species cost the national economy more than $100 billion annually, and the problem is getting worse as warming temperatures allow invasive species to spread. Among the steps the policy sets out are creating a national database for infestations and control efforts,

requiring loggers and other contractors to take steps to control invasive species, and working with neighboring landowners. Invasive Species coordinator Mike Ielmini says the policy will be a foundation to build a stronger program, which to date has been fragmented.


SPORTS

Scoreboard, D2 NHL, D3 NFL, D3

College football, D3 NBA, D5 Prep sports, D4 Tee to Green, D5, 6 College basketball, D5

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2011

D

www.bendbulletin.com/sports

PREP BOYS BASKETBALL PREVIEW COLLEGE FOOTBALL

Bend High’s Hayden Crook

Bend, Mountain View seek return trips to Class 5A state tournament

Bend’s Enyart among inductees NEW YORK — Oregon State football legend and longtime Bend resident Bill Enyart was among 16 players and coaches honored Tuesday night at induction ceremonies for the College Football Hall of Fame. The ceremonies, hosted by the National Football Foundation, took place at the Waldorf-Astoria New York. The 2011 Bowl Subdivision Hall of Fame class was announced in May. Enshrinement ceremonies are planned for July 13-14, 2012, at the College Football Hall of Fame in South Bend, Ind. Included in the 2011 class are stars such as 1995 Heisman Trophy winner Eddie George of Ohio State and Florida State’s Deion Sanders, who starred as a defensive back for the Seminoles from 1985 to 1988. Nicknamed “Earthquake” for his thundering running style, Enyart was a first-team All-America running back in 1968 and a twotime all-Pac-8 selection for the Beavers. As a junior he played for the 1967 Oregon State team known as the “Giant Killers,” who defeated No. 2 Purdue and No. 1 USC and tied No. 2 UCLA. In 1968, Enyart set single-season school records for rushing attempts (293), rushing yards (1,304) and touchdowns (17) that stood for more than 30 years. He also established OSU records of 50 carries and 299 yards in a 1968 game against Utah. Enyart was selected in the 1969 NFL draft by the Buffalo Bills. He played three seasons for the Bills and the Oakland Raiders. More on the College Football Hall of Fame induction ceremonies, D3. — Staff and wire report

Boise St., others to join Big East NEW YORK — The Big East’s long-awaited additions are set, with more rebuilding to come. The conference is preparing to announce the additions of Boise State and San Diego State as football-only members and Houston, Central Florida and SMU for all sports as soon as today, a source with knowledge of the situation told The Associated Press. The five schools will join in 2013. The source spoke Tuesday on condition of anonymity because details were still being worked out with the schools and plans for an announcement were being completed. The Big East has been trying to rebuild as a 12-school football conference since Syracuse and Pittsburgh announced they would be moving to the ACC and West Virginia announced it was leaving for the Big 12. TCU also reneged on a commitment to join the Big East and instead accepted an invite to the Big 12. The Big East has also been pursuing Navy and Air Force as footballonly members, but the military academies are not yet ready to commit to the conference, the source said. — The Associated Press

By Robert Husseman The Bulletin

Bend High and Mountain View will play three Civil War boys basketball games this season. Bragging rights and Class 5A Intermountain Conference supremacy may not be the only things up for grabs. The Lava Bears and Cougars may be playing to shape the Class 5A state championship picture. “It’s as intense as it’s been in my 12 years,” Mountain View coach Craig Reid says about the rivalry. While veteran Bend High coach Don Hayes says, “The Civil War doesn’t change in my mind from year to year ... it’s always been a huge game,” he is quick to acknowledge the stakes in the context of Class 5A. “(The Cougars) have had a run of success, and we’ve had a run of success before then,” says Hayes, the dean of Central Oregon basketball coaches in his 22nd season at Bend

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

High. “It’s going to be pretty intense (this year), but in a good way. Mountain View was the Class 5A state runner-up in 2010 and made it to last season’s state tournament before bowing out in consolation play. Reid’s son, James, returns for his senior season as a second-team all-state point guard to lead what Craig Reid calls an “extremely athletic” Cougars team this season. “This is the most athletic group I’ve had in my 12 years,” the Mountain View coach says. “Our goal is to win a state championship this year. I think it’s realistic.” To do so, Mountain View must get by Bend, which swept the Cougars in three games last season and went on to place fifth at the 5A state tournament at the University of Oregon. Senior Hayden Crook is Bend’s only returning starter, an all-IMC guard who “can score 20 points easily any given night,” according to Hayes. See Preview / D4

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Golfers tee-off on the ninth hole at Juniper golf club in Redmond Tuesday in unseasonably warm and sunny weather.

Moment in the sun • Central Oregon golf courses are taking advantage of some unseasonably nice weather By Zack Hall The Bulletin

Aspen Lakes Golf Course is currently hosting about 15 rounds per day. That does not seem like much, at least until you compare it with what the Sisters facility hosted in December 2010: Two. And that’s not an average. “We only did two rounds for the entire month of December 2010,” says Josh McKinley, Aspen Lakes’ interim head professional. “Yes, that was a TOTAL of two.” Central Oregon’s recent run of seasonably cool but sunny, dry weather has produced a relative windfall at some local golf

TEE TO GREEN courses. Well, “windfall” might be overstating it a bit. But playable weather, a rarity this time of year, has enticed at least some golfers out onto the course. “We are getting a little more play than normal,” says McKinley, adding that course conditions at Aspen Lakes are better than what many would expect on the doorstep of

Christmas. “The course is in good shape, playing firm and fast, and the greens are good for this time of year,” McKinley observes. Because of recent cold morning temperatures, most golf courses in the area are under a frost delay until at least 11 a.m. But after that, golfers appear to be taking advantage of the unfrozen — albeit largely beige — turf at a handful of courses that stay open during the winter. We’re not talking about record numbers of golfers, but surprisingly many at a time when sleigh bells should be ringing. See Sun / D5

NATIONAL FINALS RODEO

Mote breaks through, wins sixth round at NFR

Bob Click / For The Bulletin

Bobby Mote scores 87 points while riding Nutrena’s Wise Guy to win the sixth round of the bareback riding at the National Finals Rodeo in Las Vegas on Tuesday night. With four rounds to go Mote is third in the average.

Bulletin staff report $28,558 and moved the fourLAS VEGAS — Bobby Mote Inside time world champion ever closer • Complete to the $2 million mark in career is making a charge. results Shut out of the money earnings. And his score boosted from through the first four rounds him into third place in the averTuesday’s age standings in the 15-rider of the Wrangler National Fisixth nals Rodeo, the Culver cowboy NFR bareback field. round cashed in Tuesday for the secThrough six rounds of the 10of the ond night in a row — and he round finals, Mote has an agNational cashed in big. gregate score of 496.0. He ranks Finals With a score of 87 on a horse behind only world standings Rodeo, named Nutrena’s Wise Guy, and average leader Kaycee Field D2 Mote took first place in the of Utah (521.5) and Steven Dent bareback competition durof Nebraska (499.5) in the avering the sixth round of the 53rd age standings. The top eight in annual NFR at the Thomas & Mack the average after the final round will Center. earn bonus payouts; first place is worth His prize — $17,885 — pushed his $45,865. See Mote / D4 total winnings for the 2011 NFR to


D2

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2011

O  A

SCOREBOARD

TELEVISION Today

Thursday

BASKETBALL 4:15 p.m.: Men’s college, Indiana at North Carolina State, ESPN2. 4:30 p.m.: Men’s college, Florida State at Michigan State, ESPN. 6:15 p.m.: Men’s college, Virginia Tech at Minnesota, ESPN2. 6:30 p.m.: Men’s college, Wisconsin at North Carolina, ESPN. 8:15 p.m.: Men’s college, Notre Dame at Gonzaga, ESPN2. HOCKEY 4:30 p.m.: NHL, Tampa Bay Lightning at Detroit Red Wings, Versus network.

GOLF Midnight: European Tour, Dubai World Championship, first round, Golf Channel. Noon: PGA Tour, Franklin Templeton Shootout, first round, Golf Channel. BASKETBALL 4 p.m.: Men’s college, Harvard at Connecticut, ESPN2. 6 p.m.: Men’s college, West Virginia at Kansas State, ESPN2. 6 p.m.: Women’s college, Denver at Colorado, Root Sports. FOOTBALL 5 p.m.: NFL, Cleveland Browns at Pittsburgh Steelers, NFL Network.

Listings are the most accurate available. The Bulletin is not responsible for late changes made by TV or radio stations.

S   B Skiing • Ligety of U.S. rallies to win World Cup giant slalom: Ted Ligety turned in a dazzling second run in frigid conditions to capture a World Cup giant slalom. The three-time overall GS champion flew down the course in Beaver Creek, Colo., in a combined time of 2 minutes, 40.01 seconds on Tuesday, holding off Marcel Hirscher of Austria by 0.69 seconds. Kjetil Jansrud of Norway was third. Ligety entered the final run trailing France’s Alexis Pinturault by 0.14 seconds. But Ligety easily made up the time to win his 10th World Cup race. Pinturault made an early mistake and took fourth.

Football • Police have no plans to look again at Suh crash: Portland police have no plans to further investigate a car accident involving Detroit Lions defensive tackle Ndamukong Suh after two women claimed they suffered injuries in the wreck. The two women, who were not identified in a police report, came forward a day after the early Saturday morning accident to say they had been injured. The police report was amended to include the claims. Suh, who went to Grant High School in Portland and later played for Nebraska, is currently serving a two-game NFL-imposed suspension for stomping on Green Bay Packers guard Evan Dietrich-Smith during a Thanksgiving Day game. He is not allowed to take part in team activities while on suspension. • Seattle rookie G Moffitt suspended 4 games by NFL: Seattle Seahawks rookie guard John Moffitt was suspended for four games without pay for violating the NFL’s policy on performance-enhancing substances. The league announced the suspension on Tuesday. Moffitt will serve the suspension beginning immediately, even though he is currently on injured reserve and out for the season with a right knee injury. The specifics of why Moffitt was suspended were not released. • 49ers reach deal for parking near proposed stadium: The San Francisco 49ers removed another major hurdle standing in the way of the team’s plans for a new stadium in Silicon Valley. The owners of an amusement park that sits next to the proposed stadium site in Santa Clara announced a deal Tuesday that resolves parking concerns that had bottled up the stadium plan. San Francisco 49ers President Jed York called it an important step in the project. The city of Santa Clara and the team announced last week that they had secured $850 million in funding for the stadium. • Snyder runaway pick as AP Big 12 coach of year: Bill Snyder retired six years ago convinced that he was done with coaching college football. He wanted to spend more time with his family, make up for all of his kids’ ballgames and ballets that he missed while building Kansas State to unprecedented heights. The 72-year-old coach came back to the sidelines three years ago rejuvenated. And in that short of time he did the unthinkable: Snyder returned his oncemighty program to the national consciousness. On Tuesday, he was the runaway pick as the AP’s Big 12 coach of the year. • Massachusetts title lost when player celebrates winning TD: A Massachusetts high school lost a state championship game because a player

raised his arm in triumph as he ran for what would have been a go-ahead touchdown. The gesture by Cathedral High School quarterback Matthew Owens in Saturday’s Division 4A Super Bowl drew a penalty. The referee was enforcing a sportsmanship rule that prohibits players from celebratory or taunting behavior while scoring a touchdown. The 18-year-old senior was racing for a score as time wound down in the game against Blue Hills Regional Technical School. Video showed Owens briefly raising his left arm as he approached the end zone. The penalty nullified the touchdown. Cathedral lost the game 16-14.

Motor sports • JGR to replace Denny Hamlin’s crew chief: Mike Ford was let go Tuesday as crew chief for Denny Hamlin after a disappointing season in which the duo failed to contend for the championship. “I’m kind of relieved,” Ford told The Associated Press. “It had been dragging on for so long, I’m actually relieved there’s finally a resolution.” Ford’s future with the team had been subject to speculation most of the season, largely because of how far Hamlin’s performance had dropped from 2010, when he nearly dethroned Jimmie Johnson for the Sprint Cup title.

Hockey • NHL discusses player safety at board meeting: NHL Commissioner Gary Bettman said there is not enough data yet to draw conclusions about the link between concussions and a degenerative brain ailment that has been found in four dead hockey players. Player safety was a major topic Tuesday as the league wrapped up its two-day Board of Governors meeting in Pebble Beach, Calif. It came a day after The New York Times reported that former New York Rangers enforcer Derek Boogaard suffered from chronic traumatic encephalopathy, an ailment related to Alzheimer’s disease.

Boxing • Thomas Hearns tops the new Hall of Fame class: Thomas “Hitman” Hearns, the first man to win titles in four divisions, tops a list of 13 people elected to the International Boxing Hall of Fame and Museum. Hearns, who won five titles altogether, compiled a 155-8 amateur record and was 61-5-1 with 48 knockouts as a pro. Also selected were: Mark Johnson, a two-division champion; ring announcer Michael Buffer; trainer Freddie Roach; broadcaster Al Bernstein; and journalist Michael Katz. • Runner who froze feet told police he was upset: An All-American cross-country runner from the University of Alaska Anchorage who emerged from the woods with frozen feet, which later had to be amputated, told authorities he had gone for a run in the cold because he was despondent. Marko Cheseto of Kenya disappeared from the university Nov. 6 and was found three days later suffering from hypothermia and severe frostbite to his feet. A university police report obtained by The Associated Press says Cheseto told police he was “feeling unhappy” and “having to struggle to get through life” when he went for a run and passed out under a tree. He said when he awoke, his feet were frozen. Cheseto made his way to a hotel, where he got help. — The Associated Press

ON DECK Today Wrestling: Gilchrist at Novice Tournament at Bend, 5 p.m. Girls basketball: Culver JV at Gilchrist, 5:30 p.m. Boys basketball: Culver JV at Gilchrist, 7 p.m.

Carolina at Edmonton, 6:30 p.m. Thursday’s Games Florida at Boston, 4 p.m. Ottawa at New Jersey, 4 p.m. Chicago at N.Y. Islanders, 4 p.m. Tampa Bay at N.Y. Rangers, 4 p.m. Pittsburgh at Philadelphia, 4 p.m. Nashville at Columbus, 4 p.m. Vancouver at Montreal, 4:30 p.m. Phoenix at Detroit, 4:30 p.m. Anaheim at St. Louis, 5 p.m. Colorado at Calgary, 6 p.m. Minnesota at Los Angeles, 7:30 p.m. Dallas at San Jose, 7:30 p.m.

IN THE BLEACHERS

Thursday Boys basketball: Sisters at Cascade, 7 p.m. Girls basketball: Sisters at Cascade, 5:30 p.m. Wrestling: Madras at Summit, 7 p.m.; La Pine at Mountain View, 7 p.m. Swimming: Redmond at Madras, 4:45 p.m.; La Pine at Mountain View, TBA

BASKETBALL

Friday Boys basketball: Summit at North Eugene, 6 p.m.; West Salem at Redmond, 7 p.m.; Bend at North Medford, 7 p.m.; Sweet Home at Crook County, 7 p.m.; Madras at Mazama, 7 p.m.; La Pine vs. South Umpqua at Douglas Tip Off Tournament, 4 p.m.; North Lake JV vs. Gilchrist at Gilchrist Tournament, 8 p.m. Girls basketball: Crook County at Sweet Home, 6 p.m.; North Eugene at Summit, 6 p.m.; North Medford at Bend, 7 p.m.; South Medford at Mountain View, 7 p.m.; Mazama at Madras, 7 p.m.; La Pine vs. Douglas at Douglas Tip Off Tournament, 6 p.m.; La Pine JV vs. Gilchrist at Gilchrist Tournament, 6:30 p.m. Wrestling: Redmond, Crook County at Oregon Coast Classic in North Bend, noon; Mountain View at Glencoe Tournament, TBA; Madras, La Pine, Sisters, Gilchrist at Culver Tournament, 2 p.m. Saturday Boys basketball: Bend at South Medford, 12:45 p.m.; Mountain View at North Medford, 12:45 p.m.; La Pine at Douglas Tip Off Tournament, TBA; Gilchrist Tournament, TBA Girls basketball: Redmond at West Salem, 7 p.m.; South Medford at Bend, 12:45 p.m.; North Medford at Mountain View, 12:45 p.m.; La Pine at Douglas Tip Off Tournament, TBA; Gilchrist Tournament, TBA Wrestling: Redmond, Crook County at Oregon Coast Classic in North Bend, 9 a.m.; Madras, La Pine, Sisters, Gilchrist at Culver Tournament, 10 a.m.; Bend, Summit at Springfield Tournament, TBA

RODEO 53rd annual Wrangler National Finals Rodeo Thomas & Mack Center, Las Vegas, Nev. Tuesday’s Results Sixth round Bareback riding: 1. Bobby Mote, Culver, Ore., 87 points on Classic Pro Rodeo’s Nutrena’s Wise Guy, $17,885; 2. Will Lowe, Canyon, Texas, 85.5, $14,135; 3. Kaycee Feild, Payson, Utah, 84.5, $10,673; 4. Casey Colletti, Pueblo, Colo., 83.5, $7,500; 5. Wes Stevenson, Lubbock, Texas, 80, $4,615; 6. Matt Bright, Azle, Texas, 76.5, $2,885; 7. (tie) Tilden Hooper, Carthage, Texas, and Clint Cannon, Waller, Texas, 75 each; 9. Ryan Gray, Cheney, Wash., 74.5; 10. Steven Dent, Mullen, Neb., 72; 11. Cody DeMers, Kimberly, Idaho, 70; 12. Jason Havens, Prineville, Ore., 67.5; 13. (tie) Brian Bain, Culver, Ore., NS. Steven Peebles, Redmond, Ore., and Royce Ford, Briggsdale, Colo., did not compete. Steer wrestling: 1. Jake Rinehart, Highmore, S.D., 3.6 seconds, $17,885; 2. Luke Branquinho, Los Alamos, Calif., 3.8, $14,135; 3. (tie) Shawn Greenfield, Lakeview, Ore.; Casey Martin, Sulphur, La., and Seth Brockman, Wheatland, Wyo., 4.0, $7,596; 6. Mickey Gee, Wichita Falls, Texas, 4.1, $2,885; 7. Blake Knowles, Heppner, Ore., 4.3; 8. (tie) Jason Miller, Lance Creek, Wyo.; Sean Mulligan, Coleman, Okla., and Stockton Graves, Newkirk, Okla., 4.7 each; 11. (tie) Olin Hannum, Malad, Idaho, and Trevor Knowles, Mount Vernon, Ore., 4.8 each; 13. Dean Gorsuch, Gering, Neb., 5.0; 14. Billy Bugenig, Ferndale, Calif., 5.1; 15. Todd Suhn, Hermosa, S.D., NT. Team roping: 1. Trevor Brazile, Decatur, Texas/Patrick Smith, Midland, Texas, 3.5 seconds, $17,885 each; 2. (tie) Matt Sherwood, Pima , Ariz./Cory Petska, Marana, Ariz.,and Turtle Powell, Stephenville, Texas/Jhett Johnson, Casper, Wyo., 3.8, $12,404 each; 4. (tie) Erich Rogers, Round Rock, Ariz./Kory Koontz, Sudan, Texas, and Brady Tryan, Huntley, Mont./Jake Long, Coffeyville, Kan., 3.9, $6,058 each; 6. (tie) Luke Brown, Stephenville, Texas/Martin Lucero, Stephenville, Texas, and Kaleb Driggers, Albany, Ga./Brad Culpepper, Poulan, Ga., 4.0, $1,442 each; 8. Chad Masters, Cedar Hill, Tenn./Jade Corkill, Fallon, Nev., 4.4; 9. Clay Tryan, Billings, Mont./Travis Graves, Jay, Okla., 4.5; 10. Spencer Mitchell, Colusa, Calif./Broc Cresta, Santa Rosa, Calif., 4.6; 11. Colby Lovell, Madisonville, Texas/York Gill, Memphis, Tenn., 9.2; 12. Jake Barnes, Scottsdale, Ariz./Walt Woodard, Stephenville, Texas, 13.9; 13. (tie) Derrick Begay, Seba Dalkai, Ariz./Cesar de la Cruz, Tucson, Ariz.; Brandon Beers, Powell Butte, Ore./Jim Ross Cooper, Monument, N.M., and Riley Minor, Ellensburg, Wash./Brady Minor, Ellensburg, Wash., NT. Saddle bronc riding: 1. Tyler Corrington, Hastings, Minn., 86 points on Stace Smith Pro Rodeos’ Goin South, $17,885; 2. Wade Sundell, Boxholm, Iowa, 85, $14,135; 3. Chad Ferley, Oelrichs, S.D., 83, $10,673; 4. Taos Muncy, Corona, N.M., 82.5, $7,500; 5. Jesse Wright, Milford, Utah, 81.5, $4,615; 6. Jesse Bail, Camp Crook, S.D., 80, $2,885; 7. Bradley Harter, Weatherford, Texas, 78.5; 8. Jacobs Crawley, College Station, Texas, 77; 9. Jesse Kruse, Great Falls, Mont., 75.5; 10. Ty Atchison, Jackson, Mo., 72.5; 11. (tie) Cody Wright, Milford, Utah; Cody DeMoss, Heflin, La.; Heith DeMoss, Heflin, La.; Chuck Schmidt, Keldron, S.D., and Sam Spreadborough, Snyder, Texas, NS. Tie-down roping: 1. Ryan Jarrett, Comanche, Okla., 7.4 seconds, $17,885; 2. Clint Cooper, Decatur, Texas, 7.6, $14,135; 3. Hunter Herrin, Apache, Okla., 8.1, $10,673; 4. Cody Ohl, Hico, Texas, 8.2, $7,500; 5. Matt Shiozawa, Chubbuck, Idaho, 8.5, $4,615; 6. Timber Moore, Aubrey, Texas, 8.6, $2,885; 7. Scott Kormos, Teague, Texas, 9.0; 8. Cory Solomon, Prairie View, Texas, 9.6; 9. Tyson Durfey, Colbert, Wash., 10.1; 10. Adam Gray, Seymour, Texas, 11.2; 11. Tuf Cooper, Decatur, Texas, 15.8; 12. Jerrad Hofstetter, Portales, N.M., 22.4; 13. (tie) Trevor Brazile, Decatur, Texas; Shane Hanchey, Sulphur, La., and Clif Cooper, Decatur, Texas, NT. Barrel racing: 1. Sherry Cervi, Marana, Ariz., 13.93 seconds, $17,885; 2. Lindsay Sears, Nanton, Alberta, 13.95, $14,135; 3. Brittany Pozzi, Victoria, Texas, 13.96, $10,673; 4. Lisa Lockhart, Oelrichs, S.D., 13.97, $7,500; 5. Jody Sheffield, Ogden, Utah, 13.99, $4,615; 6. Sue Smith, Blackfoot, Idaho, 14.02, $2,885; 7. Brenda Mays, Terrebonne, Ore., 14.09; 8. Tammy Fischer, Ledbetter, Texas, 14.14; 9. Jeanne Anderson, White City, Kan., 14.15; 10. Britany Fleck, Mandan, N.D., 14.21; 11. Jill Moody, Letcher, S.D., 14.40; 12. Christina Richman, Glendora, Calif., 14.49; 13. Angie Meadors, Blanchard, Okla., 14.72; 14. Carlee Pierce, Stephenville, Texas, 18.71; 15. Jane Melby, Backus, Minn., 19.27. Bull riding: 1. Chandler Bownds, Lubbock, Texas, 89 points on Sutton Rodeos’ Crystal Springs Peach, $17,885; 2. Steve Woolsey, Payson, Utah, 88.5, $14,135; 3. (tie) Shane Proctor, Grand Coulee, Wash., and Tyler Willis, Wheatland, Wyo., 86, $9,087 each; 5. Seth Glause, Cheyenne, Wyo., 85.5, $4,615; 6. Jacob O’Mara, Prairieville, La., 83, $2,885; 7. L.J. Jenkins, Porum, Okla., 82; 8. Tate Stratton, Kellyville, Okla., 79; 9. Clayton Savage, Cheyenne, Wyo., 75; 10. (tie) J.W. Harris, Mullin, Texas; Wesley Silcox, Santaquin, Utah; Trevor Kastner, Ardmore, Okla.; Bobby Welsh, Gillette, Wyo.; Clayton Foltyn, El Campo, Texas, and Cody Whitney, Asher, Okla., NS.

FOOTBALL

Men’s College

West W L T Pct PF Denver 7 5 0 .583 256 Oakland 7 5 0 .583 274 Kansas City 5 7 0 .417 163 San Diego 5 7 0 .417 287 NATIONAL CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF Dallas 7 5 0 .583 283 N.Y. Giants 6 6 0 .500 287 Philadelphia 4 8 0 .333 271 Washington 4 8 0 .333 202 South W L T Pct PF New Orleans 9 3 0 .750 393 Atlanta 7 5 0 .583 269 Carolina 4 8 0 .333 290 Tampa Bay 4 8 0 .333 218 North W L T Pct PF x-Green Bay 12 0 0 1.000 420 Chicago 7 5 0 .583 291 Detroit 7 5 0 .583 333 Minnesota 2 10 0 .167 246 West W L T Pct PF x-San Francisco 10 2 0 .833 288 Seattle 5 7 0 .417 216 Arizona 5 7 0 .417 232 St. Louis 2 10 0 .167 140 x-clinched division ——— Thursday’s Game Cleveland at Pittsburgh, 5:20 p.m. Sunday’s Games New Orleans at Tennessee, 10 a.m. Indianapolis at Baltimore, 10 a.m. Kansas City at N.Y. Jets, 10 a.m. Minnesota at Detroit, 10 a.m. Houston at Cincinnati, 10 a.m. Tampa Bay at Jacksonville, 10 a.m. Atlanta at Carolina, 10 a.m. Philadelphia at Miami, 10 a.m. New England at Washington, 10 a.m. San Francisco at Arizona, 1:05 p.m. Chicago at Denver, 1:05 p.m. Buffalo at San Diego, 1:15 p.m. Oakland at Green Bay, 1:15 p.m. N.Y. Giants at Dallas, 5:20 p.m. Monday’s Game St. Louis at Seattle, 5:30 p.m.

PA 247 260 304 220 PA 189 229 238 358 PA 192 195 250 240

PA 244 315 282 256 PA 269 244 324 329 PA 262 242 277 330 PA 161 246 269 296

RAVENS BENGALS PACKERS JETS LIONS Saints DOLPHINS Patriots Falcons Buccaneers 49ers BRONCOS CHARGERS COWBOYS SEAHAWKS

l-Navy l-Landover, Md.

