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Required Reading for those on the It’s everything that’s happening in the region – arts, music, events, movies and more.

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Thursday, September 18, 2014

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This toy plane was autographed by Clyde Pangborn and Hugh Herndon after their historic nonstop trans-Pacific flight from Japan to Wenatchee in 1931.

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BY KELLI SCOTT World staff writer The folks at the Wenatchee Valley Museum and Cultural Center have some exciting things planned this fall and they need your help to make it all happen. First, the museum is inviting area residents to participate in a pop-up museum on Oct. 3. Um, a what now? A pop-up museum is “a temporary exhibit created by people showing up with objects to display and share,� according to the museum. The theme for the upcoming exhibit is “Wings and Wheels.� From museum curator Bill Rietveldt: “It’s sort of like a community showand-tell, so we have absolutely no idea what to expect! The display could have anything from someone’s butterfly collection to the steering wheel from Uncle Stu’s Studebaker.� These things do not have to be “Antiques Roadshow� worthy. They should just fit the theme and have some significance to you. Bring your object to the museum during the First Friday Art Walk, between 5 p.m and 8 p.m. Oct. 3, and be ready to talk to visitors about its history. If there is enough interest this time around, Rietveldt said the museum will make pop-ups a regular event. And just in time for holiday shopping, the museum plans to unveil a small artworks gallery during the November First Friday Art Walk. Located in glass cases near the museum entrance, the gallery will feature pieces created by NCW artists for less than $100. The museum is asking local artists to submit art for the gallery by digital image. All work should be no larger than 16 inches in any direction and artists must be 18 years or older from Chelan, Douglas, Grant or Okanogan counties. For more information, call the museum at 888-6247.

:`k`e^Ă”i\#^Xcc\ip [`i\Zkfii\j`^ej BY KELLI SCOTT World staff writer “We did not choose to lose our home in a wild fire,â€? wrote Nicole Ringgold in her latest blog entry. “We were suddenly — unpredictably — thrust into a position to make decisions that we otherwise wouldn’t have considered.â€? One of those decisions has been to leave her position as executive director of Confluence Gallery and Art Center in Twisp. Since Ringgold took over Confluence Gallery in 2011, she has focused on improving efficiency at the 26-year-old Twisp institution, and the Nicole Ringgold gallery has flourished. Revenue has steadily increased during Ringgold’s tenure. Her home was destroyed by the Rising Eagle Road Fire that began Aug. 1 between Twisp and Winthrop. “Despite the outpouring of support and how much I love Confluence, due to the fact that Confluence needs a strong leader (especially now after this season of disasters), with my energy ebbing and flowing, I do not feel capable of filling that role,â€? Ringgold wrote. “I have made the decision to resign; a choice, but not an easy one.â€? Ringgold will stay in her position until a new executive director has been hired and trained, and she will continue to volunteer for the gallery. The executive director position is full time and is responsible for the overall management and operation of the gallery and art center. For the job description and application packet, go to confluencegallery.com. The deadline to apply is Oct. 15.

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AP/MCT photos

Saturday, Wenatche

Top left: The cast from “Mulaney,� a comedy series from Emmy Award-winning writer and comedian John Mulaney (“Saturday Night Live�). Top right: Jada Pinkett-Smith plays an evil diva in “Gotham,� a retelling of the Batman story. Middle: A scene from “Z Nation,� a show filmed in Spokane. Bottom right: Demian Bichir stars as Marco Ruiz in FX’s cop thriller, “The Bridge.�

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BY ROBERT LLOYD Los Angeles Times Fall comes. Not such a big deal as it was back before there were 27 TV seasons in a year and a thousand new shows starting every week, but there are still something like a million series premiering on 6 billion channels between now and the end of the year. I think that’s right. As is usual in the hall of mirrors called Hollywood, themes emerge. There are three new series (on three networks) made from DC comics; there are two whose protagonists are women highly placed in Washington; there are a couple of things about zombies; two comics-of-color-fronted sitcoms about culture and class. Shots are taken at social media in comedy (“Selfie�) and drama (“Stalker�) alike. NBC is fielding textbook rom-coms; ABC is striking a blow for diversity; CBS is sticking with threecamera comedies and dark procedurals. And so on. But let’s get particular, in chronological order over the next few weeks:

Already in progress “Utopia�: Fox, Sundays Yearlong bucolic flip on “Big Brother� in which participants are meant to cooperate with rather than destroy one another. Online, the cameras run around the clock. “Edge of 18�: Al Jazeera High school seniors, from here, there, up, down, in and out, document their lives and times. Alex Gibney (“The Armstrong Lie�)

knits it all together. “Love Prison�: A&E, Mondays Online couples who have never met in person are left together on an island to decide whether that was such a good idea. “Z Nation�: Syfy, Fridays The Zombie-Apocalypse apocalypse continues with this knockoff of “The Walking Dead� from the network that brought you “Sharknado.� The usual bloody road trip, with Tom Everett Scott helping transport a possible cure cross-country. “God, I hate moral dilemmas,� someone says, setting a tone. “The Chair�: Starz, Saturdays Two first-time feature directors get the same script, a little money and Pittsburgh. “The Roosevelts�: PBS, Sundays Ken Burns Ken-Burnses the Barrymores of American politics. “The Mysteries of Laura�: NBC, Wednesdays Soup-slurping supersleuth Debra Messing — or as someone calls her, “a middle-aged policewoman, just like Rizzoli� — largely gets the better of this half-comic cop-romp. Her children urinate on each other in public. “Red Band Society�: Fox , Wednesdays Teen drama translated from high school to hospital offers a Breakfast Club’s worth of types, now with disorders and diseases. Olivia Spencer is the nurse who knows what’s what; Griffin Dunne a rich hypochondriac who likes to party. Sample question: “How do you tell the girl who needs a heart that she never really had one to begin with?�

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“Tim & Eric’s Bedtime Stories�: Adult Swim, Thursdays Tim Heidecker and Eric Wareheim disturb your rest in the guise of guiding you to it.

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Sunday “Madam Secretary�: CBS, Sundays Tea Leoni stays minty fresh in this tale of an ex-CIA agent who suddenly finds herself secretary of State, as tendrils of conspiracy knock at the window of your wish fulfillment. With hot-again Tim Daly and Keith Carradine, and Bebe Neuwirth, who never wasn’t. “Mr. Pickles�: Adult Swim, Sundays Secretly satanic bad-seed Lassie wreaks havoc on the less than picturesque inhabitants of a picturesque town. It’s a cartoon!

Monday “Gotham�: Fox, Mondays Jim Gordon (Ben McKenzie) is a clean cop in a dirty town in this Batman prequel set in a present-past where cellphones exist, but they’re still the flip kind. Soulfully weary Donal Logue is Gordon’s semi-dirty partner; future archvillains are easy to recognize. Is this canon? Who knows anymore. “Scorpion�: CBS, Mondays Elyes Gabel is the leader of a pack of socially inept genius weirdos recruited by G-man Robert Patrick to save the dumber, more outgoing rest of us. Yet no matter how smart you are, sometimes you have to drive

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CONTENTS A BOU T T HE SYM P HO N Y 4 5 6 8 10 12 14

Wenatchee Valley Symphony Association Music Director’s Welcome Wenatchee Valley Symphony Orchestra Music Director and Conductor History of the Wenatchee Valley Symphony Orchestra Education and Community Engagement Programs Apprentice Conductor

S PON S O RS 16 18 19 20

Individual Sponsors Business Partners Volunteer Guild Supporting the Wenatchee Valley Symphony Orchestra

Concert I: Secret Identities

Saturday, November 1, 2014, 7:00 pm; Concert Prelude 6:00 pm Numerica Performing Arts Center

23 Program 24 Artists & Notes on the Program

Concert II: Wonderwomen

Saturday, December 6, 2014, 7:00 pm; Concert Prelude 6:00 pm Numerica Performing Arts Center

35 Program 36 Artists & Notes on the Program

Nutcracker

with Fabulous Feet Academy of Ballet Saturday, December 13, 2014, 7:00 pm & Sunday, December 14, 2014, 2:00 pm Numerica Performing Arts Center

43 Program 44 Artists

Sweetheart Musical Soiree Saturday, February 14, 2015, 7:00 pm Wenatchee Valley Museum and Cultural Center

Concert III: John Williams Maestro of the Movies

Saturday, February 28, 2015, 7:00 pm; Concert Prelude 6:00 pm Numerica Performing Arts Center

50 53

Program Artists & Notes on the Program

Concert IV: Clarinet Monsters

Music of Benny Goodman, Artie Shaw and Jeff Brooks Saturday, April 18, 2015, 7:00 pm; Concert Prelude 6:00 pm Numerica Performing Arts Center

57 Program 58 Artists & Notes on the Program

DIFFXPSMEDPN ABOUT THE SYMPHONY

3


WENATCHEE VALLEY SYMPHONY ASSOCIATION BOA R D O F D IRE C TO RS Teri Snyder, President Larry McCracken, Vice-President Karen Keleman, Secretary Greg Brault, CPA, Treasurer Marva Lee McCracken, Director Dr. William Rowley, Director

STA F F Dr. Nikolas Caoile, Music Director and Conductor

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P.O. Box 3423 Wenatchee, WA 98807 509.667.2640

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MUSIC DIRECTOR’S WELCOME DR . N I KOL AS CAO IL E M U S I C DI RE CTO R A N D CO N D U C TO R Being a father of a young boy offers a unique perspective. Of late, I have been in awe at how Marvel comic book super heroes have infused themselves into our daily lives. Toys, movies, video games, clothing, lunch boxes, school supplies, and costumes. I love seeing my son’s eyes light up with imaginative fire – he can be seen wrapping himself in a kid-size bathrobe and ‘flying’ through the house shooting beams of energy from his fingertips. Thus, is the inspiration for this season with the WVSO – Super Heroes. In Concert I, we explore the idea of maintain an alter ego to mask a superhero’s identity. In his Enigma Variations, Elgar concealed the identities of his dedicatees safe for a few initials at the beginning of each variation. Too, the symbol of a skylark for Vaughan Williams’ setting of the Meredith poet might very well be represent a British soldier whose service to his country comes forth as a ‘song worthy to greet heaven.” Heroines are celebrated in Concert II – from the flirtatious Isabella in Rossini’s comic opera, to the reverent texts of Toni Morrison’s Honey and Rue, and finally to the seductress storyteller of Scheherazade. Concert III celebrates John Williams, a composer whose music has served as an important soundtrack to movie heroes for more than half a century. Finally, in Concert IV, we complete the season with a unique program designed by clarinetist, Jeff Brooks, exploring the greatest ‘monsters’ who have championed the instrument including Benny Goodman and Artie Shaw. It’s an honor to have you with us! I’m looking forward to an exciting season of music – a season of Super Heroes!

