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Inside SPECIAL INSERT-

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TODAY'S READERBOARD Marine migrationStudied through the lens of a

nuclear disaster.A3

Special Olympics — oregon's winter gamesare going

to be at Bachelor, with a local

contingent set to compete.B1 -'j

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Tolovlslon —DonnieWahlberg talks about going from the

• The aim is to address underlying issuesfor veterans; nofunding yet

• The union representing such workers expects a fight but says apaybumpwould help address high turnover

wrong side of the

By Sheila G. Miller

law during his

The Bulletin

younger days to producing the real-

The Deschutes County District Attorney's Office wants to start a specialty court for veterans that would allow them to receive treatment and avoid jail time, but funding is still unclear. Nevertheless, prosecutors in t h e o f f ice have already visited a similar program under way in Klamath County, have been selected to participate in a training program in 2014, and say it's an important priority. Deputy District Attorney Eric Marvin said the treatment court will do more than simply handle a veteran's criminal behavior, particularly because a veteran could be suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder, traumatic brain injury or other issues. "We're not going to stop the behavior unless we address the underlying problems," he said. To determine the need for the specialty court, Marvin said his office has begun tracking the veterans entering the criminal justice system and the types of crimes they're committing, though no numbers are yet available. High rates of unemployment and suicide among veterans are motivating factors for getting the court up and running, Marvin said, "because there are a lot of good men and women who wouldn't otherwise be involved in the criminal justice system if not for combat." The court'smodel, according to a news release, requiresregular court appearances, as well as treatment sessions and testing for drugs and alcohol. See Veterans/A7

ity show "Boston's Finest."B7

PlllS —The actors of "Lost": Where are they now?BS

HOuSing CriSiS —Banks find wrongful foreclosures on military members.A2

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In WOrld neWS —Cardinals meettodayaheadofaconclave to choose anewpope. A2

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And a Web exclusiveThree more stories about Pope Benedict XVI's resignation and

the selection of a successor. bendbnlletin.cnm/extras

EDITOR'5CHOICE

L.A. school board races seen asa wider test

Li.s. mLllls Babyis

foreign hackers'

said to be cured

motives

Of HIV

By Nicole Perlroth,

By Lauran Neergaard

By Jennifer Medina

David E. Sanger and

The Associated Press

New York Times News Service

Michael S. Schmidt

LOS ANGELES — On Tuesday, voters in Los Angeles will go to the polls for a mayoral primary. But much of the attention will also be on the threeraces for the school board, a battle that involves the mayor, the teachers' union and a host of advocatesfrom across the country — including New York City's billionaire mayor — who have poured millions of dollars into the races. The outcome of the political fight for the school board seats will have a profound impact on the direction of the nation's second-largest school district. But the clash has also become a sort of test case for those who want to overhaul public education, weakening the power of theteachers'union, pushingformore charter schools and changing the way teachers are hired and fired.

New York Times News

WASHINGTON — A baby born with the virus that causes AIDS appears to have been cured, scientists announced Sunday, describing the case of a child from Mississippi who's now 2t/~ and has been off medication for about a year with no signs of infection. There's no guarantee the child will remain healthy, although sophisticated testing uncovered just tracesofthe virus'genetic material still lingering. If so, it would mark only the world's second reported cure. Specialists say Sunday's announcement, at a major AIDS meeting in Atlanta, offers

After years of pressing to take power away from local school boards, some advocates have directed their money and attention directly to school boards in the hope that they will support their causes, as unions have done in the past. See Schools/A7

Service

SAN FRANCISCO — When Telvent, a company that monitors utilities, water treatment plants and more than half the oil and gas pipelines in North America, discovered last September that the Chinese had hacked into its computers, it immediately shut down remote access to its clients' systems to assure that no outsider could seize control. Company officials and U.S. intelligence agencies then grappled with a fundamental question: Why had the Chinese done it? Was the People's Liberation Army trying to plant bugs into the system so they could cut

RyanBrennecke/The Bulletin

Ray Swayne helps Doreen Williams out of her chair to test the height of her walker handles after making a slight adjustment last week at Williams' home. Swayne describes his Iob duties as being part nurse, part housekeeper, part cook, part chauffeur and part counselor, saying he makes a little more than $6 an hour.

By Mac McLean The Bulletin

Ray Swayne knelt down from a table where he and Doreen Williams were drinking coffee in her Northeast Redmond home and adjusted her walker so she could get around without bothering her already sore back. He helped the 50-year-old diabetic check her blood sugar and started making her lunch. "It's going to rain," said Williams, who has suffered from two strokes in the past decade and needs a home care worker like Swayne with her at all times. "My knees are hurting.... my knees and my back." Service Employees International Union Local503represents 19,500publichome care workers like Swayne who help Oregon's most vulnerable residents get dressed, take their medication and perform other activities of daily living so they can stay at home and not in a hospital or an institution.

During its current round of contract negotiations,Local 503's members are asking for a $1.80-per-hour raise its organizers claim will address their profession's 300 percent turnover rate at a time when the largest generation of Americans is starting to get old. It would be the first raise these publicly paid home care workers have received since 2005. Union officials know getting the raise could be a tough battle, because by their own calculations it is estimated to cost the state $18.5 million. But they claim the state would recoup this loss because the extra pay would helpmany home care workers transition off public assistance programs. M any of t h ese w o rkers, who, l i k e Swayne, live in their clients' homes so they can provide care for them around the clock, earn less than minimum wage for the amount of time they work. See Home care/A6

Sunny High 51, Low 26

Page BS

Calendar A6 Crosswords Classified C 1 - 6Dear Abby Comics/Puzzles C3-4 Horoscope

forts to eliminate HIV infection in children, especially in AIDS-

off energy supplies and shut down the power grid if the United States and China ever confronted each other in the Pacific'? See Hacking /A2

plagued African countries where too many babies are born with the virus. See HIV/A3

4 P We userecycled newsprint

INDEX

TODAY'S WEATHER

promising clues for ef-

AoIndependent

C4 Local &State A5-6 SporlsMonday B1-6 22 pages,

B 7 Nation & World A2 Television

B7 - 8

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A2 THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, MARCH 4, 2013

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BlldgOt CUtS —With federal budget cuts beginning to take effect,

New York Times News Service

ments as she recovers, and outside experts said shemay haveto be

The nation's biggest banks wrongfully foreclosed on more than 700 military members during the housing crisis and seized homes from roughly two dozen other borrowers who were current on t h eir mortgage payments, findings that eclipse earlier estimates of the improper evictions. Bank of America, Citigroup, JPMorgan Chase and Wells Fargo uncovered the foreclosures while analyzing mortgages as part of a multibillion-dollar settlement deal with federal authorities, according to people with direct knowledge of the findings. In January, regulators ordered the banks to identify military members and other

borrowers who were evicted in violation of federal law. The analysis, which w as turned over to regulators in recent days, provides the first detailed glimpse into the extent of wrongful foreclosures amid the collapse of the housing market. While lenders previously acknowledged that they relied on faulty documents to push throughforeclosures,the banks claimed borrowers were rarely evicted by mistake, including military personnel protected by federal law. That thesis, which underpinned the government's response to the financial crisis, helps explain why homeowners languished for years without relief. The revelations of more

House SpeakerJohn Boehner onSunday reinforced his opposition to any deal to reverse the cuts that includes new revenues. But he and senior White House officials left open a narrow path that could

restore at least some of the money. Queen EliZadeth — Britain's QueenElizabeth II was hospitalized Sunday with an apparent stomach infection that has ailed her for days, a rare instance of ill health sidelining the long-reigning monarch. Elizabeth will have to cancel a visit to Rome and other engage-

pervasive harm could provide f resh ammunition for W a l l Street critics and prompt regulators to adopt a tougher stance. Housing advocates say the findings also underscore the broader flaws with the settlement. In the latest negotiations, according to people briefed on the talks, the banks secured favorable terms for doling out some aid, a deal that could diminish the relief to homeowners. Dan Petegorsky, national outreach manager with an ad-

rehydrated intravenously.

VOtillg riglltS — The vice president and black leaders commemorating a famous civil rights march Sunday in Selma, Ala., and said efforts to diminish the impact of African-Americans' votes haven't

stopped in the years since the1965 Voting Rights Act addedmillions to Southern voter rolls.

Florida sinkhole — Crews on Sundayrazedmore than half of the Tampa-area home perched over a huge sinkhole that swallowed a

man three daysago, managing to salvagesomekeepsakes for family members who lived there. JeremyBush, 35, tried to savehis brother, Jeff, when the earth opened up and swallowed him Thursday night.

Health inSuranCe — The Obama administration says it will require health insurance companies to report all price increases to

vocacy group, the Campaign for a Fair Settlement, described the terms as a "step backwards" for homeowners. "Our initial reaction was stunned disbelief," he said.

the government so officials can monitor the impact of the new health

care law and insurers' compliance with it. Federal health officials said they need the additional data to monitor trends in premiums as major

provisions of the law takeeffect and more people buy insurance. KOllyo 8IOCtiOll —A pre-dawn attack on police in Kenyaearly today killed several officers hours before Kenyansbegancasting votes in a nationwide election being held five years after more than1,000 people died in election-related violence. Police in the coastal city of

DIRECTION SOUGHT ASCARDINALS GATHER

smpsooAw.

Mombasareporteda2a.m.attackbyagang ofdozens. PakiStani bOmding —A Pakistani surgeon says the death toll

DcsoussRe

from a massive car bombing in the southern port city of Karachi has

jumped from 37 to 45 asmore victims died overnight. Dr. Jalil Qadir says that146 people werealso wounded in the Sunday evening ex-

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way to the hospital in New York early Sunday when the cab in which they were riding was struck by another vehicle, killing them both. survived, the police said.

Filipino Catholics attend a Mass onSunday at the Shrine of Dur Lady of Perpetual Help in suburban Paranaque, south of Manila. Faithful attending Sunday Mass on five continents for the first time

since PopeBenedict XVI's retirement haddifferent ideas about who should next lead the Roman Catholic Church, with people suggesting everything from a Latin American pope to one more like the conservative,

Polish-born John Paul II. What most agreedon, however, was that the church is in dire need of acomeback. Clergy sex abuse scandals and falling numbers of faithful have taken

their toll on the church, andmany parishioners said the next pope should be open about the problems rather than ignore them.

Cardinals from around theworld have descended onRometo discuss some of these problemsahead of the conclave to elect Benedict XVI's successoras pope.

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The first preconclave meeting is scheduled for this morning, headed

by the dean of theCollege of Cardinals, Cardinal Angelo Sodano. Hehas said the date for the start of the conclave won't be set until all the cardi-

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Hacking

ernment hasdenied, also raises questions of w h ether those Continued from A1 fears — the subject of weekly Or were the Chinese hack- research group reports,testiers just trolling for industrial mony and congressional studies — may be somewhat overs ecrets, trying to rip off t h e t echnology an d p a ssing i t blown, or whether the precise along to China's own energy nature ofthe threat has been companies? misunderstood. "We are still trying to figure U.S. intelligence officials beit out," a senior U.S. intelligence lieve that the greater danger to official said last week. "They the nation's infrastructure may could have been doing both." not even be China, but Iran, beTelvent, which also watches cause of its avowal to retaliate utilities and water treatment for the Stuxnet virus created by plants, ultimately managed to the United States and Israel and keep the hackers from break- unleashed on one of its nuclear ing into its clients' computers. sites. But for now, these oNcials At a moment when corporate say, that threat is limited by America is caught between gaps in Iranian technical skills. what it sees as two different There is no doubt that attacks nightmares — preventing a of all kinds are on the rise. The crippling attack that b rings Department of Homeland Sedown America's most critical curity has been responding to systems and preventing Con- intrusions on oil pipelines and gress from mandating that the electric power organizations at private sector spend billions "an alarming rate," according of dollars protecting against to an agency report last Dethat risk — the Telvent experi- cember. Some 198 attacks on ence resonates as a study in the nation's critical infrastrucambiguity. ture systems were reported to To some, it is prime evidence the agency last year, a 52 perof the threat that President centincrease from the number Barack Obama highlighted in of attacks in 2011. his State of the Union address, Researchers at McAfee, a when he warned that "our en- security firm, discovered in emies are also seeking the abil- 2011 that five multinational oil ity to sabotage our power grid, and gas companies had been our financial institutions, our attacked by Chinese hackers. air traffic control systems," per- The researchers suspected that haps causing mass casualti es. the Chinese hacking campaign, Obama called anew for legis- which they called Night Draglation to protect critical infra- on, had affected more than a structure, which was killed last dozen companiesin the energy year by a Republican filibuster industry. More recently, the Deafter intensive lobbying by the partment of Energy confirmed Chamber of Commerce and in January that its network had other business groups. been infiltrated, though it has But the security breach of said little about what damage, Telvent, which the Chinese gov- if any, was done.

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MONDAY, MARCH 4, 2013•THE BULLETIN

MART TODAY

A3

TART • Discoveries, breakthroughs, trends, namesin the news— the things you needto knowto start out your day

It's Monday, March 4, the 63rd day of 2013. There are 302 days left in the year.

RESEARCH HAPPENINGS SpeeCh —Vice President Joe Biden delivers the keynote address to the annual conference of the American Israel

Public Affairs Committee, an influential pro-Israel lobbying gl'oup.

POpe —The unofficial cam-

sin nucear Isasel' 0 s u mi ra ion For most people, the thought of radioactive sushi tuna is nightmarish, but for one scientist it represented an opportunity: If radiation from Fukushima

paign to be the 265th pope

was found in the fish, it could provide clues about animal behavior.

begins as the college of cardinals begins holding a series of closed-door general meetings.

Los Angeles Times

HISTORY Highlight:1913, Woodrow Wilson was inaugurated as the 28th president of the United

States, succeeding President William Howard Taft. In1789, the Constitution of the United States wentinto effect

as the first Federal Congress met in New York. (The lawmakers then adjourned for lack

of a quorum.) In1791, Vermont became the 14th state. In1813, President James

Madison was inaugurated for a second term of office. In 1861, Abraham Lincoln was inaugurated as the16th president of the United States. The U.S. Government Printing

Office began operation. The Confederate States of America adopted as its flag the original version of the Stars and Bars. In1863, the Idaho Territory

was created. In1888, legendary college football coach Knute Rockne was born in Voss, Norway. In1913, just before leaving office, President William Howard

Taft signed legislation replacing the Department of Com-

merce and Labor with separate Departments of Commerce and Labor. The "Buffalo nickel" officially went into circulation. In1933, Franklin D. Roosevelt took office as America's 32nd

By Eryn Brown L OS ANGELES — M a rine biologist Dan Madigan stood on a dock in San Diego and considered some freshly caught Pacific bluefin tuna. The fish had managed to swim 5,000 miles from their spawning grounds near Japan to California's shores, only to end up as the catch of local fishermen. It was August 2011, five months after a magnitude-9 earthquake and tsunami had struck in Japan, crippling the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear plant. Madigan couldn't stop thinking about pictures he'd seen on TV of Japanese emer-

gency crews dumping radioactive water from the failing reactors into the Pacific Ocean. The gr a d uate st u d ent looked at the tuna and wondered: Could they have transported any of that radiation to California'? If radiation from Fukushima was detectable, scientists might look for traces of the contamination in all sorts of amazing creatures that make epic journeys across the open seas, from tuna to sharks to turtles to birds. They might learn more about where the animals came from, when they made their journeys, and why. T hey might learn how a single, man-made event — the plant failure i n F u kushima — could be linked to the lives and fates of animals making

homes over half the globe. Madigan baggedsome tuna steaks he had collectedfrom the fishermen, threw them in a cooler and made a mental note to call Nicholas Fisher, a scientist he knew who would be able to tell him whether the tuna had carried radiation from the disaster. Maybe the fish could still tell their story. Pacific bluefin tuna migration is mysterious. Only some of the tuna born each year leave the W e stern P acific around Japan for California, swimming for two months or more to reach their destination. They stay here for a few years, and then they swim back to the waters where they were born so that they can reproduce. Some tuna are thought to cross the ocean multiple times. Researchers don't r e a lly understand why. It may have to do with food availability, ocean temperatures orother factors. Madigan's doctoralresearch t ries to fill i n s ome of t h e blanks by looking for nitrogen and carbon isotopes in tissue that serve as signatures of where the fish have lived and for how long. But interpreting the chemical signatures can be tricky. If M adigan could use the radioactive signal from Fukushima to confirm the results of the chemical analysis, he realized, it might bolster his work.

Or that wa s t h e t h eory, anyway. Madigan, a 30- y ear-old whose casual demeanor can mask the intensity he brings to his research, called Fisher about the San Diego steaks. The marine radioactivity expert, who works as a professor at Stony Brook University in New York, doubted they'd detect any radiation in the bluefins. Surely, he thought, any radiation the fish might have picked up would have dissipated over the months it took for them to cross the Pacific. What's more, it was hardly certain that the animals ever got close enough to Fukushima to encounter its plume in the first place. "I thought, OK, I can do this, but I wasn't expecting anything," Fisher said. Still, he forged ahead, analyzing quarter-cup-sized piles of freeze-dried, powdered muscle from some of the younger tuna Madigan had seen that day on the dock. After examining a sample fromthe first fish, Fisher called Madigan. "He was like, 'You're not going to believe it, but here it is,'" Madigan said. The tuna had tested positive for cesium-D4 and cesium-37, both known waste products from Fukushima. For Madigan, it was "a real discovery moment, like in the movies," he said.

Eryn Brown / LosAngeles Times

Stanford University graduate student Dan Madigan displays a steak collected from a Pacific bluefin tuna caught off the Southern California coast in 2012. Madigan, who is based at Stanford's Hopkins Marine Station in Pacific Grove, Calif., found that the tuna tested positive for cesium-134 and cesium-37, both known waste products from Fukushima. A second fish also tested positive for the isotopes. So did a third. And a fourth. In the end, every single one of the 15 fish they examined c arried radiation f rom t h e power plant. In May, Fisher and Stony Brook postdoctoral researcher Zofia Baumann published a paper in the journal Proceedings of the National Academies of Sciences detailing their findings. The team believed it was the first time that anyone had demonstrated that migratory animals could transport radioactive contaminants across the Pacific. The amounts the fish carried were minuscule — far less,ounce for ounce, than the amount of naturally occurring radiation in a banana — but possibly enough for scientists

six AcademyAwards, including best picture and best actress for Greer Garson (whose5~ /~minute acceptancespeech became the butt of industry

jokes). JamesCagneywon best actor for "YankeeDoodle Dandy." In1952, Ronald Reagan and

Nancy Davis weremarried in San FernandoValley, Calif. In1963, American poet William Carlos Williams, 79, died in Rutherford, N.J. In 1987, President Ronald

Reagan addressed thenation on the Iran-Contra affair, acknowledging that his overtures to lran had "deteriorated" into

an arms-for-hostages deal. Ten years ago:TheArmy's oldestarmored division, "Old

Ironsides," got orders to head for the Persian Gulf as the total

of U.S. Iand, seaandair forces arrayed against Iraq or preparing to go neared300,000. Five yearsago:Republican John McCain clinched his party's presidential nomination. Democrat Hillary Clinton

won primary victories in Ohio, Texasand Rhode Island, while

Barack Obamaprevailed in Vermont. GreenBay Packers quarterback Brett Favre retired

after17 years, saying hewas "tired." (Favre later madea comeback with the New York Jets, then the Minnesota Vi-

kings, before retiring again.) One year ago:President Barack Obama said he didn't want war but insisted he would attack lran if that were the only option left to stop that nation

from getting a nuclear weapon. Vladimir Putin scored adecisive victory in Russia's presidential election to return to the

Kremlin and extend his hold on power for six more years.

BIRTHDAYS Texas Gov. Rick Perry is 63. Actor Ronn Moss is 61.

Musician Emilio Estefan is 60. Actress Catherine O'Hara is 59.

Rapper GrandPuba is47. Gay rights activist Chaz Bono is 44.

Jazz musician Jason Marsalis is 36. Actress Jessica Heap is 30. TV personality Whitney Port is 28. — From wire reports

& Technology, he and his colleagues reported that it was. They concluded that their tracking method worked, and that Fukushima provided "an unprecedented opportunity" for scientists to use radioactive tracers to follow animal movement. "This was just nature being amazing," Fisher said. "Now, potentially, we have a very useful tool for understanding these animals."

THE UNRESOLVED

president. In1943, "Mrs. Miniver" won

to gain insight into animal migration, the team wrote in their report. Madigan c o llected a d ditional tuna samples in 2012, testing 50 to see whether the cesium signal was still detectable more than a year after the accident. In a study published online this month by the journal Environmental Science

HN

rare because HIVtesting and treatment long have been part Continued from A1 of prenatal care. "You could call this about "We can'tpromise to cure as closeto a cure,ifnot a cure, babies who are infected. We that we've seen," Dr. Anthony can promise to prevent the Fauci of the National Institutes vast majority o f t r a n smisof Health, who is familiar with sions if the moms are tested the findings, told The Associ- during every pregnancy," Gay ated Press. stressed. A doctor gave this baby The only other person confaster and stronger treatment sidered cured of the AIDS vithan is usual, starting a three- rus underwent a very different drug infusion within 30 hours and risky kind of treatment of birth. That was before tests — a bone marrow transplant confirmed the infant was infrom a special donor, one of fected and not just at risk from the rare people who is natua mother whose HIV wasn't rally resistant to HIV. Timothy diagnosed until she was in Ray Brown, of San Francisco, labor. has not needed HIV medica"I just felt like this baby was tions in the five years since at higher-than-normal r i sk, that transplant. and deserved our best shot," The Mississippi case shows "there may bedifferent cures Dr. Hannah Gay, a pediatric HIV specialist at the Univer- for different populations of HIV-infected people," said Dr. sity of Mississippi, said in an interview. Rowena Johnston of amFAR, That fast action apparently the Foundation for AIDS Reknocked out HIV in the baby's search. That group f unded blood before it c ould f orm Persaud's team to explore poshideouts in the body. Those so- sible cases of pediatric cures. calledreservoirs of dormant It also suggests that scientists cells usually rapidly reinfect should look back at other chilanyone who stops medication, dren who've been treated since said Dr. Deborah Persaud of shortly after birth, including Johns H o pkins C h i l dren's some reports of possible cures Center. She led the investiga- in the late 1990s that were distion that deemed the child missed at the time, said Dr. Ste"functionally cured," meaning ven Deeks of the University of in long-term remission even if California, San Francisco, who all traces of the virus haven't also has seen the findings. "This will likely inspire the been completely eradicated. Next, Persaud's team is field, make people more optip lanning a study t o t r y t o mistic that this is possible," he prove that, with more aggres- sa>d. sive treatment of other highIn the Mississippi case, the risk babies. "Maybe we'll be mother had had no prenatal able to block this reservoir care when she came to a rural seeding," Persaud said. emergency room in advanced No one should stop antilabor. A rapid test detected AIDS drugs as a result of this HIV. In such cases, doctors case, Fauci cautioned. typically give th e n ewborn B ut "it opens up a lot of low-dose medication in hopes doors" to research if other of preventing HIV from takchildren can be helped, he ing root. But the small hospital said. "It makes perfectsense didn't have the proper liquid what happened." kind, and sent the infant to B etter than t r eatment i s Gay's medical center. She gave to prevent babies from be- the baby higher treatment-leving born with HIV in the first el doses. place. The child responded well About 300,000childrenwere through age 18 months, when born with HIV in 2011, mostly the family temporarily quit in poor countries where only returning and stopped treatabout 60 percent ofinfected ment, researchers said. When pregnant women get treatment they returned severalmonths that can keep them from pass- later, remarkably, Gay's staning the virus to their babies. In dard tests detected no virus in the U.S., such births are very the child's blood.

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A4 THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, MARCH 4, 2013

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MONDAY, MARCH 4, 2013•THE BULLETIN

AS

LOCAL 4 T A TE BRIEFING

rO ressma eon an

Prineville-area home burnsdown

OI' IS efS-cII'eB I'BI

A propane-fueled barbecue, left burning for nearly aday,causeda

Proposedpaved

Black Butte

multiuse trail

Black Butte

fire Friday that destroyed

a ranch homeeast of

Bulletin staff report The environmentalassessment for the first phase of a proposed paved path between Black Butte Ranch and Sisters will soon be available for public inspection, according to the Deschutes National Forest. The 10-foot-wide, eight-mile, two-lane trail would accommodate walkers, runners, bikers and wheelchairs and would become part of an overall plan to link the communities of Tollgate, Black Butte, Crossroads and Sisters. Phase one, the section planners expect to fund first, is a 1.1-mile leg linking Tollgate with Sisters.

Prineville. The fire at the Key-

stone Ranchhome,on Southeast Keystone Ranch Road about14

miles from Prineville, was reported about 5:20

p.m., according to the Crook County Sheriff's Office. A housekeeper said the fire started after she discovered that the

patio barbecuehadbeen left on, possibly for al-

most 24 hours. When deputies arrived, black smoke was

billowing from thehouse, coming from the walls and rising out ofthe roof,

"It's pretty exciting. There's about 440 homes in Tollgate; they wouldhave directaccess to the (Sisters) high school and city without having to get into their vehicles," said Kirk Flannigan, recreation team leader for the Sisters Ranger District. The environmental assessment should be available in about a month, he said. Completion of any part of the projecthinges on successful grant applications, an effort Flannigan said the Deschutes National Forest has teamed with the Sisters Trail Alliance to complete. Phase one is estimated to cost $801,000.

A portion of the multimodal path would be raised near Black Butte Ranch, where it would cross wetlands, said Gary Guttormsen, chairman of the Sisters Trail Alliance. Grant applications for the first phase would also include a mile-long proposed path from Crossroads to Sisters, he said. Guttormsen said he felt confident that phase one would be funded through grants from thefederal government and the Oregon Department of Transportation. The Forest Service would serve as the grant applicant, he said. SeeTrailiA6

Ranch

Phase2 Tollgate development

Phase 1 MILES

Sist rs 0

1

2

Crossroads development

Source: Oeschutes National Forest

Greg Cross/The Bulletin

according to theSheriff's Office.

The homeowners were gone atthe time of the fire, according to the Sheriff's Office.

The home isoutside the Crook County Fire District, so there was no

firefighter responseto the blaze. The deputies and

• The first BendUrban Iditarod collects foodfor Neighborlmpact (and the racerscollect beer)

some relatives and friends of the homeowners attempted to put the fire out, but itfully engulfed the house after about 30 minutes.

A damageestimate from the blaze was not available.

By Dylan J. Darling The Builetin

Cloudier, cooler weather ahead

S

even teams mushed around the streets of Bend on Sunday, but this Iditarod wasn't for the dogs. The first Bend Urban Iditarod had shopping carts instead of sleds and costumed runners, joggers and walkers pulling the carts through town. The race course covered more than four miles of pavement, starting and ending at GoodLife Brewing Company on Century Drive. Race day coincided with the start of the real Iditarod in Alaska, where more than 60 mushers ride dog sleds from Anchorage to Nome. "Ours isa much shorter course, not a thousand miles," said Roger Fox, Bend Urban Iditarod organizer. "We're going through the streets of

Sunday wasclear, sunnyand a little crisp in Bend. Despite the sunshine, the high didn't top the mid-40s, said Josh Smith, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Pendleton.

More sun is instore for today, but the high

should bearound 50. The sunshine is likely to be short-lived, though, according to the weather

service. Clouds,cooler weather andperhapsrain

Bend, going from pub to pub, facing

and snow markthe forecast for most of the week.

challenges along the way just as an Alaskan Iditarod would do." The challenges in Alaska range from staying warm in subzero temperatures to staying awake during long days on the traiL The challenges in Bend included shooting a paintball gun accurately and showing off the best dance moves. Racers shared suds at stops along the route at Crux Fermentation Project, Silver Moon Brewing, McMenamins Old St. Francis School and Riverside Market. But the Bend U rban I ditarod wasn't just about fun. It was also a food drive and a fundraiser for NeighborImpact, a nonprofit that helps provide food to people in need around CentralOregon. Each team, with three to five members, turned in 30 pounds of food as part of its entry. Each individual racer paid a $10 fee. Fox said he made arrangements with a grocery to supply carts

A cold front is expected to move into Central

Oregon onTuesday, likely bringing rain to Bend, according to the weather service. Highs throughout the week should slide from near 50 down into the 40s, with lows in the

20s expected. "Tuesdayand Wednesday look like they will be the worst for weather," Smith said.

There is a 70percent chance of rain inBend on Tuesday,according to the weather service.

The snow levelshould be at4,100 feet. A mix of

rain and snowmayfall Wednesday intown. — Bulletin staff reports

The Central Oregon Sasquatch Rescue team, above, is in the lead in McKay Park during the Bend Urban iditarod on Sunday. Casey O'Roark, of the Riverside Market Safety Committee team, left, wins the beer mugholding contest at Silver Moon Brewing.

See video coverage

O bendbuttetin.com/nrbaniditarod on The Bulletin's website:

to teams that bought their food there, and other teams tracked down their own carts. In all, the event brought in 210 pounds of food, said Sandy Klein, food resourcespecialis t for NeighborImpact. "It's not your everyday, run-of-the-mill food drive," she said. It has b een d one e lsewhere, though. Klein said there have been similar races that were also food drives in Portland and Boston. This was the first year for the race in Bend, and Fox said he is hopeful it will be an annual event. He said he wanted it to be just as fun for those

al<

Photos hy Joe Kline The Bulletin

who saw it pass by as for those who competed."We'retryingto put smiles (on faces) wherever we go," he said. The color and clatter of a band of racers pulling shopping carts around town likely did just that. Costumes in-

February2013weather for Bend DAILY HIGHS AND LOWS Average temperature: 35.2' (0.9' above normal) t D H H H H KI H H H EH EHEHCHEHHE3 CHE3K I K3 H 49 5 0

5 7 57 53

47

50 38

42 44

44

49

50

46 53

58 49

44

41 41

41

H H K3 E IE R H E R R H H 39

38 44

47

41

47

46

Pulitzer-winningauthor Greenblatt to speak By David Jasper The Bulletin

0 27 20

2 8 2 0 36

33

31 23

PRECIPITATIQN TOTAL: 0.12" tN«R R R R R D D

SNOW TOTAL:0" t«BH

18 21

18

24

28

25 25

32 17

0 23

Illt

17 20

21

20

21 21

21

19

24

32

His torical average precipitation for the month: 1.05"

T= Trace

R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R O E O R R R R R Historical average snowfor the month: 5.34"

T=

Trace

R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R H

ALMANAC

temperature ~

Lowest tempe rature

Highest recorded temperature forthe month:

Lowest recorded temperature forthe month:

through the years:

low temperature through the years:

73'

-26'

45.2'

24'

on Feb. 24, 1995

on Feb. 9, 1933

Highest

* Monthly averages calculated from 1928 through 2005, Western Regional Cl!mate Center Sources. NOAA, Western Regional Climate Center, Bend Public Works Department

Average high

Average lew

Monthly average

Monthly average

high temperature

Greg Cross/The Bulletin

cluded a team of Sasquatch hunters and theirrival Sasquatch rescuers, classy dudes in suits and two teams of zombies that would hold their own at Halloween costume contests. See iditarodiA6

includes "Will in the World," a biography of Shakespeare that spent nine weeks on the New York Times Best-Seller list. Greenblatt is the third author, after Mitch Albom and Jenmfer Egan, to participate in Author! Author!, which includes a lecture, question-andanswer session and

Author Stephen Greenblatt will speak at 7 p.m. Thursday at Bend High School as part of Deschutes Public Library Foundation's Author! Author! Literary Series. Greenblatt, a literary critic, theorist and scholar, will discuss his book "The Swerve: book signing, along How the World Became Greenbiatt with outreach to area Modern," which won high school students. the Pulitzer Prize for NonficThe Library Foundation is givtion in 2012 and the National ing 100 copies of Greenblatt's Book Award in 2011. award-winning books to area Greenblatt has written high schools, and will provide extensively on Shakespeare, 200 seats for his presentation the Renaissance,culture and to high school and community New Historicism, a school of college students. literary theory that has gained Edgar Award-winner Erik influence since he introduced Larson, author of "Devil in it in the 1980s. the White City" and "In the He is also co-founder of the Garden of Beasts," is next in literary-cultural journal Repthe series. resentations. His other work SeeGreenblatt iA6


A6 THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, MARCH 4, 2013

Trail

E VENT

AL E N D AR

Continued from A5 Breaking the project into smaller,less-expensive phases should factor in its favor, he said. "These trails are going to be ADA compliant, so we meet all the standards for the Americans With Disabilities Act," Guttormsen said. "All nonmotorized users would have a safe way to get to town, school or work using bikes, walking, with strollers or using their wheelchairs." Motorized wheelchairs would be OK, and all grades would be safe for wheelchairs, he said. The Forest Service did the

Email events at least 10days before publication date to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on "Submit an Event" at www.bendbulletin.com. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

TODAY NO EVENTS LISTED

TUESDAY KNOW SHAKESPEARE: SHAKESPEARE ONSCREEN: A screening of the1996 PG-13 rated film "Hamlet"; free; 6 p.m.; Tin Pan Theater, 869 N.W. Tin Pan Alley, Bend; 541-312-1032 or www. deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. GREEN TEAM MOVIENIGHT: Featuring a screening of "Surviving Progress," a documentary film about the implications of human progress; free; 6:30-8:15 p.m.; First Presbyterian Church, 230 N.E. Ninth St., Bend; 541-815-6504.

