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WSU Health & Wellness Services, Vol. 2/ No. 4 | Dec. 2013/Jan. 2014

Career Development: How to Get Where You Want to Go Pg. 19 Where to get help with your papers Pg. 17

Nordic an Cross Country Skiing Pg. 15


contents

EDITOR’S LETTER

pg11 pg17 The end of the semester is both wonderful and terribly hectic. The last few weeks are spent between final exams, papers, and projects. The library basically becomes my second home. It seems like there’s no rest in those final weeks, which is what makes winter break such a magical, much needed time of the year. During breaks I end up feeling overwhelmed with the amount of free time I suddenly have. This usually results in wearing sweatpants for days and watching copious amounts of television. What I’ve learned about my free time in college (or lack there of ) is that it’s best to use it wisely. I think the same thing can be said of winter

Wellzine | December/January 2014

break. Last year I spent the majority of it running in between the many delicious restaurants in the Twin Cities. Don’t get me wrong, it was wonderful and worth it but when it came time for the spring semester to start, I still felt exhausted and overworked. I checked out of second semester before it had even started. That’s why this winter break I’m focused solely on relaxing and getting my seven dimensions back in shape for next semester. I challenge you to do the same.

Whether that includes focusing on your physical wellness and working out, or your social wellness and catching up with old friends, do what’s best for you and your wellness this winter. Now maybe that includes lots of Netflix or winter sports, but do whatever taking it easy means to you. After all, it will be a new year when we come back. We want you feeling fresh too.

S m i K

r e d i chne

7 DIMENSIONS OF WELLNESS

EVERY ISSUE

09 11 13 15 17 19 21

03 05 07 08 23 25 27

INTELLECTUAL

Need help with that paper? Visit the Writing Center

SPIRITUAL

A Youthful Performance

EMOTIONAL

Anxiety and Stress Management Through Finals and Beyond

ENVIRONMENTAL

Nordic Skiing

SOCIAL

Giving Social Life A Bit Of Color

OCCUPATIONAL

Career Development:How to Get Where You Want to Go

PHYSICAL

Do It For Yourself: Self-Motivated Workouts

pg15

& HEALTH& WELLNESS SERVICES

CALENDAR CREDITS December & January

Does your regular method of birth control work for you? & Creating a Safer Community

&

SE TECH FRESHMEN NEWS

Health Insurcance & Student Loans

STUDENT GROUPS

Health & Wellness Adovactes, S.H.A.G.

HEALTHY ALTERNATIVES

Healthy Cookies for the Holidays

BULLETINS

December & January

FIVE TIPS

5 Reasons & Ways to Get Involved


contents

EDITOR’S LETTER

pg11 pg17 The end of the semester is both wonderful and terribly hectic. The last few weeks are spent between final exams, papers, and projects. The library basically becomes my second home. It seems like there’s no rest in those final weeks, which is what makes winter break such a magical, much needed time of the year. During breaks I end up feeling overwhelmed with the amount of free time I suddenly have. This usually results in wearing sweatpants for days and watching copious amounts of television. What I’ve learned about my free time in college (or lack there of ) is that it’s best to use it wisely. I think the same thing can be said of winter

Wellzine | December/January 2014

break. Last year I spent the majority of it running in between the many delicious restaurants in the Twin Cities. Don’t get me wrong, it was wonderful and worth it but when it came time for the spring semester to start, I still felt exhausted and overworked. I checked out of second semester before it had even started. That’s why this winter break I’m focused solely on relaxing and getting my seven dimensions back in shape for next semester. I challenge you to do the same.

Whether that includes focusing on your physical wellness and working out, or your social wellness and catching up with old friends, do what’s best for you and your wellness this winter. Now maybe that includes lots of Netflix or winter sports, but do whatever taking it easy means to you. After all, it will be a new year when we come back. We want you feeling fresh too.

S m i K

r e d i chne

7 DIMENSIONS OF WELLNESS

EVERY ISSUE

09 11 13 15 17 19 21

03 05 07 08 23 25 27

INTELLECTUAL

Need help with that paper? Visit the Writing Center

SPIRITUAL

A Youthful Performance

EMOTIONAL

Anxiety and Stress Management Through Finals and Beyond

ENVIRONMENTAL

Nordic Skiing

SOCIAL

Giving Social Life A Bit Of Color

OCCUPATIONAL

Career Development:How to Get Where You Want to Go

PHYSICAL

Do It For Yourself: Self-Motivated Workouts

pg15

& HEALTH& WELLNESS SERVICES

CALENDAR CREDITS December & January

Does your regular method of birth control work for you? & Creating a Safer Community

&

SE TECH FRESHMEN NEWS

Health Insurcance & Student Loans

STUDENT GROUPS

Health & Wellness Adovactes, S.H.A.G.

HEALTHY ALTERNATIVES

Healthy Cookies for the Holidays

BULLETINS

December & January

FIVE TIPS

5 Reasons & Ways to Get Involved


SUNDAY

MONDAY

Dec.

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

1

2

3

4

5

8

9

10

11

12

13

Finals Week

credits PUBLISHERS Shawnessy Mohawk

EDITOR IN CHIEF

Jan.

Kimberly Schneider

6

Nutts for Mutts 1 pm- 3 pm IWC Hallway

7

13

14

15

16

17

18

20

21

22

23

24

25

30

31

Classes Begin

GRAPHIC DESIGNER Cam Neely COVER PHOTO CREDIT Sharon Mollerus

January Observances

19

Martin Luther King Day Holiday - No Classes

Fit Stop 11 am IWC 138

Wellness Wednesday 3 pm IWC 138

27

28

29

National Stalking Awareness Month Cervical Cancer Awareness Month Blood Donor Month

Wellzine | December/January 2014

26

Healthy Monday 7 pm IWC 138

Fit Stop 11 am IWC 138

Wellness Wednesday 3 pm IWC 138


SUNDAY

MONDAY

Dec.

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

1

2

3

4

5

8

9

10

11

12

13

Finals Week

credits PUBLISHERS Shawnessy Mohawk

EDITOR IN CHIEF

Jan.

Kimberly Schneider

6

Nutts for Mutts 1 pm- 3 pm IWC Hallway

7

13

14

15

16

17

18

20

21

22

23

24

25

30

31

Classes Begin

GRAPHIC DESIGNER Cam Neely COVER PHOTO CREDIT Sharon Mollerus

January Observances

19

Martin Luther King Day Holiday - No Classes

Fit Stop 11 am IWC 138

Wellness Wednesday 3 pm IWC 138

27

28

29

National Stalking Awareness Month Cervical Cancer Awareness Month Blood Donor Month

Wellzine | December/January 2014

26

Healthy Monday 7 pm IWC 138

Fit Stop 11 am IWC 138

Wellness Wednesday 3 pm IWC 138


Does your regular method of birth control

work for you? Clinic IWC 222 Academic Hours: Mon-Fri: 7:30 - 4:30 p.m. *Winter Hours: Closed Dec 23 - 27 Reopen Dec 30

Pharmacy IWC 130 Academic Hours: Mon-Fri: 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. *Winter Hours: Closed Dec 24 -26 & Jan 1 *Check Facebook for most current schedule

Right now, seven in 10 pregnancies in the U.S. among unmarried women 18 to 29 are described by women themselves as unplanned. Bedsider.org, the Birth Control Support Network, found that almost nine in 10 college students said that an unplanned pregnancy would make it harder to achieve their educational goals. While Winona State University’s Health and Wellness Services offers contraception resources for students to take an active role in their own reproductive health, many college women rely on emergency contraceptives to prevent pregnancy. Emergency contraception such as the Plan B One-Step, Next Choice One Dose, My Way, and Levonorgestrel pill work by keeping a woman’s ovary from releasing an egg for longer than usual. It provides the possibility of pregnancy prevention after unprotected sex. Emergency contraception is best used as soon as possible, though they can be taken up to five days after unprotected sex and the effectiveness decreases each day. Plan B is available without prescription to men and women at your nearest pharmacy, without age restrictions. Although Emergency Contraception, like Plan B is considered the quickest and easiest “after-the-fact” option, it is not the most effective method out there. It is not as effective as using a birth control method before or during sex, like the pill or condom. In fact, recent research has also found that there may be other factors such as body mass index that may impact the overall effectiveness of Emergency Contraception. If you are sexually active and really want or need to keep from getting pregnant, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says the best way to reduce the risk of unintended pregnancy is to use effective birth control correctly and consistently.

