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Contents 4

Sixth Form Curriculum

30

The Wells Approach

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A Level Study

31

Option Choices

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Academic Standards

7

Extended Project Qualification

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Personalised Study Support

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The Tutor System

10

Boarding in the Sixth Form

11

Co-curricular Programme

12

Sport

13

Combined Cadet Force (CCF)

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Music

15

University and Career Advice

16

Preparing for Oxford and Cambridge

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Music College Applications

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Art College Applications

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Opportunities for Leadership

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Peer Mentoring

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Sixth Form Centre

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Places to Work and Computer Usage

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Induction Programme

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What the Pupils Say

26

Life Skills

27

A Level Results

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Sixth Form Destinations

Subject Choices 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 44 46 48 50 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 62 66

Art Art History Biology Business Chemistry Classics: Classical Civilisation Classics: Latin Computing Economics English Literature French Geography Geology German History Mathematics Further Maths Music Music Technology Religious Studies Photography Physical Education Physics Psychology Spanish Theatre Studies


Sixth Form Curriculum

The Wells Approach The Wells framework provides an opportunity for Sixth Formers to study a wide range of subjects as part of a rounded academic education. As with other areas of the curriculum, we strive to be flexible and enable you to follow the best path for you. The overall approach allows you maximum flexibility in the number of ways you can combine subjects to match your other commitments in the Sixth Form. In all of this, careers advice and tutor consultation is vital. It is essential to your broader education that co-curricular activity and non-academic commitment should balance the wide programme of education for which our school and Sixth Form has become renowned. You will find more details about this later in this guide. The Extended Project Qualification (EPQ) is a piece of independent research work mentored and taught in school and leading to an AS level equivalent. Results over recent years on the EPQ have been excellent, and EPQ has an increasingly positive profile with universities. Except perhaps for specialist musicians, it is our expectation that pupils will start four subjects and will leave the Sixth Form with three A levels. In addition to the subjects you choose, all pupils undertake a course across the first four terms of the Lower Sixth called ‘Life Skills’. This course is designed to prepare the pupils for broader life and includes an element of Personal, Social, Health Education (PSHE), Team Building, and even some Cookery!

Making Your Choices Towards the end of January, pupils will be asked to make a set of subjects choices from the options columns (see page 31). At this stage, pupils are also asked to indicate if there are other subjects they would like to study which are not typically offered. If there is sufficient interest in a new subject then we would look to add this to the Sixth Form curriculum.

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Pupils are also encouraged to indicate a combination of subjects that do not fit the published options columns. Once the option choices are in, we will undertake significant checking to determine whether it will be possible to change where subjects appear in the options columns. After this point, the subject option blocks will be fixed to allow the process of timetabling to begin. However this doesn’t mean that your choices cannot change! It isn’t unusual for some pupils to change their mind once the GCSE results come out, and there will be an opportunity to discuss or possibly change your options in the few days before term starts in September.

Universities, Colleges and Careers Following the recent educational reforms, universities are still making offers based on three A levels that are sat at the end of the Upper Sixth year. Most universities will base their offer on the pupils’ best three A level results (although for some courses they will specify grades in particular subjects).

Subject Combinations Some subjects at university will require you to study particular subjects (or at least one particular subject) at A level. For example, Medicine will require Chemistry, usually another Science, and one other A level; Engineering will require Mathematics and, preferably, Physics. If you are uncertain what the requirements are likely to be for any particular subject then either speak to Mrs Rowley (Head of Sixth Form) or the Head of the appropriate Department or Faculty. It is hoped that as many candidates as possible will choose one subject that contrasts with their other A level subjects, although this will depend, of course, upon the pupil’s interests. In addition some pupils may consider the EPQ as part of their course of study as a number have done in the current Lower Sixth.


A Level Study

All pupils will start with four A levels; specialist musicians may decide to start on three. There will be no AS exams; all subjects will be taught for examination at the end of Upper Sixth. At the end of Lower Sixth we will run our own internal assessments; at this point most pupils will drop down to three subjects for Upper Sixth. We firmly believe in the benefits of the educational breadth that starting with four A level subjects will provide; universities also view exposure to such breadth during Lower Sixth in a positive light. In relation to the subject that is dropped before the start of Upper Sixth, a UCAS reference could be strengthened by the inclusion of good internal assessment marks gained in this subject during our tests at the end of Lower Sixth.

If a pupil wishes to start on three subjects, or drop down to three during the course of Lower Sixth, then this may be possible depending on personal circumstance; however, we do not foresee this being the case for many pupils.

Enrichment We provide many opportunities for pupils to enrich their learning outside of the classroom. All Sixth Form pupils attend fortnightly lectures from a range of visiting speakers. Recent highlights have included Cassidy Little, Max Lemanski and Christopher Jefferies. Our most able pupils are given the opportunity to extend themselves through participation in the TED-Ed scheme and through publishing an annual magazine.

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Academic Standards

Academic Standards at Wells

Entry Requirements

Academic standards and expectations are high and results are routinely strong. This enables our pupils to achieve places at the most prestigious universities in the country with typically around 10% of the year group gaining places at Oxford or Cambridge, and many others gaining places at other Russell Group universities.

To enter the Sixth Form at Wells, pupils will need satisfactory IGCSE or GCSE results in at least six subjects at grades 9-4 (A* to C ) and typically a minimum of grade 7 or 6 (A or B) in the chosen areas of Sixth Form study.

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Whatever your grades, the Head Master must be confident that each potential Sixth Former (internal or external) has the academic qualifications as well as the sufficient maturity and self-discipline to participate in the curriculum and in the life of the Sixth Form. In making this assessment the Head Master might take previous records and reports into account.


Extended Project Qualification

If you have a passion for a topic that you don’t cover at A level, want to deepen your knowledge of the subject you intend to study at university or wish to develop an aspect of your musicianship further, then you should consider the Extended Project Qualification (EPQ). Universities are looking for pupils who can demonstrate autonomous interest in a subject and the EPQ can do just that, showing motivation to achieve something that requires commitment, organisation, good time management and the ability to seek out and take on board advice. In addition to all of this, as part of the EPQ, you learn to research, reference and evaluate sources, and develop presentation and writing skills. When applying to university, the EPQ gives you a specialist topic to discuss as well as a wealth of evidence of the valued competencies that will impress university admissions officers. As an EPQ pupil at Wells, you will be assigned a supervisor who will guide you through the project, week by week, giving advice and helping you to think about your planning, research and evaluation. You will also follow a taught research skills course in which you will learn a variety of the skills that will not only become an important aspect of your EPQ but that will also form an essential skill set for university study and beyond. Most pupils begin the EPQ course in November of Lower Sixth, submitting their final projects in October of Upper Sixth.

So what exactly is the EPQ? The EPQ is a unique qualification, assessed by A level criteria (therefore it is possible to gain an A*), but worth the equivalent of an AS Level in UCAS points. Past projects from Wells pupils have been as diverse as looking at the effect that Chanel’s life had on her work, building a sports coaching website, and answering the question, “Should badgers be culled in an attempt to control Bovine Tuberculosis in the UK?”. An EPQ could include: ● A design ● A report with findings from an investigation or study ● A dissertation presenting an argument ● An artefact ● A performance

Music-based EPQ For musicians at Wells, the EPQ presents an opportunity to research an aspect of your instrument or technique whilst at the same time gaining a respected qualification. Previous music-based EPQ projects have included wide-ranging aspects of music and musicianship (all of which could enhance any music college application), for example looking at how the original playing style of pieces on Baroque trumpets can influence that of modern day trumpets.

Whatever your interest and whatever your primary motivation, the EPQ can fit alongside your other commitments at Wells, enhancing your Sixth Form experience and beyond.

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Personalised Study Support

The Learning Centre provides personalised study support to pupils through Sixth Form study skills drop-in sessions. The sessions run twice a week and are open to all pupils in the Sixth Form. The study skills taught during the sessions are personalised for the pupil’s own learning requirements and can include: ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

Revision techniques Spelling Reading strategies Literal and inferential comprehension Critical analysis Writing skills Time management and organisation Question analysis Self-advocacy and understanding regarding personal learning strengths and challenges.

Study skills sessions are run by a specialist teacher and assessor in Specific Learning Differences, meaning that study skills sessions are delivered in a way that recognises diverse ways of learning. Teaching approaches are based on information provided by the pupils’ self-reports, subject teacher feedback, and any relevant information from diagnostic reports and assessments if appropriate. As a result, any difficulties experienced by pupils are considered in an informed and professional manner so that appropriate support can be put in place for lessons, study support and exams.

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Pupils with learning differences also can be supported when thinking about learning support as they progress to Higher Education or the workplace. We are able to teach pupils about assistive technology and equipment often recommended to pupils with learning differences at university. Assistive technology can include: ● ● ● ● ●

Mind Mapping software Speech-to-text Text-to-speech Livescribe audio recording and note-taking Use of apps for study skills and revision.

Learning about assistive technology and exploring personal learning strengths can truly put pupils ahead of the game in preparation for going onto the next stage of their academic learning. Advice also can be given to pupils and parents regarding the requirements for accessing support at university so that pupils are prepared and supported as they begin their studies in Higher Education. Please contact our Head of SEND, Mr Mark Dignum (m.dignum@wells-cathedral-school.com) for any further information about our Learning Support Department.


The Tutor System

Our dedicated team of Sixth Form Tutors provide individual support and guidance. These Tutors are experienced members of staff, often Heads of Departments, and all with a wealth of experience in their different fields. The allocation of Sixth Form Tutors is a process that is taken very seriously in order to provide pupils with the best possible support through their academic studies and the greatest level of expertise with applications to university and music colleges.

Pupils have regular contact with their Tutors as tutor time is timetabled into the School week. These sessions range from 1:1 discussions about termly academic grades and target setting to group discussions and activities selected from a varied tutor programme. Pupils also have access to ‘Unifrog’- a careers platform which allows them to research careers, university courses and apprenticeships, as well as allowing pupils the opportunity to build their profiles ahead of university or employment applications.

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Boarding in the Sixth Form Entry into the Sixth Form whether as an existing Wells Cathedral School pupil or as a new pupil represents the beginning of a new chapter in the pupils’ educational career. This is particularly so if one is a boarder. Life as a boarder in the Sixth Form at Wells offers many opportunities and acts as an excellent preparation for life at university, music college or in the wider world. Life is different because the School invests a lot of trust in Sixth Form boarders. There is still the same level of professional support and care available from house staff, but in the interests of encouraging pupils to become independent learners, they are expected to take more responsibility for their learning both in and outside of the classroom. To encourage independence, boarders are allowed to work in their studies during private learning periods and can make use of the Library and the Sixth Form Centre in the evenings. Boarders in the Sixth Form have the opportunity to shape the boarding community. In their respective houses they have the chance to act as positive role models through organising house events, keenly participating in House competitions, mentoring younger pupils and by guiding prospective pupils `and parents around the school. Sixth Form boarders also have the opportunity to contribute to wider school life through active involvement in the School’s committee structure. Through this involvement Sixth Form boarders realise the value of teamwork and develop a sense of community responsibility. Like day pupils, boarders in the Sixth Form have much to look forward to outside of academic study. As well as opportunities to participate in world-class music and competitive sport every term, there are a considerable number of trips available. In addition, every term there is a Sixth Form party, usually with a fancy dress theme. The party season culminates with the Sixth Form Ball at the end of the academic year. Boarders can also go to Bristol and Bath at weekends providing they have no school commitments. Life in the Sixth Form for a boarder at Wells Cathedral School offers an excellent preparation for later life. The friendly and supportive environment seeks to develop the leadership and academic potential in every pupil. Pupils leave the School confident in themselves and in their abilities and ready to embark on the next chapter of their education.

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Ritchie House Ritchie House is our bespoke Sixth Form only co-educational House designed to provide a stepping stone from school life to university for our Upper Sixth pupils. There are three distinct areas: the main house, a modern wing (Ritchie Gardens) and a satellite house (Brock House). Ritchie has a modern design with en-suite rooms, a beautiful university campus feel and a large walled garden. A resident Houseparent and Assistant, along with a non-resident Matron and a number of regular staff, support our Sixth Formers and ensure the House runs smoothly.


Co-Curricular Programme

Wells has a rich co-curricular programme that is about engendering a love for sport, hobbies and outdoor activity that lasts for life. We want our co-curricular programme to enable all pupils to try everything once and pursue what they enjoy. We want them to continue to play competitive sport, enjoy robust fitness activities, join in challenging outdoor adventurous activities, or take part in amateur dramatics or dance once they have left Wells. In the Sixth Form we hope and expect our pupils not only to continue to enjoy the wealth of sport, clubs and activities that are available, but start to lead in them as well. Sports matches, expeditions, trips and clubs require organisational and management acumen, and we expect our senior pupils to take the lead in some facets of this work. Our Wednesday afternoon activity programme enables pupils to pursue interests outside the classroom, such as coding, gardening in our allotment (with a focus on conservation), mindfulness and volunteering in both the community and our Junior School. These activities vary from year to year, but we run a very successful and vibrant Combined Cadet Force (in which the Sixth Form take on many leadership roles) and our pupils support the local community with involvement in community service programmes, community art and drama projects, and even helping in the Bishop’s Palace with gardening work. For the Upper Sixth this programme is voluntary, but most continue through from the Lower Sixth with their chosen activity.

The centrepiece of the outdoor education programme in the Sixth Form is the Gold Duke of Edinburgh’s Award programme with an incredible rate of success. Pupils find themselves doing activities such as helping people in the community, getting fitter, developing skills and going on an expedition. We have staff who have experience in canoeing, rock climbing and caving, among others - so most adventurous needs are catered for. Each year we run charitable trips to Sierra Leone and a science research trip to Japan. Biennially we take overseas sports trips, and every three years adventurous pupils are invited to undertake a physically challenging expedition. We also have a dynamic drama and dance programme, with clubs and productions to meet everyone’s needs. In the Sixth Form pupils have the opportunity to take a role in the annual Upper School production, and the inter-house drama competition the Bigny Cup - nearly always involves a large crew from each house. Even the shy and retiring pupils often find themselves on stage at some point. Our co-curricular provision also includes a vast number of clubs and societies where pupils have the opportunity to do forensics, learn special relativity, lead debates and more. However, we are always looking to improve our co-curricular provision! New staff bring new skills and, often, new pupils do the same. Whether it’s Zumba or Fencing, we are always on the lookout for new things for our pupils to do.

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Sport in the Sixth Form Sport and physical activity play an important part in school life at Wells; it’s a common thread that binds our youngest pupil to our oldest with the expectation that all do some form of physical activity each week. The underlying ethos of the Faculty is to provide opportunity for all pupils to enjoy participation in sport and exercise to their chosen level.

Competitive Sport Sport at Wells follows two paths in the Sixth Form. On the one hand we compete in all of the major sports against most of the independent schools in the southwest. We also compete locally with our neighbouring state schools. The major sports for the boys are rugby, hockey and cricket, whilst for the girls they are hockey, netball and tennis. We compete strongly in many other sports too including football, boys’ tennis, athletics, cross-country, swimming, badminton and basketball. We have recently toured to South Africa with sports teams and regularly host visiting schools. First team sport at Wells is strong and competitive and our sports captains play a key role in their sports, not only leading the first team, but also encouraging and influencing more junior teams. And most of our younger sports teams are supported by Sixth Form pupils who take on appropriate responsibility.