Saturday, Dec. 17 New Mexico Bowl Temple 7 7 Wyoming Idaho Potato Bowl Utah St. 3 3 Ohio New Orleans Bowl San Diego St. 5.5 5.5 UL-Lafayette

Florida Int’l

Tuesday, Dec. 20 St. Petersburg Bowl 4.5 4.5

Marshall

Tcu

Wednesday, Dec. 21 Poinsettia Bowl 11.5 11.5

La Tech

Thursday, Dec. 22 Las Vegas Bowl 13 14

Arizona St

Saturday, Dec. 24 Hawaii Bowl Southern Miss 6.5 6.5

Nevada

Boise St

Florida St Baylor

Missouri

Monday, Dec. 26 Independence Bowl 3.5 3.5 N. Carolina

Purdue

Tuesday, Dec. 27 Little Caesars Bowl 2 2 W. Michigan

Air Force California

Friday, Dec. 30 Armed Forces Bowl Byu 2.5 2.5 Tulsa Pinstripe Bowl Rutgers 2 2 Iowa St Music City Bowl Mississippi St 6.5 6.5 Wake Forest Insight Bowl Oklahoma 15.5 14.5 Iowa Saturday, Dec. 31 Texas Bowl Texas A&M 9.5 9.5 Northwestern Sun Bowl Georgia Tech 3 3 Utah Fight Hunger Bowl Illinois 3 3 Ucla Liberty Bowl Vanderbilt 2.5 2.5 Cincinnati Chick Fil-A Bowl Auburn 1 1 Virginia

Oklahoma St

Monday, Jan. 2 Ticket City Bowl 6 6 Outback Bowl 2.5 3.5 Capital One Bowl 1 1 Gator Bowl 2 2 Rose Bowl 4.5 6.5 Fiesta Bowl 3.5 3.5

Michigan

Tuesday, Jan. 3 Sugar Bowl 1 1.5

Oregon

Army

Louisville

Thursday, Dec. 29 Champ Sports Bowl 3 3 Notre Dame Alamo Bowl 9 9 Washington

Florida

NFL (Home teams in Caps) Opening Current Underdog Thursday 13.5 14 Browns Sunday 15 16.5 Colts 2.5 3 Texans 12 11.5 Raiders 9 9 Chiefs NL NL Vikings 3.5 3.5 TITANS 3 3 Eagles 8.5 8 REDSKINS 2.5 2.5 PANTHERS NL NL JAGUARS 4 4 CARDINALS 3 3.5 Bears 6.5 6.5 Bills 4 3.5 Giants Monday 6.5 6.5 Rams College Saturday 7 7

Texas

S. Carolina

Betting Line

STEELERS

Wednesday, Dec. 28 Military Bowl 3 3 Holiday Bowl 4 4

Toledo

Georgia

Schedule Bowl Glance Subject to Change All Times PST ——— Saturday, Dec. 17 New Mexico Bowl At Albuquerque Wyoming (8-4) vs. Temple (8-4), 11:30 a.m. (ESPN) Famous Idaho Potato Bowl At Boise, Idaho Utah State (7-5) vs. Ohio (9-4), 2:30 p.m. (ESPN) New Orleans Bowl Louisiana-Lafayette (8-4) vs. San Diego State (8-4), 6 p.m. (ESPN) ——— Tuesday, Dec. 20 Beef ‘O’Brady’s Bowl At St. Petersburg, Fla. Marshall (6-6) vs. FIU (8-4), 5 p.m. (ESPN) ——— Wednesday, Dec. 21 Poinsettia Bowl At San Diego TCU (10-2) vs. Louisiana Tech (8-4), 5 p.m. (ESPN)

Favorite

Belk Bowl 1 1

NC State

Houston

College

NFL National Football League All Times PST ——— AMERICAN CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF New England 9 3 0 .750 362 N.Y. Jets 7 5 0 .583 290 Buffalo 5 7 0 .417 278 Miami 4 8 0 .333 246 South W L T Pct PF Houston 9 3 0 .750 310 Tennessee 7 5 0 .583 249 Jacksonville 3 9 0 .250 152 Indianapolis 0 12 0 .000 174 North W L T Pct PF Baltimore 9 3 0 .750 296 Pittsburgh 9 3 0 .750 268 Cincinnati 7 5 0 .583 266 Cleveland 4 8 0 .333 175

PA 292 308 268 289

Michigan St Nebraska Ohio St Wisconsin Stanford

Virginia Tech

Wednesday, Jan. 4 Orange Bowl 2.5 3.5 West Virginia

Clemson

Arkansas

Friday, Jan. 6 Cotton Bowl 7 7

Pittsburgh

Saturday, Jan. 7 Compass Bowl 5.5 5.5

Arkansas St

Sunday, Jan. 8 Go Daddy.com Bowl 1 1

Lsu

Penn St

Tuesday’s Results ——— EAST Bucknell 77, Binghamton 63 Columbia 46, Holy Cross 45 Marquette 79, Washington 77 Missouri 81, Villanova 71 Monmouth (NJ) 69, Navy 67 Pittsburgh 97, VMI 70 Quinnipiac 70, Hartford 61 Robert Morris 64, Duquesne 60 Seton Hall 78, NJIT 48 Syracuse 62, Marshall 56 Wagner 58, Hofstra 43 SOUTH Belmont 75, Tennessee St. 62 Charlotte 57, Radford 49 Coastal Carolina 80, The Citadel 58 E. Kentucky 75, NC Central 62 Furman 86, Virginia-Wise 66 Gardner-Webb 87, Alice Lloyd 57 Howard 72, Delaware St. 65 Kent St. 71, James Madison 51 Lipscomb 70, UT-Martin 55 Louisiana Tech 94, Northwestern St. 93, 2OT Memphis 71, Miami 54 North Carolina 97, Evansville 48 UMass 63, East Carolina 58 UNC Wilmington 77, Liberty 68 Virginia 68, George Mason 48 Wofford 61, Tulane 50 MIDWEST Ball St. 76, SIU-Edwardsville 55 Bradley 79, Northeastern 68 Iowa St. 84, Prairie View 59 Kansas 88, Long Beach St. 80 Minnesota 70, Appalachian St. 56 N. Iowa 80, Iowa 60 S. Dakota St. 92, SW Minnesota St. 69 Youngstown St. 69, Fredonia St. 35 SOUTHWEST TCU 75, Texas Tech 69 Texas 80, Texas-Arlington 62 Texas St. 81, Houston 78 UALR 102, Philander Smith 59 FAR WEST Pacific 64, Hawaii 54 Utah St. 63, Utah Valley 54

Women’s College Tuesday’s Results ——— EAST Albany (NY) 55, Niagara 45 Binghamton 49, Army 47 Bucknell 49, Fordham 39 Duquesne 64, Miami (Ohio) 63 Harvard 69, New Hampshire 62 Penn St. 66, Virginia Tech 28 Rider 53, Stony Brook 41 Temple 68, Kent St. 33 UConn 81, Texas A&M 51 UMBC 65, Md.-Eastern Shore 60 SOUTH E. Kentucky 60, Belmont 46 Georgia 80, Mercer 43 Middle Tennessee 69, Austin Peay 63 UAB 72, UNC-Greensboro 42 MIDWEST Bowling Green 73, Youngstown St. 61 Bradley 66, SIU-Edwardsville 60 Chicago St. 70, W. Michigan 65 Dayton 77, Wright St. 69 Indiana St. 49, Butler 46 Michigan St. 64, Detroit 41 Missouri St. 81, ETSU 70 Valparaiso 64, IPFW 43 Xavier 71, Morehead St. 66 SOUTHWEST Arkansas 61, Stephen F. Austin 46 S. Dakota St. 60, UALR 49 Texas St. 102, Huston-Tillotson 69 FAR WEST Arizona St. 63, Cal St.-Fullerton 49 Utah 56, Idaho St. 31

DEALS Transactions

Kansas St

Smu

N. Illinois

Monday, Jan. 9 BCS Championship Game 1.5 PK Alabama

HOCKEY NHL NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE All Times PST ——— EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Pittsburgh 28 16 8 4 36 86 69 N.Y. Rangers 24 15 6 3 33 71 55 Philadelphia 25 15 7 3 33 88 73 New Jersey 26 13 12 1 27 65 74 N.Y. Islanders 25 9 11 5 23 57 79 Northeast Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Boston 26 17 8 1 35 89 54 Toronto 28 15 10 3 33 89 90 Buffalo 26 14 11 1 29 72 69 Ottawa 27 13 11 3 29 83 91 Montreal 28 11 11 6 28 69 72 Southeast Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Florida 27 15 8 4 34 78 69 Winnipeg 27 12 11 4 28 77 83 Washington 26 13 12 1 27 79 84 Tampa Bay 27 11 14 2 24 70 89 Carolina 29 8 17 4 20 72 101 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Chicago 28 16 8 4 36 93 88 Detroit 26 16 9 1 33 77 59 St. Louis 27 15 9 3 33 66 60 Nashville 27 12 11 4 28 70 74 Columbus 27 8 16 3 19 65 90 Northwest Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Minnesota 28 18 7 3 39 71 61 Vancouver 27 16 10 1 33 89 67 Edmonton 27 13 11 3 29 76 71 Colorado 28 13 14 1 27 75 84 Calgary 27 12 13 2 26 67 78 Pacific Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Phoenix 27 15 9 3 33 74 67 Dallas 26 15 10 1 31 69 72 Los Angeles 27 13 10 4 30 62 61 San Jose 24 14 9 1 29 68 58 Anaheim 27 8 14 5 21 63 88 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. Tuesday’s Games Columbus 3, Montreal 2, SO New Jersey 3, Toronto 2, OT N.Y. Islanders 5, Tampa Bay 1 St. Louis 3, Detroit 2 Phoenix 3, Nashville 2 Winnipeg 2, Boston 1 Calgary 7, Carolina 6 Vancouver 6, Colorado 0 Anaheim 3, Los Angeles 2 Minnesota 2, San Jose 1 Today’s Games Washington at Ottawa, 4 p.m. Philadelphia at Buffalo, 4:30 p.m.

BASEBALL American League BOSTON RED SOX—Agreed to terms with LHP Andrew Miller on a one-year contract. CLEVELAND INDIANS—Designated RHP Hector Rondon for assignment. Added OF Grady Sizemore to the 40-man roster. MINNESOTA TWINS—Traded RHP Kevin Slowey to Colorado for a player to be named. TAMPA BAY RAYS—Agreed to terms with INF Matt Mangini, 1B Juan Miranda, RHP Jhonny Nunez and RHP Ricky Orta on minor league contracts. TORONTO BLUE JAYS—Acquired RHP Sergio Santos from the Chicago White Sox for RHP Nestor Molina. National League NEW YORK METS—Aagreed to terms with RHP Jon Rauch on a one-year contract. FOOTBALL National Football League NFL—Suspended Washington TE Fred Davis, Washington T Trent Williams and Seattle G John Moffitt for four games each for violating the league’s substance abuse policy. HOUSTON TEXANS—Released QB Kellen Clemens. Placed P Brett Hartmann on injured reserve. INDIANAPOLIS COLTS—Placed DT Drake Nevis on injured reserve. Signed DB Brandon King from the Miami Dolphins practice squad. Claimed LB Kevin Bentley off waivers from Jacksonville. Promoted DB Mike Holmes from the practice squad to the active roster. Signed OT Mike Tepper to the practice squad. SEATTLE SEAHAWKS—Placed T Russell Okung on injured reserve. Signed G Mike Gibson. Signed LB Keith Darbut and RB Jay Finley to the practice squad. HOCKEY National Hockey League NHL—Suspended Nashville F Jordin Tootoo for two games, without pay, for charging Buffalo G Ryan Miller during a Dec. 3 game. BUFFALO SABRES—Recalled D Joe Finley from Rochester (AHL). CAROLINA HURRICANES—Recalled G Mike Murphy from Charlotte (AHL). PHOENIX COYOTES—Assigned F Patrick O’Sullivan to Portland (AHL). TAMPA BAY LIGHTNING—Recalled D Evan Oberg from Norfolk (AHL). WINNIPEG JETS—Claimed F Ben Maxwell off waivers from Anaheim and assigned him to St. John’s (AHL). Activated D Brett Festerling from the injured reserve list and assigned him to St. John’s. SOCCER Major League Soccer CHICAGO FIRE—Agreed to terms with MF Logan Pause on a two-year contract extension through 2013. CHIVAS USA—Re-signed G Dan Kennedy to a multiyear contract. COLORADO RAPIDS—Announced the resignation of managing director Jeff Plush. VANCOUVER WHITECAPS—Agreed to terms with MF Young-Pyo Lee. COLLEGE ALBANY (NY)—Named Patrick Hairston associate director of athletics for NCAA compliance. APPALACHIAN STATE—Named Matt Nelson men’s soccer coach. ARIZONA—Announced freshman G Josiah Turner has been suspended for one game due to violations of team policy. ARKANSAS—Announced the resignation of defensive coordinator Willy Robinson. ILLINOIS—Announced the resignation of offensive coordinator Paul Petrino to return to Arkansas. Announced quarterbacks coach Jeff Brohm will be offensive coordinator for the Fight Hunger Bowl against UCLA on Dec. 31. PURDUE—Suspended sophomore WR O.J. Ross indefinitely from the football team for violating team policy and rules. UCLA—Suspended junior F Reeves Nelson indefinitely for conduct unbecoming a member of the basketball team.


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

D3

NHL ROUNDUP

COLLEGE FOOTBALL

Defense leads Jets to victory over Bruins

Hall of Famer keeps his promise to late friend

The Associated Press WINNIPEG, Alberta — Ondrej Pavelec made save after save, fending off the Boston Bruins. When it was all over, he had stopped 39 shots, and Bryan Little scored to help the Winnipeg Jets beat the Boston Bruins 2-1 Tuesday night, ending Boston’s 15-game 15 game stretch in which it earned 29 of a possible 30 points. “We know if we’re going to stick with the plan, if we’re going to play the way we want, that we can beat everybody,” Pavelec said. The Jets (12-11-4) moved above the .500 mark for the first time this season, and have won six of their last seven home games. Little scored 94 seconds after Shawn Thornton tied the game for Boston. He controlled the puck off a neutral-zone faceoff, went the length of the ice and beat Tuukka Rask to the glove side. “It was the loudest I’ve ever heard the arena,” Little said. “It was unbelievable.” The goal came just six seconds after David Krejci drove Jets defenseman Mark Stuart into the end boards from behind. Krejci and Zach Bogosian were in the penalty box for offsetting roughing minors after the hit, which left Stuart face down and motionless on the ice. He later returned to the game. Jets coach Claude Noel chose not to comment on the hit, saying he would let the league decide whether it was dirty. The rest of his postgame comments consisted of nothing but praise for his players. “We’re getting a lot of good games from a lot of people,” Noel said. “It was goaltending, defense and forwards. Just smart, responsible play.” In other games on Tuesday: I sl anders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Lightning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 UNIONDALE, N.Y. — Matt Martin scored his second game-winning goal in his three-year NHL career, and the New York Islanders shook off a slow start and routed Tampa Bay. Blues. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Red Wings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 ST. LOUIS — David Backes scored St. Louis’ second straight power-play goal, and the Blues broke out of a two-for-39 slump with the man advantage in a victory against Detroit. Devils . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Maple Leafs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 TORONTO — David Clarkson scored twice, including the winning goal 2:40 into overtime to lift New Jersey over Toronto. Ilya Kovalchuk also scored for the Devils, who got 31 saves from Martin Brodeur. Blue Jackets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Canadiens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 MONTREAL — Rick Nash’s shootout goal lifted Columbus over Montreal. Curtis Sanford was perfect in the tiebreaker, turning aside David Desharnais, Max Pacioretty and Brian Gionta. Gionta scored a goal with 1:21 left in regulation to send the game to overtime. Coyotes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Predators. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 NASHVILLE, Tenn. — Keith Yandle scored with 1:45 remaining to give Phoenix a win against Nashville. The Coyotes won their second straight game. The Predators have dropped six of eight. Flames . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Hurricanes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 CALGARY, Alberta — Brendan Morrison had two goals and two assists as Calgary edged Carolina. Canucks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Avalanche . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0 VANCOUVER — Daniel Sedin scored three times, Cory Schneider had 20 saves in relief of Roberto Luongo and Vancouver beat Colorado. Ducks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Kings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 ANAHEIM, Calif. — Bobby Ryan’s awkward shot glanced off Drew Doughty’s shin and past Jonathan Quick with 48.8 seconds to play, and Anaheim beat Los Angeles for its first victory under new coach Bruce Boudreau. Wild . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Sharks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 SAN JOSE, Calif. — Mikko Koivu and PierreMarc Bouchard scored late in the first period and Matt Hackett made 34 saves to win in his NHL debut, helping Minnesota beat San Jose.

Trevor Hagan / The Associated Press

Winnipeg Jets Bryan Little, left, and Andrew Ladd celebrate after Little scored to put the Jets ahead of Boston during the third period of Tuesday’s game in Winnipeg, Manitoba.

By Ralph D. Russo The Associated Press

Charlie Neibergall / The Associated Press

Tim Tebow has completed just 48 percent of his passes, but he is 6-1 as the starting quarterback for Denver.

The Tebow experiment • Retired scramblers weigh in on the debate on the Broncos’ quarterback By Arnie Stapleton

NFL

The Associated Press

ENGLEWOOD, Colo. — Nobody knows what will come of the Tim Tebow experiment, not even those scrambling ramblers who came before him. Yet it seems like everybody wants to talk about it. Retired QBs who made a living with their legs, and who also turned the NFL on its ear in their day, have strong opinions about what’s happening in Denver, where Tebow has led the once lowly Broncos to six wins in his seven starts. Randall Cunningham loves it. Steve Young hates it. Bobby Douglass admires it. While they debate whether Tebow can morph into a prototypical pocket passer, they’re all pulling hard for the Broncos’ quirky quarterback who defies his messy mechanics and flawed footwork with grit and last-minute magic. “I think what we all ought to do is enjoy the circus while it’s in town,” suggests another former NFL quarterback, Joe Theismann.

He just wins Tebow has brought the option back to the NFL and while he usually struggles for much of the day to move his team downfield, he keeps coming up big in crunch time, guiding the Broncos to second-half comeback wins against the Dolphins, Jets, Raiders, Chargers and Vikings since taking over as the starter two months ago. On Sunday, he won a shootout in Minnesota, propelling the Broncos (7-5) into a first-place tie with Oakland atop the AFC West. “You’ve got Aaron Rodgers, you’ve got Drew Brees, you’ve got Tom Brady that set a standard of excellence in football that we haven’t seen,” said Theismann, now an NFL Network analyst. “What makes 2011 so unique is we have seen quarterback play in this league at such a high extreme and in Tim’s case, the bottom rung when it comes to completions.” And yet the Broncos are also in the playoff hunt in this pass-happy league because of an old-fashioned formula based on stout defense and a strong ground game. “That defense is as good as any in football right now,” Theismann said. “The offense doesn’t turn the ball over. There’s been one interception in seven games. I say this tongue-in-cheek: The way Tim throws the ball sometimes, nobody has a shot at getting it, his guy, the defenders. It’s either bounce it in the ground or throw it in the third row.” Tebow is completing just 48 percent of his passes. “And what’s his winning percentage?” retorts Cunningham. It’s 85.7 percent, second only to Rodgers, whose Packers are perfect at 12-0. Still, Broncos boss John Elway won’t publicly commit to Tebow for 2012 and beyond. Coach John Fox, who told NFL.com last month that Tebow would be “screwed” if they were running a conventional offense, is living in the moment, not focused on the future. “The guys wins. How can you not be a fan of that?” Fox said. “He does it with his feet, with his arm, just with his competitive greatness, really. That’s what you’re looking for in a quarterback.” The Broncos have decided not to try to fix Tebow’s throwing troubles now but to try to accentuate what he already does well,

which is running a ball-control, low-risk, no-frills offense heavy on the option while sprinkling in some downfield passes. “He’s in a sweet spot right now,” said Young, “but I don’t know if it’s developing him to go do it longterm in the NFL.”

A championship QB? Tebow is coming off his best passing performance as a pro — 10 of 15 for 202 yards and two TDs — but Young would like to see him sling it 20-25 times every Sunday. “I learned the hard way what the job in the NFL was,” said Young, who came into the league as a scrambler and left as a pocket passer with a championship and a ticket to the Hall of Fame. “I didn’t know what that job was and it wasn’t natural to me and I like to just run around and make plays. “But it’s not championship football. It can be winning football, but it’s not championship football,” Young said. “And so I had to learn the job, and the job is a Ph.D. in studying defenses and the ability — and some of it’s natural — to deliver the football.” There’s the rub. Does Tebow really need to be a great passer? “My first year, I was no more accurate than he was,” said Cunningham, who was a 42 percent passer as a rookie but finished his career at 56.6 percent and was one of the most exciting players of his day. Young worries that the option offense is stunting Tebow’s growth. “We really haven’t learned anything,” Young said. “We knew he was good at that.” Young said he fears the Broncos will head into the offseason still clueless as to whether Tebow can really throw the ball and thus they’ll decide to draft another quarterback, “and then I’m going to say, ‘Well, why didn’t we spend that time last year seeing if he could really do this job?’ ” The answer to that question: Because he’s winning. So says Douglass, the Bears’ scrambling quarterback from 1969 to 1975 who was a career 43 percent passer. “You have to make a decision: Can we put in some of the stuff that he’s real comfortable with plus create all these problems for the defense?” said Douglass. “And then, are we better off sacrificing some of the things that he could be learning if we didn’t do that? Obviously, they have made that decision.” Although they’ve slowed his growth as a passer, they haven’t stunted it, Douglass suggested. Cunningham, who spent 16 seasons in the NFL, said the results speak for themselves. “The bottom line is the man wins games. I’m probably his biggest fan,” Cunningham said. “When I look at him, I see a large Michael Vick. People tell Tim what he can’t do; he defies the odds. He doesn’t do it in a way that everybody else does it. He doesn’t do it like Tom Brady or my man Drew Brees. But let me tell you something: At the end of the game, it’s always exciting and he comes out ahead.”

Do the legs go? Eventually, all scramblers are forced to rely more on their arm. Age and injuries catch up. Tebow ran the ball 22 times two weeks ago, more than any NFL

quarterback since 1950, prompting Vikings coach Leslie Frazier to crack that he’d like to get his star tailback Adrian Peterson that many touches. The Broncos dispute the notion they’re putting Tebow in harm’s way with so many designed quarterback runs, insisting he’s susceptible to bigger hits in the pocket. Young’s not worried about Tebow’s health. “No, he’s a bull,” Young said. “Physically, he’s as ready to go take that beating as anyone in the league, running backs, anybody. Now, can you transition from running somebody over to then dropping back and reading the zone blitz and drop off the ball to the hot read? I mean, that’s the transition he has to get used to, but I’m not worried about him. The guy’s built for it.” Theismann agrees that “your vulnerability to big shots in the pocket are greater than outside the pocket. But when you start to tuck and run, somebody’s going to come in and just say, ‘Hey, this is my shot at Tim Tebow and I’m going to take it.’ “And my bet is he’ll get up. But after how many can you get up?” Young said he thinks Tebow’s biggest problem in the passing game is that his head’s swimming. “So, I just got a feeling that yeah, maybe he’s not a 70 percent passer but he’s not 45. And so I just feel like as he plays more and gets more opportunity, he’ll throw the ball better as he relaxes more and gets more reps,” Young said. “But that’s what I’m worried about with him. I feel like it’s a disservice if he’s not getting the reps throwing the ball.” Douglass disagrees. “You have to use his talents,” he said. “I believe you have to use his physicality, his ability as a runner and the physicality is the size which means he can take some punishment, maybe run through a guy once in a while.”

Will the option last? Like they do with everything else, opponents will eventually decipher the option, critics say. “They kind of have. It’s not flourishing. Let’s be honest,” Young said. “But you let Tim hang around, he’ll beat you. He will beat you. There’s nobody I can say that more emphatically about than Tim Tebow. If he’s around at the end, you’re dead.” While Tebow is diplomatic, saying he’ll do whatever is asked of him, Young thinks in his heart of hearts, Tebow wants to be groomed into a passer and not run the same offense he did in college. “I believe he would rather take the chance of failing, even miserably, and dropping back and really throwing the ball and playing NFL quarterback,” Young said. “And I think the Broncos don’t believe he can do it. John Fox, what did he say, he’d be screwed if he does that? That’s a pretty strong statement, right? “The Broncos are saying he can’t play quarterback traditionally so we’ll just fiddle faddle around here for a little while but long term we’re not committed to this. It’s almost like they’ve made it a little bit of a sideshow.” In that case, Theismann said, grab the popcorn, sit back and enjoy the show. “He certainly is. Why can’t we?” Theismann said. “I call it Cirque du Soleil. It’s in town.”

NEW YORK — Jake Scott had a promise to keep. The former Georgia star doesn’t make many trips to the mainland from his home in Hanalei, Hawaii, a small coastal town on the island of Kauai. He made an exception, however, for the College Football Hall of Fame induction Tuesday because his late friend Jim Mandich made him vow to do so. “He got me before it went down,” Scott said Tuesday, referring to the death in April of his former Miami Dolphins teammate. “So I agreed to do it and that’s why I’m here.” Scott, along with Heisman Trophy winner Eddie George, former Florida State star Deion Sanders and retired Michigan coach Lloyd Carr are among the latest class of 16 players and coaches to be inducted into College Hall of Fame by the National Football Foundation. The group also includes former Air Force coach Fisher DeBerry; Alabama defensive lineman Marty Lyons; Miami defensive lineman Russell Maryland; Texas defensive lineman Doug English; Florida receiver Carlos Alvarez; Oregon State fullback Bill Enyart; Nebraska guard Will Shields; Minnesota’s Sandy Stephens, who was inducted posthumously; West Virginia linebacker Darryl Talley; Oklahoma halfback Clendon Thomas; Arizona defensive lineman Ron Waldrop; and Michigan State receiver Gene Washington. Scott led the Southeastern Conference in interceptions in 1967 and ’68 and his 16 picks still stands as the Georgia record. He went on to a stellar nine-year NFL career with Miami and Washington. He was the MVP of the 1973 Super Bowl, which wrapped up the Dolphins’ perfect season. Mandich, a College Hall of Famer from Michigan, was a tight end on those Dolphins’ teams and Scott’s roommate. He was in the hospital dying of cancer earlier this year when he called Scott and made a request. “He was going down for the count with cancer, and he said, ‘Would you do me a favor?’ And I said, ‘Jim, I’ll do anything you want me to do.’ He says, ‘If you get in the College Hall of Fame, will you attend?’ And I said, ‘Yes, I’ll do anything for you.’ “I thought it was going to be something simple,” Scott said with a chuckle. Scott has built up a reputation as something of a recluse, the J.D. Salinger of defensive backs. Though he certainly doesn’t come across as a misanthrope. “Somebody said, you’re hiding out,” he said. “I said no I just wasn’t there.” Scott was sitting next to Sanders on the dais during the news conference with the other Hall of Famers — that is, when “Primetime” finally showed up about 15 minutes late. “First of all I’d like to thank God for allowing me to be here,” Sanders said. “I am so exhausted I just was on a redeye flight from New York, I’m saying New York, from L.A. You can tell I’m still asleep right now. This suit put on itself, but I still think it looks pretty darn good.” When Sanders was done thanking his family, coaches — he said former Florida State defensive coordinator Mickey Andrew taught him everything he knows about playing cornerback — and teammates for helping him get to the hall of fame, it was Scott’s turn to speak. “Well, I want to thank Deion for not speaking 30 or 40 minutes like he usually does,” Scott said, getting a hearty laugh from the crowd gathered in the ballroom.


D4

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2011

Preview

PREP ROUNDUP

Storm hold off Outlaws; improve record to 3-0 • Summit takes a 74-61 win over Sisters Bulletin staff report Summit did not shoot the ball especially well — the home team went 26 of 65 from the field, including one of 16 from beyond the threepoint line — but the host Storm found a way to win against Sisters. Kristen Parr led all scorers with 18 points, and Raja Char chipped in 17 points as Summit defeated the Outlaws, 74-61, in a nonconference girls basketball matchup at Summit High on Tuesday night. The Storm took a 36-30 halftime lead despite early foul trouble and initial struggles shooting. “A big key for us is finishing (plays),” Summit coach Ryan Cruz said. “We didn’t finish around the basket that well in the first half.” That changed dramatically in the third quarter, as the Storm outscored the Outlaws 18-5. Summit extended its lead to 21 points in the fourth quarter. Four Outlaws players scored in double figures on the night: Taylor Nieri (16 points), Elise Herron (12 points), Claire Henson (11 points) and Carissa Kernutt (10 points). Sarah Edwards added 14 points and 14 rebounds for the Storm. Summit (3-0 overall) hosts North Eugene on Friday. Sisters (0-2) plays at Cascade on Thursday. Also on Tuesday: BOYS BASKETBALL Redmond. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76 Bend . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .54 REDMOND — The Panthers earned their second victory of the season in an Intermountain Hybrid matchup against the visiting Lava Bears. Connor Lau led Redmond with 16 points. Tanner Manselle added 14 points for the Panthers. Bend, which trailed 33-31 at the half, fell further behind in the third quarter. Connor Scott led the Lava Bears with 17 points. Teammate David Larson added 11 points of his own. Redmond (2-1 overall) will host West Salem on Friday. Bend (2-1) plays at North Medford the same day. Mountain View . . . . . . . . . . . .71 Madras . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55 The Cougars scored 70 or more points for the third consecutive game, rolling past the visiting White Buffaloes in the second half to improve to 3-0 on the season. James Reid scored a game-high 27 points and Mitch Modin added 20 points for Mountain View in the nonconference victory. Madras, which was playing its season-opener, led 38-29 at halftime, but the Cougars outscored the Buffs 42-17 in the second half. Edward Zacarias led Madras with 21 points and six rebounds. Mountain View controlled the boards against the White Buffaloes, outrebounding Madras 4027. Additionally, the Cougars

converted 23 of their 28 free throws. Mountain View is at South Medford on Friday and Madras is at Klamath Falls’ Henley High the same day. Sisters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .57 Summit. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .51 Eli Harrison exploded for 32 points as the Outlaws won at Summit High in a nonconference matchup. Sisters (2-0 overall) trailed 26-23 at halftime, but outscored the Storm 18-11 in the third quarter to change the momentum of the game. John Erickson added 14 points for the Outlaws and Jalen Miller contributed six points. Bradley Laubacher led the Storm with 13 points. J.T. Evans added 11 points for Summit, which fell to 2-1 with the loss. Sisters is back on the road Thursday at Cascade. Summit plays at North Eugene on Friday. Estacada . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .66 Crook County . . . . . . . . . . . . .46 ESTACADA — Tevin Cooper scored 12 points for the Cowboys in a Class 4A nonconference loss to the Rangers. Estacada led 29-20 at half before capitalizing on a string of Crook County turnovers in the third quarter, eventually taking a 53-31 lead into the fourth. The Cowboys (0-2 overall) host Sweet Home on Friday. Henley. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .49 La Pine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .40 LA PINE — Austin Pierce led La Pine with 17 points and 11 rebounds. The Hawks led 28-27 at the half, but fell behind in the third quarter. Tyler Parsons also contributed 10 points for La Pine. The Hawks (0-3 overall) are scheduled to play South Umpqua on Friday at the Douglas Tournament in Winston. Culver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .64 Dufur. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .51 CULVER — Gerson Gonzalez scored a game-high 28 points to move to the Bulldogs to 2-1 on the season. Culver hosts Sherman on Tuesday. GIRLS BASKETBALL Bend . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .45 Redmond. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29 The Lava Bears grabbed a 13-4 lead in the first quarter and cruised from there, knocking off the Panthers in Intermountain Hybrid action. Bend post Mekayla Isaak scored a game-high 13 points while Heidi Froelich and Ally McConnell added 10 points apiece. Jesslyn Albrecht and Mandy Dollarhide led Redmond with eight points each. The Lava Bears (2-1 overall) host North Medford on Friday. The Panthers (1-2) are at West Salem on Saturday. Mountain View . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 Madras . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38 MADRAS — Megan McCadden made a pair of free throws with 0.5 seconds remaining to ice a nonconference victory for the Cougars. Class 5A Mountain View took a 15-4 lead on Class 4A Madras in the first quarter, but the White Buffaloes

responded in cutting their halftime deficit to 21-19. The game remained tight into the fourth quarter; Madras missed a free throw to tie the game with 1:30 remaining, then missed two other baskets in the final minute. Abby Scott scored 25 points and grabbed nine rebounds for the White Buffaloes. Kylie Durre led the Cougars with 13 points. Madras (0-1 overall) hosts Mazama on Friday. Mountain View (21) hosts South Medford on Friday. Crook County . . . . . . . . . . . . .51 Estacada . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25 PRINEVILLE — Brooke Buswell scored a game-high 12 points and Jessie Loper added 11 points, five rebounds and four steals as the Cowgirls blew out the visiting Rangers. Crook County (2-0 overall) led 12-9 after the first quarter before outscoring Estacada 14-1 in the second period to take control of the game. Makayla Lindburg contributed 11 points for the Cowgirls in the nonconference victory. Crook County is at Sweet Home on Friday in another nonconference matchup. Henley. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .58 La Pine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33 KLAMATH FALLS — The Hornets made 17 of 29 foul shots in their nonconference victory over the Hawk, dropping La Pine to 1-2 on the season. The Hawks, who made just two of six free throws, trailed 27-20 at halftime before Henley put the game away in the second half, outscoring La Pine 33-13 after the break. Ryan Fogel led the Hawks with 15 points and Katie Mickel added three points, three assists and five rebounds. La Pine plays Douglas in the first round of the Douglas Tournament on Friday. Culver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .46 Dufur. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38 CULVER — Cassandra Fulton scored a game-high 20 points for the Class 2A Bulldogs in a nonconference victory over the Class 1A Rangers. Culver outscored Dufur 16-8 in the second quarter, taking a 29-20 halftime lead and extending it by as many as 14 points over the course of the games. Blair Anglen scored 12 points for the Bulldogs, and Sam Donnelly added nine points and nine rebounds. Culver (3-0 overall) hosts Sherman County on Tuesday. Trinity Lutheran . . . . . . . . . . .34 Gilchrist JV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24 The Saints of Bend, who are playing an independent schedule this season, won their third consecutive game to improve to 3-0 on the season. Abbey Carpenter led Trinity Lutheran with 12 points, four rebounds and two blocks. Katie Murphy added 10 points, nine rebounds and four steals. The Saints led 22-14 at the half, and stayed ahead the entire game. Trinity Lutheran is scheduled to play the Mountain View freshman team at Mountain View on Saturday.