Nikolas Caoile Music Director and Conductor Wenatchee Valley Symphony Orchestra

ABOUT THE SYMPHONY

5


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Susan Ball

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Lori Laugh

Susan Ree

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Jeff Hemin

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Mike Lock

N I KOL AS CAO IL E , M U SI C D IRE C TOR AND CONDUCTOR

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Teri Snyde

Kerry Travers, Assistant Concertmaster

Sharon Tveten, Principal

Annie Cha

Vicki Fechner

Alice Crawford

Lara Gardner

Aaron Davis

Elise Harder

Karen Keleman

Marva Lee McCracken

Vinny Lee

Dave Notter

Heath Rush

Michelle Vaughn

Elizabeth Talbot

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Gretchen Woods, Principal

Matthew Ryan-Kelzenberg, Principal

Cindy Dietz, Assistant Principal

Larry Hayes

Anna Fleming

Meredith Hunnicutt

Mary Carter Pringer

Megan Lamon

Tanner Rookard

Cathie Lau

Zhorik Roseburg

Rhiannon Schaub

Owen Sheets

Samantha Segaline

Daniel Tveten Denis Vasin

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Emily Vasin

Megan Cleary, Principal

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ABOUT THE SYMPHONY

ABOUT THE SY


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Suzanne Carr, Principal

Kent Chalmers, Principal

Jeanne Lodge

Larry Benoit

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Susan Ballinger

Tom McNair, Principal

OBOE

Cameron Gilbert Don Larson

Lori Laughlin, Principal Susan Reed

C L A R I N ET

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Jeff Heminger, Principal

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Josh Cozart

Stan Fishburn, Principal

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BAS S C L ARI N E T James Mitsuyasu

BAS S OON Mike Locke, Principal

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Sherry Krebs

P I ANO Kathryn Castrodale

LI BRARI AN Larry McCracken

Teri Snyder, Principal Annie Chalmers Mary Ellen Rose-Witt Dave Neir

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Songsmith String Instruments

Aaron B. Davis, Violinmaker

Dealer, repair and restoration of bowed string instruments, bows and accessories By appointment 509-662-7275 songsmith@nwi.net

ABOUT THE SYMPHONY

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DR . N I KO L AS CAO IL E Nikolas Caoile is a sought-after conductor, pianist and presenter. Concurrently serving as Director of Orchestras at Central Washington University, Music Director of the Wenatchee Valley Symphony Orchestra, and Principal Conductor of the Salem Chamber Orchestra,

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Caoile’s musical leadership spans academic, community and professional arenas. Caoile has also guest conducted many other orchestras including: Northwest Mahler Festival, Rainier Symphony, Yakima Symphony, Gig Harbor Symphony, and the Olympia Symphony. He made his New York City debut in 2009 conducting the Philharmonic Orchestra of the Americas in collaboration with the Christopher Wheeldon’s Morphoses Dance Company at New York City Center. A passionate believer in music education for all ages, Caoile has led numerous educational and community engagement concerts including the Alaska and Indiana All-State Orchestra, the Washington All-State Jr. Orchestra as well as many regional honor orchestras in Washington, Montana, Oregon and Indiana. He has been a featured presenter as part of the Seattle Symphony Talk Music series. Caoile has collaborated with several popular rock groups including Queensrÿche, John Popper, Heart, and Yes as the Music Director for Synergia

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Northwest. Caoile was also selected to participate at the Cabrillo Festival for Contemporary Music where he worked with Marin Alsop and Gustav Meier. Caoile is a popular guest conductor and clinician with youth orchestras, collegiate ensembles, and high school honor orchestras throughout the Northwest. Caoile has participated in the 2002 Vakhtang Jordania Conducting Competition and the 9th Cadaques Conducting Competition. Caoile is a frequent collaborative recitalist performing throughout the Northwest. He has performed with Third Angle New Music Ensemble, the Yakima Seasons Festival, Icicle Creek Center for the Arts, Woods House Conservatory of Music, and is currently a faculty member of the Kairos Chamber Music Lyceum, Chamber Music Madness, and the Icicle Creek Summer Symphony. Caoile collaborates regularly with violinist Denise Dillenbeck, flutist Sarah Tiedemann, mezzo-soprano Melissa Schiel, and cellist John Michel.

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Caoile is a passionate advocate for opera repertoire. He has served on the music staff of the Aspen Opera Theater Center as a Coach Accompanist Fellow preparing many productions including: Rigoletto, The Cunning Little Vixen, Die Entführung auf dem Serail, The Turn of the Screw, and Giasone. He served as accompanist with the Seattle Opera assisting in productions of Eugene Onegin and Norma and has worked with the Seattle Opera Young Artists on productions of Gianni schicchi and Eugene Onegin. He was a coach pianist and chorus master for the Bel Canto Vocal Institute where he prepared L’elisir d’amore and Fidelio. He was harpsichordist in performances of L’incoronazione di Poppea, Giasone, and Calisto. Caoile has also served as conductor many main-stage productions. He has led performances of Così fan Tutte, Il Matrimonio Segretto, Gianni Schicchi, The Bartered Bride, Die Fledermaus, The Tender Land, and Dido and Aeneas. Further, he premiered Nacy van de Vate’s Opera, Where the Cross is Made, for the 2006 National Opera Association Conference in Ann Arbor. He assisted Martin Katz in the University of Michigan production of Hänsel and Gretel. His teachers include Martin Katz, Phil Kelsey, David McDade, and Kenneth Merrill. Nikolas Caoile is a native of Portland, Oregon and now resides in Ellensburg, Washington with with his wife, mezzo-soprano, Melissa Schiel and their son, Kieran. Caoile holds degrees from the University of Michigan, University of Washington, and Willamette University. He recently accepted a nomination to join Phi Beta Kappa as a member of the Willamette chapter, Delta of Oregon. His principal teachers are Kenneth Kiesler, Gustav Meier, and Peter Erös. Caoile also enjoys playing golf, NYT Crosswords and cooking.

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LOCAL WINES


HISTORY OF THE WENATCHEE VALLEY SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA The Wenatchee Valley Symphony Orchestra began when a group of less than twenty musicians gathered at Wenatchee Junior College in 1947, just eight years after the founding of the college. George Bower was the high school music teacher leading the group, which he named the Wenatchee Civic Orchestra. It performed free concerts to sparse audiences. Wenatchee Valley College received a federal grant in 1968, which brought three professional artists to the college, one of whom was musician Dr. Malcolm Seagrave. The Wenatchee Valley College, led by President Dr. William Steward, hired Seagrave that year with the desire to have him lead a full symphony. An orchestra board of directors was selected and charged with managing and raising funds. Board members included Dr. Al Stojowski, Wilfred Woods, Paul Ellis and Sam Mills. They got community sponsors for every program and organized as a non-profit entity. A full symphony repertoire was then possible. In 1970 the symphony made arrangements to play in the Liberty Theater, with its first concert on November 1st. When the new Wenatchee High School opened in the fall of 1972, its 900-seat auditorium became home for the symphony concerts. The 1970’s were memorable not only for the musicianship of Dr. Malcolm Seagrave, but for the addition of Camilla Wicks, concert violinist, who became the symphony’s concertmaster in 1972. She made a profound impression, and Dr. Seagrave commented that her presence had moved the orchestra years ahead in its musical development. She played with the orchestra for three seasons. After Malcolm Seagrave left, Glenn Kelly took over the podium in 1979 and conducted the orchestra for the next six seasons. Mike Lee succeeded Glenn Kelly in the 1985-86 season. Among Lee’s concerts was the Mozart “Requiem” with the Central Washington University choir, the Columbia Chorale, and the college choir. One of the concerts that Lee conducted that year was a new piano concerto composed and played by Gordon Schuster, who had written the composition while at Eastern Washington University. Dan Baldwin, director of the Central Washington University Symphony, succeeded Lee in 1994. Baldwin conducted the local group until 1997. The symphony had guest conductors until 1999, when Adam Flatt was selected. In 2000, Mel Strauss was hired as conductor. Strauss was head of Seattle’s Cornish College of the Arts, and his experience and musical maturity were evident. Marty Zyskowski, from Eastern Washington University, led the symphony from 2004 through the 2009 season. Among the highlights of his tenure was the 60th anniversary season with a program that spanned the Baroque, Classical and Romantic periods. Nikolas Caoile, Central Washington University symphony conductor, was among the guest conductors of the 2009-10 season. The board hired Caoile for the following season and he continues to conduct the symphony today.

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EDUCATION & COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT PROGRAMS

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EN S EMB L E S I N T HE SCHO O L S An in-school program that brings symphony musicians into local school classrooms to educate and entertain students.

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STR I N G ST U D E N TS I N T HE SYM P H ONY The Wenatchee Symphony provides opportunities for advanced high school string students to participate in the symphony, performing alongside and learning from symphony members.

