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2013 – 2017

A N I K A T U TE RA N A L P C I G E T STRA


Early childhood is “..a period of momentous significance for all people growing up in (our) culture‌ By the time this period is over, children will have formed conceptions of themselves as social beings, as thinkers and language users and they will have reached certain important decisions about their own abilities and their own worthâ€?. (Donaldson, Grieve & Pratt, 1983)


Strategic Plan 2013-2017 o k o p Ū i ng a RĀr

s t n e t n co

Kōrero a te Tiamana o te Poari – From the Chairperson

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Whakarāpopoto – Strategic Plan Elements at a Glance

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Ngā Uara – Our Values

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Te Uaratanga – Our Mission

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Whakakitenga – Our Vision

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Te Kaupapa – Our Philosophy

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Ngā Whāinga – Strategic Goals

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Te Whakahononga o ngā Rōpu Tautoko – Connecting with our Communities of Interest

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Whakatinanatanga o ngā Tikanga Whakahaere – Operational Planning and Implementation

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kindergarten literally means child’s garden!


W E L LI N GTON KI N D E RGA RT E N S | ST RAT EG IC PLAN 2013 – 2017

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1. Korero a te Tiamana o te Poari – From the Chairperson This strategic plan was developed during a series of planning workshops between June and August 2012. The intention of the plan is to provide a broad statement of the direction, goals and strategies for the Association for the next five years and to provide a framework for those who work within the organisation to prepare their own operational plans and goals for the future. It should also be used as a vehicle for informing parents and whānau, communities, schools and others with an interest in our progress, of our intentions and commitment to deliver the highest standard of early childhood education. The core elements of the plan are summarised on the following page. In the remaining pages we expand on these elements, explaining what they mean to us and providing more detail on our strategic goals to assist people develop shorter-term operational plans for their areas of responsibility. The Free Kindergarten movement was founded on the work of 19th Century German educationalist Frederich Froebel. Froebel believed young children learnt best through play and exploration – hence the name “kindergarten”, meaning child’s garden. Early advocates of the Free Kindergarten movement in New Zealand had studied under Froebel. Mary Richmond was pivotal in establishing the first kindergarten in Wellington in 1905 and in forming the Wellington Free Kindergarten Association in 1906. She believed that all young children should have access to environments that “took them off the streets” and nurtured their thirst for learning. The philanthropic underpinnings of the movement formed the basis on which Free Kindergartens grew in New Zealand and on which the Wellington Association operates today. All teaching teams in Wellington Kindergartens implement the national early childhood education curriculum Te Whāriki1. Te Whāriki is a bicultural document and as such reflects the unique place of Māori as Tangata Whenua in Aotearoa New Zealand. Te Whāriki is founded on socio-cultural theory that children’s development takes place within systems that have a powerful influence on each other. In particular, Bronfenbrenner’s2 ecological theory of human development underpins much of the pedagogical theory on which Te Whāriki is based. The child-centred approach is in contrast to a more adult-directed approach where the adult (usually the teacher) determines the learning agenda and programme. In 2011 the Wellington Region Free Kindergarten Association adopted Te Manawa as its criteria for curriculum implementation. We have clear expectations that Te Manawa will support all teachers in this Association to be collaborative, critical, reflective and high performing. Te Manawa translated into English means “the heart of what we do”. It signifies our teachers’ commitment to continuous focus on and self-review with regard to the provision of high-quality early childhood education for all children attending our kindergartens. Carole Olmedo Chairperson

1

Ministry of Education. (1996). Te Whāriki Early Childhood Curriculum. Learning Media, Wellington.

2

Bronfenbrenner, U. (1979). The Ecology of Human Development. Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts.


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2. Whakarapopoto – Strategic Plan Elements At a Glance (Note: A one-page summary for photocopying is included at the end of this document.)

Ngā Uara – Our Values

(These are used to guide our decisions and to govern how we work with others.)