WEDNESDAY "THE METROPOLITANOPERA: RIGOLETTO": Starring Diana Damrau, Oksana Volkova and Piotr Beczala in an encore performance of Verdi's masterpiece; opera performance transmitted in high definition; $18; 6:30 p.m.; Regal

Home care Continued from A1 Some of them earn so little they qualify for food stamps or other public assistance. "This is what we do," Swayne said ashe described hisjob duties as being part nurse, part housekeeper, part cook, part chauffeur and part counselor. "And yeah, I make about $6 an hour for it. It's like working two

jobs in one day and only getting paid for half a day's work." Mark Hunt, a state labor relations manager who represents the state in negotiations, declined to comment, except to say the next bargaining session between the commission and the home care workers was set to take place March 13. "What we're trying to do is ensure the health of this program," said Rebecca Sandoval, a home care worker in Medford who chairs the union bargaining committee. "We want to make sure this is a profession people will want to do because you can support yourself doing it

1f

The client Swayne became a certi fied nursing assistant in 1981. But after working with tw o c l ients in the Portland area, he switched careers and became a licensed contractor to take advantage of the construction boom sweeping across the state. He and Williams met about 13 years ago when they were working f o r t h e P o r t land Housing Authority. The two hit it off almost immediately and formed a n e x ceptionally close friendship that has lasted more than a decade and survived Williams' deteriorating heath. P utting hi s h e a lth c a r e background to a g ood use, Swayne cut back on his hours as a contractor in 2000 so he could care for Williams on a part-time basis. He continued to work at the housing authority while h elping W i l liams qualify fo r S o cial Security disability payments and medical coveragefrom the Oregon Health Plan, a Medicaid program that helps low-income state residents pay their medical bills. "I lost a lot," he said of the transition from full-time contractor and housing authority supervisor to being his friend's part-time and now f ull-time caregiver. "But you know, I have no problems with that." Since 2004, Williams has been diagnosed with T y pe II diabetes and has suffered two strokes — one of which may have happened while she recovered from knee replacement surgery. The strokes left her with a constant, generalized sense of weakness on the right side of her body and some slight b r ai n d a mage that makes it hard for her to remember certain details, like how to spell her first name. "They fix me up and I fall apart," said W i l liams, who also suffersfrom severe back problems, depression and an anxiety disorder that causes panic attacks.

The caregiver Swayne also helped Williams qualify for the Oregon Department of Human Servic-

Old Mill Stadium16 & IMAX, 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541382-6347. THE BLACKBERRYBUSHES STRINGBAND: The Seattle-based alternative folk act performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www. mcmenamins.com. RYAN STILES ANDFRIENDS: The improvisational comedian performs, with Northwest improv all-stars; $50 plus fees; 7:30 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www. towertheatre.org. JOHNNY OUTLAWANDTHE JOHNSON CREEKSTRANGLERS: The Portland-based country act performs; $5; 8 p.m.; The Horned Hand, 507 N.W. Colorado Ave., Bend; 541-728-0879 or www. facebook.com/thehornedhand.

THURSDAY CENTRAL OREGON SPORTSMEN'S SHOW: Featuring vendors and a variety of resources for outdoor recreation, with a head and horns competition, a kids trout

pond, cooking demonstrations and more; $10, $5 ages 6-16, free ages 5 and younger, $15 for a two-day pass; noon-8 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 503246-8291 or www.thesportshows. com. AUTHOR! AUTHOR!: Stephen Greenblatt, Pulitzer Prize-winning author of "The Swerve" and "Will in the World: How Shakespeare became Shakespeare" speaks; $20-$75; 7 p.m., doors open at 6 p.m.; Bend High School, 230 N.E. Sixth St.; 541-312-1027 or www. dplfoundation.org. IGNITE BEND: A series of fiveminute presentations on a range of topics, each chosen by the presenter; SOLD OUT; 7 p.m., doors open 6:30 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St.; 541317-0700 or www.ignitebend.com. NATHANIEL TALBOTQUARTET: The Portland-based folk artist performs; $10, $7 students; 7 p.m.; The Belfry, 302 E. Main Ave., Sisters; 541-815-9122 or www. belfryevents.com. "OKLAHOMA!": The Mountain View High School music and drama departments present the story

Public home care workers in Oregon Since 2000, SEIU Local 503 has represented the interests of

Oregon's home care workers andnegotiated the terms of their contract with the stategovernment. This year,theseworkersmany of whom work 24 hours a day and earn less than minimum wage — are asking for a raise that could cost the state $18.5 million.

THE CLIENTS • Elderlyand disabled residents who qualify for the Oregon Health

Plan can hire ahomecare worker to help themperform certain activities of daily life, like getting dressed, using the bathroom,

preparing their mealsandcleaning their house. • Before getting a home care worker, these people must meet with a

case managerwhoevaluates their condition anddeterminesthetype of care they need. The case manager also determines whether the

person needspart-time help or24-hour care. • The client is then responsible for interviewing and hiring his or her

home careworker from alist of people whohavebeen prescreened and trained bythe OregonHomeCareCommission. The client can also fire his or her home care worker if need be.

THE WORKERS • Public home careworkers, who care exclusively for Oregon Health Plan recipients, are represented by SEIU Local 503 and are paid by the state government under the terms of a contract their union negotiates with the Oregon Home CareCommission. • They are different from private home care workers — who in most

cases arenot represented by aunion — andare either paid directly by their clients or according to theterms of acontract with a private home care firm.

THE STATE • Oregon became the first state in the country to let its home care workers organize when its voters passed a 2000 ballot measure. This

ballot measurealso created the OregonHomeCare Commission to represent the state's interests in contract negotiations.

• The nine-memberhomecare commission is also responsible for training the state's home care workers, determining the

qualifications eachonemust possess andmaintaining a registry of workers OHP beneficiaries can turn to when looking for one. Source: SEIU Local 503, the Oregon Home Care Commission

I LW IW

Ryan Brennecke/The Bulletin

Doreen Williams eats her lunch as Ray Swayne, a home health care worker, cleans around the house in Redmond. es' Client-Employed Provider Program, which lets elderly and disabled OHP recipients hire a publicly funded home care worker to help them with tasks otherstake for granted. These workers must be cleared by the state government and can work on an hourly or a live-in basis depending on their client's medical condition and needs. "I'm on call 2 4/7," said Swayne, who has been by Williams' side since she qualified for a home care worker in 2005. "I don't go anywhere without her, and she doesn't go anywhere without me." Under the CEP program, home care workers can be asked to help their clients perform certain activities of daily living, like bathing, dressing, using the bathroom, moving around their homes and making good decisions that keep them safe. They can also be asked toperform certain selfmanagement tasks, like preparing their clients' meals, taking them shopping and cleaning their homes.

When Williams qualified for the program, she met with a case managerwho determined she needed the third-highest levelofcare home care workers can provide, the level of care provided bedridden patients. The case manager crafted a four- to five-page care plan for Williams that outlined the care she needed and the number of hours her live-in home care worker would be paid to work. Under the p l an, Swayne earns $10.20 an hour for the 28'/4hours each week he spends helping Williams in daily living and $4.55 an hour for the 57'/z hours each week she needs help performing her self-management tasks and is otherwise on call. This pay schedule translates into an average hourly wage of $6.43 an hour — $2.52 an hour less than Oregon's current minimum wage — and does not include the remaining 813/4 hours Swayne is by Williams' side each week keeping her safe. "I took this job knowing exactly what it involved, so I can't complain," said Swayne.

Flannigan. Any grant funding would involve a partner match, meaning the Forest Service and t r ail a l l iance would each pony up a share. The trail alliance would take responsibility for maintaining the path, keeping it clear of debris and trash, he said. The project grew in 2011 out of a revamped Sisters trail plan. It would connect the outlying communities with Sisters and would also remove n onmotorized traffic f r o m state Highway 242 and U.S. Highway 20, Guttormsen said. The phase one plan has a minimal impact on the environment, he said. A few small trees may be felled to make way for the trail, he said. The path was altered to address concerns by some Tollgate residents that its original designpassed too close to some homes.

of two cowboys in 20th-century Oklahoma Territory seeking the hearts of the women they love; $8, $6 MVHS students, seniors and children ages 6 and younger; 7:30 p.m., doors open at 6:45 p.m.; Mountain View High School, 2755 N.E. 27th St., Bend; 541-383-6360 or www.bend.k12.or.us/mvhs. "THE SHADOW BOX":Preview night of Cascades Theatrical Company's presentation of the drama about the lives of three terminally ill people; $10; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W.Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www. cascadestheatrical.org. ROLLER RUMBLERACESERIES: Competitors race a sprint on bikes attached to fork-mounted rollers, with music and raffles; $5 to race, $3 spectat ors;7 p.m.,6:30 p.m . sign-up; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-382-2453. PALEYFEST: "THEWALKING DEAD": A pre-recorded Q&Awith stars and producers from the television horror series, "The Walking Dead"; $15; 8 p.m.; Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 8 IMAX, 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-3826347 or www.fathomevents.com.

preliminary design work, Guttormsen said. The Sisters Park and Recreation District and Sisters City Council also backed the project. The proposed trail lies entirely on ForestService property, said

Iditarod

Riverside Market, called the Riverside Market Safety Committee, took home the title for fastest team, although Fox didn't have a total overall time for them. "They were the first team in to each stop," he said. The race was a blast, said C ambria Bittinger, 24, o f Bend. She said she used to live in Portland and saw the races there, but hadn't taken part. She's looking forward to the race becoming an annual event in Bend and wants to run in it again. "I already have been planning my outfits for the next ... ten yearsto come," she said.

Continued from A5 "In October I can get away with dressing like a zombie, but in March I can't — except for this," said Tracie Wrisley, 37, of Bend, who was dressed like a zombie and whose team pulled a cart loaded with fake hands, heads and a skeleton. There was some zombie cart envy going on between the two teams. "They have all the body parts in their cart," said Elisa Carroll, 32, of Bend. "I wish we had body parts." Wrisley's team, Cart of the Living Dead, ended up winning the best cart and costume award, Fox said. A team from

"Yeah," Williams responded. "But you didn't know you weren't going to get paid."

The contract Because of the economic downturn, Sandoval said, it will be difficult for home care workers to obtain a pay raise above their current $4.55 an hour and $10.20 an hour pay scale. The union negotiates with the Oregon Home Care Commission — a nine-member panel that serves as its employer of record — to negotiate the terms of a two-year contract. "Every time we've had a contract negotiation, we've just been tryingto keep ourselves where we were at," she said. Low wages make increasingly difficult the retention of wellqualifiedhome care workers — many of whom suffer from burnout — and the ability to recruit new ones. She said concerns about worker morale and turnover are especially worrisome given the fact that the state's one million baby boomers are approaching an age when they too couldrequire the same services Williams needs to conduct her daily life. "We have ahuge population that's getting ready to meet this system," Sandoval said. "We want to make sure it can meet their demands." That's why the union's bargaining team made getting a $1.80 an hour raise for home care workers, which would bringtheirwages to $6.35 and $12 an hour depending on the type of work they did, one of its top priorities in negotiations in January. Hunt, the state negotiator, said he was familiar with the request and was considering what fiscal and policy impacts it would have. Sandoval said a strong, wellstaffed home care program would save the state money in health care costs. Using her 99-year-old client who suffers from congestive heart failure as an example, Sandoval said home care workers make sure their clients stay r elatively healthy without being placed in a hospital or nursing home, where they would receive costly medical treatments at state expense. "We save the state millions of dollarsa year,"she said."We need tomake thisjob a career that is worth having."

— Reporter:541-617-7812, ddarlingC<bendbulletin.com

Greenblatt

Public Library." Tickets are $20 and are available at the Deschutes Public Library Foundation's website. For more information, log on to www.dplfoundation.org, email

Continued from A5 He will appear June 20 at Bend High School. "We believe these acclaimed voices are critical admin®dplfoundation.org or to expand the cultural land- call 541-312-1031. scape in Central Oregon," — Reporter: 541-383-0349, said the library's commudjasper@bendbulletin com nity r e l ations m a nager, Chantal StrobeL "Author! F RI G I DLI RE Author! improves literacy in the region, strengthens Compact community dialogue, and Refrigerator enhances the programs and services of the Deschutes Adjustable Glass Shelves Crisper Drawer

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MONDAY, MARCH 4, 2013• THE BULLETIN A7

Schools Continued from A1 Last month, Mayor Michael Bloomberg of New York City donated $1 million to a coalition formed by Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa of Los Angeles to help elect candidates who will supportthe currentsuperintendent andthe policy changes he has promoted. Students First, a nationaladvocacy organization created by Michelle Rhee, the former schools chancellor in Washington,donated $250,000 to the same cause. So far, the total spending from outside groups, including theteachers'union, had reached $4.4million as of Friday, according to the city's ethics commission. And Villaraigosa has said he expects to raise even more in the final days for his group, the Coalition for School Reform. In 2006, Villaraigosa tried to gain control of the city schools — as Bloomberg and many oth-

er big-city mayors were doing across the country. But after his efforts failed, he moved to back school board candidates who he said would support his vision for drastic changes in the city's schools. The mayor sees the election as a referendum on the future of education changes in the city. If the three candidates he is backing lose, he said, it would mean "losing reform in Los Angeles as we know it." The superintendent, John

Deasy, has generally been a far less divisive figure than some of his counterparts in other large urban districts. But the current campaign has turned particularly nasty, and many here say they believe that Deasy could lose his job if the mayor's slate of school board candidates loses. Warren Fletcher, the president of the teachers' union,

Veterans Continued from A1 I f th e v eterans court i s launched, Deschutes County will be the fourth county in Oregon to offer a specialty program for veterans. In May 2012, Lane County began operating a v eterans treatment court, and in October 2012, Marion County established a veterans docket. Klamath County started a v eterans treatment court i n November 2010. Steve Tillson, the treatment court's coordinator, said then-district attorney Ed Caleb was frustrated by the veterans he saw filing through the courtroom. After seeing a television piece on a veterans treatment court, Caleb thought it could work in Klamath.

How it works Tillson said Klamath's court was able to i m plement the program with the help of the National Association of Drug Court Professionals, which provided trainingresources and funded a training seminar in Buffalo, NY. One month later, court was in session. So far in Klamath Falls, 39 veterans have been admitted to the program. Of those, 14 have graduated, three were kicked out when they couldn't comply with the program, and one died in a car crash. The rest are currently participating. In Klamath County, about half of the program's participants fought in Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation IraqiFreedom, the recent wars in Afghanistan and Iraq. The other half, Tillson said, are split between Vietnam v eterans, those who participated in the Gulf War and some who were in thearmed forceswhen there were no active conflicts. "None of our graduates have repeat-offended," Tillson said. The Klamath specialty court considers community safety and treatment options when deciding whether to allow a veteran toenter the program. For example, if the veteran is accused of murder or another Measure 11 crime that has a mandatory minimum prison sentence, that person will likely not be able to participate in the program. And if the treatment needed to help the veteran isn't available in th e community, that will prevent his or her participation, as well. In Klamath County, for example, a veteran who commits a sex offense requires specialized treatment that the county cannot provide. Tillson described the treatment court as a partnership between the circuit court and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. A treatment team meets before court to look at cases, and for each participating veteran, figures out the best treatment available, which

1aWd. K,

• y L s 4 vvt gg

Monica Almeida/ New York Times News Serwce

Elementary students at a school in Los Angeles, where school board elections have drawn $4.4 million in outside spending. United Teachers Los Angeles, declined to c omment when a sked whether t h e b o a r d should remove Deasy as superintendent. In one race, the union is backing all three opponents to the school board president, Monica Garcia, who is seen as Deasy's strongest backer. The union has spent nearly $450,000 to help elect its candidates, but Fletcher bristles at the involvement of Bloomberg, Rhee and others from outside Los Angeles and their attempt to influence the results. "We don't elect a superintendent, but school board races are a way to take the temperature of whether people like the direction schools are going in," Fletcher said. "It would be really tragic if the voices are drowned out by folks who have no sense of what is going on here to begin with." Two of the school board races are likely to go to a runoff to determine who will get a spot on the seven-person board. But the third race, with only two candidates, incumbent Steve Zimmer, a Teach for America alumnus, and Kate Anderson, a lawyer and former congressional staff member, is expected

to bedecided Tuesday, making it the most watched — and most expensive — contest. Zimmer portrays himself as a middle-of-the-road deal maker, sometimes siding with the teachers' union and other times backing Deasy. He has often been theswing vote on issues that have divided the board. That he is being challenged so vociferously, he said, is a sign of "the need for orthodoxy in the reform community." "People aren't very interested in reform or middle ground and instead there'sa tremendous interest in continuing this warfare," he said. Anderson, for her part, says that changes in Los Angeles schools need to come more quickly, particularly in the ways teachers are laid off or fired. Like most public systems, layoffs in Los Angeles are based on seniority, which Anderson calls "absurd." "L.A. should be leading the nation, but instead we have been failing our kids for a long, long time," she said. "Now we are on the precipice of real reform, but we need to support the superintendent to really be able to do so."

could mean mental health or substanceabuse treatment,ora combination thereof. Veterans make weekly court appearances, and each has a mentor who is also a veteran. Tillson described the mentors as similar to Alcoholics Anonymous sponsors. "They're kind of almost like a role model to say, 'You can overcome these traumatic experiences you have, and you can be well and get along fine,"' Tillson said. Alison Perry, the executive director for Central Oregon Veterans Outreach, worked as a counselor for the veterans affairsoffi ce forfour years and is the sister ofan Army medevac pilot who served three combat tours in Iraq. Perry believes the development of a veterans treatment court is vital to the area. "People are changed when they come home from war," Perry said. "We train the military to respond to threat, and the training is so intense, and then when you throw someone ... into combat, into a prolonged exposure to threat, you're only reinforcing how they respond to a threat." As a result, veterans return home and respond differently to their environments than before,Perry said,sometimes suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder. That is then sometimes coupled with substance abuse. "When people can't sleep, they're constantly anxious ... they often self-medicate just so they can sleep and feel calm," Perry said. "You look at how substance abuse is used to cope and then they're getting into trouble with DUIIs. That is very common." A person suffering f r om PTSD, Perry said, has a much lower threshold for distress, so their fight or flight response is likely to kick in much faster than an average person's. And that can result in an arrest for violence. "The military doesn't deprogram soldiers or combat veterans," she said. "You spend months and months training to go to war and kill people.... And then we expect them to endurethatstressand come home and be normaL" If the specialty court works, Perry said, it will mean "veterans are getting treatment instead of punishment."

uncertain, his office is applying for grants and funding from nonprofits.

"The goal is to help people

get the treatment they need and respond appropriately to what's going on.... They signed up and trained and were sent to war, and we owe it to them to figure out how to cope." But the court is a long way from implementation.

No funding yet Marvin, the Deschutes County deputy DA, said that while funding for the project remains

"The (circuit) court is going

to have to come up with how much they're going to need to

fund (the specialty program) and if the funds are available," he said. "But we're working towards finding funds outside of the typical state funding." Deschutes County Circuit Court Presiding Judge Alta Brady said the local circuit court doesnot currently have the funds to start the program. Based on the county's population and the area's caseload, Brady said, the circuit court should have 1.5 more judges, and more staff as well. "We don'thave enough judicial time to handle everything we have right now," she said. B rady said she wa s a p proached by the DA's office in the fall about the veterans treatment court, and the circuit court agreed to participate in a grant application that would pay to explore developing the specialty court. "We are open to that possibility, but we made it very clear and we continue to make it clear that, at least as of how things exist right now, we do not have the judicial resources, thestaffresources orthe money to create a new specialty court," Brady said. "We recognize and respectthe service these people give to our country and to us, but we can't look at it in a vacuum." Brady said she hasn't yet received information from the DA's office about how many veterans might be involved in the specialty court or how it would be run. And she said she doesn't yet know whether the circuit court will face future budget cuts. "We'll continue to work with the district attorney if there's some sort of viable program to be created," Brady said, "but unfortunately, if we're talking as of today's date, there is no veterans courtbeing created right now." Specialty courts, Brady said, cost moremoney because they require more oversightof defendants, more staff time and treatment costs. For example, she said, the family drug court currentlyoffered in Deschutes County has a full-time coordinator, and for the first severalmonths, defendants are required to appear in court each Monday. "If there are further budget cuts, some of our current specialty courts are on the line, and we would be hard pressed to say, 'We are cutting family drug court or domestic violence courtbut we're creating a new court,'" she said. "We're just in a difficult position from both a time and money standpoint." — Reporter: 541-617-7831, smiller@bendbulletin.com

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IN THE BACI4: ADVICE, TV (0 WEATHER > Scoreboard, B2 NBA, B3

Golf, B4 Community Sports, B5-6

© www.bendbulletin.com/sports

THE BULLETIN• MONDAY, MARCH 4, 2013

A rundown of games and events to watch for locally and nationally from the world of sports:

Tuesday

< Thursday

Saturday/Sunday

< Saturday

NBA, LosAngeles Lakers at OklahomaCityThunder, 6:30 p.m.(TNT) —The Lakers continue to makea pushto make the playoffs — they are

Men's college dasketdall, No. 24OregonDucksat ColoradoBuffaloes, 6 p.m. (ESPN2) —With just two games left in the regular season, the

Special OlympicsOregon Winter State Games, 9a.m.4 p.m. both days —Some

Grin & Bear lt Run, Bend:Therunning

currently in ninth place in the

Duckslook to m ovea step

about 20 from the High Desert

Western Conference, onthe outside looking in, just ahead

closer to a Pac-12regularseason title. Oregon is currently

chapter, are expected to take part in two days of snow-sports

of the Portland Trail Blazers. The Thunder, meanwhile,

tied with UCLA atop the league standings at12-4, with Cal half

competition at Mt. Bachelor ski

,'.'1>gly+yfee ( (

hope to mount achallenge to get the West's top seed — theyare in second behind

San Antonio.

Oregon forward Arsalan Kazemi dunksagainst Oregon State last Thursday.

from around the state, including

r arr

for more information

skiing, snowboarding and

or to register, visit

snowshoeing racesover the weekend.

Ryan Brennecke I The Bulletin file

Runners at the 2011 Grin & Bear It Run.

Edwards' drought ends at Phoenix AVONDALE, Ariz. Carl Edwards climbed -

from his car, stood on the door and landeda

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backflip near the finish

line. He thenhoppedup on the wall in front of A'

the grandstand, grabbed the checkered flag and

waded into the crowd, trading high-fives with

I,

, = -

fans. After a miserable

-

week at Daytona, Edwards had plenty to

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celebrate.

'I I,

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That it came at Phoenix International

I

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Raceway only seemed fitting.

Coming through on his promise to dominate after his Daytona disaster, Edwards pulled

gg

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Joe Kline / The Bulletin

The Special Olympics Oregon High Desert chapter athletes and coaches pose at Mount Bachelor late last month.

Edwards had a rough

Special Olympians

the Chase for the cham-

pionship. His downward spiral continued at Day-

A look at the Central Oregon participants at this weekend's Winter State Games:

tona, where he wrecked

five cars. On his way out of Florida, Edwards said he was ready to dominate and win at

Phoenix. Kanee Amberson, Bend, alpine skiing

Bob Arata, Bend, alpine skiing

He did just that, leading the final 78 laps on

Josh Arnold, Bend, alpine skiiing

the 312-lap race around PIR's odd-shaped oval in the first non-restric-

tor-plate race with NASCAR's new Gen-6

Eric Cain, Redmond, alpine skiing

Jordan Estrada, Bend, snowshoeing

Adam Funerton, Bend, nordic skiing

• A COntingentof Central OreganiansWil compete in theSpecial OlympicsOregon 2013 Winter StateGamesthis weekend at Mt. Bachelor

A

lot of hard work is about to pay off for a group of Central

Oregonians.

After weeks of practice on snowshoes, skis and snowboards, dozacross the state will be converging on Mount Bachelor this weekend to compete in the Special Olympics Oregon (SOOR) 2013 Winter State Games for snow sports. The annual event is slated for this Friday, Saturday and Sunday at Mt. Bachelor ski area. Approximately 200 participants, including some 20 from SOOR's High Desert chapter, are expected to take part in snow-

w hen they're skiing d ow n t h e mountain away from you, you kind of have to keep up," Simmons observed. "When the athlete can go faster than the coach ... they've had that happen several times this year. They've got some fast skiers and athletes who are just bombing down the hill past them."

try skiing and snowshoeing competitions. Dozens of volunteers, including coaches and event staff, will be on hand to assist with the races. This year's contingent from the High Desert chapter — which serves residentsof Deschutes and Crook counties— ranges in age from 22 to 57. The group is a little smaller than in the recent past, but at least one member is feeling confident heading into the games. "We're looking p r etty g o od," said Darren Laughlin, 44 and of Bend, a snowshoer. "We're pretty awesome." The smaller size of this year's group has been a boon, in particular, to the alpine skiers and one snowboarder on the team. Those athletes, High Desert chapter local program coordinator Jill Simmons said, have enjoyed an almost 1-to-1 ratio with coaches. "Which is really good, because

competitive and sports opportunities for individuals with intellectual disabilities. According to its website, SOOR serves 10,000 Special Olympians and offers 14 Olympic-style sports in the summer, fall and winter seasons. This winter, in addition to the s now sports competition at M t . Bachelor, SOOR staged winter regional games events in basketball this past weekend in Springfield and Turner. And on the weekend following the Winter State Games here in Central O regon, powerlifting competition will be staged in Roseburg, and more basketball regional games will take place in Beaverton and Hillsboro. As for the Mt. Bachelor event, Friday is a practice day. Competition will take place from approximately 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. on both Saturday and Sunday. See Olympics /85

super events with huge individual brackets that, unless you're a kid's grandma, you're not going to sit there all day long."

Eric Fullerton, Bend, nordic skiing

Alexis Andrea Gibson, Bend, Gifford, Bend, alpine skiing nordic skiing

Charlee Landon, Bend, snowshoeing

Alley's biggest concern for his

sport is w here its f uture leaders will be groomed. A leadership void could create a trickledown effect, he says, if wrestling is kept out of the

Olympics.

I

"In Oregon, there's24 colleges that have lost wrestling," says Alley, pointing to large universities like Portland State and the University of Oregon and to smaller schools such as Lewis & Clark College, Eastern Oregon University, and Oregon Institute of Technology. See Wrestling /B4

M elissa Ashle y Roy Ritter, Murray, Bend, Pantera, Bend, alpine skiing Redmond alpine skiing snowshoeing

See more prep sports photos

Kelly M ichelle Kris t e l Spurlock, Swager, Bend, Wieglenda, snowshoeing Bend, Bend, snowshoeing nordic skiing

from the past week:

benddulletin.com/preppics

— The Associated Press

PP +'

Special Olympics Oregon (SOOR) boarding, alpine skiing, cross-coun- is an organization that provides Nicole Misty Harder, Bend, Holloman, snowboarding Bend, alpine skiing

car.

AMANDA MILES

ens of Special Olympians from

cally powerful high school wrestling programs. "We've gotten into more

good or better as any win I've ever had," Edwards said. 2012 season, missing

the country, wonders if w restling has lost its way — and in turn lost a on individual wrestlers than overall team competitions. "I think w r estling's pretty ent ertaining, bu t t h e a v erage f a n has turned away," Alley says. "We need more of those Crook CountyRedmond duals," he adds, referring to two of Central Oregon's histori-

away on a late restart and snapped a70-race winless streak onSunday. "This win feels as

programs in Oregon and around strong fan base — by focusing more

myhb.org/events/grinbear-it-run.

MOTOR SPORTS

~4:.,

Coaches not fans of wrestling's elimination

While the news is unlikely to have an immediate effect on area high school wrestling programs, Combs says the l o ng-term r a mifications could be chilling. "Let's say 2016 is the last Olympics wrestling is in," Combs says, "and I'm a 10-, 11-, or 12-year-old kid. Am I going to be a wrestler if I want to be in the Olympics? That's the longterm psychological effect." The decision did not surprise everyone. The wrestling community has sometimes been its own worst enemy when operating on amacro level, says longtime Culver High coach J.D. Alley. "When we're talking about the political process, wrestling people are sometimes the worst," Alley says. "We get so focused on building our own programs and our own local issues ... we have our head in the sand a bit." Alley, who also laments the loss of numerous collegiate wrestling

The race starts at10 a.m. at Les Schwab Amphitheater, Bend;

e

field."

unofficial start with the annual 5K, 10K and 1-mile runs.

P~

COMMUNITY SPORTS

BEAU EASTES

he I n t ernational O l y m p ic Committee's surprise decision last month to eliminate wrestling from the Olympics after the 2016 games completely stunned Les Combs, the veteran coach at Bend's Mountain View High. "A student told me he saw something about it on the 6 a.m. news," Combs says about the IOC's secret vote on Feb. 12 that, if upheld during the IOC's full leadership meeting in September, would cut a sport that has been a part of all but one Olympic Games since 1896. "I looked at him like he was crazy.... Like most people, I was caught totally by surprise. This was completely out of left

Oregon gets its

area. Spectators are encouraged to cheer the athletes on in

a game backat12-5. The Ducks wrap up the regular seasonwith a game atUtah onSaturday (11:30 a.m., Pac-12Network).

PREP SPORTS

season in Central

J(

200 Special Olympics athletes

7R DIRECT

puralesf

C

Carl Edwards celebrates after winning the NASCAR Sprint Cup race, Sunday in Avondale, Ariz.

GOLF

Thompson picks up first PGAwin Golfer holds off Geoff Ogilvy for a victory at

the Honda Classic,B4

MichaelThompson


B2

THE BULLETIN• MONDAY, MARCH 4, 20'I3

ON THE AIR: TELEVISION TODAY BASEBALL 6:30 a.m.:MLB, spring training, Chicago Cubs(ss) at LosAngeles Angels (taped), MLBNetwork. 10 a.m.:MLB, spring training, Atlantaat New York Mets, MLB Network.

Noon:MLB,spring training, Colorado at Seattle, Root Sports.

TUESDAY SOCCER 4 a.m.:English Premier League,Tottenham HotspurFC

vs. Arsenal FC(taped), Root Sports. 11:30 a.m.:UEFA Champions

League, Roundof16, Borussia Dortmund vs. FC Shakhtar Donetsk, Root Sports. 7 p.m.:UEFA Champions

1 p.m.:MLB, spring training, Colorado at Seattle (taped), MLB League, Roundof16, Network. 5:30 p.m.:MLB, spring training,

Houston at Detroit (taped), MLB Network.

SOCCER 11:55a.m.:English Premier League, Aston Villa FC vs. Manchester City FC, ESPN2.

BASKETBALL 4p.m.:Men's college, Cincinnati at Louisville, ESPN.

4 p.m.:Women's college, Connecticutat Notre Dame, ESPN2.

4 p.m.:Men's college, Texas Tech at Kansas,ESPNU. 6 p.m.:Men's college, Baylor at Texas, ESPN.

6 p.m.:Men's college, Savannah

Manchester United FC vs. Real

Madrid CF(same-day tape), Root Sports. BASEBALL 10 a.m.:MLB, spring training, Dominican Republic at Philadelphia, MLB Network. 1 p.m.:MLB, spring training, Los

Angeles Dodgers atSanDiego (taped), MLBNetwork. 6 p.m:MLB, spring training, Mexico at Arizona, MLB Network.

LACROSSE 2 p.m.:Men's college, Mount St. Mary'sat Johns Hopkins, ESPNU.

BASKETBALL 4 p.m.:Men's college, Arkansas

State at North Carolina A&T, ESPNU.

at Missouri, ESPN.

6 p.m.:Women's college, Louisville at Syracuse,CBSSN.

at Notre Dame, ESPN2.

7 p.m.:NBA, Charlotte at

Tech at Duke, ESPNU.

Portland, Comcast SportsNet

4 p.m.:Men's college, Southern

Northwest.

Miss at Marshall, CBSSN. 4p.m.: NBA, Boston at Philadelphia, TNT. 6 p.m.: Men's college, Ohio State at Indiana, ESPN.

HOCKEY 4:30 p.m.:NHL, Tampa Bay at Pittsburgh, NBCSN.

TENNIS 6p.m.: Exhibition, Juan Martin del Potro vs. Rafael Nadal, ESPN2.

CYCLING 9p.m.:Paris-Nice, Stage1 (same-day tape), NBCSN.

4p.m.: Men's college, St. John's 4p.m.:Men's college, Virginia

6 p.m.:Men's college, Alabama at Mississippi, ESPNU.

6 p.m.:Men's college, Memphis at UTEP, CBSSN. 6:30 p.m.:NBA, Los Angeles Lakers at Oklahoma City, TNT.

HOCKEY 4:30 p.m.:NHL, Philadelphia at New York Rangers, NBCSN.

CYCLING 9 p.m.:Paris-Nice, Stage 2 (same-day tape), NBCSN.

ON THE AIR:RADIO TODAY BASKETBALL 7 p.m.:NBA, Charlotte at Portland, KBND-AM 1110, KRCD-AM 690.

TUESDAY BASEBALL 2 p.m.:College, Oregon State at Portland, KICE-AM 940.

Listings are the mostaccurate available. The Bulletinis not responsible for late changes made by 7Vor radio stations.

SPORTS IN BRIEF BASEBALL

The winner gets a newtruckand a cash prize of $50,400. Therest

Ducksend two-game slide

of the $600,000 purse will be split between the next 29 mush-

— Oregon salvagedthefinal game of a three-gameseries

ers to cross the finish line.

against Cal State Fullerton with a 9-1 win Sunday at Fullerton's

Goodwin Field. RyanHambright, who entered the game with just two hits in 36 turns at bat this

TENNIS Guldis wins atDelray-

season, went three for four with three RBls for the Ducks(8-3), who handed theTitans (10-1) their first defeat of the season.

3 on Sunday for his second title

UD freshman Cole lrvin scattered

Championships in Florida. The 109th-ranked Gulbis, who also

eight hits over seveninnings to earn the victory, boosting

his record to 3-0. Shaun Chase belted a solo home run to high-

light a three-run eighth inning for Oregon, which opens atwogame home series with Cal State Northridge tonight at 6 o'clock at PK Park in Eugene.

Beavers earn sweep — Michael Conforto set a career-high with seven RBls on

the strength of his first career grand slam and later a three-

run home run to paceOregon State to a 14-0 win over Bryant Sunday afternoon at Goss Stadium in Corvallis. The win

gave the Beavers aseries sweep overthe visiting Bulldogs. The

Qualifier Ernests Gulbis beat Ed-

ouard Roger-Vasselin 7-6 (3), 6at the Delray Beach lnternational won the tournament in 2010, is the first qualifier to reach a final

this season.

Pliskova takes Malaysian OPSll —Karolina Pliskova of

the CzechRepublic fought back from a poor first set to beat American Bethanie MattekSands1-6, 7-5, 6-3 on Sunday to win the Malaysian Open in Kuala

Lumpur, Malaysia.Eachwas looking for her first WTAsingles title, but the 127th-ranked Pliskova won in her first final.