Creating a Safer Community Award 2013 Winona State University’s Gender Based Violence Program has been awarded the Women’s Resource Center (WRC) annual ‘Creating a Safer Community Award’ for 2013. The award is granted to an individual or group that promotes the mission of the WRC. Groups are selected based on their initiative to go above and beyond to ensure the safety and well being of survivors of domestic and/or sexual assault. Past recipients have been from law enforcement, prosecution, medical and human services sectors. Gender Based Violence is defined as violence that encompasses physical, emotional, sexual, psychological, and verbal abuse. This includes: domestic violence, sexual abuse, traditional practices harmful to women such as honor killings, and genital mutilation targeted towards a person because of his or her socially constructed gender role. This year the Gender Based Violence Program, launched in January 2013, was recognized for the difference it has made at Winona State and in the Winona community through their 24-hour Helpline and Peer Advocacy and Education program. The Gender Based Violence Program is a Sexual Violence Advisory Committee Program funded through Winona State’s Next Chapter Grant.

So, if you find yourself using emergency contraceptive pills a lot, it might mean that you haven’t yet found a regular method of birth control that works for you. In that case, talk to your health care provider or check out what some of your other options might be. You may discover you want to switch to a low-maintenance method like the IUD or the implant for effective pregnancy prevention. Written by: Shawnessy Mohawk, CHES, Health and Wellness Promotion Graduate Assistant Health & Wellness Services

06


Does your regular method of birth control

work for you? Clinic IWC 222 Academic Hours: Mon-Fri: 7:30 - 4:30 p.m. *Winter Hours: Closed Dec 23 - 27 Reopen Dec 30

Pharmacy IWC 130 Academic Hours: Mon-Fri: 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. *Winter Hours: Closed Dec 24 -26 & Jan 1 *Check Facebook for most current schedule

Right now, seven in 10 pregnancies in the U.S. among unmarried women 18 to 29 are described by women themselves as unplanned. Bedsider.org, the Birth Control Support Network, found that almost nine in 10 college students said that an unplanned pregnancy would make it harder to achieve their educational goals. While Winona State University’s Health and Wellness Services offers contraception resources for students to take an active role in their own reproductive health, many college women rely on emergency contraceptives to prevent pregnancy. Emergency contraception such as the Plan B One-Step, Next Choice One Dose, My Way, and Levonorgestrel pill work by keeping a woman’s ovary from releasing an egg for longer than usual. It provides the possibility of pregnancy prevention after unprotected sex. Emergency contraception is best used as soon as possible, though they can be taken up to five days after unprotected sex and the effectiveness decreases each day. Plan B is available without prescription to men and women at your nearest pharmacy, without age restrictions. Although Emergency Contraception, like Plan B is considered the quickest and easiest “after-the-fact” option, it is not the most effective method out there. It is not as effective as using a birth control method before or during sex, like the pill or condom. In fact, recent research has also found that there may be other factors such as body mass index that may impact the overall effectiveness of Emergency Contraception. If you are sexually active and really want or need to keep from getting pregnant, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says the best way to reduce the risk of unintended pregnancy is to use effective birth control correctly and consistently.

Creating a Safer Community Award 2013 Winona State University’s Gender Based Violence Program has been awarded the Women’s Resource Center (WRC) annual ‘Creating a Safer Community Award’ for 2013. The award is granted to an individual or group that promotes the mission of the WRC. Groups are selected based on their initiative to go above and beyond to ensure the safety and well being of survivors of domestic and/or sexual assault. Past recipients have been from law enforcement, prosecution, medical and human services sectors. Gender Based Violence is defined as violence that encompasses physical, emotional, sexual, psychological, and verbal abuse. This includes: domestic violence, sexual abuse, traditional practices harmful to women such as honor killings, and genital mutilation targeted towards a person because of his or her socially constructed gender role. This year the Gender Based Violence Program, launched in January 2013, was recognized for the difference it has made at Winona State and in the Winona community through their 24-hour Helpline and Peer Advocacy and Education program. The Gender Based Violence Program is a Sexual Violence Advisory Committee Program funded through Winona State’s Next Chapter Grant.

So, if you find yourself using emergency contraceptive pills a lot, it might mean that you haven’t yet found a regular method of birth control that works for you. In that case, talk to your health care provider or check out what some of your other options might be. You may discover you want to switch to a low-maintenance method like the IUD or the implant for effective pregnancy prevention. Written by: Shawnessy Mohawk, CHES, Health and Wellness Promotion Graduate Assistant Health & Wellness Services

06


Southeast Tech Health Insurance Enrollment Days A lot of people have questions about the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare. Many are also unsure of how they can sign up for an affordable plan through an insurance exchange. The insurance exchange is an online resource for individuals, families and small businesses to find information about health plans and coverage. Healthcare.gov is the federal insurance exchange and if you are a resident of Minnesota you can look under MNsure.

Student loans can be a great way to help pay for your education. While you shouldn’t be afraid to take out student loans, you should be smart about it. Before you take out a loan, it’s important to understand that a loan is a legal obligation that you will be responsible for repaying with interest. Winona State University’s Financial Aid Services offers a variety of resources for you to understand your financial aid package or assist you with money management. Although you may not be required to make payments currently, your student loans are generating interest. Interest is the cost you need pay to borrow funds. You can save money by making interest payments. Paying down the interest on your loans will save you money in the long run by reducing the amount of interest that’s capitalized.

While researching online can be daunting, Southeast Technical College invited Navigators. These designated helpers can answer your questions about the new health care law and help you get enrolled in a plan that fits your budget. Navigators will be at Southeast Technical College Winona campus for open enrollment:

Another great resource for you to manage your student loans is Tuition.io by Tuition.io, Inc.

Dec. 4, Noon – 4 p.m. at Southeast Technical College

What is it?

Dec. 18, Noon – 4 p.m. at Southeast Technical College

Why we love it: Recommended by The Huffington Post, Lifehacker, Los Angeles Times, and Forbes, this app offers what its tagline says it will: “Student Loans Made Simple.” Users can organize all of their student loans in one place, both federal and private. Interactive graphs illustrate entire loan portfolios over time and ways to save to optimize your repayment plan. Price? Free Find it online!

Freshmen News

ABOUT

STUDENT GROUPS

Dear WSU Freshmen,

Winona State University’s Health & Wellness Services collaborates with a variety of wellnessfocused clubs and organizations on campus to promote holistic wellness for Winona State students and Southeast Technical College students. These groups focus on peer-to-peer education on specific wellness related topics in order promote the benefits of a healthy lifestyle. If you are interested in working with Health & Wellness Services to join a Student-2-Student Communicator Group, please contact the Health & Wellness Promotion graduate assistant SMohawk06@winona.edu Shawnessy Mohawk.

Health & Wellness Advocates

During final exam week at Winona State University, thousands of stressed-out and sleep deprived students roll through the doors of Kryzko Commons each day looking for a place to study or to catch a break with friends. The Health and Wellness Advocates will be at Stress Fest on Dec. 3 in East Hall to provide students with a space, services, and resources to relieve that burden of finals. From 11 a.m. – 3 p.m., they will host a “Make Your Own Stress Ball Station” as well as providing nourishing treats and tea to keep you fueled for your grueling week. We will be accompanied by other student groups such as Active Minds WSU, RunnerUp Improv and BedsiderWSU from the Sexual Health Awareness Group. Come relax, recharge and get well!

Facebook

Sexual Health Awareness Group (SHAG)

SHAG is dedicated to promoting sexual health through awareness and education at Winona State University. You might have attended their campus activities at Condom Bingo, Condom Carnival or Get Talking. This year, SHAG partnered with Bedsider, the Birth Control Support Network to bring you more resources to increase awareness, start conversations, and give you tools to get on top of your sex life. Sounds great, right? Alright, enough foreplay, SHAG is looking for more students interested in joining their group. Shoot them an email if you are interested or would like to hear more information. They are also looking to partner with other events on campus or student groups to bring you the resources you need. So, spread the word! BedsiderWSU wants to hear from you. Ready. Sex. Go!

Facebook

08

Health & Wellness Services


Southeast Tech Health Insurance Enrollment Days A lot of people have questions about the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare. Many are also unsure of how they can sign up for an affordable plan through an insurance exchange. The insurance exchange is an online resource for individuals, families and small businesses to find information about health plans and coverage. Healthcare.gov is the federal insurance exchange and if you are a resident of Minnesota you can look under MNsure.

Student loans can be a great way to help pay for your education. While you shouldn’t be afraid to take out student loans, you should be smart about it. Before you take out a loan, it’s important to understand that a loan is a legal obligation that you will be responsible for repaying with interest. Winona State University’s Financial Aid Services offers a variety of resources for you to understand your financial aid package or assist you with money management. Although you may not be required to make payments currently, your student loans are generating interest. Interest is the cost you need pay to borrow funds. You can save money by making interest payments. Paying down the interest on your loans will save you money in the long run by reducing the amount of interest that’s capitalized.

