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ur O ing o! l i e Unv w Log Ne

www.wellspringky.org

August 2012 A New Look for Wellspring!

In one glimpse, a logo leaves a lasting impression about its brand and the personality of the organization it represents. Spurred on by Board Member, Ack Willets, Wellspring decided it was time to update our logo to better embody the vibrant, multi-faceted organization that Wellspring is today. The houses of multiple colors signify that there is no single path to recovery, and that Wellspring provides client-centered, individualized housing solutions and multi-disciplinary care. The tagline emphasizes our core mission and goal: mental health recovery. Our long-term plans and our day-to-day operations revolve around Wellspring’s commitment to help those with mental illnesses develop satisfying, hopeful, and contributing lives, despite the presence of a mental illness. Deepest thanks to Ack Willets and to Michael Osborne and his colleagues at Joey’s Corner, who designed the new logo.

Wellspring Remembers Philip P. Ardery, Founding Board Chair (1914 - 2012)

Celebrating Jackie Swigart, Ph.D. Wellspring’s Newest Honorary Lifetime Board Member

Jackie Swigart is the kind of person that makes an impression immediately. She is one of those very bright, strong, compassionate people that you immediately sense is a great leader. In 1979, John Y. Brown was elected Governor and he made good on his promise to appoint a woman to his Cabinet. He appointed Jackie as Secretary of the Department for Natural Resources and Environmental Protection, which required her to oversee the regulation of industry in Kentucky, including the traditionally male-dominated strip mining industry and industrial factories around our state. As Secretary she also oversaw Conservation and Water Patrol. One can only imagine the kind of smarts and savvy required of a woman going into that world more than thirty years ago. Board Chair Jeff Yussman presents Jackie Swigart with a gift from Wellspring. Wellspring has been very fortunate to have had Jackie Swigart on our Board for almost our entire history. She was Board Chair from 1992-1996. It was during Jackie’s term as Board Chair that we opened the first Wellspring Crisis Stabilization Unit, which is now called the Frank M. Gaines Center. The opening of the CSU marked a significant step in the growth

It is with great sadness that we acknowledge the death of Philip P. Ardery, but it is with deep gratitude that we remember him for the many ways he worked to make our world a better place. Phil was a World War II pilot who flew many dangerous missions and retired as a Major General. He served on numerous Boards, including serving as Board Chair of the National Heart Association and was a founding partner of the law firm now called Frost Brown Todd. Phil took civic responsibility very seriously and provides us with a vivid example of what a difference one person can make. Phil was a visionary and a man with many friends and strong connections. His vision, keen intelligence, and ability to recruit other powerful and passionate people combined to make great things happen. As one might expect from a Major General, Phil was courageous and undaunted. When he saw a need, he found a way to address it. It’s because of that attitude that Wellspring exists today. Phil’s neighbor, Bos Todd, had a son who had been diagnosed with schizophrenia in a time when supportive services were extremely limited and supportive housing was totally lacking. Phil did not have a family member with a disabling mental illness but he could continued on p. 2

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In Remembrance of Phil Ardery, continued

