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KATARZYNA MARIA ALASZEWSKA Design work

MArch Architecture [TMHARCSING09] (ARB/RIBA Part II)


WARSAW UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY

VII semester with the maximal grade average 5.0/5.0

STANFORD UNIVERSITY

Master degree level programme

Bachelor Thesis Shortlisted among the best Bachelor Degree’s final projects

2013

2015

Hotel of suppressed desires

2015

Incubator for cultural initiatives

Hotel typology treated as a pretext to create a public refuge in a business district of Poland’s capital city

The city’s complex: investigation into processes that formed the urban and architectural tissue of Łódź

AA VISITING SCHOOL: ÅRHUS

ESTUDIO LAMELA, APAGA, ARTPANEL

Rethinking patterns: exploring heterogenic structures modular panel that tests light properties

201517

Professional work football research and training complex; vertical extension of semi detached house; 3d wall panel

2014

AEC Global Teamwork The project based learning laboratory - multidisciplinary design of a IT faculty in Nevada

201017

Artworks collection of my drawings and photographs


HOTEL OF SUPPRESSED DESIRES “The metropolitan type – which naturally takes on a thousand individual modifications – creates a protective organ for itself against profound disruption with which the fluctuations and discontinuities of the external milieu threatens it. The multiplicity of encounters leads to weakened interactions encouraging superficiality and anonymity. In order to shield oneself from pressures of overly stimulating environment one develops a defensive and passive character. Instead of reacting emotionally, the metropolitan type reacts primarily in a rational matter, thus creating a mental predominance through the intensification of consciousness, which in turn is caused by it. Thus the reaction of the metropolitan person to events is moved to a sphere of mental activity which is least sensitive and which is furthest removed from the depths of personality. This intellectualistic quality, which is thus recognized as a protection of the inner life against the domination of metropolis, becomes ramified into numerous phenomena...” George Simmel, The Metropolis and Mental Life, 1903


The business district

Daily average time spent at work

Daily average time spent commuting

DESIGN STRATEGY The brief required designing a hotel in a business district in Warsaw - the exterritorial typology which I decided to use as a pretext to discuss the influence of money economy on human mindset and their daily rituals. The project tackles the problem of lack of non-commercial social spaces in the city centre and proposes a strategy where a private facility creates programmes that are open to the public. Situated along the main east - west road of the capital, the hotel inscribes itselft within the the existing infrastructure connecting the subterranean commercial passages, train station via underground entertainment spots with the overground garden.

Project site


Visualisation of the underground pool

repetitive floors

public garden overground path to the lake

main entrance for hotel’s guests

continuation of an existing subterrean shopping corridor

technical rooms

underground connection with a local railway station

Underground

car park for guests

public swimming pool

Project elements exploded

entertainment rooms (cinema, workshops, discos)


Section

Ground floor

View from Aleje Jerozolimskie


Visualisation of the foyer Detail of the wall in guest rooms 25cm - porotherm block hectagonal column 2cm - interior finishing 15 cm - isolation

Prototype of the ornamented panel in fully glazed comon rooms

3cm - fiber cement boards 3cm - fiber cement board with a pattern

ORNAMENTATION

Repetetive floor

Ornamentation is an important part of the project. It is intended to provide tangible sensation for the person exploring the building. It is inspired by the works of Louis Sullivan and the Chicago School where terra cotta ornamentation flourished at the beginning of XX century. Its geometric rigid form relates to the aesthetics of the surrounding builing erected in early 1950’. It stays in opposition to the trend of erecting buildings devoid of any ornamentation.


INCUBATOR FOR CULTURAL INITIATIVES Łódź’ s population multiplied from 400 in 1800 to 670 000 in 1918 thanks to the introduction of textile industry when Polish lands were still under foreign occupation. The project’s site is situated within the very heart of the city, which bears traces of all phases of Łódź development making architectural and urban tissue highly diversified. But what renders the place epitome of city’s demographic and social transformations makes its spatial organisation chaotic. The design intent was to create a structure that would aim to reconcile an accumulation of typologies and would take a critical stance towards current tendencies in city planning. Incubator is intended to work as a catalyst for bringing together young artist, enterpreneurs and recipients of their work


Project elements exploded

Visual connections inside the building

Building footprint

HEB 280

INP 280

TRANSPARENCY

Main axes of the passage

The use of glazing invites the surrounding buildings to project themselves on the glass walls of Incubator and visually erases the boundaries between the interior and exterior. I intended to provide multi-layered optical penetration into the building by dividing cross section into many blocks, visually connecting elements of vertical communication, creating 3-storey continuous space. By retreat of the frontal faรงade, the deepest on the first floor and by overhanging the next stories the building seems to be hanging in the air. The ground floor in the line of the retreats was left free of any structure in order not to obstruct the existing pedestrian paths.