Games On the other hand individuals all participate in, and are coached in, games lessons with the aim of enjoyment and progress. Activities that are available include swimming, weights and fitness, badminton, climbing, dance, football, basketball, yoga, zumba, running and aerobics in addition to the main sports of the term. We also run an inter-house sports competition that sees the houses competing against each other in a wide variety of sports with a friendly rivalry.

Benefits The benefits of sport and physical activity are considerable and well documented. We hope that all pupils will leave Wells with a desire to continue taking part in regular exercise in an activity or sport they have

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discovered in their time here. Sixth Form sport at Wells aims to set pupils up and equip them with the skills and knowledge to follow a healthy and active lifestyle.

Leadership Opportunities In the Sixth Form, pupils are given the opportunity to follow a Sports Leader Programme, which aims to develop their ability to plan, lead and evaluate coaching sessions for younger pupils in and beyond Wells. Time is spent looking at the principles of coaching and the theory behind this. They will also develop transferable skills such as planning and evaluating, group leadership, and running competitions and tournaments. Pupils will also be given the opportunity to gain a recognised first aid qualification.

Relationship with Brian Ashton MBE Wells Cathedral School has developed an exclusive relationship with the internationally renowned Brian Ashton MBE. Brian has an international reputation as a creative, pioneering thinker and is also more widely known as an elite rugby coach. He has coached a number of sides, including: Bath RFC, Ireland, a groundbreaking England Rugby Academy (where he mentored the current England coach, Stuart Lancaster) and led the England rugby side to World Cup glory in 2003 as Clive Woodward’s attack coach. He then led the England 2007 World Cup squad to within 10 points of victory in the final against South Africa as Head Coach. Since then, Brian has worked on a number of different projects all revolving around coaching high performing individuals and teams in all walks of life. Brian’s role here at Wells is to mentor School sports coaches, challenging the way they think about coaching and the way they approach sessions. The aim to help us further encourage our pupils’ independence on and off the pitch/court! He also leads pupil seminars on topics including: leadership, succeeding by thinking differently and creativity.


Combined Cadet Force (CCF)

The Combined Cadet Force (CCF) Contingent at Wells is established for 130 Cadets, and they can join either the Royal Air Force, Royal Navy, Army or Royal Marines Band sections. The emphasis in the Sixth Form is on developing leadership through challenging experiences and assisting in the delivery of training to younger Cadets. The Senior Cadets enjoy a balanced training programme of both military and adventurous training. Training includes: leadership activities, life firing marksmanship training, rock climbing, orienteering, weapon handling, blank firing fieldcraft exercises and air experience flying. In addition to the weekly training programme Sixth Form Cadets have extensive opportunities to attend residential courses. These include courses provided by the Cadet Centre for Adventurous Training, such as sea kayaking and mountaineering in Scotland. The key purposes of the CCF are outlined in the CCF Charter published by the Ministry of Defence:

“The broad function of the Combined Cadet Force is to provide a disciplined organisation within a school so that boys and girls may develop powers of leadership by means of training to promote the qualities of responsibility, self-reliance, resourcefulness, endurance and perseverance, and a sense of service to the community. It is firmly believed that the self-discipline required in Service life are equally important in the civil life of the nation today. The specific functions of the service training in the CCF are to provide the opportunity for young people to exercise responsibility and leadership, and to learn from the services how they can best be developed; to show them why the defence forces are needed and how they function; and to encourage those who have an interest in the services to become Officers of the Regular or Reserve Forces.” Here at Wells we believe in the CCF Charter, especially that the ‘self-discipline required in Service life is equally important in the civil life of the nation today’. This sense of service is in keeping with the community ethos that runs throughout our Wednesday afternoon activities.

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Music in the Sixth Form

Wells uniquely provides a pre-professional performance course, for outstanding young musicians from all over the world, within a proper school. Specialist and Special Provision music and academic programmes are developed on an individual basis and support each pupil’s musical aspirations. Decisions regarding the amount of time required for music, and therefore the number of A level subjects chosen, will be discussed with each specialist’s relevant coordinator and the Deputy Director of Music. Specialist musicians should normally start with three A level subjects. The expectation is that all specialists will be at the level to achieve music college success should they choose that path. Specialists will have up to three hours per week of individual tuition, ensemble opportunities, masterclasses as well as participating in many concerts as performers and listeners. Practice is an essential part of the programme, and pupils have opportunities to access rehearsal spaces from 7.45am until 9.45pm, schedules permitting.

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The Music Faculty delivers approximately 200 concerts per year and has over 70 ensembles (orchestras, chamber music groups and choirs) and 90 members of staff. This creates an exciting community for all members of the Sixth Form. Many groups are open to all, whilst others are by invitation. Whether pupils are totally absorbed with music, see it as a hobby, or have other priorities, the cultural impact of being surrounded by music has a profound effect on all our learning and wellbeing. The individualised approach developed, because of the Specialists, has benefits for all Sixth Formers, and the presence of highly motivated and dedicated young musicians in the community brings a realisation that to be world class in any area of life you have to be committed, responsive and passionate.


University and Career Advice

Decisions, decisions! No sooner are you in the Sixth Form before someone is asking you to think about what you are going to do when you leave. Well no, it’s not quite like that! Elsewhere in this prospectus you will find examples of the range and variety of subjects and activities that we hope you will enjoy to the full in the two years at the top of the School, and to which you can give time and energy. Those two years will pass, however, and the more you are enjoying life the more quickly they seem to go by. So we have a range of ways in which you can start to plan for the moment at which you say goodbye, at least in educational terms, to Wells Cathedral School. The subjects you choose to study when you enter the Sixth Form may already have given a clue to your future direction. There is, however, no reason why you should have much idea of your ultimate destination at this stage, and many doors will be open to you, whatever your choice of subjects. Most pupils who leave Wells at the end of the Sixth Form go on to some form of Higher Education. This may be university (in the UK or abroad), music college, art or drama courses, or graduate level apprenticeships, and at some point before the end of your Lower Sixth year you will start to research these. We provide help in many ways: ●

Half hour appointments with the Head of Sixth Form whenever you need guidance. Simply book a time that suits you Unifrog support and guidance

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Tutors are always available, and an introduction to the Higher Education process is given in tutor meetings All Lower Sixth pupils go to a UCAS (Universities Centralised Admissions System) fair in spring, at which every UK university is represented An information morning for all Sixth Form pupils and their parents is held in June, at which talks are given by admissions tutors, Upper Sixth pupils and former pupils Gap year and work experience advice is freely available from the higher education adviser. All pupils will participate in an interview programme with people from outside the School staff. This is the start of the leadership process, but also helps pupils to develop their interview skills in a realistic setting. These skills can be further refined in the Upper Sixth.

In the Upper Sixth year we provide help with all aspects of applications, including how to: ● ● ● ● ●

write a CV use the UCAS system write personal statements prepare for interviews by doing mock interviews apply to universities outside the UK.

Perhaps as a result of this, the last three years have seen about 90% of pupils admitted to one of their first two choices of university, and over 60% of these at UK Russell Group institutions. Pupils have also left Wells to go to universities in the United States, Ireland, mainland Europe and Hong Kong.

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Preparing for Oxford and Cambridge

Oxford and Cambridge stand slightly apart from other UK universities in that they are organised on a collegiate basis, and teaching takes place in very small tutorial groups in individual colleges. Entry is very competitive; the standard offer is A*A*A or A*AA, and most candidates receiving an offer will have: ● ●

Very good GCSE results (usually six or more grades at level 8/9) Very high predicted grades at A level (at least A*AA)

Unlike most other universities, Oxford and Cambridge interview applicants before making an offer, and both universities set pre-assessments for some subjects. Both universities also frequently require examples of written work.

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To help prepare pupils for entry to Oxford and Cambridge, we organise: ● ● ● ●

Weekly tutorials for all candidates in the autumn of U6 conducted by subject mentors Subject specific lessons aimed at deepening and broadening knowledge Practice interviews and critical thinking sessions A visit to Oxford in the spring for potential applicants in Lower Sixth.

In recent years Wells pupils have successfully gained places at Oxford and Cambridge to study a diverse range of subjects including English, Mathematics, History, Natural Sciences, Engineering, Music, Law, Geography, Modern and Medieval languages, Philosophy, Politics and Economics (PPE), Human Social and Political Sciences (HSPS), and Anglo-Saxon, Norse and Celtic.


Music College Applications

As there are many different routes into instrumental performance-based courses in higher education, pupils intending to apply to a music conservatoire, either in the UK or abroad, should discuss this with their instrumental teacher and head of department in the early stages of their Sixth Form courses. Applications for all UK conservatoires are made through UCAS Conservatoires, except for the Guildhall School of Music for which pupils apply directly via their website. The application deadline is 1st October. Entry to all UK music colleges is by audition. All pupils applying for performance courses will be offered an audition. The London colleges tend to audition in early December but others may be from late October. The specific audition requirements differ for each college and are listed on the colleges’ websites. These should be studied very carefully well in advance of the auditions. Pupils applying for non performance courses (such as composition) will usually be required to submit a portfolio or video of evidence and may also be asked for interview. Pupils will generally hear the results of their auditions during the Christmas holidays and have about a month to decide and respond. The reply dates will be different for each individual pupil and are dependent on when the last offer is made from the colleges.

This will be communicated via the UCAS Conservatoires ‘Track’ system. Many pupils at Wells have international ambitions and are encouraged to look at conservatoires in other countries in Europe, Asia and North America. Application and audition procedures for these conservatoires vary quite widely and so if pupils wish to investigate this route, they should seek advice from their instrumental head of department during their Lower Sixth year. It is common, but not necessary, for musicians to also apply to university music (or other) courses through UCAS, and academic music staff can advise on suitable courses. These courses are applied for via the UCAS system. It is fine for pupils to apply for both a number of conservatoires and universities via UCAS in the same academic year. 25 Wells pupils applied for September 2020 places at UK Conservatoires. Between them, they received 64 offers of places, 30 of which included scholarships. Two musicians accepted places at Oxbridge to read music, and three others to read music at other UK universities.

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Art College Applications

If you decide that you may wish to pursue a career in Art, you will need to apply for an Art Foundation Course (1 year), before you select a degree course in which you want to specialise.

In addition, you will write a personal statement, outlining your particular interests and specialisms; we will also provide a reference, which will be written by your Art teacher.

Unlike the UCAS scheme, applications are made direct to individual art colleges, and you may apply to several. You may also submit a normal UCAS application for other academic courses at the same time. It is advisable to visit some of the colleges on Open Days, and at this stage the Head of Art will advise pupils as to courses offered at different colleges.

The closing date for applications for most colleges is 31st January. However, one or two colleges have an earlier date in December. If your application is successful, a college will offer you either a conditional or unconditional place on the Foundation Course.

All applications are individual. Some colleges require a portfolio only and others require a portfolio and interview. Guidance will be given by the Head of Art with portfolio preparation and interviews.

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Opportunities for Leadership

At Wells, there are many opportunities to develop your leadership skills and although these become especially prominent in the Sixth Form, there are many opportunities throughout the entire School. In the Lower Sixth there is the Sports Leadership Programme: members of the Lower Sixth can take part in a ‘leadership within sport’ initiative which involves organising tournaments for local primary schools and is an excellent co-curricular option. Members of the Lower Sixth are also invited to form part of the Sixth Form Council. In the Upper Sixth, through the pupil leader/prefect system, you are able to become leaders - not only amongst the Sixth Form but within the whole School, providing a great opportunity to contribute to the Wells community. Working alongside the Head Boy and Head Girl is the pupil leader team, comprised of House captains, sports and music representatives and other prefects. The pupil leaders and prefects play an extremely important role in the day-to-day running of the School. House captains help the house staff to run integrated day and boarding houses smoothly, and each leader heads a key area of the School, which collectively allow the opinions of members throughout the School to have their say.

Being a pupil leader is a very fulfilling job. The duties provide you with the chance to talk and work with members of the Junior School and Senior School. The Sixth Form leaders are role models to those in younger year groups, and act as approachable peers. Being a pupil leader is an opportunity to create a legacy at Wells, whether that is continuing and building upon something already existing or creating something new. Not only does this provide excellent experience for those preparing to take the next step after school, it is also a rewarding and enjoyable job. Furthermore, sports captains are key figures in the school and being awarded first team captaincy is regarded as a great privilege. Sports captains lead their respective first teams and also lead development of their particular sport across the whole School. Leadership opportunities at Wells are not only great experiences for individual development but also play a significant role in developing the community atmosphere throughout the School. We are very excited to see what great things will result from the leadership programme at Wells.

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Peer Mentoring

For several years we have been running a very successful peer mentoring programme in the School, supported by Upper Sixth pupils with specific roles in that area. All Lower and Upper Sixth have the opportunity to become peer mentors. The scheme is valuable to Sixth Form pupils in providing them with the opportunity to be role models for younger pupils and to have an additional level of responsibility. Pupils mainly chose to help with this out of a sense of enjoyment/fulfilment, but it does support UCAS applications and a Duke of Edinburgh service requirement. Volunteers for the programme do need to be aware of the importance of good reliability and the sensitivity involved.

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If you choose to help with Learning Support peer mentoring you will have a dedicated pupil who you support on a one-on-one basis during an allocated lunchtime in the Library, overseen by the leader of learning support. Help is very individual and targeted towards the individual needs of the Lower School pupil. Support can be in many forms, but examples include listening to a child read, carrying out spelling or proofreading activities, giving support with touch typing, assisting with prep, and emotional support.


Sixth Form Centre

The Sixth Form Centre is open Monday to Saturday from 8.45am – 7.00pm for social and academic use and is the hub for all things Sixth Form. Information about events, trips, concerts and activities are displayed on the Sixth Form noticeboard. There is an enclosed garden, a kitchen where you can make coffee, hot chocolate or tea, a common room, locker room, large silent working area upstairs (which is staffed during the day) plus the foyer for working in groups.

There are themed parties once every term; “dressing up” is optional but fun. Drinks (alcoholic and soft) are supplied. There are a variety of events such as pizza and video evenings, quiz nights, cocktail parties, and ‘bacon sandwich break times’ - many of these events are advertised in the full school calendar. Sixth Formers are expected to take collective responsibility for the Sixth Form Centre and there is an expectation that they will all contribute to the smooth running of the facilities.

Once a month there is a Sixth Form assembly, which is an opportunity for any specific notices and issues to be raised. There is a Sixth Form committee consisting of one or two people usually from each House who help decide on all things to do with the Sixth Form and who liaise between staff and pupils and help with running the Sixth Form Centre.

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Places to Work and Computer Usage

When you become a member of the Sixth Form at Wells you will find you have a lot more freedom and independence to decide where and when you work. This can be difficult, especially in the beginning, so it is important that you think about where you work best.

including vinyl records, CDs and DVDs. The Library also offers space where you can work individually, in groups, as a class, as well as being a place to relax and read or to listen to music. The Library has wireless connection throughout to support the use of laptops..