see that there was a crying need in our community for support and housing for individuals with mental illnesses. He invested himself in creating a solution. He was instrumental in founding Wellspring in 1982, and was the first Board Chair of Wellspring. What began as a single staffed residence in Old Louisville is now an organization that has grown to 21 sites, including two Crisis Stabilization Units, two transitional housing programs, eight permanent supportive housing programs, and nine independent housing sites scattered across Jefferson County and surrounding counties. Spurred on by Phil’s visionary leadership, Wellspring has now served more than 7,000 people with severe and persistent mental illness through the provision of housing and supportive services. Shortly after founding Wellspring, Phil, Bos Todd, and Barry Bingham provided the impetus that led to the founding of NARSAD, the National Alliance for Research on Schizophrenia and Depression, which is now known as the Brain & Behavior Research Foundation. The story goes that Phil enlisted his old friend, Barry Bingham, Sr., first in the establishment of Wellspring and then in the founding of NARSAD. In addition to a lack of appropriate services they wanted to stimulate greater scientific interest in solving the riddles of mental illness. Since 1987, the Brain & Behavior Research Foundation has awarded nearly $300 million in over 4,000 NARSAD grants to more than 3,100 scientists around the world. Phil was a member of NAMI Louisville, going all the way back to its very early days, and served on the Board for many years. He also served on the board of the Kentucky Mental Health Association (now known as Mental Health America-Kentucky Chapter). MHA KY awards the Philip P. Ardery Award annually to “honor a program or organization that provides significant service to the local or state-wide community regarding the promotion of mental health, prevention of mental illness, and improvement in diagnosis and treatment for people with mental illness.” His concern for health-related issues reached beyond mental health. Louisville civic leaders had formed the Institute of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation in the early 1950s to develop and operate Louisville’s first rehabilitation hospital. Phil got involved and early on and through the efforts and support of many others, including important gifts from Amelia Brown Frazier, the rehab hospital was able to expand and achieve excellence as the Frazier Rehab Center. As a Board member, he joined with others to bring Frazier into the fold of Jewish Hospital HealthCare Services (JHHS) and served on the JHHS Board for many years. Phil’s civic and charitable service during his retirement years extended into many areas beyond healthcare. He served actively on the Boards of Directors of the Kentucky Horse Park, the Ballet Español, The Filson Historical Society, the Kentucky Historical Society, and the Thomas D. Clark Foundation. Thousands of us have benefited from the leadership of this courageous man, who stood up for what he believed in, who fought for justice, who refused to be bound by narrow and outmoded ways of thinking. He constantly questioned, moved beyond the boundaries, and refused to draw lines that kept others out. There is much more that could be said about Phil, but suffice it to say he was one of a kind and, while he will be sorely missed, he leaves one heck of a legacy. The Ardery family asks that gifts in Phil’s memory be sent to Wellspring, or another charity of your choice. You can find links to Phil’s obituary and a Courier-Journal article that paid tribute to his life at www.wellspringky.org.

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When I think of Phil... ...I think of a gallant man. A gallant, gallant man. Gallant as in courtly. as in courageous. as in loyal. as in open to adventure and all things new. Gallant as in caring. as in fighting for justice. as in standing up for what he believed in. Gallant as in smart - really, really, really smart. as in funny. as in courteous. Gallant as in generous - giving, brushing off thanks, making you feel as if you had done something for him. Some years ago, at a celebration for Anne and Phil, I quoted Shakespeare and said of him: This was the noblest Roman of them all... His life was gentle, and the elements so mixed in him, that Nature might stand up and say to all the world, ‘This was a man!’ And it rings true for me today, but I would add this: Phil’s mind moved quickly and widely. He didn’t suffer fools gladly. He refused to be bound by narrow and outmoded ways of thinking. I’m sure he irritated some. We liked to talk about theology. He would twinkle at me and say, “I’m really a heretic, you know.” Yes, he was, if by heretic we mean someone who constantly questioned. Someone who pushed at the edges - and beyond. Someone who looked for God outside and beyond the officially approved places. Someone who declined to worship the small, comfortable God of the smug. Someone who refused to draw lines that kept others out. But no heretic if we think of the fierce God of the prophets. Phil would be right there with Amos: I take no delight in your solemn assemblies. ... Take away from me the noise of your songs; I will not listen to the melody of your harps. But let justice roll down like waters, and righteousness like an ever-flowing stream. Phil, may you come ever closer to the God who made and formed you, who is greater than any of our words or songs or doctrines, whose love is stronger than death. The Rev. Lucinda Laird Rector, St. Matthews Episcopal Church


It’s easy to make a gift to Wellspring! & Implementing Illness Management Just fill out the form below and send it to: Recovery at Ardery House

Hello, my name is Carolyn... Wellspring Remembers Mental and I’d like to share my recovery story withCynthia you. Coe Health Advocate,