Continued from D1 Senior J.C. Grim gained significant varsity experience off the bench last year, and senior Tanner Torkelson will be counted on at point guard once he recovers from a foot injury suffered during football season. The Lava Bears will also benefit from the addition of David Larson, a 6-foot-6-inch junior forward who transferred from Mountain View. Hayes expects Larson to be a significant rotation player. The Cougars, meanwhile, have a transfer from Bend High in senior wing Mike Teitgen. At Summit, Jon Frazier takes over a program that went 0-6 against intracity rivals Bend and Mountain View last season. Frazier, an assistant to Hayes at Bend High from 2006 to 2010 and last season at Summit, understands the challenge before him in building up the Storm. “Bend and Mountain View have had a lot of success (recently). We hope to position ourselves to be competitive,” he says. “This is a good group of kids,” Frazier adds in reference to his Summit players. “There’s a lot of leadership and senior buy-in. They care for each other and play hard for each other.” Summit graduated seven seniors from last year’s team but returns all-IMC standout wing Austin Peters and senior point guard Bradley Laubacher, whose contributions have been praised by Frazier. “For the system we run, it’s imperative to have an extension of the coaching staff on the floor,” Frazier says. That’s exactly what (Laubacher) is.” Four Central Oregon teams will be playing this season under the direction of firstyear coaches: Frazier at Summit, Dan Poet at Central Christian, Brennan Whitaker at Culver, and Jon Corbett at Redmond. Corbett joins the Panthers after serving an eight-year stint as an assistant in the Mountain View girls basketball program. He won his coaching debut with Redmond last Thursday as the Panthers defeated Class 6A Special District 1 opponent Thurston of Springfield, 51-4, behind 22 points and 18 rebounds from senior wing Tanner Manselle, an all-IMC selection last season. “I like a high-possessiontype game,” Corbett says. “We’ll look to take a lot of shots – the first best shot we can find. Defensively, Redmond kids traditionally are real tough.” At Madras High School, coach Allen Hair returns four starters from a White Buffaloes team that won the Class 4A Tri-Valley Conference and fell a game short of making the state quarterfinals. Reigning Tri-Valley player of the year Bobby Ahern and allleague guard Ed Zacarias will be counted on heavily, and Madras returns three experienced post players in seniors Kyle Palmer and Andrew McConnell and junior Jhaylen Yeahquo. “All around, I think we’ve got a little bit of everything,” Hair says. “We can go big (or) go small. We’ve got length. We can throw different matchups at people. “We should be vying for a league title.”

Boys basketball outlook CLASS 6A REDMOND Head coach: Jon Corbett (first season) 2010-11 record: 9-15 overall, 1-3 Special District 1 North (third) Returning all-league player: Tanner Manselle, sr. Class 6A Special District 1 opener: Redmond 51, Thurston 48, Dec. 1

CLASS 5A BEND Head coach: Don Hayes (22nd season) 2010-11 record: 22-4 overall, 6-0 Intermountain Conference (first); lost in Class 5A state third-place game Returning all-league player: Hayden Crook, sr. Class 5A Intermountain Conference opener: Summit at Bend, Jan. 6 MOUNTAIN VIEW Head coach: Craig Reid (12th season) 2010-11 record: 16-9 overall, 3-3 Intermountain Conference (second); lost in Class 5A quarterfinals Returning all-league players: James Reid, sr.; Blake Bosch, sr. Class 5A Intermountain Conference opener: Summit at Mountain View, Jan. 10 SUMMIT Head coach: Jon Frazier (first season) 2010-11 record: 7-17 overall, 0-6 Intermountain Conference (third) Returning all-league player: Austin Peters, jr. Class 5A Intermountain Conference opener: Summit at Bend, Jan. 6

CLASS 4A CROOK COUNTY Head coach: Jeff Lowenbach (eighth season) 2010-11 record: 11-14 overall, 2-2 Special District 1 (second) Returning all-league player: Peyton Seaquist, sr. Class 4A Special District 1 opener: Roosevelt at Crook County, Jan. 13 LA PINE Head coach: Kyle Kalmbach (sixth season) 2010-11 record: 6-18 overall, 2-8 Sky-Em League (sixth) Key player: Austin Pierce, sr. Class 4A Sky-Em League opener: La Pine at Cottage Grove, Jan. 13 MADRAS Head coach: Allen Hair (fifth season) 2010-11 record: 11-13 overall, 7-3 Tri-Valley Conference (first); lost in Class 4A playoffs, first round Returning all-league players: Bobby Ahern, sr.; Ed Zacarias, sr. Class 4A Tri-Valley Conference opener: Gladstone at Madras, Jan. 17 SISTERS Head coach: Rand Runco (15th season) 2010-11 record: 16-9 overall, 7-3 Sky-Em (second); lost in Class 4A playoffs, first round Returning all-league players: John Erickson, sr.; Eli Harrison, jr.; Jalen Miller, sr. Class 4A Sky-Em League opener: Sweet Home at Sisters, Jan. 13

CLASS 2A CULVER Head coach: Brennan Whitaker (first season) 2010-11 record: 2-22 overall, 0-14 Tri-River Conference (eighth) Key player: Gerson Gonzalez, sr. Class 2A Tri-River Conference opener: East Linn Christian at Culver, Jan. 3

CLASS 1A CENTRAL CHRISTIAN Head coach: Dan Poet (first season) 2010-11 record: 0-21 overall, 0-15 Big Sky Conference West (sixth) Key players: Corwin Eells, sr.; Coughling Wang, jr. Class 1A Big Sky League opener: Central Christian vs. Echo at Crook County Middle School, Dec. 16 GILCHRIST Head coach: Brian Stock (fourth season) 2010-11 record: 3-18 overall, 0-14 Mountain Valley Conference (eighth) Key player: Tyler Shuey, jr. Class 1A Mountain Valley League opener: Butte Falls at Gilchrist, Jan. 6

Sisters also came up shy of the Class 4A state tournament last season, despite a 16-9 overall record and a secondplace finish in the Sky-Em League. Outlaws coach Rand Runco lost two seniors to graduation but returns three all-league players from last

BASKETBALL Boys Tuesday’s results ——— INTERMOUNTAIN HYBRID BEND (54) — Connor Scott 17, Larson 11, Crook 10, Grim 6, Connell 6, Kramer 2, Beaumarchais 2, J. Johnson, C. Johnson, Wetzell. Totals 23 5-6 54. REDMOND (76) — Connor Lau 16, Manselle 14, Genz 13, Jackson 11, Dahlen 9, Powell 9, Rodby 2, Reed 2, Brown, Bordges. Totals 24 14-20 76. Bend 15 16 11 12 — 54 Redmond 17 16 23 20 — 76 Three-point goals — Redmond: Powell 3, Genz 3, Manselle 2, Lau 2; Bend: Crook 2, Larson 1 ——— NONCONFERENCE ——— MADRAS (55) — Edward Zacarias 21, Ahern 10, Yeahquo, Haugen 6, Fracasso 4, Palmer 4, McConnell 2, Mitchell, Quintana, Smith. Totals 19 12-16 55. MOUNTAIN VIEW (71) — James Reid 27, Modin 20, Lannin 9, Logan 7, Siefken 6, McNelis 2, Bachman, Teitgen, Dattke, Haugen, Gentry, J. Hollister, Thompson. Totals 22 23-28 71. Madras 18 20 4 13 — 55 Mountain View 16 13 16 26 — 71 Three-point goals — Madras: Zacarias 3, Ahern 2; Mountain View: Reid 3, Logan. ——— CLASS 4A NONCONFERENCE ——— CROOK COUNTY (46) — Tevin Cooper 12, Seaquist 5, Buss 5, Benton 3, Mahurin 9, Washechek 4, Dees 8, A. Cooper, Greaves, Dean. Totals 14 14-19 46. ESTACADA (66) — Ryan Vauphieu 24, Overton 5, Lensch 10, Lindberg 5, Bergquist 8, Barstud 6, Fritz 5, Foust 1, Mullens 2, Wheeler. Totals 28 5-9 66. Crook County 13 7 11 15 — 46 Estacada 19 10 24 13 — 66 Three-point goals — Crook County: Jacob Mahurin 2, Tevin Cooper, Troy Benton; Estacada: Lensch 2, Lindberg, Fritz, Overton. ——— HENLEY (49) — James Hull 15, Mueller 13, Seater 6, Mitchell 5, Hosack 4, Asbro 3, Alves 2, Sherrill 1, Delarosa. Totals 18 10-18 49.

Girls Tuesday’s results ——— INTERMOUNTAIN HYBRID ——— REDMOND (29) — Jesslyn Albrecht 8, Mandy Dollarhide 8, Benson 6, Capps 6, Bergum 1, Edwards, Baker, B. Simmons, C. Simmons, Current. Totals 10 7-14 29. BEND (45) — Mekayla Isaak 13, Froelich 10, McConnell 10, Jones 6, Lundy 3, Crook 2, Reeser 1, Burnham, Maloney, McClay, Sylvester, Mattox, Kramer. Totals 14 15-24 45. Redmond 4 7 11 7 — 29 Bend 13 12 12 8 — 45 Three-point goals — Redmond: Benson 2; Bend: Jones 2. ——— NONCONFERENCE ——— MOUNTAIN VIEW (41) — Kylie Durre 13, Booster 10, Waldrup 8, Platner 5, McCadden 4, Cant 1, Owens, Ke. Durre, Reeves. Totals 12 12-20 41. MADRAS (38) — Abby Scott 25, Stacona 6, Suppah 5, I. Jones 2, Simmons, Kaltsukis, Adams, R. Jones. Totals 13 12-17 38. Mountain View 15 6 10 10 — 41 Madras 4 15 8 11 — 38 Three-point goals — Mountain View: Maddy Booster 2, Kylie Durre, Ciera Waldrup, Emma Platner; Madras: None. ——— SISTERS (61) — Taylor Nieri 16, Herron 12, Peterson 2, Kaiser 3, Kernutt 10, Spear 5, Rowe 2, Henson 11, Chauncey. Totals 21 16-30 61.

Reporter: 541-617-7811; rhusseman@bendbulletin.com

Mote

PREP SCOREBOARD LA PINE (40) — Austin Pierce 17, Parsons 10, Boen 7, Hanna 2, Smith 2, O’Casey 2, Ramirez, Kraft, Sayers, Wieber. Totals 18 1-2 40. Henley 9 18 17 5 — 49 La Pine 8 20 11 1 — 40 Three-point goals — Henley: Hull 2, Mitchell 1; La Pine: Parsons 2, Boen 1 ——— NONCONFERENCE DUFUR (51) — Boone Little 25, Parke 10, Frakes 7, Kortge 6, Morris 3, Tibbels, J. Little, Caldwell. Totals NA. CULVER (64) — Gerson Gonzalez 28, Bolton 16, Gibson 8, Frtiz 7, Slaght 5, Leeper, Lequie. Totals NA. Dufur 10 11 21 9 — 51 Culver 18 11 19 16 — 64 Three-point goals — Culver: Gonzalez 3, Bolton 1; Dufur: Little 5, Parke 2 ———

season: seniors John Erickson and Jalen Miller and junior Eli Harrison. “We’re very similar to last year,” Runco says. “We’re pretty athletic. We’re pretty well balanced.”

SUMMIT (74) —Kristen Parr 18, Char 17, Trejo 2, Haseneroehl 7, Cuniff 4, Edwards 14, Wettig 3, Patterson 9, Powers. Totals 26 19-28 74. Sisters 17 13 5 26 — 61 Summit 20 16 18 20 — 74 Three-point goals — Sisters: Taylor Nieri; Summit: Raja Char. ——— CLASS 4A NONCONFERENCE ——— ESTACADA (25) — Shalnutt 10, Smith 8, Kammeyer 4, Hammons 2, Haga 1. Totals 8 8-16 25. CROOK COUNTY (51) — Brooke Buswell 12, Loper 11, Lindburg 11, Morgan 5, Ovens 4, McKenzie 4, Solomon 2, Martin 1, Walker 1, Apperson, Smith. Totals 19 11-18 51. Estacada 9 1 5 10 — 25 Crook County 12 14 13 12 — 51 Three-point goals — Estacada: Smith; Crook County: Loper 2. ——— LA PINE (33) — Ryan Fogel 15, Glenn 4, Ebner 4, Porter 3, Mickel 3, Wieber 2, Town 2, Boen, Sazama, Huddleston, King, Totals 13 2-6 33. HENLEY (58) — Morgan 17, Sholer 13, Fahnei 11, Patterson 5, Parlan 4, Kochenderfer 4, DeHoope 2, Olden 2. Totals 19 17-29 58. La Pine 12 8 5 8 — 33 Henley 16 11 12 19 — 58 Three-point goals — La Pine: Fogel 3, Ebner; Henley: Patterson. ——— DUFUR (38) — Janelle Keever 18, Macras 8, McDonald 5, Borden 4, Anderson 2, Reed 1, Serres. Totals 17 4-10 38. CULVER (46) — Cassandra Fulton 20, Anglen 12, Donnelly 9, Seehawer 4, Sandy 1, McKinney. Totals 19 6-26 46. Dufur 12 8 6 12 — 38 Culver 13 16 8 9 — 46 Three-point goals — Dufur: None; Culver: Blaire Anglen. ——— CLASS 1A ——— GILCHRIST JV (24) — Courtney James 10, Langford 4, Heater 4, Shuey 2, Smith 2, Longbotham 2, Harris, Davidson, McDevitt, Krohnke. Totals NA 24. TRINITY LUTHERAN (34) — Abbey Carpenter 12, Murphy 10, Sample 4, Spencer 4, Clift 2, Cowan 2, Garcia, Xie, Martin, Ford, Nielsen. Totals NA 34. Gilchrist JV 5 9 4 6 — 24 Trinity Lutheran 16 6 4 8 — 34

Continued from D1 “That horse (Nutrena’s Wise Guy) has been around for quite a while, and he’s a winner,” said Mote, who saw Dent finish third in the first round on the same horse. “Typically, if somebody who rides good has that horse, they’ll be in the 90s or high 80s. That’s what you need here; you need a great horse, because they’re all good.” Despite missing the last three months of the regular season because of injuries, Mote currently ranks seventh in the world standings; he ranked ninth coming into the NFR. With Tuesday’s win, he also moved his NFR bareback record to 22 round victories. Mote, who placed third in Monday’s round (also with a score of 87), was the only Central Oregon contestant to finish in the money on Tuesday. Also in the bareback competition, Prineville’s Jason Havens posted a score of 67.5, and Culver’s Brian Bain did not receive a score. Another Central Oregon barebacker at the NFR, Steven Peebles, of Redmond, suffered leg and ankle injuries during Monday night’s round and will not return to action in these finals. In team roping, Powell Butte header Brandon Beers and his partner, heeler Jim Ross Cooper of New Mexico, for the sixth straight round did not post a time. And in barrel racing, Terrebonne’s Brenda Mays was clocked in 14.09 seconds — her second-fastest time at the NFR but one position out of the money in seventh place. Mays currently ranks a solid fourth in the average standings.


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Sun

NBA

Shorter NBA schedule has 42 back-to-back-to-backs By Brian Mahoney The Associated Press

NEW YORK — The Los Angeles Lakers will play games on the first three nights of the NBA season, the first of 42 back-to-back-to-back sets teams will face during this lockout-shortened season. The NBA announced the compacted, 66game schedule on Tuesday night, one that will require every team to play on three consecutive nights at least once. And it will force every team to navigate demanding stretches that are never seen during a full season, such as the nine games in 12 nights the Atlanta Hawks face starting with their Dec. 27 opener. The league’s 66th season begins with five games on Christmas, including the Lakers hosting the Chicago Bulls. Los Angeles then visits Sacramento the next night before returning home to host Utah on Dec. 27. Teams will play 48 conference games and 18 against the opposing conference, meaning they play only three nonconference opponents home and away. The league did preserve its most storied rivalry, with the Lakers traveling to Boston for a Feb. 9 matchup before the Celtics open a stretch of eight road games in 13 nights in March with games on back-to-back nights at Staples Center. Dallas and Miami also will face off twice, following their Christmas NBA finals rematch with a March 12 game in Miami. The Heat and Lakers also meet two times. The 50-game 1999 season featured 64 sets of back-to-back-to-backs and was plagued by sloppy basketball being played on fatigued legs. The NBA faces a similar predicament now after failing to reach a new labor deal in time to save the Nov. 1 start to the season. Instead, a tentative agreement was reached on Nov. 26. Lawyers for the owners and players are still finalizing the rest of the deal, with both sides expected to vote on it Thursday before training camps and free agency open on Friday. Aging teams such as the Celtics, Lakers and NBA champion Mavericks will have to pace themselves, while younger teams such as Oklahoma City figure to be better prepared for the grind. “You’re not going to have those breaks of three or four days that you sometimes got in the old 82game schedule, when it was the normal regular schedule,” former NBA coach and current analyst Mike Fratello said during the schedule announcement on NBA TV. “Now with everything being compacted, games come that much more quickly, you’ve got to gear up back up again, you move onto the next one immediately.” The Denver Nuggets, hit hard by free agency with three of their players in China, face another difficult obstacle in the schedule. They play five games in six nights spanning the New Year’s weekend, including a home-and-away set with the Lakers on New Year’s Eve and New Year’s Day. The Nuggets do not host Carmelo Anthony, whom they traded to the Knicks last February. Deron Williams, sent from Utah to New Jersey days later, is scheduled to return to Salt Lake City on Jan. 14. Other quirks of the schedule include: • Toronto plays a franchise-record 19 games in 31 days in January, including five games in six days from Jan. 9 to Jan. 14. • Cleveland has its longest homestand ever, nine games from Feb. 8 to Feb. 28 — including a visit from LeBron James and the Heat on Feb. 17. • Philadelphia plays its first five games on the road, its longest season-opening trip ever. Miami will appear on ABC or ESPN 16 times, the most allowable, followed by 15 appearances apiece for the Lakers and Bulls. The Lakers and Celtics each appear a league-high 10 times on TNT. The regular season is scheduled to conclude April 26 and the playoffs will open two nights later. The last possible date of the NBA finals is June 26.

Blazers 2011-12 schedule Date

Opponent

Time

Philadelphia Sacramento Denver

7 p.m. 7 p.m. 7 p.m.

DECEMBER Mon. 26 Tue. 27 Thu. 29

JANUARY Sun. 1 Tue. 3 Thu. 5 Fri. 6 Sun. 8 Tue. 10 Wed. 11 Fri. 13 Sat. 14 Mon. 16 Wed. 18 Fri. 20 Sat. 21 Mon. 23 Tue. 24 Wed. 25 Fri. 27 Mon. 30

at L.A. Clippers at Oklahoma City L.A. Lakers at Phoenix Cleveland L.A. Clippers Orlando at San Antonio at Houston at New Orleans at Atlanta at Toronto at Detroit Sacramento Memphis at Golden State Phoenix at Utah

6:30 p.m. 5 p.m. 7:30 p.m. 7:30 p.m. 6 p.m. 7 p.m. 7 p.m. 5:30 p.m. 5 p.m. noon 5 p.m. 4 p.m. 4:30 p.m. 7 p.m. 7 p.m. 7:30 p.m. 7 p.m. 6 p.m.

Charlotte at Sacramento Denver at New Orleans at Dallas Washington at Golden State L.A. Clippers Atlanta at L.A. Lakers San Antonio at Denver

7 p.m. 7 p.m. 7 p.m. 5 p.m. 5:30 p.m. 7 p.m. 7 p.m. 7:30 p.m. 7 p.m. 7:30 p.m. 7 p.m. 6 p.m.

Miami Minnesota New Orleans at Minnesota at Boston at Washington at Indiana at New York at Chicago at Oklahoma City Milwaukee Memphis at L.A. Lakers Goldren State Oklahoma City New Orleans at L.A. Clippers

7:30 p.m. 7 p.m. 7 p.m. 5 p.m. 4:30 p.m. 4 p.m. 4 p.m. 4:30 p.m. 5 p.m. 6:30 p.m. 7 p.m. 7 p.m. 7:30 p.m. 6 p.m. 7 p.m. 7 p.m. 7:30 p.m.

Minnesota Utah New Jersey at Dallas at Milwaukee Houston Goldren State Dallas at Sacramento at Phoenix Utah at Memphis at San Antonio at Utah

6 p.m. 7 p.m. 7 p.m. 5:30 p.m. 5:30 p.m. 7 p.m. 7:30 p.m. 7:30 p.m. 3 p.m. 7 p.m. 7 p.m. 5 p.m. 5:30 p.m. 5 p.m.

FEBRUARY Wed. 1 Thu. 2 Sat. 4 Fri. 10 Sat. 11 Tue. 14 Wed. 15 Thu. 6 Sat. 18 Mon. 20 Tue. 21 Wed. 29

MARCH Thu. 1 Sat. 3 Mon. 5 Wed. 7 Fri. 9 Sat. 10 Tue. 13 Wed. 14 Fri. 16 Sun. 18 Tue. 20 Thu. 22 Fri. 23 Sun. 25 Tue. 27 Thu. 29 Fri. 30

APRIL Sun. 1 Mon. 2 Wed. 4 Fri. 6 Sat. 7 Mon. 9 Wed. 11 Fri. 13 Sun. 5 Mon. 16 Wed. 18 Sat. 21 Mon. 23 Thu. 26

COLLEGE BASKETBALL ROUNDUP SYRACUSE, N.Y. — Dion Waiters scored 15 points, Kris Joseph had 11 points and eight rebounds and Syracuse continued to win, this time outlasting Marshall. No. 4 North Carolina . . . . . . . .97 Evansville. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .48 CHAPEL HILL, N.C. — Harrison Barnes scored 17 points to help North Carolina beat Evansville. Reggie Bullock added 15 points off the bench for the Tar Heels (7-2). No. 10 Missouri. . . . . . . . . . . . .81 Villanova . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71 NEW YORK — Marcus Denmon had his second straight strong game from three-point range, this time making six and scoring 28 points in Missouri’s victory over Villanova in the Jimmy V Classic at Madison Square Garden. No. 15 Pittsburgh . . . . . . . . . . .97 VMI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70 PITTSBURGH — Ashton Gibbs scored 20 points and Pittsburgh rolled to its sixth straight win by beating VMI. No. 21 Memphis . . . . . . . . . . . .71 Miami . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .54 CORAL GABLES, Fla. —

Sophomore Will Barton had career highs of 27 points and 14 rebounds to help Memphis overcome a poor night of outside shooting against Miami. The Tigers went one for 12 from beyond the arc.

Winter golf The status of Central Oregon golf courses (excluding private courses). Those open through the winter could still close temporarily due to weather: Aspen Lakes Golf Course (Sisters): Open through winter Black Butte Ranch: Closed for winter Crooked River Ranch: Open through winter Desert Peaks Golf Club (Madras): Open through winter Eagle Crest Resort (Redmond): Challenge and Ridge courses open through winter; Resort Course closed for winter The Greens at Redmond: Open through winter Juniper Golf Course (Redmond): Open through winter* Kah-Nee-Ta Resort: Open through winter Lost Tracks Golf Club (Bend): Open through winter Meadow Lakes Golf Course (Prineville): Open through winter Missing Link Family Golf Center (Redmond): Open through winter Old Back Nine at Mountain High (Bend): Closed for winter Prineville Golf Club: Open through winter Pronghorn Club’s Nicklaus Course (Bend): Open Wednesdays through Sundays Quail Run Golf Course (La Pine): Closed for winter River’s Edge Golf Course (Bend): Open through winter Sunriver Resort: Closed for winter Tetherow Golf Club (Bend): Closed for winter Widgi Creek (Bend): Closed for winter *On temporary greens

in the four-person scramble. The weather is a draw, says Daniel Wendt, head pro at Brasada. “Add to it the tournament has a great beneficiary, Toys for Tots, and we’re in the season of giving, and the interest has been strong,” Wendt adds. Not that the run of mild weather will completely make up for business lost during a lackluster spring earlier this year. But unseasonable runs of playable weather do help those facilities that have not closed for the winter bring in revenue and allow members to get a bit more value for their annual fees. “We’ve put out over 95 players a couple of times in the last week,” says Ron Buerger, director of golf at Redmond’s Eagle Crest Resort. “Yes, it makes a difference, but it is also true the members (who have already paid their dues for the year) are enjoying the

good weather as well. It’s a blend.” The Greens at Redmond, an executive course that reportedly has been hosting about 40 or 50 rounds a day during the recent fair weather, has seen a similar mix of daily fee golfers and members playing. Those golfers who have yet to give up on the golf season have been rewarded during the last two weeks. Yet, it won’t last forever. Or, as The Greens head pro Craig Melott puts it, “The degree of crappiness in weather will drop these (player) numbers accordingly.” But for now, golfers get a few more swings in the sun. Says Bruce Wattenburger, head pro at Juniper Golf Course in Redmond: “I’m sure that Mt. Bachelor (ski area) is hoping for some snow, and us golfers are liking it the way it is.” — Reporter: 541-617-7868, zhall@ bendbulletin.com

GOLF SCOREBOARD The Bulletin welcomes contributions to its weekly local golf results listings and events calendar. Clearly legible items should be faxed to the sports department, 541-385-0831, e-mailed to sports@bendbulletin.com, or mailed to P.O. Box 6020; Bend, OR 97708.

Club Results CROOKED RIVER RANCH Men’s Golf Club, Nov. 29 Stroke Play A Flight — Gross: 1, Paul Nemitz, 74. 2, Jerry Harris, 76; 3, Monty Modrell, 76. 4, Dennis Glender, 77. Net: 1, George Mitchener, 61. 2, Scott Eberle, 63. 3, Art Crossley, 64. 4, Ron Fitzpatrick, 66. B Flight — Gross: 1 (tie), Jack Martin, 83; Tom Gilkey, 83. 3, Vene Dunham, 85. 4, Len Johnson, 87. Net: 1, Ken Nored, 57. 2 (tie), Carl Uhrich, 66; Ted Carlin, 66; Ron Meisner, 66. DESERT PEAKS Thursday Men’s Club, Dec. 1 Net Red, White & Blue 1, Ken Southwick, 67. 2 (tie), Val Paterson, 68; Dean Ditmore, 68; Joe Stanfield, 68. KP — Mike Funk. LD — Mike Funk, Dick Pliska. Sunday Group Play, Dec. 4 Blind Draw Gross: 1, Denny Story/Fred Blackman, 144. 2, Bob Ringering/Spud Gephart, 158. Net: 1, Clifford Reynolds/Denny Story, 132. 2, Mike Funk/Francisco Morales, 137. KP — Jim Wyzard. Long Drive — Francisco Morales.