SOCCER Timders rally for draw-

victory pushed OregonState to12-0 this season andfor the

The Portland Timbers overcame

fourth time in school history.

dola to forge a 3-all draw with the New York Red Bulls inboth

The12-game win streak is also the team's longest since the 2007 club won 12 straight late in

non-conference action. Oregon State hits the road Tuesdayfor a 2 p.m. game at Portland.

two early goals by FabianEspinteams' Major LeagueSoccer season opener onSunday night in Portland. Espindola, a veteran

acquired in the offseason from Real Salt Lake, scored in the ninth and 24th minutes, while

Jamison Dlave, also obtained in

WINTER SPORTS Iditarod off andrunning — Dogs aching to run bolted out of the chute Sunday to launch

the 41st running of Alaska's Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race in Willow, Alaska. Now 65 teams

the trade with RSL, added a goal in the 28th minute. Argentine

midfielder DiegoValeri scored his first goal for the Timbers,

who played before asellout crowd of 20,674 at Jeld-Wen Field. Darlington Nagbe's goal in the second half pulled Portland

will be making their way through closer before anown goal that punishing wilderness toward the finish line in Nome on Alaska's

western coast1,000 miles away.

bounced off of Dlave in the 83rd minute tied it. — From wire reports

COREBOARD ON DECK Wednesday Boys basketball: Class5Astate tournamentat Matthew KnightArenain Eugene, Mountian Viewvs Wilsonvi le,3:15p.m. Thursday Girls basketball: Class5Astate tournamentat MatthewKnightArenainEugene, Bendvs. Hermiston, 3:15 p.m. Friday Boys basketball: Cass5Astatetournament at MatthewKnightArenain Eugene,TBD Girls basketball: Class5Astate tournamentat MatthewKnightArenain Eugene,TBD

Delray BeachInternational

Sunday At Delray BeachStadium & Tennis Center Delray Beach, Fla. Purse: $519,775(WT250) Surface: Hard-Outdoor Singles Championship ErnestsGubis, Latvia, def.EdouardRoger-Vasselin, France,7-6 (3), 6-3. Malaysia nOpen Sunday At Bukit KiaraEpuestrfan 8CountryResort Kuala Lumpur,Malaysia Purse: $235,000(Intl.) Surface: Hard-Outdoor Singles Championship Karolina Pliskova,CzechRepublic, def. Bethanie Mattek-Sands,UnitedStates,1 6, 7-5,6-3.

Canada

Italy Mexico UnitedStates

0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0

Thursday, March7 At Scottsdale, Ariz. Italy vs.Mexico,noon Friday, March8 At Scottsdale, Ariz. Canadavs. Italy,11.30a.m. At Phoenix Mexicovs.UnitedStates,6p.m.

.0 0 0 .0 0 0 .0 0 0 .0 0 0

GOLF PGA To Uy'

Honda Classi Sunday At PGA National (Champion Course) Palm BeachGardens, Fla. Purse: $6mill ion Yardage: Tzll0;Par: 70 HOCKEY Final M. Thompson (500), $1,080,00067-65-70-69—271 WINTER SPORTS NHL GeoffDgilvy(300), $648,000 68-66-70-69—273 NATIONALHOCKEY LEAGUE LukeGuthrie(190), $408000 68-63-71-73—275 Local AH TimesPST KeeganBradley(104), $226,20068-68-70-71—277 Sled DogRacing Erik Compton (104), $226,200 69-68-70-70—277 Eastern Conference LucasGover (104), $226,200 69-66-72-70—277 Bachelor Butte OogDerby Saturday, Sunday Atlantic Division DavidLynn(104), $226,200 72-68-68-69—277 At WanogaSno-Park GP W L OTPts GF GA Justin Rose (104), $226,200 68-66-72-71—277 Pittsburgh 22 14 8 0 28 77 64 Graham DeLaet (73), $156,000 65-68-73-72—278 (Oay1 time, Day 2time, total time) 21 1 0 6 5 25 52 56 Graeme McDoweg (73), $156,00067-68-73-70—278 Junior (1 mile) — I, IsabelMax,4:53,5:20, 10:13. N ewJersey 2 3 1 1 11 123 66 68 CharlSchwartzel (73), $156,00070-68-71-69—278 2,FionaMax,5:53,6:07,12:00.3,Erin Madsen, Philadelphia N Y. Rangers 2 0 1 0 8 2 22 51 51 Lee We s twood(73),$156,000 66-68-70-74 278 6.41, 12.30,19:11. SkiJor (5 miles) 1, Shawn Bresler, 25:08,27:50, N .Y.lslanders 2 2 9 1 1 2 20 64 75 RickieFowler(56), $109,200 65-71-69-74—279 Northeast Division PeterHanson(56),$109,200 71-67-68-73—279 52:58. 2,GenevaLyon, 34:01, 3936, 1:13:37.3, GP W L OT Pts GF GA RussellHenley(56),$109,200 68-71-70-70—279 DanielSolbach,40:07,DNS. 22 14 4 4 32 68 53 DarronSties(56), $109,200 71-68-68-72—279 5-Oog (5 miles) — 1, DebbieLyman,17:43, 19 14 3 2 30 57 42 Chris Stroud (56), $109,200 67-70-72-70—279 17:32,35:15.2,TomRiley,18:46, 16:53,35:39. 3, 23 12 7 4 28 52 44 Matt Jones (51), $78,240 67-73-72-68—280 KenziMyers,2115,1949,41:04.4,RickJohnson, 22 13 9 0 26 64 55 SeanO'Hair(51), $78,240 66-68-74-72—280 22:23, 20:53, 43:16. 5, Sheryl O'Rourke,24:48, 23 9 12 2 20 60 73 Kyle Stanl e (51), y $78,240 70-69-69-72—280 25:08, 49:56. 6,Jill Harreg,25:49, 24:11, 50:00. Southeast Division RobertStreb(51),$78,240 65-70-74-71 —280 7, Reggi Lombardi27:26, , 27:28,54:54. 8, Dan GP W L OT Pts GF GA YE Yang(51) $78240 67-72-67-74—280 Silvertree,29:28, 28:06,5734. 9, BuckYockey, 21 12 8 I 25 63 59 Boh Estes(48),$60,000 69-69-70-73 —281 27:23, 30:59,58:22. 10,Jan Purkeypile, 29:19, Carolina Winnipeg 21 10 10 1 21 55 64 N.Thompson(48),$60,000 69-66-72-74—281 35:24,I:04:43. 21 9 11 1 19 73 67 TomGigis(45),$47,850 67-68-72-75 282 Adv Skijor (9 miles) — 1, Joel Myers,37:39, T ampaBay Florida 22 6 11 5 17 55 82 FreddieJacohson(45), $47,850 70-69-72-71—282 45:23, 1'23:02. 20 8 1 1 1 17 55 59 Vaughn Taylor (45), $47,850 71-68-73-70—282 8-Oog (9.6 miles) — 1,ThadMccracken,35:56, W ashington 35:57, 1:11:53. 2, Jane Devtin, 39:53, 42:34, Western Conference BooWeekley (45),$47,850 66-67-74-75 282 1.22:27. Central Division StevenBowditch (39),$36,525 70-69-72-72—283 7-Mid (15 miles) — 1,SharonCarpenter,1:11:49, GP W L OTPts GF GA Brendon deJonge(39), $36,525 70-68-73-72—283 113 25,2 25:14.2, NickSalerno,1:16 56,11718, Chicago 22 19 0 3 41 70 41 James Driscoll (39),$36,525 69-68-70-76—283 2:34:14. 3,TimCurley, I:15:55, I:24:25, 2:40:20. Detroit 22 10 8 4 24 61 59 CharlesHowell III (39),$36,525 67-67-71-78—283 67-69-73-74—283 4, Matt Hamel, 1:20.45, 1:20:43, 2:41:28. 5, St.Louis 21 11 8 2 24 60 61 Jeff Klauk(39),$36,525 GabeDunham,1:23:59,1.21.20, 2:45:19.6, Dina Nashville 2 2 9 8 5 23 46 54 Matte oManassero,$36,525 73-67-71-72—283 Lund, 1:31:29,1:33:56, 305:25.7, LauraCrocker, Columbus 22 6 12 4 16 49 66 Scott Stallings(39),$36,525 74-66-72-71—283 66-69-75-73 —283 1:36:47, I:35:22,3:12:09. 8, Ji IWilson, 1:36:47, Northwest Division BrianStuard(39),$36,525 —284 1:37:57, 3:14:44. GP W L OTPts GF GA DougLaBege0(33),$27,600 66-68-77-73 Vancouver 21 11 6 4 26 61 58 Jeff Dverton(33),$27,600 67-71-74-72—284 Minnesota 21 11 8 2 24 49 51 MarkWilson(33), $27,600 70-68-71-75—284 BASKETBALL Calgary 2 0 8 8 4 20 57 68 TigerWoods(33), $27,600 70-70-70-74—284 Colorado 2 0 8 8 4 20 50 60 StewartCink(28), $22,200 68-71 71-75 285 Men's college Edmonton 2 1 8 9 4 20 51 58 BenKohles(28), $22,200 66-73-69-77—285 Pacific Division George McNeig (28),$22,200 71-68-71-75—285 Sunday's Games GP W L OT Pts GF GA RyanPalmer(28), $22,200 69 69-75-72 285 East Anaheim 20 15 3 2 32 71 55 KevinStreelman(28), $22,200 71-68-73-73—285 BostonCollege53,Virginia 52 Dallas 22 11 9 2 24 61 63 Emie El s (23), $16,632 69-70-75-72—286 Hartford61,Vermont58 SanJose 20 10 6 4 24 47 44 Billy Horschel(23), $16,632 66-69-81-70—286 lona 80,Siena61 Phoenix 21 10 8 3 23 62 59 TrevorImmelman(23), $16,632 73-67-71-75—286 Loyola(Md.)63,Manhattan61 L osAngeles 1 9 1 0 7 2 22 49 47 BrandtJobe(23), $16,632 69-71-68-78—286 Marist 73,Fairfield60 NOTE: Two poi n ts Ior a wi n , one poi n tfor overtime DustinJohnson(23), $16,632 66-71-74-75—286 NewHampshire 79,Maine74 loss. GregChalmers(17), $14,040 68-71-73-75—287 Pittsburgh73,Viganova64 DT Sunday's Games JasonDufner(17), $14,040 69-70-74-74—287 StonyBrook75,Albany(NY) 70 Chicago2, Detroit1, SD BrianGay(17), $14,040 67-72-73-75—287 UMBC59,Binghamton49 NY. Islanders3, Ottawa2, SD Martin Kaymer (17), $14,040 71 66-76-74 287 South N.Y.Rangers3, Buffalo 2,SD Chris Kirk(17), $14,040 68-68-75-76—287 NC State70, GeorgiaTech57 Columbus2, Colorado1, OT HankKuehne(17), $14,040 67-72-75-73—287 NorthCarolina79, FloridaSt. 58 Dallas 4,St.Louis1 Brendan Steele(17), $14,040 72-67-73-75 287 SouthFlorida83, DePaul 73 73-66-76-73—288 Carolina 3,Florida2 JamteDonaldson,$13,200 Midwest Montreal 4,Boston3 MarcLeishman(11), $13,200 69-69-77-73—288 Mtchigan58,MichiganSt.57 67-73-75-73—288 Minnes ot a4,Edmonton2 PatrickReed(11), $13,200 Purdue69,Wisconsin 56 Ca gary4, Vancouver2 KevinStadler(11), $13,200 67-71-74-76—288 Southwest Today' s Games 69-67-74-78—288 D. Summ e rh ays(11),$13,200 Texas-Pan American 71 NewOrleans57 71-66-77-75—289 NewJerseyat Toronto,4 p.m. RossFisher(8),$12,840 Far West 70-69-72-79—290 Tampa Bayat Pittsburgh, 4:30p.m. BenCrane(6),$12,540 Cal Poly64,Hawaii 61 66-72-72-80—290 Anahetm atPhoeni x,6 p.m. FabianGomez(6), $12,540 Stanford84,Utah66 72-67-71-80—290 Nashville at Los An g el e s 7.30 p.m. Retief Goo sen (6), $12, 5 40 Washington 72,Washington St.68 71-68-77-74—290 Tuesday'sGames Justin Hicks (6), $12,540 TampaBayat NewJersey, 4p.m. NicolasColsaerts(2), $12,120 69-71-72-79—291 Pacific-12 Conference 67-71-77-76—291 Montreal atNY.Islanders, 4 p.m. D.A. Points(2), $12,120 AH Times PST Boston atWashington, 4p.m. GaryWoodland(2), $12,120 68-70-77-76—291 atCarolina, 4p.m. JasonBohn(1), $11,760 70-69-79-74—292 Conference Overall Buffalo Branden Grace, $11,760 65-71-75-81—292 W L W L Edmontonat Columbus,4 p.m. Philadelphiaat N.Y.Rangers,4:30 p.m. Cameron Percy(1), $11,760 71-66-77-78—292 Oregon 12 4 23 6 Winnipeg at Fl o ri d a,4:30 p.m. Brad Fri t sch (1), $11, 4 60 68-72-77-77—294 UCLA 12 4 22 7 ColoradoatDetroit, 4:30p.m. SteveMarino(1), $11,460 71-69-75-79—294 Califomia 12 5 20 9 Minnesotaat Chicago,5:30 p.m. Arizona 1I 6 23 6 San Jose at Vancouver,7 p.m. Colorado 9 7 19 9 LPGA Tour St.LouisatLosAngeles,7:30 p.m. SouthernCal 9 7 14 15 HSBCWomen's Champions ArizonaSt. 9 8 20 10 Sunda Washington 8 8 16 13 y BASEBALL At SentosaGolf Club (SerapongCourse) Stanford 8 9 17 13 Singapore OregonSt. 3 13 13 16 MLB Purse:$1.4million Utah 3 13 11 17 Yardage: 6,60 6; Par:72 Washington St. 2 14 11 18 MAJORLEAGUEBASEBALL Final Sunday'sGames Spring Training 67-66-69-71 —273 StacyLewis,$210,000 Washington 72,Washington State68 69-66-67-72 —274 Na Yeon Choi, $134,116 Stanford84,Utah66 Sunday's Games Paula Cream er, $97, 2 92 68-67-69-71 —275 Wednesday'sGames Miami 6,N.Y.Mets 4 Ariya Jutanugarn,$75,263 69-66-72-71—278 UCLAatWashington State,6 30p.m. Atlanta 6,Detroit1 69-71-69-70—279 CandieKung,$50,543 StanfordatCalifornta, 8p.m. Pittsburgh 8,Houston6 72-68-68-71—279 JessicaKorda,$50,543 USCatWashington, 8:30p.m. Baltimore12,Philadelphia(ss) 3 68-69-70-72—279 Dani e ge K ang,$50,543 Thursday's Games Tampa Bay7, Minnesota2 73-68-69-70—280 LexiThompson,$34,511 OregonatColorado, 6p.m. Washington7,St. Louis6 68-67-74-71—280 Chega Choi,$34,51I Oregon Stateat Utah, 6pm Philadelphia(ss)13,Toronto5 70-69-72-70—281 CatrionaMatthew,$27,657 Saturday's Games NY.Yankees5, Boston 2 67-71-72-71 281 Pornanong Ph at l u m,$27,657 UCLAatWashington,11 a.m. San Francisco5,Arizona3 70-71-69-71—281 MorganPressel,$27,657 Oregonat Utah, 11:30a.m. Seattle 7,Texas6 67-74-70-71—282 LizetteSalas,$24,084 ArizonaStateatArizona,1:30 p.m. KansasCity8, Cincinnati1 71-72-70-70—283 JennyShin,$20,780 Oregon Stateat Colorado, I:30 p.m. San Diego4, ChicagoWhite Sox0 Mortya Jutanugarn, $20,780 73-68-71-71—283 USCatWashington State, 3:30p.m. ChicagoCuhs(ss) 4, L.A.Angels 2 NicoieCastrale,$20,780 69-71-69-74—283 L.A. Dodgers 5, Cleveland1 SunYoungYoo,$20,780 67-68-72-76—283 Mi waukee 4, Chicago Cuhs(ss) 3 Women's college KarrieWebb,$16,619 71-71-73-69—284 Oakland7, Colorado2 Sunday's Games Jodi Ewart Sha doff, $16, 6 19 69-71-74-70—284 Today's Games East Hee-Won H an, $ 16, 6 19 72-71-71-70—284 Minnesotavs. St. LouisatJupiter, Fla., 1005a.m. BostonCollege74, GeorgiaTech68 Philadelphiavs. Pittsburghat Bradenton, Fla.,10:05 BrittanyLincicome,$16,619 69-73-72-70—284 Buffalo 81,KentSt.45 Jiyai Shin,$16,619 71-69-70-74—284 a.m. Delaware 62, Drexel 57 AzaharaMunoz,$16,619 65-70-72-77—284 Houstonvs.Detroit at Lakeland,Fla., 10:05a.m. Duquesne 59, Butler43 Rhee Lee,$13,768 70-74-72-69—285 Atlanta vs. N.Y.Metsat PortSt. Lucie, Fla., 10:10 Fordham 58,Temple 44 HeeKyungSeo,$13,768 71-69-74-71—285 a.m. George Washington68,Saint Louis55 72-71-70-72—285 TampaBayvs Boston at Fort Myers, Fla., 10:35 AnnaNordpvist, $13,768 Hofstra70, UNCWilmington 50 Beatriz Recari , $13,768 71 -72-69-73 —285 a.m. lona 76,Rider63 Chie Ari m ura, $11,993 69-72-72-73 —286 Clevelandvs. ChicagoCuhsat Mesa,Ariz., 12:05 Loyola(Md.)57,St. Peter's45 YaniTseng,$11,993 68-73-71-74—286 p.m. Manhattan 61, Niagara52 KarineIcher,$11,993 70-71-68-77—286 Coloradovs.Seatt eat Peoria, Ariz.,12:05p.m. Marist 70,Fairfield33 70-77-71-70—288 San Franciscovs. ChicagoWhite Soxat Glendale, I K. Kim,$11,087 Northeastern79,0 dDominion 60 Shanshan Fe ng,$9,810 69-73-76-71—289 Ariz.,12:05 p.m. Siena64,Canisius 53 JenniferJohnson,$9,810 72-73-73-71—289 L A.Angelsvs OaklandatPhoenix,12:05p.m. St. Bonaventure 71, LaSalle 58 70-69-77-73—289 HaejiKang,$9,810 San Diegovs. Texasat Surprise, Ariz.,12:05p.m. 69-71-76-73—289 South Cincinnati vs. Arizona at Scottsdale, Ariz., 12:10 AmyYang,$9,810 73-70-72-74 —289 Aubum 74, Mississippi St. 65 Suzann Pe t e rsen, $9, 8 10 p.m. 74-71-73-72 290 Charlotte64, Richmond55 JulietaGranada,$7,517 Duke65, NorthCarolina58 70-70-78-72—290 CarolineHedwag,$7,517 71-71-75-73—290 EastCarolina69,Memphis 52 WBC MeenaLee,$7,517 71-71-74-74 290 Georgia 55, Vanderbilt 50 Gerina Pi l e r, $7,517 World Baseball Classic Glance 73-69-73-75—290 JamesMadison67,GeorgeMason56 BrittanyLang,$7,517 AH TimesPST Kentucky78,Tennessee65 StacyPrammanasudh,$7,517 73-70-71-76—290 FIRST ROUND Maryland88, WakeForest61 InbeePark,$7,517 73-69-71-77—290 GROUP A Miami 64,VirginiaTech46 Karin Sjodin,$7,517 67-72-74-77—290 W L Pc t GB Missouri 88, Aahama64 Michege Wi e , $6, 1 31 71-75-77-69—292 Japan 2 0 1 . 000 NC St ate63,Clemson47 Juli Inkster,$6,131 77-70-71-74—292 Cuba 1 0 1. 000 '/z SouthCarolina67, Florida56 $5,690 76-71-74-73—294 China 0 1 .0 0 0 1 ' /z Mika Miyazato, Tulane80,Southern Miss.69 Vicky Hurst, $5,690 73-71-70-80—294 Brazil 0 2 .0 0 0 2 UAB59,Tusa45 Katte Futcher, $5,164 70-75-78-72—295 At Fukuoka,Japan UCF75, Marshall51 KatherineHull-Kirk, $5,164 75-70-75-75 295 Saturday, March 2 VCU55, RhodeIsland46 Giulia Sergas, $5,164 75-72-72-76—295 Japan5,Brazil3 Virginia 72,FloridaSt. 60 Hee Young P ark, $4, 6 26 72-75-78-71—296 Cuba 5,Brazil2 Midwest Cristie Kerr, $4,626 74-73-77-72 296 Sunday, March 3 Akron71,Mtami(Dhto) 65 MomokoUeda, $4,626 78-68-77-73—296 Japan 5,China2 Ball St. 60,W.Michigan46 CindyLacrosse,$4,626 70-76-75-75—296 GROUP B BowlingGreen73,Ohio 52 AngelaStanford,$4,258 76-76-73-73—298 W L Pc t GB Bradley73, Evansville57 Mi Jung Hur, $4, 0 38 74-77-75-74—300 Taiwan 2 0 1. 000 Cent. Mtchtgan 82, N.Illinois 61 SandraGal,$4,038 75-77-72-76—300 Netherlands 1 1 .5 0 0 1 Creighton67, Drake66 MinaHarigae,$3,819 72-76-76-77—301 Austraia 0 1 .0 0 0 1 ' /z ChristahelGoh,$3,671 Dayton73,Saint Joseph's66 80-78-80-77—315 SouthKorea 0 1 .0 0 0 1 H RlinoisSt. 81,Missouri St.60 At Taichung, Tai w an lowa 62,Northwestem45 Saturday, March2 SOCCER MichiganSt.54, Wisconsin 48 Taiwan4,Australia I Minnesota 59, Indiana53 Netherl a nds 5, So uth K orea 0 N. Iowa 74,S. Illinois 60 MLS Sunday, March3 Ohio St.66, Michigan55 Taiwan 8, Ne t h erl a nds 3 MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCER PennSt. 82, Nebraska67 GROUP C AH TimesPST Purdue76, lginois 65 W L P c t G B Toled o48,E.Michigan38 DominicanRepubli c 0 0 .000 Eastern Conference WichitaSt.63, IndianaSt.53 PuertoRico 0 0 .0 0 0 W L T Pts GF GA Southwest Spain 0 0 .0 0 0 Columbus 1 0 0 3 3 0 Arkansas 93, Mississippi 52 Venezuel a 0 0 .0 0 0 — At S porttng Kansas Ci t y 10 0 3 3 1 Houston69,Rice59 San Juan, Pu e rto Ri c o Houston 1 0 0 3 2 0 LSU67,TexasA8M52 Thursday, March 7 Montreal 1 0 0 3 1 0 SMU 73,UTEP71 Venezu eavs.DominicanRepublic,3:30p.m. NewYork 0 0 1 1 3 3 Far West Friday, March 8 N ew Engl a nd 0 0 0 0 0 0 Colorado66, OregonSt.63, DT Spainvs.Puerto Rico,2:30 p.m. Toronto FC 0 1 0 0 0 1 SouthernCal67,ArizonaSt.60 Saturday, March9 Philadelphia 0 1 0 0 1 3 UCLA68, Arizona57 DominicanRepublic vs. Spain,8a.m. D.C. 0 1 0 0 0 2 Utah 70,Oregon52 Puert oRicovs.Venezuela,2.30p.m. Chicago 0 1 0 0 0 4 Sunday, Marchlg WesternConference Spainvs.Venezuela, 9:30a.m. W L T Pts GF GA TENNIS DominicanRepublic vs PuertoRico,4:30p.m. Los Angeles 1 0 0 3 4 0 RealSaltLake GROUP O 1 0 0 3 2 0 Professional W L Pc t GB Vancouver 1 0 0 3 1 0

Saturday Boys basketball: Class5Astate tournamentat MatthewKnightArenain Eugene,TBD Girls basketball: Class5Astate tournamentat MatthewKnightArenain Eugene,TBD

FC Dagas Portland Colorado Seattle San Jose

1 0 0 3 1 0 0 1 1 3 0 1 0 0 0 0 I 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 ChivasUSA 0 1 0 0 0 NOTE: Threepoints Ior victory, onepoint fortie.

0 3 1 I 2 3

Sunday's Games Los Angele4, s Chicago0 Portland 3, NewYork3,tie RealSaltLake2,SanJose0

Saturday'sGames SportingKansasCity atTorontoFC,1030a m. Philadelphia atColorado 3 pm RealSaltLakeatD.C.Untted, 4p.m. NewEnglandatChicago 430pm

Columbus atVancouver,4:30p.m. Montrealat Portland,730p.m. Sunday, March 10 FC DallasatChtvasUSA,2 p.m. NewYorkat SanJose, 7p.m.

MO TOR SPORTS NASCAR Sprint Cup Subway FreshFit 500 Sunday At Phoenix International Raceway Avondale, Ariz. Lap length: 1 miles (Start position in parentheses) 1. (15)CarlEdwards, Ford,316laps,136.5 rating,48 points,$293,675. 2. (3) JimmieJohnson, Chevrolet, 316,126.9, 43, $209,686. 3. (8) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 316, 98.7, 41, $157,575. 4. (11) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 316, 115.8, 41, $1 68,076. 5. (21) DaleEarnhardtJr., Chevrolet,316,107.9, 40, $130,750. 6. (13)ClintBowyer,Toyota,316,101,38, $140083. 7. (9) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 316, 111.1, 37, $129,841. 8. (6) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 316, 103.2, 36 $1 32,575. 9. (5) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 316, 982, 35, $131,186. 10. (20) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 316, 87.5, 34, $96,950. 11.(23) A JAgmendinger, Chevrolet, 316,71.7, 33, $111,808 12. (29) JuanPabloMontoya, Chevrolet, 316,80.5, 33, $111,064. 13. (7) Kevin Harvtck, Chevrolet, 316, 108.4, 31, $125,136. 14. (43) Casey Mears, Ford, 316, 64.1, 30, $105,333. 15. (18) Aric Almirola, Ford, 316, 859, 29, $117 886. 16. (12) RickyStenhouseJr., Ford, 316, 72, 28, $125,311. 17. (17)GregBiffle, Ford,316,86,28,$92,925. 18. (22) MarcosAmbrose, Ford, 316, 67.4, 26 $105,914. 19. (2) Kasey Kahne,Chevrolet, 316, 84.9, 25, $93,000. 20. (16) Paul Menard,Chevrolet, 316, 70.9, 24, $108,866. 21. (1)MarkMartin, Toyota,316, 919, 24 $92,425. 22. (19) JamieMcMurray, Chevrolet, 316,68.3, 22, $103,995. 23. (4)KyleBusch, Toyota, 316,60.3, 21,$119,508. 24. (33) Bobby Lahonte Toyota 315 55 20 $99,408 25. (34) DavidReutimann,Toyota, 315, 49.4, 20, $89,233. 26. (32) Joey Logano, Ford, 315, 72.3, 18, $104,708. 27. (25) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 315, 73.7, 17, $102,920. 28.(27)J.J.Yeley,Chevrolet,315, 46.3, 16,$76,350. 29.(30) TravisKvapil,Toyota,313,41.4,I5,$93,672. 30. (37) David Stremme,Toyota, 313, 40.1, 14, $77,475. 31. (41) Joe Nemec hek, Toyota, 311, 356, 0, $72,810. 32. (38) LandonCassill, Chevrolet, 309, 35.1, 12, $75,125. 33. (26) Dave Blaney,Chevrolet, 306, 38.2, 11, $72,500. 34.(42) KenSchrader, Ford,accident,300, 29.8, 10, $72,375 35.(36)JoshWise,Ford,295,36,0,$72,250. 36. (I4) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 284, 59, 8, $104,170. 37.(31) DavidGigiland, Ford,accident,237, 53.7, 7, $71,970. 38. (24) DavidRagan, Ford, accident, 186,46.5, 7, $75,400. 39. (40) DanicaPatrick, Chevrolet, accident, 184, 44.2, 5,$63,400. 40.(10)RyanNewman,Chevrolet,accident, 137,53.5, 4, $93,558 41. (28) Scott Speed,Ford, brakes, 88, 31.5, 3, $55,400. 42. (35) Mike Bliss, Toyota, brakes,34, 28.4, 0, $51,400. 43. (39) Scott Riggs, Ford,accident, 19, 30.5, 0, $47,900. Race Statistics Average Speed of Race Winner: 105.187 mph. Time of Race: 3hours,0minutes,15 seconds Margin of Victory: 1.024 seconds. Caution Flags: 8for43 laps. Lead Changes: 12 among9 drivers. Lap Leaders: MMartin 1-49; J.Montoya5056; G.Biffle 57-64; J.Montoya65-69; G.Biffle 70100; M.Martin 101-126; B.Keselowski 127-142; D.Ragan143-145; C.Edwards 146-189; J.Johnson 190; D.Reutimann191; D.Eamhardt Jr. 192-238; C.Edwards 239-316. Leaders Summary(Driver, TimesLed, Laps Led): C.Edwards,2timesfor 122 laps; M.Martin, 2 times for 75laps; DEarnhardt Jr.,1 timefor 47laps; GBiffe,2timesfor39laps;BKeseowskt,1timefor16 laps; J.Montoya,2timestor 12laps; D.Ragan,I time for 3 laps;J.Johnson,1 timefor1 lap; D.Reutimann, 1timeIor 1lap. Top12 in Points:1. JJohnson,90; 2 DEamhardt Jr., 82; 3. Bra.Keselowski, 82 4. D.Hamlin, 72; 5. C.Bowyer,72; 6. G.Biffle, 66; 7. MMartin, 65; 8. J.Gordon,60; 9 R.StenhouseJr., 60; 10.A.Almirola, 60; 11.C.Edwards, 59;12. M.Amhrose,52.

DEALS Transactions BASEBALL American League LDS ANGE LES ANGELS—Reassigned C Jett Bandy, CCarlosRamirez andC Zach Wright to their minor league camp. NEWYORKYANKEES—Reassigned RHPCorey Black,RHPMatt Daley, RHPNick Goody RH PShane Greene,RHPBryan Mitchell, RHPZach Nuding, RHP Mike O'Brien, RHPRyan PopeandINFKyle Roller to their minoreaguecamp. DAKLAND ATHLETICS—ReassignedRHPAndrew Carignan to their minorleaguecamp. National League FLORIDAMARLINS— Reassigned LHP Andrew Heaney to rehabilitation. .DSANGELES DODGERS— Reassigned INF/DF I NickEvans,18 DallasMcPherson,LHP Kevin De La Cruz andINFOzzie Martinez to their minor league camp. NEWYORKMETS—Agreed to terms with DF Mike Baxter,LHPRohCarson, DFCogin Cowgig, C Travis d'Arnaud,DFl.ucas Duda, LHPJosh Edgin, RHPJeurysFamilia, INFWilmer Flores, RHPDilon Gee,RHPGonzalezGermen, LHPDarin Gorski, RHP Matt Harvey, INFReese Havens, RHPJeremyHefner, INFBrandonHicks,OFJuanLagares,INFZachLutz, RHP CoginMcHugh, RHPJenrry Me


MONDAY, MARCH 4, 2013• THE BULLETIN

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Canadiensrally to beat Bruins NHL ROUNDUP

The Associated Press

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Indiana Pacers' George Hill (3) is fouled by Chicago Bulls' Marquis Teague (25) as he goes up for a shot during the second half of Sunday night's game in Indianapolis. Indiana won 97-92.

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uS NBA ROUNDUP

The Associated Press INDIANAPOLIS — David West and George Hill came to Indiana to make the Pacers title contenders. Now they have Indiana rolling along toward

10 assists, and Oklahoma City held off a late rally by Los Angeles in a matchup of two of the West's best teams.

the playoffs.

Spurs .......... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... 114

West matched his season-high by scoring 31 points, Hill finished with 21 and the two accounted for the last nine points as the Pacers held off a late Chicago charge for a 97-92 victory in Sunday night's big Central Division showdown. "He (West) leads our team in will," coach Frank Vogel said. "He has a great will to do whatever is necessary to get the job done and to get a 'W' and that was clear tonight." The win gives the Pacers a clear advantage in the division race, too. They extended theirlead over second-place Chicago to four full games and now own the tiebreaker, too, by virtue of sweeping this season's first three meetings with Chicago. Indiana also has won six of seven since the All-Star break — the only loss coming when Roy Hibbert was suspended by the league for one game. And it closes the season with 10 of its remaining 22 games at home where the Pacers are 21-3 since early December. The Pacers improved to 8-5 against the Eastern Conference's top seeds, a mark that includes the perfect record against the Bulls, a 2-0 record against Miami and a 2-1 record against the New York Knicks. Also on Sunday: Heat..... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99 Knicks...... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93 NEW YORK — LeBron James had 29 points, 11 rebounds and seven assists, and Miami tied a franchise record with its 14th straight victory, rallying to beat New York. Thunder..... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108

Pistons..... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75 SAN ANTONIO — Manu Ginobili scored 17 points, Tim Duncan had 16 points and 11 rebounds, and San Antonio routed Detroit despite playing without All-Star point guard Tony Parker. Rockets ...... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136 Mavericks...... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103 HOUSTON — Chandler Parsons scored a career-high 32 points on 12-for-13 shooting and Houston snapped a nine-game losing streak to Dallas. Grizzlies..... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108 Magic ...... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82 ORLANDO, Fla. — Tayshaun Prince had 14 points and Marc Gasol added 12 points and 11 assists as Memphis cruised to a victory over Orlando. Wizards ...... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90 76ers..... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87 WASHINGTON — John Wall scored the final six points of the game after teammate Bradley Beal left the court with an apparent injury, leading Washington past Philadelphia. Kings...... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119 Bobcats..... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 SACRAMENTO, Calif. — John Salmons scored 22 points and Jason Thompson had 18 points and 14 rebounds to lead Sacramento over slumping Charlotte. Lakers...... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99 Hawks...... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98 LOS ANGELES — Kobe Bryant scored 11 of his 34 points in the fourth quarter and hit the go-ahead layup with 9 seconds left, leading the Los Angeles Lakers back to .500 for the first time in more than two months with a victory over Atlanta.

Clippers ........... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... 104 LOS ANGELES — Kevin Durant scored 35 points, Russell Westbrook had 29 points and

BOSTON — David Desharnais and the Montreal Canadiens saw an opening when Z deno Chara went to the penalty box, and they certainly made the most of it. Max Pacioretty scored the tying goal in the third period and Desharnais put Montreal ahead to stay, leading the Canadiens to a 4-3 comeback win over the Boston Bruins on Sunday in a matchup of the Eastern Conference's top teams. Both goals came with Chara sitting in the penalty box. "It's big," said Desharnais, who also scored in the first period. "He's a

the bench a few minutes later. Chara collected an instigat-

ing penalty, fighting major and 10-minute misconduct, leaving Boston short-handed on defense for a good portion of the third.