While researching online can be daunting, Southeast Technical College invited Navigators. These designated helpers can answer your questions about the new health care law and help you get enrolled in a plan that fits your budget. Navigators will be at Southeast Technical College Winona campus for open enrollment:

Another great resource for you to manage your student loans is Tuition.io by Tuition.io, Inc.

Dec. 4, Noon – 4 p.m. at Southeast Technical College

What is it?

Dec. 18, Noon – 4 p.m. at Southeast Technical College

Why we love it: Recommended by The Huffington Post, Lifehacker, Los Angeles Times, and Forbes, this app offers what its tagline says it will: “Student Loans Made Simple.” Users can organize all of their student loans in one place, both federal and private. Interactive graphs illustrate entire loan portfolios over time and ways to save to optimize your repayment plan. Price? Free Find it online!

Freshmen News

ABOUT

STUDENT GROUPS

Dear WSU Freshmen,

Winona State University’s Health & Wellness Services collaborates with a variety of wellnessfocused clubs and organizations on campus to promote holistic wellness for Winona State students and Southeast Technical College students. These groups focus on peer-to-peer education on specific wellness related topics in order promote the benefits of a healthy lifestyle. If you are interested in working with Health & Wellness Services to join a Student-2-Student Communicator Group, please contact the Health & Wellness Promotion graduate assistant SMohawk06@winona.edu Shawnessy Mohawk.

Health & Wellness Advocates

During final exam week at Winona State University, thousands of stressed-out and sleep deprived students roll through the doors of Kryzko Commons each day looking for a place to study or to catch a break with friends. The Health and Wellness Advocates will be at Stress Fest on Dec. 3 in East Hall to provide students with a space, services, and resources to relieve that burden of finals. From 11 a.m. – 3 p.m., they will host a “Make Your Own Stress Ball Station” as well as providing nourishing treats and tea to keep you fueled for your grueling week. We will be accompanied by other student groups such as Active Minds WSU, RunnerUp Improv and BedsiderWSU from the Sexual Health Awareness Group. Come relax, recharge and get well!

Facebook

Sexual Health Awareness Group (SHAG)

SHAG is dedicated to promoting sexual health through awareness and education at Winona State University. You might have attended their campus activities at Condom Bingo, Condom Carnival or Get Talking. This year, SHAG partnered with Bedsider, the Birth Control Support Network to bring you more resources to increase awareness, start conversations, and give you tools to get on top of your sex life. Sounds great, right? Alright, enough foreplay, SHAG is looking for more students interested in joining their group. Shoot them an email if you are interested or would like to hear more information. They are also looking to partner with other events on campus or student groups to bring you the resources you need. So, spread the word! BedsiderWSU wants to hear from you. Ready. Sex. Go!

Facebook

08

Health & Wellness Services


Visit the Writing Center For many students, writing can be a stressful experience. If it’s not something you do all the time, even just starting a paper can make you feel like you are way in over your head. Luckily, there’s a resource at Winona State University available to help you out.

With a tutor, students are given that one on one time they need to really improve their writing skills.

Many professors push the use of the writing center, located on third floor Minne 348, when they assign papers in class. Though many students might find that intimidating or think that they don’t have time for it.

Regardless of your stage or process of writing, the writing center is at your service. Whether you have just received a writing assignment or have a nearly perfect final draft, tutors can help you think through all aspects of your paper.

“I think most professors understand it’s very difficult to give students all the attention they need in a classroom,” said April Herndon, director of the writing center.

Wellzine

The writing center can also be helpful in several different ways.

Each year, Herndon selects talented student tutors. This year there are 16 tutors, most of them graduate students but the writing center has anywhere between one and seven undergraduate tutors.

There are a few benefits of individual tutors. “Their individual writing gets the kind of attention it needs to be the best it can be,” Herndon said. Furthermore, this individual attention allows students to focus on different aspects of their papers. Whether they focus on the clarity of claims, organization, the thesis, or introduction—the sky’s the limit. At a typical session, the student will sit down with a tutor and explain the assignment. If the essay is focused on a particular text, then the student will give a little bit of background context for the paper and then together, the tutor and student will set goals for the session. Each session lasts about 30 or 40 minutes. Although tutors are there to help, they are also not there to write the paper for you. Herndon said they simply act as a person to bounce ideas off of. “It’s very helpful to have a place that you can get feedback from someone who knows a lot about writing,” said Amber Arcand, sophomore nursing major.

Intellectual

Kim Schneider, Sophomore Mass Communications Journalism and English Writing

Need help with that paper?

Herndon said she hears a lot of people say they do not like writing, when in fact it’s just that they need a bit more practice.

December/January 2014

“For a lot of students, especially this time of the semester, it’s a stress reliever.” Sometimes it can be helpful for students to just have a second opinion on their final draft. For others, Herndon said, starting is the most difficult part and the tutors can help shape a thesis that will work well. However, the goal of the writing center is not to write for the student. It is their hope that students leave as a better writer, said Herndon. To do this, tutors guide students in a way that helps them understand their own writing process better. This way, next time they get an essay assignment, it might be easier for them to start and write on their own. Appointments with the writing center can be made either on the sign up sheet in Minne 348 or by phone: 507.457.5505. Interested in becoming a tutor in the writing center? Each tutor is required to take and excel in Tutor Writing. Regardless of your skill level of writing or where you’re at in your writing process, the writing center is there as a resource for you.

Health & Wellness Services


Visit the Writing Center For many students, writing can be a stressful experience. If it’s not something you do all the time, even just starting a paper can make you feel like you are way in over your head. Luckily, there’s a resource at Winona State University available to help you out.

With a tutor, students are given that one on one time they need to really improve their writing skills.

Many professors push the use of the writing center, located on third floor Minne 348, when they assign papers in class. Though many students might find that intimidating or think that they don’t have time for it.

Regardless of your stage or process of writing, the writing center is at your service. Whether you have just received a writing assignment or have a nearly perfect final draft, tutors can help you think through all aspects of your paper.

“I think most professors understand it’s very difficult to give students all the attention they need in a classroom,” said April Herndon, director of the writing center.

Wellzine

The writing center can also be helpful in several different ways.

Each year, Herndon selects talented student tutors. This year there are 16 tutors, most of them graduate students but the writing center has anywhere between one and seven undergraduate tutors.

There are a few benefits of individual tutors. “Their individual writing gets the kind of attention it needs to be the best it can be,” Herndon said. Furthermore, this individual attention allows students to focus on different aspects of their papers. Whether they focus on the clarity of claims, organization, the thesis, or introduction—the sky’s the limit. At a typical session, the student will sit down with a tutor and explain the assignment. If the essay is focused on a particular text, then the student will give a little bit of background context for the paper and then together, the tutor and student will set goals for the session. Each session lasts about 30 or 40 minutes. Although tutors are there to help, they are also not there to write the paper for you. Herndon said they simply act as a person to bounce ideas off of. “It’s very helpful to have a place that you can get feedback from someone who knows a lot about writing,” said Amber Arcand, sophomore nursing major.

Intellectual

Kim Schneider, Sophomore Mass Communications Journalism and English Writing

Need help with that paper?

Herndon said she hears a lot of people say they do not like writing, when in fact it’s just that they need a bit more practice.

December/January 2014

“For a lot of students, especially this time of the semester, it’s a stress reliever.” Sometimes it can be helpful for students to just have a second opinion on their final draft. For others, Herndon said, starting is the most difficult part and the tutors can help shape a thesis that will work well. However, the goal of the writing center is not to write for the student. It is their hope that students leave as a better writer, said Herndon. To do this, tutors guide students in a way that helps them understand their own writing process better. This way, next time they get an essay assignment, it might be easier for them to start and write on their own. Appointments with the writing center can be made either on the sign up sheet in Minne 348 or by phone: 507.457.5505. Interested in becoming a tutor in the writing center? Each tutor is required to take and excel in Tutor Writing. Regardless of your skill level of writing or where you’re at in your writing process, the writing center is there as a resource for you.

Health & Wellness Services


Ben Strand, Sophomore Mass Communications Journalism and Creative Writing

A Youthful Performance There’s an “annual” sort of theme of events as the holiday season stumbles around the corner. There are all sorts of yearly celebrations that have people biting at the lip in anxiousness. It makes sense considering outdoor activities are quite limited when the long, frigid winter of Minnesota makes its annual visit. It makes it hard to comfortably spend time outside while you enjoy your free time. In the winter months, it becomes difficult to get yourself to venture out into the cold. Going to indoor events such as plays, dance recitals, and operas become more popular during this time of year because they are events done inside where it is comfortable, sociable and warm. It can also be difficult to get off campus, especially at the end of the semester when finals are coming up. No one really wants to camp out in the library all day, but sometimes the freezing walk home seems too intimidating. However, it is important to get off campus and out into the community.