Hole-In-One Report

Marquette beats Washington The Associated Press NEW YORK — Jae Crowder hit a three-pointer from the corner with 6.3 seconds to play and No. 11 Marquette beat Washington 79-77 in the Jimmy V Classic at Madison Square Garden on Tuesday night. Darius Johnson-Odom had 23 points to lead the Golden Eagles (8-0) in an up-anddown game that included 15 lead changes and four ties over the final 12 minutes. Crowder, who finished with 18 points, hit his only threepointer of the game in four attempts nine seconds after Terrence Ross had given the Huskies (4-3) a 77-76 lead with a nice move in the lane when he was closely guarded by two Marquette players. Washington had a chance at one more lead change but Abdul Gaddy’s long jumper at the buzzer was well off the mark. Ross had 19 points to lead the Huskies, who have lost three of four and will remain in New York to face No. 7 Duke on Saturday, also in Madison Square Garden. Also on Tuesday: No. 3 Syracuse . . . . . . . . . . . . .62 Marshall . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .56

Continued from D1 “It’s definitely better than it could be,” says Ryan Whitcomb, general manager at Bend’s Lost Tracks Golf Club. “It’s nothing crazy. We’re talking about 20, 30, 40 golfers a day.” A busy summer day might bring more than 200 golfers to the course, but a couple dozen golfers is not insignificant to the bottom lines of golf courses. Even golfers who prefer their golf in tournament form have options. The Club at Brasada Ranch, Meadow Lakes Golf Course in Prineville, and the Central Oregon Winter Series all have public tournaments scheduled for this weekend. At Meadow Lakes, tournament play this late in the year is a fixture on the calendar. The municipal golf course attempts to host its Christmas Goose golf tournament every December. But the holiday tourney has lost out to Mother Nature in recent winters, says Zach Lampert, assistant pro at Meadow Lakes. “The Goose has been cooked the past two years, canceled due to snow on the course,” says Lampert, adding that he expects a large field for this year’s tournament. “The last time we were able to play, 2008, we had to change the event to nine holes because of fresh snow that morning, and we had to wait for it to melt off. “We are definitely off to a great start for December,” Lampert adds. “In five days, we already have half as many golfers as we had in all of December 2010. November was also good for us, as rounds were up 12 percent over November 2010.” Like Meadow Lakes, Brasada expects a relatively high turnout of more than 50 golfers Saturday for its Toys for Tots fundraising golf tournament, which asks participants to pay $20 and bring two unwrapped toys to play

D5

Dec. 3 BRASADA RANCH Chuck Griffin, Powell Butte No. 4. . . . . . . . . . . . 175 yards . . . . . . . . . .6-iron Dec. 6 THE GREENS AT REDMOND John Lyon, Bend No. 13. . . . . . . . . . . 120 yards . . . . . . . . .9-wood

Calendar The Bulletin welcomes contributions to its weekly local golf events calendar. Items should be mailed to P.O. Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708; faxed to the sports department at 541-385-0831; or e-mailed to sports@ bendbulletin.com. ———

TOURNAMENTS Dec. 9 — Central Oregon Winter Series betterball tournament at Eagle Crest Resort in Redmond. Two-person teams with no more than one professional allowed per team. Cost is $30 for professionals, $50 for amateurs. Cost includes gross and net skins competitions. Cart costs extra. All players must sign up by noon on the Thursday before the event. To register or for more information, call Pat Huffer, head pro at Crooked River Ranch, at 541-923-6343 or email him at crrpat@crookedriverranch.com. Dec. 10 — Toys for Tots golf tournament at the Club at Brasada Ranch. Four-person scramble begins with an 11 a.m. shotgun start. Cost is $20 plus two new unwrapped toys per person. Deadline to register is Friday at 4 p.m. For more information or to register, call Brasada Ranch at 541-526-6380 or email event coordinator Dan Wendt at danielw@brasada.com. Dec. 10 — Christmas Goose Golf Tournament at Meadow Lakes Golf Course in Prineville. Alternate shot tournament is for two person-teams and tees off with an 10 a.m. shotgun start. To register or for more information, call the Meadow Lakes golf shop at 541-447-7113. Jan. 13 — Central Oregon Winter Series shamble at Kah-Nee-Ta High Desert Resort & Casino near Warm Springs. Two-person teams with no more than one professional allowed per team. Cost is $30 for professionals, $50 for amateurs. Cost includes gross and net skins competitions. Cart costs extra. All players must sign up by noon on the Thursday before the event. To register or for more information, call Pat Huffer, head pro at Crooked River Ranch, at 541-923-6343 or e-mail him at crrpat@crookedriverranch.com. Feb. 3 — Central Oregon Winter Series triple six tournament at Meadow Lakes Golf Course in Prineville. Two-person teams with no more than one professional allowed per team. Cost is $30 for professionals, $50 for amateurs. Cost includes gross and net skins compeitions. Cart costs extra. All players must sign up by noon on the Thursday before the event. To register or for more information, call Pat Huffer, head pro at Crooked River Ranch, at 541-923-6343 or email him at crrpat@crookedriverranch.com. Feb. 5 — Super Bowl Scramble at Meadow Lakes Golf Course in Prineville is a four-person scramble. Event tees off with a 10 a.m. shotgun start. For more information or to register, call the Meadow Lakes pro shop at 541-447-7113. Feb. 24 — Central Oregon Winter Series better ball at Crooked River Ranch. Two-person teams with no more than one professional allowed per team. Cost is $30 for professionals, $50 for amateurs. Cost includes gross and net skins compeitions. Cart costs extra. All players must sign up by noon on the Thursday before the event. To register or for more information, call Pat Huffer, head pro at Crooked River Ranch, at 541-923-6343 or e-mail him at crrpat@ crookedriverranch.com.

Professional PGA Tour 2012 Ryder Cup Points At Medinah Country Club Medinah, Ill. Sept. 28-30, 2012 Through Dec. 5 United States 1. Keegan Bradley 1,445.000 2. Jason Dufner 865.000 3. Phil Mickelson 847.143 4. Dustin Johnson 802.992 5. Steve Stricker 541.075 6. Ryan Palmer 441.591 7. David Toms 401.400 8. Bo Van Pelt 390.088 9. Robert Garrigus 379.991 10. Kevin Chappell 364.241 11. Rickie Fowler 347.405 12. Davis Love III 346.166 13. Scott Verplank 331.000 14. Tiger Woods 330.667 15. Gary Woodland 326.775 Europe Through Dec. 6 European Points 1. Martin Kaymer 1,179,368.79 2. Rory McIlroy 1,131,144.51 3. Gonzalo Fernandez-Castano 1,051,976.58 4. Sergio Garcia 833,330.00 5. Michael Hoey 691,859.17 6. Joost Luiten 646,370.95 7. Graeme McDowell 573,999.24 8. Richie Ramsay 523,511.85 9. Miguel Angel Jimenez 506,790.78 10. Gregory Havret 498,315.04 World Points 1. Rory McIlroy 131.08 2. Luke Donald 107.16 3. Martin Kaymer 103.85 4. Gonzalo Fernandez-Castano 90.27 5. Justin Rose 81.46 6. Sergio Garcia 71.93 7. Lee Westwood 64.05 8. Graeme McDowell 63.82 9. Joost Luiten 63.79 10. Simon Dyson 62.79

541-322-CARE At The Center


D6

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2011

T EE T O GR EEN

GW

CENTRAL OREGON COURSE UPDATE

Meadow Lakes Golf Course By Zack Hall The Bulletin

The Bulletin continues a weekly Tee To Green feature in which we check in via email with golf professionals at Central Oregon courses for an offseason update. This week we contacted Alan Hoover, general manager at Meadow Lakes Golf Course in Prineville. Hoover took over at Meadow Lakes in June for Lee Roberts, who retired this past spring after spending nine years at Prineville’s municipal golf course. The 50-year-old Hoover comes to Central Oregon from Colorado, where he spent a year as the head pro at Harvard Gulch Golf Course, a municipal facility in Denver. And it won’t take long for Hoover — a Portland native who grew up in Seattle — to make his mark at Meadow Lakes, which has some significant changes in store for 2012. This is what he had to say about the current business of golf and about his new home course:

Q:

How was business in 2011?

Meadow Lakes Golf Course Number of holes: 18 Status: Open year-round, weather permitting Location: 300 S.W. Meadow Lakes Drive, Prineville Tee times: 541-447-7113 Course stats: Par 72, 6,731 yards Head golf professional: Alan Hoover Course designer: Bill Robinson (1993) Extras: Putting green, driving range, restaurant, pro shop Website: www.meadowlakesgc.com

A:

It was down most of the year, but it is improving.

Q: A:

Were any changes of note made to the facility during the last year? Several bunkers were eliminated and the majority of the trees have been trimmed up, improving shot values throughout the course. Windmills were added to aerify the ponds (Meadow Lakes doubles as a wastewater treatment facility), which help to eliminate the odor that they sometimes produced. The junior golf program was overhauled to be more year-round and to get kids out on the course more

during instruction. We also started our Baby Birdies program for kids ages 2 through 6. We also created the Family Association, where families could play golf during the early evening for $10 per person and play in family golf tournaments.

Q:

Are any changes and/ or improvements to the facility scheduled for 2012? The entire facility will be getting a face-lift inside and out including the golf shop, dining room, bar, and banquet room. Changes will be made to the restaurant menu. On the course, three new forward tees and a

A:

European Tour

championship tee are scheduled for construction. The driving range will be reconfigured with more targets and better sight lines. We also look forward to hosting more special events for the community.

Q:

Has the Central Oregon golf industry started to bounce back from the economic struggles that have gripped the region since 2007? I’ve only been here since June so I don’t know if I’m a qualified spokesperson, but I’d be hard-pressed to say the industry has bounced back anywhere.

A:

Q: A:

What more can be done to bring new golfers to the course? Every golf industry trade magazine has different success stories and suggestions that cover a wide range of options to consider. Here in Prineville we have one of the best golf values in Central Oregon, but we all still need the economy to make an upturn. — Reporter: 541-617-7868, zhall@ bendbulletin.com

DUBAI WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP Site: Dubai, United Arab Emirates. Schedule: Thursday-Sunday. Course: Jumeirah Golf Estates, Earth Course (7,675 yards, par 72). Purse: $7.5 million. Winner’s share: $1.25 million. Television: Golf Channel (Thursday, midnight-4 a.m., 7 a.m.-noon, 3:30-8:30 p.m.; Friday, midnight-5 a.m., 7 a.m.-noon, 3:30-5:30 p.m.; Saturday-Sunday, noon-5 a.m., 7 a.m.-noon, 3:306:30 p.m.). Last year: Sweden’s Robert Karlsson won the season-ending event, beating Ian Poulter with a birdie on the second extra hole after Poulter’s bizarre marking blunder. Poulter was given a onestroke penalty for dropping his ball on his marker on the green, causing the marker to flip over and move from its original position. Last week: Rory McIlroy rallied to win the Hong Kong Open. Notes: Top-ranked Luke Donald is trying to become the first player to sweep the PGA Tour and European money titles. Donald has earned $5,156,965 — $1,056,144 more than second-place McIlroy. If McIlroy wins the tournament, Donald needs only to tie for ninth with one player to take the money title. The money champion will earn $1.5 million from the $7.5 million bonus pool.

PGA Tour PGA TOUR COMMENTARY

FRANKLIN TEMPLETON

SHOOTOUT Site: Naples, Fla. Schedule: Friday-Sunday. Course: Ritz-Carlton Golf Resort, Tiburon Golf Club (7,288 yards, par 72). Purse: $3 million. Winners’ shares: $375,000 each. Television: Golf Channel (Friday, noon-3 p.m., 5:30-8:30 p.m., 9 p.m.-midnight; Saturday, 6:308:30 p.m.; Sunday, 6:30-8:30 p.m.) and NBC (Saturday, 11:30 a.m.1:30 p.m.; Sunday, noon-3 p.m.). Format: Two-player teams. Friday, modified alternate shot; Saturday, best ball; Sunday, scramble. Teams: Greg Norman-Fredrik Jacobson, Jerry Kelly-Steve Stricker, Keegan Bradley-Brendan Steele, Charles Howell III-Justin Leonard, Rickie Fowler-Camilo Villegas, Anthony Kim-Webb Simpson, Stewart Cink-Bo Van Pelt, Jason Dufner-Sean O’Hair, Chad Campbell-Chris DiMarco, Rory Sabbatini-Jhonattan Vegas, Mark Calcavecchia-Nick Price, J.B. Holmes-Kenny Perry. Last year: Dustin Johnson and Ian Poulter closed with a 13-under 59 in the scramble format to beat Darren Clarke and Graeme McDowell by two strokes. Last week: Tiger Woods won the Chevron World Challenge for his first victory since the Australian Masters in November 2009. Notes: Norman, the tournament host, designed the 36-hole Tiburon (“shark” in Spanish) facility. ——— All Times PST

Woods’ quiet win could produce a big echo for 2012 tour season “I’m sure he thinks he can get back there,” he added a moment later. “I wouldn’t doubt if he did.”

JIM LITKE

Jim Litke is a national sports columnist for The Associated Press. Write to him at jlitke@ ap.org. Follow him at http:// Twitter.com/JimLitke.

N

o one knows what this one means, least of all Tiger Woods. A win at the Chevron World Challenge doesn’t provide much in the way of bragging rights. It’s not an official PGA Tour event, the field is limited to 18 players and it wraps up in the middle of an NFL Sunday, when most golf fans are paying closer attention to first downs than fairways hit. But after more than two years and 26 tournaments without a win of any kind, Woods isn’t about to hand this one back. “It feels great,” he said afterward. “It’s kind of hard for me to elaborate beyond that.” Here’s why: Woods won’t play tournament golf again until the end of January, when any momentum from the birdie-birdie finish he dropped on Zach Johnson to seal the deal will be little more than a fading memory. Ditto for the sometimes-sparkling golf Woods has played for nearly a month now, including nine of 11 rounds in the 60s and a handful of shots that no other golfer in the world could have pulled off. But if there’s a takeaway from any of that, it’s this: For the first time in a long time, there was a feeling of inevitability about Woods’ final putt on the 18th green at Sherwood Country Club. It was only 6 feet, but it was also straight downhill, the way our expectations for Woods have been trending for some time now. Yet the second after the ball disappeared into the cup, an NBC camera cut to Johnson flashing his caddie a grin that suggested, “I can’t do anything about that” before walking across the green to shake hands. “In this game, I’m never surprised with the way the guys are able to execute and hit shots,” said Johnson, a former Masters champion. “I think he would be the epitome of that example. ... I mean, he’s the most experienced and the best player I’ve ever played with. In every situation, he knows how to execute and win.” Or did — until that fateful crash-filled, post-Thanksgiving ride down the driveway of his Florida mansion two years ago cost Woods his marriage, his reputation, a handful of big-buck sponsors and his uncanny ability to produce magical shots time and again in the most pressure-packed situations. That 6-footer on Sunday won’t be cherished,

$ Danny Moloshok / The Associated Press

the distractions of his divorce and a string of injuries left Woods little time to work on his game. He left swing coach Hank Haney for Sean Foley, cut caddie Steve Williams and hired Joe LaCava, but the biggest change over the winless streak was how little Woods actually played. Beginning with the Fry’s Open last month, then on through some exhibitions, the Australian Open, Presidents Cup and now the Chevron, Woods has hit more golf balls than at any time in the past year. In the wind at Royal Melbourne, he hit a half-dozen shots that made you gasp — among them a 3-wood that was head-high and traveled 280 yards before coming to a stop 12 feet from the pin — and if not for a bogey-bogey-bogey start to the third round, Woods might have won that tournament, too. The old Tiger might have said exactly that, but the one who’s out there now wouldn’t dare. The closest thing to an old “I told you so” that Woods mustered was a tweet asking, “who’s up for some ll cool j?” that linked to a video of the rapper’s 1991 hit “Mama Said Knock You Out.” The song’s well-known first line warns, “Don’t call it a comeback. I’ve been here for years.” Just not in the winner’s circle for the last two. All of a sudden, though, the guys Woods will be facing again come the start of next season won’t be surprised to find him there again. “I don’t know if he’ll ever get to where he was before, because he was so dominant. Sure, he’ll have good stretches again and play some tremendous stretches again,” Stricker said. “I don’t know if we’ll ever see that again from anybody.

19

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Tiger Woods waves his cap after winning the Chevron World Challenge golf tournament at Sherwood Country Club Sunday in Thousand Oaks, Calif.

let alone remembered, the way any of the dozens that locked up major championships will be, and a few of his fellow golfers went so far as to make that same point on Twitter. Not that Woods needed humbling, not after 18 months as the butt of countless late-night TV jokes and two-plus years without a win. “They all feel good, you know. They’re not easy,” he said. “People don’t realize how hard it is to win golf tournaments. I’ve gone on streaks where I’ve won golf tournaments in a row, but still, each one, I don’t think I’ve taken it for granted. “And I know,” Woods added, “because of how hard it is.” In case he needed reminding, No. 2 Rory McIlroy won the Hong Kong Open and No. 3 Lee Westwood won the Nedbank Challenge in South Africa the same day. But the funny thing is that the Chevron, which Woods hosts to benefit his foundation, actually had more players ranked in the top 25 than either: 11 total, compared to just three in Hong King and six in South Africa. And a few of those golfers saw enough to suggest that after so many false starts, Woods may actually be — as he never tires of saying — putting it all together. “I figured someday he’d let all this stuff get past and rededicate himself,” said Steve Stricker. “When somebody goes in the tank, you need to have that work ethic to get yourself off the bottom. We all know he works extremely hard when he wants to. He’s finally getting his mind clear and wants to work at it a lot.” Though no one discussed it and few people were in a position to actually know, there was plenty to suggest that

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SAVVYSHOPPER

E

TV & Movies, E2 Dear Abby, E3 Comics, E4 Puzzles, E5

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2011

www.bendbulletin.com/savvyshopper

IN BRIEF Christmas trees available online If the busy holiday season isn’t leaving you time to get into the forest or out to the tree lots popping up around Central Oregon, there is now a direct-to-yourdoor way to get a real Christmas tree. Costco, Target and Sears are all selling freshly cut trees on their websites, offering doorstep delivery. The prices are higher than you’ll find at tree lots around town. But retailers’ sites promise top quality. Costco.com says through Dec. 18, consumers can buy a 6½- to 7-foot Fraser fir starting at $119.99. Three sizes of trees are available. Target. com Fraser firs start at $74.99 for a 4½- to 5-foot tree and come in five sizes, according to the website. A 7½to 8-foot Fraser fir is available from Sears for $159.99, according to Sears.com. All three retailers say their trees come with a biodegradable bag for disposal. Contact: www.costco .com; www.target.com; www.sears.com.

Tony Cenicola New York Times News Service

Among the year’s many samples, several beauty products rise above the rest for gift ideas.

TUX

New York Times News Service

As the Beauty Spots columnist, I receive an overwhelming number of samples. Although many items end up in shopping bags under my desk or donated to charity, I make an earnest attempt to try as many eye creams, lip glosses and nail polishes as possible. Life is tough, I know. As I dabbled, smeared, buffed and scribbled this year, I grew quite fond of (and in some cases, dependent on) a number of products, listed below. Each one would make an excellent stocking stuffer.

By Greg Morago Houston Chronicle

This year for the holidays, more merchants are offering free shipping for items purchased online with no minimum for dollars spent. For techies, Best Buy will ship any product for free until Dec. 27. The offer requires no minimum order value. Apple is also providing free shipping for online purchases, through Dec. 22. The company normally requires a minimum $50 purchase. Other retailers tempting online shoppers with free shipping include L.L. Bean, Nordstrom and Nine West. Numerous retailers continue to offer free shipping with a minimum dollar amount purchased. Contact: www.free shipping.org

ome menswear histories trace the introduction of the tuxedo to a natty gent who, frustrated by tails that interfered with his dancing, wore a tailless dress coat to New York’s Tuxedo Park resort’s Autumn Ball in 1886. This is the 125th anniversary of the tux — the most dashing apparel by far in a man’s wardrobe. But there’s the rub: Most guys rent them. Isn’t it about time you owned your own tux? It’s an investment that will keep giving, says men’s fashion arbiter Tom Julian, author of “Nordstrom Guide to Men’s Style” and “Nordstrom Guide to Men’s Everyday Dressing.” A good, single-breasted tux “is the best investment to make,” said Julian, president of the brand-consulting firm Tom Julian Group.

S

Skin care Dior Capture Totale One Essential Skin Boosting Super Serum This smooth, pearly potion features 21 purportedly detoxifying and anti-aging ingredients, including detoxinyle (an algae extract) and the plant extract alpha longoza. It goes on like silk ($95, Dior counters). See Beauty / E6

Julian’s tips for tuxes • When choosing a tux, look for trousers (never cuffed) that are slimmer and sport a higher waist than normal suit pants, which offers a proportion better suited for a tux jacket, formal shirt and cummerbund. • Stay away from synthetic materials — go with Super 100 wools. See Tux / E3

Deadlines approach for shipping gifts

— Heidi Hagemeier, The Bulletin

By Hilary Howard

TIPS

Shipping free for online purchases

Mark a few dates on your calendar if you’re shipping gifts to friends and family afar. By today, the U.S. Postal Service advises customers to get international shipping under way for delivery by Christmas, according to the Postal Service website. Of course, the Postal Service can’t control what happens to the parcel once it leaves the country. For guaranteed domestic delivery by the 25th for Parcel Post, the Postal Service offers a Dec. 15 deadline. Firstclass mail should be off by Dec. 20, Priority Mail by Dec. 21 and Express Mail by Dec. 22. Priority and Express mail will cost customers more than Parcel Post. The Postal Service’s website lists more specific dates for international packages depending on where they are traveling — the date recommended for Europe is Friday while Africa’s date was last week — and for deadlines for shipping parcels to military locations. Contact: www.usps .com/holiday

For gifts, a crop of the creams

Bazaars prep you for the holiday

Thinkstock

The following is a list of holiday bazaars for the upcoming week. A new list of upcoming bazaars will publish every Wednesday. To submit a bazaar that has not already appeared, send your information to communitylife@bendbulletin. com or mail it to The Bulletin, Holiday Bazaars, P.O. Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708. The deadline is a week before each Wednesday’s publication. Contact: 541-383-0351. Admission to bazaars is free unless otherwise noted.

THURSDAY

Giving holiday cards still a cherished tradition By Robin McMacken Cox Newspapers

New York Times News Service

There are even smartphone apps to create and mail personalized holiday cards.

DAYTON, Ohio — Some holiday traditions will grandly withstand the dismal economy this year and remain firmly on shoppers’ minds and to-do lists. The holiday greeting card is just as important in 2011 as it has been in more financially robust times, according to designers and retailers. After all, as Joe Bohardt, of Oakwood, Ohio, points out, a beautiful holiday card is a gift in itself. “A handwritten note or a holiday greeting card is a gift because you have taken the

time out of your busy day to send a nice message,” he said. “I think people definitely still want to send holiday cards,” added Jenna Yee, coowner of Pink Ink Design Group in Glendale, Ohio. Christmas is the largest cardsending holiday in the U.S., with approximately 1.5 billion cards sent annually, according to Hallmark Cards Inc. But card senders are keeping costs down this year by keeping things elegantly simple. “We have seen a shift from highly embellished cards — with layers of crystal, ribbon and vellum — to more simple

designs on good paper,” Yee says. Another way shoppers are staying within budget this year is by sending postcards, which are not only cheaper to produce, but also to mail. “I love the look of an envelope, but I hate the waste of it. Postcards are a totally green approach.”

Photos fashionable More and more people are opting for digital photo cards, which carry a wonderful personal touch, according to Bohardt. See Cards / E6

CROOKED RIVER ELEMENTARY CHRISTMAS BAZAAR: Ornaments and baked goods; 5-7 p.m.; Crooked River Elementary School, 640-641 N.E. Third St., Prineville; 541-420-2920.

FRIDAY LA PINE CHRISTMAS BAZAAR: Crafts, baked goods, gifts, photos with Santa and more; donation of nonperishable food requested; 11 a.m.-7 p.m.; La Pine Event Center, 16405 First St.; www.lapinefrontierdays.org or 541-536-7821. SWEETGRASS LANE COUNTRY CHRISTMAS: Jewelry, art and handmade gifts; 11 a.m.-3 p.m.; 60121 Sweetgrass Lane, Bend; 541-383-9053.

See Bazaars / E3


E2

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2011

TV & M Jo ub erts share vulnerability of species during ‘Big Cat Week’ TV SPOTLIGHT By Luaine Lee McClatchy-Tribune News Service

BEVERLY HILLS, Calif. — When we think of endangered species we think of the red wolf, the black rhinoceros or even the short-haired chinchilla — if we think of them at all. But people rarely consider the big cats. Nat Geo Wild will chronicle some of these lithe predators when it plays its own game of Hello, Kitty with “Big Cat Week,� beginning Sunday. One of the featured films will be “The Last Lions� by Dereck and Beverly Joubert, wildlife photographers and researchers who’ve been stalking the stalkers for 30 years. “One of the alarming things for us, which was the sort of genesis of this film and this ‘Big Cat Week,’ actually, is that we discovered that in our lifetimes, lion numbers have dropped from 450,000 down to 20,000, and the leopard numbers are from 700,000 down to 50,000,� said Dereck Joubert. It’s hard to believe, but more tigers are living in captivity today than in the wild. “And by that sort of extension of curve, you will imagine these big cats to be extinct within the next 10 or 15 years,� he said. The Jouberts were born in South Africa, but say they moved to Botswana because they “needed to go out into the real Africa. ... I thought that the big cats would lead us into a greater understanding of the rest of Africa, and then we kind of got stuck there,� said Dereck. Why the big cats? Why not apes or crocodiles or prairie dogs? “They really are the

Courtesy National Geographic Channel

Three lions are part of the documentary “The Last Lions,� airing on Nat Geo Wild on Dec. 16 as part of “Big Cat Week.�

iconic species in Africa,� said Beverly Joubert. “Without saving the apex predator, we’re going to lose vast tracts of land. If the apex predator is taken out of the system, the whole system will collapse. But also, man will move into the system, and man will eventually take every single animal out of there as bush meat. So we ultimately need to keep the apex predators alive so that we’ve got corridors for elephants, for antelope, and the tiny little dung beetles. It is vitally important.� Part of the “Big Cats Week� is the National Geographic’s Big Cats Initiative, a longterm commitment to staunch the decline of these denizens of the wild. While cheetahs have disappeared from more than 75 percent of their range, the cheetah story offers a glimmer of hope, says Dereck Joubert. “Cheetahs today came out of a genetic bottleneck

of about 200 individuals and then grew back up to about 45,000 to 50,000. Today they’re down around 12,000. But the fact that you can actually recover a species is what gives us so much hope, and we think that we can do exactly the same with lions and leopards.� The Jouberts spend days on end watching wildlife do its thing. They see the animals prosper and perish. Sometimes it’s hard to watch and not intervene, says Beverly. “It’s heart-wrenching. On a daily basis it’s heart-wrenching. So I don’t know if we’ve got a certain personality. We have a concern of looking at the bigger picture and wanting to protect wildlife in general. And so it is wrong of us to believe that we are going to play God with nature. This has been happening for millions of years. What we’re trying to do is show how unique and how similar, actually, wildlife is to us by doing that (observing) — and not interfering — even though it is heart-wrenching. Often Dereck and I will say that we’re more emotionally drained than physically drained even though we’re working 16 to 18 hours a day.� The two-hour premiere of “The Last Lions� airs Dec. 16.

L M T FOR WEDNESDAY, DEC. 7

BEND Regal Pilot Butte 6 2717 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend, 541-382-6347

ANONYMOUS (PG-13) 6 THE IDES OF MARCH (R) 3:40, 6:50 MIDNIGHT IN PARIS (PG-13) 3:10, 6:30 MONEYBALL (PG-13) 3:30, 6:20 THE SKIN I LIVE IN (R) 3:20 TAKE SHELTER (R) 3, 6:10 THE TWILIGHT SAGA: BREAKING DAWN — PART 1 (PG-13) 3:50, 6:40

Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX

PUSS IN BOOTS 3-D (PG) 9:05 TOWER HEIST (PG-13) 12:45, 4:15, 7:25, 9:55 THE TWILIGHT SAGA: BREAKING DAWN — PART 1 (PG-13) 12:10, 1:10, 3:15, 6:30, 9:35

McMenamins Old St. Francis School

EDITOR’S NOTES: • Open-captioned showtimes are bold. • There may be an additional fee for 3-D movies. • IMAX films are $15. MARGIN CALL (R) 6:45 THE TWILIGHT SAGA: BREAKING DAWN — PART 1 (PG-13) 6:30

700 N.W. Bond St., Bend, 541-330-8562

DOLPHIN TALE (PG-13) 3 DRIVE (R) 9 THE THREE MUSKETEERS (PG-13) 6 After 7 p.m., shows are 21 and older only. Younger than 21 may attend screenings before 7 p.m. if accompanied by a legal guardian.