"The guy just broke his stick c r oss-checking T yler and went down," Chara said. "I was just reacting to it. He's one of our best players and I'm not going to just watch h im g etting c r u shed l i k e that." That's when the Canadiens

Standings

d-Miami d-Indiana d-New York Atlanta Chicago Brooklyn Boston Milwaukee Philadelphia Toronto Detroit Cleveland Washington Orando Charlotte

EasternConference W L Pct GB 43 38 35 33 34 34 31 29 23 23 23 20

14 22 2t 25 26 26 27 28 35 37 39 39

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him to not be on the ice is good for us, and we took advantage of it." T omas Plekanec h a d the other goal for the Can adiens, w h o j um p e d two points ahead of Boston for first overall in the conference. Last season, Montreal finished out of the playoffs — 28th in the 30-team league. This year, the Canadiens are off to a 14-4-4 start. "We're c oming f r o m a long w a y," M o n treal coach M i chel T h e r rien said. "Everyone knows if we stick to our plan we've got a chance to win every

game."

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the tying goal on a power play

clean first period before some bad f eelings surfaced late in the second. Alexei Emelin appeared to cross-check young Bruins star Tyler Seguin on the right hip, sending him to the ice in pain. C hara then r aced i n , nailed Emelin and the pair squared off to the left of M ontreal's net, with t h e B oston c a ptain t h r o w ing most of the punches. Seguin headed down the ramp toward the dressing room, but came back to

with 2:02 left in regulation and had the only goal in a shootout, lifting Chicago to a win over Detroit. B lue Jackets..... . . . . . . . . . . . 2 A valanche..... . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 COLUMBUS, Ohio — Artem Anisimov scored on a hard wrist shot on an over-

d-SanAntonio d-Oklahoma City d-L.A.Clippers Memphis Denver GoldenState Utah Houston LA. Lakers Portand Dallas Minnesota Phoenix NewOrleans Sacramento t -divisionleader

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S enators.......... . . . . . . . . . . 2 UNIONDALE, N.Y. — John Tavares and Frans Nielsen scored in the shootout, lifting the New York Islanders over Ottawa. F lames..... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

Canucks.......... . . . . . . . ... 2 CALGARY, Alberta Jarome Iginla continued to have a hot hand, scoring the winning goal at 12:36 of the third period to lead Calgary to a victory over Vancouver. W ild..... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 O ilers ..... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 MINNEAPOLIS — Mikko Koivu made up for a frustrating stretch without a goal by Minnesota,scoring 9 seconds into the third period to snap a tie and spark the Wild to a victory over Edmonton. R angers ...... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3

S abres .......... . . . . . . . . . . . 2 NEW YORK — Rick Nash had a goal and assist and also scored in the shootout to lead the New York Rangers to a win over Buffalo. DOUBLE SAVINGS NOW! $25-50 rebates on select Hunter Douglas products, and matching instant dealer rebates (thru 4/2/1 3)

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7-144-618, Hill6-66-1021,Stephenson3-102-49, T.Hansbrottgh 0-12-2 2,Granger0-30-00, AugustirI 0-22-2 2,Mahinmi2-3 0-0 4,Johnson 0-0 0-00, Young0-00-00.Totals 33-71 25-33 97. Chicago 21 19 26 26 — 92 Indiana 32 15 22 28 — 97

94-612, Wal7-0 l 2-216, Beal6-120-014, Vesely 3-6 0-2 6,Ariza2-84-49, Price1-70-0 2, Seraphin 0-30-00,Temple0-0 0-0 0 Totals 34-80 16-21 90. Philadelphia 2 2 27 1 9 19 — 87 Washington 26 24 22 18 — 90

Rockets 136, Mavericks103

Kings119, Bodcats 83

JOin in the fIUI during I;he Irduoatian I'OundSti011'S eighth Snnual

DALLAS(103) Marion 6-131-2 14,Nowitzki2-8 4-4 8, Kam an 3-500 6,Collison 2-3 0-0 5,Mayo 6-9 3-4 18, Carter4-8 2-212, Crowder3-90-2 8, Brand0-20-2 0 M.James4-8 0-011, D.Jones1-1 0-0 2, Wright 5 824 t2,Beatrbois2 63-47,B.James0-00-00. TotaIs 38-80 15-24103. HOUSTON (136) Parsons 12-13 2-2 32, Motiejttnas 3-6 1-3 8, Asik 4-6 2-410, Lin 8-144-5 2t, Harden5-10 7-9 21, Delfino1-7 t-t 3, Beverley2-55-69, Robinson 3-4 4-6 10,Garcia3-7 0-0 8, Anderson1-3 1-13, Smith 33228,Ohlbrecht1-21-1 3.Totals4680 30-40 136. Dallas 33 28 17 25 — 103 Houston 31 33 44 28 — 136

CHARLO TTE(83) Kidd-Gilchrist 4-8 2-2 10, Biyombo1-1 0-0 2, Mullens5-11 0-0 t2 Walker 2-76-9 t 1,Henderson 4-9 4-4 t2, Diop1-2 0-0 2,Sessions0-54-44, Taylor 3-8 2-4 9,Adrien0-3 3-4 3, Gordon1-50-0 3, McRoberts 3 t2 0 0 6,Wiliams4-6 0-0 9 Totals 28-7721-27 83. SACRAMENTO (119) Salmons6-13 5-5 2Z Thompson6-8 6-6 18, Cousins6-142-4 14, IThomas4-10 0-010, Evans 3-6 5-713,Thornton7-112-218, Paterson2-4 0-0 5, Fredette3-110-07, Hayes3-50-t 6, Douglas 0-4 2-2 2, Johnson1-20-0 2,Aldrich t-2 0-0 Z Totals 42-90 22-27 119. Charlotte 27 13 19 24 — 83

TriVia Bee. NeSrly 00 teaIL9 in PurSuit Of triVial suPeriOrity-

Spurs114, Pistons75

Thunder 108, Clippers104

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S tars..... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 B lues...... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 DALLAS — Derek Roy had a goal and two assists and Kari Lehtonen made 25 saves to help lead Dallas over St. Louis. I slanders ...... . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3

the lead. "We were able to capitalize off the loss of Chara," Therrien said. "Everyone knows he's one of the best defensemen in the league." Pacioretty's slap shot from the point beat Tuukka Rask, who appeared to be screened, and tied it at 3-all 5:31 into the third period. Desharnais scored out of a scramble in front with 10:43 to play. Chara's teammates felt his actions were justified. "Z knows the right time to step up and fight for his teammates — and tonight was the right time," Bruins w i nger Brad Marchand said. "One of our guys that plays a lot of minutes takes a good shot." Also on Sunday: B lackhawks...... . . . . . . . . . . . 2 R ed Wings...... . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 DETROIT — Chicago has extended its NHL-record, season-opening points streak to 22 games. Patrick Kane scored

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T he

time power play, and Serg ei B o brovsky m a d e 1 8 saves to lead Columbus over Colorado. Hurricanes...... . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 P anthers...... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 SUNRISE, Fla. — Jordan Staal, Alexander Semin, and Justin Faulk scored in Carolina's win over Florida, giving the Hurricanes theirsecond victory over the Panthers in as

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Sttttday'sGames

Miami99,NewYork 93 Oklahoma City t08, LA.Clippers104 Sacramento 09, Charlotte83 Memphis108,Orlando82 Washington 90, Philadelphia87 Houston136,Dallas103 SanAntonio114,Detroit 75 Indiana97, Chicago92 L.A. Lakers99,Atlanta98 Today'sGames NewYorkatCleveland,4 p.m. Miami aiMinnesota,5p.m OrlandoatNewOrleans,5 p.m. Utah atMilwaukee,5p.m. Atlantaat Denver, 6p m. CharlotteatPortland, 7p.m. TorontoaiGoldenState, 7:30p.m.

Tuesday'sGames

Bostonat Philadelphia, 4p.m. L.A. Lakers ai OklahomaCity, 6:30p.m. Denverat Sacramento, 7 p.m.

Summaries Sunday's Games

Pacers97, Bulls 92 CHICAGO (92) Deng5-13 4-515, Boozer3-9 0-0 6, Noah6-13

2-2 14, Robinson2-6 2-2 6, Belinelli 8-17 0-0 20, Butler61t 5 620,Radmartovict-3002,Teagttet 5 0-22,Mohammed3-41-17,Cook0-00-00.Totals 35-81 14-18 92. INDIANA(97) George4-140-010, West 0-18 9-9 31, Hibbert

DETR0IT(75I Singler 2-100-05 Maxiell 0-21-21, Monroe6-

134416, Calderon6-100014, Knight3-14 t-38, Stuckey0-50-00, Vilanueva4-11 0-010, Middleton 1-5 0-0 2, Byrtum2-3 2-2 6, Jerebko 3 9 4 4 t0, English0-30-0 0,Kravtsov1-11-3 3. Totals 28-86 13-18 75.

SANANTONIO(114) Leonard6-102-2 14,Duncan7-t4 2-2 16,Splitter 3-9 2-3 8,Joseph3-51-1 8, Green6-12 t-t 16, Blair1-5234, Mills34006,Ginobili 682217, Jackson3-70-26, Bonner0-22-22, De Colo 1-30-0 3, Baynes3-31-2 7, Neal3-7 0-07. Totals 45-89 15-20 114. Detroit 19 21 16 19 — 75 Satt Antonio 32 28 2 9 25 — 114

Grizzlies108, Magic 82 MEMPHIS(108) Prince6-12 0-0 14, Arthur2-4 3-3 7, Gasol5-6 2-2 t2, Conley5-91-t 13, Allen6-13t-t 13, EDavis 5-6 0-410, Bayless 2-6 t-t 6, Pondexter4-91-2 t Z Wroten3-60-08, Letter3-40-06, Pittman1-40-12, Daye 2-40-05. Totals44-839-15108. ORLANDO (82) Harkless 5-60-011, Nicholson4-64-412, Vucevic 3-7 0-0 6,Moore4-104-412, Afflalo 2-6 8 8tz Udrih 1-53-45,Harrington 3-90-07, Harris3-140-0 6,O'Quinn0-42-4 2,Jones3-51-27,Lamb1-10-0 2 Totals29-73 22-26 82. Memphis 29 31 22 26 — 108 Orlando 19 16 22 25 — 82

Wizards 90, 76ers87 PHILADELPHIA (87) Turner4-t3 3-4 0, TYoung5-12 4-6 14, Hawes 6-11 t-214, Holiday4-194-414, Ivey2-50-04, Allen1-3 0-0 2,Wright 5-102-215, Wilkins3-60-06, Pargo 0 3t-2 t, Moultrie 3-3 0-0 6. Totals 33-85 15-2087. WASHINGTON (90) Webster4-105-5 16,Nene7-141-215, Okator4-

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OKLAHOMA CITY (108) Durant10-2512-1535,Ittaka7-91-216, Perkins120-02, Westbrooit11-207-1029,Sefolosha4-70-09, Martin3-122-310,Collisont-30-02, Thabeei0-01-2 t, Jackson 1-22 24 Totals38-8025-34108. L.A. GLIPPERs (104) Butler 4-82-210, Griftin 8-144-620, Jordan3-3 1-2 7, Paul8-219-926, Bilups 0-31-1 1, Odom2-4 0-0 6, Crawford7-132-2 20,Turiaf 0-00-0 0, Barnes 3-8 0-0 8,Hollins1-40-0 2, Bledsoet-2 0-0 2, Hil 1-20-0 z Totals38-82 19-22 104. Oklahoma City 2 7 2 7 28 26 — 108 LA. Clippers 20 2 1 32 31 — 104

Heat 99, Knicks 93 MIAMI (99)

James12-233-629,Haslem2-40-04, Bosh7-17 2-316, Wade 8-164-520, Chalmers2-51-1 6, Allen 2-72-2 7,Battier4-40-012, Andersen0-1 t-21 Cole 2-4 0-0 4, Lewis0-30-00. Totals 39-8413-19 99.

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NEWYORK(93)

CAnthonyg t9131432,Whiteg t 000, Chandler 4-72-210,Shumpert1-41-23, Felton3-83-49, Smith 5-180-0 t3, Stoudemir5-72-412, e Kidd 5-7 00 t4, Novak 0-30-00. Totats 327421-26 93. Miami 23 22 28 26 — 99 New York 22 37 18 16 — 93

Lakers 99, Hawks 98

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ATLANTA (98)

FOUNDATION

Smithg-160-619,Horfordt2-200-024,Pachulia t-t 0-02, Teague3-132-28 Stevenson 1-3 1-24, Petro 3-50-0 6, Harris 5-93-3 t6 Korver6-13 2-2 t6, Johnson0-00-00, Tolliver 1-20-03, Jones0-0 0-0 0. Totals41-828-1598.

LA. LAKERS (99) World Peace 5-81-213, Clark3-60-07, Howard

5-121-211, Nash 6-122-215, Bryant t3-276-834, Jamison 3 72 210,Meeks0-2 t-21,Blake3-4 0-0 8 Totals 38-78 13-1899. Atlanta 26 19 28 25 — 98 L.A. Lakers 30 22 27 20 — 99

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B4

THE BULLETIN• MONDAY, MARCH 4, 2013

GOLF ROUNDUP

Looking back Athlete of the week:Grant Lannin led Mountain View back to the Class 5A boys state basketball tournament Friday night, recording 18 points,11 rebounds, three assists, three blocks and two steals in the Cougars' 62-51 playoff victory over Corvallis. Contest of the week:Bend High held off Marist 45-43 on Saturday to advance to the Class 5A girls basketball state

tournament for the third time in four years. Kendall Kramer and Jessica McClay each scored11 points to lead the Lava

Bears.

Lookingahead WEDNESDAY

Class SAdoysdasketdall state puarterfinal round at Matthew Knight Arena inEugene, Mountain View vs. Wilsonville, 3:15 p.m.:The Cougars, who are playing in

their sixth state tournament in sevenyears, hope to improve on last year's fourth-place finish. A win against Wilsonville would put the Cougars in the semifinals, where they likely would face No.1 seed Churchill of Eugene, guided by former

RedmondHighcoach KellyBokn.

Thompsonwinsfirst PGATour title The Associated Press PALM BEACH GARDENS, Fla. — Michael Thompson's dream of w i nning his f i r st PGA Tour event was walking up the final fairway with a big lead and very little stress. The reality was much different Sunday in the Honda Classic. He had a one-shot lead as he stood in the 18th fairway, some 240 yards from the flag with trouble in the way in the shape of a large lake. The motto from his golf team at Alabama was to "finish strong," and Thompson did just that.

g).oR'rg

Instead of laying up, he

THURSDAY

Class 5Agirls dasketdall state puarterfinal roundat Matthew Knight Arena in Eugene, Bend vs. Hermiston, 3:15 p.m.:The Lava Bears, who took fifth at state a year ago, defeated the Bulldogs in the state quarterfinal round last year.

The winner of Thursday's gamecan expect to face reigning state champion Springfield in the semifinal round on Friday.

Wrestling

d ollars. There's no p r i ma donnas. It's a sport full of

Continued from B1 "Where are ou r

ground-up ears and people

c oach- working their butt off." es going to come from? Combs even thinks that Alley added. "Our good in the short term, the IOC's coaches, the guys that keep decision to drop wrestling the sport advancing, where m ight even w or k i n th e aretheycomingfrom? ... My sport's favor and bring in fear is, who is going to lead new fans and participants. "This ultimately could pay the next generation'?" F ortunately f o r wr e s - off for us and have a positive tling, its backers are a fierce effect," Combs says. "This bunch. has gone to the forefront of "These kids will be bet- the national media. Nonter husbands, better fathers, wrestling people are up in better employees because arms. . .. Wrestling is a l l they wrestle," says Crook about learning how to deal C ounty a s sistant c o a c h with adversity. In the long Mike Shinkle. run, we'll come out stronger "I still consider this one of and better because of what the purest amateur sports," happened." — Reporter:541-383-0305, Alley adds. "There's not beastesCbendbulletin.com. people making millions of

SKIING ROUNDUP

drilled a 5-wood into the bunker left of the green, setting up a simple sand shot and a birdie he didn't even need. He closed with a I-under 69, one of only five rounds under par on a punishing day at PGA National to finally become a PGA Tour winner. "That for me kind of sealed the deal," Thompson said. "It a llowed me to walk up t h e fairway and enjoy the experience, see the crowd and ... just finish strong." T he s t ar t w a s n' t b a d , either. Thompson holed a 50-foot eagle putt on the third hole, relied on a superb short game a round th e t o u ghest p a r t of the golf course to build a four-shot lead, and hung on for a two-shot win over Geoff Ogilvy that takes him places he always wanted to be. He gets into his first World G olf C h a mpionship n e x t week at Doral, and qualifies for two more WGCs this year at Firestone and in Shanghai. He's in the PGA Championship, gets to start next year in Hawaii and earned a twoyear exemption on the PGA Toul". And tothinkjust two weeks ago he was so down after a

Wilfredo Lee/The Associated Press

Michael Thompson celebrates after winning the Honda Classic Sunday in Palm Beach Gardens, Fla. 78-80 performance atRiviera that he wondered if he would ever make another cut. "This week was magical," Thompson said. "Just had a groove and kept feeling it." I t turned out to be a b i g week for Ogilvy, too. T he f o rmer U . S . O p e n champion missed hi s p a st four cuts and had plunged to No. 79 in the world ranking. He already missed the Match Play Championship and was

Super-G victory goes to Austrian; Maze reeeives death threat The Associated Press GARMISCH-PARTENKIRCHEN, G e rmany Anna Fenninger of Austria upstaged the favorites to win a super-G race Sunday, while G y w<r~< overall World Cup winner -„-.~o Tina Maze was placed unVW der police protection after ,$. organizers received a death threat against the Slovenian. M aze finished fourth in the race and had two bodyguardsclose by afterthe race. The threat came in an email received Saturday afternoon, after Maze had won the Marco Trovati /The Associated Press downhillrace and broken the Austria's Anna Fenninger celpoints record for a season. ebrates in the finish area after "That's sad. If somebody winning a women's World is strong and showing good Cup super-G, in Garmischperformances and perfect Partenkirchen, Germany, in the thing you are doing, Sunday. there are people who want to disturb you," Maze said. "I guess it's part of the game h eide, Switzerland, in tw o but it didn't disturb me that weeks. Maze isalready assured of much. "It shouldn't be part of the the overall title and became game, but life is not perfect. the first skier to collect more It's not nice for me, it's not than 2,000 points in a seanice for my team. I haven't son by winning Saturday's seen the email ... they want downhill on the same slope. to ruin your day, ruin the She now has 2,074 points. record, but I enjoyed the day Mancuso said she lost the 100 percent," Maze said. race in the middle section of Peter Fischer, chief of the the course. " I was not good in t h e organizing committee, said t he email came f rom a n turning section, I don't know anonymous source and that what it is, maybe a quesit was immediately turned tion of confidence," said the over to the police. American, who was second "We had to take it serious- in Friday's super-G on the ly, our job is to keep every- same slope. "I am happy to be on the one safe here," Fischer said. "Police took over the case podium, just trying my best and provided protection." every day. I a m e n joying Maze said she had never it with the sun out. I wish felt safer in her life, "I've had I could have gained some police in front of my door all more points on her, I need all the time since yesterday." the luck on my side. I need to Fenninger beat hometown win the (last) race and then favorite Maria Hoefl-Riesch anything can happen," Manby 0.20 of a second on the cuso sard. K andahar course for h e r Also on Sunday: thirdcareer victory and sec- Svindal clinches super-G title ond of the season. Julia ManK VITFJELL, Norway cuso of the United States Aksel Lund Svindal clinched was third. Laurenne Ross, of the World Cup super-G title Bend, finished 22nd with a after winning his first race in Norway. The Norwegian time of I:22.23. Mancuso and Maze are edged Austria's Georg Streitstill in competition for the berger by 0.52 seconds to win season super-G title, which in I minute, 29.79 seconds. will now be decided at the Werner Heel of Italy ended World Cup finals in Lenzer- third, 0.57 seconds back.

ready to miss another WGC n ext week a t D o r a l u n t i l putting together four s olid rounds. He chipped in fo r b i r die behind the 16th green and two-putted for birdie on the 18th for a 69 to finish alone in second, moving him up to No. 47 to get into Doral. " I kind o f p enciled in a week off," Ogilvy said. "So it's nice, and it gets me back in the mix for the Masters."

Ogilvy has to stay in the top 50 by the end of the month to return t o A u g usta N ational. For now, he has smaller problems — he only packed enough for this week. "I'm going to have to go do some laundry," Ogilvy said. "I haven't got a hotel room for tonight. But half the tour lives in this area, so I'm sure I can find somewhere to stay." L uke Guthrie, t ied w i t h Thompson for t h e 5 4 -hole lead, fell behind with a bogey on the second hole and closed with a 73 to finish third. Tiger Woods was never in the picture. He started the final round eight shots behind, and whatever hopes he had of a rally ended on the sixth hole when he hit his drive so far to the right that the ball was never found. Also on Sunday: Lewis holds on for LPGA title SINGAPORE — American Stacy Lewis won the HSBC Women's Champions for her sixth career LPGA title, overcoming two bogeys and some shaky putting on th e b ack nine to hold off South Korea's Na Yeon Choi. Lewis shot a I-under 71 in the final round to finish at 15-under 273, one stroke ahead of Choi. Paula Creamer brieflyheld a share of the lead early in the day but struggled with her putting on the back nine and faded to a 71 to finish third at 13-under. Van Der Walt wins in Africa C ENTURION, South A f rica — Dawie Van Der Walt became the fifth South African winner in 10 European Tour events this season with h is two-shot victory at t h e Tshwane Open. Van Der Walt posted a final round 5-under 67 to finish at 21-under overall for his first win on the Tour. South Africans Darren Fichardt and Louis deJager finished second and third, respectively.

MEN'5 COLLEGE BASKETBALL

Michigan holds on to beat Michigan St. The Associated Press ANN ARBOR, Mich. — A 10-point lead h a d s l i pped away in the final minutes, and it looked like the best Trey Burke and M i chigan could hope for was another chance in overtime. Then the star point guard decided to gamble, reaching in and knocking the ball away from Michigan State's Keith Appling with the game on the line. "I take my eyes off it for a second to see their formation,

-; 'iiP ((

and there's Trey going down the other end," Wolverines coach John Beilein said. Burke's steal and dunk put Michigan ahead by two with 22 seconds remaining, and the fourth-ranked Wolverinesheld on for a pulsating 58-57 win over No. 9 Michigan State on Sunday. Burke had 21 points and eight assists, and he had enough energy left down the stretch to help Michigan to a much-needed victory. The Wolverines avenged a 75-52 loss at Michigan State last month — and they rebounded f ro m W e d nesday n ight's stunning d efeat a t Penn State with an inspired performance at home. The Spartans (22-7, 11-5 Big Ten) had the ball with the shot clock off and the score 56-all, but Burke stole the ball from Appling near midcourt and went in alone for the game's

last field goaL "I really wasn't pressuring him as hard as I felt like I could,

Carlos Osorio /The Assoaated Press

Michigan guard Trey Burke, foreground, and teammate forward Mitch McGary celebrate their 58-57 win over Michigan State on Sunday in Ann Arbor, Mich. the whole game," Burke said. "I tried to turn him as many times as possible. The one time I did turn him, he kept the ball out, so I just went after it. If I was going to miss it, then I was going to be out of the play." Instead, he ended up with a

dunk, giving Michigan (24-5, 11-5) the lead. Michigan State's Derrick Nix was fouled with 8.8 seconds left, but he missed the first free throw. After he made the second, the Spartans fouled M i chigan f r eshman Mitch McGary, who missed the front end of a l-and-l. A Free Public Service

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M ichigan State called a timeout with 4.9 seconds left but never got a shot off. Burke stole a pass by Gary Harris to end the game. The Michigan State loss clinched at least a share of the Big Ten title for Indiana. It was exactly the type of game it didn't seem like Michigan could win. The Wolverines shot zero-for-12 from 3-point range and were left to slug it out inside with the physical Spartans. Michigan State had 19 offensive rebounds, but the Spartans also turned the ball over 18 times. "They've got a good team," Michigan State coach Tom Izzo said. "We did some real good things, but unfortunate-

ly, 'good' isn't good enough in this league." In other games on Sunday: P urdue.... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 N o. 17 Wisconsin.... . . . . . . . 56 MADISON, Wis. — D.J. Byrd scored 16 of his 22 points in the second half and Purdue upset Wisconsin.

N o. 23 Pittsburgh..... . . . . . . 73 V illanova ..... . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64 PITTSBURGH — TalibZanna scored nine of his 14 points in overtime and Pittsburgh rallied past Villanova. S tanford.... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84 U tah..... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 6 STANFORD, Calif. — Chasson Randle scored 22 points and matched his career high with six assists, and Stanford snapped its l o ngest l osing streak at home this season with a win over Utah. W ashington..... . . . . . . . . . . . 72 Washington State ..... . . . . . 68 SEATTLE — Scott Suggs hit a t i e breaking 3-pointer with 4 minutes remaining and finished with 23 points, and Washington beat rival Washington State, handing the Cougars their ninth straight loss. 5

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MONDAY, MARCH 4, 2013• THE BULLETIN

BS

COMMUNITY SPORTS INBRIEF SWIMMING

Sports Scoreboard (below).

welcome at Saturday's event; ad-

mission is free.

Locals shine at state meet — Emily Brockman highlighted

a strong performance byBend Swim Club swimmers at the 2013

Oregon Swimming Short Course 11-14Age GroupChampionships,

POWERLIFTING Special Olympians tocompete in Bend —Four athletes representing High Desert Special Olympics will take part in apower-

races and is a benefit for Central

Oregon's Healthy Beginnings12Point Kid lnspections Program. For more information on the race, visit myhb.org/events/grin-bearit-run.

RUNNING Sponsorshipsavailadle for local race —central

Oregon Pediatric Associates has

SKIING Locals qualify for nordic

lifting meet this Saturday in Bend. The competition will take place

Brockman set anewage-group

from10 a.m. until noon at Bend

Healthy Beginnings to payregistration fees for100 families to

state record in the 200-yard breaststroke with her winning time

Barbell, 2625 N.E. Butler Market Road. The roster of lifters includes

participate in the 2013 Grin 8 Bear It Run this Saturday in Bend. Any

country skiers with the Bend

of 2 minutes,25.30seconds.She

three men —Alan Hubbell, Troy

placed first in a total of five events

Richards and Richard Robertson — all of whom will perform in

sponsorship in the 1-mile family

west Ski Association in the 2013 Junior National Championships, to

and second in another onherway to winning the high-pointaward

in her class. Other event winners for BSC were Emma Brady, Audrie

Stephens, TeresaCobb,Hannah

squat, bench pressand deadlift. A female lifter, Dareth Steffey, is ex-

pected to perform the benchpress and dead lift. Brian McLaughlin serves as coach of the local Spe-

Jr. Nationals —Threecross-

nings, www.MYHB.org, and use the promo code "COPAkids" when

ing behind Tualatin Hills. For com-

Scott Edmondson, RobCarlson

checking outat the endofthe registration process. Thesponsorship applies only to the family fun run fees. Theannual Grin 8 Bear It Run

plete BSC results, see Community

and Shawn Vial. Spectators are

also includes10- and 5-kilometer

Peterson and Ben Brockman. BSC finished second in the team scor-

cial Olympics lifters, assisted by

BasketbaII

High school league

Semifinals — Red Raiders48, Spartans 43; Huskies46, Broncos38. Final — Red Raiders 38, Huskies 36.

Bowling League highscores Lava Lanes,Bend Feb. 4-10 CasinoFun— HiLows;JosiahDhlde,247/655; EdieRoebuck,203/514. Haue-A-Bau —LouisMccoy,208/513. His and Hers —Mercedez-Benzof Bend; Allyn Hayes,258/732;CarolynWirth,215/568. Greased Lightning —BrosB4Hose; GaryDeBernardr,233/572;VonnreGreen,174/480. GuysandGals — Team 14;KevinBaessler, 267/632, CassieRobertson,2247505/

Rejects —ThePossibles; JimWhitson,277/619; Sue Snedden, 189/481 LavaLanesClassic— Team 6;JaymeDahlke, 256/747;DebbieSmith, 2087515. WednesdayInc. — Dave Sims,300/759;Rommel Sundita,2797762. Tea Timers —FranWeaver,216/602. TNT —Rommel Sundita, 2347641; MeagenWaltosz, 1697462.

Progressive —BoneyardBoyz; DanThompson,

227/633.

Latecomers — BeckieZimmerman,220/525. Free Breathers — Sweet Sixteen; JohnScott,

245/699;LindaGilbert,I807505. T.G.I.F.— Maui Built; BretBorovec,267/677; Patti Sundita,215/599.

Draft — 5 0'clockSomewhere; SteveWilson, 210/584;KarenDougan,243/566. Haue-A-Bau —Team8; Ryan Pierce, 205/510;

Boys Age 12 — 100Breaststroke: 3 Griffin McKean, 1:14.13; 6,ChristopherDavami,1:14.76. 50 Breaststro ke:7,McKean,34.64.50 Backstroke:8,McKean,

Greased Lightning — OnePin; GaryDeBernardi,184/523;AmyAnderson, 2237570. Rejects — ThePossibles; JimWhitson,255/639; Mary Flemming,174/459. Wednesday Inc.— Autnie Em'sDeli, Riley Ziegle ,279/754;TravisDenmark,259/759. TNT — Team20; RommelSundita,246/664; Shauna Larsen, 182/502. Progressive — Hills Horseshoeing; Tony Ybarra,2547617. T.G.I.F. — Suck Em up; RommelSundita, 277/790; ShariHamel,2367572.

32.03. Age 13 — 400Individual Medley 8, Jonathan Davami4:53 , 61. 200Butterfly: 7, Davami,2:20.39. Age 14 — 100 Freestyle: 1, BenBrockman, 49.22; 3, Paul Rogers,50.71. 200 Backstroke:2, Brockman,1:55.30; 3, Baxter Halligan, 2:00.17; 7, Rogers, 2:0498. 200Individual Medley: 3, Brockman, 2:01.48; 4,Taj Mercer,2:03.76. 100 Butterfly: 4, Mercer, 55.84. 100 Backstroke: 3, Brockman, 56.83; 5, Halligan 57.85. 400 Individual Medley: 3, Brockman,4:16.41;4, Mercer,4:19.77. 200Butterfly: 2, Brockman,1:56.12; 3, Mercer, 2:04.38. 1,600 Freestye: 2, Rogers,16:54.87; 4, Halligan, 17:13.50; 8, Christian Dffenhauser,18.01.10. 500 Freestyle: 4, Rogers,4:57.85; 6, Halligan,5:01.63. 1,000 Freestyle. 2, Rogers,10:04.62; 3, Halligan, 101616; 6,Dffenhauser,103975;7, Austin Snyder Jewsbury,10:53.33, 8, Matt Howell, 10:59.84.100 Breaststroke: 4, Mercer,1:05.46. 200 Freestyle: 4, Rogers,1:50.97.

Alexis Hig-Gruenberg,164/425.

Rimrock Lanes,Prineviue (Team scratchgame;teamscratch series; men's scratchgame;men's scratch series; women's scratchgame;women'sscratch series) Week20 Friday Night Specials 12-13 —Split It, 754;

Olympics Continued from B1 Typically, participants compete in divisions based on age, gender and ability level. In between the competitions tzp at the mountain, on Saturday, Summit High School in Bend will serve as the site of the opening ceremonies and

always-popular dinner and dance, which Laughlin described as "totally awesome." "You see all your f riends that you met on the mountain," he said. At a recent practice session, while his teammates milled around him before setting off for the slopes and trails, High Desert alpine skier Bob Arata stated his goal for the upcoming competition. "I'm going to try and go for the gold," the 57-year-old Bend resident said. Medals were on the minds of some of his teammates as well. Snowshoer Jordan Estrada, 27, mentioned that she wanted to get some medals, and cross-country skier Kristel Wieglenda, 31, said she is anticipating the medal ceremony, "because they hand us out medals." At l e ast f o r L a u g h lin, Wieglenda provided one of the memorable moments of this season when she performed some acrobaticson her skis out on the nordic trails. "Oh my gosh, Kristel, she did a 360 on the hill, down

"I just love cheering the athletes On and just being able to holler and stand at the end and get excited with them when they win." — High Desert chapter local program coordinator Jill Simmons

that hill," Laughlin recalled. W ieglenda i n j u re d h e r ankle in the process, but she has been on the mend. As of that late-February practice, she was still wearing a brace, she said, but she was out and about with h e r t e ammates on snowshoes instead of skis — she had forgotten them, she sard. The Winter Games make for a much-anticipated weekend — and not just for those who are competing. " My f avorite par t . . . i s watching them r ace," Simmons said. "I just love cheering the athletes on and just being able to holler and stand at the end and get excited with them when they win. The athletes get so excited, and getting a medal or a ribbon is just the best thing that could have happened to them that day. "It's a good experience to watch." — Reporter: 541-383-0359; sportsC<bendbulletin.com.

OSU-Cascadescludskiers

COaChOS — Volunteer coaches are needed for the Bend Park 8

Recreation District's upcoming Spring Youth Lacrosse League. The program is for boysandgirls in grades1-8. Coachestypically

Ski and SnowboardAssociation national championships this week in SunValley, Idaho. Sierra Foster, a freshmancross-country

devote about five hours per week during the10-week season, which

begins April1 and runs through May 31. Teams will meet twice

skier, won the 5- and10-kilometer

be held March11-16 in Fairbanks,

nordic events in the collegiate division in the Sunnyside Qualifier at Mt. Bachelor ski area in January.

J1), TeddyWidmer (Male J1) and Ryan St. Clair (MaleOJ) secured

aweekand playaneight-game schedule. Coachescan select their own practice daysandtimes. Applicants will be screenedfor criminal history and must havesome knowledge of lacrosse. Formore

Christian Schuster, a freshmanal-

their trips to Alaska with their performances Feb. 23-24 in a Junior National Qualifier event at Mount

Spokane, Wash.Hawkinson placed

pine skier, qualified at the regional competition held last month in Red

information, call Rich at the park district office, 541-706-6126. — Bulletin staff reports

Lodge, Mo nt.Thenationalchampionships get underway today and

o gp

, . Ci t l

.".rr',

~~ Cenfral"Ore on.