•• Mana •• Excellence •• Partnership •• Fairness •• Fun

Te Uaratanga – Our Mission

We provide quality teaching in welcoming and innovative learning environments for infants, toddlers and children, in partnership with whānau, reflecting diverse communities.

Whakakitenga – Our Vision

Leaders in and strong advocates for quality early childhood education for every child.

Te Kaupapa – Our Philosophy

•• Qualified teaching staff

(This is a statement of our purpose, our services and for whom we seek to provide them.)

(This is a statement of what we aspire to achieve and/or become in the long term.)

(These are our characteristics that define who we are and that differentiate us from other providers of early childhood education.)

•• Affordable early childhood education •• Accessible early childhood education •• Community-based operational mode •• Reciprocal partnerships with whānau •• Professional development and support

Ngā Whāinga – Strategic Goals

(This is a high-level statement of the steps on which the Association will focus during 2013–2017 and through which we will make progress towards our vision.)

•• Lead in the provision of quality early childhood education •• Improve access for children and their families •• Attract, inspire, develop and retain great teachers •• Build stronger relationships with our communities of interest •• Strengthen our Treaty partnership and enact our Treaty obligations •• Achieve and maintain a financially sustainable position •• Improve the effectiveness of governance, planning and management


W E L LI N GTON KI N D E RGA RT E N S | ST RAT EG IC PLAN 2013 – 2017

Te Whakahononga o ngā Rōpu Tautoko – Connecting with our Communities of Interest

(Here we define our specific commitments to groups who have a particular interest in our performance and service delivery.)

The eight groups are: •• children •• parents and whānau •• kindergarten committees/whānau groups •• teachers and support staff •• local communities •• partners in early childhood education, health providers and tertiary institutions •• primary and secondary schools •• the Ministry of Education, including Group Special Education.

Whakatinanatanga o ngā Tikanga The management team is committed to a process of annual planning, Whakahaere – Operational monthly reviews of progress and project management to ensure these Planning and Implementation strategic goals are achieved during the five years covered by this plan. (This expresses our commitment to support the management team as they implement the strategy through a process of annual planning and management.)

There is an overall approach by management and teams to implement the principles of continuous improvement and inclusion to maximise the benefits for all our communities.

Kindergartens have a proud history of fostering strong relationships with families.

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3. Nga Uara – Our Values

Mana, Excellence, Partnership, Fairness and Fun

Fun

Humour, Positivity, Enjoyment, Play

Fairness

Ethical, Equitable, Accepting

Partnership Excellence Mana

The aspiration statement in Te Whāriki, the national early childhood education curriculum, states:

Partnership (With and between) Children, Parents and Whanau / Teachers / Researchers / Associations and Schools Professionalism Innovation Leadership Continuous Improvement Well-being / Mana Atua Belonging / Mana Whenua Contribution / Mana Tangata Communication / Mana Reo Exploration / Mana Aoturoa

(for all children) … to grow up as competent and confident learners and communicators, healthy in mind, body, and spirit, secure in their sense of belonging and in the knowledge that they make a valued contribution to society. (Ministry of Education, 1996)

This statement is underpinned by the concept of Mana – that the child is empowered in many ways and these are represented in five domains of mana: •• •• •• •• ••

Mana Atua/Well-being Mana Whenua/Belonging Mana Tangata/Contribution Mana Reo/Communication Mana Aoturoa/Exploration.


W E L LI N GTON KI N D E RGA RT E N S | ST RAT EG IC PLAN 2013 – 2017

What this means to us

Mana Excellence Partnership

And so Mana underpins the values that the Association uses to guide our decisions and to govern how we work with others. Striving for Excellence drives the Association to focus on continuous improvement by being innovative, professional and by taking responsibility for its role as a leader in early childhood education. Partnership, both with and between children, their parents and whānau/ teachers/researchers/associations/schools ensures that we recognise the importance of the child’s immediate and wider environment in contributing to their learning and development – that partnership is critical in creating services that are communities of mutual respect. There exists a respect for the different contributions that each person makes – for the contribution of the teacher, the parent, the administration assistant, the older sibling. In nurturing communities of mutual respect where each member is valued for their expertise and contribution to the education and care of the child, an environment exists that truly celebrates the primacy of place that children hold – that truly empowers them in every way.