As far back as I can remember, I have experienced sort of A long-time Wellspringsome staff member, trauma and negativity. My childhood was surrounded by chaos. I Cynthia passed away on March 1, 2012. by Emily Hill, Peer Support Specialist grew up with neglectful and She abusive parents who regularly used will be dearly missed by all, but I would likeoftoour make a giftyear of $____________ As part senior internship at Kent School of substances in my presence. Iespecially had no idea what a healthy relaby the residents of Wellspring’s Social Work required to dochecks a capstone My tionship was, I didn’t understand boundaries, and I just wasn’t ____ A checkI was is enclosed (Make payableproject. to Wellspring. Concord Apartments, who she considcapstone was to be my legacy that I left behind to make my equipped to enter adulthood.ered her extended family. Memories Please do not mail cash.) agency a little better than it was before I came. I did my As a young adult, the chaos continued. I experienced an abound of the years she spent with the Please charge my credit card: ___Visa ___MC ___AmEx internship at Wellspring’s Ardery House, and after 29 years unplanned pregnancy and the stress and heartbreak of choosing “Concord ladies” and the fun they shared itName was difficult to find to improve on. another family to raise my child. I married at a young age and as it appears on anything card: ____________________________ together. Cynthia was their “Bingo Budfound this marriage to also be an abusive relationship. I began to After some thought (and advice from Heather) I dedy” and was always ready with a story Billing Address:______________________________________ realize that not only was I struggling with domestic violence but I cided to run a new wellness group, developed by the Subto make them laugh. She loved to cook, couldn’t take care of myself on any level. stance Abuse and Mental Health Administration, called Acct. #: ______________________________ Exp. Date______ and her Spinach remains Desperate for help, I checked myself into&a Artichoke psychiatricdip hospital the Illness Management and Recovery (IMR) program. It a house favorite. “She was always kind, I would like to make a recurring donation of $_______ to be paid: where I first received the diagnoses of PTSD, depression, personfocused on teaching the residents valuable recovery and and always there for us, ” say the ladies. “She was so generous with her ___ monthly ___ quarterly ___ annually ality disorder, and generalized anxiety. I had two more childrenlove independent living skills such as building social support, and after her time. Eveninafter retired,Despite she always stayed in touch. We will my stay the she hospital. finally getting help”and coping with persistent symptoms, creating a personalized My employer, _________________________,matches my gift. carry with us her sense of justice and her irreverent sense of humor, and putting some labels on my problems, I still wasn’t able to develop definition of recovery, and much more. always cherish her for the the loveskills and caring she shared so bountifully. necessary to improve my life; I also Donor Name: When many_______________________________________ of the residents come in to the program at Until I moved into lost my children at this time. For years these Ardery they_________________________________________ have never heard of the concept of recovery Special Volunteer, Becky Gootee! Telephone: ArderyThanks House, I tounhealthy behaviors continued. so it is important to start there and work forward. The proWe’ d like to extend our most heartfelt thanks to our longtime My recovery didn’t truly beginsupporter, until I never thought I’d Address: ___________________________________________ gram helps them to envision what recovery means to them Becky Gootee, who volunteered in our administrative center every chose to leave behind the life I knew and be able to live on and sets goals to reach that personal definition by City,then State, ZIP: ______________________________________ Wednesday this spring. Becky she wanted trulysaid askshe forvolunteered help. So, onbecause December 4, 2009 myback own. using the skills learned in the program. The residents took to give to Wellspring I–hopped her son on wasthe a client for two years andfor spent Greyhound headed is: toThis thegift program right away and said that they wished more timeLouisville at Ardery KY’s HouseCenter and the “Myand husband and IThe could never repay forCSUs. Women Families. CWF conIn Memory _______________________(name of deceased) places offeredof:programs like IMR. Ardery is still using the nected” me transitional housing for domestic violence victims, Wellspring, she to said. “The care our son received was worth a gajillion dollars! but theprovided focus was onahealthy mentalhim illness. IMR program with great results. I thorhim home inrelationships, a time of crisisnot andon enabled to In Honor of: _________________________(name of honoree) Wellspring From back theretoI awent to theliving. Wellspring CSU, staff where moreseeing