MADRAS Madras Cinema 5 1101 S.W. U.S. Highway 97, Madras, 541-475-3505

ARTHUR CHRISTMAS (PG) 5:10, 7:20 HAPPY FEET TWO 3-D (PG) 5, 7:30

REDMOND

JACK AND JILL (PG) 6:50

680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend, 541-382-6347

Redmond Cinemas

ARTHUR CHRISTMAS (PG) 12:20, 3:30, 6:45, 9:15 ARTHUR CHRISTMAS 3-D (PG) 12:50, 4:25, 7:15, 9:45 HAPPY FEET TWO IMAX (PG) 1, 4:40, 7:35, 10:05 HAPPY FEET TWO (PG) 12:30, 3:45, 7, 9:30 HUGO (PG) 12:05, 3:10, 6:20, 9:10 HUGO 3-D (PG) 12:35, 3:55, 7:10, 10 IMMORTALS (R) 12:40, 7:20 IMMORTALS 3-D (R) 4:05, 9:50 IN TIME (PG-13) 12:55, 4:30, 7:05, 9:40 J. EDGAR (R) Noon, 3:05, 6:15, 9:20 JACK AND JILL (PG) 1:05, 4:45, 7:45, 10:05 THE METROPOLITAN OPERA: SATYAGRAHA (no MPAA rating) 6:30 THE MUPPETS (PG) 12:15, 1:15, 3:20, 5, 6:35, 7:40, 9:10 PUSS IN BOOTS (PG) 12:25, 3:35, 6:50

THE MUPPETS (PG) 4:50, 7:10

1535 S.W. Odem Medo Road, Redmond, 541-548-8777

PUSS IN BOOTS (PG) 4:35

HAPPY FEET TWO (PG) 4:30, 6:45 THE MUPPETS (PG) 4:15, 6:30 PUSS IN BOOTS (PG) 4:45, 7 THE TWILIGHT SAGA: BREAKING DAWN — PART 1 (PG-13) 3:30, 6:30

THE TWILIGHT SAGA: BREAKING DAWN — PART 1 (PG-13) 4:30, 7

PRINEVILLE Pine Theater 214 N. Main St., Prineville, 541-416-1014

SISTERS

ARTHUR CHRISTMAS (PG) 4, 7

Sisters Movie House

THE TWILIGHT SAGA: BREAKING DAWN — PART 1 (UPSTAIRS — PG-13) 6

720 Desperado Court, Sisters, 541-549-8800

ARTHUR CHRISTMAS (PG) 6:15 J. EDGAR (R) 6:15

Pine Theater’s upstairs screening room has limited accessibility.

get a room

Local Service. Local Knowledge. 541-848-4444 1000 SW Disk Dr. • Bend www.highdesertbank.com

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BD PM SR L ^ KATU KTVZ % % % % KBNZ & KOHD ) ) ) ) KFXO * ` ` ` KOAB _ # _ # ( KGW KTVZDT2 , _ # / OPBPL 175 173

5:00 KATU News News News KEZI 9 News The Simpsons Electric Comp. News That ’70s Show Caprial-Friends

5:30 World News Nightly News Evening News World News The Simpsons Fetch! With Ruff Nightly News That ’70s Show Cook’s Country

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Jeopardy! ‘G’ Wheel Fortune Jeopardy! ‘G’ Wheel Fortune How I Met 30 Rock ’ ‘14’ Entertainment The Insider ‘PG’ Big Bang Big Bang PBS NewsHour (N) ’ Ă… Live at 7 Ă… Inside Edition Seinfeld ‘PG’ Seinfeld ‘PG’ Doc Martin Dry Your Tears ‘PG’

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The Middle ‘PG’ Suburgatory (N) Modern Family Happy Endings Revenge Loyalty (N) ‘PG’ Ă… Up All Night ’ Up All Night ’ Harry’s Law Purple Hearts ‘PG’ Law & Order: SVU Survivor: South Pacific (N) Ă… Criminal Minds (N) ’ ‘14’ CSI: Crime Scene Investigation The Middle ‘PG’ Suburgatory (N) Modern Family Happy Endings Revenge Loyalty (N) ‘PG’ Ă… The X Factor The remaining finalists perform. ‘14’ Teen. Daughter News TMZ (N) ’ ‘PG’ Journey of the Universe ’ ‘G’ Ă… The Mystery of Chaco Canyon ’ ‘G’ Ă… Up All Night ’ Up All Night ’ Harry’s Law Purple Hearts ‘PG’ Law & Order: SVU America’s Next Top Model ‘PG’ America’s Next Top Model ‘PG’ Cops ‘14’ Ă… ’Til Death ‘PG’ Adventures of Sherlock Holmes World News Tavis Smiley Charlie Rose (N) ’ Ă…

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The First 48 ‘14’ Ă… Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Lady Hoggers Lady Hoggers Lady Hoggers Lady Hoggers 130 28 18 32 The First 48 ‘14’ Ă… ››› “Silveradoâ€? (1985, Western) Kevin Kline, Scott Glenn, Kevin Costner. Old West drifters shoot it out with sheriff, ›› “A Christmas Carolâ€? (1984, Fantasy) George C. Scott, Angela Pleasence, Edward Woodward. ›› “A Christmas Carolâ€? (1984, Fantasy) George C. Scott, 102 40 39 clan. Ă… Christmas Eve spiritual visitations enlighten an old miser. ‘G’ Ă… Angela Pleasence. ‘G’ Ă… River Monsters: Unhooked ‘PG’ River Monsters: Unhooked ‘PG’ River Monsters: Unhooked ‘PG’ River Monsters: Unhooked ‘PG’ River Monsters: The Lost Reels River Monsters: Unhooked ‘PG’ 68 50 26 38 River Monsters: Unhooked ‘PG’ The Millionaire Matchmaker ‘14’ The Millionaire Matchmaker ‘14’ The Real Housewives of Atlanta Top Chef: Texas ‘14’ Work of Art: Great Artist Top Chef: Texas Higher Steaks (11:01) Top Chef: Texas 137 44 (5:40) World’s Strictest Parents The Carrolls ‘14’ (6:50) World’s Strictest Parents ›› “Because of Winn-Dixieâ€? (2005) AnnaSophia Robb, Jeff Daniels. Premiere. ’ ›› “Because of Winn-Dixieâ€? (2005, Drama) ’ 190 32 42 53 Strict Parents The Coffee Addiction American Greed Arthur Nadel Mad Money BMW: A Driving Obsession American Greed Arthur Nadel Get Rich Now! 21st Century 51 36 40 52 Target: Inside the Bullseye Piers Morgan Tonight (N) Anderson Cooper 360 Ă… Erin Burnett OutFront Piers Morgan Tonight Anderson Cooper 360 Ă… Anderson Cooper 360 Ă… 52 38 35 48 Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Ă… South Park ‘14’ Daily Show Colbert Report 30 Rock ’ ‘14’ 30 Rock ’ ‘14’ Chappelle Show Chappelle Show South Park ‘MA’ South Park ‘MA’ South Park ‘MA’ South Park ‘MA’ Daily Show Colbert Report 135 53 135 47 Always Sunny Dept./Trans. City Edition Bend City Council Work Session Bend City Council Get Outdoors Visions of NW The Yoga Show The Yoga Show Talk of the Town Local issues. 11 Capitol Hill Hearings 58 20 12 11 Capitol Hill Hearings Good-Charlie Shake It Up! ‘G’ Good-Charlie A.N.T. Farm ‘G’ Jessie ‘G’ Ă… So Random! ‘G’ “The Ultimate Christmas Presentâ€? (2000) ’ ‘G’ A.N.T. Farm ‘G’ Jessie ‘G’ Ă… So Random! ‘G’ Good-Charlie 87 43 14 39 Good-Charlie Sons of Guns ’ ‘14’ Ă… Sons of Guns ’ ‘14’ Ă… Sons of Guns ’ ‘14’ Ă… Sons of Guns (N) ’ ‘14’ Ă… Moonshiners (N) ’ ‘14’ Ă… Sons of Guns ’ ‘14’ Ă… 156 21 16 37 Sons of Guns ’ ‘14’ Ă… Kourtney & Kim Take New York Kourtney & Kim Take New York E! News (N) Sex & the City Sex & the City Kourtney & Kim Take New York The Soup ‘14’ After Lately ‘14’ Chelsea Lately E! News 136 25 College Basketball Xavier at Butler (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) (Live) ‘14’ Ă… SportsCenter (N) (Live) ‘14’ Ă… SportsCenter (N) (Live) ‘14’ Ă… SportsCenter (N) (Live) ‘14’ Ă… 21 23 22 23 College Basketball College Basketball St. Bonaventure at Illinois (N) (Live) NFL Live (N) Ă… Baseball Ton. SportsNation NFL’s Greatest Games From Jan. 20, 2008. (N) 22 24 21 24 College Basketball Stories of... (N) Stories of... White Shadow Ă… Boxing: 1991 Cooper vs. Holyfield Stories of... Stories of... College Football From Sept. 25, 2010. (N) 23 25 123 25 Bay City Blues Ă… SportsCenter (N) (Live) ‘14’ Ă… SportsCenter (N) (Live) ‘14’ Ă… SportsCenter H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. 24 63 124 203 SportsCenter (N) (Live) ‘14’ Ă… ›› “National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacationâ€? (1989) Premiere. The 700 Club (N) ‘G’ Ă… 67 29 19 41 That ’70s Show That ’70s Show Pink Christmas ›› “Home Alone 2: Lost in New Yorkâ€? (1992, Comedy) Macaulay Culkin, Joe Pesci. Hannity (N) On Record, Greta Van Susteren The O’Reilly Factor Ă… Hannity On Record, Greta Van Susteren The Five 54 61 36 50 The O’Reilly Factor (N) Ă… Best Dishes Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Restaurant: Impossible Restaurant: Impossible Restaurant: Impossible Restaurant: Impossible The Next Iron Chef: Super Chefs 177 62 98 44 Best Dishes “Night-Smithsonianâ€? Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Two/Half Men ›› “Armoredâ€? (2009, Suspense) Matt Dillon, Jean Reno. Premiere. American Horror Story (N) ‘MA’ (11:01) American Horror Story 131 Income Prop. Income Prop. Income Prop. Hunters Int’l House Hunters House Hunters Hunters Int’l Income Prop. Kitchen Cousins Property Brothers (N) ‘G’ Ă… Property Brothers ‘G’ Ă… 176 49 33 43 Income Prop. Modern Marvels B-2 Bomber ‘PG’ Pearl Harbor: 24 Hours After (N) ‘PG’ Ă… Brad Meltzer’s Decoded (N) ‘PG’ Brad Meltzer’s Decoded ‘PG’ 155 42 41 36 Titanic’s Final Moments: Missing Modern Marvels ‘PG’ Ă… Reba ‘PG’ Ă… “Christmas in Paradiseâ€? (2007, Drama) Charlotte Ross. ‘PG’ Ă… › “An Accidental Christmasâ€? (2007, Drama) Cynthia Gibb. Ă… ›› “Comfort and Joyâ€? (2003) Nancy McKeon. ‘PG’ Ă… 138 39 20 31 Reba ‘PG’ Ă… The Rachel Maddow Show (N) The Last Word The Ed Show The Rachel Maddow Show The Last Word Hardball With Chris Matthews 56 59 128 51 The Ed Show (N) Teen Mom 2 Best Laid Plans ‘PG’ The Real World (N) ’ ‘14’ Ă… The Real World (N) ’ ‘14’ Ă… 192 22 38 57 Ridiculousness That ’70s Show That ’70s Show That ’70s Show Friendzone ‘PG’ Friendzone ‘PG’ Teen Mom 2 Catch Up Special SpongeBob My Wife & Kids My Wife & Kids That ’70s Show That ’70s Show George Lopez George Lopez Friends ’ ‘14’ Friends ’ ‘14’ 82 46 24 40 Big Time Rush Big Time Rush Big Time Rush Big Time Rush SpongeBob Dr. Phil Settling disputes. ’ ‘PG’ The Rosie Show ’ ‘PG’ Dr. Phil Gender issues. ‘PG’ Ă… “Becoming Santaâ€? (2010, Comedy) ’ Dr. Phil Parenting questions. ‘PG’ 161 103 31 103 Prison Wives ’ ‘PG’ Cougars Huskies UEFA Champions League Soccer Basel vs. Manchester United (N) The Game 365 Huskies Seahawks The Dan Patrick Show 20 45 28* 26 Mark Few Show Beavers (6:44) UFC Unleashed ’ ‘PG’ (7:50) UFC Unleashed ’ ‘14’ (8:55) UFC Unleashed ’ ‘14’ UFC Unleashed (N) ’ ‘14’ (11:12) UFC Unleashed ’ ‘14’ 132 31 34 46 UFC Unleashed (5:35) UFC Unleashed ’ ‘14’ Ghost Hunters Distillery of Spirits Ghost Hunters ’ Ă… Ghost Hunters Urgent ’ Ă… Ghost Hunters Christmas Spirit Ghost Hunters ’ Ă… Ghost Hunters Christmas Spirit 133 35 133 45 Ghost Hunters Voices of Pain ’ Behind Scenes Turning Point Joseph Prince End of the Age Praise the Lord (Live). Ă… Easter Exper. Jesse Duplantis Thru History Creflo Dollar The True Story of the Nativity 205 60 130 Seinfeld ‘PG’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ Big Bang Big Bang Conan Director Michael Moore. 16 27 11 28 Friends ’ ‘PG’ Friends ’ ‘PG’ King of Queens King of Queens Seinfeld ‘PG’ ››› “From Here to Eternityâ€? (1953) Burt Lancaster, Montgomery Clift. Lives (7:15) ›› “Task Forceâ€? (1949, War) Gary Cooper, Jane Wyatt, Walter Brennan. Pioneer Navy ›› “To the Shores of Tripoliâ€? (1942) John Payne. World ››› “Air Forceâ€? (1943, War) John 101 44 101 29 intertwine at a Pearl Harbor base before the attack. Ă… pilot promotes aircraft carriers. Ă… War II transforms a young man into a patriot. Ridgely, Gig Young. Ă… Toddlers & Tiaras ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Toddlers & Tiaras ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Toddlers & Tiaras ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Toddlers & Tiaras ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Toddlers & Tiaras (N) ‘PG’ Ă… Toddlers & Tiaras ’ ‘PG’ Ă… 178 34 32 34 Toddlers & Tiaras ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Law & Order Slave ’ ‘PG’ The Mentalist Red Moon ’ ‘14’ The Mentalist Jolly Red Elf ‘14’ “Silent Witnessâ€? (2011) Dermot Mulroney. Premiere. ‘14’ Ă… Leverage The Office Job ‘14’ 17 26 15 27 Law & Order Prejudice ’ ‘14’ Regular Show MAD ‘PG’ Wrld, Gumball Johnny Test ’ Johnny Test ’ The Grinch Tom & Jerry: A Nutcracker Tale King of the Hill King of the Hill American Dad American Dad Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ 84 Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Tailgate Paradise (N) ‘G’ Ă… Deep Fried Paradise ‘G’ Ă… Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ 179 51 45 42 Bourdain: No Reservations (6:12) M*A*S*H ‘PG’ Ă… (6:52) M*A*S*H (7:24) M*A*S*H Home Improve. Home Improve. Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Hot, Cleveland The Exes ‘PG’ King of Queens King of Queens 65 47 29 35 Bonanza The Hostage ‘G’ Ă… NCIS Split Decision ’ ‘PG’ Ă… NCIS: Los Angeles Breach ‘14’ NCIS Jurisdiction ’ ‘PG’ Ă… NCIS Baltimore ‘14’ Ă… (DVS) Psych The Tao of Gus (N) ‘PG’ Burn Notice ‘PG’ Ă… 15 30 23 30 NCIS Dead Man Talking ’ ‘14’ T.I. and Tiny Excused ‘PG’ Excused ’ ‘14’ 40 Winningest Winners of 2011 (N) ’ ‘PG’ Baseball Wives (N) ’ ‘14’ Celebrity Rehab Revisited Baseball Wives ’ ‘14’ 191 48 37 54 T.I. and Tiny PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS

(5:20) ›› “2012â€? 2009 John Cusack. A global cataclysm nearly wipes out humanity. The Take ‘MA’ (8:45) ›› “The Santa Clause 2â€? 2002 Tim Allen. ’ ‘G’ Ă… (10:35) ›› “Blue Crushâ€? 2002 Kate Bosworth. ’ ENCR 106 401 306 401 Home Alone ’ ››› “Courage Under Fireâ€? 1996 Denzel Washington. ‘R’ Ă… ›› “For the Boysâ€? 1991, Musical Bette Midler, James Caan, George Segal. ‘R’ Ă… FMC 104 204 104 120 ›› “For the Boysâ€? 1991, Musical Bette Midler, James Caan, George Segal. ‘R’ Ă… Strangers Strangers Ellismania (N) Punk Payback UFC 140: Jones vs. Machida The Daily Habit Hooters Bikini Ellismania Punk Payback UFC 140: Jones vs. Machida The Daily Habit Moto: In Out FUEL 34 Golf Academy Golf Academy Golf Academy Golf Central Golf Central Golf Academy Golf Academy Golf Academy Golf Academy Golf Academy Golf Academy GOLF 28 301 27 301 Bobby Jones’ Year to Remember Golf Academy “Santa Jrâ€? (2002) Lauren Holly, Judd Nelson, Nick Stabile. ‘G’ Ă… “Debbie Macomber’s Trading Christmasâ€? (2011) Tom Cavanagh. ‘G’ “Farewell Mr. Kringleâ€? (2010, Comedy) Christine Taylor. ‘PG’ Ă… HALL 66 33 175 33 “Mistletoe Over Manhattanâ€? ‘G’ (4:45) ›› “Wall Street: Money Never Sleepsâ€? 2010, Drama Michael Douglas, REAL Sports With Bryant Gumbel › “Cop Outâ€? 2010, Comedy Bruce Willis, Tracy Morgan. Two NYPD detec- Boardwalk Empire Jimmy revisits his Enlightened ’ ››› “The Blind HBO 425 501 425 501 Shia LaBeouf, Josh Brolin. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… tives must retrieve a valuable baseball card. ’ ‘R’ Ă… college days. ’ ‘MA’ Ă… ‘MA’ Ă… Sideâ€? Ă… ’ ‘PG’ Ă… ››› “The Hunt for Red Octoberâ€? 1990, Suspense Sean Connery, Alec Baldwin, Scott Glenn. ‘PG’ ›› “Miracle at St. Annaâ€? 2008, War Derek Luke. Four black soldiers get trapped behind enemy lines in Italy. ‘R’ Hunt-Red-Oct. IFC 105 105 (4:30) ››› “The Americanâ€? 2010 (6:15) ›› “Date Nightâ€? 2010 Steve Carell. A case of mis- (7:45) ›› “Waterworldâ€? 1995, Science Fiction Kevin Costner, Dennis Hopper, Jeanne Tripplehorn. ››› “Cedar Rapidsâ€? 2011 Ed Helms. A naive insurance Zane’s Sex MAX 400 508 508 George Clooney. ’ ‘R’ Ă… taken identity leads to a wild adventure. Ă… A loner navigates a future world. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… agent has a wild time at a convention. ‘R’ Chronicles ‘MA’ Five Years on Mars: The Rovers Rocket City Rocket City Science of Winter ‘G’ Five Years on Mars: The Rovers Rocket City Rocket City Science of Winter ‘G’ Alaska State Troopers ‘14’ NGC 157 157 Dragon Ball Z Dragon Ball Z Dragon Ball Z Dragon Ball Z Odd Parents Dragon Ball Z Dragon Ball Z SpongeBob SpongeBob Fanboy-Chum Fanboy-Chum Planet Sheen T.U.F.F. Puppy NTOON 89 115 189 115 Dragon Ball Z Shooting USA Ă… Impossible Amer. Rifleman Gun Stories Shooting Gllry Gun Nuts Shooting USA Ă… Best Defense Gun Stories Impossible Amer. Rifleman OUTD 37 307 43 307 Gun Nuts (4:15) ››› “Ondineâ€? 2009, Drama ››› “Fair Gameâ€? 2010, Drama Naomi Watts, Sean Penn, Sam Shepard. iTV. Homeland Carrie identifies Walker’s Inside the NFL (iTV) (N) ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Fight Camp 360: Penn & Teller: Inside the NFL (iTV) ’ ‘PG’ Ă… SHO 500 500 Colin Farrell. iTV. ‘PG-13’ Valerie Plame is revealed as a CIA agent. ‘PG-13’ contact. ’ ‘MA’ Ă… Boxing Bulls...! ’ ‘MA’ Dumbest Stuff Pimp My Ride Pimp My Ride My Ride Rules My Ride Rules Dumbest Stuff Dumbest Stuff Pimp My Ride Pimp My Ride My Ride Rules My Ride Rules Auto Racing SPEED 35 303 125 303 Dumbest Stuff (8:03) ›› “Prince of Persia: The Sands of Timeâ€? 2010 ‘PG-13’ Ă… Boss Stasis ’ ‘MA’ Ă… Spartacus: Gods of the Arena ’ STARZ 300 408 300 408 (4:35) ››› “The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the Kingâ€? 2003 Elijah Wood. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… (4:30) ›› “Shadeâ€? 2003 Stuart (6:15) ›› “Cracksâ€? 2009, Drama Eva Green, Juno Temple. A headmistress ››› “Campâ€? 2003 Daniel Letterle. Premiere. Teens attend a summer camp “B-Girlâ€? 2009 Julie Urich. A young woman competes in ››› “Bandslamâ€? TMC 525 525 Townsend. ’ ‘R’ Ă… takes special interest in a new student. ’ ‘R’ Ă… for budding entertainers. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… underground break-dancing. ’ ‘PG-13’ 2009 ‘PG’ NFL Turning Point (N) NFL Turning Point (N) NHL Overtime (N) (Live) Sports Talk Sports Talk NHL Overtime VS. 27 58 30 209 (4:30) NHL Hockey Philadelphia Flyers at Buffalo Sabres (N) Ă… ›› “Beauty Shopâ€? 2005, Comedy Queen Latifah, Alicia Silverstone. ‘PG-13’ Ă… Ghost Whisperer ’ ‘PG’ Ă… The Locator The Locator WE 143 41 174 118 ›› “Beauty Shopâ€? 2005, Comedy Queen Latifah, Alicia Silverstone. ‘PG-13’ Ă…


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

A & A 

Husband is aging too well for worrying wife to handle Dear Abby: When I married my husband, “Mason,� 30 years ago, I was the only girl he could get. He was a great catch by my standards — and still is. But back then nobody else wanted him but me, which was fine with me. I don’t like competition. We have had a great life together up until the last 10 years or so. Mason is aging gracefully, and there’s something about him now that every woman is suddenly interested in. They all treat him like he’s a new toy. They fawn over him and I become invisible. We don’t get out much, and I used to think I wanted to go out more — but now I just want to stay home and hide my husband inside. The real problem is, Mason loves the attention. It could be what he always wanted. I don’t know how to handle this without getting my feelings hurt, pouting and being incredibly jealous. He gives me no reason to think he’ll be unfaithful, but I can’t help but worry. Help! — Wife of a Late Bloomer Dear Wife: Congratulations. You are now a member of a “club� comprised of spouses living in the shadows of actors, politicians, moguls, etc. However, your self-esteem issues could create real problems for you and your husband if you don’t learn to deal with them. You weren’t the “only woman Mason could get� — you’re the woman Mason CHOSE to spend his life with. The sooner you accept that, the better off both of you will be. If you can’t do it on your own, counseling could help because hiding is not the answer. Dear Abby; My son and daughter-in-law live like pigs. Neither one of them was raised that way. They live in a beautiful home that literally smells like a litter box. I would look the other way or not visit, but now they have four children. Not only are my grandchildren unkempt and dirty — dirty clothes, smelly shoes, unwashed hair — but my son

This year you declare that you need more efficiency in order to live your life to the fullest. Think before you get involved in anything new or different. The quality of your life becomes even more important. You mix activity and caring in a relationship. Your sweetie might have to adjust to your new concerns. If you are single, you will look for someone who adds to your life, as opposed to trying to “save� another person. You have a lot to smile about. TAURUS helps you in any way possible. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHH Good suggestions and bright ideas seem to happen naturally, especially when communicating with a loved one or dear friends. The good news remains — you have the energy to act on the situation as well. Tonight: Treat yourself well. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHHHH You feel good; act accordingly. Do you do different activities when you are on top of the world? Charge! If you’re feeling less than great, see what is going on. Consider eliminating certain factors in your life that put you in a downward spiral. Tonight: All smiles. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHH Listen to a friend you really care about. His or her advice right now might be more grounded than in the past. You feel tired and drawn, as you have gone out of your way for others. Now go out of your way for yourself. Tonight: Get some extra zzz’s. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHH You might want to rethink a decision that is taking you in a new direction. Actions taken right now might not work out instantly, but point to the correct direction. You have made an enormous effort and need to see the responses. Tonight: Where people are. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHH Others naturally gravitate toward you, but is this what you want? Sometimes you might be happier assuming a low profile. Feeling a little suffocated is one of the outcomes of so much publicity. You can handle it. Tonight: A partner needs attention, too.

C   C 

Please email event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event� at www.bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

TODAY DEAR ABBY and his wife foist their parenting duties off on their daughter, who’s only 10. It’s HER job to get her brothers up and bathed, changed, dressed and fed so Mom and Dad can sleep late. The poor girl is exhausted all the time. She doesn’t always have the time to brush her own hair/teeth before school. She’s often made fun of. My son sees nothing wrong with these “chores,� and I’m afraid to say anything because I know my daughter-in-law will cut me off from the kids. What’s sad is my son allows it. Am I crazy? Please help. — Desperate Grandma on the East Coast Dear Desperate Grandma: You’re not crazy; you’re a caring grandmother who can’t stand seeing her grandchildren neglected. Now pick up the phone and call Childhelp at 800-422-4453. The advocate who answers the call can give you information about agencies that can help, and your confidentiality will be protected. Dear Abby: My father-inlaw drops by our house nearly every weekend. He arrives so early that we’re usually still in bed. He also rides a motorcycle that sounds like a jet engine and disturbs our neighbors. I have asked my husband several times to talk to his dad about these early morning visits. He refuses to say anything. We have two kids who are 4 and 9 months. Sleep is something we cherish. What do I do? — Annoyed Daughter-inLaw in Pennsylvania Dear Daughter-in-law: Because your husband refuses to stand up and explain to his father that he needs to come at a specific time — like 11 o’clock that task now falls to YOU. Speak up! — Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

Horoscope: Happy Birthday for Wednesday, Dec. 7, 2011 By Jacqueline Bigar

E3

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHH Take an overview. Be willing to dig into an issue more deeply, or detach more to understand what is happening, or check to see that you have a full perspective. Tonight: Let your mind wander. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHHH Relate on a one-onone level with others. That type of attention always makes someone feel important. Your caring comes back in multiples like you never expected. You might need to reveal frustration about a key issue. Tonight: Find time for a special friend. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHH You might be taken aback by everything that happens around you. The issue might be that you have some strong opinions and want to proceed in a key direction. You also need to let others follow through on what they feel is the right way. Accept what is happening. Tonight: Sort through ideas and invitations. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHH Maintain an even pace, and clear out your errands. You have the ability to accomplish a lot. You mobilize your feelings and get the job done. There is an awkwardness between you and someone you really care about. Tonight: Squeeze in some exercise. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHH You could be overwhelmed by all the ideas that are coming forward. News from a distance sets you in a new direction. Make no judgments. You don’t have all the news and information. Trust that more is coming in. Tonight: Let the fun begin. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHH Stay centered on your personal patterns. Realize what is going on behind the scenes with what you want to bring forward. You also can choose to ignore what is happening and give yourself some space. Tonight: Where the action is. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHHH Clear your desk and answer calls before making a key decision. Recognize what you are feeling and what is going on behind the scenes. You might decide to say little and observe more. Make an important call; don’t keep putting it off. Tonight: Visit with a friend as soon as you can. Š 2011 by King Features Syndicate

“THE METROPOLITAN OPERA, SATYAGRAHA�: Starring Rachelle Durkin, Richard Croft, Kim Josephson and Alfred Walker in an encore presentation of Glass’s masterpiece; opera performance transmitted in high definition; $18; 6:30 p.m.; Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & Imax, 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-382-6347. THE DIMES: The indie-pop band performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www .mcmenamins.com. “A CHRISTMAS STORY�: Cascades Theatrical Company presents the story of a young boy and his quest to get a BB gun for Christmas; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www .cascadestheatrical.org. “THE SANTALAND DIARIES�: Innovation Theatre Works presents the humorous story of David Sedaris’ stint as a Christmas elf in Macy’s; $10; 8 p.m.; Innovation Theatre Works, 1155 S.W. Division St., Bend; 541-504-6721 or www .innovationtw.org.

THURSDAY BENEFIT AUCTION: Silent auction benefits the Summit High School senior graduation party; free; 8 a.m.-8 p.m.; Athletic Club of Bend, 61615 Athletic Club Drive; 541-3853062 or bellandifamily@ bendbroadband.com. BOOKS, BITES & WINE: Learn about the Jefferson County Community Read program, and the 2012 author and book; with a wine tasting; free, $3 for wine tasting; 5-7 p.m.; Great Earth Natural Foods, 46 S.W. D St., Madras; 541-475-3351. RUBBISH RENEWED ECO FASHION SHOW: Sustainable fashion show featuring repurposed materials made into clothes; proceeds benefit REALMS Charter School’s arts program; $10, $6 children; 6 p.m. all ages, 8:30 p.m. ages 21 and older; Century Center, 70 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; www.realmschool.org/ fundraising/rubbishrenewed. CXMAS PARTY: Watch a presentation on cyclocross professional Ryan Trebon, with cycling photography; $5 suggested minimum donation; 6:30 p.m.; Powered by Bowen, 143 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; 541-585-1500. “THE STORY OF THE NUTCRACKER�: Bend Experimental Art Theatre presents a dramatic adaptation of the classic holiday ballet; $15, $10 students ages 18 and younger; 7 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-419-5558. “A CHRISTMAS STORY�: Cascades Theatrical Company presents the story of a young boy and his quest to get a BB gun for Christmas; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www.cascadestheatrical.org.