For the last four decades Saint Mary’s University has been hosting an annual winter event at the Minnesota Conservatory of Arts (MCA), also known as the Valencia Art Center. This year the Dance Repertory Company II (DRC II) will perform both classical and contemporary dances. Those who would like to participate can try-out for beginning and intermediate level dance. The roles are open for students age 5-13 and tryouts are free and open to the public. Tryouts for this year’s performance were held in early September. If enrolled, you are required to partake in one dance class at the MCA. Managing Director of MCA Joelle Harris mentioned the event shows how involved students are with the community and education.

“The Dance Repertory Company provides a performance opportunity for the younger students in the earlier stages of their dance career,” she said. “Kids get an opportunity to practice what they’re learning in class.” With almost three months to prepare for the big winter event, students are eager to put on their best performance, looking to impress an entire audience of more than just family and friends. The season of giving is cheerful and lively and what better demonstrates that than ambitious young performers looking to showcase what they have learned? It’s a fairly big deal to these young kids and showing support of their efforts and hard work gives them a drive to continue practicing. There will be two showings of the event: 6:30 p.m. on Dec. 6 and 3 p.m. on Dec. 7. Tickets are $5 and $3 for students and seniors.

Spiritual

So, during this cheerfully cold season, spend some time inside watching young performers display their skills at Saint Mary’s MCA.

Wellzine

If you are interested in the different classes offered by the MCA you can visit their forms website. They offer programming in dance, music, visual art, and theatre all year to students ages 3 up to adults.

December/January 2014

Above and Opposite: Younger students practicing their moves. (Lina Tawfik)

Health & Wellness Services


Ben Strand, Sophomore Mass Communications Journalism and Creative Writing

A Youthful Performance There’s an “annual” sort of theme of events as the holiday season stumbles around the corner. There are all sorts of yearly celebrations that have people biting at the lip in anxiousness. It makes sense considering outdoor activities are quite limited when the long, frigid winter of Minnesota makes its annual visit. It makes it hard to comfortably spend time outside while you enjoy your free time. In the winter months, it becomes difficult to get yourself to venture out into the cold. Going to indoor events such as plays, dance recitals, and operas become more popular during this time of year because they are events done inside where it is comfortable, sociable and warm. It can also be difficult to get off campus, especially at the end of the semester when finals are coming up. No one really wants to camp out in the library all day, but sometimes the freezing walk home seems too intimidating. However, it is important to get off campus and out into the community.

For the last four decades Saint Mary’s University has been hosting an annual winter event at the Minnesota Conservatory of Arts (MCA), also known as the Valencia Art Center. This year the Dance Repertory Company II (DRC II) will perform both classical and contemporary dances. Those who would like to participate can try-out for beginning and intermediate level dance. The roles are open for students age 5-13 and tryouts are free and open to the public. Tryouts for this year’s performance were held in early September. If enrolled, you are required to partake in one dance class at the MCA. Managing Director of MCA Joelle Harris mentioned the event shows how involved students are with the community and education.

“The Dance Repertory Company provides a performance opportunity for the younger students in the earlier stages of their dance career,” she said. “Kids get an opportunity to practice what they’re learning in class.” With almost three months to prepare for the big winter event, students are eager to put on their best performance, looking to impress an entire audience of more than just family and friends. The season of giving is cheerful and lively and what better demonstrates that than ambitious young performers looking to showcase what they have learned? It’s a fairly big deal to these young kids and showing support of their efforts and hard work gives them a drive to continue practicing. There will be two showings of the event: 6:30 p.m. on Dec. 6 and 3 p.m. on Dec. 7. Tickets are $5 and $3 for students and seniors.

Spiritual

So, during this cheerfully cold season, spend some time inside watching young performers display their skills at Saint Mary’s MCA.

Wellzine

If you are interested in the different classes offered by the MCA you can visit their forms website. They offer programming in dance, music, visual art, and theatre all year to students ages 3 up to adults.

December/January 2014

Above and Opposite: Younger students practicing their moves. (Lina Tawfik)

Health & Wellness Services


Kim Schneider, Sophomore Mass Communications Journalism and English Writing

Emotional

Anxiety and Stress Management Through Finals and Beyond The life of a college student is nothing like how it is perceived in movies and TV shows. Our days are not filled with constant partying and barely any homework—our lives can actually be incredibly stressful.

Left and Opposite: Stressed Students (Marie McMahon)

Many students, including myself, have a very hard time not having a mental breakdown when faced with an important test, project, or paper. Sometimes all of these can be within the same week, if not the same day. Numerous college students also have jobs or are involved with clubs on top of the constant schoolwork. According to Winona State University counselor Eunie Alsaker, the major stressors students generally deal with are academics, roommate conflict, ending of a relationship, parental conflict, the death of someone close to them, and personal illness or an illness of someone close to them. These are just the top stressors of many taken from a health assessment survey from 2012. With so many possible areas of stress, it’s no wonder students are usually on edge. “Students who manage stress well seek positive support and resources on campus,” said Alsaker.

Wellzine

December/January 2014

Once students get to this point, it can be very difficult to manage the anxiety that goes along with these stressors. Just remember, stress is inevitable during finals week.

Alsaker also mentioned that it is good not to do everything on your own, and that it is okay to need and ask for help. Stress also needs to be recognized as a part of everyday life but don’t forget to be grateful for the positive things in your life either. It is important to be aware of negative influences, but to not constantly focus on them. As if daily stressors weren’t enough, finals are just around the corner. Finals usually add even more stress to the already over-crowded plate of a college student. “When there is one stress, it can become a magnet for other stresses, making it worse,” said Alsaker.

Luckily some of this stress and anxiety is in our control. We can limit stress and anxiety by planning ahead, being organized, and setting attainable goals. Focus on what you can do at the moment, and what you have control over. It is also essential to have positive self-talk like: “I can do this,” and “One thing at a time.” Alsaker suggests getting plenty of sleep the night before an exam and having a good breakfast the following morning. Simple fixes like these that are in your control can help ease the enormous amounts of anxiety and stress that go along with finals, said Alsaker. If students are looking for more help with managing anxiety and stress, Alsaker recommends the four-week Anxiety Management Seminar offered twice each semester by Winona State. The next one is scheduled for early spring semester—watch the calendar for dates.

Can you feel the stress of finals building up in your muscles? Make your own stress ball to help combat that stress! All you need is a balloon and flour. Simply fill the balloon with flour and tie at the top. According to Livestrong.com, stress balls help relieve muscle tension, stimulate the nerves, and divert your attention away from your stress. These little stress-relievers are also small enough to fit in your pocket or backpack, so you can take them anywhere.

Just remember that stress is an inevitable part of our lives as college students. However, we can adopt stress and anxiety management skills that will help us achieve any goal in the future.

Health & Wellness Services


Kim Schneider, Sophomore Mass Communications Journalism and English Writing

Emotional

Anxiety and Stress Management Through Finals and Beyond The life of a college student is nothing like how it is perceived in movies and TV shows. Our days are not filled with constant partying and barely any homework—our lives can actually be incredibly stressful.

Left and Opposite: Stressed Students (Marie McMahon)

Many students, including myself, have a very hard time not having a mental breakdown when faced with an important test, project, or paper. Sometimes all of these can be within the same week, if not the same day. Numerous college students also have jobs or are involved with clubs on top of the constant schoolwork. According to Winona State University counselor Eunie Alsaker, the major stressors students generally deal with are academics, roommate conflict, ending of a relationship, parental conflict, the death of someone close to them, and personal illness or an illness of someone close to them. These are just the top stressors of many taken from a health assessment survey from 2012. With so many possible areas of stress, it’s no wonder students are usually on edge. “Students who manage stress well seek positive support and resources on campus,” said Alsaker.

Wellzine

December/January 2014

Once students get to this point, it can be very difficult to manage the anxiety that goes along with these stressors. Just remember, stress is inevitable during finals week.

Alsaker also mentioned that it is good not to do everything on your own, and that it is okay to need and ask for help. Stress also needs to be recognized as a part of everyday life but don’t forget to be grateful for the positive things in your life either. It is important to be aware of negative influences, but to not constantly focus on them. As if daily stressors weren’t enough, finals are just around the corner. Finals usually add even more stress to the already over-crowded plate of a college student. “When there is one stress, it can become a magnet for other stresses, making it worse,” said Alsaker.