C ON C ERT P RE LU D E S Presented prior to each concert, the Prelude features Music Director Nikolas Caoile in an entertaining and informative talk about the works being performed. Designed to help draw audiences into the performances, lectures also include historical backgrounds on the composers and the periods in which they lived. Concert Preludes commence one hour prior to each concert.

M U S I CA L SO IRE E S A community engagement program that provides classical music-lovers the opportunity to hear chamber music performed by symphony musicians.

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A N GEL A S CHU ST E R S V E N D SE N M E M ORI AL YOUNG M USI CI AN C OM PETI T IO N The Wenatchee Valley Symphony Orchestra Young Musician Competition is designed to encourage and foster musicianship in student musicians. Many winners and participants have continued on as professional performers and music educators. The winner earns the opportunity to be a featured soloist with the Symphony. In 2011, the Competition was underwritten by New York Life Insurance Company in memory of Angela Schuster Svendsen, a winner of the competition as a student of Wenatchee High School. Angela was an outstanding teacher with a private studio of over forty students. As a performer, she occupied the principal second violin chair with the Eugene Symphony Orchestra and was also a member of the Portland Opera Orchestra and Vancouver Community Orchestra. Angela was killed by a drunk driver while returning to her home from a rehearsal with the Eugene Symphony Orchestra, February 11, 2007. In 2013, the name of the competition became the Angela Schuster Svendsen Memorial Young Musician Competition in her honor.

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A PPR EN TI C E C O N D U C TO R In collaboration with Central Washington University, the Wenatchee Valley Symphony Orchestra has established an apprentice conductor position. The graduate student will work closely with and assist Music Director and Conductor Nikolas Caoile in the artistic preparation of the orchestra.

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NORTH CENTRAL WASHINGTON’S FAMILY MUSIC CENTER

532 N Wenatchee Avenue Wenatchee, WA 98801

ABOUT THE SYMPHONY

avalon@nwi.net WWW.AVALONMUSIC.NET

Ph: 509-663-7300 Fax: 509-664-0560

13


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APPRENTICE CONDUCTOR A A R ON H I RS CH Aaron Hirsch, a first year master’s conducting student at Central Washington University, is excited to serve the Wenatchee Valley Symphony Orchestra as conducting apprentice this season. Aaron grew up in rural, south-central Minnesota with a very musical, dairy-farming family. In 2002, after studying piano for some time, he was encouraged to learn the organ. Two years later, Aaron began to act not only as organist at his church, but choir director as well, which served as his inspiration to pursue conducting. In 2013, Hirsch graduated from the University of Minnesota with a Bachelor’s degree in organ performance. While at the University, he also studied piano, harpsichord, conducting, and German, and was awarded a fellowship to study in Germany from the Deutscher Akademischer Austausch Dienst (DAAD) in 2012. During his semester at the Musik Hochschule in Stuttgart, Germany, Hirsch focused on organ and conducting studies. Aaron began his conducting career with the Riverside Chamber Orchestra, a small volunteer ensemble consisting of youth and adults in the Minneapolis-St. Paul region in 2011. By the summer of 2013, the RCO formed a more coherent, non-profit organization called Young Musicians of Minnesota, an ensemble of talented young students and alumni who are given a chance to participate in a highintensity summer festival with instruction by members of the Minnesota Orchestra, all at no cost to the students. Hirsch serves as artistic director with the ensemble, rehearsing and performing with them during the summer.

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ABOUT THE SYMPHONY

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The Symphony has joined orchestras across the country in the Orchestras Feeding America National Food Drive. Patrons are encouraged to bring non-perishable food items to concerts and events. Donated items will be provided to local food banks.

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High School Art Show WINTER WINE GALA Train PANGBORN

Pipes Concerts Environmental Film Series Coyote’s Corner HISTORIC HOME TOUR Exhibits Spring Tea First Fridays Apple Industry

People of our Past

Multicultural Fest Super Summer Adventures

Clovis

Christmas Family Fun Day

Tuesday-Saturday 10am-4pm First Fridays FREE www.wvmcc.org • 509-888-6240 ABOUT THE SYMPHONY

15


M USI C L

INDIVIDUAL SPONSORS

Gretchen B

Thank You to Our Sponsors

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Greg and Jo

D ON OR D E S I G N AT E D F U N D S MA N AGE D BY T HE CO M M U N I T Y F OU N DAT I O N O F N O RT H C EN TR A L WASHIN GTO N Roy Hill Fund George E. and Mary Ellen Miller

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Sec

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Make the long haul a joy ride.

Allegro Roman Allegro

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ENIGMA

E L G AR ( 1857

Theme Variatio Variatio Variatio Variatio Variatio Variatio Variatio Variatio Variatio Variatio Varaitio Variatio Variatio Variatio

VAU G H AN MOZ ART 3

CONCERT I: SE


PRE SE N TS

C O N C E RT

Secret Identities November 1, 2014, 7:00 pm Numerica Performing Arts Center

THE LARK ASCENDING VA UGHA N- WILLIAMS (1 872-1958)

PIANO CONCERTO NO. 20, IN D MINOR, K.466 M OZ A RT (1756-1791)

haul

MAI A TRAV E RS Z ANDE R, V IO L I N

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ENIGMA VARIATIONS, OP. 36 EL GA R (18 57- 1934)

Theme (Andante) Variation I (L’istesso tempo) “C.A.E.” Variation II (Allegro) “H.D.S-P.” Variation III (Alegretto) “R.B.T.” Variation IV (Allegro di molto) “W.M.B.” Variation V (Moderato) “R.P.A.” Variation VI (Andantino) “Ysobel” Variation VII (Presto) “Troyte” Variation VIII (Alegretto) “W.N.” Variation IX (Adagio) “Nimrod” Variation X (Intermezzo: Allegretto) “Dorabella” Varaition XI (Allegro di molto) “G.R.S.” Variation XII (Andante) “B.G.N.” Variation XIII (Romanza: Moderato) “ * * * “ Variation XIV (Finale: Allegro Presto) “E.D.U.” VAUGHAN W IL L IA M S IS A PPROX IM AT E LY 13 MI N U T E S , MOZART 30 M IN U T E S, E LGA R 31 M IN U T E S

CONCERT I: SECRET IDENTITIES

23


KENNADI HAWES

MAIA

2014 Angela Schuster Svendsen Memorial Young Musician Competition Winner

Violinist Ma

Kennadi Hawes grew up on a farm in Quincy. Homeschooled through grade ten, she is currently a student at Moses Lake Christian Academy. Kennadi first showed an interest in the piano at age four when she taught herself familiar Christmas carols and hymns. She began piano lessons shortly thereafter with her aunt, Sherrie Cole. Kennadi quickly advanced and began lessons with Preta Laughlin who she studied with for six years and currently studies with Dr. Oksana Ezhokina. She has worked with Dr. Jody Graves, Dr. Bonnilynn Bricker-Smith, and Jon Kimura Parker. Kennadi, who learned her first concerto at age ten, has represented WSMTA at the state teacherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s conference several times and has won at the Ellensburg Sonatina festival twice. She has competed in Musicfest Northwest in Spokane for eight years, earning a silver and gold medal numerous times and has participated in numer-

avid chamb

String Quar

and additio innovative the Boston

Extension S

Middle and

reached rec

regional orc

from the pr

ous competitions around the state including the Mid-Columbia Symphony Young Artist

A Washingt

Competition. Kennadi is honored with the opportunity to perform with the Wenatchee

Wenatchee

Valley Symphony Orchestra.

professor C

Arts degree

Violin Repe

she teaches

24

CONCERT I: SECRET IDENTITIES

CONCERT I: SE


MAIA TRAVERS ZANDER Violinist Maia Travers Zander is an active performer and teacher in the Los Angeles area. An

he is cur-

est in the

he began

anced

rently

nilynn

t age ten,

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ET IDENTITIES

avid chamber musician, Maia has been a member of the Galena, Hunt, Nomis and Cavaletta String Quartets, performing nationally and internationally on radio and in concert halls, and additionally presenting numerous outreach programs for the underprivileged. An innovative teacher, Maia has served as a faculty member of the Suzuki Strings of Madison, the Boston Youth Symphony Orchestra’s Intensive Community Project, and the Brookline Extension School. Most recently, Maia was appointed orchestra director for the Malibu Middle and High School orchestra programs. Under her leadership, enrollments have reached record levels, and the orchestra programs have earned their highest ever ratings at regional orchestra festivals. She is also a fully certified Suzuki teacher, a degree she earned from the prestigious program at the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point. A Washington native, Maia spent her high school years at Chelan High School and Wenatchee Valley College. Her primary teachers include her mother Kerry Travers, CWU professor Carrie Rehkopf, David Perry, and Bayla Keyes. She received her Doctor of Musical Arts degree from Boston University in 2008 and is the author of the book, “Intermediate Violin Repertoire: A Teachers’ Guide.” She currently resides in Malibu, California, where she teaches in the public schools and runs the Malibu String Academy.

CONCERT I: SECRET IDENTITIES

25


VAUGHAN-WILLIAMS Scored for flutes, oboe, clarinets, bassoons, horns, percussion, and strings.

This meditative piece was written in 1914. With the onset of the Great War, Vaughan Williams was enlisted as an orderly in the Royal Army Medical Corps. The piece takes its name from the title of a poem by George Meredith (1828-1909) and the following quotation heads the score:

GR

He rises and begins to round, He drops the silver chain of sound,

C

Of many links without a break, In chirrup, whistle, slur and shake. For singing till his heaven fills, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Tis love of earth that he instils, And ever winging up and up, Our valley is his golden cup And he the wine which overflows to lift us with him as he goes.