Submitted photo

Indie-pop band The Dimes will perform for free at 7 tonight at McMenamins Old St. Francis School in Bend. JAZZ CONCERT: The Central Oregon Community College Big Band Jazz performs under the direction of Andy Warr; with Michelle Van Handle and Mark Kershner; $10, $8 students, seniors and children; 7:30 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Pinckney Center for the Arts, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-280-9371. TIMOTHY B. SCHMIT: Former The Eagles bass player and singer performs, with Anastacia; $30 or $35; 7:30 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org. “THE SANTALAND DIARIES�: Innovation Theatre Works presents the humorous story of David Sedaris’ stint as a Christmas elf in Macy’s; $10; 8 p.m.; Innovation Theatre Works, 1155 S.W. Division St., Bend; 541-504-6721 or www .innovationtw.org. ONE WAY STATION: The San Francisco-based roots rock band performs, with Gabe Johnson; $5 plus fees in advance, $7 at the door; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www.silvermoonbrewing.com.

FRIDAY I’LL BE HOME FOR CHRISTMAS HOME TOUR: See a home decorated in holiday style, with more than 40 decorated Christmas trees, wall hangings and more; proceeds benefit the Children’s Vision Foundation, Deschutes County Historical Society, Williams Syndrome Association and Bend Heroes Foundation; $5; 10 a.m.4 p.m.; tour home, 21163 Clairaway Ave., Bend; 541-389-1813 or www .deschuteshistory.org. WINTER ART WALK: Start at the library, then walk downtown Redmond viewing art; free; 5-8 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-312-1050 or redmondartwalk@gmail.com. “A CHRISTMAS MEMORY�: Innovation Theatre Works presents the story about a boy and an elderly woman, the joy of giving and friendship; a portion of proceeds benefits the Assistance League of Bend; $20, $18 students and seniors; 7 p.m.; Innovation Theatre Works, 1155 S.W. Division St., Bend; 541-504-6721 or www .innovationtw.org. “THE STORY OF THE NUTCRACKER�: Bend Experimental Art Theatre presents a dramatic adaptation of the classic holiday ballet; $15, $10 students ages 18

and younger; 7 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-419-5558 or www .beatonline.org. HOLIDAY MAGIC CONCERT: The Central Oregon Community College Cascade Chorale performs holiday songs under the direction of James Knox; with the Proteus Chamber Players; proceeds benefit Abilitree; $15; 7 p.m.; Summit High School, 2855 N.W. Clearwater Drive, Bend; 541-388-8103 or www.abilitree.org. “A CHRISTMAS STORY�: Cascades Theatrical Company presents the story of a young boy and his quest to get a BB gun for Christmas; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www. cascadestheatrical.org. FLOATER: The veteran Oregon trio plays an electric rock ‘n’ roll set, with Jones Road; $15 plus fees in advance, $18 at the door; 8 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-788-2989 or www.randompresents.com.

SATURDAY “THE METROPOLITAN OPERA, FAUST�: Starring Marina Poplavskaya, Michele Losier, Jonas Kaufmann, Russell Braun and Rene Pape in a presentation of Gounod’s masterpiece; opera performance transmitted live in high definition; $24, $22 seniors, $18 children; 9:55 a.m.; Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & Imax, 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-382-6347. I’LL BE HOME FOR CHRISTMAS HOME TOUR: See a home decorated in holiday style, with more than 40 decorated Christmas trees, wall hangings and more; proceeds benefit the Children’s Vision Foundation, Deschutes County Historical Society, Williams Syndrome Association and Bend Heroes Foundation; $5; 10 a.m.4 p.m.; tour home, 21163 Clairaway Ave., Bend; 541-389-1813 or www .deschuteshistory.org. SENSATIONAL SATURDAY: Learn about holiday traditions throughout history; included in the price of admission; $10 adults, $9 ages 65 and older, $6 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger; 10 a.m.-3 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www.highdesertmuseum.org. MOTORCYCLISTS OF CENTRAL OREGON TOY RUN: Toy drive featuring arm wrestling, live music, photos with Santa, a motorcycle

Tux

Bazaars

Continued from E1 • Tux details can include stripes and braids on trousers and satin on lapels. Satin, with its subtle sheen, is a traditional choice for an accent fabric. Grosgrain pants stripes are quite natty. • Wing-collar shirts are best with a bow tie; lie-down collars are best with a solid silk necktie. • Don’t forget: Cummerbund pleats face up; cuff links for French-cuffed sleeves; studs for exposed shirt placket. • If you’re investing in a grown-up tux, You might as well spring for good shoes, too. And throw in evening hosiery.

Continued from E1

Tie one on To tie a bow tie, start with end in left hand extending an inch and a half below that in right hand. Cross longer end over shorter and pass up through loop. Form front loop of bow by doubling up shorter end (hanging) and placing across collar points. Hold this front loop with thumb and forefinger of left hand. Drop long end down over front. Place right forefinger, point up, on bottom half of hanging part. Pass up behind front loop and poke resulting loop through knot behind front loop. Even ends and tighten.

CENTRAL OREGON CRAFTS HOLIDAY FAIR: Jewelry, soaps, knitted goods, candles, cards and more; Phoenix West Building, 384 S.W. Upper Terrace Drive, Bend; centraloregoncrafts@gmail.com.

SATURDAY CECIL SLY HOLIDAY BAZAAR: Crafts and food; 8 a.m.-2 p.m.; Cecil Sly Elementary School, 1400 S.E. Second St., Prineville; 541-350-1678. 4-H CRAFT SALE: Crafts, tack and equipment; $1 or donation of nonperishable food; 9 a.m.7 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; www. deschutes4h.com or 541-548-6088. MADRAS HOLIDAY MARKET: Food, produce, decorations, arts, crafts and more; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Jefferson County Fair Complex, 430 S.W. Fairgrounds Road, Madras; 541-4893239 or 541-279-0604. SCANDINAVIAN CHRISTMAS BAZAAR: Lefse, krumkaka, fattigmand, special cookies and Scandia items; 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; Sons of Norway Hall, 549 N.W. Harmon Blvd., Bend; 541-382-4333. WALDORF HOLIDAY FAIR: Vendors, music, food, a magic show and more; 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; 19888 Rocking Horse Road, Bend; 541-330-8841. ZION HOLIDAY BAZAAR: Homemade crafts

ride through Bend and more; donations benefit the Bend Elks’ Christmas charity food baskets; donation of new unwrapped toy required; 11 a.m.-4 p.m.; Cascade Harley-Davidson of Bend, 63028 Sherman Road; 541-280-0478. PHOTOS WITH FRONTIER SANTA: Take pictures with a Victorianera Father Christmas; proceeds benefit the museum’s educational programs; $3 for photos, plus museum admission; 11 a.m.-3 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www.highdesertmuseum.org. SOLAR VIEWING: View the sun using safe techniques; included in the price of admission; $10 adults, $9 ages 65 and older, $6 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger; 11 a.m.-2 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www.highdesertmuseum.org. PET PHOTOS WITH SANTA: Proceeds benefit the Humane Society of Redmond; donations required; noon-3 p.m.; Humane Society of Redmond Thrift & Gifts, 1568 S. U.S. Highway 97; 541-504-0101. SCIENCE FRICTION: Hear about the ways science and its products enrich our lives while challenging ways of thinking; free; 2 p.m.; Downtown Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-312-1032 or www .deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. A JAZZY GOSPEL CHRISTMAS: The Gospel Choir of the Cascades performs, with Andy Warr; donations accepted; 4 p.m.; First Presbyterian Church, 230 N.E. Ninth St., Bend; 541-390-2441 or www. freewebs.com/bendgospel. VFW DINNER: A dinner of steak; $7; 5 p.m.; VFW Hall, 1503 N.E. Fourth St., Bend; 541-389-0775. BOARD GAME NIGHT: Play available board games or bring your own; free; 6 p.m.-midnight; East Bend Public Library, 62080 Dean Swift Road; 541-318-8459 or mgage@ bendbroadband.com. LA PINE LIGHT PARADE: Vehicles of all types are bedecked in holiday lights; free; 6 p.m.; downtown La Pine; 541-536-9771 or www.lapine.org. “A CHRISTMAS MEMORY�: Innovation Theatre Works presents the story about a boy and an elderly woman, the joy of giving and friendship; a portion of proceeds benefits the Assistance League of Bend; $20, $18 students and seniors; 7 p.m.; Innovation Theatre Works, 1155 S.W. Division St., Bend; 541-504-6721 or www .innovationtw.org.

and gifts, baked goods and more; proceeds benefit community projects; 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; Zion Lutheran Church, 1113 S.W. Black Butte Blvd., Redmond; 541-548-4712. LOCAVORE HOLIDAY GIFT FAIRE: Food, gifts, candles, stocking stuffers and more; followed by a Christmas party; $5 for party; 10 a.m.4:30 p.m., 7 p.m. party; 910 S.E. Wilson Ave., Unit C-3, Bend; info@centraloregonlocavore. com. POWELL BUTTE ART SHOW AND SALE: Pottery, glasswork, paintings, jewelry, photography and more; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Powell Butte Community Center, 8404 S.W. Reif Road; 541-419-9252. LA PINE CHRISTMAS BAZAAR: Crafts, baked goods, gifts, photos with Santa and more; donation of nonperishable food requested; 11 a.m.-9 p.m.; La Pine Event Center, 16405 First St.; www.lapinefrontierdays.org or 541-536-7821. SWEETGRASS LANE COUNTRY CHRISTMAS: Jewelry, art and handmade gifts; 11 a.m.3 p.m.; 60121 Sweetgrass Lane, Bend; 541-383-9053.

SUNDAY 4-H CRAFT SALE: Crafts, tack and equipment; $1 or donation of nonperishable food; 10 a.m.3 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; www .deschutes4h.com or 541-548-6088.


E4

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2011

TUNDRA

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HEART OF THE CITY

SALLY FORTH

FRAZZ

ROSE IS ROSE

STONE SOUP

LUANN

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM

DILBERT

DOONESBURY

PICKLES

ADAM

WIZARD OF ID

B.C.

SHOE

GARFIELD

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PEANUTS

MARY WORTH


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

BIZARRO

E5

DENNIS THE MENACE

SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively.

SOLUTION TO YESTERDAY’S SUDOKU

DAILY BRIDGE CLUB

GET FUZZY

NON SEQUITUR

Seeking a friendly duplicate bridge? Find five games weekly at www.bendbridge.org.

CANDORVILLE

SAFE HAVENS

LOS ANGELES TIMES DAILY CROSSWORD

SIX CHIX

ZITS

HERMAN


E6

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2011

Cards

Beauty

Continued from E1 There are several ways to create digital photos cards. First of all, you can visit stationery shops and choose templates from albums, or, “if those don’t tickle your fancy,” adds Bohardt, you can enlist the help of a graphic designer. Online retailers are giving good cause to celebrate with coupons and special offers. Websites worth checking out if you want to send a photo card include snapfish.com, www .simplytoimpress.com, vista print.com and shutterfly.com.

Continued from E1 Yes to Tomatoes Clear Skin Pore Scrub Most facial exfoliants are either too abrasive or too subtle. This product has a salty, soupy texture that is oddly satisfying (try to refrain from tasting). Ingredients include the antioxidant lycopene (naturally present in tomatoes), salicylic acid, ground bamboo and mango seeds ($9.99, http://yesto carrots.com). Cle de Peau Beaute Intensive Eye Contour Cream Encased in a sparkling jar with a platinum eyemassaging wand attached, this pale green cream features a proprietary “illuminating complex” that contains a retinol derivative. Applying the cream with the wand in tiny circles feels refreshing and nurturing (for $250, it had better). Available at select department stores, including Bergdorf Goodman.

Shaping things up A trend this year is to send holiday cards that do double-duty as Christmas tree ornaments. These flat round cards feature a design or photo on one side, she adds, and a greeting on the other — complete with a pretty ribbon for hanging. At the same time, smaller cards are becoming more important and their tinier shapes mean a more affordable approach to celebrating the season.

For the procrastinator Time is money and money is time. We all can understandably fall behind sometimes, but fortunately there are a couple of ways to send good thoughts last-minute during the yuletide season. Many retailers, including Kroger stores, are stocking Hallmark’s Postage-Paid Greetings — a line of cards that already includes postage. Add your personal holiday message, then just sign, seal and send. (Postage-paid greetings range from $2.69 to $3.99.) Starting at $2.99 per greeting card, the new Cards app from Apple lets users create and mail beautifully crafted cards personalized with text and photos from their iPhone or iPod touch. Take a quick snapshot and with a few taps and swipes, an elegant letterpress card is on its way to any address in the world. Design and customize your card with a personal message and photo. Then select an address from your contacts and place your order. How cool is that?

Better beauty products

A Bliss Mistle Toes Gift Set for $48, available at www.blissworld.com. Among the year’s many

BeadforLife shea butter soap for $4 at http://beadforlife.org. Tony Cenicola New York Times News Services

Lips CoverGirl NatureLuxe Gloss Balm There are 16 shades of this highly moisturizing gloss-balm hybrid with a subtle staining effect. My favorite: Peony Pivoine, a dark berry that adds a natural-looking red tone ($6.49 each, www .covergirl.com). Urban Decay Stardust Sparkling Lip Gloss A pick-me-up in a tube. These mint-flavored, glittering glosses have impressive staying power. Space Cowboy (sheer nude) has a mother-of-pearl tone, while the hot pink Glitter Rock (sheer fuchsia) is ready to party. My favorite, Andromeda (sheer peachy pink), is flirtatiously iridescent ($19, www.urban decay.com). Burt’s Bees Tinted Lip Balm The color is slight, but you can’t beat the nurturing sensation of beeswax on your lips. There’s also the do-good angle: Burt’s Bees has been raising awareness about the importance of bees since its inception 27 years ago.

Clockwise from top: Mally Poreless Evercolor Face Defender for $40 at http://mallybeauty.com, Intellishade SPF 45 Matte tinted moisturizer for $48 at http://intellishadespf45.com and Miracle Skin Transformer Treat and Conceal for $36 at www .miracleskintransformer.com.

Bliss Mistle Toes Gift Set This is around the time of year when feet, especially sporty feet, dry out. The soothing, gel-lined socks in this kit hydrate, while the Foot Patrol exfoliates with alpha hydroxy and salicylic acids ($48, www .blissworld.com).

Fragrance

Bath

Dolce & Gabbana Rose the One The scent of rose has always had a calming effect on me. Fresh citrus top notes include pink grapefruit and mandarin, so the scent is not too cloyingly floral (starting at $62, www.saks.com). Valentina An ultra-feminine perfume introduced this fall by the house of Valentino. Notes include Calabrian bergamot, white Alba truffle, jasmine and Amalfi orange blossom. The couture bottle, the “freespirited heiress” marketing campaign and the fragrance itself make one want to don a slip dress and run barefoot through the streets of Rome at night. The scent, which starts at $80, will be sold at Valentino boutiques in the United States starting this month.

Lush Holiday and Seasonal Bath Bombs These are such a pleasure, from the optional packaging reminiscent of an oldfashioned popcorn bag to the sweet-smelling fizz that erupts when the bombs are plopped into the water. Bath bombs are also kid-friendly; some are vegan ($3.95 to $6.95). New this season are Bubbleroons ($5.95), which don’t fizz but produce an impressive bubble bath (www .lushusa.com). BeadforLife Shea Butter Soap The nonprofit BeadforLife (http://beadforlife.org), known for its beads made of recycled paper, is now helping some 760 Ugandan women produce shea butter products. Buying a $4 bar of their extraordinarily rich soap is a win-win.

Face This earth-friendly company recently collaborated with the Pollinator Partnership, a nonprofit organization that fosters the health of pollinating animals through research, conservation and education ($7, burtsbees.com).

Hair Julien Farel Restore This year, Farel, a celebrity stylist, introduced a new haircare line made in Italy that comes in three formulas: Hydrate; Vitamin (for color-treated hair); and Zero-Frizz (curly hair). The shampoo ($33) and conditioner ($23) leave no residue and smell like Creamsicles (www.julienfarel.com).

Eyes Clinique Lid Smoothie Antioxidant 8-Hour Eye Colour These refreshing cream eye shadows include extracts of vitamin E and vegetables like broccoli and spinach, as well as caffeine to give tired eyes a boost. Most of the 12 colors have some shimmer ($19.50,

www.clinique.com). MAC Snow Globe Eye Shadows These palettes offer three six-color combinations: cool (blues and purples), warm (earth tones) and sultry (reds and pinks), but the best part is the mood-enhancing snowglobe tops ($38, www.maccos metics.com).

Hands Nails Inc. Porchester Square Polish, Hand Cream and Vitamin E Pen All colors in this trendy British line are named after English destinations, like Gatwick (matte red) and Piccadilly Circus (dark pink cerise). My favorite is Porchester Square (muted mushroom, $19.50). Enriched with caviar extract, the hand cream ($18) is nongreasy, and the pen ($10) is the easiest way I’ve found to condition cuticles. NARS Space Odyssey Nail Polish Glittery polishes often suffer from lack of opacity. Not this one. After two coats, I’m

Feet

staring at futuristic, metallic, sparkly nails. Part of the Holiday 2011 Color Collection ($17, www.narscosmetics .com). Julep Nail Color Original on-trend colors with great staying power; I particularly like Zoe (burnt umber; $14 at www.julep.com).

Miracle Skin Transformer Treat & Conceal This light and airy concealer contains color minerals, mica and natural silicones, as well as vitamins K and F, thought to have antiaging properties ($36, www.miracleskintrans former.com). Intellishade SPF 45 Matte I thought I lost my tube at the airport a few months ago and panicked. It is the product I am most excited about from 2011, as it combines a moisturizer, high SPF and natural-looking tint that adjusts to different skin tones. Glides on and doesn’t leave the face feeling dirty ($48, http://intelli shadespf45.com). Mally Poreless Evercolor Face Defender The Defender has a cult following and has been selling like hotcakes on QVC for months now. It acts like a finishing powder, but is in actuality a hard gel-like substance that makes pores disappear and softens your whole look ($40, http://mallybeauty.com).

Services Glam a Go-Go Gift Certificate Maria Bonita, a Brazilian salon and spa in NoLIta, offers a deep hair-conditioning treatment (using the salon’s protein-rich formula, Envix), manicure, blowout and cocktail service all in an hour ($98, www.maria bonitany.com). Henri Bendel New York Gift Certificate Most any excuse to visit this Fifth Avenue landmark is understandable, but new to the store is Blink, a threading salon that also offers lash tinting. As a pale-lashed person who dislikes mascara, I’m a big fan of tinting, which costs $40 and lasts up to six weeks (www.henribend el.com).

Find It All Online bendbulletin.com


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DO YOU HAVE SOMETHING TO SELL FOR $500 OR LESS? Non-commercial advertisers may place an ad with our "QUICK CASH SPECIAL" 1 week 3 lines, $12 or 2 weeks, $18! Ad must include price of single item of $500 or less, or multiple items whose total does not exceed $500.

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Want to Buy or Rent Mom of 3 needs donation or low cost (low monthly payments) reliable car w/good mpg, 541-923-3900 Student needs car or truck running or NOT! Call 541-508-2151. 208

Pets & Supplies

Labs, purebred, 6 yellow ROTTWEILER puppy, female & 2 black fe10 wks Ready now. male; 2 black male, 1 Tail, dewclaws, first yellow male, $200 shots/worming done. each Chihuahua/Lab Socialization & potty mix puppies, 5 male, 1 training started. Call female, $100 ea. All on or text 503-805-8662 site, ready for ChristAKC parents on site. 1940 Beer “Pump”, $500, mas! 541-977-6844 made in England by Gaskell & Chambers, MINI-AUSSIE. Gorgeous 541-408-4613 Red - Merle. Blue eyes. 13 Weeks, papers inThe Bulletin reserves cluded in price. Shots/ the right to publish all Wormed. Very Sweet ads from The Bulletin temperment. $500. Schnauzer AKC mini newspaper onto The 503-443-0212. pups ready now, 8 wks. Bulletin Internet webMale $400; female site. $350. 541-536-4369 Mini Aussies Toy size, 2 black tri’s $180 cash. 541-678-7599

Scottish Terrier AKC pups - ready NOW! Perfect Christmas gifts. 541-317-5624

Call Classifieds at 541-385-5809 Christmas Puppy Sale, www.bendbulletin.com Pomeranian CKC pups Shih Tzu puppies, male Poodle/Maltese cross, for sale, fancy col/female, $475/$575, female, $150, Male, ored, 2 mo. on Dec. 9, 541-788-0090 $100, Also large malt- English Mastiff puppies 541-598-4443. AKC Fawns-1 male, 1 ese mix male puppy, 210 female DOB 10/10/11 $50, Cash Only. 541-279-1437 $800. 541-546-7909. Furniture & Appliances ESTATE & HOLIDAY The Bulletin recom30x50 coffee table, SALE! KITTEN & CAT mends extra caution solid wood, 3 yrs old, ADOPTIONS! Dec. 10 when purchas$100. 541-548-7137 &11, 8-4. Inside! Furing products or serniture, gift items, Amana Energy Saver sporting goods, more! vices from out of the fridge, white, 22 cu ft, All proceeds benefit area. Sending cash, exc cond, $250, the rescued cats of checks, or credit in541-388-2159. nonprofit CRAFT. Will formation may be have cats & kittens subjected to fraud. !Appliances A-1 Quality& available for adoption For more informaHonesty! on site! 2957 NE tion about an adverA-1 Washers & Deborah Ct. off Red tiser, you may call Dryers $125 each. Rock/Wells Acres Rd. the Oregon State Full Warranty. Free 389-8420, 598-5488. Attorney General’s Del. Also W/D’s Office Consumer wanted dead or Protection hotline at alive. 541-280-7355. 1-877-877-9392.

Aussie, black tri-male, neutered, 8 yrs old. good with kids, $100. 541-548-3660. Aussie Mini/Toy AKC, red Tri’s, blue Merles with blue eyes 541-598-5314/788-7799 Foster kittens, male orBoxer, 5½-year unneuange tabby, female tered male, good with Maine Coon mix, 5 mo. kids, elderly & other $25 ea. 541-548-5516. dogs. Free to good Shepherd home. 541-777-0917 German Puppies, purebred, 2 dark, 4 white, $350 $500. 541-610-5785 or 541-598-5105 German Shepherd purebred puppies, ready 12/22, $300 Boxers! Beautiful pups, each.. 541-350-3025 4 males, $400 ea.; 2 females, $450 ea. 8 weeks old, ready now! Wormed, 1st shots & vet checks. Parents on site. Call Todd, 541-815-4622 Chihuahua pups, 10 Goldendoodle pups, kid conditioned, ready wks $100. Chi-Wien12/10, wormed, health ers, 11 wks, $150. guarantee. $500 ea, Cute & weaned! 541-548-4574, 408-5909 541-362-5485

Chihuahua Pups, assorted colors, teacup/ toy, 1st shots, wormed, $250, 541-977-4686 Chihuahua toy purebred pups, 1st shots, paper trained, 3 @ $250 ea. 541-241-4021

Dachshund AKC mini pup, $350. Bend, 503-470-0729 www.bendweenies.com

Dachshunds, mini, longhaired,pups,AKC,males $500, 20% off if you neuter, 541-598-7417 Doxie AKC mini short hair male, chocolate & cream, $325. Will hold for Xmas. Pix avail. 541-420-6044

Poodle pups, toy, for Fridge, 25 cu. ft. black SALE. Also Rescued side-by-side with icePoodle Adults for maker. 3½ yrs old adoption, to loving $800. 541-312-4182. homes. 541-475-3889 Pugs, Fawn purebred, 3 girls, $400 ea; 2 boys, $350 ea. 541-610-5133 or 541-233-7576

-- PUPPIES -Cavalier King Charles Spaniels, Purebred APR with champ blood lines. 3 Tri-Color males left. Born 9-1. Current shots, Health Cert, papers, APR reg litter. ONLY $600 ea. 541-504-2259

LAB PUPS AKC, 7x Master National Hunter sired, yellows & blacks, hips & elbows certified, 541-771-2330 royalflushretrievers.com

Queensland Heelers Standards & mini,$150 & up. 541-280-1537 http://rightwayranch. wordpress.com/

Rescued kittens/cats to adopt! 65480 78th St., Bend, 1-5 Sat/ Sun, other days by appt, 541-647-2181. Addtl small kittens @ Bend foster home, call 815-7278 to visit. Altered, shots, ID chip, carrier. Info: 541-3898420. Map, photos at www.craftcats.org

Rodents? FREE barn/ shop cats, we deliver! Altered, shots. Some friendly, some not so much, but will provide www.alpen-ridge.com expert rodent control in exchange for safe Labrador Puppies, AKC shelter, food & water. chocolate, ready Dec. 389-8420, leave msg. 8th. 541-281-8297 Labradoodles - Blue merle, chocolate, sable, phantom 541-504-2662

GENERATE SOME excitement in your neighborhood! Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 541-385-5809.

Pups, $125 ea., 3/4 Walker hound, 1/4 Black & tan, great all around dogs, 10 wks, 4 avail., 541-447-1323

Rescued adult companion cats FREE to seniors, disabled & veterans! Tame, altered, shots, ID chip, Jack Russell/Fox Terrier more. Will always take Pups (4), $100 ea, 7.5 back for any reason. wks, 541-420-3048 Photos, map, info at www.craftcats.org. 389-8420, 647-2181. Sat/Sun 1-5, other days by appt. 65480 78th St., Bend.

541-385-5809

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Near Costco in the Forum Center 2660 NE Hwy. 20 541-330-0420

Second Hand & Rebuilt Mattresses Sets & singles, most sizes, sanitized & hygienitized.