During the Day

The extensive non-fiction collection is linked to the curriculum, as well as providing books for wider interests. Fiction covers all genres and interests with some foreign language texts. The Librarian, Miss Estall, can assist with book choice and information on fiction and non-fiction resources that are available around the Library on displays and in leaflets. Miss Estall also can assist with research skills: methods of research, evaluating information sources, referencing and all other information literacy queries.

The Library is open from 9.00am - 5.00pm and 7.00pm - 10.00pm Monday – Friday, and Saturday 8.45am - 12.15pm and provides a very quiet working area. The Sixth Form Centre is open from 8.30 am – 7.00 pm Monday to Friday and has two areas in which you can work. The upstairs work area is a silent (and during the day and evening, staffed) work space. The foyer area allows you to work in groups with other pupils. You can work back at your house either in the day work area or in your room if you are a boarder. Ritchie House is also available for private study.

In the Evenings The Library and Ritchie House are both open for you to use in the evenings. Day pupils are welcome to stay in and do their prep in school between 7.00pm and 10.00pm. These areas are staffed by senior teachers at that time whom you can see if you need any help. You could also work in your boarding house.

Using the Library The Library offers a wide range of non-fiction, fiction, journals, newspapers and audiovisual resources,

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Computer Usage All pupils are required to bring a laptop to School. Our network is designed to work with whatever device is best for you. A whole range of personal devices are used by pupils in the Sixth Form including Chromebooks, Windows laptops and Apple MacBooks. Our only requirement is that whatever device you choose has a web browser (in order to access our online resources) and a keyboard (as opposed to just an iPad, for example). A Chromebook is more than sufficient and indeed works very well with the rest of our system, but you are free to choose according to your preference and budget!


Induction Programme

Even for those pupils who have been at Wells since joining the Pre-Prep, entering the Sixth Form is a major change. No longer will pupils be studying over ten subjects, wearing school uniform or have a full timetable of academic lessons. There is also a large number of new pupils to the School who not only have to deal with these changes but must also adapt to a whole new environment.

communication, independent learning and higher order thinking skills. Working in mixed teams, pupils tackle a variety of tasks, each designed to draw out different problem-solving skills from strategic thinking and careful planning to delegation, deduction and application of knowledge.

For both sets of pupils a clear induction programme is offered to ensure that all Lower Sixth pupils are familiar with some basic operating systems within the School and to give them an opportunity to get to know the rest of the cohort.

The induction programme includes an academic introduction. Pupils are introduced to how study skills relate to Sixth Form life in a wider sense. In addition, pupils are given the opportunity to hear from key members of the senior leadership team and the Higher Education and Careers Advisor so that they can hit the ground running in the important Lower Sixth year.

New pupils are invited to Wells prior to the start of the academic year where they are given a tour of the School and an opportunity to meet key members of staff.

The social events offered during the first few weeks of term are a major part of the induction programme and enable both the Upper Sixth and Lower Sixth to get to know each other in a variety of activities.

All Lower Sixth pupils participate in an induction day during the first few weeks of term. This is a course full of hands-on tasks to improve leadership, advanced

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What the Pupils Say “Sixth Form life is incredibly varied and exciting and there are so many opportunities that can be taken. A typical day often takes me from tutor period, through some academic lessons, then down to the Music School for Brass Quintet, followed by hockey training and finally Big Band in the evening. I think that the Sixth Form really helps you to bridge the gap between school life and the adult world and allows you to act independently while still having the support from your Tutor and the Sixth Form team. The Library offers a brilliant place for this independent work. The relationship between music and academic work is very important and your increased freedom allows you to tailor your timetable so suit you personally.” “I joined Wells halfway through Year 5, and since then, each year has been more challenging, but the jump from Year 11 into Sixth Form has been the largest difference by far. Although the work intensity significantly increases, I love being and working in the Sixth Form Centre. I also like being able to focus on fewer subjects, so you can put all your concentration into the subjects that you actually enjoy. For me, this makes it feel as though I’m making better use of my time rather than studying subjects that I feel won’t benefit me. This makes Sixth Form feel as though it is setting up more of a foundation for my future.” “Since joining the Sixth Form from St Gregory’s College in Bath, I feel fully included and comfortable. While I enjoy the freedom and flexibility, it is reassuring to have a full body of support behind me from individual subject teachers, my tutor and the Sixth Form team. The Sixth Form Centre has been great for linking socialising and working, and has succeeded in integrating both years and lots of different people. There is a hardworking, motivated attitude and I love studying in an environment so driven for success. I feel Wells’ Sixth Form is a perfect bridge between Year 11 and university, with a mix between independent, group and supported learning. Similarly I have really benefited from regular career guidance that has helped me choose appropriate subjects and well-informed advice for looking towards the future.” “I am currently in my 13th year at Wells and so far it has been the best year yet. I’ve chosen to pursue the subjects that I love and have incorporated one new subject to my studies. The Library and Sixth Form Centre create excellent places to work and relax, both during school and after school hours. I found the transition to sixth form very easy with the help and support of the Sixth Form staff, and my Tutor. Even

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though I have been at the School since Reception, the Sixth Form life encourages independence, private study and independent research. This, I feel will set me up for a smooth transition to university life.” “I was a pupil who is new to the Sixth Form this year and one of my greatest worries was integrating into the social life and being able to prosper academically. However straight away I made friends and made the transfer of schools very easily. I am also a boarder at Wells and the opportunities and experiences we are handed are amazing. I enjoy being a boarder at Wells, being warmly welcomed by pupils and staff, fitting in easily. The adjustment to A levels has been easy due to the help offered by the staff and many work places to suit a learning environment. I have so far been motivated to join in with the school sports, becoming a part of the hockey team as well as attending the Sixth Form socials, which offer a warm atmosphere and a relaxing time to meet new people. Wells is a school that welcomes all new pupils making their high aims achievable.” “I joined Wells at the beginning of my lower sixth year and have never looked back. The whole reason I joined the School was down to the unique atmosphere it has. Somehow Wells seems to have perfected the balance of enough independence to prepare you for future whilst having teachers and staff available to help whenever you feel out of your depth. The wide range of sports and activities on offer also mean that there is never a dull moments. With opportunities for leadership or just an excuse to have a bit of fun, there seems to be an activity suited to any pupil. In the Sixth Form Wells becomes more of a family than a school and its this care that helps you through some of the hardest years of your life.” “Having been educated in every principality, I joined the school in Year 6 as a day pupil. I have since then been able to develop and flourish both academically and socially alongside improving my sporting capability. During my time at Wells, I have always valued the approachable characteristic of the teaching staff, who are refreshingly passionate about their subjects. After entering the Sixth Form this year, I have found that I have been given further academic opportunities by being one of the first pupils to study history of art at the school. In comparison to studying for my GCSEs last year, I have found that in the Sixth Form access to study areas is more accessible, with teachers and our librarian to offer continued guidance.”


“I have been at Wells since Year 4 and I am now in my second year of Sixth Form. The Sixth Form has meant that I have been able to enjoy a greater level of independence and study the subjects I enjoy, which has made it very different to other years I have spent at this school. There are also a large number of opportunities in the Sixth Form to attend social events and lectures. I have also have taken part in the trek to Everest Base Camp which was a wonderful experience. Further to this there are many chances to take part in lots of different activities and I have spent a lot of time playing sport and now in my final year at school I am tennis captain.”

“Following education at a local primary school, I joined Wells Cathedral School in Year 5. After a brief stint as a brass musician, I ultimately concluded that music was not for me. I broke into the WCS Football Team during Year 10, and this is something which I have continued into the Sixth Form. To date, my time at Wells has proved a defining stage in my development as an individual. Through the diverse range of extracurricular activities that Wells has to offer, I can say that I have fully embraced with the community. Life in the Sixth Form has certainly taught me transferable skills including the importance of independent study such as the EPQ, but also added responsibilities through my title as ‘Head of Events’ for the Michaelmas and Advent Terms. I have experienced support from both my Tutor and Careers Advisor who assisted me in securing highly sought-after work experience at a law firm - hopefully this will better enable me to achieve vocational success in the future. When my turn comes to leave Wells, I will carry with me many happy memories and lasting friendships.”

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Life Skills

We feel it is very important for pupils to have the opportunity to experience / learn from these diverse areas. All Lower Sixth pupils follow this course, which has been divided up into four areas with varying amount of time spent on each. They are Personal, Social and Health Education (PSHE), Food and Young Adult Life Skills.

Personal, Social and Health Education Purpose To ensure all pupils in the Sixth Form have had access to and have had an opportunity to participate in a comprehensive PSHE course. The Course In this ten-week course, pupils will participate in active discussion on the following topics: ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

Mental health Identity Independent thinking Relationships Alcohol use and abuse Responsibility Contraception Consent Rape.

Pupils are also free to introduce other related topics of their own choosing in a safe environment. Pupils are not obliged to comment and are reminded to seek support from any member of staff with whom they feel comfortable should they need it. As well as this, all Sixth Formers attend regular talks and lectures on further subjects from cyber bullying and radicalisation to transplantation.

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Food Purpose Pupils will experience a taster of the British Nutrition Foundation’s Life Skills course with the aim to provide skills for when they leave School. The Course It is envisaged that it will provide opportunities for pupils to: ● ● ● ● ●

have hands-on experiences with food, i.e. cook learn about and demonstrate basic food hygiene and preparation skills learn about healthy eating through practical work work independently and in small groups to develop confidence become better informed consumers.

Young Adult Life Skills Purpose In this module our Sixth Form pupils are introduced to some of the challenges, opportunities and responsibilities they will face as young adults in society. The Course Young Adult Life Skills sessions include: ● ● ● ● ●

Why voting matters Taxation LinkedIn vs. Facebook To rent or to buy and how mortgages work Why the “Big Society” matters


A Level Results 2020

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Sixth Form Destinations 2020 Bath - Psychology with Industrial Placement Birmingham – Physics and Astrophysics Bristol – History of Art and French Cambridge – History Cardiff – Architectural Engineering Cardiff – Criminology Durham – Anthropology and Archaeology Durham – Biological Sciences Durham – Music Durham – Theoretical Physics Durham – Physics and Astronomy (2021) Durham – Philosophy and Politics Durham – Psychology Edinburgh – Veterinary Medicine Edinburgh – Psychology Edinburgh – Biomedical Sciences Edinburgh - Linguistics Exeter – Psychology Exeter – Human Biosciences Exeter – Medical Sciences Glasgow - Pharmacology Loughborough - Business, Economics and Finance Liverpool – Medicine LSE - Social Anthropology Manchester – Medical Physiology Manchester – Economics Manchester – Management, Leadership and Leisure Manchester – Computer Science and Mathematics Oxford - Music Oxford - Music Oxford - French Oxford - Earth Science St Andrews - Psychology with Biology Southampton - Oceanography Sussex - International Business Management Queen Mary – Human Geography Royal Holloway - Psychology Royal Holloway - Liberal Arts UCL - History of Art Warwick – MORSE Warwick - Modern Languages Warwick - Engineering Warwick - Psychology York – Economics and Mathematics York – Environmental Geography

On average about 75% of the Upper Sixth go on to a Russell Group University or Music Conservatoire each year. Between 5-10% on average go to Oxbridge, and in recent years about 80%+ who go on to Music Conservatoire receive a scholarship.

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The Wells Approach

At Wells we pride ourselves on our ability to provide a curriculum that meets the needs of all our pupils. Our subject pathways allow for clearly defined programmes of study which clear links to further study or employment.

The Academic Pathway Pupils choose four A level subjects to study from the options columns. This pathway allows for a breadth of study across different subject areas and will provide the necessary grounding for further study at university. Alongside their A levels, pupils may also wish to undertake an EPQ to help them develop their research skills.

The Specialist Pathway Music Specialists choose three A levels to study from the options columns, one of which must be Music. Alongside this will be timetabled practice time to allow pupils to focus on, and develop their instrumental skills. Pupils may also opt to complete an EPQ as part of their programme of study.

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Alternative qualifications We are able to provide other qualifications such as: ● ● ● ● ●

CCF Leadership Lifeguarding Sports coaching awards Leith’s Introductory Certificate in Food and Wine Duke of Edinburgh Gold Award.

If you would like to discuss these qualifications in more detail, please contact Sally Rowley (Head of Sixth Form) or Natalie Perry (Deputy Head, Academic) on 01749 834200.


Option Choices

Option A

Option B

Option C

Option D

Option E

Chemistry Computing French History Maths Music Psychology

Biology BTEC Sport Further Maths* Maths Music Photography Psychology RPE

Biology Chemistry Classical Civilisation Economics English Geology Latin Spanish

Art Business Studies English Geography Maths Music Tech Physics Theatre Studies

Further Maths* Music Tech PE Psychology

*Pupils studying Further Maths must select Further Maths in both columns B and E.

The Options Process Pupils are to choose a maximum of four A levels based on their chosen route of study. Only one subject can be chosen from a column. Music Specialists choose three A levels, one of which is to be Music. Pupils will receive an electronic options form where they will indicate the subjects that they would like to study. If a particular subject combination is not available, this can also be noted on the form. Currently these are subjects that we plan to offer in the academic year 2021-22, however these may be subject to change based on demand and resources.

Key dates Deadline for the electronic option choices form: Friday 15th January 2021.

Please note that if you miss this deadline, we cannot guarantee your choices will be available later.

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Edexcel 9FA0 Ms Linzi Stockdale-Bridson

Art Why should I study Art? Art encourages pupils to develop intellectual, imaginative and creative powers and therefore goes well with any of the creative subjects on offer but, it is also a great companion course for practically any other area of study. It provides entry to Degree or Foundation Art courses which in turn, can lead to careers in any of the following areas: Graphics, Product Design, Interior and Theatre Design, Film, TV or Digital Media, Photography, Ceramics, Fashion and Textiles, Advertising, Publishing, Architecture, Landscape and Environmental Design Conservation/Restoration, Gallery and Museum work and this is by no means an exhaustive list!

What do I need to know or be able to do before taking Art in the Sixth Form? The best foundation for success in A level Art is a good grade at GCSE. Sixth Form Art is not an easy option and you should be prepared to work hard at developing your abilities. You should have an understanding of the basic elements of art - colour, tone and form - and also a desire to understand the place of art, craft and design in the world, its history and its purpose. Above all, you should have an interest in creating and understanding art and the determination to develop this interest.

What will I learn? The main purpose of any course in Art is to develop your ability to appreciate the visual world, respond in a personal and creative way and perhaps contribute to it for the benefit of everyone. The skills you acquire will be determined, to some extent by the area of study you choose. However, whether you see yourself as a painter or a graphic designer, the same basic rules and skills apply. Some of the skills you will develop are: ● A working knowledge of materials, practices and technology within art and the skills to interpret and convey your ideas and feelings using art ● Imaginative and creative powers and your experimental, analytical and documenting skills ● A knowledge and understanding of the place of art and craft in history and in contemporary society.