Ge

Till lost on his aerial rings In light, and then the fancy sings. Vaughan Williams musically personifies the avian protagonist with fluttering pentatonic scales, the soloist soaring high and free as a skylark. The orchestra remains muted much like an inspired congregation. Occasionally, there are cries of exuberant joy from individual woodwinds and from the orchestra as a whole. But, the entire piece generally sustains an understated mood of thanksgiving. Vaughan Williams dedicated this work to the distinguished English violinist Marie Hall, who gave the first performance at the Queenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hall, conducted by Sir Adrian Boult, in 1921.

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CONCERT I: SECRET IDENTITIES

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MOZART Scored for flute, oboes, bassoons, horns, trumpets, timpani, and strings.

This is the Mozart piano concerto that Beethoven admired above all others. It’s the only one he played in public (and the only one for which he wrote cadenzas). Throughout the nineteenth century, it was the sole concerto by Mozart that was regularly performed — its demonic power and dark beauty spoke to musicians who had been raised on Beethoven, Chopin, and Liszt. When it was fashionable to dismiss Mozart as an outdated composer with fussy manners and empty charm, this score revealed a darker side. It’s surely one of the most celebrated pieces ever written —“almost as much myth as work of art,” as Charles Rosen put it. What distinguishes this particular piano concerto from the 28 he composed in his lifetime is undoubtedly its key. The vast majority of D minor works in the classical repertory maintain a decidedly tragic character – Beethoven’s Symphony No. 9, Sibelius’ Violin Concerto, Mozart’s Don Giovanni, Mozart’s Requiem Mass, Shostakovich’s Symphony No. 5, to name just a few. Meanwhile, the relationship between the piano soloist and the orchestral accompaniment remains tense as the string provide determined rising tremolos and mysterious, uneasy syncopations. The tension is eased temporarily in the second movement where the soloists beautiful melodies are simply echoed by the orchestra with great amplification. But, the storms re-enters with a powerful middle section. In the third movement D minor menace remains in the air. All of a sudden the tonality changes. There is no transition to D major; it just happens. With very few exception do classical pieces end in a minor key.

Music is an outburst of the soul. —Frederick Delius

www.cfncw.org (509) 663-7716

28

We help ensure the music keeps playing, forever. CONCERT I: SECRET IDENTITIES

Su Sup M


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Support your Symphonyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s future. Become a Member Supporter by contributing to the Crescendo Campaign. Memberships start at $35 individual, $50 family. Contact the Symphony for more information.

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29


ELGAR

Variation V

Scored for flutes, oboes, clarinets, bassoons, horns, trumpets, trombones, tuba, timpani, percussion (snare drum, triangle, cymbals, bass drum), and strings.

manner, ev

Arnold, wa

There is much debate as to the origin of the theme and whether or not the “enigma” is

conversatio

Elgar’s mo

in relation to the theme, and if the theme is borrowed from a previous work. Since Elgar

deeply trut

entitles his work, Variations on an Original Theme and his story states that the melody de-

Variation V

veloped out of an evening of fatigued improvisation that would seem to be the answer. But some have argued that the puzzle of the “enigma” lies within the theme itself. Some have conjectured origins of the theme include “Auld Lang Syne,” “God Save the Queen,” “Rule, Brittania!,” a portion of Mozart’s “Prague” Symphony, and even “Pop Goes the Weasel.”

of “grave, s

of violists i

music conj

In 1953 the Saturday Evening Review held a contest to identify the enigmatic theme. The

Variation V

results were interesting and varied, but again, nothing compelling enough for scholars to

intimate fr

confirm. There is a camp that believes the “enigma” lies in a second theme that must be

by some m

pieced together from the original theme and its variations; this has yet to be convincingly

attempts o

proven. Still others speculate as to whether the “enigma” has to do with a grander and

despairing

larger scoped idea throughout the work. Some suggest friendship as the “unplayed” theme; others suggest it is the composer’s feelings of loneliness and isolation.

Variation V

of Miss Nor

Elgar dedicated his Enigma Variations “to my friends pictured within,” and begins with

her sister F

the theme, followed by fourteen variations. The theme is broken into two parts; the first, a

variation d

reflective theme in g minor which features the interval of the seventh, a particular favorite

Variations.

of Elgar’s; and the second, in G Major providing a more hopeful and uplifting sensibility.

until the ot

Theme—This is a simple three-part design, something you could represent as A-B-A, and, in the words of Elgar’s biographer Diana McVeagh, “as productive as a goldmine.” Variation I (C.A.E.)—This is Alice Elgar, whose death in 1920 brought the composer’s creative life to a halt for twelve years until he began work on his Third Symphony toward the end of 1932. “The variation is really a prolongation of the theme with what I wished to be romantic and delicate additions; those who knew C.A.E. will understand this reference to one whose life was a romantic and delicate inspiration.”

And there,

Variation I “hunter,”

a German-

publishing

composer t record of a

movement

Variation II (H.D.S-P.)—Hew David Steuart-Powell was a pianist with whom Elgar, a

field, a view

violinist, played chamber music. Their usual cellist was Basil Nevinson (Variation XII).

twenty yea

Variation III (R.B.T.)—“Has reference to [Richard Baxter Townshend’s] presentation of an

Variation X

old man in some amateur theatricals—the low voice flying off occasionally into ‘soprano’ timbre.” Townshend was a classicist at Oxford and rode through that town on his bicycle, the bell constantly ringing. The violins’ plucked strings and their woodwind doublings

Baker), che

suggestion

narily pote

represent the bicycle bell.

response to

Variation IV (W.M.B.)—William Meath Baker, “a country squire, gentleman and scholar.

Variation X

In the days of horses and carriages it was more difficult than in these days of petrol to arrange the carriages for the day to suit a large number of guests. This Variation was written after the host had, with a slip of paper in his hand, forcibly read out the arrangements for the day and hurriedly left the music-room with an inadvertent bang of the door.”

30

CONCERT I: SECRET IDENTITIES

Hereford C

few bars we

the steep b

(bars 2 and

to music.’ I

CONCERT I: SE


Variation V (R.P.A.)—Richard Penrose Arnold, son of the literary critic and poet Matthew Arnold, was “a great lover of music which he played (on the pianoforte) in a self-taught

ercussion

manner, evading difficulties but suggesting in a mysterious way the real feeling. His serious conversation was continually broken up by whimsical and witty remarks.” Strings, in one of

ma” is

Elgar’s most expansive and inspired melodies, represent Arnold’s nobility of mind and his

e Elgar

deeply truthful way of playing music.

elody de-

Variation VI (Ysobel)—This is Isabel Fitton, a woman, in critic Michael Kennedy’s words,

swer. But

ome have

,” “Rule,

Weasel.”

of “grave, statuesque beauty.” She was an amateur violinist who, to make up for a shortage of violists in the neighborhood and to be obliging, switched to the deeper instrument. The music conjoins formality and gravity with discreet romantic allure.

me. The

Variation VII (Troyte)—Arthur Troyte Griffith, an architect, was one of Elgar’s most

holars to

intimate friends. “The uncouth rhythm of the drums and lower strings was really suggested

must be

by some maladroit essays to play the pianoforte; later the strong rhythm suggests the

incingly

er and

ed” theme;

attempts of the instructor (E.E.) to make something like order out of chaos, and the final despairing ‘slam’ records that the effort proved to be in vain.” Variation VIII (W.N.)—This variation, named for Winifred Norbury, is less a portrait of Miss Norbury than of Sherridge, the eighteenth-century house where she lived with

s with

her sister Florence. “The gracious personalities of the ladies are sedately shown.” As the

he first, a

variation draws to a close, Elgar offers the most beautiful harmonic stroke in the Enigma

ar favorite

Variations. As the final G major chord dies away, only the first violins hold their note—G—

sibility.

until the other strings, re-entering, with magical effect slip a chord of E-flat major under it.

-B-A, and,

oser’s toward

wished to

eference to

And there, in a new world, begins Variation IX (Nimrod)—the most loved of the variations. “Jaeger” is the German for “hunter,” and Nimrod is the “mighty hunter” mentioned in Genesis 10. August Jaeger was a German-born musician of frail health and great soul who worked for the London musicpublishing house of Novello and who, more than anyone except Alice Elgar, sustained the composer through his frequent and severe periods of depression. “The Variation . . . is the record of a long summer evening talk, when my friend discoursed eloquently on the slow movements of Beethoven, and said that no one could approach Beethoven at his best in this

gar, a

field, a view with which I cordially concurred.” Jaeger, still young, died in 1909, and nearly

XII).

twenty years later Elgar wrote: “His place has been occupied but never filled.”

ation of an

Variation X (Dorabella—Intermezzo)—Dora Penny, stepniece of Variation IV (Billy

soprano’ bicycle,

lings

d scholar.

ol to

was written

ments for

ET IDENTITIES

Baker), cheerful and music-loving, was a woman to whom Elgar was very close. We hear a suggestion of the stammer with which she spoke in her youth. We also sense an extraordinarily potent though repressed sexuality, to say nothing of Elgar’s powerful and repressed response to it. Variation XI (G.R.S.)—The initials belong to George Robertson Sinclair, organist of Hereford Cathedral, but the music belongs to Dr. Sinclair’s dog. In Elgar’s words, “The first few bars were suggested by [the] great bulldog Dan (a well-known character) falling down the steep bank into the River Wye (bar 1); his paddling up stream to find a landing place (bars 2 and 3); and his rejoicing bark on landing (second half of bar 5). G.R.S. said ‘set that to music.’ I did; here it is.”