doorsBecky’s oughly enjoyed my time at Ardery and transition life worth ” The admin misses To Celebrate: _______________________________________ opened up to week me. and hopes she visits often! smiling face every will take the experience with me into the I then moved into Ardery House and found myself in a future. I am honored to have had a chance anniversary, etc.) ____________________________(birthday, community where I had all theSeven services Counties I needed to address both to make even a small difference. Wellspring is Awarded Services’ Please acknowledge my gift to: __________________________ my domestic violence issues and my mental health issues. I was Champion of Community in Recovery Award As a result of her efforts Emily won 3rd also connected services like Seven andConference Bridge- on Address: ___________________________________________ At Seven Countieswith Services’ recent Stand Up!Counties for Recovery place for her capstone project out of a class haven. For the first time in my life, I was able to receive the help July 20th, Wellspring was honored with the Champion of Community in I ofCity, 50 other Congratulations Emily!! State,students. ZIP: ______________________________________ needed. Recovery Award. This accolade is conferred annually to an agency or emForpromotes me, Wellspring wasintegration the key in by learning skills to live onin ployer that community employing individuals Wellspring Staff Attend Phil Ardery often used the Members quote “better to light a candle, than to my own. Until I moved into Ardery House and went through the recovery, advocating for change in the Louisville community, and/or developPeer Training in Wellspring. New Mexico curse theSupport darkness” when he spoke about The theme of program, I never thought I’ d be able to live on my own. I found ing opportunities for people in recovery. Vice President of Seven Countiesa our Our latestpeer annual report revolved around the choice that so many family in them. I found support, love and compassion. I foundto specialists and other Rx Housing staff particiMarsha Wilson said, “Wellspring has demonstrated a steadfast dedication have pastfrom 30 years to be a part of Wellspring. supportive people who believed in me and so I was able to push patedmade with over otherthe staff around the nation in a 3-day Phil advocating for change and developing opportunities for people in recovery chose to get with involved and make a difference for“Committing a community with myself to use the tools they had given me to live a happy, meaningconference workshops that focused on and has played a critical role in creating a recovery environment in Louisville.” atocrying need Peer for services for” The adults with severe, persistentwith mental ful, successful, independent life. Authentic Support. program will continue Wellspring’s housing options include seven HUD housing sites, our illness. Whether as a founder, such as Phil, a Board or staff When I look back on my life and the struggles I faced, I am webinar participation for a total 6-month commitment. “Collaborative Housing (CH2)” program, and the SAMHSA-funded member, a volunteer, as a consumer, it is the melding of many amazed and very proud of the changes I’ve made and the goals Our involvement hasorallowed us to strengthen our peer Housing First program (Rx Housing), in which Wellspring is a partner. individuals’ energies that have made Wellspring what it is today. I’ve accomplished. I’ve been clean and sober services, but more importantly has affirmed our role as In addition to our array of community living and recovery environments, The opportunities to become involved – to strengthen the candle’s for three years. I now have my own apartment leaders in the field. Wellspring peer specialists are committed Wellspring is a pioneer in Kentucky in flame – still abound. Please, make the choice to support Wellspring and am living independently. While I lived at employing consumers. We began hiring to recovery goals, team participation, and client service. by making a contribution to our Annual Fund today. Your supArdery House I obtained my CNA certificate consumers in the mid-1980s, and when The peer specialist provides andbecome valuedthe aspect port can help make the dreamaofunique recovery reality of and volunteered at the Red Cross and Kosair we opened our first CSU in 1995 our staff of the service array works that offers hope to our clients ways recovery. Whatever for you, whatever choice in you make will Children’s Hospital. I now have a part time job included 3 peer counselors. We have traditional help changeservice lives….often even cannot. your own! as a hostess at Jewish Hospital, which I truly employed nearly 30 consumers over the enjoy. years and currently have 9 Peer Specialists Today I am living a happy and meaningful on staff. life. I hope that my story gives encouragement We also work to increase understanding and hope to others. of mental illness and the hope of recovery With much love, in myriad ways, always with goal of reducing stigma and breaking down barriers.