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What kind of pupil is this course suitable for? ●

Pupils who have an interest in and aptitude for the subject, but who do not intend to take the subject beyond the A level Pupils who wish to undertake further studies in art, craft and design, usually at art college or further education Pupils who are looking to take up careers for which an art background is relevant. These might include advertising, publishing, architecture, museums, theatre or art gallery work

How is the course assessed? Component 1: Personal Investigation (60% of total qualification) Internally set and marked. Externally moderated. Component 2: Externally Set Assignment (40% of total qualification) Internally marked and externally moderated.

What could I go on and do at the end of my course? There are many careers in art, craft and design. Most of these require further study at an art school, further education college or university. If you are unsure about whether to make a career of the subject, the best thing to do is to speak to your art teacher who will know about the courses on offer in your area or elsewhere. At present most pupils wishing to take art, craft or design further will go on to do a one-year Foundation Course at an art college or college of further education before applying to degree courses in more specialist areas of art and design. Some pupils may wish to go straight into employment where it is useful to have had experience of art, or where you will need to use some of the skills developed during your course such as advertising, marketing, design, architecture, publishing and the media.


Edexcel 9HTO Ms Janice Gearon

Why should I study Art History? As well as offering pupils the opportunity to extend their knowledge and understanding of a wide range of visual arts, Art History also encourages pupils to make contextual links with other areas - historical, social, political and religious. This healthy crossing of subject borders broadens pupils’ outlook and perspective on the arts and humanities in general.

What do I need to know or be able to do before taking Art History? Pupils need no prior qualifications or specific Art History knowledge before taking this course. GCSE Art and Photography can be helpful, but certainly not necessary. A love of the visual arts, an interest in their contextual significance and relevance, and a willingness to learn how to analyse, discuss and write cogently about them, is what is needed.

What will I develop? ●

● ● ●

critical understanding of works of art, placing them firmly in the context in which they are found. knowledge and understanding of art historical movements, practitioners and works, considering the ways that these change and evolve within chronological and thematic frameworks, ranging from classical antiquity to cutting-edge twenty-first century works of art. awareness of art historical terms and concepts and the significance of techniques and materials in the creation of artefacts. knowledge and understanding of a range of media including painting, sculpture and architecture. understanding of the principal methods of analysis and interpretation, and the ability to make critical judgements. appreciation of critical interpretations and theory of art. the ability and confidence to express and communicate knowledge and understanding. active and independent learning, with opportunities to extend knowledge beyond the curriculum. an appreciation of art works through first-hand experience by visiting galleries, public buildings, museums etc. in the UK and abroad.

Art History Who is this course suitable for? ●

Any pupil who enjoys art and wishes to extend their knowledge and understanding of painting, sculpture and architecture, Art and photography pupils wishing to develop their analytical and contextual awareness of the visual arts. Pupils wishing to study Art History at university.

How is the course assessed? The course is assessed at the end of the second year of study. The qualification consists of two components: Paper 1: Visual Analysis and Themes ● 3 hour written paper ● Part 1: Visual analysis [three compulsory questions on unseen photographs each of a painting, sculpture and building] ● Part 2: Themes [pupils write on two themes; each has a single compulsory question in two parts] ● 110 marks. Weighting: 50% Paper 2: Periods ● 3 hour written paper, ● Compulsory questions on two selected Art Historical Periods ● For each Period pupils answer a single compulsory question in four parts. ● 110 marks. Weighting: 50%

What can I do at the end of my course? You could carry on the study of Art History at university, or of other Humanities degrees. In terms of professions after study, work in the world of art or architecture as an art adviser or investor; a gallery curator; an art conservator; a freelance writer; or even a film or TV stylist is open to you! Art History is also valued within the world of advertising and the creative industries.

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AQA 7402 Mr Ken Padgett

Biology Why should I study Biology? Biology is an exciting and rapidly expanding field of study. If you are interested in how the body works, the effects of disease, cell function and the microscopic world, advances in gene technology and the impact of human activity on ecosystems then biology could be for you. In the UK biotechnology has the highest earnings of any industrial sector. The study of biology, in common with other sciences, can open the door to a wide range of cutting edge and well paid careers. The A level course will improve your scientific literacy in a technology driven world and you will gain an understanding of the ethical considerations involved.

What do I need before taking Biology? The specification assumes that candidates have achieved Grade 6 or above in GCSE/iGCSE Science and Combined Science or a minimum of Grade 6 in GCSE Biology and one other science. The course builds on the knowledge and understanding of GCSE science courses. During the course pupils will need to have the ability to communicate effectively and research information from a variety of sources. Pupils will be expected to handle and interpret data including the use of statistics. The mathematical content of the course has been increased, and it is recommended that a pupil has a B grade or higher in GCSE/IGCSE Maths.

What will I do? ●

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Develop a deeper understanding of the major biological principles, applying these in a variety of situations with an emphasis on Human Biology and Cell Biology Undertake a range of practical work using sophisticated apparatus and techniques e.g. DNA, fingerprinting Continue to enjoy and develop a personal interest in the study of living organisms through scientific literature and a hands on approach with activities such as fieldwork Gain an understanding of the techniques underlying many of the recent advances in biotechnology and medicine Make informed and balanced judgements about the moral and ethical implications that recent advances have on society and the living world.

What kind of pupil is this course suitable for? ●

● ●

Pupils who have an interest in the study of living things; for example, through natural history or medicine Pupils who have an interest in Human Biology Pupils who enjoy investigation through laboratory based practicals, fieldwork or by reading about recent research. Pupils who are interested in the ‘new’ biological topics such as genetic engineering and drug research, and their impact on society. Pupils who want to use biology to support other qualifications such as geography and physical education or even to broaden their Sixth Form study by including a science subject for interest.

How is the course assessed? Three written 2 hour examinations on the topics: ● Biological molecules ● Cells ● Organisms exchange substances with their environment ● Genetic information, variation and relationships between organisms ● Energy transfers in and between organisms ● Organisms respond to changes in their internal and external environments ● Genetics, populations, evolution and ecosystems ● The control of gene expression

What can I do at the end of my course? Follow a degree course such as Biology, Biochemistry, Zoology, Plant Science, Medicine, Dentistry, Nursing, Food Technology, Agriculture and Forestry, Marine Biology, Natural Sciences, Psychology, Pharmacy and Veterinary Medicine. Biology, as a science discipline, is a useful addition to the list of subjects read by a predominantly arts or humanities based pupil. It demonstrates the ability to think logically and to express conceptually difficult ideas in a concise manner. Many universities and employers would therefore welcome it. Employment opportunities cover a wide range of areas related to medicine, food, agriculture, land management, law and biotechnology.

Additional Costs The Upper Sixth part of the course contains a residential field trip which is a requirement of the course. The cost of this is currently around £120 and takes place during a weekend in late June.


AQA 7132 Mrs Teresa Jarman

Why should I study Business? The popularity of TV shows such as ‘Dragon’s Den’ and ‘The Apprentice’ has raised the profile of Business in recent years. Never has it been more important to develop entrepreneurial skills in the context of the business environment in which we find ourselves. The AQA course is broad in scope and provides a lively counterpoint to more traditional subjects.

What do I need to know or be able to do before taking Business? Although not an entry requirement for this specification, candidates who have studied GCSE in Business will find that this specification builds on the concepts and skills that they have learnt. Those who are new to the subject will find that whilst some technical terms are unfamiliar initially, it doesn’t take long to grasp these provided the individual pupil is prepared to apply themselves to the subject. An awareness of and interest in UK current affairs, the business environment and enterprise will be central to the thinking of any potential pupil in this subject as will the ability to express themselves precisely and imaginatively. Pupils wishing to take this course should be aware that their proficiency in English will be an important consideration in choosing this subject.

What will I learn? Pupils will learn to: ● manipulate data in a variety of forms and to interpret their results ● present arguments and make judgements justifying recommendations on the basis of the available evidence ● recognise the nature of problems, solve problems and make decisions using appropriate business tools and methods ● plan work, taking into account the demands of the task and the time available to complete it ● conduct research ● challenge their own assumptions using evidence.

Business Pupils will learn about: ● the practical application of business concepts and reinforcing pupils’ understanding of theories active rather than passive understanding of the subject ● entrepreneurship, customer service, emerging markets, globalisation and migration.

What kind of pupil is this course suitable for? ●

● ● ● ● ●

Pupils who are engaged with the world around them and who take a keen interest in social, political and cultural life. Pupils who think ‘out of the box’ Those who wish to pursue a career in Business or a related subject Practical, lively thinkers Those who wish to cultivate transferable, practical skills based on theoretical knowledge Pupils who are attracted to the ideas of enterprise and entrepreneurship.

How is the course assessed? Topics: What is business? Managers, Leadership and decision making; Decision making to improve marketing, operational, financial and human resource performance; Analysis of strategic position of a business; Choosing strategic direction; Strategic methods; Managing strategic change Three 2 hour written examinations

What can I do at the end of my course? The skills learnt in this course are useful in a wide variety of applications and are widely recognised by universities and employers. In terms of a university career, Business is well regarded and fits well with the requirements of degrees in law, business, management, economics and politics. This subject also prepares pupils for the real world so if you are an entrepreneur in the making, this course may well help you on your way.

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AQA 7405 Miss Fiona Robertson

Chemistry Why should I study Chemistry? Doing an A level in Chemistry can open so many doors for you in the future. It is seen, and quite rightly so, as a challenging, academic and rigorous A level that will impress many universities and employers. A good grade in Chemistry shows that you are numerate, analytical and practical and have good problem solving skills. An A level in Chemistry can lead to many careers other than in the chemical industry such as medicine, dentistry, veterinary science, but is also extremely useful in careers in the biological sciences, physics, mathematics and even law. It is challenging but will suit the inquisitive and eager pupil. You could of course study chemistry just because you enjoy it!

What do I need to know or be able to do before taking Chemistry? The specification assumes that candidates taking Chemistry have achieved Grade 6 or above in GCSE/iGCSE Chemistry and one other science or a Grade 6 at Combined Science. The level of Maths in the course does not require Maths A level although due to the Maths components within the A level pupils would normally have achieved Grades A in Maths and Chemistry or Combined Science at GCSE. An important attribute to possess is to have an open mind and to be willing to grasp ideas and concepts that challenge our previous thinking.

Pupils will be able to: ●

● ●

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Develop a deeper understanding of the major chemical principles and be able to apply these in a variety of situations Undertake a wide range of practical work used in analysis, synthesis and identification tests Continue to enjoy and develop a personal interest in the study of chemical applications and laboratory techniques through scientific literature and a hands-on approach with activities such as the synthesis of a local anaesthetic, benzocaine at Bristol University Gain an understanding of the techniques and principles underlying many of the recent advances Develop a logical and systematic approach to problem solving.

What kind of pupil is this course suitable for? ● ●

● ●

Pupils who have an interest in and enjoy chemistry Pupils who enjoy carrying out investigations by the application of imaginative, logical and critical thinking Pupils who want to find out more about the world around them Pupils who want to use Chemistry to support other qualifications or progress onto further studies

How is the course assessed? Topics: Inorganic and Organic chemistry with relevant physical chemistry and relevant practical skills Three written 2 hour examinations

What could I go on and do at the end of my course? So many careers are open to those who have studied Chemistry at A level that it is difficult to summarise them. Chemistry’s position in relation to other sciences, from Physics to Medicine, and its role throughout technology has led to its being called the ‘Central Science’. You might follow a degree course in Chemistry, Biochemistry, Environmental Science, Medicine or Pharmacy, but these are only some of the subjects with direct links. Courses such as Law appreciate the skills learnt in Chemistry, such as being able to weigh up two competing explanations for something and being able to quickly grasp some complicated concepts. The analytical skills of Chemistry would help support any financial-based career and Engineering-based courses would benefit from the extra knowledge of materials and practical skills.

Additional Costs During the Lower Sixth there is an optional day trip to Bristol University laboratories to carry out a synthesis of a local anaesthetic ‘benzocaine’ followed by a lecture demonstration. The price for this trip is approximately £40.


OCR H408 Mr Lawrence Plum

Classics: Classical Civilisation

Why should I study Classical Civilisation? It provides a link with our understanding of the origins of our modern day world in many varied areas. Far more than simply daily life in the past, Classical Civilisation offers the opportunity to study the Art, Architecture, History, Archeology and Literature of the Classical Mediterranean that influenced the development of those areas in our modern world. The study of these areas provides a valuable insight into the changing nature of human endeavour and core values but also demonstrates that in many key areas, the people behind the great Empires of the past had familiar views, emotions and weaknesses.

What do I need to know or be able to do before taking Classical Civilisation? This course requires no prior knowledge and is a stand-alone course although pupils who have studied English Literature, History or even Classical Languages at GCSE may find these an advantage.

The course will enable you to: ●

● ● ● ●

Acquire a deeper understanding of the cultural structures of the Classical world, and to consider Greece and Rome’s influence on modern world-wide social and cultural characteristics and conventions Read and make a personal response to a selection of Classical literature drawn from a wide range of genres, including epic and personal poetry, oratory, history and drama, and to develop your skills of literary criticism and appreciation Develop an awareness of classical historical and social issues and the close interaction between Roman life and literature, as well as our own debt to the classical world Consider the spiritual, moral and cultural issues that emerge from your reading Communicate in appropriate style and format Gather evidence, integrate information and draw conclusions logically and effectively Demonstrate valuable qualities of analysis, imagination and cultural awareness.

Pupils will learn about: ● The everyday life and actions of Ancient Greeks and Romans including their Literature, Religion, Houses and Entertainment as well as their interactions with each other and the relationships in both Love and War that they experienced

The impact of the culture from the ancient world on modern day events and viewpoints.

What kind of pupil is this course suitable for? ●

● ● ● ●

Pupils who are engaged with the world around them and who take a keen interest in social, political and cultural life Pupils who think ‘out of the box’ Those who wish to pursue a career in Classics or a related subject Practical, lively thinkers Those who wish to cultivate transferable, practical skills based on the assessment of information Those wishing to broaden their spectrum of study whilst still retaining links to other chosen areas of interest.

How is the course assessed? A2 Unit 1 (40%) The World of the Hero - Homer's Iliad or Odyssey and Virgils' Aeneid: 2h20m examination A2 Unit 2 (30%) Culture and the Arts: 1h45m examination A2 Unit 3 (30%) Beliefs and Ideas: 1h45m examination

What can I do at the end of my course? Classical Civilisation does not qualify you solely for a university course based on classical culture and literature. On the contrary, university admissions tutors in many subjects (e.g. English, Modern Languages, Humanities and the Sciences) look favourably upon candidates who have qualifications in Classics, because they have developed logical and analytical skills, show the ability to communicate their opinions effectively, and display a sensitive and sophisticated approach to society, literature and other cultures. However, Classical Civilisation may also provide access to the study of wider cultures and societies at university on courses such as ANAC [Ancient Norse and Celtic], South American Historical Studies [Aztec, Inca, and Mayan] as well as proving useful in the increasing range of Oriental Studies courses offered at Further Education level. Furthermore, pupils with a qualification in Classical Civilisation have gone on to success in a variety of careers, including accountancy, the law, medicine and even the military!

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OCR H443 Mr Lawrence Plum

Classics: Latin Why should I study Latin? The study of Latin is far more than simply Grammar and Vocabulary but will underpin your knowledge of these in both English and other modern foreign languages. In addition you will cover elements of Classical Civilisations and discover our lingering modern links to the past. The literature part of the course enables you to get inside the Roman psyche as well as form your own opinion.