CONCERT I: SECRET IDENTITIES

31


Variation XII (B.G.N.)—“The Variation is a tribute to a very dear friend [Basil Nevinson] whose scientific and artistic attainments, and the wholehearted way they were put at the disposal of his friends, particularly endeared him to the writer.” Variation XIII (***Romanza)—The asterisks in place of initials suggest further mystery, and the additional title of “Romanza” heightens the effect, as does part of the music itself. The variation starts harmlessly enough, and sweetly, but after only a few bars its course is interrupted by a strange rocking figure in the violas, which, with a soft drumroll, forms the background for a clarinet playing a phrase from Mendelssohn’s Calm Sea and Prosperous Voyage Overture. Elgar explains that the asterisks take the place of the name of a lady who was, at the time of composition, on a sea voyage. The lady was Lady Mary Lygon of the Worcestershire nobility, in the spring of 1899 on her way to Australia with her brother, who was to be installed as Governor of New South Wales. The music conveys a poignant sense of longing for someone far away. Variation XIV (Finale: E.D.U.)—These are no one’s initials, but run them together and they give you Alice’s nickname for Edward. This variation/finale shows the composer’s

Locate Wenat two m Perfor and th •

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Com dail

Com Rec Wed

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boldly assertive, confident side—less than half of him, in other words. Alice returns, as does Nimrod, and the music ends in a blaze.

We’re proud to support the

Wenatchee Symphony

An affiliation between Central Washington Hospital & Wenatchee Valley Medical Center

confluencehealth.org

For res 32

CONCERT I: SECRET IDENTITIES

1


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mystery,

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Located in the heart of Wenatchee, less than two miles from the Performing Arts Center and the Symphony. •

Spacious studio suites

Complimentary breakfast daily

Complimentary Manager’s Reception Monday Wednesday

Indoor pool and spa

Fitness center open 24 hours

Free high-speed internet

Electric charging stations

rns, as

ET IDENTITIES

For reservations, call 509.667.2775 or visit www.wenatcheespringhill.com 1730 N Wenatchee Avenue, Wenatchee, Washington 98801

33


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PRE SE N T

C O N C E RT

Wonderwomen Saturday, December 6, 2014, 7:00 pm Numerica Performing Arts Center

OVERTURE TO L’ITALIANA IN ALGERI ROS S INI (179 2-1 868)

HONEY AND RUE A ND RÉ PREVIN (B .1 929)

KARI RAG AN, SO P RANO

First I’ll Try Love Whose House is This? The Town Is Lit Do You Know Him? I am Not Seaworthy Take My Mother Home INTERMISSION

SCHEHERAZADE, OP.35 RIM S KY - KORSAK OV (1844-1908)

The Sea and Sinbad’s Ship The Kalendar Prince The Young Prince and The Young Princess Festival at Baghdad ROSSINI IS A PPROX IM AT E LY 9 M IN U T E S , PREVIN 2 5 M IN U T E S, RIM SKY-KO RSA KOV 4 5 MI N U T E S

CONCERT II: WONDERWOMEN

35


ROSSI

Scored for flu cymbals), an

Rossini was

able pressu

Algiers) – in

to create a n

opening nig

tinuous gen

L’Italiana in

It is a tale o

Mustafà, th

rescues the

KARI RAGAN

of Rossini’s

Since making her operatic debut as the three heroines in Offenbach’s Les Contes d’Hoffmann with Spokane Opera, Kari Ragan is continually praised for her sparkling lyric coloratura voice and dynamic stage presence. In addition, she is acclaimed as a crossover singer, having the ability to sing beautifully in Oratorio, Opera or the Musical Theatre genre. Other operatic roles include Giannetta in L’Elisir d’Amore with Opera Idaho, Frasquita in Carmen with Washington East Opera, and the Oregon premiere of Mozart’s La Finta Giardiniera as Serpetta. In Humperdinck’s Hansel and Gretel she performed the role of Gretel with the Lyric Opera Northwest, Lake Chelan Bach Festival and the Sandman/Dew Fairy in Washington East Opera’s production. Concert Work includes Carmina Burana with the Ft. Collins Symphony as well as the Seattle Choral Company, Honneger’s King David and Mendelssohn’s Elijah, Brahms Requiem and more with the Tri-Cities Oratorio Orchestra, Impresario with Spokane Symphony, and Mozart’s Requiem in Colorado Springs, Barber’s Knoxville Summer with Mid-Columbia Symphony and Haydn’s The Creation and Bach’s Cantata Jauchzett Gott in allen Landen both with the Lake Chelan Bach Feste. Seasonally, she performs Messiah in the Tri-Cities and Colorado Springs. Among other awards and honors she has been recognized as the Regional Finalist for the Metropolitan Opera National Council and the Regional Finalist for the MacCallister Competition. In academia, Dr. Ragan is a nationally acclaimed vocal pedagogue having received the prestigious Van L. Lawrence Award given jointly by the Voice Foundation and National Association of Teacher’s of Singing. Due to her research, publishing and affiliation with the UW Otolaryngology Department for habilitation of injured singers, she is frequently sought after as a presenter and adjudicator. Dr. Ragan is on the University of Washington Voice Faculty where she teaches applied voice, vocal pedagogy and Italian Diction.

36

CONCERT II: WONDERWOMEN

The Overtur

Then the ob

enlivens th

alternation

Rossini’s m


ROSSINI Scored for flute, oboes, clarinets, bassoons, horns, trumpets, timpani, percussion (bass drum, cymbals), and strings.

Rossini was just 21 years old, already had composed ten operas, and then, under considerable pressure for time, produced the effervescent L’Italiana in Algeri (the Italian Girl in Algiers) – in just eighteen days! Given the time constraints, there was obviously no time to create a new libretto, so Rossini used an old one, albeit revised, by Angelo Anelli. The opening night of L’Italiana in Algeri on May 22nd 1813 was greeted with “deafening, continuous general applause” – an applause that has continued to this day. After all, Rossini’s L’Italiana in Algeri still remains one of his very best comic operas. It is a tale of an Italian girl in Algiers, trying to save her lover Lindoro from the clutches of Mustafà, the Bey of Algiers. She uses her feminine wiles to outwit the absurd old Bey and rescues the man she loves. Not an overly complicated plot, but enough to fire up the magic of Rossini’s genius. The Overture is delightful. It starts quietly, until abruptly interrupted by a fortissimo chord!

ing lyric

ossover

atre genre.

quita in

nta Giar-

of Gretel

w Fairy in

the

hms

ane

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tly sought

n Voice

NDERWOMEN

Then the oboe begins a long, sinuous melody – followed by two further crashes. Rossini enlivens the mood with a transition passage that launches the Allegro. There is much alternation between loud and soft, much scampering from the violins. Then comes one of Rossini’s most identifiable trademarks – a long , building crescendo.


PREVIN

DO YOU

Scored for flutes, oboes, clarinets, bassoons, horns, trumpets, tuba, jazz drum set, string bass, harp, piano, and strings.

The Carnegie Hall Corporation commissioned Honey and Rue with original text by Toni Morrison for Kathleen Battle. Kathleen Battle and the Orchestra of St. Luke’s, conducted by Andre Previn, first performed it on 5th January 1992 at Carnegie Hall, New York City.

Do you kn

Easy (My

He’s easy So easy.

Do you kn

He lasts (

How long

F I R ST I ’L L T RY LOV E First I’ll try love. Although I’ve never heard the word Referred to even whispered to Me First I’ll try love. So when winter comes And sundown becomes My time of day, If anybody asks, I can say, “First, I tried love.”

WH OS E H O U SE IS T HI S ? Whose house is this? Whose night keeps out the light In here? Say, who owns this house? It’s not mine. I had another, sweeter, brighter, With a view of lakes crossed in painted boats; Of fields wide as arms opened for me. This house is strange. Its shadows lie. Say, tell me, why does its lock fit my key?

TH E TOW N I S L I T

But I know that somewhere, out there

He lasts.

The town is lit

Do you kn

The players begin

I know hi

To make music in all the cafés

He’s easy

Clowns on wheels Linger to steal Foxes that click on the curb Lovers expecting The night to protect them The moon too far to disturb Trees in the park Dance after dark To music in all the cafés. It’s been suggested: well kept lawns and fences white porch swings and toast by the fire. It’s been requested: puppies, a window of blossoming pear trees and a place for the robins to nest. But I know that somewhere, out there Geminis split Sagittarians kick To the music in all the cafés Aquarians throw Gold on the floor To rival the glitter it makes Pisces swim Over the rim Knowing they’ve got what it takes

It’s been suggested: well kept lawns and

To cut through the dark

fences white porch swings and toast by

And get to the heart

the fire.

Of the music in all the cafés.

It’s been requested: puppies, a window of blossoming pear trees and a place for the robins to nest.

38

CONCERT II: WONDERWOMEN

I AM NO

I am not s

Look how home.

I had a lif

the sea.

I am not s

Let me be

Mixed wi

Give me t

To trick li

I am not s

Look how home.


D O YOU K N OW HI M ?

ass, harp,

y Toni

nducted by

ity.

t there

Do you know him?

My lady rides a Tennessee stud with a tiny

Easy (My God)

whip in her hand. The afternoon sky is

He’s easy to take, to mistake

kind to her and the wind is in love with

So easy.

her veil. Her coat is as red as her heart. The

Do you know him?

spurs on her heels glint like knives where

He lasts (My Lord)

the flesh of the stud is soft.

How long so long so long

I wish I had me a fast-footed horse; a veil

He lasts.

to wrap my mind.

Do you know him?

I wish I had me a tiny little whip and a

I know him.

heart that could close like a coat.

He’s easy.

Take my mother home; take my mother

I A M N OT S E AWO RT HY

ns and

oast by

ndow of for the

t there

akes

NDERWOMEN

TAKE M Y M OT H E R H OM E

home I ain’t free; never mind about me

I am not seaworthy.

Take my mother home.

Look how the fish mistake my hair for

Take my father home let my father see his

home.

home

I had a life, like you. I shouldn’t be riding

I ain’t free; don’t worry about me

the sea.

Take my father home.

I am not seaworthy.

Take my sister home; lead my sister home

Let me be earth-bound, star fixed.

I ain’t free; forget about me

Mixed with sun and smacking air.

Take my sister home.

Give me the smile, the magic kiss

Take my brother home; show him the way

To trick little bow death of my hand.

to get home

I am not seaworthy.