Luckily some of this stress and anxiety is in our control. We can limit stress and anxiety by planning ahead, being organized, and setting attainable goals. Focus on what you can do at the moment, and what you have control over. It is also essential to have positive self-talk like: “I can do this,” and “One thing at a time.” Alsaker suggests getting plenty of sleep the night before an exam and having a good breakfast the following morning. Simple fixes like these that are in your control can help ease the enormous amounts of anxiety and stress that go along with finals, said Alsaker. If students are looking for more help with managing anxiety and stress, Alsaker recommends the four-week Anxiety Management Seminar offered twice each semester by Winona State. The next one is scheduled for early spring semester—watch the calendar for dates.

Can you feel the stress of finals building up in your muscles? Make your own stress ball to help combat that stress! All you need is a balloon and flour. Simply fill the balloon with flour and tie at the top. According to Livestrong.com, stress balls help relieve muscle tension, stimulate the nerves, and divert your attention away from your stress. These little stress-relievers are also small enough to fit in your pocket or backpack, so you can take them anywhere.

Just remember that stress is an inevitable part of our lives as college students. However, we can adopt stress and anxiety management skills that will help us achieve any goal in the future.

Health & Wellness Services


Nordic Skiing We all know Minnesota winters can be a drag but instead of making the snow your enemy and going into hibernation this winter, stay active with one of the oldest and most popularized wintertime sports to date—Nordic skiing! Conveniently, Winona State University has its very own cross-country skiing club, called the Winona State Nordic Ski Club.

Environmental

Leah Perri, Sophomore English Writing

The club welcomes and encourages skiers of all levels, even beginners who have never skied before. There are basically two main styles of Nordic skiing— classic and skate. Classic is the more traditional of the two, and involves gliding in a forward and back kind of motion while staying within groomed parallel tracks. Skate style is more comparable to ice skating or roller blading, forming a sort of “V” pattern, and is a little more fast-paced. Both styles require a different kind of wax. For people of all ages and ability levels, Nordic skiing is great for all aspects of wellness. For one thing, it is a great workout. “Cross-country skiers use all parts of their bodies: legs, arms, core, all of it,” says Winona State Nordic Ski Club member, Michelle Johannsen. “It is [also] a low impact exercise, so it is easy on joints for people that have had previous injuries.” Not to mention, cross-country skiing is a great way to get out and enjoy the winter season, make new friends, and boost your mood and mental capacity.

Wellzine

December/January 2014

“What I like best about Nordic skiing [is] the community,” says club member Zoe Reker. “Everyone is friendly, everyone is happy. When you go out to ski, you’ll never ski alone.” The club gathers at least once or twice a week during the winter months to ski on the trails at St. Mary’s—home to some of the best trails in southern Minnesota. St. Mary’s has over 20 km of beautiful, scenic routes. Since St. Mary’s trails are privately owned, Winona State Nordic Ski Club works with the Winona Community Ski Club in order to fundraise money to keep the trails well maintained. The club’s latest project has been installing a lighting system on the St. Mary’s trails for skiing into the evening since it gets dark so early during these months. Past projects include building a warming house and purchasing snow machines that produce snow during lighter winters. Winona State Ski Club also partners with the community club to teach lessons to local area youth.

One problem Winona State club members run into every year is with people who don’t understand proper trail etiquette. “The groomers put a lot of work into caring for the trails and stomping all over them can be very frustrating,” says Johannsen. “Avoid walking on the groomed trails if possible, walk just outside on the edge of the trail.” For those looking to compete, many club members ski in the annual American Birkebeiner, North America’s largest cross-country ski marathon, attracting over 10,000 skiers. The race spans 50 km from Cable to Hayward, Wisconsin, and is open for anyone to participate. Ideal weather conditions for skiers are freshly groomed trails on a sunny day with temperatures in the 20’s, says skiing expert Bruce Adelsman, founder of http://Skinnyski.com. Founded back in 1995, Adelsman and his team provide updates on snow and trial conditions, upcoming races, etc. “Skiers can come check area ski trail conditions, post their own reports, find information on races, results, and even info on lodging, stores and equipment.” Whether you are looking to tryout skiing on your own or getting involved with the club here on campus, crosscountry skiing is a great sport that will be worth the try. If you are interested in getting involved with the Winona State Nordic Ski Club, join their group on Facebook, “WSU Nordic Skiing,” or visit their official website for contact information.

Above: Images of WSU skiers at the American Birkebeiner 2013, from top down: Eric Engen, Kyle Dammen and Zoe Reker (Skinny Ski) Opposite: WSU Cross Country Ski Club members after American Birkebeiner 2013, from right to left: Kyle Dammen, Eric Engen, Michelle Johannsen, Lucas Seaberg, and Ben James (WSU Cross Country Ski Club)

Health & Wellness Services


Nordic Skiing We all know Minnesota winters can be a drag but instead of making the snow your enemy and going into hibernation this winter, stay active with one of the oldest and most popularized wintertime sports to date—Nordic skiing! Conveniently, Winona State University has its very own cross-country skiing club, called the Winona State Nordic Ski Club.

Environmental

Leah Perri, Sophomore English Writing

The club welcomes and encourages skiers of all levels, even beginners who have never skied before. There are basically two main styles of Nordic skiing— classic and skate. Classic is the more traditional of the two, and involves gliding in a forward and back kind of motion while staying within groomed parallel tracks. Skate style is more comparable to ice skating or roller blading, forming a sort of “V” pattern, and is a little more fast-paced. Both styles require a different kind of wax. For people of all ages and ability levels, Nordic skiing is great for all aspects of wellness. For one thing, it is a great workout. “Cross-country skiers use all parts of their bodies: legs, arms, core, all of it,” says Winona State Nordic Ski Club member, Michelle Johannsen. “It is [also] a low impact exercise, so it is easy on joints for people that have had previous injuries.” Not to mention, cross-country skiing is a great way to get out and enjoy the winter season, make new friends, and boost your mood and mental capacity.

Wellzine

December/January 2014

“What I like best about Nordic skiing [is] the community,” says club member Zoe Reker. “Everyone is friendly, everyone is happy. When you go out to ski, you’ll never ski alone.” The club gathers at least once or twice a week during the winter months to ski on the trails at St. Mary’s—home to some of the best trails in southern Minnesota. St. Mary’s has over 20 km of beautiful, scenic routes. Since St. Mary’s trails are privately owned, Winona State Nordic Ski Club works with the Winona Community Ski Club in order to fundraise money to keep the trails well maintained. The club’s latest project has been installing a lighting system on the St. Mary’s trails for skiing into the evening since it gets dark so early during these months. Past projects include building a warming house and purchasing snow machines that produce snow during lighter winters. Winona State Ski Club also partners with the community club to teach lessons to local area youth.

One problem Winona State club members run into every year is with people who don’t understand proper trail etiquette. “The groomers put a lot of work into caring for the trails and stomping all over them can be very frustrating,” says Johannsen. “Avoid walking on the groomed trails if possible, walk just outside on the edge of the trail.” For those looking to compete, many club members ski in the annual American Birkebeiner, North America’s largest cross-country ski marathon, attracting over 10,000 skiers. The race spans 50 km from Cable to Hayward, Wisconsin, and is open for anyone to participate. Ideal weather conditions for skiers are freshly groomed trails on a sunny day with temperatures in the 20’s, says skiing expert Bruce Adelsman, founder of http://Skinnyski.com. Founded back in 1995, Adelsman and his team provide updates on snow and trial conditions, upcoming races, etc. “Skiers can come check area ski trail conditions, post their own reports, find information on races, results, and even info on lodging, stores and equipment.” Whether you are looking to tryout skiing on your own or getting involved with the club here on campus, crosscountry skiing is a great sport that will be worth the try. If you are interested in getting involved with the Winona State Nordic Ski Club, join their group on Facebook, “WSU Nordic Skiing,” or visit their official website for contact information.

Above: Images of WSU skiers at the American Birkebeiner 2013, from top down: Eric Engen, Kyle Dammen and Zoe Reker (Skinny Ski) Opposite: WSU Cross Country Ski Club members after American Birkebeiner 2013, from right to left: Kyle Dammen, Eric Engen, Michelle Johannsen, Lucas Seaberg, and Ben James (WSU Cross Country Ski Club)

Health & Wellness Services


Giving Social Life A Bit Of Color There are many opportunities to get out and socialize in Winona: sporting events, campus clubs, and more. One look at the University Programming Activities Committee’s upcoming schedule is a great reference.

Social

Mitch Johnson, Senior English Writing

However, stepping outside of the traditional, campuscentered activities can be a great way to find a new, exciting social scene. Pablo Picasso said, “Art washes from the soul the dust of everyday life.”