What do I need to know or be able to do before taking Latin in the Sixth Form? The A level course in Latin builds primarily on the knowledge, understanding and skills specified for the GCSE Latin course, and it is expected that, at present, only pupils who have taken GCSE Latin will wish to continue their studies in the Sixth Form.

What will I learn? The Latin course is designed to enable you to: ●

● ● ● ●

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Acquire a deeper understanding of the linguistic structures of Classical Latin, and to consider Latin’s influence on English and modern foreign languages Read and make a personal response to a selection of Classical Latin literature drawn from a wide range of genres, including epic and personal poetry, oratory, history and drama, and to develop your skills of literary criticism and appreciation Develop an awareness of classical historical issues and the interaction between Roman life and literature, as well as our own debt to the classical world Consider the spiritual, moral and cultural issues that emerge from your reading Communicate clearly in an appropriate style and format Gather evidence, integrate information and draw conclusions Demonstrate valuable qualities of analysis, imagination and linguistic awareness to potential employers and Higher Education Admissions tutors.

What kind of pupil is this course suitable for? ●

● ● ● ●

Pupils who wish to deepen and strengthen their knowledge of classical language, literature and culture, and are interested in tracing the development of modern languages, literature and society from their classical roots Pupils who are interested in the way languages are constructed, develop and change Pupils who enjoy reading and responding to literature Pupils who enjoy expressing and justifying their opinions Pupils who want to keep their options open for further study

How is the course assessed? A2 H443/01: Unseen Translation ● 1h45m examination (33% of A level Course) A2 H443/02: Composition or Comprehension ● 1h15m examination (17% of A level Course) A2 H443/03: Latin Prose ● 2h examination (25% of A level Course) A2 H443/04: Latin Verse ● 2h examination (25% of A level Course)

What could I go on and do at the end of my course? Pupils with A level Latin have a very wide range of possible opportunities in careers and higher education. Latin does not qualify you solely for a university course based on classical languages and literature. On the contrary, university admissions tutors in many subjects (e.g. English, Modern Languages, Humanities and the Sciences) look favourably upon candidates who have qualifications in Latin, because they have developed logical and analytical skills, show the ability to communicate their opinions effectively, and display a sensitive and sophisticated approach to language, literature and culture. Furthermore, pupils with a qualification in Latin have gone on to success in a variety of careers, including accountancy, the law, medicine and even as airline pilots!


AQA 7517 Mr Bryan Moore

Why should I study Computing? The answer is very straight forward! Look at your everyday life – everything that you do now, without you realising it, is either controlled by a computer, supervised by a computer, stored by a computer or processed and used by a computer. From how you play, to how you work, how your house is designed and built, to how you travel, to how your food is grown and delivered, to how you are educated, to how you live your everyday life–there is a computer involved somewhere down the line. Those who understand how a computer works, how a computer can be used in research, be it in medicine, exploration, the entertainment world, food and product manufacture, control, organisation or space exploration and how to solve problems by programming, are constantly in high demand. This course will help you develop an understanding of the nature and principles of Computing, and knowledge and understanding of the techniques used to design and write programs.

I chose Computing because I want to be part of the future of technology.

What do I need to know or be able to do before taking Computing in the Sixth Form?

Computing What kind of pupil is this course suitable for? Pupils who enjoy problem solving and computer programming will be well suited to the subject. The subject is one that works well as a package with Maths and/or the Sciences, and should be combined with A level Mathematics for applicants intending to study a degree related to Computing at university.

How is the course assessed? Topics: Problem Solving, Programming, Data Representation and Practical Exercise, Computer Components, The Stored Program Concept and The Internet, Operating Systems, Databases and Networking Two 2 hour 30 min on-screen examinations Coursework task on practical problem solving

What could I go on and do at the end of my course? The course has been designed for pupils who wish to go on to higher education courses or employment where knowledge of computing would be beneficial. Having studied Computing at A level, pupils can go on to a career in computing, engineering, medicine, law, business, or any type of science.

Pupils following this course do not need to have any prior knowledge of Computing or ICT. The course is not about learning to use tools or just training in a programming language. Instead the emphasis is on computational thinking. If you have good mathematical skills you will find both practical programming and many of the theoretical concepts more manageable. We would normally expect you to have a GCSE in Mathematics at grade B or higher.

What will I learn? You will learn about all the components of a computer system (hardware and software), how they work and how they are used. You will do a lot of practical work, gaining skills in using modern software and in particular in learning to write useful, working computer programs in Python. You will also develop an understanding of the consequences of using computers, including social, legal, and ethical issues, an awareness of emerging technologies and an appreciation of their impact on society.

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Edexcel 9EC0 Mr Marcus Laing

Economics Why should I study Economics? “Every time I think about economics I learn something new.” Economics is a unique subject, bridging as it does the gap between the arts and the sciences. We use the methods of the physical scientists where we can, while acknowledging that we are studying the behaviour of people and societies, and these are not always co-operative in obeying rules, laws and theories. So there are very few questions indeed to which economists have discovered The Answer – but we have enormous fun in trying to work out the best answer to a given question about, say, Brexit, or Angola, or the UK in 1992. Economics is always changing: when an event occurs that does not fit with what we expect, we must look closely at our theories and alter them. Priorities are changing, too, as the world changes around us: there is now far more emphasis on the global economy, inequality and ethics than there was even five years ago.

What do I need to know or be able to do before taking Economics in the Sixth Form?

You will develop an understanding of the way that the world works and why oil prices behave as they do, and of the limitations of economic theory in explaining what actually happens; you will discover how economic and business decisions are made and whom they affect; you will develop the skills of analysis and evaluation which will enable you to make sensible decisions of your own and to assess critically those made by others. You will learn why Winston Churchill is quoted as saying “When I ask two economists a question I get two different answers, unless one of them is Lord Keynes, in which case I get three.”

What kind of pupil is this course suitable for? ● ● ● ●

Those who enjoy assessing and presenting the merits of alternative courses of action Those who have an interest in a career in business, or finance or as an economist Those who would like to study a relevant subject that affects everyday life Those who intend to keep their futures open by broadening their academic curriculum

How is the course assessed?

You will need to have an interest in the world outside school; you need a desire to acquire the skills that will enable you to better understand the decisions that you will take as a consumer, producer and voter. You need no previous classroom experience of this subject: we aim to develop in you the skills necessary to investigate it and to communicate your findings. You do not need to have taken Business for GCSE; nor do you need to be a star mathematician.

There are three papers, each is two hours long and contain multiple choice, data response and essay questions. Paper 1 focuses on markets and business behaviour (microeconomics); Paper 2 on the national and global economy (macroeconomics); Paper 3 is the “synoptic” paper covering all the topics studied.

What will I learn?

The prime purpose of this course is to give you “transferable skills”, i.e., skills which you will be able to apply in whatever course you choose to follow when you leave school, whether in employment or at university. By the time you have finished the course you should be able to analyse, to evaluate options, to communicate effectively orally and on paper, and, most importantly, to solve problems and to make decisions based on evidence and sound analysis. These skills are in great demand and are recognised by employers, universities and colleges as being of deep value. This subject combines well with a wide range of social science and humanities subjects leading to university courses in areas such as Law, Business, Accounting, Engineering, Geography, Economics or Politics. A large proportion of pupils have gone on to study Economics, Business or Management.

You will acquire the tools of analysis which will enable you to explain why the world economy is in such a state. To say “It’s Trump’s fault” is not enough. The current generation of economists is among the luckiest ever: so much is going on at the moment which needs explaining that studying economics is a real challenge. And it will equip you to sound Very Wise Indeed in the Sixth Form Centre/Headmaster's study/University interview. You will investigate how firms work, and how the people in them work and make decisions; you will find out what effects the Government has on the workings of the economy and why interest rates came tumbling down, why Mr Javid taxes fuel so heavily or why Mr Corbyn wants to nationalise the railways; you will investigate international issues and those of inequality, or why Lionel Messi can still earn $111m p.a..

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What could I go on and do at the end of my course?


OCR H472 Mr Neil Bowen Why should I study English Lit? Life informs literature and we very much believe that this is a two way process: literature also informs life. If you want to stretch your mind and learn how to tackle life's complexities from a range of different perspectives then English is the one for you. Embracing an open minded approach to multiple interpretations yet finding the confidence to shape your own individual critical voice is key to A level English. As in literature study as in life. This course is expansive in its vision but intense in its engagement so literature is not just searching for meaning. You will learn to detect the socio-historical factors that shape our literature and see how such contextual influences change over time and space. Not only that but you find the chance to luxuriate in in the wealth of the collective literary imagination and its glorious language!

What do I need to know or be able to do before taking English Lit in the Sixth Form? You will need at least a B grade in English Language and English Literature in order to feel confident about tackling the demands of the subject at this level. You should be prepared to read widely for pleasure; you will be asked to keep a personal reading record during the course. You should be willing to support literary events held after school, such as the Literature Society and the peripeteia online forum which run a wide range of activities and you will also have the opportunity to attend theatre visits and creative writing workshops workshops.

Note - This is an English Literature course, and is not appropriate for those looking to study English as a foreign Language

What will I learn? Pupils will be able to: ● Explore the human condition as expressed through Literature, and Literature as medium for this expression. ● Develop an understanding and enjoyment of literature through a wide range of critical and independent reading. ● Discuss their response to a range of texts accurately, coherently and effectively through speech and writing. ● Become familiar with the traditions of literature in English. ● Learn how to construct critical essays.

English Literature ● ● ●

Consider other readers’ interpretations of literary texts. Have an awareness of cultural, historical and other contextual influences on literature. Learn how to develop their creative writing.

What kind of pupil is this course suitable for? ● ●

● ● ●

● ●

Pupils who enjoy expressing their opinions and justifying their comments. Pupils who have an interest in reading, discussing and writing on a wide range of literary texts. Pupils who are keen to develop a life-long reading habit. Pupils who want to develop their essay writing skills. Pupils who would like the opportunities for personal literary choice and the creative writing option offered by English literature coursework. Pupils who want to keep their options open for further study. Pupils who enjoyed GCSE English Literature.

How is the course assessed? Topics: ● ● ● ● ●

● ●

Shakespeare and Poetry Pre 1900 Literature post 1900 Close reading in a topic area Comparative and contextual study American Literature; The Gothic; Dystopia; Women in Literature; The Immigrant Experience Critical or Re-creative work Comparative Essay

Two 2 hour 30 minute written examinations plus coursework component

What could I go on and do at the end of my course? English Literature is a popular qualification for a wide range of courses in higher education or for future careers. You will learn and use a number of transferable skills during the course. These skills are in demand from employers and universities and are also valuable in their own right. English Literature pupils often go on to work in the following career areas: Journalism, Editing/publishing, Law, Academia/research, Writing professionally, Teaching Advertising/PR.

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AQA 7652 Ms Julie Desmarchelier-Arpino

French If you talk to a man in a language he understands, that goes to his head. If you talk to him in his language, that goes to his heart. - Nelson Mandela

Why should I study French?

French is spoken in over 43 countries in the world including two of the G8 countries. French is a major language of high-tech and business in the world. (Second language on the internet.) In terms of number of words, French is the largest language after English. English is not enough! The world has become a much smaller place; it's really important that you learn to speak and understand other people no matter where they are from. ●

● ●

● ●

Languages are the perfect way to meet new people, immerse yourself in new cultures and make a difference to who you are. Speaking another language really makes you stand out from the crowd and you’ll be able to work anywhere in the world. Learning a foreign language can help you understand your own language. They’re good for you! Speaking more than one language increases your brain capacity and you have better memory too. You can travel all over the world and feel like a true local. It’s an impressive achievement to speak a foreign language - one your friends and family will envy and employers will love!

What do I need to know or be able to do before taking French in the Sixth Form? ●

You need to have passed GCSE (or an equivalent examination) at B grade or better in French. You need to be interested in the culture and way of life of the target language country, and be prepared to spend some time there during the course (exchange; work experience; stay with family). You need to take some interest in current affairs and world issues in general.

What will I learn? ●

● ●

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To develop your general communication skills such as presenting information, organising your arguments, presenting and defending opinions. To analyse ideas, sustain a conversation, to communicate at a higher level in French. To speak French with greater fluency.

To read, listen to and understand more complex material from a variety of sources. To write in French with greater accuracy and sophistication. About a wide range of aspects of French society.

What kind of pupil is this course suitable for? Pupils who: ● like to communicate. ● are interested in and enjoy other cultures. ● take an interest in a broad range of issues. ● may want to travel, live or work abroad. ● want to use their language for work, or further study. ● want to pick up a satisfying skill. ● want to open up many other opportunities: personal, social, academic and professional. ● wish to complement their other courses: a language combines particularly well with History, English, Geography and the other Humanities as well as Music, Maths, the Sciences or the Social Sciences. ● wish to work in the STEM or space industry (some employers will demand two languages).

How is the course assessed? Paper 1: Listening, Reading, Writing (translation) 2 hours 30 minute examination (50% of A level) Paper 2: Writing (essays) 2 hour examination (20% of A level) Paper 3: Speaking 21-23 minute oral exam (30% of A level)

What could I go on and do at the end of my course? There will be a range of opportunities open to you, where you can continue to use and further your language skills and knowledge of contemporary society. Some pupils choose to do degree courses in languages; often there is an opportunity to learn a new language from scratch. Others choose to pursue a higher education course which combines study of a language with another subject such as law, politics or business. There are also many courses on offer in European Studies, which include language study among a number of other disciplines. Having a language at A level will certainly improve your employability, in particular with companies which have international branches. Whether you are interested in continuing your studies or working at home or abroad, a language course at A level is an excellent step towards achieving your goals.


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Geography Why should I study Geography? Geography is a living, breathing subject, constantly adapting itself to change. It is dynamic and relevant. For me geography is a great adventure with a purpose. - Michael Palin, former President of the Royal Geographical Society Our course teaches pupils a considerable variety of subject matter with a balance roughly equal between human and physical geography. Pupils learn a wide range of geographical skills and the opportunity for fieldwork opens up the possibility to travel and study in outstanding locations. The subject bridges the gap between the arts and the sciences and A level geographers develop diverse skills, from essay writing to statistical analysis.

What do I need to know or be able to do before taking Geography in the Sixth Form? It is not a requirement that you should have studied Geography at GCSE in order to take an A level course in the subject. However, those pupils who have studied GCSE Geography will find that the material and the skills they have learnt will prove a valuable foundation for further study.

What will I learn? ●

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That physical and human geography are interwoven – physical events frequently demand human responses, from the use and abuse of natural resources to hazard management An understanding of the importance of scale, whether considering global issues such as world population and atmospheric circulation, to the analysis of local and national trends, for instance in the redevelopment of inner cities. Practical fieldwork skills, including planning and devising strategies for data collection, and then carrying them out and analysing and presenting the results How to construct essays, selecting appropriate exemplars and case studies to provide substantive evidence, and how to balance arguments whilst drawing conclusions which show values and viewpoints That geography is an acutely contemporary subject rarely out of the news, with decisions being made at governmental and other levels which will affect our country and planet.