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334

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+ 0,00 -

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+ 0,00 -

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1 5 x 1 6,8 x 2 7

500

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320

A

6 x 1 6,8 x 2 7

6 x 1 6,8 x 2 7

C

1955

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184

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156

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285

285 625

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325 610

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4270

Ground floor 8

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+319,2

3977

580

11 x 16,8 x 27

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+504

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15

View from one of the workshop units

G

334

9

462

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H

(5 przęseł x 600cm)

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600

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11 x 16,8 x 27

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310

12 F

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THE PURPOSE

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150

40

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300

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320

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12 x 16,8 x 27

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+504

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+504

15 x 16,8 x 27

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184 285

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First floor 575

4270

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950

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325 610

The Incubator offers the studio spaces to let for the artists and entrepreneurs from creative industries, rooms for educational purposes and exhibition spaces. It supports the residents at every stage of creative process from designing to distributing the product. It is a highly democratic structure, open to everyone and providing spaces distributed throughout the site where integration between the artist and the recipient can take place. Three axes organise the space of the project site. The main axis connects the Piotrkowska Street with H. Sienkiewicz Park. To the North there is a strip of workshop units and then the shorter pedestrian path leading to the interior courtyard in front of the multifunctional hall.


Detail of the exterior glazing 3

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334

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+705,6

300

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320

3 3

+705,6

12 x 16,8 x 27

12 x 16,8 x 27

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+907,2

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12 x 16,8 x 27

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+907,2

12 x 16,8 x 27

1955

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500

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C

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184

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156

285

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285 625

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4270

Third floor

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334

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150

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+1108,8

300

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+1108,8

12 x 16,8 x 27

320

+1310,4

12 x 16,8 x 27

4

7

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+1310,4

12 x 16,8 x 27

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500

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1955

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184 285

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156

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575 4270

Fourth floor

950

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325 610


Plattenbau

after 1945

Tenement

1900

Manufactures

Plan of the passage

Wooden sheds

1850 Sheds Weaver’s house

1823

Land for farming

Accumation of typologies

Perimeter of the existing passage

Section


WORKSHOP UNITS

Due to implementation of steel frame structure longer spans (16m) were achieved so there is no need for additional columns

Structure shown by the example of the uppermost floor

The grid (1,5m x1,5) comes from division of the parcel (21,7 m) for 14 equal pieces (0,7m construction walls). Modular glass walls of workshop units are attached to primary or, more commonly, secondary beams of the structure.

Sheer walls, staircases, shafts were moved to the sides in order to obtain the open space in the middle An infinite number of modules combination is possible

Workshop walls can be easily added or dismantled - depending on the demand


STANFORD AEC GLOBAL TEAMWORK This project is the result of collaboration between one architect, two structural engineers, two MEPs and two construction managers. The brief was to design a university faculty in Reno, Nevada. We were given a precise program to fit into a given footprint (double diamond shape). As the Reno is surrounded by Sierra Nevada mountains range, in the design proposal I wanted to relate to the experience of mountain climbing where one gradually explores the slowly changing landscape. Project was designed with the use of Revit for multidisciplinary coordination.


81'-0" 73'-10" 16'-6"

16'-10"

a2

17'-0"

23'-5"

a4

a5

16'-6" 41'-4" 37'-1"

aD

aD

16'-6"

aE

a3

aE

a1

37'-2" 37'-2" 18'-4"

17'-4"

18'-10"

7

15'-11"

aB

W X

F W

16'-6"

16'-10"

12'-5"

a3

D

C

a2

a1

Z

12'-1"

+ 0' 0"

76'-0"

74'-0"

aA

E

11'-2"

23'-6"

V

3'-8"

37'-1" 42'-2"

Z

11'-4"

37'-2"

37'-2"

X

Inspiration for creating an interior boulevard came from the early OMA’s work on scheme for two libraries at Jussieu, the technical university in Paris. The intention was to create a democratic structure that wouldn’t differentiate between students and the professors or administrative workers of the faculty.

A

13'-9"

25'-5"

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Y

A

In designing this university edifice my intention was to create an interior boulevard that would wind throughout the building. Instead of stacking one storey onto another I proposed splitting the levels so as to decrease the difference in height between each pair of the two adjacent ones. In doing so I intended to creating conditions of sustained visual connections between users of different storeys. The floors are connected by the central staircases, each of a unique shape. Positioned in the atrium at the very heart of the building, stairs act as a filter of light casting shadows on a floor when the weather is sunny. The flights of stairs will guide their users to the terrace on the uppermost floor. As one climbs them, the opportunities to observe the changing landscape outside emerge. In this I hoped to create a sensation of relating to the mountain climbing experience being under impression of ever-present Sierra Nevada mountain range.