Are their times the monotony of a daily schedule provokes boredom? Are there moments when something new is needed, a burst of color to liven up the day? College students, their lives scheduled out by classes, clubs, homework, and appointments, feel this drabness of everyday life readily; sometimes a dip into something new is what’s needed. Winona is the perfect place to find a fresh art scene. Over the past decade, Winona has become a thriving arts community, with multiple interregional events such as The Great River Shakespeare Festival, The Minnesota Beethoven Festival, The Frozen River Film Festival and Mid-West Music Fest. This trend was continued this September with the advent of the Downtown Art Party or DTAP, a monthly celebration of the Winona community and the art that has brought it together. It takes place the first Tuesday of every month. DTAP is the brainchild of Kevin Ihrke, a 2013 graduate of Winona State, and a curator/contributor to the Lyon Smith Studio located at 119 E Third Street, in downtown Winona.

Above: People at DTAP (Todd Hanson/The Noisy Neighbor) Oppostie: WSU student and musician Kelly Blau playing at Sum Sum Studio (Rory O’Dirscoll/Winona Daily News)

Wellzine

December/January 2014

This past September, Ihrke and Sam Brown, owner of Some Sum Studio, made the effort to organize the event, enlisting the help of several local businesses and studios including: Burke’s Furniture, Jade Community Acupuncture, Infinity Chiropractic, and others. And the list is growing.

Ihrke had the idea when he noticed the absence of opportunities for private galleries. He saw Winona was ripe for an organized effort to get local artists gallery time. “People come out and support,” said Ihrke, “and not only that, they are interested in the art.” Ihrke sees his plan fulfilled; he is bringing the local arts community together in a way that hasn’t been done before. Another member of the DTAP community, the curator of Some Sum Studio Noah Glenn Short, expresses his growing passion for the Winona arts community. “So much has happened over the past five to ten years,” says Short. “It’s really interesting where [the art’s community] will be in the next five to ten.” Short sees the next step in an expansion of demographics, past the typical crowd of art enthusiasts. There is growing interest in a Winona Arts Calendar to address this issue, and websites such as Winona Buzz, The Noisy Neighbor, and Visit Winona are all great resources that keep reader up-to-date on all the various happenings around the community. DTAP is only the most recent member to the flourishing art scene in Winona, and it presents another avenue to invigorate social life here at the university.

For inofmration about future DTAP’s check out Sum Sum Studio’s Facebook page:

Facebook For more interesting events in the community visit The Noisy Neighbor, or subscribe on Facebook:

Facebook

Website

So on those first Tuesdays, when the homework needs to be set aside, and the eyes need something new and beautiful rest on, remember DTAP. The opportunity is there—join the party.

Health & Wellness Services


Giving Social Life A Bit Of Color There are many opportunities to get out and socialize in Winona: sporting events, campus clubs, and more. One look at the University Programming Activities Committee’s upcoming schedule is a great reference.

Social

Mitch Johnson, Senior English Writing

However, stepping outside of the traditional, campuscentered activities can be a great way to find a new, exciting social scene. Pablo Picasso said, “Art washes from the soul the dust of everyday life.”

Are their times the monotony of a daily schedule provokes boredom? Are there moments when something new is needed, a burst of color to liven up the day? College students, their lives scheduled out by classes, clubs, homework, and appointments, feel this drabness of everyday life readily; sometimes a dip into something new is what’s needed. Winona is the perfect place to find a fresh art scene. Over the past decade, Winona has become a thriving arts community, with multiple interregional events such as The Great River Shakespeare Festival, The Minnesota Beethoven Festival, The Frozen River Film Festival and Mid-West Music Fest. This trend was continued this September with the advent of the Downtown Art Party or DTAP, a monthly celebration of the Winona community and the art that has brought it together. It takes place the first Tuesday of every month. DTAP is the brainchild of Kevin Ihrke, a 2013 graduate of Winona State, and a curator/contributor to the Lyon Smith Studio located at 119 E Third Street, in downtown Winona.

Above: People at DTAP (Todd Hanson/The Noisy Neighbor) Oppostie: WSU student and musician Kelly Blau playing at Sum Sum Studio (Rory O’Dirscoll/Winona Daily News)

Wellzine

December/January 2014

This past September, Ihrke and Sam Brown, owner of Some Sum Studio, made the effort to organize the event, enlisting the help of several local businesses and studios including: Burke’s Furniture, Jade Community Acupuncture, Infinity Chiropractic, and others. And the list is growing.

Ihrke had the idea when he noticed the absence of opportunities for private galleries. He saw Winona was ripe for an organized effort to get local artists gallery time. “People come out and support,” said Ihrke, “and not only that, they are interested in the art.” Ihrke sees his plan fulfilled; he is bringing the local arts community together in a way that hasn’t been done before. Another member of the DTAP community, the curator of Some Sum Studio Noah Glenn Short, expresses his growing passion for the Winona arts community. “So much has happened over the past five to ten years,” says Short. “It’s really interesting where [the art’s community] will be in the next five to ten.” Short sees the next step in an expansion of demographics, past the typical crowd of art enthusiasts. There is growing interest in a Winona Arts Calendar to address this issue, and websites such as Winona Buzz, The Noisy Neighbor, and Visit Winona are all great resources that keep reader up-to-date on all the various happenings around the community. DTAP is only the most recent member to the flourishing art scene in Winona, and it presents another avenue to invigorate social life here at the university.

For inofmration about future DTAP’s check out Sum Sum Studio’s Facebook page: Facebook

For more interesting events in the community visit The Noisy Neighbor, or subscribe on Facebook: Facebook

Website

So on those first Tuesdays, when the homework needs to be set aside, and the eyes need something new and beautiful rest on, remember DTAP. The opportunity is there—join the party.

Health & Wellness Services


Career Development:

Occupational

Grace Pesch, Sophomore Public Health

How to Get Where Wou Want to Go

Early on in life decisions are made for you. You wear what is picked out for you and eat what is set in front of you. Entering college is snipping that metaphorical umbilical cord. A new chapter unfolds and this time, the author is strictly you. It’s daunting to have this amount of power and choice. Deciding what your career path will be might be just as hard as actually reaching the goal. Thankfully, there are plenty of resources on campus to help ease the pain. There’s that magical and mysterious place on the third floor of Maxwell called the Warrior Success Center. It offers help with advising, tutoring, and access and career services. DeAnna Goddard, Associate Director for Career Services suggests students like their Facebook page to be aware of events they are hosting as well as posts regarding summer programs and occasionally jobs available on campus. Their upcoming events are the Job and Internship Fair hosted in the Twin Cities, the Camp Internship Volunteer Fair, and the Education Fair in the Twin Cities as well. The first two events are during February and the last event is in April and geared specifically toward those pursuing a career in teaching. Goddard stressed that the Warrior Success Center is a student space. There are students working there alongside some alumni. It’s a welcoming and inviting environment designed specifically to advise students.

Wellzine

December/January 2014

Overall, they follow a four-step career development model and form their events and services offered around this. The first step to this model is to know yourself. Without understanding your skills and interests, choosing a career will be difficult. After understanding what you’d excel and flourish in, the second step is to explore your options in that field. Understand your own personal goals, how to reach them, and what the trends in that industry are.

You’re probably sitting there thinking, “Well, not everyone achieves their goals through such a concrete model.” That is a true statement. Not everyone goes through a center like this and meticulously achieves each goal in a timely fashion.

Lenz says to “follow your passion” even if that means readjusting the way you thought your life would turn out. The four-step career development model is extremely useful for college students. Being under 25 and expected to plan out the rest of your life is overwhelming.

Dr. Holly Lenz, professor of Public Health at Winona State is a prime example of diverging from this path. She originally started out her career expedition with the intent of becoming a theater director/producer. She received a Bachelor of Arts and Masters in Theater Arts and earned a coveted internship on Broadway.

Using these steps will give you a good idea of where you’d like to go, but always keep in mind that life throws curve balls sometimes and it’s alright to adjust your route. Overall, no matter what age you discover your passion, your career will develop in roughly the same way. It is necessary to network and present yourself in an appealing way to employers.

Sure, she started out following these goals, but things clearly didn’t end up the way she had thought they would. Lenz realized that the lifestyle of the Broadway workers wasn’t as emotionally fulfilling as she had hoped. She then took a job at a national non-profit working in the Health and Human Services department. This opportunity caused a passion for Public Health to grow. Unfortunately, starting your career goals over at 28 is difficult. The cookie-cutter mold wasn’t in the forefront of her mind. Her path was forged with a desire to soak up as much knowledge as possible and hopefully attain a fulfilling job in the end.

What you must keep in mind is that people’s lives run on different clocks. What one person has known about themselves since age 12, another person won’t discover until age 35. No matter what you decide to do, whether it’s follow the calculated steps or just roll with the punches, there are career development resources in your community.