Swimming

Cobb, 2:14.05; 3, AudrieStephens,2:14.22; 7, Elli Draft — 5 0'clockSomewhere; SteveWilson, Ferrin, 2:18.29. 100 Butterfly: 5, Cobb, 1:02.34. 200 Breaststroke: 2, Cobb,2:28.07. 400Individual 247/657;Patti Sundita,235/634. Medley: 1,Stephens,4:41.99; 2, Cobb,4:42.14. 100 Feb. 11-17 CasinoFun — HiLows;JosiahDhlde,235/653; Breaststroke:1,Cobb,1:08.97; 4, Stephens,I:13.78. 200 Butterfly: 2, Stephens,2:16.15, 4, HannahPeEdie Roebuck,184/529. His and Hers—Mercedes-BenzofBend;Jayme terson, 2:19.32; 5, Cobb,2:21.74. 200Backstroke: 1, Peterson,2.11.10; 6, Ferrin, 2:16.58.100BackDahlke ,235/673;BrandiMcclennen,246/693. Guys andGals — Team14; ChadWannemaker, stroke: 2,Peterson,100.45; 4,Ferrin,1:0286.100 Freestyle: 6,Ferrin, 56.52.100Buterfly. 3, Peterson, 268/596;JanetGetling, 206/551. Lava LanesClassic — Team6, Terry Lussier, 1:01.00; 4,Stephens,1:01.98. 200Freestye: 4, Stephens,2:00.63;6,Peterson,2:02.31. 289/718;AngieMombert,191/517. Age 14 — 200Individual Medley:3, Ali Epple, Tea Timers — MK Quilts; SandyWeaver, 2:12.39; 4,KennedyBright, 2:14.27.50 Freestyle: 7, 211/536. Latecomers — High Desert Disposal; Becky Bright, 25.66. 200Breaststroke: 3, Bright, 2:28.47; 5, Epple, 2:35.32.400Individual Medley:2, Epple, Zimmerman, 1877502. Free Breathers — SpareNone;JimWhitson, 4:40.00; 6, Bright, 4:49.15. 100 Breaststroke: 3, Bright, I:09.10; 6,Epple, I:11.49. 269/670;ElienEdwards,198/511.

LACROSSE Youth programseeks

classic and skate races.

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The GrayMayers, 2,310; TimBudiselich, 256;Chris Hom,652;Julie Mayers,188;ChrisGray,672. Week 23 Rimrock —ColdStoneCreamery,956; TheGray Mayers ,2,853;GeoffJones,244;Jim Gregory,672; An Mayers,216; ChrisGray,620. Week 25 50+ or -—It's RTurn, 730; FireBaller's, 1,962; Matt Hawes, 236; ColbyHawes, 687; PeggyBraker, 189; Brenda Murphy, 486. Week 26 Grizzly Mountain Men —CougarCuts,1,007; No Boundaries, 3,167; EdWhale, 258; KrisStill, 710.

Dregon11-14Short CourseChampionships At Corvauis, Feb. 21-24 Team scores Itop 10) —TuaiatinHills Thunderbolts 1,448.5, BendSwrmClub 539, Hillsboro HeatSwimTeam329.5, PortlandAquatic Club277, TigardTualatinSwimClub272.5, TheDolphinsSwim Team242, LakeOswego Swim Club 242,Multnomah Athletic Club221, MountHoodAquatics145, Oregon City Swim Team135. Bend SwimClubresults (AH distances inyards) Girls Age 11 — 200 Individual Medley: 2, Emma Brady,2:2218.100Butterfly: 1, Brady,1:05.71. 500 Freestyle:2,Brady,5:34.93. 100Backstroke: 3, Brady, 1:06.23.200Freestyle: 3, Brady2:06.21. 100Freesty e: 3,Brady,56.88. Age 12 — 200 Individual Medley: 1, Emily Brockman,2.12.50.50Breaststroke:5, AlexaBorstad, 33.86. 50Freestyle.2,Brockman,25.28.200Breaststroke: 1,Brockman,2:25.30 (newstate record) 200 Freestyle: 1,Brockman,1:59.33. 100Breaststroke: 1, Brockman,1:07.90; 4, Borstad,1:1368; 7, Carmen Hansen,1:17.27. 100 Freestyle:1, Brockman, 54.81. 50 Backstroke:6, Lily Chrisman,31.75. Note:Brockmanwonhigh-point awardfor12-year-old girls. Age 13 — 200 Individual Medley: 2, Teresa

St. Clair placed first in both the10K

Alaska. Vivian Hawkinson (Female

COMMUNITY SPORTS SCOREBOARD

Bend Park &Recreation District Adult league playoff scores Men's A —7's Deli 100, Knightryderz66; Brad's Team72 MoneyGang66. Men's B —Rigobertos65, 541Threads 58;Ravens 73,Athletic Clubof Bend,70; BendBroadband 74, People's Insurance55; Jim's Rats108, Widgi Creek83.

fifth in the10K classic race. And

in the United States Collegiate

EnduranceAcademy have qualified family wishing to receive theCOPA to compete for the Pacific Northfun run portion of the racecan sign up online atHealthy Begin-

run through Saturday.

tO natiOnalS —Two members of the OregonState UniversityCascadesCampusclub sports program havequalified to compete

held Feb. 21-24 at Osborn Aquatic Center in Corvallis. Swimming in the12-year-old girls division,

announced a partnership with

first in the 10K classic and second in the10K skate. Widmer finished

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THE BULLETIN• MONDAY, MARCH 4, 20'I3

O M M U N IT Y ARCHERY:Ages 8-13; Thursdays, March 7-April 4; 5:30 p.m.-7 p.m.; Cent Wise Sporting Goods, 533 S.W. Fifth St., Redmond; learn safety, etiquette and bow handling; equipment provided; $25; 541-5487275; raprd.org.

BASEBALL BEND ELKSSPRING TRAINING CAMP: For boys and girls in grades three through five; Thursday, March14-Friday, March15; 8:30 a.m.-11:30 a.m.; Bend Fieldhouse, Bend; includes instruction in hitting, throwing, fielding and base running; instruction provided by the Bend Elks staff; $42 park district residents, $54 otherwise; bendparksandrec.org. BEND ELKSFRIDAY NIGHT LIGHTS: Skills development for players age12 and younger; Fridays, March 6, 15 and 22; 6:30-8 p.m.; BendFieldhouse,Bend;includes instruction in hitting, throwing and fielding and base running; instruction provided bythe Bend Elks coaches; walk-up registration, $ l5 per session or all three for $40; bendelks.com.

BASKETBALL PEEWEE HOOPS: Ages 3-5;for beginners, teaches basic skills; Wednesdays, March 6-20; 11 a.m.-11:30 a.m. or 3:30 p.m.-4 p.m.; RAPRD Activity Center, Redmond; $17; 541-548-7275; raprd.org. LITTLE HOOPSTERS: Ages 6-8; dribble, pass and shoot; Thursdays, March 7-21; 4 p.m.-4:45 p.m.; RAPRD Activity Center, Redmond; $21; 541-548-7275; raprd.org. OREGON MIDDLESCHOOL BASKETBALLCHAMPIONSHIP: Saturday, March 9-Sunday, March10; 8 a.m.-6 p.m.; Bend and Redmond;104 middle school teams from throughout Oregon will play games at Bend, Mountain View and Summit high schools in Bend, Redmond High School in Redmond, and at Pilot Butte Middle School in Bend and Elton Gregory Middle School in Redmond; $5 adults, $3 students and seniors, kids 10 and younger free; participating teams and schedules available at statebasketballchampionship.

P OR T S

com; 541-647-2134; bill@ statebasketballchampionship.com.

ARCHERY

Email events at least 10days before publication to sportsCbendbulletin. com or click on "Submit an Event"at www bendbulletin com. For a more complete calendar, visit www.bendbulletin.comlcomsportscal.

CYCLING RADLANDSSPRINGTRAIL BUILD DAY:Saturday; 9 a.m.-2 p.m.; The Radlands,1859 N.E. Maple Ave., Redmond; work on the expansion of this trail network; breakfast, lunch and beer provided by Trinity Bikes Cycling Team; 541-420-5047; bobgilbert@ trinitybikescycling.com; facebook. com/events/537609136273651/. WET-N-WINDY 50: Sunday, March 17; 9 a.m.; 50-mile ride from east-side Hutch's Bicycles store to Powell Butte and back; course will be marked, maps will be provided, and route has one food/drink stop; $8; 541-382-6248; eastside@ hutchsbicycles.com.

MULTISPORT DESCHUTESDASHTRAINING GROUP: Fifteen-week program led by USATTriathlon certified coach Joanne Eastwood; begins Monday, April 1; includes training for both the sprint- and Olympic-distance triathlons; two coached workouts per week, running analysis, bike skills training, email communication for support and motivation, and discounted entry to Deschutes Dash; $199; poweredbybowen.com; 541-585- I500.

RUNNING

GRIN & BEAR ITRUN: Saturday; 10 a.m.; Les Schwab Amphitheater, Bend; 5K, 10K and 1-mile family fun run; proceeds go to Healthy Beginnings; $10-$40; myhb. org/events/grin-bear-it-run. TREADMILL RACES: Wednesday, MISCELLANEOUS March13; 6 p.m.; FootZone, downtown Bend; watch 10 FOAM ROLLERCLINIC:Sunday, bouts of local speedsters racing March17; 9:45 a.m.; FootZone, downtown Bend; taught by Ashleigh against each other on calibrated treadmills; free Brooks pint Mitchell, CPT; learn basic myofacial release with afoam roller; bring yoga glass to first 25 spectators; free, but register at footzonebend. mat and foam roller if you own them; com/events/treadmill-races. foam rollers available for purchase; ST. PATRICK'S DAYDASH: Sunday, limited to15 participants; $5; register at FootZone; footzonebend. March17; 10:05 a.m.; start and finish is at Deschutes Brewery, com. downtown Bend; 5K fun run; $15ACROVISIONTAEKWONDO:Age 6 and older; Tuesdays and Thursdays, $40;bendstpatsdash@gmail.com; bendstpatsdash.com. March 6-April 3; 7-8 p.m.; RAPRD HALF MARATHON TRAINING Activity Center, Redmond; students GROUP: Wednesday, March will learn about Korean culture, self-defense, discipline and fitness; 20; 7 p.m.; meet FootZone half marathon training group mentors uniforms are required and will be and group leader; ask questions, available for purchase the first day of class for $35; classes are ongoing hear testimonials about the training group; footzonebend.com; and nonsequential; $69; 541-548541-317-3568. 7275 orraprd.org. "BE PREPARED"FORSPRING TRAINING 101 WITHMAX KING: BACKCOUNTRYADVENTURES: Thursday, March 21; 7 p.m.; FootZone, downtown Bend; learn Wednesday; 6 p.m.-8 p.m.; Brooks about training basics such as Room, Deschutes Public Library interval and hill training; tempo downtown branch; presentation on essential clothing, gear and and threshold runs and more; free, but sign up at footzonebend.com/ emergency protocols for the events/training-101-clinic-withbackcountry; free; class is best for max-king. adults who like to hike, climb, hunt, ski, snowshoe,snowmobile,photo SUNRIVER MUDSLINGERMUD shoot or explore in the backcountry; RUN: Sunday, March 24;11 a.m.-2 Robert Speik, 541-385-0445; p.m.; untimed event starts near traditionalmountaineering.org. Sunriver Marina; 1.5-mile course HIGH DESERTSPECIAL OLYMPICS consists of half-mile run, scramble POWERLIFTINGMEET:Saturday; over and under obstacles, and run through mud pits; open to 10 a.m.-noon; Bend Barbell, 2625 N.E. Butler Market Road, Bend; individuals, families and teams; Brian, 541-933-5438. costumes encouraged, spectators

welcome; registration $20 for ages 12 and older, $12 for ages 4-11, through 5 p.m. on March 23; online registration available March 1-23 at www.sunrivermudslinger.com; to volunteer, contact Emily Savko at 541-585-3145 or emilys©srowners. Ol'g.

SNOWSHOE RUNNINGGROUP: Saturday mornings through March16; all running paces welcome; focuson funand fitness; different trail/destination everyweek;free;facebook.com/ groups/SnowshoeWithLaura; SnowshoeWithLaura@gmail.com. FOOTZONE HALFMARATHON GROUP:Starts Saturday, March 30;8 a.m.; eight-week program includes training program and manual, online and mentor support, and clinics; must currently be running 3 to 5 miles three days a week; $65-$75, depending on registration date; mastenbroek. cm@gmail.com or teague@ footzonebend.com; footzonebend. com/events/hmtg. FOOTZONE PUBRUN: Monday, March 25; 5:30 p.m.; group run starting at FootZone in downtown Bend; loop distance of 3 miles (or more), finishing at GoodLife Brewing, where runners will be offered half-off pints of beer and complimentary chips and salsa; all paces and running levels welcome;footzonebend.com or 541-317-3568.

SNOW SPORTS SKI WAXCLINICS:Tuesdays, March 6 and19; 7:30 p.m.; Pine Mountain Sports, Bend; clinics will cover the basics on tuning and waxing skis; participants do not need to bring own equipment; free; call 541-385-8080 to sign up (required). PNSA U12 ZONAL CHAMPIONSHIPS:Alpine ski race; Saturday-Sunday; Mt. Bachelor ski area; $25 for one day or $50 for both days, and $39 lift pass per day; 541-388-0002; mbsef©mbsef.org; mbsef.org. 2013 UNITEDSTATESNATIONAL SNOWSHOE CHAMPIONSHIPS: Friday, March15-Sunday, March 17;Bend; senior10K, junior 5K, and open citizens, kids and relay events; start/finish at Virginia Meissner Sno-park; $5-$40; snowshoeracing. com; visitbend.com/Bend Oregon Activities Recreation/USSnowshoe-Nationals.

MIKE PUDDYMEMORIAL:Alpine ski race; Sunday, March17; Mt. Bachelor ski area; 541-388-0002; mbsef@mbsef.org; mbsef.org. MBSEF FREERIDESNOWBOARD AND SKISPRING CAMP: Thursday, M arch23-Tuesday,March 26;Mt. Bachelor ski area; 541-388-0002; mbsef@mbsef.org; mbsef.org. CASCADE CREST: Cross-country free ski mass start race; Saturday, March 23;10a.m.; Mt. Bachelor ski area; 541-388-0002; mbsef© mbsef.org; mbsef.org. MBSEF FREERIDESNOWBOARD AND SKISPRING CAMP: Saturday, March23-Tuesday,March 26;Mt. Bachelor ski area; 541-388-0002; mbsef©mbsef.org; mbsef.org. MBSEF ALPINESPRING CAMP: Tuesday, March 26-Friday, March 29;Mt. Bachelor ski area; 541-3880002; mbsef@mbsef.org; mbsef.org. RAD CAMPS:For kids ages 7-17; trips for night skiing and snowboarding at Hoodoo Ski Area; Saturdays and Sundays through March 30; depart at 3:45 p.m., return at10 p.m.; trips leave from Harmon Park, Bend; $40, includes transportation, lift ticketand pizza; radcamps©gmail.com. NORDIC SKATEPRE-POLE PEDAL PADDLECLINICS: In preparation for the Pole Pedal Paddle on May 18; now accepting enrollments for one-, three- and five-day clinics; 541-388-0002; mbsef@mbsef.org; mbsef.org.

for upcoming clinics and team information. BEND 60+ SENIOR SOFTBALL: For players born in1963 or earlier; 14-game season, April 22-July 31, 2013; games are played on Mondays andsome Wednesday eveningsat Skyline Sports Complex in Bend; open practices on Mondays, W ednesdays and Fridaysfrom noon to 2 p.m. begin today at Pine Nursery Park; veteran players will be contacted via email; $60 for players 74 and younger, free for players 75 and over; registration closes March 11; Jim Berado, 541-420-6614, da2schmoova©bendbroadband. com; Tim Fissori, 541-408-7407, tfissori@gmail.com. CENTRAL OREGONVOOD00 GIRLS FAST PITCH TRYOUTS: Saturday, March 9-Sunday, March10; 10:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m.;BowlbyFields, Redmond; competitive program looking for girls at16U and14U age levels; Jeff Edwards, 541-350-2621; Scot Lair, 541-408-1476. GIRLS SOFTBALL:Forgirls in Central Oregon ages 6-14 who are not participating in high school program; through the BendPark & Recreation District; Monday, April 1-Mnnday, June 3; practices and mostgames scheduledonweekdays; $75 for park district residents, $101 otherwise; registration deadline is March12; bendparksandrec.org. ADULT LEAGUES: Open to players 18 and older and high school graduates; league meetings for the Bend Park & Recreation District adult softball leagues are scheduled SOCCER for Wednesday, March 20, at the park district office, 799 S.W. ENTRY-LEVELUSSFREFEREE Columbia St.; senior metro,5:15 COURSE:For aspiring referees age p.m.; women's metro, 6 p.m.; coed 13 and older;Saturday, March16metro, 6:45 p.m.; men's metro, 7:30 Sunday, March17; 9 a.m.-6 p.m. p.m.; attendance by a representative first day, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. second day; required for prospective teams; St. Charles Bend, Conference Room registration fee is $740 except for D, $85; Claudio M uggia,acmuggiaO women's metro, which is to be bendbroadband.com; Pat Evoy, determined; rosters and team fees soccer@cascadefoot .com. due by April 3; 541-389-7275. GIRLS LEAGUE:Ages 6-14 (as of SOFTBALL Jan. 1, 2013); girls participating HIGH DESERTFASTPITCH in their respective high school TRYOUTS:Opentryouts have been programs not eligible to participate; scheduled for the following teams through the Bend Park & Recreation for the 2013 spring/summer season: District; Monday, April 1-Monday, 10U, March17,1:30-3 p.m. at Bend June 3; all practices and most High School; 14U, March 9 and games staged on weekdays; 10,1:30-3 p.m. at Bend High; 16U, $70 park district residents, $95 March10, noon-2 p.m. at Juniper otherwise; registration includes Field; tryouts are mandatory for visor, uniform top, socks and all currentand past players; visit shorts; registration deadline is www.highdesertfastpitch.com March12; bendparksandrec.org.

MEAL O F

silver sponsors Pamela Armstrong Awbrey Dental Group Joe Bankofier Laura Becker Bend Dermspa

gold sponsors 10 Below Anthony's Restaurants Audio VisionsPlus, Inc.

Awbrey Glen Golf Club Bellatazza

Bendistillery Bendsroadband BendFurniture & Design Bigfoot Beverages BleuBite Catering Bonta Gelato

Brasada Ranch

BrokenTop Club Cada Dia Cheese CarlsonSign Cascade Catering Company Cascade Ice COCC Cascade Cuilinary Institute Deschutes Brewery Eco-Scapes Elevation Faith Hope& Charity Vineyards FivePine Lodge and Conference Center Ronand Molly Foerster

Fog CityDiners Ginger's Kitchenware

Hand in Hand Productions Hola!at the Old Mill Horizon Broadcasting Group

Ida'sCupcakeCafe Loren Irving

LakeCreek Lodge Local SlicePizza Jack and Barbara McCown Mission Linen Supply O'Brien Events Robert and Claudia Nordqvest Saxon's Fine Jewelers RayShumway and Jocquie Bushong Sunriver Resort Tobletops Tate 8 Tate Catering TetherowGolf Club The Bulletin

The Cake Lady The DeLay Team — HassonCompany Realtors The Well Traveled Fork TheWhere to Eat Guide Vehrs, Inc. Chris and Jan Wick

Bend Film Bend Garbage and Recycling BendGolf & Country Club Bend Mailing Services Bend Pilates Billee OPlethora Salon Black Butte Ranch Linda 'Bo' Bonolto Annie Bruckner C.E.Lovejoy's Brookswood Market Captured Memories Videogra phy Sandi Cormiencke Cascade Disposal Cascade Faces — Michael Villono MD Cascade Theatrical Company Celadon Skin & Nail Care Clean and Green Cleaning Clinic COCC Bookstore COCCLatino Club Cog Wild Mountain Bike Tours Carrie Colombo ComplementsHome Interiors Coombe& Jones Dentistry Crooked River RanchClub Greg Cushman LynnDahlqvist —Bend Pilates

Joanna Larsen — Flipside Visual Laravola Fine Linen Rental Legacy Window Cleaning Scott and Kristy Lovejoy Lulu'sBoutique McKay Cottoge McMenamins Pubs and Breweries Mint Floral Mirror Pond Cleaners and Shirt Laundry Alicia Moore Craig Moore DanaMuller NashelleJewelry Newport Avenue Market Susan Noyes Old Mill District Patrick Oliver Oregon Coast Aquarium Oregon Museumof Science and Ind OSU Cascades Oxford Hotel Group Papa Murphy's Pastini Pastaria Poweredby Bowen Ranchero MexicanGrill & Cantina Rio Distinctive Mexican Cuisine Robert's onWall Street Roots Massage Vic and Vicki Russel Ryder Graphics, Inc. Savory SpiceShop Barbara Secor Seventh Mountain Resort

YEAR We thank the businesses and individuals listed for their generous contributions to the COCC Foundation's annual Meal of the Year and Taste of the Town events. We also deeply thank those who attended these events and supported scholarships through their participation.Thank you toeveryone who made this event a success.

table sponsors 8 hosts

restaurants

James& Ardyce Swift

10 Below Anthony's Awbrey Glen Bellatazza Bonta Gelato Bleu Bite Catenng Brasada BrokenTop Club Cada Dia Cheese Cascade Catering Co Elevation FivePine Lodge

Avion Water

BallJanik Bank of theCascades

Bendsroadband Bend Memorial Clinic Bigfoot Beverages Bryant, Lovlien 8 Jarvis CarlsonSign Central Oregon CommunityCollege Economic Developmentfor Central Oregon Fog Cily Diners Fratzke Commercial

Shibvi Spa

Bill &Judy Smith

Bill and Cheryl Davidson

Sisters Rodeo Association

Lillian Decker Diane's Riding Place Douglas Fine Jewelry Design Doug Downer Bill DuBois EagleCrest Golf

Security Pros

Kriby NagelhoutConstruction Mary Carlson NorthlineWealth Management Pinnacle Architecture, Inc.

Mark and Brenda Eberle Laura Ergenbright Falling Waters Natural Health & Fitness Ronand Sandy Federspiel Fireside Motel Maryanne Freedman and DennisMagill Fullers Yard Service Pat and Bob Fvlton Glenn, Reeder8 Glassner,LLP Genger Denecke Hackett Deanna D. Hansen Healing Bridge Physical Therapy House on the Metolius High Desert Museum J. K. Carriere John andNancy James Jinsei Spa

JuniperGolf Club Kialoa Canoe Poddles

Betsy and JordanSkovborg Bill and JudySmith Sortor Bushido Kai Karate Steller Design Sun Country Raft Tours Sun Mountain Fun Center Sunriver Music Festival Team Casino& Music Oran Teater Ter psichorean Dance Studio TheArts Station - o program of Arts Central The DuckStore The Hen'sTooth

Ron andSandy Federspiel Schwabe, Williamson& Wyatt St. Charles Health Systems Sunriver Resort Terry & BruceJuhola and Vicki & Vic Russell

John Teller& Amy Tykeson US Bank Vehrs, Inc. Volunteers in Medicine

Wells Fargo William Smith Properties

The Miller Lumber Company The Nature of Words The Riverhouse Hotel and Convention Center Thin LizzyAthletics Dr. SteveTimm Tower Theatre Foundation Wanderlust Tours

Widgi CreekGolf Club Wildlife Safari vvilson'sof Redmond

A heartfelt thank you to the many students who volunteered at these events!

TH E

F O U H DA T I O H

Hola! Ida'sCupcake Cafe LakeCreek Lodge Local Slice Pizza Ranchero Mexican Restaurant Sunriver Resort Tate& Tate Catering

The CakeLady The Well-TraveledFork


MONDAY, MARCH 4, 2013•THE BULLETIN

B7

ADVICE 4 E N T ERTAINMENT TV TODAY

or onnie a TV SPOTLIGHT

"It's a big risk for any police department to do something like this, and I think, for them, they would only entrust it to a local boy. I speak the same language as the people that the show is about, and I come from the streets that they patrol and that they grew up on themselves."

By Luaine Lee McClatchy-Tribune News Service

P ASADENA, C a l i f . When he was younger, actor Donnie Wahlberg often was on the wrong side of the law. Now he's not only on the right side, he's leading a cheering section for the boys in blue. Wahlberg, one of nine kids from a blue-collar suburb of Boston, not only has played a policeman on two impressive TV series: "Boomtown" and CBS' "Blue Bloods," but he's producing his own reality show about Beantown's cops, "Boston's Finest," airing on TNT. "It's a big risk for any police department to do something like this, and I think, for them, they would only entrust it to a local boy," he says in a noisy lounge of a hotel here. "I speak the same language as the people that the show is about, and I c ome fr om the streets that they patrol a nd that they grew u p o n themselves." Wahlberg's own problems with th e p o l ice h a ppened when he was a ki d scaling t he charts w it h h i s b a n d, New Kids on the Block. "My troubles were not in Boston, thank goodness. I didn't get into trouble back home," he

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— Donnie Wahlberg, talking about his reality TV show "Boston's Finest"

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Donnie Wahlberg has played a cop on "Bo omtown" and CBS' "Blue Bloods." Now he's producing his own reality show about the Boston police he grew up with. with arson for setting a fire in the hall of a Kentucky hotel. Charges were later dropped. "I think my intentions when I started my band in 1984 or '5 were to be a straight-ahead guy, to take the right path," he says, the afternoon sun backlighting his round face. "When I became famous at

says.

such a young age and got in

Indulging in tattoos, piercings and belligerent behavior, Wahlberg was charged

the spotlight, I really didn't expect the negative part that came with it. I didn't under-

on my own, I can look back and say, 'I worked hard. And I've earned the things that the pizza guy would go, 'Hey, have come my way because I Donnie, proud of you, come didn't quit and I kept working in and have a slice.' hard.' But back then how can "Instead I took up the loyou know that? It was just a cal newspapers and read my struggle for respect, and it b and stinks, and w e w e r e was misguided. I've made a p honies, and we w ere this lot of bad choices because I and that — personal attacks didn't know any better." on my family. I didn't underDonnie, w h ose y o unger stand that and didn't know brother, Mark, has gone on how to deal with it. I became to even greater fame, says it angry, bitter and wanted to runs in the family. His brothprove myself and went about er, Bob, is also involved in "Boston's Finest." "I think we it the wrong ways." Eventually he caught on. learned about hard work and "At the end of the day what I drive from our parents,"says really had to learn was that I Wahlberg, 43. "My mother r a ised ni ne really wanted to prove myself to myself," he says. kids, my dad had to feed nine "To be 16, 17 years old and kids and they were, I think, the biggest band in the world, determined not to fail. And I how can you ever really feel think in some ways we have worthy of that? I don't think that same determination that deep inside we felt worthy they sort of instilled in us. "But none of us has nine of that. I t h in k n ow, looking back, the career that my kids, we're not faced with the b and members h av e a n d same economic burdens that I've had and the career I had they had. But we sort of still

m oItanCea i ne SCIeenin Dear Abby: I always knew high blood pressure ran in my family, but I never realized it could cause kidney disease. Then I attended one of the National Kidney Foundation's free kidney healthscreenings and was shocked to learn that my lab results showed a decline in DEAR my kidney function. ABBY Because I felt healthy, Ihadn'tworriedabout my "borderline" hypertension. Turns out, my kidneys were silently being damaged. I have since made lifestyle changes to control my blood pressure and prevent further damage. These include daily exercise and cutting back on salt, sweets and fast food. Kidney disease and its leading causes — high blood pressure and diabetes — run in families, and one in three American adults are at risk. Many people don't realize that early detection can make a critical difference,protecting the kidneys and preventing damage. March is National Kidney Month, and March 14 is World Kidney Day. The National Kidney Foundation is urging Americans to learn their risk factorsforkidney disease and to get their kidneys checked with a simple

urine and blood test. They will offer moreadvice on protecting these vital organs and staying healthy. For a schedule of free kidney health screenings across the country, not only during March but throughout the year, visit the ¹ tional Kidney Foundation website at kid-

ney.org. — Jeff Carter, Buffalo, N.Y.

ing baby clothes for my children. My Christmas tree is decked with all the ornaments from my husband's youth, and a massive dusty doll collection is coming our way. Although my husband himself struggles with buying and collecting stuff, he agrees with me that less is better for our family. I would like to keep things simple, but it's impossible with my in-laws. — Overloaded in Minnesota

Dear Jeff: I'm glad Dear Overloaded: People make you wrote because I was taken aback purchases beyond that which is to learn that more than 26 million needed for various reasons. SomeAmerican adults and thousands of times it's an attempt to buy love. childrenhave chronic kidney disease. Other times it can be to ease anxiety R eaders, it's important t o b e or depression. checked becausemillions of people Ifyou don't drawthe line and make with diabetes, hypertension and other your wishes clear,your mother-indiseases do not realize they're at risk law will not stop what she's doing. for developing kidney disease. Could Explain that you are grateful for her this include you or someoneyou love? generosity, but your house is FULL Dear Abby: I married into a shopa- and thereforeone or two gifts per holic family. My husband and I live child is all you will accept. Period. in a small home with our two young Leave some of the Christmas decdaughters. My biggest problem is orations in storage next December my mother-in-law. She has only two so there will be room on your tree interests: eating and shopping. Good for some of your own. And when the manners dictate that I graciously ac- doll collection is delivered, if your cept all her gifts, but I am sick to my girls can't use it, consider selling or stomach over the gross excess. donating it. — Write to Dear Abby at dearabby.com I think she has an addiction. She has stolen from me the joy of buyor PO. Box69440,Los Angeles, CA 90069

have that drive. I think we've done a good job of nurturing the desire to not fail and turning it into a desire to succeed. A lot of people say they're afraid of failure, but they're really not. They're just afraid to do their best. Because if your best isn't good enough, what do you have left?" He realizes he can't always be perfect. "I think one of the big turning points for me was coming to the awareness that I'm not really afraid to fail. I'm afraid to be my best. In an audition you do your very best and don't get the part, what do you have left? But the truth is if you do your very best you'll be at peace with what you put out there. And if you're the right person .

MARCH 4, 2013: Thisyeartension

YOUR HOROSCOPE

controlling. New beginnings become possible if you allow the other party to have more of asay. Confusion surrounds communication. Confirm that you and others are on thesame page. Tonight: Before spending money, checkyour budget.

often is the motivator that creates important By Jacqueline Bigar events and opportunities in your life. Your career, your relationships andyour public image becomeevenmore significant. Your this person. Tonight: Say "yes." family life serves CANCER (June21-July 22) Stars show the kind as a foundation ** * Think rather than react. Sometimes SAGITTARIUS (Nov.22-Dec. 21) of day you'll have t hat seems ** * * * I magine being so stressed you won't be able to stop yourself, but start ** * * * D ynamic indestructible. Ifyou out by so many opportunities thatyou ** * * P ositive a r e single, take yourthe process anyway. Remind yourself of don't know which way to turn. You might the negativity that can result from knee** * A verage tim e getting to know even wonder if there can besuch a thing jerk reactions. Opportunities will greet ** So-so a potential suitor. as too much good news. Youwill tend to you more often with a little self-discipline. * Difficult You could meet this Tonight: Get a lot done. overindulge and not be asgrounded as person quite easily, you'd like. Tonight: King or Queen ofyour LEO (July 23-Aug.22) perhaps even onyour way to work. If you domain. ** * * O pen up your imagination, and let are attached, bring your significant other CAPRICORN (Dec.22-Jan.19) your ideas flow in a moreupbeat manner. into your public life. GEMINIcares deeply. ** * You would prefer to be anobserver Others rarely see thecomplete dimension ARIES (March21-April 19) rather than a player today. Youwill be of your personality, and they could have ** * T ension forces you to evaluate each subject to several ups anddowns asthe odd responses at first. You don' t want to requestyou get today. Recognize that your daygoeson.Getsomeexercise,and make push too far to havesomething go the way plate is full. Prioritize your responsibilities, sure that you areeating properly. Tonight: you'd like. Tonight: Ever playful. and some stress will evaporate. Avert Get some extra Rand R. You are going to VIRGO (Aug.23-Sept. 22) a misunderstanding by clarifying and need it. confirming information. Tonight: Partake in ** * You are coming from a solid place, AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Fed.18) where understanding is enhanced to alevel a favorite pastime. Y our friends seem to seekyou thatmightshockevenyou.Honora change ** * * * TAURUS (April 20-May20) out. Even in ameeting, nearly everyone thatoccursbetweenyouand someone else. ** * Sometimes an unimportant acts like your best friend. Listen to what is As a result, you'll see eye-to-eye with this interaction can dominate your day.Avoid being shared. Your creativity soars with person. Tonight: Feeling pulledbetween letting this type of distraction prevent you everything that is happening around you. If two different possibilities. from dealing with a loved one.Yousee eyeyouchooseto,giveotherssomefeedback. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) to-eye with others, as wasdemonstrated Tonight: Takenotes. in an earlier meeting. Good news involves a ** * Excess spending — or perhaps a PISCES (Fed.19-March20) different indulgence — comesout. You partnership. Tonight: Dinner for two. ** * You shoulder many responsibilities. could be too verbal for your own good and GEMINI (May21-June20) You handle these burdens sowell that few end up saying something unintentionally. ** * * Defer to others, and know full people realize how muchyou actually do. Keep reaching out to someone at a well what must be done. Understand that A family member could throw a tantrum, distance, and show this person that you Lady Luck is riding on your shoulder. You as he or she might feel neglected. Give this care. Tonight: Catch up onnews. will gain a greater understanding of the person more of your time. Tonight: To the SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.21) interpersonal dynamics of an important wee hours. ** Curb a need to bepossessive or partnership. Opportunities come through © 2013 by KingFeatures Syndicate

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for the job you will be (cast) or not, and there's nothing you can do about that. I think that's one of the things that's been helpful for me, and I think it's one of the things my family — we sort of all seem to be on the same page — let's not be afraid to be our best." D ivorced from h i s w i f e , Kimberly F e y , Wa h l b erg has two sons, 20 and 11. He says the birth of his first son helped set him on the straightand-narrow. "It sounds cliche, but I stopped living for me and started living for him. It stopped being about my legacy and became about my ability to provide for him. I was 23. I was terrified."