I ain’t free; it don’t matter about me

Look how the fish mistake my hair for

Take my brother home.

home.

Take my baby home; take my baby home I ain’t free and I never will be Take my pretty baby on home. Home. Home. I can stay here all along if you Take my mother home. Text ©Copyright Toni Morrison 1992


The Story

a tribe of w

in turn by b

flute, and h

in turn is in

The lyric sw

falling coun

melodies w

seem to da

The solo vio

dance accen

wilder, pun

RIMSKY-KORSAKOV

of the them

Scored for flutes, oboes, clarinets, bassoons, horns, trumpets, trombones, tuba, timpani, percussion (bass drum, suspended cymbal, snare drum, triangle, tambourine, tamtam), harp, and strings.

by a Bronze

until The S tion of the

The tales of the Arabian Nights were passed down through the centuries by word of mouth;

has been m

the oldest tales date to the 10th century. Anotine Galland, who published several collections

broad, sust

of the stories, brought them to Europe in 1704. These included the now well-known sagas of Sinbad the Sailor, Ali Baba and the 40 Thieves, and Aladdin and his magic lamp. The story of Scheherazade provides the narrative thread between the tales, and runs as follows: Scheherazade was the daughter of the grand vizier to Sultan Shahriyar. The sultan’s first wife had betrayed him, and in anger and grief he not only executed her but vowed to marry a woman each night and kill her the next morning. The sultan’s cruel order was obeyed for three years, until Scheherazade conceived a plan to stop him and convinced her father to offer her as the sultan’s next wife. The clever girl talked the sultan into letting her sister spend the night with them in the bridal chamber, and in the morning, as planned, Scheherazade’s sister begged her to tell a story. Scheherazade began one of the exciting tales but stopped before the story ended, causing the sultan, who had listened as well, to put off killing her until she could finish her story the next evening. Scheherazade, of course, never finished her tales, but kept her husband enthralled with story after story for 1,001 nights. By that time the pair had produced three sons and the sultan, convinced of his wife’s fidelity and wisdom, revoked his death sentence. The first movement, The Sea and Sinbad’s Ship, opens with two opposing themes: a stern and solemn tune dominated by the brass, and a sinuous violin melody introduced by a woodwind choir. The former is the stern sultan; the latter is Scheherazade, weaving her tales. Rimsky-Korsakov described the two themes, which wind throughout all movements of the work, as “purely musical material … Appearing as they do each time under different moods, the self-same motives and themes correspond each time to different images, actions, and pictures.” In this movement, the themes ebb and flow over a third rocking melody like the ocean’s waves.

40

CONCERT II: WONDERWOMEN

7 Nort

CONCERT II: W


The Story of the Kalendar Prince — a royal prince who disguised himself as a member of a tribe of wandering dervishes called Kalendars — features an “oriental” melody played in turn by both the full orchestra and different solo instruments, including bassoon, oboe, flute, and horn. The theme is offset by a brisk martial tune introduced by the brass, which in turn is interrupted by a clarinet solo that whirls like the dervishes of the title. The lyric sweep of The Young Prince and the Young Princess is colored by a rising and falling counterpoint from woodwinds, harp, or upper strings against lower. Romantic melodies weave in and out, and the movement ends with a series of rapid, quiet figures that seem to dance into the distance. The solo violin of Scheherazade heralds the final movement, which bursts into a vigorous dance accented by cymbal and tambourine, The Festival in Baghdad. The dance becomes wilder, punctuated by snare and bass drum, and a brass fanfare announces a return to some of the themes of Sinbad and The Sea. The music rises and falls with the swell of the ocean

ercussion rings.

until The Ship Goes to Pieces on a Rock (the full title notes that the rock is “Surmounted by a Bronze Warrior”). With a mighty crash, the music segues into a sweeping recapitulation of the Sultan’s theme from the first movement, which then subsides as if the Sultan

of mouth;

has been mollified. Scheherazade’s violin ends the tale on a series of harmonics over a

collections

broad, sustained chord.

wn sagas of

uns as fol-

sultan’s

owed

der was

inced her

in the

r to tell ended,

finish

kept

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duced by

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GREAT CLASSICS

ovements differ-

images,

ocking

NDERWOMEN

7 North Worthen

CONCERT II: WONDERWOMEN

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/PybusPublicMarket

41


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THE NUTCRAC


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The Nutcracker

with Fabulous Feet Academy of Ballet Saturday, December 13, 2014, 7:00 pm Sunday, December 14, 2014, 2:00 pm Numerica Performing Arts Center

THE NUTCRACKER (ARR. MCDERMOTT) PYOTR TC HA I KOVSKY (18 40-18 93)

Miniature Overture ACT I

Tableau I Scene (The Christmas Tree) March Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Galop and Dance of the Parents Dance Scene (Arrival of Drosselmeyer) Scene and Grandfather Dance Scene (Clara and the Nutcracker) Scene (The Battle) Tableau II Scene (The Magic Castle on the Mountain of Sweets) Scene (Clara and Nutcracker Prince) INTERMISS ION ACT II

Tableau III Scene (The Magic Castle on the Mountain of Sweets) Divertissements Dance of the Reed-Pipes Trepak (Russian Dance) Chocolate (Spanish Dance) Tea (Chinese Dance) Coffee (Arabian Dance) Mother Gigogne and the Clowns Waltz of the Flowers Pas de Deux Variation II: Dance of the Sugar Plum Fairy Final Waltz and Apotheosis ACT I IS AP PROX IM AT E LY 4 0 M IN U T E S, AC T I I 3 0 MI N U T E S

THE NUTCRACKER

43


WILSON ALVAREZ, GUEST CONDUCTOR Ecuadorian musician Wilson Alvarez started his piano studies at an early age with his father,

MELIS FABU

Carlos Alvarez, graduating from the Music Conservatory “Vicente Anda Aguirre” in Rio-

Melissa, pa

bamba, Ecuador. He later traveled to Italy to study at the “Conservatorio Statale di Brescia.”

teach. She

As a prominent student of Maestra Aida Fino’s class, he frequently participated in recitals

DeMarie. S

and concerts with the Conservatory’s Orchestra. He placed between the winners of the

the infamo

international piano contest “Rodolfo del Corona” in 1983 at Livorno, and “Franz Liszt” in

She has als

1984 at Luca, Italy. In 2005 he obtained his Bachelor´s Degree in Musical Education Sciences,

for DeMarie

majoring in piano and instrumental pedagogy and in 2007 he obtained his teaching degree

all over the

in the specialty of musical pedagogy, both from the Technical University of

and Bermu

Manabí, Ecuador.

Since open In 1991 he was named principal conductor of Quito’s Metropolitan Symphony Band, Institu-

in many co

tion with which he recorded an important musical documentary of Ecuadorian Sacred Music

and Duo’s o

for chorus and band. As guest conductor, he has performed with the Ecuadorian Symphony

professiona

Orchestras of Cuenca, Guayaquil, Loja and the National Symphony Orchestra of Quito. in

The great s

June 2004 he was hired as principal conductor of Loja’s Symphony Orchestra. in September

that makes

2008, he was named principal conductor of the city of Cuenca’s Symphony Orchestra. From

National Bo

1989 to 2009 he was the principal pianist of the National Symphony Orchestra; and was

for DMA. Sh

piano teacher and principal conductor of the orchestra at the Franz Liszt’s Conservatory of

teaching sk

Music in Quito, Ecuador.

with young

Wilson Alvarez and his family moved to the United States on 2009. Since his arrival he has actively participated in musical performances and has shared his talent with school districts and institutions, teaching and accompanying. In December 2010 he became the Music Minister of St. Joseph Parish in Wenatchee, where he currently resides with his family. He is involved in several cultural activities in the community.

44

THE NUTCRACKER

THE NUTCRAC


his father,

MELISSA MILLER, DIRECTOR, FABULOUS FEET ACADEMY OF BALLET

in Rio-

Melissa, past-president of Dance Masters of America chapter #39 is certified by test to

i Brescia.”

teach. She has studied dance seriously since the age of five under the direction of David

n recitals

DeMarie. She has also taken master classes with Gus Giordano, Betsy Haug, Brian Foley,

of the

the infamous Tom Ralabate, and others. She was crowned Miss Dance DMA Chapter #8.

Liszt” in

She has also competed in and won highest scores in national competitions. Melissa taught

n Sciences,

for DeMarie from 1979-1986, going on to tour with Greg Thompson Productions, performing

ng degree

all over the world including Philadelphia, Atlantic City, New York, Reno, Toronto, and Bermuda. Since opening the Fabulous Feet Dance Studio, Melissa’s students have achieved top honors

d, Institu-

in many competitions, including high score, Dancer of the Year, Performance Groups

cred Music

and Duo’s of the Year and many first place awards. Other students have gone on to dance

ymphony

professionally with Greg Thompson Productions and other producers and dance companies.

uito. in

The great success of her students has brought the Fabulous Feet Dance Studio to a high

eptember

that makes all of its students proud to be “Fabulous Feet dancers.” Melissa served on the

stra. From

National Board of Dance Masters of America. She has also been on the National Judges Panel

nd was

for DMA. She was the future planning director of DMA as she was recognized for her

rvatory of

teaching skills, studio “know-how” and assertive attitude. Melissa absolutely loves working with young children, as they love working with her.

al he has

ool districts

Music

mily. He is

NUTCRACKER

THE NUTCRACKER

45


TRACY TROTTER, CHOREOGRAPHER AND DEVELOPER

RHIAN BALLE

Tracy graduated from Wenatchee High School. During her prep education years she studied

Rhiannon h

Ballet with Joan Shelton at the Wenatchee School of Ballet and Fabulous Feet Dance Studio,

nesiology a

performed with the Wenatchee Youth Circus. She spent five years at Eastern Washington