Y

1

2 9'-1"

4

3 11'-2"

10'-10"

5 13'-1"

7

6 11'-4"

18'-4"

73'-11" 76'-0"

Project intentions

splitting levels to obtain physical and visual connections

G

+ 9'8"

IDEA

framing the landscape

9'-1"

H

73'-11"

V

16'-7"

73'-11"

81'-0"

aC

20'-7"

6

First floor plan

mountain climb-like experience

Auditorium

Sitting stairs

Floor at 9’8”

Big classroom

Regular stairs

Floor at 0’0”

Instructional labs

Guard

Lift

Vestibule

Cafeteria

Technical shaft


Model showing the stairs connecting the split levels

Department Chair’s Office Senior Admin. Office Administrative Assistants Faculty offices Faculty lounge Zen zone Eating area Technical support Toilets

Big classroom Small classrooms Seminar room Student offices Zen zones Eating area Technical support Toilets

Audtorium Big classroom Instructional labs Guard Cafeteria

Project steps

Server room Storage Toilets MEP room Technical shafts 1. Splitting the levels

.2. Moving the floors

.3. Connecting storeys

Staircases

Isometric view of the building


Auditorium side

Non-auditorium side Slab - wall detail 12” x12” column 6 x 10” 7’’ slab 5 x 8’’ additional sheer wall reinforcement

aA

aB

23'-6"

88'-2" 86'-1"

16'-7"

aE

aD

aC

17'-4"

aF

16'-6"

12'-3"

59'7"

50'1"

Slab - column detail 12” x12” column 6 x 10” 7’’ slab 5 x 8’’

38'10" 36'3"

25'7"

21'6"

Slab - slanted column detail additional reinforcement 6 x 10” 7’’ slab 5 x 8’’ 12” x12” column

9'8"

0'0"

2'-9"

20'-9" 23'-6"

2'-9"

13'-10" 16'-7"

76'-8" 76'-0"

2'-9"

14'-7" 17'-4"

North - south section

2'-9"

13'-10" 16'-6"

2'-9"


RETHINKING PATTERNS: EXPLORING HETEROGENIC STRUCTURES Ă…RHUS AA VISITING SCHOOL Coinciding with International Year of Light this 10-day summer workshop focused on exploring variety of light properties through algorithmicaly designed structures. First step was to design a lightfiltrating module, controlled by a set of parameters that would allow us to manipulate varied aspects of light to examine them. The typology we elaborated was that of two frusta connected via four common edges of a truncating plane.

Cross-section crevices easening bending

C

MODULE SHAPE CONCEPT flat panels that stiffens the structure and allows to reduce its weight

The typology we elaborated was that of two frusta connected via four common edges of a truncating plane. B A

reflecting

holes for joints

dispersing

V

B

Exemplary B3-1 upper part of module

V concentrating

A

C

Our intent was to investigate certain qualities of light

flat outline for CNC cutter

photo of physical module


Parameters controlled by the algorithm

Position of the attractor

Number of subdivisions

DESIGN WITH PARAMETERS AND ALGORITHMS. From a surface which was aimed to be subdivided, with the Kangaroo plugin, we applied physical forces to the form the structure and planarize the sub-surfaces. Firstly, we generated truncated pyramids from each sub-surface. These truncated pyramids are pointed towards an external point and for those which are closer to the attraction point, they will to get higher. The attractor represents the point we want to direct the light towards. Using the Ladybug plug-in, we analyzed solar radiation (relating to the Copenhagen’s weather) and changed parameters in order to optimize the design. Ladybug was employed to enhance a dynamic platform: the design is put under an environment with real time reflection phenomenon. The studies of the artificial light effects through experiments on a physical model has an important input. The results created more perimeters to the decision to add employ perforation on the surfaces in order to archive the design goals. We underwent multiple tests by manipulating set of parameters to examine varied aspects of light, ability of the structure to dicperse, reflect and concentrate light as well as esthetic and structural aspects of the designed object.

Number of flat panels

Height of truncated pyramids

Distance between the surfaces


MODULAR WALL PANEL These modular wall panels were designed for ArtPanel company. I drew inspiration from roman diamond rustication prevalent in Renaissance with the difference in catenary section allowing for seamless joining of adjacent modules. The client requested two versions of the pattern accompanied by delivery of visualisations, technical drawings and 3dmodels for each option. With use of Grasshopper software I was able to quickly modify dimensions after initial physical tests that proved the panel is too thin to sustain its own weight.