MOVIE TIMESTDDAY • There may beanadditional fee for 3-0 and IMAXmovies. • Movie times are subject to change after presstime. I

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Regal Old Mill Stadium t6 & IMAX, 680S.W.Powerhouse Drive, 541-382-6347 • 21 AND OVER (R) 1:20, 4:35, 7:35, 10:05 • DARK SKIES (PG-13) 1:30, 4:05, 7:25, 9:50 • DJANGO UNCHAINED (R) 9:30 • ESCAPE FROM PLANET EARTH(PG) 3:30, 9:10 • ESCAPE FROM PLANET EARTH 3-0(PG)t:10,6:30 • A GOOD DAYTODIE HARD(R) 145, 445, 745, 1015 • IDENTITY THIEF (R) 12:15, 3:50, 6:35, 9:25 •JACK THEGIANT SLAYER (PG-l3)12:30,3:40,6:45 • JACK THE GIANT SLAYER3-0 (PG-13) 12:45, 3:55, 7, 9:45 • JACKTHE GIANT SLAYERIMAX (PG-13) 1, 4:15, 7: I5, 10 • THE LAST EXORCISM PART II (PG-13) 12:55, 4:40, 7:50, IO:I5 • LIFEOFPI (PG) I2:05 • LIFEOFPI3-0 (PG) 3,6:10,9: I5 • LINCOLN (PG-13) t 1:50 a.m., 3:10, 6:25, 9:40 • PHANTOM (R) Noon, 3:t5, 6:55, 9:20 • SAFE HAVEN (PG-13) 12:40, 3:45, 7:10, 9:55 • SNITCH (PG-13)12:25, 3:25, 6:15, 9:40 • WARM BODIES (PG-13) 1:40, 4:25, 7:40, 10:10 • ZERO DARK THIRTY (R) 1t:45 a.m., 4:30, 7:55 • Accessibility devices are available for some movies. t

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8 p.m. onE3, "How I Met Your Mother" — Barney (Neil Patrick Harris) draws up an elaborate prenuptial agreement that has Ted and Marshall (Josh Radnor, Jason Segel) considering some changes in their relationships. A furious Quinn (Becki Newton) drafts her own version in "The Pre-Nup." Cobie Smulders and Alyson Hannigan also star. 9 p.m. on (CW), "90210" — Liam (Matt Lanter) gets romantically involved with the first person to invest in his new business: a custom surfboard shop for women. When Mark (Charlie Weber) gets an offer for a head chef position in New York, Naomi (AnnaLynne McCord) tries to persuade him to stay in Los Angeles. Dixon (Tristan Wilds) talks Silver (Jessica Stroup) into directing Michaela's (Lyndon Smith) music video in the new episode "Life's a Beach." 10 p.m. onl3, "Hawaii Five0" — Chin (Daniel Dae Kim) is kidnapped and dropped into Halawa Prison in an inmate's uniform, and he must act fast to get out of there before the other prisoners recognize him as Five-0. Lindsay Price guest stars in "Olelo Ho'opa'I Make" — Hawaiian for "death sentence" — which includes seven rare tracks from the late Jimi Hendrix. 10 p.m. on TNT, "Monday Mornings" — When an older doctor (guest star Hal Holbrook) wanders into the wrong place at the wrong time, the surgeons wonder if his mind is going. Villanueva (Ving Rhames) trusts his gut, with surprising results, in diagnosing a patient. Ty and Michelle (Jamie Bamber, Emily Swallow) help Tina (Jennifer Finnigan) with a risky procedure. Sydney (Sarayu Rao) questions Lieberman's (Jonathan Silverman) abilities in the new episode "The Legend and the Fall." ©Zap2it

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7 p.m. on NGC, "Inside Comdat Rescue" — The pararescue jumpers can't land in an area littered with enemy mines until a full sweep confirms that it is safe to land. The setback jeopardizes the life of an Afghan soldier with a severed leg. On another call, frustration mounts when defensive jamming techniques block radio communications, complicating the rescue of U.S. soldiers seriously injured during a coordinated attack by insurgents on a remote outpost in the new episode "Into the Fire."

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Lost 8 Found

Horses & Equipment

Employment Opportunities

Found pre s c riptionHorse Boarding in NW tinted glasses on side Redmond. Monthly Human Resource Since September 29, of road, Hwy 20 W rates starting at $195 Representative 1991, advertising for and Old B end/Red- per horse. Paddocks, used woodstoves has mond Hwy. The case stalls wit h t u rnoutsWoodgrain Millwork is been limited to mod- was b r o ke n but avail., indoor/outdoor a highly motiels which have been glasses appear intact. riding arenas, trainer seeking v ated H uman R e c ertified by the O r - logo says n29 Below" on site. 541-504-4282 s ource Rep at t he egon Department of Coffman Vision Clinic. / Want to Buy or Rent Prineville, Oregon, loEnvironmental Qual- Call 541-388-7510. cation. In this role you ity (DEQ) and the fedFarmers Column • Wanted: $Cash paid for will be responsible for Found sunglasses in eral E n v ironmental vintage costume jewproviding comprehenProtection A g e ncydressing room at Lydi's elry. Top dollar paid for Rafter L F Ranch & sive HR expertise as Place, call to i dentify, FarmSvcs. - Custom (EPA) as having met 541-385-3102 Gold/Silver.l buy by the well as ensuring comsmoke emission stanEstate, Honest Artist Haying & Field Work p liance w it h l a w s , dards. A cer t ifiedLost male orange tiger Elizabeth,541-633-7006 Call Lee Fischer, policies, and procew oodstove may b e cat, short hair, Scotts541-410-4495 dures. Monitor and WANTED: Tobacco identified by its certifi- dale Dr. area, Bend. Shy, administer w o rkers' pipes - Briars, Meercation label, which is but lovable; answers to 375 comp claims and shaums and smoking permanently attached Barney. 541-330-6923 Meat & Animal Processing OSHA recordkeeping. accessories. to the stove. The BulMust possess excelWANTED: RAZORSletin will no t k n ow- R EMEMBER: If you All Natural g rain-fed lent c ommunication, Gillette, Gem, Schick, ingly accept advertishave lost an animal, beef $2.88/lb. hang- interpersonal and deetc. Shaving mugs i ng for the s ale o f don't forget to check ing wt, half or whole cision making skills. and accessories. uncertified The Humane Society to b e pro c essed Experience in recruitFair prices paid. woodstoves. in Bend 541-382-3537 mid-march. $500 dep. ing, interviewing, new Call 541-390-7029 Redmond, Half Hog Sale, $190 in- hire orientation, benbetween 10 am-3 pm. 267 541-923-0882 cludes cutting wrap- efit coordination, payPrineville, Fuel & Wood WANT TO RENT OR ping and cure. roll. Proficient in Mi541-447-7178; BUY: Garage size WHILE THEY LAST! crosoft office (Word, OR Craft Cats, 541-573-2677 space for my woodExcel, Outlook), SAP 541-389-8420. WHEN BUYING turning shop, need experience a p l u s. 220. 541-389-3992 FIREWOOD... Bachelor's degree in 286 related field preferred. To avoid fraud, Sales Northeast Bend M inimum of 1 y e a r The Bulletin experience in HR. We Pets & Supplies recommends payoffer competitive salment for Firewood ** FREE ** ary, benefits including only upon delivery The Bulletin recomm edical, l i fe , an d Garage Sale Kit and inspection. mends extra caution dental insurance, and • A cord is 128 cu. ft. Place an ad in The when purc h as401k. To apply, send 4' x 4' x 8' Bulletin for your gaing products or serresume to • Receipts should rage sale and revices from out of the jtoholsky I woodgrain. include name, ceive a Garage Sale 476 area. Sending cash, com Kit FREE! phone, price and checks, or credit inEmployment We are an equal kind of wood purf ormation may b e opportunity employer. KIT INCLUDES: Opportunities chased. subjected to fraud. • 4 Garage Sale Signs avail. 541-350-3335 • Firewood ads ~ g k 20 ! PROPERTY MANAGEMENT For more i nforma• $2.00 Off Coupon To MUST include speAd must include Fridgidaire range needs AK-47 RomanianSpecial P/T Assistant tion about an adverwith an ad in Use Toward Your CAUTION READERS: oven element, olive cies and cost per price of single item Leasing Agent tiser, you may call Forces, NIB, lots of exNext Ad The Bulletin's cord to better serve of $500 or less, or green, $30 • 10 Tips For "Garage needed in Bend. Must be the O r egon State tras, 2 30-rd clips, $1000 Ads published in nEm541-504-0707 "Call A Service our customers. multiple items able to work Mondays 8 obo. 541-771-9902 Sale Success!" Attorney General's ployment Opportuniwhosetotal does Office C o n sumer Professional" GENERATE SOME ex- Bend local pays CASH!! t ies" i n c lude e m - weekends as needed. not exceed $500. The Bulletin Protection hotline at QUALIFICATIONS citement i n your Serr ng Cent al 0 egnn a nee tgt8 and Directory ployee for all firearms & PICK UP YOUR 1-877-877-9392. neighborhood! Plan a i ndependent pos i - • Customer service or Call Classifieds at ammo. 541-526-0617 GARAGE SALE KIT at garage sale and don't tions. Ads for posi- sales exp. 541-385-5809 260 1777 SW Chandler The Bulletin www.bendbulletin.com 1 cord dry, split Juniper, forget to advertise in CASH!! tions that require a fee • Strong computer skills Ave., Bend, OR 97702 Misc. Items $190/cord. Multi-cord For Guns, Ammo & classified! or upfront investment • Property management t/g cords exp. is a plus Reloading Supplies. discounts, 8 541-385-5809. must be stated. With The Bulletin FREE Male Black Lab • Loan processing exp. is 541-408-6900. Buying Diamonds available. Immediate Adopt a nice CRAFT cat gervrng Central Oregon ttnre 1903 any independent job a plus or kitten from Tumalo (9 yrs) 8 Male Chiwe- Mattress set, twin, like /Gold for Cash delivery! 541-408-6193 opportunity, p l ease • Strong $150. Colt 357 Python, 8" bar- Saxon's Fine Jewelers attention to detail sanctuary, Pet Smart, or nee (6 yrs) both neu- new. investigate thorr el, w/ s c ope, 5 0 Petco! Fixed, shots, ID tered, current shots. 541-480-5950 541-389-6655 Aii Year Dependable oughly. To apply, send resume rounds, cleaning kit, c hip, t e sted, m o r e! Moving & can't take Microwave E m e rson Firewood: Seasoned to recruiter@princBUYING 541-389-8420. Open Sat/ with us. Must go to- b rand 9 0 0W , e x c . n ever fired. Al l i n Lodgepole, Split, Del. Use extra caution when etonproperty.com lLLIQgQ) locking case. $3300. Lionel/American Flyer Sun 1-5pm 65480 78th St gether!! 541-233-3534 Bend: 1 for $175 or 2 applying for jobs onshape $28. 541-771-4970 Photos 8 info at trains, accessories. for $335. Cash, Check Just bought a new boat? line and never pro- Remember.... 541-382-3106. 541-408-2191. www.craftcats.org or Credit Card OK. Sell your old one in the vide personal infor- A dd your we b a d 8 like us on Facebook. classifieds! DOM'T MI S S T HI S 541-420-3484. Ask about our mation to any source dress to your ad and BUYING 8( SE L LING Recliner/Loveseat Super Seller rates! The All gold jewelry, silver you may not have re- readers on Australian She p herd sofa, $300. Queen Seasoned Juniper, 541-385-5809 searched and deemed Bullefin' s web site and gold coins, bars, minis, purebred, no pa4-post bed frame & DO YOU HAVE $200 spilit 8 delivto be reputable. Use will be able to click rounds, wedding sets, pers, 1 blue female, 1 red Labradoodles - Mini & m attress, $300 . SOMETHING TO ered. 541-977-2040 class rings, sterling sil316 extreme caution when through automatically male. 541-604-6060 med size, several colors Vintage 5 - d rawer SELL ver, coin collect, vinr esponding to A N Y to your site. 541-504-2662 Irrigation Equipment & mi r r or FOR $500 OR tage watches, dental 269 Bengals TICA R e g., www.alpen-ridge.com dresser online e m p loyment $200. Elect. exerLESS? gold. Bill Fl e ming, Gardening Supplies 3-inch & 4 -inch pipe, ad from out-of-state. Champion lines, takcise bike, $50. The Bulletin Non-commercial Labrador Pups, AKC 541-382-9419. ing deposits NOW! Text 541-639-2479 Nelson 100 Big Gun w/ 8 Equipment advertisers may I Recommends extra We suggest you call bengalcatspride.com. Chocolate/Yelfow/White cart, 3hp pump & control Men's brand new wincaution when purguaranteed. place an ad $800-$1200. Ready Hips OFA panel, misc. All $3200 the State of Oregon chasing products or i $300-$400. with our ter hooded coat sz XL Recliner, small green, 4/5. Call Kim Consumer Hotline at For newspaper obo. 541-420-2382 1-541-954-1727 services from out of ' "QUICK CASH $40. 541-508-3886 503-860-8974, R e d$25. Redmond, you 1-503-378-4320 delivery, call the l the area. Sending SPECIAL" mond. Poodle pupsAKC toys. haul, 503-860-8974 Wanted- paying cash Circulation Dept. at ash, c hecks, o r Loving, cuddly companFor Equal Opportunity l ccredit 541-385-5800 for Hi-fi audio & stu• Hay, Grain & Feed i n f o rmation Refrigerator: W hirlpool or Dachshund AKC minia- ions. 541-475-3889 L aws: Oregon B uTo place an ad, call dio equip. Mclntosh, and Amana over-thel may be subjected to ture, b l ac k & tan ~g a eka g g t reau of Labor 8 In541-385-5809 J BL, Marantz, D y FRAUD. 1st quality grass hay, Ad must long-hair male, $325. P OODLE pups T o y, range microwave, hardly or email 70-Ib bales, barn stored, dustry, C i vil Rights For more informadark colors, 4 males, used, white, $400 both. naco, Heathkit, SanInfo/pix, 541-420-6044 include price of claggtfted@bendbullettn.com Division, 541-848-9080 sui, Carver, NAD, etc. $250/ ton. Also big bales! 1 fe m ale. $2 5 0 . tion about an advera~la ta et $ 500 971-673-0764 Patterson Ranch, Call 541-261-1808 Dachshund AKC mini pup Ready 3/24 call or text Washer/dryer Irg cap. l tiser, you may call or less, or multiple The Bulletin Sisters, Se ng Cent al 0 egnna nee tgtta 541-549-3831 Julie 760-504-8725 Oregon State www.bendweenies.com items whosetotal If you have any ques- l the Amana, white, n ew, 263 Attorney General's $350. 541-508-4558 does notexceed Queensland Heelers $700. 541-848-9180 tions, concerns or Office Co n s umert $500. Tools comments, contact: standard & mini,$150 & SUPER TOP SOIL Looking for your Protection hotline at I Washer, dryer Westingwww.hershe soilandbttrk.com up. 541-280-1537 Classified Department next employee? 20' alum. e xtension Screened, soil & coml 1-877-877-9392. Call Classifieds at house, almond, $100. rightwayranch.wordThe Bulletin Place a Bulletin 541-385-5809 ladder. Werner. $100. post Redmond, you haul, m i x ed , no press.com 541-385-5809 help wanted ad ~Tlie Bullet ttT www.bendbulletin.com 503-860-8974 r 503-860-8974 rocks/clods. High hutoday and Rodent control experts mus level, exc. f or (barn cats) seek work reach over 265 The Bulletin flower beds, lawns, Dachshund Mini AKC DPMS AR-15 556 rifle in exchange for safe The Bulletin 60,000 readers gardens, straight Looking for your next Choc. long-haired F. Building Materials w/2 mags & ammo, NIB, recommends extra ' shelter, basic care. each week. s creened to p s o i l . $600. 2 0% off if w i l l People Look for Information Placeemployee? Fixed, shots. Will de- l caution when pur- $1400. 541-647-8931 Your classified ad Bark. Clean fill. Dea Bulletin help spay. 541-598-7417 lam i nate chasing products or • Leupold scope 3x9x40 Harmonics liver! 541-389-8420. About Products and will also wanted ad today and flooring, 6 17.2 s.f. box. liver/you haul. services from out of I Services Every Daythrough BEND'S HOMELESS NEED OUR HELPI New ln Box $200. 541-548-3949. appear on reach over 60,000 $100. 541-382-8389 t the area. Sending t 541-647-8931 The Bulletin Classifieds readers each week. The cold weather is upon us and sadly there are ' cash, checks, or bendbuiietin.com La Pine Habitat Your classified ad still over 2,000 folks in our community without l credit i n f o rmation M ag-Pul 3 0 270 which currently rou n d RESTORE will also appear on permanent shelter, living in cars, makeshift receives over may be subjected to Lost 8 Found mags, New In Box. DO YOU NEED Building Supply Resale bendbulletin.com camps, getting by as best they can. 1.5 million page l FRAUD. For more $40. 541-647-8931 Quality at A GREAT which currently The following items are badly needed to views every information about an g Found: Car Keys, on LOW PRICES EMPLOYEE receives over 1.5 help them get through the winter: advertiser, you may I MEC9000 shotshell 12 month at no 2/22/13, at River Trail, 52684 Hwy 97 RIGHT NOW? million page views ga. reloader, RCBS / call t h e Or e gon / b etween Archi e extra cost. @ CAMPING GEARof any sort: @ 541-536-3234 Call The Bulletin every month at Attor ney ' model scale, $400. Briggs an d A r chie Bulletin New or used tents, sleeping bags, tarps, blankets ' State Open to the public . before 11 a.m. and no extra cost. 541-389-8563 or Briggs cut-off. Call l General's O f fi c e Classifieds get an ad in to pubBulletin Classifieds e WARM CLOTHING: Consumer P r otec- • yukonwilly@msn.com 541-322-0682 to Prineville Habitat Get Results! Get Results! lish the next day! Rain Gear, Boots, Gloves. t ion ho t l in e at I R emington 700 S P S identify. ReStore Call 541-385-5809 541-385-5809. Call 385-5809 l 1-877-877-9392. PLEASE DROP OFF YOUR DONATIONS AT Varmint 204 R uger, Building Supply Resale or place your ad or place VIEW the THE BEND COMMUNITY CENTER $550!. Remington 700 1427 NW Murphy Ct. Found keys, off China on-line at your ad on-line at Classifieds at: 541-447-6934 1036 NE 5thSt.,Bend, Mon.-Sat.9 a.m.-5 p.m. bdl . 22-250 S O LD. Hat Rd near Mtn High, bendbuiietin.com bendbulletin.com www.bendbulletin.com PLEASE HELP, YOU CAN MAKEA D/FFERENCE. 541-948-2646 Open to the public. call to I.D., 541-382-1490

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Doberman AKC pups Seniors 8 Veterans! champion lines, black Adopta companion cat The Bulletin reserves Rossi single shot 12 8 rust, 1 male red, 6 from Tumalo rescue, fee the right to publish all gauge, great cond. wks now ready 3/24. waived! Tame, fixed, ads from The Bulletin $125. 541-948-2646 $2000F, $1800M. shots, ID chip, tested, newspaper onto The bbest242@yahoo.com more! 389-8420. Photos Bulletin Internet web- R uger Mini 1 4 SS , 541-659-9058 etc: www.craftcats.org. w/scope, 2 maqs (25 site. Like us on Facebook. 8 4 0 r n ds) $ 1000. Donate deposit bottles/ 541-480-2265. cans to local all volun- To good home, tabby The Bulletin ger ng CentralOregnn t nre lglH teer, non-profit rescue, to spayed, sweet, mostly Wanted: Collector help w/cat spay/neuter i ndoor c a t . Li k e s seeks high quality vet bills. Cans for Cats dogs. 541-419-2502. fishing items. Coins & Stamps • trailer at Grocery Outlet, Call 541-678-5753, or SE 3rd/Wilson, 2/26- Yorkie pup small fe503-351-2746 3 /1 2. Donate M-F O male, shots, docked, Private collector buying p ostage stamp a l Smith Siqns, 1515 NE 8 weeks, ready for 247 2nd; CRAFT, Tumalo any great home! $ 6 50. bums & c ollections, world-wide and U.S. Sporting Goods time. 541-389-8420; 541-536-3108. 573-286-4343 (local, www.craftcats.org - Misc. 210 cell ¹) Furniture & Appliances Yakima Skybox, complete w/racks & locks, Bicycles & $350. 541-678-2906 A1 Washers&Dryers Accessories $150 ea. Full war266 ranty. Free Del. Also 17 n Well equipped mnt Doxie pups! Adorable Computers wanted, used W/D's 10-wk-old short hair. bike. Great deal $200. 541-280-7355 541-480-5950. A few red's and wild T HE B U L LETIN r e boar/red & chocolate quires computer ad242 mix. Asking $300. Call Bakers rack, black metal vertisers with multiple 5 41-508-2167 if y o u w/brass trim, cstm glass Exercise Equipment ad schedules or those are ready to give one shelves, 80x60x16, beauselling multiple sysof these little ones a tiful cond, very elegant. Weider ProStack 550lb. tems/ software, to dis$950. 541-923-5089 good home! press. 2 be n c hes, close the name of the business or the term Display shelf, 6', 4 glass $200 541-419-4195. DO YOU HAVE "dealer" in their ads. shelves, heavy, $200. SOMETHING TO 541-728-0105 Private party advertisSELL Guns, Hunting ers are d efined as FOR $500 OR those who sell one & Fishing USE THE CLASSIFIEDS! LESS? computer. Non-commercial Door-to-door selling with 150 rounds of .223 advertisers may ammo, $140. fast results! It's the easiest Get your place an ad with 541-647-8931 way in the world to sell. our business "QUICK CASH AK47, 75 rnd drum, 2-30 The Bulletin Classified rnd mags, bi-pod, book, SPECIAL" box. $1000; a m mo G ROW I N G 1 week 3 lines 12 541-385-5809

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TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED• 541-385-5809

C2 MONDAY, MARCH 4, 2013•THE BULLETIN 870

541-385-5809 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

:o.

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AD PLACEMENT DEADLINES Monday • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 5e00 pm Fri •

Tuesday•••• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Noon Mone Wednesday •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • e Noon Tuese a

Q

850

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Starting at 3 lines

Place a photoin your private party ad for only $15.00 per week.

"UNDER '500in total merchandise

OVER '500in total merchandise

7 days .................................................. $10.00 14 days................................................ $16.00

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(cell for commercial line ed rates)

A Payment Drop Box is available at Bend City Hall. CLASSIFICATIONS BELOW M A R K E D W ITH AN ( *) REQUIRE PREPAYMENT as well as any out-of-area ads. The Bulletin reserves the right to reject any ad at any time.

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The Bulletin bendbulletin.com

is located at: 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, Oregon 97702

486

636

750

Independent Positions

Apt./Multiplex NW Bend

Redmond Homes

Sales

Small studio close to library, all util. pd. $550, $525 dep. No pets/ smoking. 541-3309769 or 541-480-7870

50000

Will hire t w o s a lespeople to work from The Bulletin newspap er office f o r t h e 627 Newspaper In Education sales campaign. Vacation Rentals This is a part-time, in8 Exchanges dependent contractor sales position, and you will not be em- ) ocean front ployees of The Bulle- house, beach walk tin. We offer a short from town, 2 bdrm /2 paid orientation pro- bath, TV, Fireplace, gram. The average BBQ, $85 per night, 2 s alesperson e a r ns night MIN. $400 to $ 7 00 p e r 208-342-6999 week, for a 27-hour 630 work we e k . T h e dress code is casual Rooms for Rent and this is soft, relaxed b usiness t o Studios & Kitchenettes business sales. We Furnished room, TV w/ prefer a background cable, micro & fridge. in "business to busi- Utils & l inens. New ness" selling. This is owners.$145-$165/wk 541-382-1885 not ad or s ubscription sales, however, if 634 you have p r evious experience in adver- Apt./Multiplex NE Bend tising sales, I will give you priority consider- gkGREAT WINTER s ation. I'm looking for DEAL! motivated, energetic, 2 bdrm, 1 bath, articulate people with $530 8 $540 w/lease. excellent communicaCarports included! tion skills. Call Mela- FOX HOLLOW APTS. nie at 541-383-0399.

(541) 383-3152

Ã1iMxco 8 Df1@AMM

Cascade Rental Management. Co.

Ads published in the "Boats" classification include: Speed, fishing, drift, canoe, house and sail boats. For all other types of watercraft, please see Springdale 2005 27' 4 slide in dining/living area Class 875. sleeps 6, low mi,$15,000 541-385-5809

The Bulletin

obo. 541-408-3811

The Bulletin

800 Polaris, less than 250 mi, like new. 700 Polariswith less that 900 mi, like new. RMK; tag good until 2015. Asking $6000 for both, you will not believe how nice they are. (541) 350-6865

OMC rebuilt marine motors: 151 $1595; 3.0 $1895; 4.3 (1993), $1995. 541-389-0435

Wind River 250 RLSW

Aircraft, Parts & Service

Automotive Parts, Service & Accessories Kenwood KAT 7285 60 w att amplifier. $ 6 0 obo. 541-382-0805

Studless snow tires, 225/ 60R-17, fit '13 Subaru Outback,less than 2500 1/5th interest in 1973 miles, exc. cond. $350!

Cessna 150 LLC

Executive Hangar at Bend Airport (KBDN) 60' wide x 50' deep, w/55' wide x 17' high bifold dr. Natural gas heat, offc, bathroom. Adjacent to Frontage Rd; great visibility for aviation business. Financing available. 541-948-2126 or email 1jetjock©q.com

K0000

Check out the 2011 4-season pkg, Piper A rcher 1 9 8 0, classifieds online dual pane windows, based in Madras, allarge picture window in ways hangared since www.bendbulletin.com Watercraft rear, super slide, new. New annual, auto Updated daily foam/air sofa sleeper, pilot, IFR, one piece Ads published in eWa26" LCD TV. Garaged. windshield. Fastest Artercraft" include: Kay• Yamaha 750 1999 cher around. 1750 to~ Qo Mountain Max, $1400. aks, rafts and motortal t i me . $6 8 ,500. M ore P jxa t B e n d b o lle t i n co m ized personal • 1994 Arctic Cat 580 541-475-6947, ask for $25,900. 541-408-2111 watercrafts. For EXT, $1000. Rob Berg. "boats" please see • Zieman 4-place Class 870. Looking for your 1966 GMC, 2nd owner, trailer, SOLD! next employee? too many extras to list, 541-385-5809 All in good condition. Trucks & $8500 obo. Serious buyPlace a Bulletin help Located in La Pine. ers only. 541-536-0123 wanted ad today and Heavy Equipment Call 541-408-6149. reach over 60,000 readers each week. 860 880 Your classified ad Motorcycles & Accessories Motorhomes will also appear on bendbulletin.com Harley Davidson Heriwhich currently retage Softail C l assic, ceives over 1.5 mil2006. Black cherry pearl/ Chevy C-20 Pickup lion page views ev- Diamond Reo Dump 1969, an orig. Turbo 44; b lack p e a rl , ex t r a Truck 19 7 4, 1 2-14 ery month at no chrome, stage one tune, 4-spd, 396, model yard box, runs good, auto extra cost. Bulletin Vance & Hines pipes. k CST /an options, orig. $6900, 541-548-6812 Classifieds Get Reexcellent cond„always owner, $22,000, sults! Call 385-5809 g araged, never l a i d2003 Fleetwood Dis541-923-6049 covery 40' diesel modown. 4100 mi, $11,900. or place your ad G K E A T '55 Chevy 2 dr . wgn torhome w/all Home, 541-548-2258; on-line at options-3 slide outs, P ROJECT car, 3 5 0 Cell, 503-970-3328 bendbulletin.com satellite, 2 TV's,W/D, small block w/Weiand Harley Davidson Soft- e tc.32,000 Hyster H25E, runs mile s . dual quad tunnel ram Tail De luxe 2 0 0 7, Wintered i n h e ated well, 2982 Hours, with 450 Holleys. T-10 white/cobalt, w / pas- shop. $89,900 O.B.O. • Fif t h Wheels $3500, call 4-speed, 12-bolt posi, senger kit, Vance & 541-749-0724 541-447-8664 Weld Prostar wheels, Hines muffler system extra rolling chassis + 8 kit, 1045 mi., exc. extras. $6000 for all. cond, $16,9 9 9, 541-389-7669. 541-389-9188. Harley Heritage Softail, 2003 32' Fleetwood Fiesta '03 Carri-Lite Luxury 2009 $5,000+ in extras, no slide-out, Triton eng by Carriage, 4 slide- Peterbilt 359 p o table $2000 paint job, an amenities, 1 owner outs, inverter, satelwater t ruck, 1 9 90, 30K mi. 1 owner, perfect, only 17K miles 3200 gal. tank, 5hp lite sys, fireplace, 2 For more information $21,500. 541-504-3253 p ump, 4 - 3 e hoses, Chevy Wagon 1957, flat screen TVs. please call camlocks, $ 2 5 ,000. 4-dr., complete, $60,000. 541-385-8090 541-820-3724 $7,000 OBO, trades. 541-480-3923 or 209-605-5537 Please call 541-389-6998 Automotive Parts, Chrysler 30 0 C o u pe Service & Accessories 1967, 44 0 e n g ine, Country Coach Intrigue auto. trans, ps, air, 2002, 40' Tag axle. 4 C o n tinental t i r e s frame on rebuild, re400hp Cummins Die- Laredo 2009 30' with 2 225/601 5 95%. $200. painted original blue, Harley Limited 103 2011, sel. two slide-outs. slides, TV, A/C, table 541-480-5950 original blue interior, many extras, stage 1 8 air 41,000 miles, new & c h airs, s a t ellite, original hub caps, exc. cushion seat. 18,123 mi, tires & batteries. Most Arctic pkg., p o wer Eclipse all season tires, chrome, asking $9000 $21,990. 541-306-0289 options. $85,000 OBO awning, Exc. cond! P235/60R-16 99T, (4) or make offer. HD Screaming Eagle 541-678-5712 $28,000. 541-419-3301 $150. 541-678-2906 541-385-9350 Electra Glide 2005, n NuWa 29 7LK Hi t ch103 motor, two tone Hiker 2007, 3 slides, candy teal, new tires, 32' touring coach, left 23K miles, CD player, kitchen, rear lounge, hydraulic clutch, exmany extras, beautiful cellent condition. c ond. inside & o u t , Highest offer takes it. Econoline RV 19 8 9, $32 900 OBO Prinev541-480-8080. fully loaded, exc. cond, ine. 541-447-5502 days Ca/I 54 I -385-5809 35K m i. , R e duced 8 541-447-1641 eves. 865

Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS

5'00I

Looking for your next

emp/oyee?

Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000

readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or

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Good classified ads tell the essential facts in an interesting Manner. Write BANK OWNED HOMES! from the readers view - not the seller's. Convert the FREE List w/Pics! www.BendRepos.com facts into benefits. Show bend and beyond real estate the reader how the item will 20967 yeoman, bend or help them in someway. 745

Homes for Sale

NOTICE All real estate advertised here in is subject to t h e F e deral F air H o using A c t , which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or intention to make any such preferences, l i m itations or discrimination. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for r ea l e s tate which is in violation of this law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available

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The Bulletin tenrng Cent al Oregonr nce leea

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NOW!