Technical C

University (EWU), receiving her Bachelor of Arts in Music Education. She taught dance and

munication

gymnastics camps at EWU, receiving “Best Teacher Awards.” While at Eastern, she was an

of learning

assistant teacher in the athletic department and a featured soloist with the Spokane

independen

Ballet Company.

such as Pac

Tracy has attended Master Teacher courses in New York as well as attended teacher classes at the LADF National Convention. She was a corporate member of the “Royal Academy of Dance” London 2003-2013, and the “International Tap Association” 2003-2013. Tracy has toured as a professional dancer and has performed, danced and held the position of “Dance Captain” and “Assistant Choreographer” in many shows ranging from Magic Shows, Vegas style Reviews, Circus, Rock Tours, Motown and Blues, and various Broadway style reviews. She has traveled and performed in Japan, Bahamas, West Indies and various locations in the U.S. While in Japan and Bahamas, she taught gymnastics, dance and aerobics as a professional guest. She has worked with the choreography for Wenatchee Music Theatre productions of “Grease”, “Chorus Line” and “Thoroughly Modern Millie.” Tracy and competition dancers have won several honors and national awards.

previous co

at the age o

Beyond bal

always drew

teaching, s

tenth year o

Feet Dance

at Next Ste

and univers

with Pacific Ballet, Los mer Dance

Rock Schoo

46

THE NUTCRACKER

THE NUTCRAC


RHIANNON ARCHERELLE, BALLET ARTISTIC DIRECTOR

he studied

Rhiannon has studied sports medicine under Dale Blair at Wenatchee High School, A&P, ki-

ce Studio,

nesiology and massage theory at Ashmead College, early childhood development at Renton

hington

Technical College, psychology at Pierce Community College, child guidance and com-

dance and

munications at Wenatchee Valley College and is a Certified Pilates Instructor. An advocate

he was an

of learning, she is constantly continuing her dance instructor education through vigorous

ne

independent study, and attends teacher seminars at internationally acclaimed schools such as Pacific Northwest Ballet. A third generation dancer, Rhiannon is the daughter of a

er classes

demy of

Tracy has

of “Dance

ws, Vegas reviews.

ions in the profes-

e produc-

mpetition

NUTCRACKER

previous corps dancer with Oakland City Ballet. She began ballet training with Joan Shelton at the age of six. She studied with Gigi Partridge who became one of her greatest mentors. Beyond ballet, Rhiannon spent three years as a well-reputed Seattle freestyle dancer who always drew a crowd and was invited to competitions. Known for her holistic approach to teaching, she implements a nurturing, healthy environment within class structure. In her tenth year of instructing ballet, she has taught at The Wenatchee School of Ballet, Fabulous Feet Dance Studio, and L’Academie de Danse Classique, and was the artistic ballet director at Next Step Dance Studio for six years. Rhiannon’s alumni are studio owners, instructors, and university dance program students, and have been accepted through audition to study with Pacific Northwest Ballet, Evergreen City Ballet, International School of Ballet, Toledo Ballet, Los Angeles Ballet, Grand Rapids Ballet, Cornish College of the Arts, Whitman Summer Dance Lab, American Ballet Theatre, Bolshoi Ballet, Walnut Hill Conservatory, and The Rock School for Dance Education.

THE NUTCRACKER

47


KATIE SPURBECK, BALLET APPRENTICE Katie Spurbeck has been dancing for 17 years. She has attended regional and national competitions all over the United States including Las Vegas, Lake Tahoe, and Anaheim. With her team, Katie has received many top awards. She has starred as the Sugar Plum Fairy in the Wenatchee Nutcracker and this will be her eighth year participating in the show.

Nationally Acclaimed!

Opens Daily 9am April 15 - October 15

3327 Ohme Road Wenatchee, Washington Junction of Hwy 2 & 97A, overlooking the Wenatchee Valley

509-662-5785 www.ohmegardens.com CONCERT I: SECRET IDENTITIES


onal com-

m. With her

y in the

RET IDENTITIES

Sweetheart Musical Soiree February 14, 2015 7:00 pm Wenatchee Valley Museum

$40

Symphony Association members receive a $5 discount.

Celebrate with your sweetheart at the Symphonyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Valentine-themed musical soirĂŠe featuring Symphony soloists and ensembles, wine tasting, light fare, and desserts.

Proceeds to support the WVSO. Tickets can be purchased at the PAC. www.numericapac.org

www.wenatcheesymphony.org | 509-667-2640 symphony@wenatcheesymphony.org


PRE SE N TS

John Williams Maestro of the Movies Saturday, February 28, 2015, 7:00pm Numerica Performing Arts Center

THE COWBOYS OVERTURE WIL L IA MS

EXCERPTS FROM CLOSE ENC OUNTERS OF THE THIRD KIND

THAT’S

SC H W ARTZ /

Hooray There’s That’s

WIL L IA MS

THREE PIECES FROM HARRY POTTER WIL L IA MS

Hedwig’s Theme Nimbus 2000 Harry’s Wondrous World

ADVENTURES ON EARTH FROM E .T. WIL L IA MS

INTERMISSION

THREE P SCHIND WIL L IAMS

TANGO

G ARDE L , A R

STARS W WIL L IAMS

Main T Princes Imperia Yoda’s Throne

THE FIRS T H E S E CO


IND

C O N C E RT

THAT’S ENTERTAINMENT S CHWA RT Z /DIETZ, AR R . WILLIAMS

Hooray for Hollywood There’s No Business Like Show Business That’s Entertainment

THREE PIECES FROM SCHINDLER’S LIST

TARN TRAV E RS, V IO L IN

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STARS WARS SUITE FOR ORCHESTRA WIL L IA MS

Main Theme Princess Leia’s Theme Imperial March (Darth Vader’s Theme) Yoda’s Theme Throne Room and End Titles THE FIRST H A L F IS A PPROX IM AT E LY 4 3 MI N U T E S , THE SECON D H A L F IS A PPROX IM AT E LY 4 2 MI N U T E S .

TARN TRAV E RS, V IO L IN


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CONCERT III: J


TARN TRAVERS Violinist Tarn Travers has performed throughout the Unites States, Europe, and Japan as a soloist and a chamber musician. In 2001, he was a prizewinner at the Heifetz Guarneri auditions, which led to a performance on the historic “ex-David” Guarneri, the favored violin of Jascha Heifetz. Tarn spent three years as a violinist in the New World Symphony, where he often led the orchestra as concertmaster under numerous conductors, including Michael Tilson Thomas, baroque expert Ton Koopman, and new music specialist Susanna Mälkki. He appeared as soloist with the New World Symphony three times, once in every season spent with that orchestra, in the music of Béla Bartók, Ramiro Cortés, and Chen Yi. After giving the world premier of Maria Newman’s Triple Concerto, he was asked by the composer to record the piece, which was released in 2010. Currently on faculty at Luther College, Tarn performs regularly throughout the country as a soloist, chamber musician, and an orchestral player, including performances as a member of the Luther College Piano Quartet, with whom he released a CD of chamber music by Beethoven, Brahms, and Brooke Joyce in 2011. Tarn is also a member of the Sun Valley Summer Symphony and the Firebird Chamber Orchestra, and was principal second violin of the Festival Orchestra for the International Beethoven Festival in Chicago in 2012 and 2013, where he also performed chamber music as a part of the Prometheus Ensemble live on WFMT. Additionally, Tarn joined the faculty of AlpenKammerMusik in the Austrian Alps in 2014, where he coached and performed chamber music. A busy 2013-2014 season included an Austrian tour of Sibelius’ Violin Concerto, including an appearance in Vienna’s Konzerthaus, a performance at the Library of Congress with Chicago-based new music group Dal Niente, and concerti, recitals, and chamber music performances from coast to coast. Tarn studied at the San Francisco Conservatory, the Cleveland Institute of Music, and Stony Brook University, where his primary teachers included Cleveland Orchestra concertmaster William Preucil, concert violinists Camilla Wicks and Axel Strauss, and Emerson Quartet violinist Philip Setzer.

CONCERT III: JOHN WILLIAMS

53


WILLIAMS One of the most popular and successful American orchestral composers of the modern age, John Williams is the winner of five Academy Awards, 17 Grammys, three Golden Globes, two Emmys and five BAFTA Awards from the British Academy of Film and Television Arts. Best known for his film scores and ceremonial music, Williams is also a noted composer of concert works and a renowned conductor. Williams’ scores for such films as Jaws, E.T.: The Extra-Terrestrial, Schindler’s List, as well as the Indiana Jones series, have won him multiple awards and produced best-selling recordings, and his scores for the original Star Wars trilogy transformed the landscape of Hollywood film music and became icons of American culture. Williams has composed the music and served as music director for nearly eighty films, including Saving Private Ryan, Amistad, Seven Years in Tibet, The Lost World, Rosewood, Sleepers, Nixon, Sabrina, Schindler’s List, Jurassic Park, Home Alone, Far and Away, JFK, Hook, Presumed Innocent, Always, Born on the Fourth of July, the Indiana Jones trilogy, The Accidental Tourist, Empire of the Sun, The Witches of Eastwick, the Star Wars trilogy, E.T.: The Extra-Terrestrial, The Empire Strikes Back, Superman, Close Encounters of the Third Kind, Jaws and Goodbye Mr. Chips. Williams has been awarded several gold and platinum records, and his score for Schindler’s List earned him both an Oscar and a Grammy. In 2000, at the ShoWest Convention USA, he was honored as Maestro of the Year by the National Association of Theater Owners. John Williams was born in New York and moved to Los Angeles with his family in 1948. There he attended UCLA and studied composition privately with Mario Castelnuovo-Tedesco. After service in the Air Force, Mr. Williams returned to New York to attend the Juilliard School, where he studied piano with Madame Rosina Lhevinne. While in New York, he also worked as a jazz pianist, both in clubs and on recordings. He then returned to Los Angeles, where he began his career in the film industry, working with such composers as Bernard Herrmann, Alfred Newman, and Franz Waxman. He went on to write music for many television programs in the 1960s, winning two Emmy Awards for his work. In January 1980, Williams was named nineteenth Conductor of the Boston Pops Orchestra since its founding in 1885. He assumed the title of Boston Pops Laureate Conductor, following his retirement in December 1993, and currently holds the title of Artist-in-Residence at Tanglewood.