Wellspring, P.O. Box 1927, Louisville, KY 40201

Executive Director Kathy Dobbins and Director of Programs Patrick Rhodes are all smiles over Wellspring’s recent award.

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In Celebration of Jackie Swigart, continued of the agency, effectively doubling our staff and exponentially increasing the number of clients served annually. Jackie knew that this kind of growth, and this kind of project, did not come without risks to our developing The Art of Recovery took place at the Speed Art Museum on August 3. This annual art exhibit and sale usually takes place during the first week of agency, but her leadership never faltered. During Jackie’s two terms we also opened Patrick Henry October, which is Mental Illness Awareness Week. Since the Speed Museum Apartments, Clover Hill Apartments, and Youngland will begin extensive renovations this fall, we renovated our date! Apartments. Patrick Henry and Clover Hill were funded A record-breaking 592 mental health through the HUD 811 program; together they provide 16 supporters from all walks of life came out units of attractive and affordable housing for persons with to view and buy the art, which was created mental illness. Youngland was an historic rehab of a home by consumers at Wellspring, Bridgehaven, originally built around 1820 and later owned and embellished by Colonel Bennett Young who rode with Morgan’s NAMI Louisville, and Seven Counties Raiders in the Civil War. It was on the historic register but Services. The diverse art in the show demonstrated the many ways art facilitates in very poor condition when Wellspring purchased it and re-purposed it to provide five units of affordable housing. healing and recovery. Wellspring won an historic preservation award and the After the art show, there was a preappreciation of the surrounding Shively community. sentation of segments of Minds on the These are but a few of Jackie’s many contributions over Edge, a powerful video that challenges us the more than a quarter century she has served as Board to think about how mental illness affects Member. She has been a staunch supporter and a vocal Megan Zoeller, each of us and our community. A panel of proponent of our work. On July 26th, Jackie stepped down as Wellspring’s Art Therapist mental health advocates led a community Board Member but we are delighted to say that she is now an discussion after the film. The discussion was moderated by WHAS11 News Honorary Lifetime Board Member. We are appreciative of Reporter, Johnny Archer, and the panel included: Jackie and we honor the historic role that she has played in the development of Wellspring. We will be deeply indebted • Jim Burch, Criminal Justice Director at Seven Counties Services to this wonderful woman who has given so much of herself • Rebekah Cotton, NAMI Louisville Board Member and family member to help this agency stretch to better achieve its mission for • The Honorable Deborah DeWeese, District Court Judge many years to come. • Natalie Harris, Executive Director of The Coalition for the Homeless • Sadiqa Reynolds, Metro Louisville Chief Community Builder. • Ramon Thorton, Certified Peer Support Specialist at Seven Counties Services

Look for Wellspring at the Sept. 6 and Sept. 8 performances!

Special thanks to Ashley Furniture Homestores and Walnut Grove Nursery for providing the staging for the panel discussion.

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Implementing Illness Management & Recovery at Ardery House by Emily Hill, Peer Support Specialist As part of our senior year internship at Kent School of Social Work I was required to do a capstone project. My capstone was to be my legacy that I left behind to make my agency a little better than it was before I came. I did my internship at Wellspring’s Ardery House, and after 29 years it was difficult to find anything to improve on. After some thought (and advice from Heather) I decided to run a new wellness group, developed by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Administration, called the Illness Management and Recovery (IMR) program. It focused on teaching the residents valuable recovery and independent living skills such as building social support, coping with persistent symptoms, creating a personalized definition of recovery, and much more. When many of the residents come in to the program at Ardery they have never heard of the concept of recovery so it is important to start there and work forward. The program helps them to envision what recovery means to them and then sets goals to reach that personal definition by using the skills learned in the program. The residents took to the program right away and said that they wished more places offered programs like IMR. Ardery is still using the IMR program with great results. I thoroughly enjoyed my time at Ardery and will take the experience with me into the future. I am honored to have had a chance to make even a small difference. As a result of her efforts Emily won 3rd place for her capstone project out of a class of 50 other students. Congratulations Emily!!

Wellspring Staff Members Attend Peer Support Training in New Mexico Our peer specialists and other Rx Housing staff participated with other staff from around the nation in a 3-day conference with workshops that focused on “Committing to Authentic Peer Support.” The program will continue with webinar participation for a total 6-month commitment. Our involvement has allowed us to strengthen our peer services, but more importantly has affirmed our role as leaders in the field. Wellspring peer specialists are committed to recovery goals, team participation, and client service. The peer specialist provides a unique and valued aspect of the service array that offers hope to our clients in ways traditional service often cannot.

Wellspring Remembers Mental Health Advocate, Cynthia Coe

A long-time Wellspring staff member, Cynthia passed away on March 1, 2012. She will be dearly missed by all, but especially by the residents of Wellspring’s Concord Apartments, who she considered her extended family. Memories abound of the years she spent with the “Concord ladies” and the fun they shared together. Cynthia was their “Bingo Buddy” and was always ready with a story to make them laugh. She loved to cook, and her Spinach & Artichoke dip remains a house favorite. “She was always kind, and always there for us,” say the ladies. “She was so generous with her love and her time. Even after she retired, she always stayed in touch.” We will carry with us her sense of justice and her irreverent sense of humor, and always cherish her for the love and caring she shared so bountifully.

Special Thanks to Volunteer, Becky Gootee!

We’d like to extend our most heartfelt thanks to our longtime supporter, Becky Gootee, who volunteered in our administrative center every Wednesday this spring. Becky said she volunteered because she wanted to give back to Wellspring – her son was a client for two years and spent time at Ardery House and the CSUs. “My husband and I could never repay Wellspring,” she said. “The care our son received was worth a gajillion dollars! Wellspring provided him a home in a time of crisis and enabled him to transition back to a life worth living.” The admin staff misses seeing Becky’s smiling face every week and hopes she visits often!