Call 541-598-4643 The Bulletin r ecommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to FRAUD. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Canon Vixia HF20 digi- Rug Doctor X3 carpet/ Dry Juniper Firewood tal video camcorder. upholstery cleaning $190 per cord, split. Exquisite Collection of HD1080. 32GB Flash. system with accesso1/2 cords available. Antique Firearms for All manuals & cables ries. Paid $593; like Immediate delivery! sale, 541-350-9810 incl. Carrying case & new, used 1x, $400 541-408-6193 Kel-tek 380 w/magatripod. $400 OBO. OBO. 541-312-2448 zine extension trigger Call 541-389-6649 or Seasoned Tamarack shoe, 2 clips, $250. dave@lifestrailhead.org. Wanted diabetic test strips firewood, split & deliv- will pay up to $25/box. 541-598-6486 ered, $200/cord. Sharon, 503-679-3605. 257 Call 541-977-2040 Ruger Single-Six 22. 3 Wantedpaying cash screw model. In- Musical Instruments for Hi-fi audio & stu- Split, Dry Lodgepole cludes mag cylinder & dio equip. McIntosh, or Juniper, $200/Cord, holster. Good cond, Piano, Astin-Weight UpDelivery included! JBL, Marantz, Dy$295. 541-728-0445, right, oak finish, For More info, call naco, Heathkit, San503-307-7347; bpst@ $5000, 541-382-6681 sui, Carver, NAD, etc. 541-923-6987, lv msg. bendbroadband.com Call 541-261-1808 Piano, Baldwin Baby 269 Springfield 30-30; Grand, blond wood fin262 12-gauge shotgun; & Gardening Supplies ish, $6000, Apache Air Pistol, Call Commercial/Ofice 541-388-3208. & Equipment 541-617-5921 Equipment & Fixtures 242 Suzuki Spinet digital piSpringfield XDM For newspaper Exercise Equipment ano, Model FP-S. Like Omni Credit Card Pro9mm, black 4.5" 4 delivery, call the cessor, w/card slips, new. All software & mags, holster, Circulation Dept. at manual imprinter, manuals incl. Orig. NordicTrack Eliptical case. Two months 541-385-5800 $300, 541-416-0758 bench & MIDI cables. old, like new $499. Great Christmas Gift To place an ad, call $2500/obo. Dave at 265 541-312-3370 $500 541-419-6436 541-385-5809 541-389-6649 or or email dave@lifestrailhead.org Building Materials classified@bendbulletin.com Wanted: Collector 245 seeks high quality 260 Golf Equipment fishing items. Misc. Items Call 541-678-5753, or Estate Auction Dec. 10. 503-351-2746 Buying Diamonds SUPER TOP SOIL New Golden Bear www.hersheysoilandbark.com /Gold for Cash Optiflex Clubs 248 Screened, soil & com1, 3, 4 woods - 3, 5, 6, Saxon’s Fine Jewelers Health & post mixed, no 7, 8, 9 and putter. 541-389-6655 rocks/clods. High huBeauty Items www.dennisturmon.com mus level, exc. for 541-480-0795 BUYING flower beds, lawns, Newest innovative natuLionel/American Flyer Golf bag & 8 clubs, golf ral weight loss product. gardens, straight trains, accessories. shoes size 10.5, golf Lower Your Sugar & Carb Cabinet Refacing screened top soil. 541-408-2191. gloves, all new, never craving.Never been easier & Refinishing. Bark. Clean fill. Deused, Wilson, includes to lose abdominal weight Save Thousands! liver/you haul. outer travel bag, $275 realw8oregon.asantae.co Christmas Decor! Large 541-548-3949. OBO, 541-385-9350. assortment, full box, Most jobs m/realw8 541-419-2223 $20. 541-593-8400 completed in 246 255 5 days or less. Guns, Hunting Best Pricing Computers & Fishing in the Industry. The Natural THE BULLETIN re541-647-8261 Place for 12g Mossberg pump shot quires computer adgun, wood stck, 28” bbl vertisers with multiple Great Gifts! MADRAS Habitat $200. 541-647-8931 ad schedules or those RESTORE selling multiple sys22 Savage Long Rifles Building Supply Resale tems/ software, to dis(2), auto, 1 wood grain, Quality at close the name of the 1 synthetic, new, $125 LOW PRICES business or the term ea; 17 Mossberg, In84 SW K St. "dealer" in their ads. ternational 817 bolt ac541-475-9722 Private party advertistion,w/scope,new,$225; Over 40 Years Open to the public. ers are defined as 541-593-6182 after 5 Experience in 266 those who sell one Carpet Upholstery 30.06, Remington model computer. Forum Center, & Rug Cleaning Heating & Stoves 7600, pump, wood Bend Call Now! grain, w/wildlife scroll- People Look for Information 541-382-9498 NOTICE TO ing, new, $375, About Products and Services 541-617-8840 CCB #72129 ADVERTISER www.wbu.com/bend 541-593-6182 after 5 . Every Day through www.cleaningclinicinc.com Since September 29, 50 A&E Brass (new) & The Bulletin Classifieds 1991, advertising for dies, $25 for dies, 270 used woodstoves has $0.50/ea brass, been limited to modLost & Found BEND’S HOMELESS NEED OUR HELP 541-639-5282. els which have been The cold weather is upon us and sadly there certified by the Or- Found men’s wedding are still over 2,000 folks in our community Black powder, Pyrodex, egon Department of without permanent shelter, living in cars, band at Summit High for black powder gun, Environmental Qualmakeshift camps, getting by as best they can. School. Call to iden$15/lb, 541-639-5282. ity (DEQ) and the fedThe following items are badly needed to tify, 541-410-9076 Browning Citori O/U, 12 eral Environmental help them get through the winter: ga., $800, Foremost Protection Agency Found Mtn. Bike, west Savage Arms 410 d CAMPING GEAR of any sort: d side, very nice, call to (EPA) as having met pump, $175, Both exc. Used tents, sleeping bags, tarps, blankets. ID, 541-992-0669. smoke emission stancond., 541-480-2852. d WARM CLOTHING: Rain Gear, Boots d dards. A certified Found Redline bike woodstove may be CASH!! near downtown Bend. Please drop off your tax-deductible donations identified by its certifiFor Guns, Ammo & 541-610-5901 at the BEND COMMUNITY CENTER cation label, which is Reloading Supplies. 1036 NE 5th St., Bend, permanently attached 541-408-6900. Mon.-Sat. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. (541-312-2069). to the stove. The Bul- FOUND set of 3 keys on Nelson Road, Colt Python .357 mag, Please help -You can make a difference! letin will not knowBend. key tag saying bright stainless, 8” bbl, ingly accept advertis“I can handle any crinew in box, $2800. ing for the sale of 541-647-8931 sis, I’m a Mom”. uncertified NIKON PHOTO PACKAGE Call 541-419-4195 woodstoves. Dillon setup for reloading 50 A&E, $50, USED – EXCELLENT CONDITION 267 541-639-5282. Fuel & Wood DO YOU HAVE SOMETHING TO WHEN BUYING SELL FIREWOOD... FOR $500 OR LESS? To avoid fraud, Non-commercial The Bulletin advertisers may recommends payplace an ad ment for Firewood with our only upon delivery "QUICK CASH and inspection. SPECIAL" • A cord is 128 cu. ft. 1 week 3 lines $12 • Nikon D100 6MP Digital SLR 4’ x 4’ x 8’ or • Nikon 80-200mm f/2.8D ED AF Lens • Receipts should 2 weeks $18! • Nikon 14mm f/2.8 ED AF Ultra Wide Angle include name, Ad must Lens phone, price and include price of • Nikon 17-35mm f/2.8D-IF AF-S Zoom Lens kind of wood pursingle item of $500 • Nikon 60mm f/2.8G ED AF-S Micro Lens chased. or less, or multiple • Nikon TC-14E II (1.4x) Teleconverter AF-S • Firewood ads items whose total MUST include spedoes not exceed Boxed with original cases. Includes charger cies and cost per Thousands of ads daily in $500. and extra battery plus instructional manuals. cord to better serve print and online. $3,750 for the entire package. our customers. Call Classifieds at To place your ad, visit 541-385-5809 Call Martha Tiller at www.bendbulletin.com www.bendbulletin.com 541-633-2193 or 541-408-2913

Find Your Future Home Here!

or call 541-385-5809


F2 WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809

541-385-5809 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD Edited by Will Shortz

PLACE AN AD

AD PLACEMENT DEADLINES Monday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Noon Sat. Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Noon Mon. Wednesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Tues. Thursday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Wed. Friday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Thurs. Saturday Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:00am Fri. Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:00 Fri. Sunday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. Starting at 3 lines

Place a photo in your private party ad for only $15.00 per week.

*UNDER $500 in total merchandise

OVER $500 in total merchandise

7 days .................................................. $10.00 14 days ................................................ $16.00

Garage Sale Special

4 days .................................................. $17.50 7 days .................................................. $23.00 14 days .................................................$32.50 28 days .................................................$60.50

4 lines for 4 days.................................. $20.00

(call for commercial line ad rates)

A Payment Drop Box is available at Bend City Hall. CLASSIFICATIONS BELOW MARKED WITH AN (*) REQUIRE PREPAYMENT as well as any out-of-area ads. The Bulletin reserves the right to reject any ad at any time.

CLASSIFIED OFFICE HOURS: MON.-FRI. 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. SATURDAY by telephone 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

PRIVATE PARTY RATES

*Must state prices in ad

is located at: 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, Oregon 97702

PLEASE NOTE: Check your ad for accuracy the first day it appears. Please call us immediately if a correction is needed. We will gladly accept responsibility for one incorrect insertion. The publisher reserves the right to accept or reject any ad at anytime, classify and index any advertising based on the policies of these newspapers. The publisher shall not be liable for any advertisement omitted for any reason. Private Party Classified ads running 7 or more days will publish in the Central Oregon Marketplace each Tuesday. 270

Lost & Found Lost Cat - white female “Lucy” 13 yrs old, declawed, ran from car crash 8/11/11, on Hwy 97 at Highland, Redmond. If seen, please call 541-504-4194. $100 REWARD. LOST- PENTAX digital camera- Sat, Dec 3rd, on dirt roads west of Millican Rd, milepost 9, Millican Offroad Trail System. Karen 541-410-8475.

476

Farm Market

Employment

300 400 308

Farm Equipment & Machinery

1992 Case 580K 4WD, 5500 hrs, cab heat, extend-a-hoe, 2nd owner, clean & tight, tires 60% tread. $24,900 or best offer. Call 541-419-2713

421

Schools & Training

www.IITR.net Redmond Campus Student Loans/Job Waiting Toll Free 1-888-438-2235 476

Lost Prescription Sunglasses in black case, had wider amber colored frames, last few days, 541-548-2849.

LOST Still searching for light grey female cat gone 3 weeks near Reed Mkt & Division. Very Friendly, long & thin, & long tail, yellow eyes, microchipped. Call or text 541-728-4905 $50 reward! REMEMBER: If you have lost an animal, don't forget to check The Humane Society in Bend 541-382-3537 Redmond, 541-923-0882 Prineville, 541-447-7178; OR Craft Cats, 541-389-8420. 280

Estate Sales ESTATE & HOLIDAY SALE! Dec. 10 &11, 8-4. Inside! Furniture, gift items, sporting goods, more! All proceeds benefit rescued cats of nonprofit CRAFT. Also need items to sell! 2957 NE Deborah Ct. off Red Rock/Wells Acres Rd. 389-8420, 598-5488. 286

Sales Northeast Bend

HH FREE HH Garage Sale Kit Place an ad in The Bulletin for your garage sale and receive a Garage Sale Kit FREE! KIT INCLUDES: • 4 Garage Sale Signs • $1.00 Off Coupon To Use Toward Your Next Ad • 10 Tips For “Garage Sale Success!” • And Inventory Sheet

PICK UP YOUR GARAGE SALE KIT at

1777 SW Chandler Ave., Bend, OR 97702

288

Sales Southeast Bend Home furnishings, Christmas items, garden tools, etc. Saturday 8:30-3:30, 21170 Claremont Ct.

Sell an Item

FAST! If it's under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classiieds for

$10 - 3 lines, 7 days $16 - 3 lines, 14 days (Private Party ads only)

Employment Opportunities

Twinstar 2027 Hay Rake, electric controls, $13,500. 30’ folding roller harrow, double row of S-tines, heavy duty, $15,500. 541-419-2713 Wanted Used Farm Equipment & Machinery. Looking to buy, or consign of good used quality equipment. Deschutes Valley Equipment 541-548-8385 Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS 325

Hay, Grain & Feed Wheat Straw: Certified & Bedding Straw & Garden Straw;Compost.546-6171

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 541-385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Call The Bulletin before 11 a.m. and get an ad in to publish the next day!

CAUTION READERS: Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly. Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state. We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320 For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075 If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Kevin O’Connell Classified Department Manager The Bulletin 541-383-0398

Rentals

500 600

DO YOU NEED A GREAT EMPLOYEE RIGHT NOW?

Oregon Medical Train541-385-5809. ing PCS Phlebotomy VIEW the classes begin Jan 2. Classifieds at: Registration now open: www.bendbulletin.com www.oregonmedicaltraining.com Housekeeping 541-343-3100

TRUCK SCHOOL

Finance & Business

Employment Opportunities

528

Loans & Mortgages WARNING The Bulletin recommends you use caution when you provide personal information to companies offering loans or credit, especially those asking for advance loan fees or companies from out of state. If you have concerns or questions, we suggest you consult your attorney or call CONSUMER HOTLINE, 1-877-877-9392.

605

Roommate Wanted 50-yr old female will share home; $250 + ½ utils. 541-548-6690

The Riverhouse Hotel and Convention Center is seeking a Housekeeping Supervisor. Prior supervisory experience in a high-volume hotel operation is required. Please go to www.riverhouse.com to fill out an application on-line or come to 3075 N. Hwy 97 to apply in Nice room for rent in person. Submit a renewer home on Greens sume with your appli- BANK TURNED YOU Golf Course in RedDOWN? Private party cation. mond, $400+$100 utils. will loan on real esCompetitive wage, vaAmenities too extentate equity. Credit, no cation, bonus, medisive too list, owner problem, good equity cal insurance and use away 90% of time. is all you need. Call of resort facilities. 541-279-9538 now. Oregon Land PRE-EMPLOYMENT DRUG SCREENING Mortgage 388-4200. 630 IS REQUIRED Rooms for Rent Remember.... FREE Studios & Kitchenettes Add your web adFurnished room, TV w/ BANKRUPTCY dress to your ad and cable, micro & fridge. readers on The EVALUATION Utils & linens. New Bulletin' s web site visit our owners.$145-$165/wk will be able to click website at 541-382-1885 through automatically www.oregonfreshstart.com to your site. 631 Condo/Townhomes for Rent

The Bulletin Recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to FRAUD. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Next to Pilot Butte Park 1962 NE Sams Lp. #3 2 master bdrms each w/ 2 full baths, fully appl. kitchen, gas fireplace, 541-382-3402 deck, garage w/opener. $699/mo. + $699 dep; incl. w/s/yard care, no LOCAL MONEY:We buy pets. Call Jim or Dosecured trust deeds & lores, 541-389-3761 • note,some hard money 541-408-0260 loans. Call Pat Kelley 541-382-3099 ext.13.

Independent Contractor

H Supplement Your Income H

View Unit at The Plaza! (Old Mill District) Move in this month and receive 1 month free. $1725/mo. Shari Abell 541-743-1890. 634

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend !! NO APP FEE !! 2 bdrm, 1 bath $530 & 540

W/D hook-ups & Heat Pump. Carports & Pet Friendly Fox Hollow Apts. (541) 383-3152

Cascade Rental Mgmt. Co.

375

Meat & Animal Processing Angus Beef, 1/2 or whole, grass & grain-fed, no hormones $3/lb., hanging weight, cut & wrap included. 541-383-2523.

Where buyers meet sellers. You know what they say about “one man’s trash”. There’s a whole pile of “treasure” here!

Operate Your Own Business

FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF

Newspaper Delivery Independent Contractor Join The Bulletin as an independent contractor!

& Call Today & We are looking for independent contractors to service home delivery routes in:

H Madras and Prineville H Must be available 7 days a week, early morning hours.

Must have reliable, insured vehicle.

Thousands of ads daily in print and online. To place your ad, visit www.bendbulletin.com or call 385-5809

Please call 541.385.5800 or 800.503.3933 during business hours apply via email at online@bendbulletin.com

$525

Very clean 1 bdrm. w/private patio in quiet area no smoking/pets, 1000 NE Butler Mkt. Rd. 541-633-7533, 382-6625

Alpine Meadows Townhomes 1, 2 & 3 bdrm apts. Starting at $625. 541-330-0719

Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc.

Beautiful 2 Bdrms in quiet complex, parklike setting. No smkg. Near St. Charles. W/S/G pd; both W/D hkup + laundry facil. $595-$650/ mo; Free mo with 12-mo lease! 541-385-6928.

634

650

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend

Houses for Rent NE Bend

Call for Specials! Limited numbers avail. 1, 2 & 3 bdrms w/d hookups, patios or decks. Mountain Glen 541-383-9313

Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc.

636

Apt./Multiplex NW Bend DOWNTOWN AREA cute clean studio, $450/$425 dep. all util. paid. no smoking/no pets. 541-330-9769 or 541-480-7870. Small 1 bdrm, $420, 1st, last+$200 dep. 362 NW Riverside, Near Drake park, downtown & Old Mill 541-382-7972. 642

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com, currently receiving over 1.5 million page views, every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 541-385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com 654

Houses for Rent SE Bend

Apt./Multiplex Redmond Brand New 1760 sq.ft., 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath, office, 1326 SW Obsidian, fenced yard, gas fireRedmond, 2 bdrm, 1 place, huge master bath, duplex unit, bdrm & closet, 20277 SE Knightsbridge Pl, $550/mo, $635 dep., $1195. 541-350-2206 541-728-6421.

Real Estate For Sale

700 745

Homes for Sale BANK OWNED HOMES! FREE List w/Pics! www.BendRepos.com bend and beyond real estate 20967 yeoman, bend or

NOTICE:

All real estate advertised here in is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or intention to make any such preferences, limitations or discrimination. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of this law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis. The Bulletin Classified

656 Duplex, 2 bdrm, 2 bath, 1250 sqft, deck, fenced Houses for Rent backyard, DW, inside SW Bend W/D hookups, clean quiet, garage w/opener, An Older 2 bdrm, 2 extra parking, $7 bath, mfd, 938 sq.ft., 10+dep, 541-604-0338 woodstove, quiet .5 acre lot in DRW, on Check out the canal. $795. classiieds online 746 541-480-3393 or www.bendbulletin.com 541-610-7803. Northwest Bend Homes Updated daily

658

A West Side “FIXER UPPER” super location, 796 sq.ft., single Studios $400 garage, $159,900, 1 Bdrm $425 Randy Schoning, Prin• Lots of amenities. 3/2, 1728 sq.ft., great cipal Broker, John L. • Pet friendly room, open kitchen, Scott. 541-480-3393 • W/S/G paid large back yard, 3 car THE BLUFFS APTS. tandem, $1100/mo. 750 340 Rimrock Way, 541-788-9027. Redmond Close to Redmond Homes Clean 4 Bdrm + den, 2 schools, shopping, bath, 14920 SW Mavand parks! erick Rd., CRR. No Looking for your next 541-548-8735 employee? smkg; pets nego. Managed by Place a Bulletin help $900/mo + deposits. GSL Properties wanted ad today and 541-504-8545 or reach over 60,000 541- 350-1660 readers each week. Cute 2 Bdrm, 1 bath, 717 Your classified ad SW 11th St, in town will also appear on near shopping, fenced, bendbulletin.com large shed, no garage, which currently re$650, 541-548-8604 ceives over 1.5 million page Cute 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, views every month large fenced corner at no extra cost. yard, auto sprinkler, Bulletin Classifieds $825/mo + dep. Small Get Results! pet OK. *NO SMOKCall 385-5809 or ING* 541-408-1327 place your ad on-line at 659 bendbulletin.com 648 Houses for Rent

Winter Specials

Houses for Rent Redmond

Houses for Rent General

Sunriver In River Meadows a 3 bdrm, 1.5 bath, 1376 sq. ft., woodstove, brand new carpet/oak floors, W/S pd, $795. 541-480-3393 or 541-610-7803

757

Crook County Homes

PUBLISHER'S SELLER FINANCING NOTICE AVAILABLE! All real estate adverNot Bank-Owned, tising in this newspaNot a Short Sale! per is subject to the 10611 Prairie Fair Housing Act Schooner Rd, Prineville which makes it illegal 671 3 Bdrm, 2.5 Bath, 2,088 to advertise "any sq ft 1-story home on Mobile/Mfd. preference, limitation 51.89ac. Dividable or discrimination for Rent into 5ac parcels. Borbased on race, color, ders BLM. Move-in religion, sex, handiTumalo Riverfront! Ready! $229,900 cap, familial status, 2b/2b sgl. wide with adCall Peter marital status or nadition. W/D hookups, 541-419-5391 for info. tional origin, or an infridge incl. $550 mo. www.GorillaCapital.com tention to make any 1st, last + deposit req. such preference, 541-420-2980 773 limitation or discrimiAcreages nation." Familial sta687 tus includes children Commercial for *** under the age of 18 Rent/Lease living with parents or CHECK YOUR AD legal custodians, Please check your ad lopregnant women, and Office/Warehouse on the first day it runs cated in SE Bend. Up people securing custo make sure it is corto 30,000 sq.ft., comtody of children under rect. Sometimes inpetitive rate, 18. This newspaper structions over the 541-382-3678. will not knowingly acphone are misundercept any advertising stood and an error 693 for real estate which is can occur in your ad. Ofice/Retail Space in violation of the law. If this happens to your Our readers are ad, please contact us for Rent hereby informed that the first day your ad all dwellings adver- An Office with bath, appears and we will tised in this newspabe happy to fix it as various sizes and loper are available on soon as we can. cations from $200 per an equal opportunity month, including utili- Deadlines are: Weekbasis. To complain of days 11:00 noon for ties. 541-317-8717 discrimination call next day, Sat. 11:00 HUD toll-free at Approximately 1800 a.m. for Sunday and sq. ft., perfect for of1-800-877-0246. The Monday. fice or church. South toll free telephone 541-385-5809 end of Bend. Ample number for the hearThank you! parking. $575. ing impaired is The Bulletin Classified 1-800-927-9275. *** 541-408-2318.


TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809

Boats & RV’s

880

880

882

ATVs

Motorhomes

Motorhomes

Fifth Wheels

800 Yamaha Grizzly Sportsman Special 860 2000, 600cc 4-stroke, Motorcycles & Accessories push button 4x4 Ultramatic, 945 mi, $3850. 541-279-5303 870

HARLEY CUSTOM 2007 Dyna Super Glide FXDI loaded, all options, bags, exhaust, wheels, 2 helmets, low mi., beautiful, Must sell, $9995. 541-408-7908

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2011 F3

865

Boats & Accessories

A-Class Hurricane by Four Winds 32’, 2007, 12K mi, cherry wood, leather,queen, sleeps 6, 2 slides, 2 TVs, 2 roof airs, jacks, camera, new cond., non-smoker, new lower price, $54,900 OBO. 541-548-5216.

Marathon V.I.P. Pre- Alpha “See Ya” 30’ 1996, 2 slides, A/C, vost H3-40 Luxury heat pump, exc. cond. Coach. Like new affor Snowbirds, solid ter $132,000 puroak cabs day & night chase & $130,000 in shades, Corian, tile, renovations. Only hardwood. $12,750. 129k orig. mi. 541-923-3417. 541-601-6350. Rare bargain at just $89,400. Look at : www.SeeThisRig.com

931

932

933

Autos & Transportation

Automotive Parts, Service & Accessories

Antique & Classic Autos

Pickups

900

(4) studded tires on wheels, 215/75-R15 w/approx 1200 miles of use. $125 OBO. 541-382-5279

908

STUDDED 225/45R17 94T WinterPike tires on stock ‘05 VW Passat rims, great cond., $325. Ask for Bea, 541-788-2274.

Aircraft, Parts & Service

17’ Seaswirl tri-hull, walk-thru w/bow rail, 1/3 interest in Columgood shape, EZ load Beaver Patriot 2000, bia 400, located at trailer, new carpet, Walnut cabinets, soSunriver. $138,500. new seats w/storage, lar, Bose, Corian, tile, Carri-Lite Luxury 2009 motor for parts only, Call 541-647-3718 4 door fridge., 1 slide, by Carriage, 4 slide$1500 obo, or trade W/D. $85,000 outs, inverter, satelNeed help ixing stuff for 25-35 electric start 541-215-5355 around the house? lite sys, frplc, 2 flat Phoenix Cruiser 2001, short-shaft motor. scrn TVs. $60,000. Call A Service Professional 23 ft. V10, 51K. Large 541-312-3085 and ind the help you need. 541-480-3923 bath, bed & kitchen. www.bendbulletin.com Seats 6-8. Awning. Harley Davidson Call The Bulletin At $30,950. 1/3 interest in wellUltra Classic 2008 541-385-5809. 541-923-4211 equipped IFR Beech Too many upPlace Your Ad Or E-Mail Bonanza A36, logrades to list, imAt: www.bendbulletin.com cated KBDN. $55,000. maculate cond., 541-419-9510 19-ft Mastercraft clean, 15K miles. Pro-Star 190 inboard, $14,900 COACHMAN 1997 Executive Hangar 1987, 290hp, V8, 822 541-693-3975 Catalina 5th wheel at Bend Airport hrs, great cond, lots of 23’, slide, new tires, (KBDN) Winnebago Access 31J extras, $10,000 obo. extra clean, below 60’ wide x 50’ deep, 2008, Class C, Near 541-231-8709 book. $6,500. w/55’ wide x 17’ high Low Retail Price! One 541-548-1422. bi-fold door. Natural owner, non- smoker, gas heat, office, bathgaraged, 7,400 miles, Beaver Santiam 2002, room. Parking for 6 auto leveling jacks, (2) 20.5’ 2004 Bayliner 40’, 2 slides, 48K, cars. Adjacent to slides, upgraded 205 Run About, 220 Price Reduced - 2010 immaculate, 330 Frontage Rd; great queen bed,bunk beds, HP, V8, open bow, Custom Harley Cummins diesel, visibility for aviation microwave, 3-burner exc. cond., very fast DNA Pro-street swing $63,500 OBO, must bus. 1jetjock@q.com range/oven, (3) TVs, w/very low hours, arm frame, Ultima sell.541-504-0874 541-948-2126 and sleeps 10! Lots of lots of extras incl. 107, Ultima 6-spd storage, maintained, tower, Bimini & For Lease: Airplane over $23,000 in parts and very clean! Only custom trailer, hangar approximately alone; 100s of man $76,995! Extended $19,500. 60’ x 65’ on the airhours into custom fabwarranty available! 541-389-1413 field at Roberts Field. rication. Priced for Call (541) 388-7179. Contact Carrie Novquick sale, now, ick at (541) 504-3496 $15,000 OBO Four Winds Chateau Have an item to for further information. 541-408-3317 M-31F 2006, 2 power sell quick? If it’s slides, back-up camera, many upgrades, 20.5’ Seaswirl Spyunder $500 you Companion 26’ 1992, great cond. $39,900. der 1989 H.O. 302, Done RV’ing, noncan place it in 541-419-7099 285 hrs., exc. cond., Honda VT700 smoker, exc. cond, stored indoors for Shadow 1984, 23K, The Bulletin Gulfstream Scenic some extras incl., life $11,900 OBO. many new parts, Cruiser 36 ft. 1999, $4500, 503-951-0447, 541-379-3530 Classiieds for battery charger, Cummins 330 hp. dieRedmond good condition, T-Hangar for rent sel, 42K, 1 owner, 13 $10 - 3 lines, 7 days Ads published in the $3000 OBO. at Bend airport. in. kitchen slide out, $ "Boats" classification 541-382-1891 16 3 lines, 14 days Call 541-382-8998. new tires,under cover, include: Speed, fishhwy. miles only,4 door (Private Party ads only) ing, drift, canoe, 916 fridge/freezer iceKAWASAKI 750 2005 house and sail boats. Trucks & maker, W/D combo, like new, 2400 miles, For all other types of Interbath tub & stored 5 years. New Heavy Equipment watercraft, please see 2010 Cougar 276RLS, lrg shower, 50 amp. probattery, sports shield, slide, loaded with Class 875. pane gen & more! shaft drive, $3400 amenities, like new, 541-385-5809 $55,000. firm. 541-447-6552. $24,995. 541-593-6303 541-948-2310 Winnebago Sightseer 865 2008 30B Class A, ATVs GENERATE SOME exTop-of-the-line RV locitement in your neigcated at our home in 1982 INT. Dump with borhood. Plan a ga- Hunter’s Delight! Packsoutheast Bend. Arborhood, 6k on reage deal! 1988 Winrage sale and don't $79,500 OBO. Cell # built 392, truck refurnebago Super Chief, forget to advertise in 805-368-1575. Fleetwood Wilderness bished, has 330 gal. 38K miles, great classified! 385-5809. 36’ 2005 4 slides, rear water tank with pump 881 shape; 1988 Bronco II bdrm, fireplace, AC, and hose. Everything Polaris 330 Trail 4x4 to tow, 130K Travel Trailers W/D hkup beautiful works, $8,500 OBO. Bosses (2), used mostly towed miles, unit! $30,500. 541-977-8988 very little, like new, nice rig! $15,000 both. Kit Sportsman 26ft. 541-815-2380 Used out-drive $1800 ea. OBO, 541-382-3964, leave 1997, camp trailer, parts - Mercury 541-420-1598 msg. solar panel, catalytic Look at: Bendhomes.com OMC rebuilt maheater, furnace, sleep for Complete Listings of rine motors: 151 6-7, self contained, Itasca Spirit Class C Area Real Estate for Sale $1595; 3.0 $1895; good cond., a must 2007, 20K mi., front see. $4500. 4.3 (1993), $1995. entertainment center, Polaris Phoenix, 541-388-6846. 541-389-0435 all bells & whistles, Komfort 24’ 1999, 6’ MUST SELL 2005, 2+4 200cc, extremely good Komfort 27’ 2006, Like slide, fully loaded,never GMC 6000 dump like new, low hours, cond., 2 slides, 2 875 new,used 4x,fiberglass, used since buying, truck 1990. 7 yard runs great, $1700 or HDTV’s, $52,000 14’ slide-out,2 TV’s,CD/ $9700, 541-923-0854. bed, low mi., good Watercraft best offer. OBO, 541-447-5484 DVD surround sound. condition, new tires! Call 541-388-3833 21” awning, couch w/ ONLY $3500 OBO. Ads published in "Waqueen hideabed, AC, 541-593-3072 tercraft" include: Kayheavy duty hitch, night/ Montana 34’ 2003, 2 aks, rafts and motordaylight shades, pwr slides, exc. cond. ized personal front jack, & more! throughout, arctic watercrafts. For Jayco Greyhawk $19,000 541-382-6731 winter pkg., new "boats" please see 2004, 31’ Class C, Single white male, 5’8”/ 10-ply tires, W/D Class 870. 165, home owner, 6800 mi., hyd. jacks, SPRINGDALE 2005 ready, $25,000, GMC Ventura 3500 seeks petite single new tires, slide out, 541-385-5809 27’, has eating area 1986, refrigerated, 541-948-5793 white female to spend exc. cond, $54,000, slide, A/C and heat, w/6’x6’x12’ box, has quiet eves, btwn age 541-480-8648 new tires, all con2 sets tires w/rims., 30-45. 541-504-1619 tents included, bed1250 lb. lift gate, ding towels, cooking new engine, $4,500, and eating utensils. 541-389-6588, ask Great for vacation, for Bob. fishing, hunting or living! $15,500 MONTANA 3585 2008, exc. cond., 3 slides, 541-408-3811 king bed, lrg LR, ArcCall 541-385-5809 to promote your service • Advertise for 28 days starting at $140 (This special package is not available on our website) tic insulation, all opPettibone Mercury tions $37,500. fork lift, 6000 lb., 2 541-420-3250 stage, propane, hard Building/Contracting Handyman Landscaping/Yard Care rubber tires, $3500, 541-389-5355. OREGON NOTICE: Oregon state Margo Construction NOTICE: Landscape Contrac- Springdale 29’ 2007, law requires anyLLC Since 1992 tors Law (ORS 671) one who contracts • Pavers • Carpentry slide,Bunkhouse style, requires all busifor construction work • Remodeling • Decks • sleeps 7-8, excellent nesses that advertise to be licensed with the Window/Door condition, $16,900, Pilgrim 27’, 2007 5th to perform LandConstruction Con- Replacement • Int/Ext 541-390-2504 wheel, 1 slide, AC, scape Construction tractors Board (CCB). Paint CCB 176121 • TV,full awning, excelwhich includes: An active license 541-480-3179 lent shape, $23,900. Chevy Bonanza planting, decks, means the contractor 541-350-8629 1978, runs good. I DO THAT! fences, arbors, is bonded and in$5900 OBO. Call water-features, and sured. Verify the Home/Rental repairs TURN THE PAGE 541-390-1466. installation, repair of contractor’s CCB li- Small jobs to remodels For More Ads irrigation systems to cense through the Fall jobs before Winter 925 CB#151573 be licensed with the Sprinter 272RLS, 2009 CCB Consumer The Bulletin 29’, weatherized, like Dennis 541-317-9768 Landscape ContracWebsite Utility Trailers new, furnished & www.hirealicensedcontractor. tors Board. This 885 ready to go, incl Winecom 4-digit number is to be or call 503-378-4621. Landscaping/Yard Care gard Satellite dish, Canopies & Campers included in all adver$28,800. 541-420-9964 The Bulletin recomtisements which indimends checking with 12 ft. Hydraulic cate the business has the CCB prior to condump trailer w/extra a bond, insurance and tracting with anyone. sides, dual axle, 1978 Dynacruiser 9½’ workers compensaSome other trades steel ramps, spare camper, fully selftion for their employalso require additire, tarp, excellent contained, no leaks, ees. For your protectional licenses and condition. $6500 Weekend Warrior Toy clean, everything tion call 503-378-5909 More Than Service certifications. firm. 541-419-6552 Hauler 28’ 2007,Gen, works, must see! Will or use our website: Peace Of Mind fuel station, exc cond. fit 65” tailgate openwww.lcb.state.or.us to Debris Removal sleeps 8, black/gray ing. $2500 firm. check license status interior, used 3X, Fall Clean Up 541-420-6846 before contracting JUNK BE GONE $27,500. Don’t track it in all Winter with the business. l Haul Away FREE •Leaves 541-389-9188 Persons doing landFor Salvage. Also •Cones scape maintenance Cleanups & Cleanouts •Needles do not require a LCB What are you •Pruning Mel 541-389-8107 2004 Pacesetter flatlicense. •Debris Hauling bed, dual wheels, looking for? You’ll Excavating aluminum diamond Tile/Ceramic Arctic Fox 10’ 2005, fi nd it in The plate decking & aluGutter 990 Camper, A/C, Levi’s Dirt Works: minum tool box. Steve Lahey Construction Bulletin Classifieds Cleaning 2500 Watt prop gen. Residential/Commercial Electric tongue lift. Tile Installation $16,500. 541.325.1956 General Contractor: $1600. 541-388-7944 Over 20 Yrs. Exp. For all your dirt & Compost Lance-Legend 990 Call For Free Estimate excavation needs. Applications 541-977-4826 11’3" 1998, w/ext-cab, • Snow Removal Looking for your Use Less Water CCB#166678 exc. cond., generator, • Subcontracting next employee? solar-cell, large refrig, Big Tex Landscap$$$ SAVE $$$ • Public Works • Concrete Place a Bulletin help AC, micro., magic fan, ing/ ATV Trailer, Improve Soil • Small & large jobs for wanted ad today and bathroom shower, dual axle flatbed, contractors/home ownreach over 60,000 removable carpet, 7’x16’, 7000 lb. 2012 Maintenance ers by job or hour. readers each week. custom windows, outGVW, all steel, Package Available • Driveway grading (low Your classified ad door shower/awning $1400. weekly, monthly cost-get rid of pot holes will also appear on set-up for winterizing, 541-382-4115, or &smooth out your drive) and bendbulletin.com elec. jacks, CD/ste541-280-7024. • Custom pads large/small one time service which currently rereo/4’ stinger. $9500. • Operated rentals & auceives over 1.5 milBend, 541.279.0458 gering • Wet/dry utils. EXPERIENCED lion page views evCCB#194077 Commercial ery month at no 541-639-5282 & Residential extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get ReHandyman Free Estimates sults! Call 385-5809 Senior Discounts or place your ad ERIC REEVE on-line at If it's under $500 541-390-1466 HANDY SERVICES When ONLY the BEST bendbulletin.com Same Day Response Home & Commercial will do! you can place it Repairs, 2003 Lance 1030 DeCarpentry-Painting, in The Bulletin luxe Model Camper, Need to get an ad Pressure-washing, loaded, phenomenal Classiieds for Honey Do's. Small or condition. $17,500. in ASAP? large jobs. On-time 2007 Dodge 6.7 promise. Fax it to 541-322-7253 Cummins Diesel 3500 Senior Discount. 4x4 long bed, 58K mi, All work guaranteed. The Bulletin $34,900. Or buy as 541-389-3361 or (Private Party ads only) unit, $48,500. 541-771-4463 Bonded Classifi eds 541-331-1160 & Insured CCB#181595