Derek & Lana Carlso

John Williams has led the Boston Pops Esplanade Orchestra on United States Tours in 1985, 1989 and 1992 and on a tour of Japan in 1987. He led the Boston Pops Orchestra on tours of Japan in 1990 and 1993. In addition to leading the Boston Symphony Orchestra at Symphony Hall and at Tanglewood, Williams has appeared as guest conductor with a number of major orchestras, including the London Symphony, the Cleveland Orchestra, the Philadelphia Orchestra, the Chicago Symphony, the Pittsburgh Symphony, the Dallas Symphony, the San Francisco Symphony and the Los Angeles Philharmonic. Williams holds honorary degrees from fourteen American universities, including Berklee College of Music in Boston, Boston College, Northeastern University, Tufts University, Boston University, the New England Conservatory of Music and the University of Massachusetts at Boston. On June 23, 2000, he became the first inductee into the Hollywood Bowl Hall of Fame.

54

CONCERT III: JOHN WILLIAMS


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CONCERT IV: C


C O N C E RT

PRE SE N T

Clarinet Monsters Music of Benny Goodman, Artie Shaw and Jeff Brooks Saturday, April 18, 2015, 7:00pm Numerica Performing Arts Center CONCERTO FOR CLARINET (1979)

JE FF BRO O KS, C L ARINE T

GORD ON S CHUSTER (B . 1 950)

INTERMISSION

MONSTERS OF CLARINET

JE FF BRO O KS, C L ARINE T

(M US IC A RRA NGED B Y JEFF B R OOK S) JEF F BROOKS, CLAR INET DA N T A Y L OR , PIANO BREN PL UM MER , B ASS DA VY NEF OS, DR UMS THOMA S PELL, SOUND ENGINEER

885-7564

CONCERT IV: CLARINET MONSTERS

57


JEFFREY BROOKS

GORD

Jeffrey Brooks has served as Adjunct Lecturer of Clarinet at Central Washington University

Gordon D. S

and Walla Walla University and was the sabbatical replacement for Florida State University

His family l

(FSU) Clarinet Professor Dr. Debra Bish for the spring 2012 semester. Jeff received his

from his sh

Bachelor’s degree from Central Washington University, Master’s from FSU and Doctorate in

College, no

2013 from FSU.

theory-com

While completing a twelve-year tenure as principal clarinetist with the Yakima Symphony

Gordon mar

Orchestra, Jeff was very active as a freelance musician in the northwest and has performed

Schuster fam

with the Seattle Symphony Orchestra and the Seattle Opera, as well as the Tacoma and

Wenatchee

Olympia Symphony Orchestras to mention a few. He has had nearly twenty concerto appearances and is often heard as a recitalist and jazz performer and composer. As a music entrepreneur, Jeff has produced three jazz albums, which are available on iTunes, and “ClarinetMonsteR,” a classical and jazz crossover concert for Jazz Quartet and Symphony Orchestra.

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Gordon and

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CONCERT IV: CLARINET MONSTERS

tion Compe

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for church i

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CONCERT IV: C


GORDON SCHUSTER

University

Gordon D. Schuster was born in 1950 to Ronald and Eileen Schuster of St. John, Washington.

University

His family life was farming as he helped his father with fieldwork and raised livestock. Profits

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from his sheep paid for his college education! Gordon attended Eastern Washington State

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College, now University (EWU), as a music major in piano performance and theory-composition. Gordon married Kathy in 1973. Their children include Angela, Joshua, Bryan and Rebecca. The Schuster family moved to the Wenatchee Valley in 1984. He has participated as a member of the Wenatchee Valley Symphony as a percussionist and pianist, and has also served on the Board. While at Eastern, Gordon performed the Schumann Piano Concerto with the EWU symphony his junior year and composed his first major work, Concerto for Piano, as an undergraduate. The piece was performed several times by the EWU Symphony under the direction of Dr. Wendall S. Jones. Under the direction of Glenn Kelly, the Wenatchee Valley Symphony performed the Concerto for Piano. As a result of that performance, Caroline McKee, then principal clarinetist, approached Gordon about composing a clarinet concerto. She indicated that there was â&#x20AC;&#x153;precious littleâ&#x20AC;? in the repertoire, especially twentieth century literature, for clarinet concertos. Gordon and his family moved to Indiana where he began doctoral study in composition at Indiana University. Compositions of note include the Quintet for Winds and Sonata for Organ. His Sonata for Organ was the winning composition of the Clarence Mader Archive Composition Competition, sponsored by the UCLA School of Music. Gordon served as Director of Music Ministries in a number of large churches. With a passion for church instrumental music, he formed Majestic Music Publications and grew the catalog to approximately 1,500 pieces. Gordon and Kathy currently reside in Wenatchee.

CONCERT IV: CLARINET MONSTERS

59


SCHUSTER

The final ca

Scored for piccolo, flutes, oboe, English horn, clarinets, bassoon, contra bassoon, horns, trumpets, trombones, tuba, timpani, percussion, harp, and strings.

climactic a

announces

Gordon D. S

The Concerto for Clarinet was composed in early 1979 as a commissioned piece by Caroline McKee. Caroline, the Wenatchee Valley Symphony’s principal clarinetist, approached me with the idea of writing a concerto for clarinet.  [The Symphony, under the direction of Glenn Kelly, had recently performed the Concerto for Piano and Orchestra which I had composed as an undergraduate while attending Eastern Washington University]. She pointed out that there were “precious few” twentieth century clarinet concertos in the repertoire. Thus, the clarinet concerto project was begun. The Concerto for Clarinet is not a traditional woodwind concerto in which most of the orchestra players vacate the stage. The orchestration here calls for a large orchestra spanning the entire compass of instruments.  Despite the large ensemble, the soloist is never overshadowed. The orchestra creates contrasting moods and colorful textures that provide a lush canvas for the soloist. The Concerto is generally a conversation between the orchestra and soloist as they paint a musical panorama of rich textures and colors. Movement I:  Tempo guisto

THA BOU WEN SYM

The concept of the first movement is quite lyrical in nature. The soloist enters in the second bar with a bright announcement of the principal theme.  Underlying this announcement is a “shimmer” of chordal textures in the strings, joined by harp.   Playful dialog between soloist and woodwinds as well as staccato articulations in the strings create high energy throughout the movement.  Trumpets lead the brass section with punctuating contrasts in tempi and color.  The structure of the movement is a loosely constructed ABA form. Movement II:  Adagio – un poco lento The opening bars are introspective and plaintive in nature; solemn and spiritual. Many emotional contrasts can be heard from the clarinet in tambre and style on this journey. A brief cadenza is presented which allows the theme to evolve and eventually return to the opening motif. The imagery is accompanied by legato and muted strings.  The movement closes with a final statement by the soloist, drawing the musical meditation to a close. Movement III:  Vivace con fuoco This movement is firey and filled with percussive energy. The timpanist’s use of wood sticks in the opening bars set the tone for what is to come. Bright percussive sections are juxtaposed with lyrical conversations between winds and strings.  Conversations between orchestra sections direct the movement’s “ebb and flow”; something like a rollercoaster ride.  Repetition of eighth and sixteenth note patterns develop into “dance-like” elements.  Articulation throughout the orchestra and by the soloist is more accentuated compared to the previous movements. Woodwinds share a fugal section with the soloist who provides a legato foundation underneath.  The harp plays a key role within the musical palette a rich, colorful voice.  

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CONCERT IV: CLARINET MONSTERS

CONCERT IV: C


The final cadenza is sixteen bars in length progressing to a rapid 3/8 Vivace! This transition announces an abbreviated allusion to the first movement bringing the piece full circle to a

trumpets,

climactic and rousing conclusion. Gordon D. Schuster, August 2014

by Caroline

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MONSTERS OF CLARINET

The music o

The music of three clarinet monsters

Being a thir

BENNY GOODMAN, ARTIE SHAW, AND JEFF BROOKS

and Shaw a

Jeff Brooks, creator of ClarinetMonsteR is taking the world by storm with his exciting, new

arrangeme

pops show for clarinet, symphony orchestra and jazz quartet. This program highlights the music of three “clarinet monsters:” Benny Goodman, Artie Shaw and Jeff Brooks.

composed o

Benny Good

He used cla

Each of these clarinetists found a new way to use the instrument and have added repertoire

tunes. Good

that instill those innovations. Featuring the clarinet with jazz trio and symphony orchestra

become sta

this show’s original arrangements cross over between classical, jazz, and a touch of the

for Clarinet

Iranian musical tradition. Jeff is supported by sideman Dan Taylor at the piano who consistently plays intriguing and exciting improvised solos.

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CONCERT IV: C


The music of Benny Goodman and Artie Shaw has been in Jeff’s ears practically since birth. Being a third generation clarinetist, he developed a strong love for the music of Goodman and Shaw and that is certainly one inspiration for this performance. Some of the music is composed or arranged by Brooks, and Mark Thome did an incredible job creating intriguing

ting, new

lights the

.

arrangements and orchestrating Jeff’s musical ideas. Benny Goodman was well known jazz artist but he was also a pioneering crossover artist. He used classical themes, such as a violin caprice by Paganini, and convert them into jazz

repertoire

tunes. Goodman inspired or commissioned dozens of classical compositions that have

orchestra

become staples in the clarinet repertoire. This includes Aaron Copland’s sublime Concerto

of the

for Clarinet.

ho consis-

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