Wellspring is Awarded Seven Counties Services’ Champion of Community in Recovery Award

At Seven Counties Services’ recent Stand Up! for Recovery Conference on July 20th, Wellspring was honored with the Champion of Community in Recovery Award. This accolade is conferred annually to an agency or employer that promotes community integration by employing individuals in recovery, advocating for change in the Louisville community, and/or developing opportunities for people in recovery. Vice President of Seven Counties Marsha Wilson said, “Wellspring has demonstrated a steadfast dedication to advocating for change and developing opportunities for people in recovery and has played a critical role in creating a recovery environment in Louisville.” Wellspring’s housing options include seven HUD housing sites, our “Collaborative Housing (CH2)” program, and the SAMHSA-funded Housing First program (Rx Housing), in which Wellspring is a partner. In addition to our array of community living and recovery environments, Wellspring is a pioneer in Kentucky in employing consumers. We began hiring consumers in the mid-1980s, and when we opened our first CSU in 1995 our staff included 3 peer counselors. We have employed nearly 30 consumers over the years and currently have 9 Peer Specialists on staff. We also work to increase understanding of mental illness and the hope of recovery in myriad ways, always with goal of reducing stigma and breaking down barriers. Executive Director Kathy Dobbins and Director of Programs Patrick Rhodes are all smiles over Wellspring’s recent award.

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Wellspring Administrative Center 225 W. Breckinridge Street Telephone: (502) 637-4361 Fax: (502) 637-4490

www.wellspringky.org Officers and Directors

Non-Profit Org. U.S. Postage PAID Louisville, KY Permit No. 1105

P.O. Box 1927 Louisville, KY 40201-1927

Jefferey M. Yussman, Chair Robert P. Bordogna, Vice Chair David W. Miles, Treasurer Cissy Mills, Secretary Meredith Brown Trinity Campisano Paul A. Coomes Dawn Franklin Croft William Friel Gregory A. Mayes Alan K. MacDonald Nancy Neill Margaret Pennington George W. Rapp, Jr. Melissa Routt Elmore A. “Ack” Willets, III

Honorary Lifetime Members

Nancy B. Bell Roberta Fischer Rev. Richard H. Humke Clifford C. Kuhn, M.D. Malcolm R. Mathews, Jr. Jackie Swigart, Ph.D. Bosworth M. Todd, Jr. John I. Trawick

Founding Board Chair

Philip P. Ardery (1914 - 2012)

Management Team

Katharine R. Dobbins, LCSW Executive Director kathy.dobbins@wellspringky.org Robert L. Brodbeck Chief Operating Officer bob.brodbeck@wellspringky.org T. Patrick Rhodes, LCSW Director of Programs patrick.rhodes@wellspringky.org Nancy L. Doctor Development Director nancy.doctor@wellspringky.org

Wellspring’s Mission:

To promote the recovery of persons with mental illness through leadership in the development of quality housing and rehabilitation services.

Join us for the Second Annual Wellspring Wallopalooza Golf Marathon Woodhaven Country Club - Monday, October 15th If spending some time out playing golf while raising $$$ for a great cause sounds like a dream come true, then this is the event for you! All are invited to participate in this fun event - golfers and non-golfers alike. We also invite companies or individuals to sponsor the event at the $500, $250, or $100 level. There are a number of ways individuals and community partners can help make this year’s event a great success, so we’d love to hear from you! Golfer’s Mission: Complete 100 holes of golf in one day. To make this a successful FUNdraising event, we are asking each player to commit to trying their best to raise $1,000 in sponsorships. Wellspring will provide: meals and beverages throughout the day and will cover the greens and golf cart fees. Prizes: There will be a grand prize for the golfer who raises the most funds for Wellspring and lots of raffle prizes, as well as contest holes with other fantastic winnings. You can play all day or Wellspring can show you how to complete 100 holes in two hours or less! More information at www.wellspringky.org/golf or contact Melissa at (502) 753-1457 or by email at melissa.kratzer@wellspringky.org.

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Wellspring Board Chair Jeff Yussman was the top fundraiser at Wallopalooza 2011! Way to go, Jeff!

August 2012 Newsletter  

Unveiling our new logo; remembering founding Board Chair, Philip P. Ardery; Celebrating Jackie Swigart; Carolyn's story; The Art of Recovery...

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