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ATVs

$15,250. 541-546-6133

to romote our service

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Building/Contracting LandscapingNard Care Four Winds Class A 3 2 ' Hurricane s~ l NOTICE: Oregon state 2007. CAN'T BEAT law req u ires anyTHIS! Look before one who co n t racts Pilgrim 27', 2007 5th you buy, b e l ow wheel, 1 s lide, AC, for construction work ZcdN'z gaa8rip market value! Size & mileage DOES TV,full awning, excel- to be licensed with the Zaugr gch e /,'g. matter! 12,500 mi, lent shape, $23,900. C onstruction Con - More Than Service tractors Board (CCB). all amenities, Ford 541-350-8629 Peace Of Mmd V10, Ithr, c h erry, A n active lice n se slides, like new! New means the contractor Spring Clean Up low price, $54,900. i s bonded an d i n •Leaves 541-548-5216 ',«I s ured. Ve r ify t h e •Cones contractor's CCB •Needles c ense through t h e GulfstreamScenic •Debris Hauling Cons u m er Cruiser 36 ft. 1999, Pilgrim In t e rnational CCB Cummins 330 hp die- 2005, 36' 5th Wheel, Website Weed free Bark sel, 42K, 1 owner, 13 Model¹M-349 RLDS-5 www.hireaticensedcontractor. & flower beds com in. kitchen slide out, Fall price $ 2 1,865. or call 503-378-4621. new tires,under cover, 541-312-4466 The Bulletin recom- Lawn Renovation hwy. miles only,4 door mends checking with Aeration - Dethatching RV CONSIGNMENTS fridge/freezer iceOverseed the CCB prior to conWANTED maker, W/D combo, tracting with anyone. Compost We Do The Work ... Interbath tub & Top Dressing Some other t r ades You Keep The Cash! shower, 50 amp proalso req u ire addiOn-site credit pane gen & more! tional licenses and Landscape approval team, $45,000. certifications web site presence. Maintenance 541-948-2310 We Take Trade-Ins! Full or Partial Service Free Advertising. Debris Removal • Mowing «Edging BIG COUNTRY RV • Pruning «Weeding Bend: 541-330-2495 Sprinkler Adjustments JUNK BE GONE

773

Acreages

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PacificSource

,

1921 Model T Delivery Truck Restored & Runs $9000. 541-389-8963

875

CHECK YOUR AD Yamaha Banshee 2001, Please check your ad custom built 350 motor, on the first day it runs race-ready, lots of extras, Apt./Multiplex NW Bend to make sure it is cor- $4999/obo 541-647-8931 rect. Sometimes in870 Drake Park luxury apt. s tructions over t h e 1 bdrm, w /d , d / w phone are misunder- Boats & Accessories c able, $950 / m o stood and a n e r ror 541-788-0087 can occur in your ad. If this happens to your 528 ad, please contact us PUBLISHER'S Loans & Mortgages NOTICE the first day your ad appears and we will All real estate adverWARNING tising in this newspa- on an equal opportu- be happy to fix it as The Bulletin recoms oon as w e c a n . 16' SeaSwirl 1980 per is subject to the mends you use caubasis. The Bulle- Deadlines are: WeekF air H o using A c t nity 1990 4-Stroke 45hp tion when you protin Classified days 11:00 noon for Honda Outboard, which makes it illegal vide personal next day, Sat. 11:00 $3000. Text information to compa- to a d vertise "any 541-639-2479 a.m. for Sunday and preference, limitation FIND YOUR FUTURE nies offering loans or or disc r imination HOME IN THE BULLETIN Monday. credit, especially 541-385-5809 17' 1984 Chris Craft based on race, color, those asking for adYourfutureis justa pageaway. Thank you! religion, sex, handi- Scorpion, 140 HP vance loan fees or The Bulletin Classified familial status, Whetheryou're lookingfor ahat or inboard/outboard, 2 companies from out of cap, marital status or nadepth finders, trollaplaceto hangit, TheBulletin state. If you have tional origin, or an ining motor, full cover, concerns or quesClassifiedis yourbestsource. tention to make any EZ - L oad t railer, 775 tions, we suggest you Redmond: 541-548-5254 pre f e rence, Everydaythousattdsofbuyersand $3500 OBO. I Haul Away FREE consult your attorney such Manufactured/ limitation or discrimi541-382-3728. 885 For Salvage. Also s ellers ofgoods an d ser v i c es do or call CONSUMER Mobile Homes nation." Familial staMonaco Dynasty2004, Canopies & Campers Cleanups & Cleanouts HOTLINE, businessi n these pag es .They tus includes children knowyoucan't beatTheBulletin Mel, 541-389-8107 1-877-877-9392. loaded, 3 slides, die18.5' Sea Ray 2000, under the age of 18 FACTORY SPECIAL sel, Reduced - now Canopy, fits '99-'07 Ford Classi l ied Secti o n for sel e cti o n New Home, 3 bdrm, 4.3L Mercruiser, 190 living with parents or BANK TURNED YOU $119,000, 5 4 1-923-7-ft bed, white, exc cond, E xcavating • $46,500 finished hp Bowrider w/depth DOWN? Private party legal cus t o dians, andconvenience- everyitemis 8572 or 541-749-0037 call for details, $1100 on your site. finder, radio/CD player, will loan on real es- pregnant women, and just a phonecall away. obo. 541-593-3331 Levi's Dirt Works J and M Homes rod holders, full canRv CONSIGNMENTS tate equity. Credit, no people securing cusfor an your dirt & excava541-548-5511 vas, EZ Loader trailer, TheClassifiedSectionis easy WANTED problem, good equity tody of children under tion needs. Concrete, exclnt cond, $13,000. We Do The Work ... is all you need. Call 18. This newspaper to use.Everyitemis categorized Driveway Grading707-484-3518 (Bend) You Keep The Cash! now. Oregon Land will not knowingly ac- andeverycategoryis indexedon Where can you find a Low cost! ccb¹ 194077 0 0 • I On-site credit Mortgage 388-4200. cept any advertising 541-639-5282 the sectiods frontpage. helping hand? for real estate which is approval team, From contractors to web site presence. in violation of the law. W hether you ar e l o ok i n g for a hom e Need to get an Handyman O ur r e aders ar e or need We Take Trade-Ins! aservice, yourfuture is in yard care, it's all here ad in ASAP? Free Advertising. hereby informed that the pages of TheBuletin Classfied. in The Bulletin's !DO THAT! You can place it all dwellings adverBIG COUNTRY RV Home/Rental repairs „ =-..; ~ e. e I Bend: "Call A Service 541-330-2495 tised in this newspaonline at: Small jobs to remodels The Bulletin G l a stron 2005, Redmond: 541-548-5254 are available on Professional" Directory 18t/e' Honest, guaranteed www.bendbulletin.com per Volvo V6, h i gh-end an equal opportunity Aircraft, Parts work. CCB¹151573 equipped, less than 60 basis. To complain of hrs, garaged, as close Dennis 541-317-9768 & Service 541-385-5809 discrimination cal l Independent Contractor to new as you can get! HUD t o l l-free at $12,500. 541-550-7189 ERIC REEVE HANDY LOCALMONEY:We buy 1-800-877-0246. The SERVICES. Home 8 secured trust deeds 8 toll f re e t e l ephone * Supplement Your Income* Commercial Repairs, note,some hard money number for the hearSouthwind 35.5' Triton, Carpentry-Painting, loans. Call Pat Kellev ing im p aired is 2008,V10, 2 slides, DuPressure-washing, 541-382-3099 ext.13. 20.5' 2004 Bayliner 1-800-927-9275. pont UV coat, 7500 mi. Honey Do's. On-time 205 Run About, 220 Bought new at promise. Senior 1/3 interest in Columbia HP, V8, open bow, Marncar $132,913; Discount. Work guar400, $150,000 located exc. cond., very fast asking $93,500. O Sunriver. H o urly anteed. 541-389-3361 w/very low hours, Call 541-419-4212 ++++++++++++++++++ or 541-771-4463 rental rate (based upon lots of extras incl. approval) $775. Also: Bonded & Insured tower, Bimini 8 CCB¹181595 S21 hangar avail. for HEALTH PLANS custom trailer, sale, o r le a s e I $19,500. Health Services Representative II$15/day or $325/mo. MargoConstruction 541-389-1413 541-948-2963 LLC Since 1992 Pharmacy • Pavers• Carpentry Winnebago Suncruiser34' Just too many • Remodeling • Decks Our Pharmacy team is growing and we are 2004, only 34K, loaded, • Window/Door seeking a Pharmacy Technician or Assistant to too much to list, ext'd collectibles? We are looking for independent conReplacement • Int/Ext warr. thru 2014, $54,900 join our team. If you have strong pharmacy tractors to service home delivery Paint • CCB 176121 20.5' Seaswirl Spyand customer service skills this may be the Dennis, 541-589-3243 Sell them in routes in: 541-480-3179 der 1989 H.O. 302, opportunity for you! 881 The Bulletin Classifieds 285 hrs., exc. cond., This position coordinates pharmacy services stored indoors for Travel Trailers BULLETIN CLASSIFIEDS and benefits; communicating benefit determilife $11,900 OBO. Must be available 7 days a week, early mornSearch the area's most 541-385-5809 541-379-3530 Rv CONSIGNMENTS nation, serving as a liason between internal ing hours. Must have reliable, insured vehicle. comprehensive listing of and extern customers, claims processing, WANTED classified advertising... claims audits, etc. This position interfaces diWe Do The Work ... real estate to automotive, Please call 541.385.5800 or rectly with members, pharmacies, physicians, You Keep The Cash! merchandise to sporting 800.503.3933 Mon.-Fri., 8-4 or On-site credit and benefit management companies. goods. Bulletin Classifieds apply via email at approval team, appear every day in the web site presence. To review the full job description and apply, online © bendbulletjn.com print or on line. We Take Trade-Ins! 1/3 interest i n w e l l- Call 541-385-5809 please visit us online at 22' Custom Weld Jet, Free Advertising. http://www.pacificsource.com/careers. equipped IFR Beech Bo- www.bendbulletin.com 2002, 350 Vortec, 210 BIG COUNTRY RV nanza A36, new 10-550/ Serving Central Oregon since 1903 hrs, garaged, loaded. Bend: 541-330-2495 prop, located KBDN. EOE The Bulletin 541-923-0854. Redmond: 541-548-5254 $65,000. 541-419-9510 Sewing Cenrrar Oregon enre faea 636

541-536-1789

150hp conversion, low Stud tires P265/70R16, time on air frame and l ow mi., l i k e n e w engine, hangared in $400. 541-815-1523. Bend. Excellent performance & afford932 able flying! $6,500. Antique & 541-382-6752 Classic Autos

The Bulletin

PLEASE NOTE:Check your ad for accuracy the first day it appears. Please call us immediately if a correction is needed. We will gladly accept responsibility for one incorrect insertion. The publisher reserves the right to accept cr reject any ad at anytime, classify and index any advertising based on the policies of these newspapers. The publisher shan not be liable for any advertisement omitted for any reason. Private Party Classified ads running 7 or more days will publish in the Central OregonMarketplace each Tuesday.

Daytime Inside Sales

T r a vel Trailers

2007 Ski-Doo Renegade 600 w/513 mi, like new, <i R l now reduced to $4500. GENERATE SOME ex- Iiia ~~e citement in your neigCall 541-221-5221 borhood. Plan a ga(2) 2000 A rctic Cat rage sale and don't Weekend Warrior Toy Z L580's EFI with n e w to advertise in Hauler 28' 2007, Gen, covers, electric start w/ forget fuel station, exc cond. reverse, low miles, both classified! 385-5809. sleeps 8, black/gray excellent; with new 2009 i nterior, u se d 3X , Trac-Pac 2-place trailer, Ser rng CentralOregon rrnre t903 $19,999 firm. drive off/on w/double tilt, 541-389-9188 lots of accys. Selling due Used out-drive to m e dical r e asons. parts - Mercury $8000 an. 541-536-8130

Thursday • • •••• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • N oon Wed. Fr i d ay . . . . . . • • • • • . • • • • • • • • . • Noon Thurs. Saturday Real Estate • • • • • • • • • • • 11:00 am Fri • Saturday • • • •. . . . . . . 3 : 0 0 pm Fri. • • • • • • • • 5:00 pm Fri • Sunday. • • • • PRIVATE PARTY RATES

931

Boats & Accessories •

Operate Your Own Business Newspaper Delivery

Independent Contractor

© Call Today ®

* Terrebonne *

The Bulletin

OOO

Fertilizer included with monthly program

Weekly, monthly or one time service. EXPERIENCED Commercial & Residential Free Estimates Senior Discounts

541-390-1466 Same Day Response

N OTICE: O R E G O N Landscape Contractors Law (ORS 671) r equires a l l bus i nesses that advertise to p e rform L a n dscape C o n struction which inclu d es: p lanting, dec k s , fences, arbors, w ater-features, a n d installation, repair of irrigation systems to be licensed with the Landscape Contract ors B o a rd . Th i s 4-digit number is to be included in all advertisements which indicate the business has a bond, insurance and

workers compensation for their employees. For your protection call 503-378-5909 or use our website: www.lcb.state.or.us to check license status before co n t racting with th e b u s iness. Persons doing landscape m a intenance do not require a LCB license.

SPRING CLEAN-UP! Aeration/Dethatching

Weekly/one-time service avail. Bonded, insured. Free Estimates!

COLLINS Lawn Maint. Ca/l 541-480-9714


To PLAGE AN AD cALL CLAssIFIED• 541-385-5809

THE BULLETIN•MONDAY, MARCH 4, 2013 C3

TUNDRA

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE &0 AHEAD. I'M IPROWhl-SA&&lhl& IT TODAY.

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TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED• 5 41-385-580 9

C4 MONDAY, MARCH 4, 2013•THE BULLETIN

DAILY B R I D G E

CLU B

ACROSS

3 Little prankster 4 Does nothing 9 Tots' fathers 34 Neither's partner as TV host Gibbons ae Go off like a volcano 371nfo on a dashboard gauge as Countryside: Sp. 2o Within: Prefix 2a "I, the Jury" detective 23 Big name in art glass 2s Comic Caesar 2e Thanksgiving side dish 27 In layers 28 Read leisurely ao French legislature aa Tiny misstep 34 Newspaper opinion piece

By FRANK STEWART Tribune Media Services

ANSWER: Expert opinion would vary. Players whose practice is to "ignore the double" would bid one spade, but that approach makes no sense to me. Pass. You have nothing you're eager to say. The next player is unlikely to pass for penalty when you havean ace and a king, butif he does, partnercan seek a different contract if he wishes. South dealer N-S vulnerable

NORTH

4Q J5

AUTOMATIC North-South discussed the result quietly and sensibly — almost. South said North's bid of five spades was a howler. North said it was automatic. Presumably, South thought North should have passed five hearts doubled, but unless he led a trump, North-South would be minus 650. Moreover, South could make five spades. At Trick Three dummy leads a club. If South's king wins, he draws trumps and sets up the diamonds. If instead East takes the ace to lead another heart, South has six trumps, three clubs and two diamonds.

DAILY QUESTION

Q764 0 1082 4Q J83 WEST 4 None 0 AQ J 10532 OQ754 A64

EAST 4 10 8 4 3 Q K98 06 4 IA10 9 7 2

SOUTH 4 I AK 9 7 6 2 9 None 0 A K J9 3 4K5 South

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Pass Pass 5 41

4Q 5Q All Pas s

Youhold: 4a 1084 3 Q K 98 06 4 A 10 9 7 2 . Your partner Opening lead — Q A opens one diamond, and the next player doubles. What do you say? (C) 2013 Tribune Media Services, lnc.

K A N S A

Seeking a friendly duplicate bridge? Find five gamesweekly at www.bendbridge.org. BIZARRO

N E T L O S S E S

Crosswords for young solvers: nylimes.com/learning/xwords.

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Discussion group Today's deal caused a "discussion" at my club. South's five spades looked safe, but when he led a trump to dummy at the second trick, West discarded. South drew trumps and led the king of clubs, and East took his ace and returned a heart. South ruffed with his last trump, took the ace of diamonds and the Q-J of clubs, and led another diamond. The king won his last trick; West won the last two tricks with the queen of diamonds and a heart.

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD Will Sh ortZ

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SIX CHIX

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Ao Rights Reserved.

CANET

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ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:

B I S O D E E RA B O X D A L I S T door 10 Dramatic E E A T E R ballroom dance MS D O 11 Designate, as a F U N G I seat O N E A U N B 12 Hot dog 13 Oater transports I DO N T R E A 18 Lav in Leeds L 0 N G E S T D 22 "Ouch!" relative, in S E A T response to a pun A C C T S V N 24 Train tracks 25 Noisy shorebird H A H A H A A 26 Left hanging O S I R I S D 27 Tiger's foot R E M A R K A 28 Untruth A D E P T S L 32 Sorento automaker xwordeditor@aol.com 9 Small, raised porch in front of a

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53 Harrison Ford's "Star Wars" role 44 4 5 46 54 Dispenser of theater programs 57 Pastasuff ix 58 WANTED: Merry 53 monarch, for 57 smoke pollution with his pipe 62 Mythical giant bird 62 63 Takes care Df 64 Charity donations 65 65 "For shame!" By Peter Koeiiers 66 Came next

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(c)2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

67

03/04/13


TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED• 541-385-5809

Antique & Classic Autos

Antique & Classic Autos

Chrysler SD 4-Door 1930, CD S R oyal Standard, B-cylinder, body is good, needs GMC V~ton 1971, Only some r e s toration, $19,700! Original low mile, exceptional, 3rd runs, taking bids, owner. 951-699-7171 541-383-3888, 541-815-3318

FIAT 1800 1978, 5-spd, door panels w/flowers & hummingbirds, white soft top & hard

top. Just reduced to

$3,750. 541-317-9319 or 541-647-8483

Ford Galaxie 500 1963, 2 dr. hardtop,fastback, 390 v8,auto, pwr. steer & radio (orig),541-419-4989 Ford Mustang Coupe 1966, original owner, V8, automatic, great shape, $9000 OBO. 530-515-8199 Call The Bulletin At 541 -385-5809 Place Your Ad Or E-Mail At: www.bendbunetin.com

Ford Ranchero 1979 with 351 Cleveland modified engine. Body is in excellent condition,

$2500 obo.

541-420-4677

THE BULLETIN•MONDAY, MARCH 4 2013 Pickups

935

940

975

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Vans

Automobiles

Buick Enclave CX 2010 Chevy Sil v erado AWD, incl factory war96 Ford Windstar & 2000, 1/2 ton, V-8, r anty, like new, 3 1 K 2000 Nissan Quest, 8' box, bed liner, std miles, white e x terior/ both 7-passenger cab, auto, 4x4, 54k beige interior, seats 7, vans, 160K miles, mi., e xc . co n d., factory loaded + extras. low prices, $1200 & $9000. $2900, and worth Excellent cond, always 541-977-6653 garaged. You will be 2nd every cent! owner of t his beauty! 541-318-9999 $31,500. 541-312-2393

Chevy Astro Cargo Van 2001, pw, pdl, great cond., business car, well

C5

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Chevy Aveo LT 2010, Hyundai Sonata 2012, low miles, very clean. very low miles, power Vin ¹129701. windows, power locks $9988. and cruise. Vin ¹321163.

+IBN5n SUBARU.

$15999

9UBRRUOI BRND COM

©

) SUBA R U .

Mercedes Benz CLK Toyota Corola 2011, 320 Coupe, 1999. sun- Keyless entry, cruise roof, dark blue with and tilt. grey leather, chrome Vin ¹630707. rims, o rig. o w ner, $13988 104k, exc. cond, very c lean. $5,50 0 . S UBA R U

SUBRRUOPBSND COM 541-306-0499 2060 NE Hwy 20, Bend. 9UBBRUOIBRND COM 2060 NE Hwy 20, Bend. 877-266-3821 2060 NE Hwy 20, Bend. 877-266-3821 Mercedes E-class E430, Dlr ¹0354 877-266-3821 Dlr ¹0354 2002, AWD 4-dr sedan, Dlr ¹0354 Special Edition, $15,000 obo. Call 12-5pm (Iv Toyota Corolla 2004, auto., loaded, 2 04k Need help fixing stuff? msg), 541-350-0215

Dodge R a m 2500 maint'd, regular oil 2005, Quad Cab SLT Chevy Tahoe 1999, 4x4, changes, $4500. 4X4, very nice. Jeep Comanche, 1990, most options, new paint Please call original owner, 167K, Vin ¹716973. & tires, 159K mi., $4250. 541-633-5149 $17888 4WD, 5-spd, tags good Call 541-233-8944 miles. orig. owner, non Call A Service Professional till 9/2015, $3900 obo. smoker, exc. c o nd. Qgjj S UB A R U . find the help you need. 541-633-7761 F ord F reestyle S E L Chevy Lumina 1 9 95 BUBBRUOPBRNDCOM $6500 Prin e ville www.bendbunetin.com 503-358-8241 2060 NE Hwy 20, Bend. 2006, V6, AWD, AT, AC, 7 -pass. v a n wit h Chrysler Sebring 2004 front & side airbags, 25 p ower c h a i r lif t , 84k, beautiful dark gray/ 877-266-3821 mpg, 3rd row seating, $1500; 1989 Dodge brown, tan leather int., Dlr ¹0354 pwr Ithr seats, multi-CD, Turbo Va n 7 - pass.$5995 541-350-5373 traction control, new tires has new motor and Nissan Sentra 2012 & brks, maintained ex- t rans., $1500. I f i n Full warranty, 35mpg, t remely well, runs & terested c a l l Ja y 520 per tank, all power. drives exlnt,148K hwy mi, 503-269-1057. $13,500. 541-788-0427 Plymouth B a r racuda $6700. 541-604-4166 Volkswagen Jetta SE Hyundai Elantra Lmtd 1966, original car! 300 Sedan 2011, Power hp, 360 V8, center- Ford 250 XLT 1990, 2012, very clean, satThe Bulletin 975 window, power lock, lines, (Original 273 ellite radio, bluetooth, To Subscribe call Automobiles 6 yd. dump bed, "My Little Red Corvette" tilt and cruise. navigation. eng & wheels incl.) 541-385-5800 or go to 139k, Auto, $4500. 1996 coupe. 132K, Vin ¹369761. $14888 541-593-2597 Vin ¹271938. $20488 541-410-9997 www.bendbulletin.com 26-34 mpg. 350 auto. B ARU. 4 tiiI S U B A R U $12,500 541-923-1781 4j+ SU SUBBRUOPBRND COM PROJECT CARS: Chevy 2060 NE Hwy 20, Bend. 2060 NE Hwy 20, Bend. 2-dr FB 1949-(SOLD) & Honda CRV 2004, 877-266-3821 Chevy Coupe 1950 $10,495. 877-266-3821 Dlr ¹0354 rolling chassis's $1750 International Dlr ¹0354 Fla t Call 541-610-6150 or see BMW 740 IL 1998 orig. http://bend.craigslist.org ea., Chevy 4-dr 1949, Bed Pickup 1963, 1 owner, exc. c o n d. /cto/3617273265.html complete car, $ 1949; ton dually, 4 s pd. 101k miles, new tires, Take care of Cadillac Series 61 1950, trans., great MPG, Nissan Versa S 2011, loaded, sunroof. 2 dr. hard top, complete could be exc. wood Ford Taurus wagon 2004 your investments $8900. 541-706-1897 very nice, pwr everything Power eve r ything, w/spare f r on t cl i p ., hauler, runs great, Noe> &zr! Hyundai Sonata 2007 very clean. with the help from $3950, 541-382-7391 120K, FWD, good tires new brakes, $1950. ~oo G LS, 64,700 miles, Vin ¹397958. The Bunetin's 541-419-5480. MorePixattle t nrtt)otletincom $4900 obo. 541-815-9939 excellent cond, good $11788 Subaru wagon tires, non-smoker, 933 "Call A Service 1991 Loyale 4x4, new tags, $9500. BMW X5 2005 3.0i 4tmIneI' SUBARU. Pickups 5-spd, updates, Professional" Directory 541-280-7352 dark green, 61k miles. $1950 obo. 2060 NE Hwy 20, Bend. ¹Y09270 $17,995. Chevrolet Sil v erado 541-420-3277 877-266-3821 2001 4WD Reg. Cab. Dlr ¹0354 2 500HD A .C , T o w Honda CR-Z EX coupe package, Glass Tite Oregon T oyota Avalon X L S , 4Ru n ner 2011, Hybrid VTEC, canopy, clean and re- RAM 2500 2003, 5.7L Toyota AutnSource 2005, an XLS options CVT trans, low miles. l iable, 167,300 m i , hemi V8, hd, auto, cruise, 1 993, blue, 4 d r . , 541-598-3750 including n avigation. Vin ¹010255. $5150. 541-480-4136 am/fm/cd. $8400 obro. 4WD, V6, 5 speed, aaaoregonautosource.com $14,200. 541-548-1601 Volkswagen Jetta SE 541-420-3634 /390-1285 t ow pkg., plus 4 $16788 Hyundai Sonata 2012, studs tires on rims, Sedan 2012, auto 6 S UBA RU. very low miles, power r uns g reat. W a s speed w/sport shift, Chevy 3/4 ton 4x4 BUBBBUOPBRNDCOM Buick LeSabre 2004, ltaRIK RFOU C F O / windows, power door Toyota Camryst $ 5500, no w o n l y 23k miles. 1971 new trans, 2 30 mpg, 75k, heated 2060 NE Hwy 20, Bend. locks and cruise. 1984, SOLD; Vin ¹072251. new t i r es , ne w Toyota 4x 4 Pi c kup, $4000.541-659-1416 seats, nice wheels, 877-266-3821 Vin ¹ 322715. $15,999. 1985 SOLD; $15988 brakes, 2nd owner, 1983, 8000-Ib Warn a utomatic, whi t e , Dlr ¹0354 1986 parts car r uns/drives g o o d. winch, 2 sets of tire leather, Almost like @gik SUBARU. ~ S U BA R U . TURN THE PAGE Look at: only one left! $500 Make good wood new of course! Bring chains, canopy, 22R 2060 NE Hwy 20, Bend. truck. $1995 OBO Bendhomas.com motor, 5-spd transFor More Ads $6000 and it's yours. Call for details, 2060 NE Hwy 20, Bend. 877-266-3821 541-350-2859 541-508-9133. 877-266-3821 mission, $1795 obo. for Complete Listings of 541-548-6592 The Bulletin Dlr ¹0354 541-350-2859 Dlr ¹0354 Area Real Estate for Sale

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eng, power everything, new paint, 54K original miles, runs great, excenent condition in & out. Asking $8,500. 541-480-3179

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County Clerk of Des(ORS Chapter 475). Associates Architects, c hutes County o n IN THE MATTER OF: 760 NW York Drive February 28, 2 0 13. U.S. Currency in the ¹200, Bend, Oregon, The ballot title capamount of $2,165.60, 97701. Prime Bidder/ tion is: Bonds for New Case No. General Contractors Schools, Safety Im12-03-00245 s e ized may purchase sets for Sealed p r oposals provements, C l ass1/10/2012 from John the cost of reproducCAPTION: Bonds for must be received by room Re n ovations Tyler Ryan, Zachary tion and delivery from t he Office o f t h e A mandatory pre-bid New Schools, Safety and Preservation. R yan a n d Dia n a Central Oregon BuildRisk Manager not meeting and site walk Improvements, An elector may file Chambers. ers Exchange will be held March 12, Classroom R enova- petition for review of later than 2:00 p.m., (COBE), located at LEGAL NOTICE LEGAL NOTICE Proposals Due by tions and Preservation F riday March 2 2 , 2 013 at 1:00 PM at this ballot title in the 1902 NE 4t h S t reet Public Auction INVITATION TO BID2:00 p.m., Friday, 2013, addressed to WWID offices. Al l Deschutes Co u n ty Bend, O R 97 7 0 1. Auction will be WWID Seaborn Sh a n Circuit Court no later Public March 22, 2013 D ebbie Lasz l o , general c o ntractors Q UESTION: held on Saturday April Bidding D o cuments Reservoir No. 1 Benefits/Risk Manintending to bid are Bend-La Pine Schools than 5:00 p.m., March 6, will be available for 2013 at 11:00 a.m. Notice i s h e r eby ager, 1 45 SE required to attend and build schools, reno11, 2013. examination d u r ing at Old Mill Self StorSealed bids for congiven that C r ook Salmon Ave Redsign in as proof of at- vate classrooms, and age, 150 SW Indus- the bidding period at struction of W W I D County School Dismond O R 9 7 756. tendance in order to improve safety by isNancy Blankenship the following Builders trial Way, Bend, OrSeaborn Reservoir trict (District) is resuing $96 million in The outside of the be recognized as a Deschutes County Exchanges and Plan egon 97702. (Unit ¹ No.1, will be received questing proposals e nvelopes shal l Bidder o f Re c o rd. general obl i gation Clerk Centers: 335). until 2:00 PM l o cal Contract D o cument bonds? If the bonds for a n I n s urance plainly identify the Daily Journal of Agent of Record for "Crook time at the office of A ddendum w il l b e are approved, they LEGAL NOTICE project: Commerce Plan Center Water Wonderland distributed only to at- will be payable from Risk Management Sealed bids for con- 921 S.W. Washington County School Disand Insurance BroLEGAL NOTICE struction of the Centrict Insu r a nce I mprovement D i s - tendees of the pre-bid taxes on property or St., Suite 210 kerage Consulting tral Oregon Commu- Portland, OR 97205 Agent of R e c o rd trict (WWID), 17153 meeting and site walk. property o w nership NOTICE OF SEIZURE B Services. The DisCrane Drive, Bend, FOR CIVIL nity College Tel: (503) 274-0624 RFP. Facsimile Any bid received from that are not subject to Oregon 9 7 707on a bidder not in atten- the limits of sections FORFEITURE TO ALL trict desires to enter Grandview Hall Reproposals will not be www.dic-or.com into a professional March 26, 2013. Bids 11 and 11b, Article XI POTENTIAL modelPhase II will accepted. P roposdance at the pre-bid Central Oregon services agreement will be r eceived by of the Oregon ConCLAIMANTS AND TO be received by Rick als received after meeting and site walk Builder's Exchange with a qualified firm Leslie Graff, Adminis- will be deemed unre- stitution. ALL UNKNOWN the designated time Hayes, Construction 1902 N.E 4th Street that ca n d e mon- and date will be ret rator. At 2 0 0 P M , sponsive and disrePERSONS READ THIS Project Manager, at Bend, OR 97701 strate competency March 26, 2103 bids garded for award. S UMMARY: I f a p CAREFULLY the Campus Center turned unopened. Tel: (541) 389-0123 and experience in will be publ i c ly proved, this measure Building, Room 116, www.plansonfile.com opened and r e ad. Contract Documents would provide funds If you have any inter- 2600 N W Co l lege Eugene Builder's providing Risk ManThe District may reagement and InsurE ach b idder m u s t may be examined at for capital costs and est i n t h e s e i zed Way, B e nd , OR ject any p roposal Exchange ance Bro k erage not in c o mpliance s ubmit a F i rst T i er WWID offices, con- bond issuance costs, property 97701 until 2 :00pm 2460 W. 11th Avenue d e s cribed Consulting Services. Subcontractor Discloincluding: below, you must claim local time, March 21, with all prescribed t act L e s li e Gr a f f, Eugene, OR 97402 The initial term of sure list by 4:00 PM * Additional Neighbor- that interest or you will 2013 and then pubsolicitation p r oce541-593-2902. C o nTel: (541) 484-5331 the insurance conthat same day. The dures and requiretract Documents may hood Schools in High automatically lose that licly opened and read www.ebe.org tract shall be for a list may be submitted b e p u r chased a t Growth Areas: Coninterest. If you do not aloud. Bids received m ents an d o t h er Salem Contractor's p eriod o f thr e e with the sealed bid at after thus time will not applicable law, and WWID offices upon struct, including site file a c laim for t he Exchange the bidder's prefer- p ayment t o W W I D i mprovements a n d property, the property be accepted. years, commencing may reject any or an 2256 Judson Street S.E. July 1, 2013. T he ence. Label bids; Bidmay be forfeited even Briefly, the Work is proposals in whole (check or cash) of $30 land purchase, furSalem, OR 97302 contract shall be reWWID Seaborn Res- for each set. Return of nish and equip one if you are not con- described as follows: Tel: (503) 362-7957 or in part when the newable by mutual ervoir No. 1. elementary and one victed of any crime. Demolish exi s ting cancellation or r e documents is not rewww.sceonlline.org consent on an anjection is in the best quired. Amount paid middle school to meet To claim an interest, kitchen and servery Medford Builder's nual basis thereafinterest of the DisThe Work i n cludes f or d o cuments i s current an d a n t ici- you must file a written and renovate area to Exchange ter for no more than earthwork, yard piptrict, and at no cost n on-refundable. F o r pated capacity chal- claim with the forfei- faculty offices, work305 North Bartlett two additional years, ing, tank fabrication, information regarding lenges. ture counsel named room, and reception Medford, OR 97501 to the District. for a maximum conand tank erection for a the W o rk, c o ntact * Classroom Addi- below, Th e w r itten area. F ood service Tel: (541) 773-5327 t ract term o f f i v e D ATED THIS 4 t h 120,000-gal. b o l ted David claim must be signed equipment and www.medfordbuilders.com Prun, tions/Renovations: steel potable water Many cla s srooms by you, sworn to un- counters have been Oregon Contractor years. DAY OF M A R CH 541-728-7092. tank in accord with were constructed deder penalty of perjury removed though a Plan Center 2013 The scope of work Specifications, Draw- WWID reserves the cades ago. Renovate, before a notary public, large hood remains. 14625 SE 82nd Drive for the r e quested Debbie Laszlo ings, Shop Drawings, right to reject an or equip a n d fu r nish and state: (a) Your Demolish exi s ting Clackamas, OR 97015 services i n c ludes Reservoir Tank and bathrooms and renoa ny bids n o t c o n - classrooms, including, true name; (b) The Tel: (503) 650-0148 the following: Footing Design sub- forming to the intent of but not limited to, Sci- address at which you vate to ADA compli- www.orcontractor.com Debbie Laszlo mittal, and p e rmits. the Contract Docu- ence, T e c hnology, will a c cept f u t ure ant bathrooms and Regional Benefits / • "Provide assisThe Work includes all ments, or public con- Engineering, Arts and m ailings f ro m th e lactation/commute No bid will considered Risk Manager tance with the anlabor, equipment, and tracting procedures or Mathematics. court and f o rfeiture options cha n ging/ unless fully completed * nual renewal specimaterials necessary Safety Improvecounsel; and (3) A s hower room. R e in manner provided in requirements includPublish: fications for to provide a complete ing bidders require- ments: Make health s tatement that y o u move and replace the the Bid form provided Central Oregonianproperty, l i a b ility, and operational water ment to demonstrate and safety upgrades have an interest in the multi-zone a i r -han- in these specifications Tuesday, workers' compensatank ready for use. responsibility u n d er including, but not lim- seized property. Your dling unit and provide and accompanied by March 5, 2013 tion, and crime covWWID estimates the ORS 279C.375(3)(b). ited to, fire sprinklers, deadline for filing the condensing units and certified check or bid Bend Bulletinerage insurance; cost of the Work at security systems and claim document with coils for two zones. b ond e x ecuted i n WWID reserves the March 4, 2013 $275,000. right to reject an bids if entrance r e d esign. forfeiture cou n s el Some asbestos con- f avor of O w ner i n Daily Journal of • "Present the antaining mate r ials amount not less than award of a contract is Add fencing and make n amed below is 2 1 Commercenual Risk ManageThis P ublic W o rks safety improvements days from the last day abatement i s in- ten (10) percent of not in the interest of March 4, 2013 ment report to DisContract is subject to WWID. to physical education of publication of this cluded in the prolect. total amount of bid. trict Representatives O regon BOLI P r e spaces incl u ding notice. Where to file A MANDATORY pre- Said certified check or and/or School Board vailing Wage Rates A Notice of Intent to gyms, p l aygrounds a claim and for more bid conference and b id bond s hall b e and attend School LEGAL NOTICE effective January 1, fields. i nformation: Da i n a project site-visit will be forfeited as fixed and A ward will b e p r o- and Board mee t ings IN T H E CIR C U IT 2013 (ORS279C.800Vitolins, Crook County held on M arch 12, liquidated d amages vided to responsible * Maintenance and u pon D istrict r e COURT O F T HE 279C.870). A bid will District Attorney Of2 013, 2PM, a t t h e should bidder neglect bidders w i thin (7) Preservation at ExistSTATE OF OREGON not b e co n sidered i ng Buildings: R e quest;and days of bid opening. fice, 300 N E T h i rd project loca t i on: or refuse to enter into FOR THE COUNTY unless it contains a Grandview Building, Contract and provide Protest of bid results place leaking roofs Street, Prineville, OR • "Assist District staff OF DES C H UTES s tatement that t h e and Intent to Award and windows, and up- 97754. upper east entrance, suitable b o n d for with the d e velop- Probate Department, bidder will comply with must be in writing, by grade heating, ventiNotice of reasons for 2600 N W Co l lege faithful performance of ment of standard inIn the Matter of the ORS 279C.840. Each Forfeiture: The prop- Way, B e nd , OR Work in event a bidder in good legal lation, electrical, and surance language Estate of EDWIN J. bid m u s t id e n tify standing, specific, and plumbing systems, as erty described below 97701. Contract is awarded and hold harmless R ICHARDSON, D e whether the bidder is well as energy saving was seized for forfei- The purpose will be to to him. r eceived within ( 7 ) provisions for conc eased, Case N o . a Resident Bidder as ture because it: (1) answer any questions T he C o llege m a y business days of the projects. tracts and a g ree13PB0017. NOTICE defined in ORS date of issue of the Bonds would mature Constitutes the p robidders may have, re- reject any bid not in ments. TO INT E RESTED 279A.120. Bi d d ers Intent to Award. The in 25 years or less. ceeds of the violation v iew the s cope of c ompliance with a l l PERSONS. NOTICE must be licensed with protest envelope, ad- Estimated f i r st-year of, solicitation to vio- work, tour the s ite, p rescribed pub l i c T he R equest f o r IS HEREBY GIVEN the Oregon Construc- d ressed t o W W I D, c ost i s $ 0 .2 6 p e r late, attempt to vio- and to consider any contract p rocedures P roposals can b e that the undersigned tion Contr a ctors must reference the bid $1000 of a s sessed late, or conspiracy to suggestions Bidders and requirements and d ownloaded f r o m has been appointed Board (ORS 701.055). title. value. Based on this violates, the criminal wish to m ake. Any may reject for good www.crookcounty.k estimate, the bond tax laws of the State of statements made by cause an bids upon a personal representa- Bidders must provide 12.or.us. I t i s imtive. All persons hav- evidence of success- Water finding of the agency W o n derland rate for 2013-14 is not Oregon regarding the the College's repreing claims against the ful completion of (3) expected to increase manufacture, distribusentatives at the visit that it is in the public perative that those Improvement District, who download the estate are required to similar projects within February 25, 2013 from the 2012-13 rate tion, or possession of will not be considered interest to do so. The s olicitation do c u due to the retirement controlled substances binding upon the Col- College reserves the p resent them, w i t h the past 15 years. If m ents check t h e vouchers attached, to these q u a lifications LEGAL NOTICE of existing debt. (ORS C h apter475); l ege u n less c o n - right to waive any and Web site regularly the undersigned per- are not a d equately Notice of District and/or (2) Was used firmed by written adall minor informalities for addenda, clarifisonal representative supported by bidder's Measure Election Nancy Blankenship or intended for use in dendum. The or clerical errors as cations, and other a t 7 4 7 SW MIL L submittal documenta- Administrative School Deschutes County committing or f acili- conference is held for described i n OA R n otifications tha t VIEW WAY, BEND, tion, the r e spective District No. 1 Clerk tating the violation of, the benefit of the bid137-049-0350. No may be pertinent. In OR 97702, within four bid will be d eemed solicitation to violate, dels. bidder may withdraw addition, a ddenda months after the date unresponsive and Notice is hereby given Notice of Receipt Of attempt to violate, or For the project, lump his bid after the hour will be mailed or deof first publication of disregarded for that on Tuesday, May Ballot Title conspiracy to violate sum bid will be reset for opening until l ivered to al l w h o t his notice, o r t h e award. 21, 2013, a measure Notice is hereby given the criminal laws of ceived on forms pro- after a lapse of thirty are known by Crook claims may be barred. election will be held in that a ballot title for a the State of Oregon vided in these specifi- (30) days from the bid County School DisAll persons whose Bids must be submit- Administrative School measure referred by regarding the manu- cations. opening. This project t rict t o h a v e r e r ights may b e a f - ted o n pr e scribed District No. 1 located Administrative School facture, distribution or Bidding documents for is subject to prevailing ceived a complete f ected by t h e p r o - forms and in accord in Deschutes County, District No . 1 has p ossession of c o n- the work are those w age laws an d i s set of the Proposal ceedings may obtain with the Instructions to Oregon. The follow- b een filed with t h e trolled sub s tances prepared by S teele subject t o Or e g on

LEGAL NOTICE CROOK COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT PRINEVILLE, OREGON REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS (RFP) INSURANCE AGENT OF RECORD

Documents. Please call (541) 923-8249 to be added to the Interested Proposer's list.

additional information from the records of the court, the p ersonal representative, DANIEL C. RE. Dated and first published on March 4, 2013. S TEPHEN L. C A L LAN, Personal Representative.