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541-385-5809

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$10 - 3 lines, 7 days $16 - 3 lines, 14 days

Dodge pickup D100 classic, nal 318 wide push button straight, runs $1250 firm. 831-295-4903

Tires, Studded, 215/70 R15 Hankook, Zobac HPW-401,on steel rims $300, 541-647-4232

1962 Ford F250 1997 X-cab 4x4, auto, 112K, 460, origiAC, PW, PL, Split block, window, factory tow trans, pkg, receiver hitches, good, front & rear, incl. 5th Bend, wheel platform, Unit incl. cloth interior, exc. cond. $6500. Please call: 541-546-9821, Culver

We Buy Scrap! Auto & Truck Batteries, up to FIAT 1800 1978 5-spd, $10. Buying junk cars door panels w/flowers & trucks, up to $500, & hummingbirds, & scrap metal! white soft top & hard Call 541-408-1090 top, Reduced! $5,500, 541-317-9319 or 932 541-647-8483 Antique & Ford Mustang Coupe Classic Autos 1966, original owner, V8, automatic, great Chev Impala 1962 2 shape, $9000 OBO. dr. hardtop, 283 en530-515-8199 gine, 3 spd. $12,000 541-536-9646

Chevrolet Corvette 1967 Convertible with removable hard top. #'s matching, 4 speed, 327-350 hp, black leather interior. $58,500 541-306-6290

Mercury Monterrey 1965, Exc. All original, 4-dr. sedan, in storage last 15 yrs., 390 High Compression engine, new tires & license, reduced to $2850, 541-410-3425.

FORD F250 4x4 1994 460 engine, cab and a half, 5-spd stick shift,5th wheel hitch, 189K miles. $1950. Call 541-389-9764

Ford F250 SuperDuty Crew Cab 2008, diesel, low mi., Almost every option, heated power seats, sun roof, Leer topper, etc. $37,499 OBO. Call 541-306-7835. FORD Pickup 1977, step side, 351 Windsor, 115,000 miles, MUST SEE! $3800 OBO. 541-350-1686

MUST SELL

Plymouth Barracuda For Memorial 1966, original car! 300 70 Monte Carlo hp, 360 V8, centerAll original, beautiful, lines, (Original 273 GMC ½-ton Pickup, car, completely new eng & wheels incl.) suspension and brake 1972, LWB, 350hi 541-593-2597 system, plus extras. motor, mechanically $4000 OBO. A-1, interior great; 541-593-3072 body needs some VW BAJA BUG TLC. $4000 OBO. 1974 1776cc enCall 541-382-9441 gine. New: shocks, tires, disc brakes, interior paint, flat FIND IT! black. $4900 OBO; BUY IT! over $7000 invested. SELL IT! 541-322-9529. Chevy Chevelle 1967, The Bulletin Classiieds 283 & Powerglide, very clean, quality updates, The Bulletin $21,000, 541-420-1600 To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com 933

Pickups 1950 CHEVY CLUB COUPE, Cobalt Blue, Great condition, runs well, lots of spare parts. $9995. Call 541-419-7828

Chevy Corvette Coupe 2006, 8,471 orig miles, 1 owner, always garaged, red, 2 tops, auto/paddle shift, LS-2, Corsa exhaust, too many options to list, pristine car, $37,500. Serious only, call 541-504-9945

Chevy Wagon 1957, 4-dr. , complete, $15,000 OBO, trades, please call 541-420-5453. Chrysler 300 Coupe 1967, 440 engine, auto. trans, ps, air, frame on rebuild, repainted original blue, original blue interior, original hub caps, exc. chrome, asking $9000 or make offer. 541-385-9350.

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Sport Utility Vehicles Chevy 4x4 1970, short wide box, canopy, 30K mi on premium 350 motor; RV cam, electronic ignition, tow pkg, new paint/detailing inside & out, 1 owner since 1987. $4500. 541-923-5911

Ford F150 XLT 4x4, 2000 nice truck, loaded, 5.4L, AT, 200K mainly hwy miles, tow pkg, $6900. 541-815-9939

Ford F-250 1986, Lariat, x-cab, 2WD, auto, gas or propane, 20K orig. mi., new tires, $5000, 541-480-8009.

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Employment Marketplace Call

Chrysler SD 4-Door 1930, CDS Royal Standard, 8-cylinder, body is good, needs some restoration, runs, taking bids, 541-383-3888, 541-815-3318

International Flat Bed Pickup 1963, 1 ton dually, 4 spd. trans., great MPG, could be exc. wood hauler, runs great, new brakes, $1950. 541-419-5480.

541-385-5809 to advertise. www.bendbulletin.com

4-WHEELER’S OR HUNTER’S SPECIAL! Jeep 4-dr wagon, 1987 4x4, silver, nice wheels, 183K, lots of miles left yet! Off-road or on. Under $1000. Call 541-318-9999 or 541-815-3639. Free trip to D.C. for WWII Vets!

CHEVY SUBURBAN LT 2005, low miles., good tires, new brakes, moonroof Reduced to $15,750 541-389-5016.

Chevy Tahoe 2003 pwr. drs, windows, driver's seat; CD; tow pkg; upgraded wheels; 3rd row seats; cloth; 1 owner;166K;exc.cond, $9900. 360-701-9462 Chevy Tahoe LT 2001, Taupe, very clean, 102K miles, 1 owner, garaged, maint. records provided, new brakes, new battery, extra tires incl., lots of extras, $9500, 541-504-4224

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F4 WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2011 • THE BULLETIN 975

Sport Utility Vehicles

Automobiles

Ford Excursion 2005, 4WD, diesel, exc. cond., $24,000, call 541-923-0231.

Nissan Xterra S - 4x4 2006, AT, 76K, good all-weather tires, $13,500 obo. 858-345-0084

Buick Regal Grand Sport 1999, 140k, loaded with it all for the persnickety fun-car lover. This car in perfect condition is worth $6000, I’m asking $3000 to allow you to bring it up to perfection or drive it to NYC as is! Call Bob, 541-318-9999 or Sam, 541-815-3639.

Cadillac DeVille Sedan 1993, leather interior, all pwr., 4 new tires w/chrome rims, dark green, CD/radio, under 100K mi., runs exc. $2500 OBO, 541-805-1342

Cadillac SedanDeVille 2002, loaded, Northstar motor, FWD, exPorsche Cayenne 2004, lnt in snow, new tires, 86k, immac.,loaded, Champagne w/tan dealer maint, $19,500. leather, Bose stereo. 503-459-1580. Looks / runs / drives perfect, showroom Toyota FJ-40 condition!!$7100 OBO 206-458-2603 (Bend) Landcruiser 1966, 350 Chev, Chevy Corvette 1988 Downey conversion, 4-spd manual with 4-spd, 4” lift, 33’s, 3-spd O/D. Sharp, three tops! $6500 loaded, 2 tops, (tinted OBO. 541-388-2875. & metal. New AC, water pump, brake & VW Touareg SUV 2006, clutch, master cylinAWD, 68K, tow pkg, der & clutch slave cyl. new Michelin tires, $6500 OBO. $12,995,541-318-4846 541-419-0251. 940

Vans CHEVY ASTRO EXT 1993 AWD mini van, 3 seats, rear barn doors, white, good tires/wheels. Pretty interior, clean, no rips or tears. Drives exc! $2950. Free trip to D.C. for WWII Vets! (541) 318-9999 or (541) 815-3639 Chevy Gladiator 1993, great shape, great mileage, full pwr., all leather, auto, 4 captains chairs, fold down bed, fully loaded, $3950 OBO, call 541-536-6223.

Dodge Grand Caravan SXT 2005: StoNGo, 141k miles, power doors/trunk $7850. Call 541-639-9960 Advertise your car! Add A Picture! Reach thousands of readers!

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

Chrysler LeBaron Convertible, 1992, red, runs great, $1000. Call 541-382-3704

Chrysler PT Cruiser ‘08, $9600, 51k+ mi., auto, A/C, cruise, PDL/PW, tilt, CD, moon wheels & caps, 70K mi. all weather tires, great cond., 541-504-1197.

Ford Mustang Convertible LX 1989, V8 engine, white w/red interior, 44K mi., exc. cond., $5995, 541-389-9188. Ford Taurus 1996 115k, white, 4-dr. sedan, excellent condition, estate sale, $1750. Please call for more info. Bob, 541-318-9999 Sam, 541-815-3639

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Legal Notices LEGAL NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE STATE OF OREGON FOR THE COUNTY OF DESCHUTES PROBATE DEPARTMENT In the Matter of the Estate of: ELEANOR SCHECK, Deceased. Case No.: 11PB0135 NOTICE TO INTERESTED PERSONS

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Mercury Cougar 1994, XR7 V8, 77K miles, excellent condition, $4695. 541-526-1443

Automobiles AUDI QUATTRO CABRIOLET 2004, extra nice, low mileage, heated seats, new Michelins, all wheel drive, $12,995 503-635-9494.

Dated and first published December 7, 2011. Judith Vanhouweling, Personal Representative

Audi S4 2005, 4.2 Avant Quattro, tiptronic, premium & winter wheels & tires, Bilstein shocks, coil over springs, HD anti sway, APR exhaust, K40 radar, dolphin gray, ext. warranty, 56K, garaged, $30,000. 541-593-2227

BMW 323i Convertible, 1999.MUST SELL,91K, great cond, beautiful car, incredibly fun ride! Was $9300; make offer. 541-419-1763.

BMW 525i 2004

New body style, Steptronic auto., cold-weather package, premium package, heated seats, extra nice. $14,995. 503-635-9494.

Where buyers meet sellers. Thousands of ads daily in print and online. To place your ad, visit www.bendbulletin.com or call 541-385-5809

PHH MORTGAGE CORPORATION Plaintiff, v. UNKNOWN HEIRS OF WILDA JUNE MOORE, DECEASED, LIN G. MOORE, and SUMMER CREEK HOMEOWNER'S ASSOCIATION Defendant/s. Case No.: 11CV0253AB

1980 Classic Mini Cooper All original, rust-free, classic Mini Cooper in perfect cond. $10,000 OBO. 541-408-3317 Mitsubishi 3000 GT 1999, auto., pearl white, very low mi. $9500. 541-788-8218. PORSCHE 914, 1974 Roller (no engine), lowered, full roll cage, 5-pt harnesses, racing seats, 911 dash & instruments, decent shape, very cool! $1699. 541-678-3249 Saab 9-3 SE 1999 convertible, 2 door, Navy with black soft top, tan interior, very good condition. $5200 firm. 541-317-2929.

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Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subject to FRAUD. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

LARRY BLANTON Deschutes County Sheriff Laura Conard, Field Law Technician Date: November 17, 2011 Published in Bend Bulletin Date of First and Successive Publications: November 23, 2011; November 30, 2011; December 7, 2011 Date of Last Publication December 14, 2011

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Conditions of Sale: Only U.S. currency and/or cashier's checks made payable to Deschutes County Sheriff's Office will be accepted. Payment must be made in full immediately upon the close of the sale. LEGAL NOTICE PUBLIC AUCTION Public auction to be held Saturday, December 17, 2011 at 1:30 P.M., at Jamison Street Self Storage, 63177 Jamison St., Bend OR 97701. (Unit B-179, Jonathon Ueland) (Unit B-221, Frank Massari)

on the Board of Directors of Redmond Fire & Rescue will occur at Redmond Fire & Rescue, 341 NW Dogwood Avenue Redmond, Oregon on December 14, 2011 @ 7:00 pm. Copies of the planned ordinance are available at Redmond Fire & Rescue, 341 NW Dogwood Avenue Redmond, Oregon 97756. Agenda items : Minutes, Property Tax Update, October Financial Dash Board, November’s Call Report, Standards of Coverage, Emergency Operations Center, Ambulance Revenue Report, Medicare Update, Civil Service Rules, RFP for Insurance Agent of Record, Emergency Operations Plan, and the Community Wildfire Protection Plan.

Notice is hereby given that the undersigned has been appointed PUBLIC NOTICE and has qualified as Notice of Ordinance the personal repre#2011-01 to be sentative of the EsConsidered and tate of Eleanor Redmond Fire & Rescue Attorney: Scheck. All persons Board Meeting having claims against Robert C. Dougherty, OSB #87027 the estate are hereby The first reading and conLaw Office of required to present sideration of the Notice of Robert C. Dougherty their claims, with Ordinance #2011-01 ex1130 SW Morrison St., cluding fire fighters (volproper vouchers atSte. 210 unteer or otherwise) and tached, within four employees from serving (503) 241-2331 months after the date of first publication of 1000 1000 1000 this notice, as stated Legal Notices Legal Notices Legal Notices below, to the personal representative LEGAL NOTICE at: IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE STATE OF OREGON DESCHUTES COUNTY Judith Vanhouweling, Personal COLUMBIA STATE BANK, Successor in Interest to Columbia River Bank, a Representative Washington State Chartered Bank, c/o L. Thomas Clark Plaintiff, 521 NW Harriman St. v. Bend, OR 97701 R&G RENTALS, LLC, an Oregon limited liability company; AMERICAN SPRINKLERS, INC., an Oregon corporation; UNITED or claims may be RENTALS NORTHWEST, INC., an Oregon corporation; PLATT ELECTRIC barred. SUPPLY, INC., an Oregon corporation; CENTRAL OREGON INTERGOVERNMENTAL COUNCIL, an intergovernmental entity; All persons whose AMERITECH MACHINE MFG, INC., an Oregon corporation; and rights may be affected by the pro- RONALD H. COOK, an individual; DESCHUTES COUNTY OF THE STATE OF OREGON, a governmental entity; and GORDON W. WOOLSEY, ceedings in the esan individual, tate may obtain Defendants. additional information from the records of Case No.: 09CV0547ST the court, the personal representative, Notice is hereby given that I will on December 15, 2011, at 11:10a.m. in or the attorney for the the main lobby of the Deschutes County Sheriff's Office, 63333 W. Highpersonal representaway 20, Bend, Oregon, sell, at public oral auction to the highest bidder, for tive, L. Thomas Clark, cash or cashier's check, the following real property, further described in at the address set the attached Exhibit "A": forth above.

Nissan Quest 1996 150k, $4900; Ford Windstar 1995 138k, you will like what you see, bring money, $1900. Close to Costco.Phone Bob, LEGAL NOTICE Sr. 541-318-9999, or Mazda Speed 3, 2007, IN THE CIRCUIT Sam, son black, orig owner, gaCOURT OF THE 541-815-3639. raged, non-smoker. STATE OF OREGON Free trip to DC for Great cond, 77K mi, DESCHUTES COUNTY WWII vets. $12,500. 541-610-5885

Plymouth Voyager SE 1995, lots of new work, runs good, snow tires included, $1300. Call 541-306-7241

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Legal Notices y (e)Rights of neighboring property owners; and (f)Environmental laws and regulations that affect the property.

NOTICE OF SALE UNDER WRIT OF EXECUTIONREAL PROPERTY Notice is hereby given that I will on January 12, 2012, at 11:00a.m. in the main lobby of the Deschutes County Sheriff's Office, 63333 W. Highway 20, Bend, Oregon, sell, at public oral auction to the highest bidder, for cash or cashier's check, the following real property, known as 3672 SW 30th Street, Redmond, Oregon 97756, to wit, Lot Fifty (50), SUMMER CREEK PHASE 2, recorded June 11, 2004, in Cabinet G, Page 305, Deschutes County, Oregon Said sale is made under a Writ of Execution issued out of the Circuit Court of the State of Oregon for the County of Deschutes, dated November 1, 2011, to me directed in the above-entitled action wherein PHH Mortgage Corporation as plaintiff, recovered Stipulated General Judgment of Foreclosure and Money Award on September 23, 2011, against Unknown Heirs of Wilda June Moore, Deceased, Lin G. Moore and Summer Creek Homeowner's Association as defendant/s. BEFORE BIDDING AT THE SALE, A PROSPECTIVE BIDDER SHOULD INDEPENDENTLY INVESTIGATE: (a)The priority of the lien or interest of the judgment creditor; (b)Land use laws and regulations applicable to the property; (c)Approved uses for the property; (d)Limits on farming or forest practices on the property;

833 SE 1st St. Redmond, Oregon 97756 Said sale is made under a Writ of Execution of Foreclosure of Real Property issued out of the Circuit Court of the State of Oregon for the County of Deschutes, dated November 01, 2011, to me directed in the above-entitled action wherein Columbia State Bank as plaintiff, recovered General Judgment and Money Award on October 13, 2011, against R&G Rentals LLC, American Sprinklers, Inc., United Rentals Northwest, Inc., Platt Electric Supply, Inc., Central Oregon Intergovernmental Council, Ameritech Machine Mfg, Inc., Ronald H. Cook, and Gordon W. Woolsey as Defendants. BEFORE BIDDING AT THE SALE, A PROSPECTIVE BIDDER SHOULD INDEPENDENTLY INVESTIGATE: (a)The priority of the lien or interest of the judgment creditor; (b)Land use laws and regulations applicable to the property; (c)Approved uses for the property; (d)Limits on farming or forest practices on the property; (e)Rights of neighboring property owners; and (f)Environmental laws and regulations that affect the property. LARRY BLANTON Deschutes County Sheriff

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx5611 T.S. No.: 1340852-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Kimberly Strain and John Strain II, as Grantor to Chicago Title Insurance Company, as Trustee, in favor of National City Mortgage A Division of National City Bank, as Beneficiary, dated February 19, 2008, recorded June 20, 2008, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2008-26662 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: The land hereinafter described is situated in the County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, and is described as follows: That portion of Lots 16 and 17 in Block QQ, Deschutes River Woods, Deschutes County, Oregon, described as follows: Beginning at the Northwest corner of Lot 17, the true point of beginning; thence South Along the West line of Lot 17, 30 feet; thence East 235 feet; thence South 03 degrees 18'20" West 186.14 feet to the South line of Lot 16; thence South 86 degrees 41'40" East along the South line of Lot 16, 165 feet to the East line of Lot 16; thence North 03 degrees 18 '20" East, 216.14 feet to the Northeast corner of Lot 17, thence West along the North line of Lot 17, 400 feet to the point of Beginning. TAX ID: 110952 Commonly known as: 19244 Shoshone Rd Bend OR 97702. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due February 1, 2010 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,780.39 Monthly Late Charge $79.13. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $264,251.08 together with interest thereon at 5.750% per annum from January 01, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on February 21, 2012 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: October 12, 2011. Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-394355 11/16, 11/23, 11/30, 12/07 1000

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LEGAL NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE STATE OF OREGON DESCHUTES COUNTY SANDRA KILANDER, Plaintiff, v. WHISTLER DEV, LLC, (also known as WHISTLER DEVELOPMENT, LLC) an Oregon limited liability company; THE RIDGE GROUP LLC, an Oregon limited liability company; CREDITORS COLLECTION SERVICE, INC., an Oregon business corporation; THE PETER A. ELSTER AND GWEN A. ELSTER TRUST, Peter A. Elster and Gwen A. Elster, Trustees; DUANE J. BIRKHOFER, an individual; JAMES A. MARTIN, an individual; SYDNE ANDERSON, an individual; BEND HOUSING INVESTMENTS LLC, an Oregon limited liability company; KERRY FULLER ENTERPRISES, INC., an Oregon business corporation, dba PAVEMENT PROTECTORS; and JOHN PEWTHER, individually, Defendant/s.

Blair Barkhurst, Reserve Deputy Sheriff Date: November 09, 2011

Case No.: 11CV0136MA NOTICE OF SALE UNDER AMENDED WRIT OF EXECUTION IN FORECLOSURE

Published in Bend Bulletin Date of First and Successive Publications:November 16, 2011;November 23, 2011;November 30, 2011 Date of Last Publication December 07, 2011 Attorney:Shannon Raye Martinez, OSB #034276 Saalfeld Griggs PC P.O. Box 470 Salem, OR 97308-0470 Conditions of Sale: Only U.S. currency and/or cashier's checks made payable to Deschutes County Sheriff's Office will be accepted. Payment must be made in full immediately upon the close of the sale. 1000

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LEGAL NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE STATE OF OREGON DESCHUTES COUNTY ARNOLD IRRIGATION DISTRICT, Plaintiff, v. RANDALL LUCAS and MARTHA LUCAS husband and wife; VERICREST FINANCIAL, INC., a Delaware corporation, and the UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, acting by and through its agency, the INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, Defendant/s.

Notice is hereby given that I will on January 5, 2012, at 11:30a.m. in the main lobby of the Deschutes County Sheriff's Office, 63333 W. Highway 20, Bend, Oregon, sell, at public oral auction to the highest bidder, for cash or cashier's check, the following real property known as, Lot 1, Block 4, ROBERTS ADDITION TO REDMOND, TOGETHER WITH Lot 1 of a replat of Lot 1, Block 2 of RIMROCK ACRES, Deschutes County, Oregon Said sale is made under an Amended Writ of Execution in Foreclosure issued out of the Circuit Court of the State of Oregon for the County of Deschutes, dated November 18, 2011, to me directed in the above-entitled action wherein Sandra Kilanderas plaintiff, recovered Stipulated Limited Judgment on October 18, 2011, against Whistler Dev, LLC, aka Whistler Development, LLC, and John Pewther as defendant/s. BEFORE BIDDING AT THE SALE, A PROSPECTIVE BIDDER SHOULD INDEPENDENTLY INVESTIGATE: (a)The priority of the lien or interest of the judgment creditor; (b)Land use laws and regulations applicable to the property; (c)Approved uses for the property; (d)Limits on farming or forest practices on the property; (e)Rights of neighboring property owners; and (f)Environmental laws and regulations that affect the property. LARRY BLANTON Deschutes County Sheriff

Case No.: CV101963

Steven Binstock, Reserve Deputy Sheriff Date: November 30, 2011

NOTICE OF SALE UNDER WRIT OF EXECUTIONREAL PROPERTY

Published in Bend Bulletin Date of First and Successive Publications:December 7, 2011;December 14, 2011;December 21, 2011 Date of Last Publication December 28, 2011

Notice is hereby given that I will on January 5, 2012, at 11:15 a.m. in the main lobby of the Deschutes County Sheriff's Office, 63333 W. Highway 20, Bend, Oregon, sell, at public oral auction to the highest bidder, for cash or cashier's check, the following real property, known as 60540 Billadeau Road, Bend, Oregon 97702, to wit, The East Half of the Northeast Quarter of the Northwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter (E1/2 NE1/4 NW1/4 SW1/4) of Section 19, Township 18 South, Range 13 East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon. EXCEPTING THEREFROM the North 10 feet. Tax Map Number 18-13-19-00-01100. Said sale is made under a Writ of Execution issued out of the Circuit Court of the State of Oregon for the County of Deschutes, dated November 18, 2011, to me directed in the above-entitled action wherein Arnold Irrigation District as plaintiff, recovered General Judgment and Money Award on May 12, 2011, against Randall Lucas and Martha Lucas as defendant/s.

Attorney:Edward P. Fitch, OSB #78202 Bryant Emerson & Fitch, LLP 888 SW Evergreen Avenue Redmond, OR 97756 (541) 548-2151 Conditions of Sale: Only U.S. currency and/or cashier's checks made payable to Deschutes County Sheriff's Office will be accepted. Payment must be made in full immediately upon the close of the sale.

BEFORE BIDDING AT THE SALE, A PROSPECTIVE BIDDER SHOULD INDEPENDENTLY INVESTIGATE: (a)The priority of the lien or interest of the judgment creditor; (b)Land use laws and regulations applicable to the property; (c)Approved uses for the property; (d)Limits on farming or forest practices on the property; (e)Rights of neighboring property owners; and (f)Environmental laws and regulations that affect the property. LARRY BLANTON Deschutes County Sheriff Anthony Raguine, Civil Technician Date: December 1, 2011 Published in Bend Bulletin Date of First and Successive Publications:December 7, 2011;December 14, 2011;December 21, 2011 Date of Last Publication December 28, 2011 Attorney:Mark G. Reinecke, OSB #914073 Bryant, Lovlien& Jarvis, PC 591 SW Mill View Way Bend, OR 97702 (541) 382-4331 Conditions of Sale: Bidder's funds will be reviewed by Deschutes County Sheriff's Office prior to the auction. Only U.S. currency and/or cashier's checks made payable to Deschutes County Sheriff's Office will be accepted. Payment must be made in full immediately upon the close of the sale.

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Bulletin Daily Paper 12/7/11