Cambridge 9696 Mr Jeremy Boot

What kind of pupil is this course suitable for? The course is suitable for those who take a lively interest in the world around them and enjoy the challenge of a subject with a significant spread of skills and themes. Indeed one of the reasons why degree geography is so appreciated by employers is because of the outward looking nature of the subject, something the course emphasises with case studies from many different parts of the world. Geography is also a practical subject and as such particularly appropriate for pupils who enjoy study outside the classroom, whether discovering the urban structure of Bristol or viewing the amazing landforms in Iceland.

What could I go on and do at the end of my course? Many pupils want to continue studying to university level: this year three pupils are applying to study Geography and recently pupils have gone to universities including Oxford, Edinburgh, Cardiff, Exeter, Nottingham, Swansea and Liverpool. A familiar question is ‘what can you do with geography’? It may come as a surprise to some that university educated geographers are highly employable in a wide range of sectors including the arts, financial services, travel, law and other professional capacities. That geography draws from other subjects is far from being a burden; after all, with its own unique interpretative skills, its ability to set the natural world within the human context, its use of both written and numerical skills it is hardly surprising that it should be the kind of subject greatly in demand with employers.


Geography, continued Which course do we follow?

Additional Costs

We use the Cambridge International A level specification (9696). The course maintains the balance between physical and human geography established at GCSE.

There are no additional costs associated with the local fieldwork opportunities offered in Geography. We run a very popular and interesting course to London, staying at the Youth Hostel in Rotherhithe, and visiting the London Docklands Redevelopment area, Spitalfields in London’s East End and the City of London. We anticipate running this trip again which had a modest cost of around £60 attached to it. We also visit Dartmoor to study rivers and rocks and the Exmoor coast in the Upper Sixth to conduct a coastal study.

Paper: Core Physical Geography Timing: 1 hour 30 minutes Proportion of A level: 25% Content: ● ● ●

Hydrology and fluvial geomorphology Atmosphere and weather Rocks and weathering

Paper: Core Human Geography

The biennial trip to Iceland is not mandatory, but costs in the order of £900. This is a joint trip with the Geology department, enabling lower costs. These trips have proved tremendously successful, enabling pupils to study volcanoes, geysers, glaciers, waterfalls, lava flows and in most years see the Northern Lights.

Timing: 1 hour 30 minutes Proportion of A level: 25% Content: ● ● ●

Population Migration Settlement dynamics

Paper: Advanced Physical Geography Timing: 1 hour 30 minutes Proportion of A level: 25% Content: ● ●

Coastal environments Hazardous environments

Paper: Advanced Human Geography Timing: 1 hour 30 minutes Proportion of A level: 25% Content: ● ●

Global interdependence Economic transition

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Geology Why should I study Geology? Geology is a practical, broad based and multi-disciplinary subject suiting pupils who are interested in the World around them. Practical tasks are undertaken on field trips and in the classroom/laboratory. Geology impacts on our everyday lives due to natural events, and also as consumers of the Earth’s dwindling resources. The mantra ‘if we can’t grow it we have got to dig it’ means that there is demand for geologists. Geology pupils need to be numerate, literate and computer literate and have experience of problem solving in a variety of related subject areas. 74 Wells pupils have gone to read geology at university in recent years.

What do I need to know or be able to do before taking Geology in the Sixth Form? There is no assumed knowledge at the start of the course. GCSE Geography is not required to do Geology. Geology links in with the other sciences as we study some geochemistry, geophysics and fossils (biology) whilst emphasising the distinctiveness of Geology in its own right. Aspects of economics, environmental science and mapwork are also involved.

What will I learn? Geology is the principle subject of a group of sciences called the Earth Sciences. Some of the aspects covered include volcanoes, faults, fieldwork, oil & gas resources, minerals and crystals, earthquakes, fossils map work, rock types and landforms. Dinosaurs have been added to the new geology curriculum. The course is broad ranging and varied, taking on some aspects of physical Geography and GCSE Science courses and exploring them further. Transferable skills involving numeracy, literacy, problem solving and ICT are developed during the study of Geology.

What kind of pupil is this course suitable for? Pupils may have a scientific background, a geographical background or may wish to try something new and further their understanding of areas of popular interest such as volcanoes, earthquakes or dinosaurs.

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EDUQAS (WJEC) A480 Mr David Rowley

Geology is a compatible A level with other sciences, and is also a useful ‘bridge’ for a humanities-based pupil wishing to retain some element of science. Fieldwork is an essential part of the course and pupils must carry out a minimum of four days fieldwork carried out in the Mendip area as well as further afield in Dorset and Devon The subject often appeals to pupils with an interest in the outdoors. There is no project involved for coursework, only a short fieldwork-based exercise. The next biennial field trip to Iceland for the Lower Sixth and Upper Sixth (geologists and geographers) will take place in Easter 2022.


Geology, continued How is the course assessed? Fundamentals of Geology ● F1 Elements, minerals and rocks ● F2 Surface and internal processes ● F3 Time and change ● F4 Earth structure and global tectonics Interpreting the Geological Record ● G1 Rock forming processes ● G2 Rock deformation ● G3 Past life and past climates ● G4 Earth materials and natural resources Geological Themes ● T1 Geohazards ● T2 Geological map applications ● T3 Quaternary geology

Component 1: Geological Investigations Written & practical examination: 2 hours 15 minutes 35% of qualification Section A: Two stimulus response questions requiring short and structured answers. Section B: An investigation of the geology of an area shown on an accompanying simplified geological map, involving the interpretation of hand specimens and photographs of minerals, rocks and fossils map interpretation and cross-section construction the completion of questions using short, structured and extended answers. Component 2: Geological Principles and Processes Written examination: 1 hour 45 minutes 30% of qualification Component 3: Geological Applications Written examination of Geohazards, Quaternary Geology + BGS colour mapwork: 2 hours 35% of qualification

What could I go on and do at the end of my course? Degree level Geology requires a minimum of an A level pass in a science subject; Physics, Chemistry, Maths, Biology and Geology are preferred. Geology is also commonly followed as a subsidiary course or as part of a joint degree (with Chemistry, Physics, Environmental Science or Geography). A degree in Geology would show competence in scientific skills, essay writing, IT skills, data collection, data handling and research. Many opportunities exist for careers in hydrogeology, mining & mineral extraction, oil, environmental planning, civil engineering, surveying, engineering geology or possibly architecture. Geology pupils are numerate, literate and computer literate and have experience of problem solving in a variety of disciplines. They are, therefore, very employable in many areas.

Additional Costs There are no additional costs associated with the local fieldwork opportunities. The biennial trip to Iceland is not mandatory, but costs in the order of £1000. This is a joint trip with the Geography department, which helps to keep costs down. These trips have proved tremendously successful, enabling pupils to study volcanoes, geysers, glaciers, waterfalls, lava flows and in most years the Northern Lights.

Pupils will also assessed in their practical skills in field and lab work and will earn a certificate of scientific competence (called a Practical Endorsement) as part of the qualification.

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AQA 7662 Ms Jules Desmarchelier-Arpino

German If I want to sell you something, then I'll speak your language. If you want to sell me something, dann müssen sie Deutsch sprechen. - Willy Brandt

What will I learn? ●

Why should I study German? German is among the ten most commonly spoken languages in the world. It is also a lingua franca of Central and Eastern Europe; as for “all Germans speak English anyway”? That’s pure myth.

German is the language of Bach, Beethoven, and Schubert, Brahms, Schumann, Wagner, Mahler, and Schoenberg spoke and wrote German, as did Freud, Weber, Einstein, and Heisenberg, Kant, Hegel, and Heidegger. German is the second most commonly used scientific language in the world. English is not enough! The world has become a much smaller place. It's really important that you learn to speak and understand other people no matter where they are from.

● ●

● ●

Languages are the perfect way to meet new people, immerse yourself in new cultures and make a difference to who you are. Speaking another language really makes you stand out from the crowd and you’ll be able to work anywhere in the world. Learning a foreign language can help you understand your own language. They’re good for you! Speaking more than one language increases your brain capacity and you have better memory too. You can travel all over the world and feel like a true local. It’s an impressive achievement to speak a foreign language - one your friends and family will envy and employers will love!

What do I need to know or be able to do before taking German in the Sixth Form? ●

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You need to have passed GCSE (or an equivalent examination) at B grade or better in German. You need to be interested in the culture and way of life of the target language country, and be prepared to spend some time there during the course (exchange; work experience; stay with family). You need to take some interest in current affairs and world issues in general.

● ●

To develop your general communication skills such as presenting information, organising your arguments, presenting and defending opinions. To analyse ideas, sustain a conversation, to communicate at a higher level in German. To speak German with greater fluency. To read, listen to and understand more complex material from a variety of sources. To write in German with greater accuracy and sophistication. About a wide range of aspects of German society.

What kind of pupil is this course suitable for? Pupils who: ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

like to communicate. are interested in and enjoy other cultures. take an interest in a broad range of issues. may want to travel, live or work abroad. want to use their language for work, or further study. want to pick up a satisfying skill. want to open up many other opportunities: personal, social, academic and professional. wish to complement their other courses: a language combines particularly well with History, English, Geography and the other Humanities as well as Music, Maths, the Sciences or the Social Sciences. wish to work in the STEM or space industry (some employers will demand two languages).

How is the course assessed? Paper 1: Listening, Reading, Writing (translation) 2 hours 30 minute examination (50% of A level) Paper 2: Writing (essays) 2 hour examination (20% of A level) Paper 3: Speaking 21-23 minute oral exam (30% of A level)


German, continued What could I go on and do at the end of my course? There will be a range of opportunities open to you, where you can continue to use and further your language skills and knowledge of contemporary society. Some pupils choose to do degree courses in languages; often there is an opportunity to learn a new language from scratch; others choose to pursue a higher education course which combines study of a language with another subject such as law, politics or business. There are also many courses on offer in European Studies, which include language study among a number of other disciplines. Having a language at A level will certainly improve your employability, in particular with companies, which have international branches. Whether you are interested in continuing your studies or working at home or abroad, a language course at A level is an excellent step towards achieving your goals.

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OCR H505 Mr C Eldridge

History Why should I study History?

What will I learn?

Sir John Sainsbury believed studying History ''assisted me in many ways, including my ability to weigh different factors and make perceptive judgements during business discussions. It helped me to keep relevant issues in due proportion, thinking always in the long term perspective .... studying History taught me to think, reason & argue effectively." Maybe it could do the same for you!

The A level course content has been chosen to produce contrast and complementary skills with our modern history IGCSE.

The human past is intrinsically fascinating, a source of endless wonder, discussion and insight into mankind's nature. No subject more effectively develops skills of research, an argument, analysis and presentation. Needless to say these skills are transferable into any profession, hence History regularly outperforms man apparently more 'relevant' subjects in the jobs market The Daily Telegraph ranks it as one of the top ten subject choices in terms of employability (survey from 19/12/15).

What do I need to know or be able to do before taking History in the Sixth Form? History at A level is open to all pupils. It is not necessary to have studied History at GCSE; you do not need any specific prior knowledge in order to study the subject at this level. What is important is that you have a genuine interest and enthusiasm about the past and an ability to communicate your ideas clearly and effectively: both verbally and in writing! It is also useful if you can think logically and constructively; perhaps this is the reason there are many scientists who can be successful historians!

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Pupils are enabled to: ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

think for themselves view people, events and movements critically yet with compassion recognise bias and false statements understand the variety of approaches to and interpretations of the past analyse historical sources demonstrate their knowledge and understanding of selected periods of history select relevant material from wide reading and apply it in support of logical, orderly argument.

What kind of pupil is this course suitable for? ●

Pupils who are enthusiastic about the possibilities, which are opened up, when past events are analysed and assessed Any pupil who needs to improve analytical skills and who wants to learn how to express opinions convincingly should certainly consider studying History A pupil with an inquiring mind and the desire to formulate carefully considered judgements about events will benefit greatly from the study of History An enjoyment of debate and the desire to interpret controversial issues are an integral part of the course.


History, continued How is the course assessed? A level History comprises four components, three of which are examined at the end of Upper Sixth: 1. 2. 3.

The British study and enquiry unit- worth 25% of the overall mark Non-British period study - currently Japan 1853-1937 - worth 15% of the overall mark Thematic study and historical interpretations worth 40% of the overall mark..

The final component is a 4,000 word Dissertation on a subject of the pupil's choice written during Upper Sixth. Worth 20% of the overall mark.

What could I go on and do at the end of my course? A study of History at this level provides you with valuable ‘transferable’ skills in the increasingly crowded and competitive job market. By the end of your course you will have learned how to evaluate and analyse information, how to weigh up evidence and how to communicate complex ideas effectively. These skills are recognised and valued by employers, universities and colleges. History provides an excellent foundation for a number of popular careers. Graduate historians are to be found in a wide variety of careers including journalism, law, the civil service, business and education.

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Pearson (Edexcel) 9MA0 Mrs Nicky Connock

Mathematics Why should I study Mathematics? ● ● ●

Mathematics is at the heart of all modern-day scientific and technological study. It is one of the most profound and beautiful areas of human thought. A recent survey showed that the top three ‘best’ jobs were careers best suited to those who studied maths; that the top 15 highest paid careers for graduates all had maths in common.

What do I need to know or be able to do before taking Mathematics in the Sixth Form? To study A level Mathematics typically a Grade 7 or above is required at GCSE or IGCSE.

What will I learn? How to: ● Use mathematical skills and knowledge to solve problems. ● Solve quite complicated problems by using mathematical arguments and logic. ● Understand and demonstrate what is meant by proof in mathematics. ● Simplify real life situations so that you can use mathematics to show what is happening and what might happen in different circumstances. ● Use the mathematics that you learn to solve problems that are given to you in a real-life context. ● Use calculator technology and other resources (such as formulae booklets or statistical tables) effectively and appropriately and understand the limitations of such technology. ● Reflect on the ideas that some of the greatest minds of the millennium have produced.

What kind of pupil is this course suitable for? ●

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Lots of people! Some study Maths because they love it; others because it is a good ‘service’ subject, often those who want to study Science, Economics etc; others because it is a good ‘contrasting’ subject. Those who want a highly regarded qualification. It is a great A level to have when applying for any course at University. It fits in with every other subject. In almost every year the Mathematicians, between them, also study each of the subjects listed in this booklet.

● ● ●

Those who can think clearly and logically and who can work carefully and accurately. Those who look for patterns, in the world, in music, in art, in science. Maths often appeals to pupils who know that if they do the right steps, precisely, they will get the right answer, every time! Those who want to understand the language of the universe and see what ‘truth’ looks like.