Below: The Warrior Success Center (Cam Neely)

The third step is to get involved. Employers are looking to hire experienced people. Volunteering, holding a summer internship, or participating frequently in a club will help you to hone your skills and be able to capitalize on them later. After perfecting your capabilities, the last step is the job search. The Warrior Success Center provides assistance in creating resumes and cover letters, along with connecting you to the proper job search engine. There are many search engines dedicated to specific careers and the newest opportunities in that field. The Warrior Success Center also helps with mock interviews and understanding how to market yourself to show that you are worth hiring and will be an asset to the employer.

Health & Wellness Services


Career Development:

Occupational

Grace Pesch, Sophomore Public Health

How to Get Where Wou Want to Go

Early on in life decisions are made for you. You wear what is picked out for you and eat what is set in front of you. Entering college is snipping that metaphorical umbilical cord. A new chapter unfolds and this time, the author is strictly you. It’s daunting to have this amount of power and choice. Deciding what your career path will be might be just as hard as actually reaching the goal. Thankfully, there are plenty of resources on campus to help ease the pain. There’s that magical and mysterious place on the third floor of Maxwell called the Warrior Success Center. It offers help with advising, tutoring, and access and career services. DeAnna Goddard, Associate Director for Career Services suggests students like their Facebook page to be aware of events they are hosting as well as posts regarding summer programs and occasionally jobs available on campus. Their upcoming events are the Job and Internship Fair hosted in the Twin Cities, the Camp Internship Volunteer Fair, and the Education Fair in the Twin Cities as well. The first two events are during February and the last event is in April and geared specifically toward those pursuing a career in teaching. Goddard stressed that the Warrior Success Center is a student space. There are students working there alongside some alumni. It’s a welcoming and inviting environment designed specifically to advise students.

Wellzine

December/January 2014

Overall, they follow a four-step career development model and form their events and services offered around this. The first step to this model is to know yourself. Without understanding your skills and interests, choosing a career will be difficult. After understanding what you’d excel and flourish in, the second step is to explore your options in that field. Understand your own personal goals, how to reach them, and what the trends in that industry are.

You’re probably sitting there thinking, “Well, not everyone achieves their goals through such a concrete model.” That is a true statement. Not everyone goes through a center like this and meticulously achieves each goal in a timely fashion.

Lenz says to “follow your passion” even if that means readjusting the way you thought your life would turn out. The four-step career development model is extremely useful for college students. Being under 25 and expected to plan out the rest of your life is overwhelming.

Dr. Holly Lenz, professor of Public Health at Winona State is a prime example of diverging from this path. She originally started out her career expedition with the intent of becoming a theater director/producer. She received a Bachelor of Arts and Masters in Theater Arts and earned a coveted internship on Broadway.

Using these steps will give you a good idea of where you’d like to go, but always keep in mind that life throws curve balls sometimes and it’s alright to adjust your route. Overall, no matter what age you discover your passion, your career will develop in roughly the same way. It is necessary to network and present yourself in an appealing way to employers.

Sure, she started out following these goals, but things clearly didn’t end up the way she had thought they would. Lenz realized that the lifestyle of the Broadway workers wasn’t as emotionally fulfilling as she had hoped. She then took a job at a national non-profit working in the Health and Human Services department. This opportunity caused a passion for Public Health to grow. Unfortunately, starting your career goals over at 28 is difficult. The cookie-cutter mold wasn’t in the forefront of her mind. Her path was forged with a desire to soak up as much knowledge as possible and hopefully attain a fulfilling job in the end.

What you must keep in mind is that people’s lives run on different clocks. What one person has known about themselves since age 12, another person won’t discover until age 35. No matter what you decide to do, whether it’s follow the calculated steps or just roll with the punches, there are career development resources in your community.

Below: The Warrior Success Center (Cam Neely)

The third step is to get involved. Employers are looking to hire experienced people. Volunteering, holding a summer internship, or participating frequently in a club will help you to hone your skills and be able to capitalize on them later. After perfecting your capabilities, the last step is the job search. The Warrior Success Center provides assistance in creating resumes and cover letters, along with connecting you to the proper job search engine. There are many search engines dedicated to specific careers and the newest opportunities in that field. The Warrior Success Center also helps with mock interviews and understanding how to market yourself to show that you are worth hiring and will be an asset to the employer.

Health & Wellness Services


Below: People in the IWC Weight-lifting gym Opposite: The IWC also has a dance and yoga studio (Nicole Cullian)

Do It For Yourself:

Self-Motivated Workouts

It seems all the rave now a days is to lose weight, get toned, and bulk up. Essentially, we seem to be focused on superficial aspects when it comes to our workout routines but is that mentality really producing the results we desire? It’s time we drop the socially constructed pressures that have been added to the motive for working out, and determine what makes an active lifestyle intrinsic to each of us.

I asked Dr. Tamara Berg, director of WAGS, how she saw these superficial pressures as being problematic in our society. She believes by going to the gym with the

Physical

Nicole Cullian

On a daily basis, we are bombarded with images of an ideal beauty for women and men. We take in those ideologies, process them, and conclude that the reality simply is not good enough. We then hit the gym with the vision of perfection front and center in our minds.

Wellzine

December/January 2014

intent of burning x amount of calories or firming a specific area of our bodies, we are really missing the valuable benefits of working out, such as building strength and reducing stress. Berg says we need to see exercise through that lens which focuses on the more positive aspects of being active. It’s crucial that we all understand why we need to separate socially constructed values from our own in terms of appearance. “What has been socially constructed is an absolutely impossible beauty ideal, and none of us can achieve it,” said Berg. “If we focus on that kind of artificial ideal that says you must look like this to be beautiful, sexy, or even healthy because that beauty ideal gets misconstrued with health,” Berg said. “We are really setting ourselves up for failure.”

“[Your routine] has to be something you enjoy,” she said. Lucky for all Winona State and Southeast Tech students, we have various options for working out right at our fingertips. The daily workout classes held in the Integrated Wellness Center are great alternatives that get you moving while making the workout fun.

Professors Connie Mettille and Dr. Justin Geijer, Ph.D. of the Health, Exercise and Rehabilitative Sciences department reinforced the notion that there needs to be a paradigm shift in why we workout.

Geijer presents an important question that we all need to ask ourselves: How much time do you actually spend for you?

Mettille wholeheartedly believes that the key to successfully working out is having a motivational source that is personal and meaningful to each individual.

Focusing on yourself during your workout requires you to be in tune with how the physical activity makes you feel. Sure you may be sweating buckets, your heart rate is accelerated, and you probably want to grab an exercise mat for a nap at the IWC, but beyond that how do you feel?

“Society doesn’t allow us to do that very often because we attach self with selfish, and really health is all about balancing yourself so you can then be better for others,” said Geijer.

Think about what you are doing in that moment and all of the benefits that will ensue: strength, lessened anxiety, lifted depression, boost of energy, enhanced mood, the list goes on. “Weight loss is a secondary benefit,” Metille said. “The production of endorphins is the most important benefit to exercise.” Once you realize this, it’s time to bridge the gap between the mind and the body. That connection paints the big picture of an active life. As a motivational reminder, paint that picture yourself. Dr. Amanda Brouwer of the Psychology department suggests composing a list of personal motivations that are beyond the cultural expectation for what’s beautiful to reinforce the powerful benefits you’re generating for yourself. So forget the superficial, remember the significant, and reap the rewards.

Health & Wellness Services


Below: People in the IWC Weight-lifting gym Opposite: The IWC also has a dance and yoga studio (Nicole Cullian)

Do It For Yourself:

Self-Motivated Workouts

It seems all the rave now a days is to lose weight, get toned, and bulk up. Essentially, we seem to be focused on superficial aspects when it comes to our workout routines but is that mentality really producing the results we desire? It’s time we drop the socially constructed pressures that have been added to the motive for working out, and determine what makes an active lifestyle intrinsic to each of us.

I asked Dr. Tamara Berg, director of WAGS, how she saw these superficial pressures as being problematic in our society. She believes by going to the gym with the

Physical

Nicole Cullian

On a daily basis, we are bombarded with images of an ideal beauty for women and men. We take in those ideologies, process them, and conclude that the reality simply is not good enough. We then hit the gym with the vision of perfection front and center in our minds.

Wellzine

December/January 2014

intent of burning x amount of calories or firming a specific area of our bodies, we are really missing the valuable benefits of working out, such as building strength and reducing stress. Berg says we need to see exercise through that lens which focuses on the more positive aspects of being active. It’s crucial that we all understand why we need to separate socially constructed values from our own in terms of appearance. “What has been socially constructed is an absolutely impossible beauty ideal, and none of us can achieve it,” said Berg. “If we focus on that kind of artificial ideal that says you must look like this to be beautiful, sexy, or even healthy because that beauty ideal gets misconstrued with health,” Berg said. “We are really setting ourselves up for failure.”