Bidders. Bids must be accompanied by a Bid Bond, or a c e rtified c heck p a yable t o WWID, in an amount not less than 10% of the amount bid.

ing shan be the ballot title of the measure to be submitted to the district's voters on this date:

Revised St at u t es (ORS) 279C.800-870

dealing with payment of prevailing wages. No b i d wi l l be received or c onsidered by t h e College unless the bid contains a statement by the b i dder t h at O RS 279C.838 o r 279C.840 w i l l be complied with. This project is subject to O RS 279C. 3 7 0 dealing with disclosure of first-tier subcontractors, 2 79A.120 givin g preference to resident bidders, 279 A .125 giving preference to recycled m a t e rials and 279A.110 discrimination in subcontracting. Central Oregon Community College Matthew J. McCoy, Vice President for Administration P U BLI CATION AND DATES: Bend Bulletin, Bend, OR Daily Journal of Commerce, Portland, OR Advertisement: March 4, 2013 Mandatory Site Walk: March 12, 2013 at 2:00 PM

Call a Pro Whether you need a fence fixed,hedges trimmed or a house built, you'll find professional help in The Bulletin's "Call a Service Professional" Directory

541-385-5809 PUBLIC NOTICE The Bend Park & Recreation District Board of Directors will meet in a work session and regular bus i ness meeting on Tuesday, March 5, 2013, at the D istrict Office, 7 9 9 SW Columbia, Bend, O regon. The w o r k session will begin at 5:30 p.m. a t w h ich time the board will receive a staff report on an indoor recreation facility vision, a presentation of the draft senior center expansion master plan, and review a board self-assessment process. The board will meet in a re g u lar business meeting beginning at 7:00 p.m. to consider the contract award for the Big Sky Park a c c es s im provements. The board will meet in executive session immediately f o l lowing the business session pursuant t o ORS 192.660(i) for the purpose of c o nducting performance evaluations of public officers and employees. The March 5, 2013, agenda and meeting report is posted on the District's webs i te: www.bendparksandrec.org. For m o re information call 541-389-7275.


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Special $2 discount coupons available at Baxter Auto Parts stores, Les Schwab Tire Centers, Bi-Mart Stores and online:

www.thesportshows.com. Or show your Fred Meyer Rewards Card at admissions to receive a $2 discount Thursday and Friday and a $1discount Saturday and Sunday. Discounts maynot be combined.

REDMOND, Ore. T h e Central Oregon Sportsmen's most extensive resources on fishing and boating, shooting R returns to the Deschutes County sports, hunting, camping and much more. Show h Boat/RV ShowO Fair 8r Expo Center in 2013 with more gear and more fun Grab the latest gear. Browse boats, campers and tent for outdoor sports enthusiasts of all ages, gear fanatics trailers. Discover top-notch camping and backpacking and families! Now in its 14th year, this exciting Central equipment, optics, outdoor clothing and vacation packOregon tradition is a one-of-a-kind opportunity to discover ages. Plus, enjoy fabulous features such as the exciting ancutting-edge sporting and outdoor equipment, get the hest nual Head and Horns Competition, the much-loved Kids' information and to meet the industry's most renowned Trout Pond, the Fresh Water Demo Tank and the popular experts — all in one place. Plus, it's a boat show and RV Camp Cooking Demonstrations. Hundreds of vendors and top local and national outsale, offering everything from the latest watercraft and fishing boats to tent trailers and motor homes. There is door experts will fill Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center truly something for everyone at the 2013 Central Oregon from wall-to-wall with the best in outdoor tools, tips and Sportsmen's Show! gadgets. Enjoy free demonstrations, seminars and interacThe Central Oregon Sportsmen's Show is Central tive displays and the most up-to-date information for outOregon's only big outdoor adventure show, featuring the door enthusiasts of every kind. Continued on Page 4

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Hooker Creek Event Center & Deschutes Fair & Expo Center j 3


Plus, connect with guides and outfitters from exciting locations throughout the Northwest and

the second largest mountain lion ever taken in Oregon, a life sized black bear and a life sized grey wolf, along with the world record bison, and more. Don't miss it!

around the world. Here aresome of the displays and showcases sched-

Trout Fishing Pond: The Kids' Trout Fishing

uled for this year's show:

Pond is one of the show's most popular attractions and it's completely FREE, courtesy of Baxter Auto Parts. For-

Fred Meyer CampCooking Demonstrations: Celebrated outdoor cooking experts Herb Good, Tiffany

getthose frigid March temperatures and come indoors to the Central Oregon Sportsmen's Show where kids ages 12 and under can try a hand at catching a live trout to

Haugen and Mark Schneider will offer a wealth of captivating and informative Camp Cooking Demonstrations,

sponsored by Fred Meyer, Franz and Camp Chef. Learn

trucks, ATVs and accessories.

Casting Pool and Fly-Tying Theater: Are you ready to take your interest in fishing to the next level? Then come over to the casting pool and fly-tying theater for some personal instruction. Flyfishing is a lifelong pursuit and can be learned at any age. The experts will show you how.

Free SeminarS: Dozens ofexperts will be onsite offering hundreds of hours of tips and advice on topics such as elk bugling, many types of fishing, horse and mule

keep or release.

how to cook everything from starters and main courses, to deserts, family favorites and more!

packing and much more! Find a complete list of seminars

Boat Show: The Central Oregon Sportsmen's Show and demos at http://www.thesportshows.com/coss. is also the area's premier boat show. Your Sportsmen's

Fresh Water Demo Tank: BI-Mart presents the Show admission provides full access to the Boat show.

30-foot-long, 3,000-gallon Fresh Water Demo Tank! Seasoned experts share their knowledge of the Northwest's best fresh water fishing opportunities and the latest techniques. Expert anglers demonstrate fishing strategies and techniques in hourly "through-the-glass" presentations.

Make your best deal on personal watercraft, ski, wakeboard and fishing boats, kayaks, canoes, plus a huge selection of accessories, fishing gear and more.

RV Show: The first RV show of the season rolls into Deschutes County Fair R Expo Center as part of the Central Oregon Sportsmen's Show. Shop and compare ahuge selection of new and pre-owned RV's in one place, saving you time and money. Local dealers, providing local service will be on hand with the best prices on cargo trailers,

Head R Horns Competition: Bring head, horns and antlers to the show to vie for records and valuable prizes at the highly anticipated Head 5 Horns Competition. In addition to the competition, catch Northwest Big Game Inc.'s brand new display. "Big Predators of Oregon," featuring Oregon's biggest predators, including

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Become a CampCooking Expert at the CENTRAL OREGONSPORTSMEN'S SHOW Take your camp cooking to the next level with the most delicious recipes plus the latest tips, tools and tricks presented by the camp chefs of the Central Oregon Sportsmen's Showa

from boiling water to preparing delicious salmon. Famous for tips on how to improvise in the great outdoors, Herb will employ the latest in propane stoves such as the one, two

Skilled chefs and experts Herb Good, Tiffany Haugen and and three-burner (pro) models from Camp Chef. Mark Schneider will lead daily cooking demos designed for aspiring campfire chefs and grilling gurus alike at the Fred TIFFANY HAUGEN - Plank Meyer Camp Cooking Demonstrations, sponsored Franz and Camp Chef.

Cooking; Cooking Fish 8E Game

CAMP COOKINGEXPERTS

Following the release of her 10th cookbook, Cooking Game Birds, Oregon-based author and

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subsistence lifestyle guru Tiffany H augen will share tips and recipea on tnming a variety of game animals in to delicious meals, including the coveted techniques

Herb Good has been a guide

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Oven Cooking MadeEasy This camp cooking expert has 15 years experience wielding the mighty Dutch oven and he's making his debut appearance at the 2013 show with a variety of informative and fun daily seminars. Mark's sessions include Dutch Oven Cuisine for Beginners, Family Fun Recipe Ideas, Dutch Oven Breakfast and even Dutch Oven Tailgate Cuisine! If Mark's name sounds familiar to Southern Oregonians, it's because heheads up the Crooked River Ranch Dutch Oven Society.

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behind plank cooking. Tiffany is

and outfitter for more than 30

the author of nine cookbooks, four of which relate to the subsistence lifestyle including, Smoked Salmon Recipes tk

years. This perennial camp cooking favorite returns to the Show to demonstrate the basics and beyond — everything

Daily seminar schedules areincludedin this special section on pages 1Z-13 or visit

Tips, Grill It! Plank It! Wrap It! Smoke It! and Cooking Big Game.

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The West'sPremier Headtk HornsCompetition Returns to the Central Oregon Sportsmen'sShovvo of harvest: rifle, archery and black powder. The top past entries for each of the big Do you have a trophy in hiding? The game categories will be on display through-

Calling all hunting enthusiasts! Central Oregon Sportsmen's Show invites

you to bring heads, horns and antlers to the Deschutes County Fair h Expo Center, March 7-10 to vie for records and prizes at the highly anticipated Head R Horns competition. Attracting more than 300 new entries every year, hunters can bring in their heads and horns for scoring. Horns must be attached to the skull, found within the states of Oregon, Idaho, Washington or Montana,

and killed under fair chase conditions. Prizesare awarded in two separate categories: "past harvest" for those taken prior to 2011 and "current harvest" for those taken during the 2012 hunting season. Prizes are awarded for all three methods

Sportsmen's Specials

out the show. Official entry deadline for the competition is 6:00 pm, Saturday, March 9. The winning entries will be on display at the show on Sunday, March 10. The grand prize winner will be selected from the 2013 Washington, Pacific Northwest and Central Oregon Sportsmen's Shows and will receive a brand new Fort Knox Protector Safe Model 6031! Additional prizes

will be awarded at each show by ATK Federal Premium, Bushnell, LimbSaver, Fort Knox Safes, Midland and Ruger. In addition to the competition, Northwest Big Game Inc. will have copies of the much-anticipated fifth edition of the Record Book for Oregon: Big Game Animals as well as a brand new display. "Big Predators

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WELCOME TGREDMOND! 2013 Central Oregon Sportsmen's Show Participants:

of Oregon"features Oregon's biggest preda-

Welcome to Redmond! Once again, we are pleased to welcome you to the Deschutes

tors, including the second largest mountain lion ever taken in Oregon, a life sized black bear and a life sized grey wolf, along with the world record bison, and more. Don't miss it!

County Fairgrounds andtheregion's biggest sportsmen's show. Central Oregon is known for the number of outdoor activities that are available here such as camping, hiking, hunting, fishing, rock and mountain climbing, and boating. All of these contribute to the economy of the entire region, and the Central Oregon Sportsmen's Show is important in that vendors and visitors come from the area and, in some cases, from around the world to participate. There is something here for every oudoor enthusiast.

Do you have a trophy in hiding? The Central Oregon Sportsmen's Show invites you to bring heads, horns and antlers to the Deschutes County Fair R Expo Center to vie for records and prizes at the highly anticipated Head R Horns competition.

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amazed at themany waysgame andother meatscan beprepared. In closing, I wish to once again welcome you to the 2013 Central Oregon Sportsmen's Show. Enjoy yourself and take advantage of the amenities offered both at the show and the surrounding area.

Sincerely,

George Endicott, Mayor — City of Redmond

I N IN I N V E N T OI RY! VER 4 M I L L I O

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I have attended the Sportsmen's Show several times myself. The variety of exhibits, guides, vendors and acti)dties make for an exciting time. I personally like the game trophyexhibits, even if I will never have an animal on display. It is always interesting to see the new equipment available and on display. I even purchased an RVone year as a result of seeing a special one at the show. I always find the food excellent and am

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Experiencethe high-flyingX-TremeAirDogscompetition atthe2013Central OregonSportsmen'sShow! Catch the high flying X-Treme AirDogs competition, featuring three exhilarating sports for experienced dogs as well

high jump; and X-Treme Retrieve, a race against time for the bumper.

as the Give It A Try™ program, which brings new competi-

Competitions include four divisions: Novice, including Give it a Try jumping between 0 and 10 feet; Amateur, jumping 10 to 15 feet; Semi-Pro, jumping 15 to 20 feet; and Pro, dogs jumping over 20 feet, including some dogs who jump

tors into the sport. This electrifying and entertaining sport for spectators and participants alike showcases man's best friends show-

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ing off their high flying jumping skills as they launch into upwards of 27 feet! a massive swimming pool at high speeds. Awards will be given per competitor, including trophies Spectators will have the opportunity to cheer on all levels of in Novice, Amateur, and Semi-pro divisions, and cash prizes teams, from new to experienced, as they splash down into the for the Pro division. swimming pool as well as participate with their own dogs. World-class competitors and dogs from around North Each day of the show will feature various competitions, America will be in Redmond to compete during the show, training and demo sessions, ensuring there's never a dull however, this exciting feature is not just for the pros. Xmoment. Daily activities include three sports: X-Treme Air, Treme Air's Give it a Try program is designed for everyone.

a long jump for dogs; X-Treme Vertical, a last-dog-standing

Dog ownersseven years of age or older are invited to

bring any dog over the age of six months that loves the water

and enjoys playing fetch regardlessofbreed,size,shape or ability. All dogs are welcome, and those new to the sport can introduce their dogs to this fast- growing sport and get tips on coaching and encouraging their pooches from XTreme AirDogs staff.

Mike Allen, who heads up this exciting feature, encourages those who want to give it a try to come early on Thursday and Friday for the best chance to get in on the action. Saturday and Sunday will be jam packed with competition, though there will be a few times available for the amateurs. For more info an d competition schedules, check

www.thesportsshows.com/coss or

w w w.facebook.com/

x.tremeairdogs.northwest.challenge. Cost to participate is $20 per wave for Amateur, Pro and Semi-pro categories, meaning two jumps for the dog, lI15 for

junior handlers age 7 to 16, or only $10 for your four-legged friend to give it a try.

X-TREME AIRDOGSOUTDOOR SERIES Central Oregon Sportsmen'sShow J Deschutes County Fair 8 Expo,Redmond, OR THURSDA Y-FRIDAY, MARCH7-8

SATURDAY, MARCH9

SUNDAY,MARCH10

Preliminaries/ Exhibitions at Consequin MainStage

Semi/Finals at Consequin MainStage

X-TremeAir Finals Day

11 a.m.-l p.m............................. Give It A Try/Training Demos

9-11 a.m.

2-3 p.m....................................... Give It ATry/Training Demos 5-6 p.m. X-Treme AirDog Wave ¹1-¹3

11 a.m.-Noon..................................... X-Treme AirDog Wave ¹5

11 a.m.-Noon ..

1-2 p.m.

. X-Treme AirDog Wave ¹6

12:30 p.m...

7-8p.m.

3-4 p.m..

, X-Treme AirDog Wave ¹7

To Follow

. Amateur Finals

......X-TremeRetrieveFinals (Semi/Finals)

To Follow.

Semi-Pro Finals

...... X-Treme Vertical Finals (Semi/Finals)

2:30-3:30 p.m."'.

X-Treme AirDog Wave ¹2-¹4

Event 8 Series Registration: www.northwestchallenge.com

5-6p.m...... 7-8p.m......

.. Give I A Try

9-10:45 p.m.

..Give It ATry .Last Chance Wave ..Novice Finals

. Pro Finals "approximale time

Hooker Creek Event Center & Deschutes Fair 8 Expo Center l 11


THURSDAY,MARCH7

FRIDAY, MARCH8

SATURDAY, MARCH9

Fl T ing Theater

Fl Ting Theater

Fl T ing Theater

1:00 Arnie Gildow 2:00 Kelly Laatsch 3:00 ThadeusAry 4:00 Arnie Gildow 5:00 Kevin Hoar/ Fly B FieldOutfitters 6:00 ThadeusAry

DeadlyCaddisPatterns How toMakeOldPatterns New BeadHeadNymphs EffectiveSpringCreekPatterns TyingTubeFliesfor Steelhead

StoneflyNymphs

Fl Casting Pond 1:00 Scott Cook/ Fly B FieldOutfitters 3:00 Arnie Gidlow 5:00 Dean Finnerty

Becoming aBetter Friendwith YourFlyRod Single Hand FlyCasting Variations

FishingCentralOregon North Umpqua River FlyFishing YearAround NorthwestWalleyeSecrets GreatTroutRiversof Western Canada Kokanee Trolling Techniques Fly FishingCentral Oregon'sCascadeLakes 20Tips toImproveYour Outdoor Photography

Wilderness Survival Calling BlackBears SpringTurkeyTactics Mule Deerand Blacktail by theNumbers Do's andDon'tsofHuntingDogTraining AggressiveElkCaling Techniques DifferentSoundsandScenafiosfor PredatorHunting

RedTheater:Marinefducat ion 1:00 Geoff Wollaston Pleasure 2:00 James Bartlett,PGE 3:00 Steve Leonard 4:00 BeavertonMotorcycles 5:00 TumaloCreekKayaks and Canoes 6:00 Adair Homes

1:00 Scott Cook/ Fly Ik FieldOutfitters 3:00 Arnie Gidlow 5:00 Dean Finnerty

MaintainingYourBoatfor UninterruptedBoating Deschutes BasinSalmonid Re-Introduction and Fish Passage ProperBoatAnchoring Methods Persona lWatercraftCareandMaintenance BasicKayakFishing

1:00 Gary Miralles 2:00 John Garrison 3:00 Ed Iman 4:00 Kelly Laatsch 5:00 ScottCook 6:00 Arnie Gidlow 7:00 Dean Finnerty

12:30 JohnAldrich 1:30 Justin Aamodt 2:30 Gary Madison 3:30 Blake Miller 4:30 Dan Kloer 5:30 Scott Haugen 6:30 Gary Lewis

3:00 TumaloCreek Kayaksand Canoes 4:00 Adair Homes 5:00 JamesBartlett, PGE

Build YourAdventure Homewith Little to NoDown

CampCookin DutchOven:AwardWinning Chili Outdoor Cooking:QuickandEasy Cookin gFishandGame DutchOven:PickledPorkandBeans Salmon:Fileting, Grilling, CanningandSmoking PlankCooking

FreshNaterDemo Tankand SeminarSeries 1:30 Gary Lewis 2:30 SteveLeonard 3:30 Gary Miralles 4:30 John Garrison 5:30 Ed Iman 6:30 Kelly Laatsch

Fl Castin Pond

BecomingBetter Friendswith YourFlyRod Single HandedFlyCasting Variations

11:00 ScottCook/ Fly B FieldOutfitters 1:00 Dean Finnerty 3:00 ScottCook Fly B FieldOutfitters 4:00 Arnie Gidlow 6:00 Kelly Laatsch

CrawdadImitations BobberFishingfor SalmonandSteelhead Trout andKokaneeTechniques Spin FishingTechniques Jigging forWalleyeSecrets Fly Fishingwith Streamers

Horse andMule Packin 1:00 Steen sW ilderness HorseandMulePacking Adventures 3:00 BackcountryHorsemen LeaveNoTraceBehind AwarenessWorkshop of CentralOregon 5:00 Steens Wilderness HorseandMulePacking Adventures

DownriggerTrolling Tacticsfor Trout, Kokanee and Salmon FishingCentralOregon NorthwestWalleyeSecrets UpperColumbiaRiver: BigRiver,BigTrout Fly FishingCentral Oregon 20Tips toImproveYour Outdoor Photography UpperWilametteRiverBasinSalmonand SteelheadOpportunities

ExtremeWeather WallTenting Year-roundCoyote Calling Tactics Predators:SetUpsandEffective CallingTips GPSNavigationintheBackcountry HowWeatherChangesControl ElkBulging Field DressingandSkinning BigGame BlackpowderElk, DeerandAntelope

RedTheater:Marinefducation 1:00 Steve Leonard 2:00 Geoff Wollaston

ProperBoatAnchoring Methods MaintainingYourBoatfor Uninterrupted Boating Pleasure BasicKayakAngling Build YourAdventureHomewith Little to NoDown DeschutesBasinSalmonid Re-Introduction and FishPassage PersonalWatercraft CareandMaintenance

CampCooking 1:00 TiffanyHaugen 2:00 Herb Good 3:00 Jim andLoisMiler 4:00 TiffanyHaugen 5:00 Herb Good 6:00 Mark andSueSchneider

PlankCooking Salmon:Fileting, Grilling, Canning,andSmoking Dutch Oven:PineappleUpsideDownCake Cookin gFishandGame Outdoor Cooking;QuickandEasy Dutch Oven:UltimateBakedBeans

FreshNaterDemo Tankand Seminar5eries 1:30 Ed Iman 2:30 Kelly Laatsch 3:30 Gary Lewis 4:30 Gary Miralles 5:30 John Garrison 6:30 Steve Leonard

Jigging forWalleye ChironomidFlyFishingTechniques CrawdadImitations Trout andKokaneeTechniques Spin FishingTechniques BobberFishingfor SalmonandSteelhead

Horseand MulePacking 1:00 SteensWilderness Adventures 3:00 BackcountryHorsemen of CentralOregon 5:00 SteensWilderness Adventures

12 / Central Oregon Sportsmen's Show 2013f Thursday-Sunday, March 7-10

11:00 Kelly Laatsch 12:00 Thadeus Ary 1:00 Arnie Gidlow 3:00 DaveMerrick/ Fly B FieldOutfitters 4:00 Kelly Laatsch 5:00 Thadeus Ary 6:00 Kevin Hoar/ Fly 8 FieldOutfitters

Fly Casting inthe Wind

Green Theater

6:00 BeavertonMotorcycles 1:00 MarkandSueSchneider 2:00 Herb Good 3:00 TiffanyHaugen 4:00 Ray andTaraKelsey 5:00 Herb Good 6:00 Tiffany Haugen

BeadHeadNymphs EffectiveSpringCreekPatterns How toMakeOldPatterns New

Blue Theater

Green Theater 12:30 BlakeMiler 1:30 Dan Kloer 2:30 Scott Haugen 3:30 Gary Lewis 4:30 Larry Lee 5:30 Justin Aamodt 6:30 GaryMadison

Fly Tyingwith Foam StoneflyNymphs CentralOregonStreamFlies

Fl Casting Pond Fly Casting intheWind

Blue Theater 1:00 John Garrison 2:00 Dean Finnerty 3:00 Ed Iman 4:00 Kelly Laatsch 5:00 JeremyJahn 6:00 Scott Cook/ Fly B FieldOutfitters 7:00 Arnie Gidlow

1:00 Kelly Laatsch 2:00 Thadeus Ary 3:00 Dave Merrick/ Fly & FieldOutfitters 4:00 Thadeus Ary 5:00 Arnie Gidlow 6:00 Kelly Laatsch

HorseandMulePacking LeaveNoTraceBehindAwarenessWorkshop

HorseandMulePacking

BeginnerFlyTying BeadHeadNymphs EffectiveSpringCreekPatterns CentralOregonStreamFlies How toMakeOldPatterns New StoneflyNymphs TyingTubeFliesfor Steelhead

Fly Casting:Start to Finish

Single Handed Fly Casting Variations Fly Casting intheWind BecomingBetter Friendswith YourFlyRod BalancedSingleHandCasting: Dries,Nymphs Streamers

Blue Theater 11:00 ArnieGidlow 12:00 Edlman 1:00 Scott Cook/ Fly B FieldOutfitters 2:00 Kelly Laatsch 3:00 Gary Miralles

4:00 Dean Finnerty 5:00 John Garrison 6:00 JeremyJahn

20Tips toImproveYourOutdoor Photography Trout Fishingfor Kids FlyFishingCentralOregon'sCascadeLakes GreatTroutRiversofWestern Canada DownriggerTrolling Tacticsfor Trout, Kokanee and Salmon UmpquaRiverSpring Chinook FishingCentralOregon Kokanee Trolling Techniques

Green Theater 10:30 GaryLewis 11:30 Justin Aamodt 12:30 Scott Haugen 1:30 Dan Kloer 2:30 Gary Madison 3:30 John Aldrich 4:30 Larry Lee 5:30 ScottHaugen 6:30 Blake Miller

Mule DeerandBlacktail by the Numbers AggressiveElkCalling Techniques Field DressingandSkinning BigGame Calling BlackBears DifferentSoundsandScenarios for Predator Hunting ExtremeWeather WallTenting BasicHuntingDogTraining SpringTurkeyTactics Wilderness Survival

Red Theater: MarineEducation 11:00 Adair Homes 12:00 BeavertonMotorcycles 1:00 SteveLeonard 2:00 Geoff Wollaston

4:00 TumaloCreek KayaksandCanoes 5:00 BeavertonMotorcycles

Build YourAdventureHomewith Little to NoDown PersonalWatercraft Careand Maintenance ProperBoatAnchoringTechniques MaintainingYourBoatfor Uninterrupted Boating Pleasure BasicKayakAngling

Persona lWatercraftCareandMaintenance

CampCookin 11:00 HerbGood 12:00 TiffanyHaugen 1:00 Mike Rea andPat Milne 2:00 Herb Good

3:00 TiffanyHaugen 4:00 Joan McFadden 5:00 Herb Good 6:00 Tiffany Haugen

Outdoor Cooking:QuickandEasy Cookin gFishandGame DutchOvenDishesfor KidsandScouts: Stew,Cake,lceCream Salmon:Fileting, Grilling,Canning and Smoking PlankCooking DutchOven:MoroccanChicken Outdoor Cooking:QuickandEasy Cookin gFishandGame


FreshNaterDemo Tankand Seminar Series 11:30 KellyLaatsch 12:30 JohnGarrison 1:30 Gary Miralles 2:30 Gary Lewis 3:30 SteveLeonard 4:30 Ed Iman 5:30 Gary Lewis 6:30 Scott Haugen

Fly Fishingwith Streamers Spin FishingTechniques KokaneeandTrout Techniques CrawdadImitations BobberFishingfor SalmonandSteelhead Jigging forWalleye Guerilla FishingTacticsfor Trout, Bassand Steelhead Float Fishingfor Steelhead

Horse andMule Packing 12:00 BackcountryHorsemen LeaveNoTraceBehind AwarenessWorkshop of CentralOregon 2:00 SteensWilderness HorseandMulePacking Adventures 5:00 SteensWilderness HorseandMulePacking Adventures

NXK The handling you'd expect from Can-Am. The power you'd expect from no one. With 101 hp, the Can-Ame Mavenck'" is the most powerful side-by-side vehicle ever built. But power means nothing

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SUNDAY, MARGH10 ean-am ®

Fl Tin Theater 11:00 KellyLaatsch 12:00 KevinHoar/ Fly 8 FieldOutfitters 1:00 Arnie Gidlow 2:00 Thadeus Ary

BeginnerFlyTying TyingTubeFliesfor Steelhead

Mavenck 1000R X rs

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EffectiveSpringCreekPatterns BeadHeadNymphs

BecomingBetter Friendswith YourFly Rod Fly Casting:Start to Finish Single HandedFlyCasting Variations Fly Casting:Start to Finish

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Blue Theater 11:00 DeanFinnerty

12:00 GaryMiralles 1:00 John Garrison 2:00 Kelly Laatsch

UmpquaRiverSpring Chinook DownriggerTrolling TacticsforTrout, Kokanee and Salmon FishingCentralOregon UpperColumbiaRiver,BC:BigFish, BigTrout

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Green Theater 10:30 GaryMadison 11:30 LarryLee 12:30 BlakeMiler 1:30 Scott Haugen 2:30 Dan Kloer

Predators:SetupsandEffectiveCallingTips Do'sandDon'ts ofHunting DogTraining GPSNavigation inthe Backcountry Field DressingandSkinning BigGame HowWeatherChangesControl ElkBugling

RedTheater:M arineEducation 11:00 TumaloCreek KayaksandCanoes 12:00 GeoffWollaston Pleasure 1:00 BeavertonMotorcycles 2:00 Adair Homes

BasicKayakAngling MaintainingYourBoatfor UninterruptedBoating PersonalWatercraft CareandMaintenance Build YourAdventureHomewith Little to NoDown

CampCookin l :00 Mark &SueSchneider 12:00 HerbGood 1:00 TiffanyHaugen 2:00 Herb Good

Dutch Oven:GermanApplePancakesandMore Salmon:Fileting, Griling,CanningandSmoking PlankCooking OutdoorCooking:Quickand Easy

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FreshNaterDemo Tankand Seminar Series 11:30 JohnGarrison 12:30 KellyLaatsch 1:30 Gary Miralles 2:30 SteveLeonard

Spin FishingTechniques ChironomidFlyFishingTechniques Trout andKokaneeTechniques BobberFishingfor SalmonandSteelhead

Horseand MulePackin 12:00 BackcountryHorsemen LeaveNoTrace BehindAwarenessWorkshop of CentralOregon 2:00 SteensWilderness HorseandMulePacking Adventures

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We will match or beat any pricein store or on-line.

Hours: Monday through Friday 9 to 6 • Saturday 9 to 5 •

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Hooker Creek Event Center 8 Deschutes Fair & Expo Center ~ 13


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SALE $1 5200

SM 400

SM 500

(SWAV/Ei $1,20~0~

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AVAILABLEATOURBEND SHOWROOM ONLY

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ro i TumaloCreek Kayak 6 Canoe Learn more about Hobie's Mirageori ve system which leaves your hands free to fish and has everything you need to enhance your angling experience! Visit our booth ¹526

or our retail store: 805 SW Industrial Way, Suite 6, Bend OR 97702 541.31 7.9407

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14 ~ Central Oregon Sportsmen's Show 2013 ~ Thursday-Sunday, March 7-10

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CONE SEEiALLTHE 2013 NODELS! 2013 POLARIS PORTSMAN50~

POLARIS SPORTSMANXP

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2013 POLARIS RANGE XP 900

2013Sportsmeo'sShow Special

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FREEATVTRAILPACKAGE (with Sportsmen'sATVpurchase) m

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Trail Package Includes: • ¹2555 WINCH • OELIIXE FRONT HRISH OIIARO • OELIIXE REARHRIISH OIIARO • FRONT RACKEXTENSION • REAR RACKEXTENSION • LOCK-NRIDE REAR CARGO BOX

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512OOVALUE (Does notinclude installation fees) Offer valid March 7-15 only at Midstate Power Sports a

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P CILRR IS' T he Way O u t .

541-528-5931 • 1118 S+HWV97 REDMOND wwww.midstatepolaris.com tor youruatety Avoiit operatingPolaris RhggtRsandhtys onpavedutlrtmsa orpuhtic roadnRirtersandpamangersshouldalwayswaar helmets ayeprotection protmtiveclothing aadseathatts Alwaysusecahnats. Polaris adulthyymodelsuiefor ridarsagedtg anrtotdar. DriversofRANGERvehiclesmust beat least 16yearsoldwithavalid driver's license.Warning:ATVscanbehazardoustooperate.Besuretotakeasafety training course.Forsafety training information inthe U.SmcalltheSVIAat (800)887-2887,seeyourdealer,or call Polarisat 800 342-3764.InCanada see ourlocal dealer. ©20t2Polaris Industries Inc.

Hooker Creek Event Center & Deschutes Fair 8 Expo Center ~ 15


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BEND

R EDM O N D

R EDM O N D

S ALE S & S E RV I C E 63500 NE H i g h way 97

S ALE S & S E RV I C E 2795 H wy. 97

S ER V I C E & S T O R A G E 3 1 1 1 N. Cana l

(Across from Home De p ot)

(Next to the Dollar Store and Blg 5)

(North of Super Wal-Mart)

541-330-2495

541-548-5254

541-504-2585


Bulletin Daily Paper 03-04-13