How is the course assessed? Topics: Pure Mathematics 1 & 2 (Algebra, trigonometry, functions, calculus, geometry, vectors, logarithms) ● Two 2 hour papers Applied Mathematics (Statistics and Mechanics) ● One 2 hour paper

What could I go on and do at the end of my course? A level Mathematics is a much sought after qualification for entry to a wide range of courses in higher education. There are also many employers who regard Mathematics A level as an important qualification and it is often a requirement for higher education courses or careers including: economics, medicine, architecture, engineering, accountancy, teaching, psychology, environmental studies, computing, information technology. Here are some of the things that maths pupils from Wells have gone on to study: Theoretical Physics, Geology, Engineering, Medicine, Sports Science, Music, Mathematics, Anatomy and Physiology, Physics, Natural Sciences, Mechanical Engineering, Biology, Economics, Electronics and EE, Education, Physics with Music, Computer Systems, Geography, Management, Chemical Engineering, French, Classics, Business Studies, Law, Dentistry, Civil Engineering, Art, Neuroscience, Leisure Resource Management, Computer Science, English, Humanities, Music Technology, Linguistics, History, Philosophy, Aeronautical Engineering, Computing, Astronautics, Animal Science, Zoology, Finance, Aerospace Engineering, Archaeology, Architecture, Hispanic Studies, Nursing, Accountancy, Automotive Engineering, Microbiology, Primary Education, Business and French, Chemistry, P.P.E, Social Policy, Theology, Spanish and Law, Veterinary Science, Psychology, Modern Languages, Astronomy……………and so it continues!


Pearson (Edexcel) 9FM0 Mrs Nicky Connock

Why should I study Further Mathematics? ● ● ● ●

Mathematics is the language of commerce, engineering and other sciences. It is elegant and beautiful, exciting and challenging, perfect and truthful. It is an attractive qualification, highly sought after by employers. We are living in the golden age of mathematics right now!

Further Maths What kind of pupil is this course suitable for? ● ● ●

What do I need to know or be able to do before taking Further Mathematics in the Sixth Form?

To study A level Further Mathematics you would typically be expected to have achieved an 8 or 9 at GCSE or IGCSE Mathematics.

What will I learn?

How is the course assessed?

How to: ● ● ● ●

● ●

Those with a facility for Mathematics, logical thought and who aim at perfection. Those who want to get to grips with more of the many different branches of mathematics. Those who want to see the beauty of the subject and see its ‘real’ face; the maths beyond the more functional aspects studied in A level maths. Further Maths gives you the opportunity to see why so many people have studied this subject, with such dedication and devotion, for so many centuries. Those who like surprises, and also that sense of ‘correctness’ you get when you meet a new idea that just strikes you as an ‘obvious’ revelation, now you know it. Those who want to challenge themselves mathematically. Those who want to start exploring the ‘rules’ that govern the universe.

Use mathematical skills and knowledge to solve problems. Solve quite complicated problems by using mathematical arguments and logic. Understand and demonstrate what is meant by proof in mathematics. Simplify real life situations so that you can use mathematics to show what is happening and what might happen in different circumstances. Use the mathematics that you learn to solve problems that are given to you in a real-life context. Use calculator technology and other resources (such as formulae booklets or statistical tables) effectively and appropriately and understand the limitations of such technology. Reflect on the ideas that some of the greatest minds of the millennium have produced. Use advanced mathematical techniques in Further Mathematics topics.

Pupils taking Further Mathematics must also complete A level Mathematics. In addition to the examinations for A level Mathematics they would typically do: Topics: Compulsory papers: Pure Mathematics 1 and 2 (Proof, Complex numbers, Matrices, Further algebra and functions, Further calculus, Further vectors, Polar coordinates, Hyperbolic functions, Differential equations). ● Two written papers. Option papers with topics chosen from Mechanics, Statistics, Decision & Pure. ● Two written papers.

What could I go on and do at the end of my course? Further Mathematics at A level normally, but not always, leads into university courses with a strong mathematical or statistical base. This often includes subjects such as Mathematics, Engineering or Economics, although Further Mathematics is not always a requirement to study these at University.

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Eduqas/WJEC Mr Harvey Brink

Music Why should I study Music? ● ●

● ●

Because I intend to pursue a course in music in higher education. Because I am a specialist musician and academic and theoretical understanding is key to being a well-rounded and fully-equipt musician. Because I enjoyed studying music at GCSE and am interested in taking this further. Because A level Music will compliment my other choices, adding an arts-based subject to my selection. Because I spend a lot of time playing music and want to put this towards a formal academic qualification.

What do I need to know or be able to do before taking Music in the Sixth Form? Pupils should have taken music at GCSE level and obtained at least a Level 6. They should be able to play any musical instrument to Grade 6+ or equivalent standard and have passed Grade 5 theory.

What will I learn? ● ● ● ●

To study music with an integrated approach through performing, composing and listening. To study a wide range of music including classical, world, pop and jazz styles. To rehearse and perform music to a high standard. To compose in musical styles related to areas of historical study.

What kind of pupil is this course suitable for? This specification extends the GCSE skills of Performing, Composing and Appraising in ways which emphasise their interdependence. There are no limits on the instruments (or voices) and types of repertoire which may be presented in performance and the study of the widest possible range of music, including folk, popular and classical traditions of non-Western origin as well as those of jazz and Western classical and popular traditions, is encouraged. Please be prepared that A level Music at Wells is unique in that you will be in class with large numbers of some of the most talented, dedicated and experienced young musicians in the country.

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How is the course assessed? Component 1: Performing Option A ● ●

Total duration of performances: 10-12 minutes Option A: 35% of qualification

Component 2: Composing Option A ● ●

Total duration of compositions: 4-6 minutes Option A: 25% of qualification

Component 3: Appraising Written Examination ● ● ● ● ●

2 hours 15 minute exam in the Upper Sixth 40% of qualification The Western Classical Tradition: the Development of the Symphony 1750-1900 Jazz 1920-1960 Into the 20th Century Impressionism, Expressionism, Serialism, Neo-Classicism

What could I go on and do at the end of my course? Many of our musicians go on to study Music at top Universities, including Oxbridge, as well as leading conservatoires across the world. The A level in Music can also lead to further study in Music or Performing Arts in higher education at degree level, or more generally into a career in the music industry. Music can also be used as part of your Sixth Form course to broaden your studies and is well regarded by universities as a rigorous and academic second or third subject leading on to a very wide variety of courses.

Specialist musicians are expected to take A level Music and are encouraged to take a course in Music Technology. Special Provision Musicians are strongly advised to take A level Music.


Edexcel 9MT01 Mr Mark White

Music Technology

Why should I study Music Technology?

What kind of pupil is this course suitable for?

Music Technology is a constantly evolving field which has had an enormous impact on the the sound of commercial music for many decades. Advances in technology continue to push the boundaries of what is possible and extend the creative potential of the subject. You should study Music Technology to develop the musical and technical skills required to produce your own music, and to improve your understanding of the way that technology continues to influence the music that we hear every day.

Music Technology pupils should be able to plan, develop and deliver extended projects and should take pride in their outcome. Pupils should be motivated, creative and willing to contribute to Music Technology activities beyond the curriculum. You do not need to be an outstanding performer, but previous experience of learning an instrument is desirable, as is GCSE Music. It is essential that you enjoy working with computers and have an interest in producing and evaluating commercial music.

What do I need to know or be able to do before taking Music Technology in the Sixth Form?

How is the course assessed?

You should enjoy listening to commercial music, work well with computers and be a resilient learner who uses initiative to solve problems. You will learn to use the same hardware and software that is used in professional recording studios and production houses across the world. Getting to grips with it will be a challenge at first, but with perseverance and practice you will unlock its potential and be able to produce music to a very high standard. Enjoying using computers, and being interested in exploring, analysing and evaluating commercial music is essential.

What will I learn? You will become confident in using numerous pieces of Music Technology hardware and software and will learn to create music on a computer, using a Digital Audio Workstation such as Logic Pro X. You will learn about microphone techniques, how to run a recording session, and how to produce a finished multi-track recording which incorporates multiple instrumentalists and parts; just like a track you would hear on the radio. You will learn audio editing and production techniques which will be applicable in numerous contexts and will learn to appreciate the musical and technical content of a wide variety of musical styles created from the 1950s to the present day. You will gain an understanding of the way that technology has continually shaped commercial music and will develop an opinion on the future of Music Technology.

You will submit two coursework tasks and sit two exams: ● ● ●

Coursework 1: Technology-based Composition: 20% Coursework 2: Recording: 20% Exam 1: Listening to pieces of music and analysing their musical and technical content: 25% Exam 2: Demonstrating your understanding of Music Technology by producing music: 35%

What could I go on and do at the end of my course? The subject knowledge and skills acquired during the study of Music Technology A level will be of enormous benefit to any pupil who wishes to study Music or Music Technology during Higher Education and to pursue a career in any aspect of music. The course can also provide a creative outlet for any pupil who values music as an important part of their life and wishes to enhance their understanding of music technology and to develop their own projects. In addition to acquiring skills which are applicable across the music industry, Music Technology pupils gain skills and experience which transfer to other subjects, such as the ability to manage long term projects.

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Religious Studies (Philosophy & Ethics) Why should I study Philosophy & Ethics? You should study this subject if you are interested in gaining a greater understanding of the world around you and how humanity has grappled with questions of importance over the past 2,500 years. You will learn how people have formulated philosophical viewpoints and ethical arguments and will consider where you stand in this long line of philosophical exploration. You will also learn about approaches to modern day and complex ethical issues in business, sex, medicine, and the environment. Study of this subject will broaden your horizons, teach you how formulate an academic argument and develop a critical mind. You will also become very attractive to employers and further education institutions as you will have shown by choosing this subject that you are capable of articulating, analysing and developing a range of complex and challenging arguments.

What do I need to know or be able to do before taking Philosophy & Ethics in the Sixth Form? No prior knowledge is required or assumed. ● You do not have to have taken RS at GCSE; the areas we look at are significantly different from most GCSE courses. ● You should be willing to read and analyse some of the philosophical giants of human history. ● You should be prepared to contribute to current thinking on important issues. ● You do need to be able to write fluently and be prepared to work hard; a good GCSE grade (a 6 or above) in English is desirable. ● You do need to have an interest in the big questions of life. ● This is an academic subject with a lot of reading required; you must be prepared to read scholarly journals, books and other texts independently.

What will I learn? Your course of study will introduce you to: Philosophy: From Ancient Greek philosophy right up to the present day. The nature of, and 'proofs', of the existence of God, and how this is challenged by the problem of evil. Body-soul distinction, life after death and the problems associated with religious language.

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OCR H573 Ms Eleanor Smith

Ethics: An introduction to the factors that affect our morality, how philosophers have said we should live, whether or not we have freedom to choose our morality, where our consciences come from and practical issues from medical to political, sexual to business. Developments in Christian Thought: A 'synoptic' paper which draws together both Philosophy & Ethics to consider topics such as human nature, the person of Jesus Christ, moral principles and action, religious pluralism, gender and secularism.

What kind of pupil is this course suitable for? Philosophy and Ethics develops a range of skills that can either be used to support other subject areas or simply developed for themselves. The ability to analyse arguments, present your own view point, understand the points of view of a wide range of people and being able to present all of these in a clear manner are all skills developed by this course. There are links to every subject in the curriculum and the knowledge developed in your other subjects will be relevant to your philosophical studies.

How is the course assessed? Topics: Philosophy: 2h examination (1/3rd of A level) Ethics: 2h examination (1/3rd of A level) Developments in Christian Thought: 2h examination (1/3rd of A level)

What could I go on and do at the end of my course? The course develops transferable skills which can broaden your opportunities and choice at degree level and in the world of work - it really does develop the skills people are looking for in whatever field you choose. Previous pupils have gone on to study a range of subjects at Oxbridge and other Russell Group institutions including Law, Medicine, Ancient History, English and of course, Philosophy. It really is a fascinating subject that will continue to challenge you long after you have left Wells.


Eduqas A656QS Mrs Eliana Nelson

Why should I study Photography? If you have an interest in Photography, the course will equip you with knowledge and skills of contemporary practice as well as an understanding of its history and diverse genres. These include journalism, documentary, fashion and advertising, sport, portraiture, landscape, natural history, wildlife, and so on. The study of Photography can therefore compliment a variety of interests, not just Art, but also Literature, Sociology, Science, Geography to name but a few. It will also provide entry to Degree or Foundation Art and Creative Media courses.

What do I need to know or be able to do before taking Photography in the Sixth Form? It is important to have a grasp of visual elements and composition, and some experience of photographic technique as well as a keen interest in developing a critical and contextual understanding of our visual culture and media. A good grade GCSE in a Photography or Art related GCSE would therefore ensure a positive basis of knowledge. Most important, however, is a commitment to work and a desire to explore your interest in a creative and independent manner, as quite a lot of practice and study will take place out of lessons.

What will I learn? You will gain: ● ● ● ●

An understanding of genres, styles and traditions in Photography and Visual Arts. Develop skills in expressing and communicating ideas and concepts creatively. A working knowledge in camera techniques and the use of studio and outdoor lighting. Practical and creative experience in Digital Imaging using Photoshop.

Photography What kind of pupil is this course suitable for? ●

Pupils who have a general interest in Photography and our thriving Visual Culture, but do not necessarily want to follow on with further education. Pupils who wish to undertake further studies in Photography, usually at Art college or further education Pupils who are looking to take up careers for which an experience in Photography is relevant. These might include fashion, advertising, publishing, journalism, digital media, film and animation.

How is the course assessed? A level component 1 60% ● Personal investigation ● Internally set and marked; externally moderated A level component 2 40% ● Externally set assignment ● Externally set, internally marked; externally moderated

What could I go on and do at the end of my course? You can go on to do a one year Foundation Course at a college of Further Education before applying to degree courses in more specialist areas of Photography, Art and Media or other disciplines and sciences. It is also possible to go straight into employment where it is useful to have had experience of photography. There are numerous career pathways as mentioned above where you will need to use some of the skills developed during your course such as advertising, marketing, publishing, journalism, including documentary and sport photography, digital media and film.

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OCR H555 Mrs Gemma Pritchard

Physical Education Why should I study Physical Education? Are you: curious as to how our bodies push themselves to their physical peak? ● driven to find out how you can improve your performance? ● keen to understand what gives Olympic champions the psychological edge over their competitors? ● intrigued by where sports have come from and where are they going? ● asking the question ‘why?’ whenever you are involved with sport? ● feeling rather depressed now the Olympics is over but excited to see what the legacy will bring us? If so then this could be the subject for you!

What kind of pupil is this course suitable for? ●

What do I need to know or be able to do before taking Physical Education in the Sixth Form? It is preferable that pupils will have studied GCSE Physical Education, although not essential. They should have a reasonable ability in science and the expectation is that the pupil should be performing in sport at school level or above.

What will I learn? You will: ● ● ●

● ● ●

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Develop your involvement and effectiveness in physical activity. Explore contemporary sociological issues in modern sport. Enhance your understanding of the role of technology or psychology in sporting performance. Examine the effects of exercise and the relationship between training and performance. Analyse the way we learn to be skilful. Gain an understanding of the history of Physical Education. Find ways to improve your own performance through greater understanding.

● ● ● ●

Pupils who have in interest in participating in physical activity as part of a balanced, active and healthy lifestyle. Pupils who want to follow a course that develops the theoretical aspects through practical involvement. Pupils who have an enquiring mind and are interested in current issues in sport. Pupils who want to know more about how the body functions with exercise and training. Pupils who want to evaluate and improve their own and others’ sporting performance. Pupils who may want to move onto a related career or higher education course.