Two versions of the panel, with one and four apexes. Dimensions: 72 x 72 x 3,6 cm


ADDITIONAL DRAWINGS

line of joining two panels

144cm

Catenary section enables joining together two panels without the seal being visible.


VERTICAL EXTENSION OF THE HOUSE This project aimed for redesigning a half of semi-detached house with the generous rear garden with intention to welcome a 2+3 family. Vertical extension included raising the roof so the upper floor could fit all 4 bedrooms required. The objective was to open both floors to the beautiful garden, create free flow of the spaces dowstairs and allow for parents ‘ privacy upstairs. Red color of plaster relates to the wall color of the neighbour whereas mix of textures and materials combined with rack for ivy intends to provide stimuli for growing kids to play and discover materiality of the building. The stair relocation turned out to be particularly challenging as the new ones had to be designed in a way that wouldn’t enforce cutting into next spans of the ceiling construction. I was responsible for all phases of the project, starting from cataloguing, negotiating with the client, designing firstly the conceptual then the executive project and resolving administrative issues.


A'-A'

A

A

A-A

B

B

1070 114 114

140 140

68 78

100 100

80 80

182 182

136 136

140 140

110 94

W1 + 6.55

+ 6,35

+ 6,05

+ 6,35

+ 6,05 WIENIEC 29x40 cm poz. 2.

+ 6,05

40

WIENIEC 29x40 cm poz. 2.

S2

+ 6,05

WIENIEC 40x25 cm poz. 2.1

S2

+ 5,65 158

+ 5,65

40

+ 6.55

247

286

S5

S7

S6

+ 3,18 DYLATACJA gr. min. 0,5cm

+ 3,08

+ 2,83 + 2,45 108 284

158

158

+ 2,45

BUDYNEK SÄ„SIEDNI

S6

39

B

DYLATACJA gr. min. 0,5cm

39

S1

DYLATACJA gr. min. 0,5cm

A

89

B

+ 4,07

+ 0,87

87

87

2

2

29

+ 0,87

+/-0,00

130

175

306

379

140

- 1,43

A

A 140

A'

140

75

422

75

- 1,43

- 0,30

S4

229

140

270

S4 202

92.5

- 2,35

80

213

1150 1089

251

B

60

45

Sections 452 365

471

B'

426

402

452

200

180

144

60

239 180

352

329

1

1

B

B

B'

A 286 122

183 152

183

152 154 1039 1070

228 228

188

29 233

27

168

123

305

Second floor

West elevation

Front evlevation


LEGIA WARSAW FOOTBALL TEAM RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT COMPLEX WITH TRAINING AND EDUCATION CENTRE LEGIA WARSZAWA FOOTBALL TEAM training centre is a part of the club’s agenda to constantly improve the quality of the training process and aims at bringing up future generations of exquisite football players. It is the first facility of this kind and scale to be built in Poland. This complex is designed with the view to house, train and educate football prodigies providing them with dormitories, classrooms and all-round sport infrastructure. While the research and development centre will allow testing innovative technologies, coaches will be able to apply newly gained knowlegde to their training programs. I was a part of the two-person core of the team working on the project. My responsibilities ranged from designing builidngs of the complex, drawing land development plan, presenting work progress to the client, carrying out consultations with technical experts: constructors, MEP, higwhway engineers and other technologists. As I submit this portfolio the project is still under development. To deliver drawings and earth mass calculations I worked in Revit and AutoCAD.


Visualisation of the main entrance to the building

Main building - ground floor

Main building - section A-A

Isometry of construction*

Sections through the stadium building * renderings were produced by other people involved in the project. My main tasks were the land development plan and warehouse design. However at certain stages I was also responsible for producing complete technical drawings of the central and the stadium building that I present here

Main building - section B-B


ARTWORK


FLEETING MOMENTS IN ALGORITHMIC SPACES These works came into being while I was working on my Bachelor Thesis and researching questions of ephemerality and transparency in architecture. Though I did not use these graphics directly in the above mentioned project, they were inspiration for creating an effect of interpenetration of successive spaces in the building of the Incubator. This images represent maps of probability that the point lies within the area represented by each pixel. I produced them with the use of Fyre software, which is a tool that employs iterated chaotic functions to produce histograms. These ones are based on the simple Peter De Jong map equations:

xn+1=sin(a*yn) - cos(b*xn) yn+1=sin(c*xn) - cos(d*yn). By changing the set of variables I manipulated the result of the equation.


THAN K YOU FOR CON S ID E R IN G M Y A P P L I CAT I O N

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