“[Your routine] has to be something you enjoy,” she said. Lucky for all Winona State and Southeast Tech students, we have various options for working out right at our fingertips. The daily workout classes held in the Integrated Wellness Center are great alternatives that get you moving while making the workout fun.

Professors Connie Mettille and Dr. Justin Geijer, Ph.D. of the Health, Exercise and Rehabilitative Sciences department reinforced the notion that there needs to be a paradigm shift in why we workout.

Geijer presents an important question that we all need to ask ourselves: How much time do you actually spend for you?

Mettille wholeheartedly believes that the key to successfully working out is having a motivational source that is personal and meaningful to each individual.

Focusing on yourself during your workout requires you to be in tune with how the physical activity makes you feel. Sure you may be sweating buckets, your heart rate is accelerated, and you probably want to grab an exercise mat for a nap at the IWC, but beyond that how do you feel?

“Society doesn’t allow us to do that very often because we attach self with selfish, and really health is all about balancing yourself so you can then be better for others,” said Geijer.

Think about what you are doing in that moment and all of the benefits that will ensue: strength, lessened anxiety, lifted depression, boost of energy, enhanced mood, the list goes on. “Weight loss is a secondary benefit,” Metille said. “The production of endorphins is the most important benefit to exercise.” Once you realize this, it’s time to bridge the gap between the mind and the body. That connection paints the big picture of an active life. As a motivational reminder, paint that picture yourself. Dr. Amanda Brouwer of the Psychology department suggests composing a list of personal motivations that are beyond the cultural expectation for what’s beautiful to reinforce the powerful benefits you’re generating for yourself. So forget the superficial, remember the significant, and reap the rewards.

Health & Wellness Services


Peanut Butter Cookies

Ingredients 1 cup blanched almond flour (This

Healthy

is recommended for gluten-free or low-carb flour substitute. You can also purchase regular flour.) ½ teaspoon of sea salt (Lower sodium than table salt.)

¼ teaspoon of baking soda ½ cup of Sunbutter (Sunbutter can

alternatives

By Jordan DeGidio

If you are like most, you may put on a little extra weight around the holiday season. To help ward off those pesky pounds you may want to try some of these healthier holiday cookies instead of your usual holiday foods.

One of my favorite parts of the holidays is decorating cookies. I love spending the time with my family, laughing at the decorating that didn’t turn out right and enjoying the mess that I never had to clean up.

This year I want to start a new tradition. One where I can still make cookies with my family but also one where I won’t hate myself for eating double the suggested serving size. I challenge you to do the same with my two recipes. The first is for peanut butter cookies and the second for chocolate chip cookies.

be substituted with normal peanut butter) ¼ cup of agave nectar(Agave nectar is low glycemic, vegan and 100 percent organic. Can be substituted with honey)

2 tablespoons of vegan or normal shortening 1-teaspoon vanilla extract 1 bag of dark chocolate chips

Chocolate Chip Cookie Ingredients 2 ½ blanched almond flour (This

½ teaspoon baking soda ½ cup grapeseed oil (Used in place of olive oil, recommended because it has many antioxidants, LDL while increasing HDL.)

1-tablespoon vanilla extract ½ cup agave nectar (Agave nectar

is low glycemic, vegan and 100% organic. You can also use honey in place of the agave nectar.)

½ cup dark chocolate chunks

December/January 2014

2. In a different bowl, mix Sunbutter, agave nectar, shortening and vanilla extract with a hand blender. 3. Mix dry ingredient into the wet ingredients with the hand blender until consistent. 4. Scoop the dough at about 1 tablespoon apart onto parchment paper on the baking sheet. 5. Bake at 350 degrees for 6-12 minutes (depending on ingredient used) or until golden around the edges. 6. Add a dark chocolate chip to the center of the cookie.

is recommended for gluten-free or low-carb flour substitute. You can also purchase regular flour.) ½ teaspoon Celtic sea salt (Lower in sodium than table salt)

Wellzine

Directions 1. Combine almond flour, sea salt and baking soda.

Directions 1. Combine dry ingredients 2. Mix wet ingredients 3. Combine wet and dry ingredients in one bowl 4. Roll 1 inch balls and place on parchment lined baking sheet 5. Bake cookies for 7-10 minutes in oven set at 350 degrees.. Makes 24 cookies.

! y o j n E

Above: Mixing Dough Opposite: Peanut Butter Cookies (Marice McMahon) Health & Wellness Services


Peanut Butter Cookies

Ingredients 1 cup blanched almond flour (This

Healthy

is recommended for gluten-free or low-carb flour substitute. You can also purchase regular flour.) ½ teaspoon of sea salt (Lower sodium than table salt.)

¼ teaspoon of baking soda ½ cup of Sunbutter (Sunbutter can

alternatives

By Jordan DeGidio

If you are like most, you may put on a little extra weight around the holiday season. To help ward off those pesky pounds you may want to try some of these healthier holiday cookies instead of your usual holiday foods.

One of my favorite parts of the holidays is decorating cookies. I love spending the time with my family, laughing at the decorating that didn’t turn out right and enjoying the mess that I never had to clean up.

This year I want to start a new tradition. One where I can still make cookies with my family but also one where I won’t hate myself for eating double the suggested serving size. I challenge you to do the same with my two recipes. The first is for peanut butter cookies and the second for chocolate chip cookies.

be substituted with normal peanut butter) ¼ cup of agave nectar(Agave nectar is low glycemic, vegan and 100 percent organic. Can be substituted with honey)

2 tablespoons of vegan or normal shortening 1-teaspoon vanilla extract 1 bag of dark chocolate chips

Chocolate Chip Cookie Ingredients 2 ½ blanched almond flour (This

½ teaspoon baking soda ½ cup grapeseed oil (Used in place of olive oil, recommended because it has many antioxidants, LDL while increasing HDL.)

1-tablespoon vanilla extract ½ cup agave nectar (Agave nectar

is low glycemic, vegan and 100% organic. You can also use honey in place of the agave nectar.)

½ cup dark chocolate chunks

December/January 2014

2. In a different bowl, mix Sunbutter, agave nectar, shortening and vanilla extract with a hand blender. 3. Mix dry ingredient into the wet ingredients with the hand blender until consistent. 4. Scoop the dough at about 1 tablespoon apart onto parchment paper on the baking sheet. 5. Bake at 350 degrees for 6-12 minutes (depending on ingredient used) or until golden around the edges. 6. Add a dark chocolate chip to the center of the cookie.

is recommended for gluten-free or low-carb flour substitute. You can also purchase regular flour.) ½ teaspoon Celtic sea salt (Lower in sodium than table salt)

Wellzine

Directions 1. Combine almond flour, sea salt and baking soda.

Directions 1. Combine dry ingredients 2. Mix wet ingredients 3. Combine wet and dry ingredients in one bowl 4. Roll 1 inch balls and place on parchment lined baking sheet 5. Bake cookies for 7-10 minutes in oven set at 350 degrees.. Makes 24 cookies.

! y o j n E

Above: Mixing Dough Opposite: Peanut Butter Cookies (Marice McMahon) Health & Wellness Services


e h t t e G ! e r e h s t n e v e t s late ! n o ti

n

te t A

t a e r g a e v a H ter break! win Wellzine | December/January 2014

Health & Wellness Services


e h t t e G ! e r e h s t n e v e t s late ! n o ti

n

te t A

t a e r g a e v a H ter break! win Wellzine | December/January 2014

Health & Wellness Services


FIVE TIPS

5

Reasons & Ways to Get Involved

1 2 3 4 5

By Julie Thao

Winona State University offers volunteer services located in the Kryzsko Commons for students to find resources that help them get involved in the community. With such an active campus, some professors might offer extra credit opportunities for students who participate.

University clubs such as Habitat for Humanity, Greek Organizations, and National Society of Collegiate Scholars are just few clubs that offer volunteer experience through membership. According to LinkedIn.com, volunteer work makes your resume and cover letter stand out 27 percent more than others.

Religious centers, for example the Faith Lutheran Church, offer fundraising events to raise money for charities. They recently had a garage sale that raised money for children in Jamaica. Church affiliated groups also sponsor mission trips abroad that give opportunities to help out those in need.

Local events such as Spruce Up Winona offer individual and group volunteer experiences. Idealist.org states that volunteer work is almost necessary for any scholarship application and also plays an important part when applying for graduate school.

Organizations like the Winona Area Humane Society provide volunteer experience for individuals who want to do more outside of school. These outside organizations can provide networks of people whom you can connect with in the future.


December/January 2014