How is the course assessed? Unit 1: Physiological factors affecting performance 30% Unit 2: Psychological factors affecting performance 20% Unit 3: Socio-cultural issues in physical activity and sport 20% Unit 4: Performance in physical education (practical and coursework) 30%

What could I go on and do at the end of my course? Pupils with A level Physical Education have access to a wide range of possible career and higher education opportunities. These skills are in great demand and are recognised by employers, universities and colleges as being of great value. Physical Education combines with a range of A level subjects. Taken with sciences, in particular, Biology, it supports applications for a wide range of university courses with Sport Sciences, Physiotherapy, Recreation and Leisure Studies. Pupils may choose to use their qualification to go straight into employment, rather than into higher education. This can include further training in such areas as Recreational Management, Leisure Activities, Armed Forces and the Civil Service.


Edexcel 9PH0 Miss Charlotte Farmer

Why should I study Physics? You want to understand and explain the mysteries and wonders of the world in which you live. You enjoy the challenge of problem solving and exploring concepts through practical investigation. You may wish to pursue a career in a physical science or engineering or just study a subject that is held in high regard by universities and employers.

What do I need to know or be able to do before taking Physics in the Sixth Form? The assumption is that candidates taking Physics have achieved a Grade 7 or above in GCSE Combined Science or a minimum of Grade 7 in GCSE Physics and one other science. You will also need to be competent at mathematics though you do not need to be taking Maths in the Sixth Form. Grade 7 or above in GCSE maths is expected. Some areas covered in the course are developments of work studied at GCSE, but others are new. For example their are modules on recent developments in physics such as Particle Physics and Quantum Mechanics. You need to have a curiosity about the way the world works, and you must be prepared to think about the ways in which different areas of physics link together.

What will I learn? Through the course you will: ●

● ● ● ●

Develop a deeper understanding of physical concepts both through theoretical and practical means. Use more complex mathematical analysis to solve problems. Develop your practical skills. Study new areas of physics. Look at the historical context of the development of physics and at modern applications.

Physics What kind of pupil is this course suitable for? ● ● ● ●

Pupils who have an enquiring mind. Pupils who like to know how the physical world operates. Pupils who are interested in engineering or careers in STEM subjects. Pupils who enjoy physics have a sense of wonder and awe at the scale and impact of physical processes and phenomena.

How is the course assessed? The topics studied are: Year 1 ● ● ● ● ●

Mechanics Electric circuits Materials and fluids Waves Particle nature of light

Year 2 ● ● ● ● ● ●

Further mechanics Fields Nuclear and particle physics Thermodynamics Astronomy Oscillations

The course will be assessed through three written examinations. Pupils will also work towards, and achieve, the practical endorsement in physics.

What could I go on and do at the end of my course? Pupils with A level Physics are greatly sought after. Physicists may work in many fields, such as medical physics, communications, alternative energy, scientific civil service, computing, education, meteorology, geophysics, astrophysics, engineering and industry. The skills you will acquire are also valuable in their own right, and universities are well aware of the rigorous training of the mind that goes on in any physics course. Physics can be intellectually challenging but also a very enjoyable subject to study.

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AQA 7182 Mrs Jenna Rowland

Psychology Why should I study Psychology?

What will I learn?

Have you ever wondered... ● What causes Schizophrenia? ● What influence your parents have on your later life? ● How stress can be managed? ● Why some people are regarded as being so attractive? ● How you can improve your memory? ● Why some couples stay together and others break up? ● Why people are addicted to gambling or cigarettes? ● Whether playing video games can lead to aggressive behaviour?

Pupils will have the opportunity to:

Psychology is the scientific study of the human mind and behaviour. These are just some examples of the areas we explore in Psychology - studying it will allow you to make sense of the world around you.

What do I need to know or be able to do before taking Psychology in the Sixth Form? Psychology is a rewarding, yet challenging subject to study. Pupils will be required to demonstrate their scientific understanding of research methods, such as hypothesis testing and their statistical knowledge. Lessons are experiential but have a sound theoretical base. Pupils are expected to be proficient in essay construction and willing to contribute to class discussion. Emphasis is placed upon analysis, evaluation, interpretation, ethical issues and critical appreciation of psychological methodologies. To be successful in Psychology, pupils will be required to have at least a C grade (level 4) in Mathematics, English and Science, although a B grade (level 5 / 6) is preferable.

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● ● ● ● ● ●

gain an understanding of psychological theories, research, case studies and methods used to collect data. explore topics which reflect current contemporary issues, as well as earlier case studies. participate in and conduct psychological investigations, and collect appropriate data. analyse and interpret their own or second hand data and evaluate the findings. develop an awareness of the ethical issues in psychology, particularly in the field of research. relate theory to practice. explore self discovery.

What kind of pupil is this course suitable for? Pupils who: ● enjoy exploring issues dealing with how and why people behave in certain ways. ● want to find out more about the link between people’s behaviour and their environment. ● enjoy planning and carrying out investigations into patterns of human behaviour. ● want a course that will complement other A levels. ● enjoy asking questions. ● are keen to learn transferable skills. ● are willing to explore different modalities of learning.


Psychology, continued How is the course assessed? Three written 2 hour examinations Paper 1 - Introductory Topics in Psychology (Year 1) ● Social Influence ● Memory ● Attachment ● Psychopathology Paper 2 - Psychology in Context (Year 1 & 2) ● Approaches in Psychology ● Biopsychology ● Research Methods Paper 3 - Issues and Options in Psychology (Year 2) ● Issues and Debates in Psychology ● One from: Relationships; Gender; Cognition and Development ● One from: Schizophrenia, Eating Behaviour; Stress ● One from: Aggression; Forensic Psychology; Addiction

What could I go on and do at the end of my course? Psychology pupils are widely recognised for possessing a range of skills. Upon completion of a Psychology A level, pupils will have demonstrated themselves to be both numerate and literate, and that they possess analytical and problem solving skills. A good pass shows universities and employers that pupils are capable of working in a scientific and methodical manner and that they have developed strong practical skills which can be applied in new and demanding situations. Importantly, in addition to these skills, Psychology pupils show themselves to have a deeper understanding of human behaviour. Pupils wishing to go on to study Psychology at university will certainly benefit from having studied the A level, and some University courses will accept Psychology as a science subject instead of Physics, Biology or Chemistry. Psychology provides opportunities for those looking to progress to degree level in a number of fields, and can be studied as Experimental Psychology at Oxford, and as part of the Social and Political Sciences course at Cambridge. Psychology is useful for pupils wishing to go into medicine and health-related careers, research, teaching, social work, business and human resources. Other pupils go on to choose careers in the Armed Forces, with Psychology enhancing their understanding of people and the way in which they think and behave. Psychology is also essential for those wishing to study Clinical Psychology and Educational Psychology. Other specialist fields include Occupational, Sports and Forensic Psychology.

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AQA 7692 Ms Julie Desmarchelier-Arpino

Spanish Lo único imposible es aquella que no intentas - Juanto Fernandez

Why should I study Spanish? With 329 million native speakers, Spanish ranks as the world's No. 2 language in terms of how many people speak it as their first language. Spanish is also one of the world's most phonetic languages. If you know how a word is spelled, you can almost always know how it is pronounced, which is why it is thought to be ‘easier’ than other languages, but do not be fooled! It will still require a lot of work and passion! Spanish is the language of Pablo Picasso, Federico Garcia Lorca, Isabel Allende and of course Antonio Banderas. Nowadays, many people in the UK speak Spanish through the necessities of their work. Spanish has at least three million native speakers in each of 44 countries, making it the fourth most widely spoken language behind English (112 countries), French (60) and Arabic (57)... So it is clear that English is not enough! ●

● ●

● ●

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Despite expanding, the world has become a much smaller place and it is more and more important for companies to have employees with a wide spectrum of talents. Languages are the perfect way to meet new people, immerse yourself in new cultures and make a difference to who you are. Speaking another language really makes you stand out from the crowd and you’ll be able to work anywhere in the world. Learning a foreign language can help you understand your own language. They’re good for you! Speaking more than one language increases your brain capacity and you have better memory too. You can travel all over the world and feel like a true local. It’s an impressive achievement to speak a foreign language - one your friends and family will envy and employers will love!

What do I need to know or be able to do before taking Spanish in the Sixth Form? You need to have passed GCSE (or an equivalent examination) at B grade or better in Spanish. You need to be interested in the culture and way of life of the target language country, and be prepared to spend some time there during the course (exchange; work experience; stay with family) You need to take some interest in current affairs and world issues in general.

What will I learn? ●

● ● ● ● ●

To develop your general communication skills such as presenting information, organising your arguments, presenting and defending opinions. To analyse ideas, sustain a conversation, to communicate at a higher level in Spanish. To speak Spanish with greater fluency. To read, listen to and understand more complex material from a variety of sources. To write in Spanish with greater accuracy and sophistication. About a wide range of aspects of Spanish society.

What kind of pupil is this course suitable for? Pupils who: ● like to communicate. ● are interested in and enjoy other cultures. ● take an interest in a broad range of issues. ● may want to travel, live or work abroad. ● want to use their language for work, or further study. ● want to pick up a satisfying skill. ● want to open up many other opportunities: personal, social, academic and professional. ● wish to complement their other courses: a language combines particularly well with History, English, Geography and the other Humanities as well as Music, Maths, the Sciences or the Social Sciences. ● wish to work in the STEM or space industry (some employers will demand two languages).


Spanish, continued How is the course assessed?

What could I go on and do at the end of my course?

Paper 1: Listening, Reading, Writing (translation) ●

2 hours 30 minute examination (50% of A level)

Paper 2: Writing (essays) ●

2 hour examination (20% of A level)

Paper 3: Speaking ●

21-23 minute oral exam (30% of A level)

There will be a range of opportunities open to you, where you can continue to use and further your language skills and knowledge of contemporary society. Some pupils choose to do degree courses in languages; often there is an opportunity to learn a new language from scratch. Others choose to pursue a higher education course which combines study of a language with another subject such as law, politics or business. There are also many courses on offer in European Studies, which include language study among a number of other disciplines. Having a language at A level will certainly improve your employability, in particular with companies, which have international branches. Whether you are interested in continuing your studies or working at home or abroad, a language course at A level is an excellent step towards achieving your goals.

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Pearson Mrs Gemma Pritchard

BTEC Sport Why should I study BTEC Sport? After 30 years of proven success, more and more employers and Higher Education institutions across the globe are choosing BTEC-qualified candidates for their practical knowledge and employability skills. More than a million learners choose BTEC each year. The BTEC course is set up slightly differently to an A level to suit pupils who prefer written work as a form of assessment over examination. Although there is still one examination to be taken. It will cover some similar topics but also topics that aren't covered in the A Level such as looking at the sports industry and how you could progress in it once finished at school.

What do I need to know or be able to do before taking BTEC Sport in the Sixth Form? Ideally you will have studied GCSE PE but it is not essential. You should have an enthusiasm for sport and should be playing at least 1 sport competitively at school level or above.

What will I learn? Find ways to improve your own performance through greater understanding of how the body works during exercise. Develop your involvement and effectiveness in physical activity. Explore methods of fitness training and programmes for health and well being. Examine professional development in the sport industry.

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What kind of pupil is this course suitable for? ●

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Pupils who have in interest in participating in physical activity as part of a balanced, active and healthy lifestyle. Pupils who want to follow a course that develops the theoretical aspects through practical involvement. Pupils who have an enquiring mind and are interested in current issues in sport. Pupils who want to know more about how the body functions with exercise and training. Pupils who want to evaluate and improve their own and others’ sporting performance.

How is the course assessed? The course is BTEC LEVEL 3 Extended Certificate. This is the equivalent to 1 A level. Unit 1: Anatomy and Physiology 33% Written examination set and marked by Pearson. 1.5 hours. This is the only exam Unit 2: Fitness Training and Programming for Health, Sport and Well-being 33% A task set and marked by Pearson and completed under supervised conditions. Unit 3: Professional Development in the Sports Industry 17% This is an internally marked piece of work Unit 4: Practical Sports Performance 17% This is an internally marked piece of work

What could I go on and do at the end of my course? Pupils with BTEC Sport have access to a wide range of possible career and higher education opportunities. These skills are in great demand and are recognised by employers, universities and colleges as being of great value. It supports applications for a wide range of university courses with Sport Sciences, Physiotherapy, Recreation and Leisure Studies. Pupils may choose to use their qualification to go straight into employment, rather than into higher education. This can include further training in such areas as Recreational Management, Leisure Activities, Armed Forces and the Civil Service.


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AQA 7262 Mr Damian Todres

Theatre Studies Why should I study Theatre Studies? Theatre Studies is an exciting subject which develops several essential skills alongside furthering knowledge in the dramatic and performance arts. The study and practical exploration of play texts and their social and historical contexts enables a deep understanding of theatre genre and periods. This in turn offers an excellent support to those pursuing English Literature and History. You will also engage in a variety of contrasting theatre styles and develop your skills as a performer. These aspects of the subject develop communication skills and confidence in presentation which is not just aimed at helping those intending to follow a dramatic career, but is also a vital life skill. It will also complement a range of other subjects that have textual analysis as their focus.

What do I need to know or be able to do before taking Theatre Studies in the Sixth Form? You need to have achieved at least a B grade in GCSE English Literature and preferably completed a course in GCSE Drama, though the latter is not absolutely essential. You should have an enthusiasm for drama and have some meaningful experience in the subject. Due to the high level of practical and written communication required, a fluency in English is desired.

What will I learn? The course demands practical, creative and communication skills in almost equal measure. You will extend your ability to create drama and theatre, either in a performing or production role. You will also be required to write about plays and to develop your powers of analysis to become an informed critic when evaluating live theatre.

What kind of pupil is this course suitable for? This is both a practical and academic course and you should feel confident in both performance and analysis. You should have passion for the subject and a desire to be creative and interpretative with text. You should be interested in going to the theatre to see plays performed on a regular basis and be able to critically discuss what you have seen.

How is the course assessed? Component 1: Drama and theatre ● Knowledge and understanding of drama and theatre. ● Study of two set plays. ● Evaluation of live theatre productions. How it’s assessed: ● Written exam: 3 questions ● 80 marks in total ● 40% of A level Component 2: Creating original drama (practical) ●

How it’s assessed ● Working notebook (40 marks) ● Devised performance ● (20 marks) ● 60 marks in total ● 30% of A level Component 3: Making theatre (practical) ●

The course will involve taking part in drama productions, as well as studying plays, genres, theatre practitioners and styles.

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Process and performance of devised drama (pupils may contribute as performer, designer or director). Devised piece must be influenced by the work and ideas of one prescribed practitioner.

Practical exploration and interpretation of three play extracts. Reflective report on the process.

How it’s assessed ● Performance of one extract (40 marks) ● Reflective report ● (20 marks) ● 60 marks in total ● 30% of A level


Theatre Studies, continued What could I go on and do at the end of my course? This qualification could lead to further study in Drama, Theatre Studies and Performing Arts in Higher Education at degree or HND level. It can be used as part of your course to broaden your studies and may lead on to a career in the performing arts industries.

Additional Costs Within this subject Theatre Trips form an essential part of the course. Parents should be aware that there is an extra charge for this which is typically around £90 per year.

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