Fairness Fun

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To operate in a transparent manner that is ethical and that ensures children, their parents and whānau, staff and those we work with are treated equitably underpins the importance that Fairness plays in forming our values. Fun – learning and teaching are always best when they are enjoyable. Fun and play are essential to support positive learning. Children learn best in environments that build warm and trusting relationships. Sometimes learning involves challenges which provide children with the opportunity to develop resiliency. One of our primary teaching goals therefore is to develop attitudes and dispositions in children (ie imagination, creativity, resilience and relating to others), which support children to see learning as a valued and enjoyable lifelong activity. Teachers need to enjoy teaching too. When there is fun in the relationship between the teacher and the child, trust develops and learning that’s enjoyable can be shared by all.


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4. Te Uaratanga – Our Mission

We provide quality teaching

What this means to us

in welcoming and innovative

›› We strive for our communities to feel valued and important.

learning environments for

›› We proactively engage with our communities with passion, good humour and respect.

infants, toddlers and children, in partnership with whānau, reflecting diverse communities.

›› We are creative and experiment with new ideas and theories in a professional context to continually enhance learning and teaching practices. ›› Our learning environments will be aesthetically inviting, safe, reflect the community they are embedded in and support learning experiences that are open-ended and stimulating. ›› Our doors are open to all to create partnerships with whānau and the wider community to support their involvement in their children’s learning. ›› We recognise and value the diverse emotional and learning requirements of infants, toddlers and young children and will be flexible in providing for these.

ma tou rourou, ma toku rourou ka ora te iwi:

With your contribution and my contribution we will make progress.


W E L LI N GTON KI N D E RGA RT E N S | ST RAT EG IC PLAN 2013 – 2017

5. Whakakitenga – Our Vision

Leaders in and strong

What this means to us

advocates for quality early

›› We will use evidence of learning to show why 100% qualified teachers in regulated staffing positions are an integral part of early childhood education.

childhood education for every child.

›› Board, management, teachers and staff will each have the skills to advocate for and articulate quality early childhood education. ›› We will continue to build our reputation as leaders in early childhood education and we will work collaboratively with other organisations, sharing skills and knowledge. ›› We will continue to actively advocate for 100% qualified teacher funding across early childhood education. ›› We will continue to advocate for children.

Activities should invite rather than compel participation.

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6. Te Kaupapa – Our Philosophy

What this means to us A. Qualified teaching staff

B. Affordable early

We believe that qualified and competent teachers are essential in guaranteeing the best outcomes for all children within a safe and empowering environment.

To this end, 100% of all staff employed in regulated teaching positions in a kindergarten managed by this Association will be qualified, registered early childhood teachers.

The Association, in its efforts to maintain an affordable kindergarten service, will continue to develop policies and procedures that enable every infant, toddler or child attending a Wellington Kindergarten service to have access to up to 20 hours’ free early childhood education.

We are inclusive in our practices and do not discriminate on the basis of gender, race, culture, religion, specific needs or any other factor. Parent and whānau involvement is actively encouraged. No child is refused a place on the basis of the parents’ inability to participate.

Effective financial management is essential to the ongoing viability of the organisation. To this end, the Association is focused on using all available funds to meet its vision. It is an Incorporated Society and, as such, must abide by the requirements of the Incorporated Societies Act 1908.

The involvement and contributions of parents, whānau and the wider community are essential to the provision of high-quality early childhood education in our kindergartens. Involvement and contribution can take a variety of forms; for example, financial support for projects, contributions to the programme through time and resources.

The Association ensures professional competence through the provision of pastoral and professional support for its staff. This is implemented through a comprehensive system of professional development and guidance developed by the Senior Teacher and Association Office Teams.

childhood education

C. Accessible early childhood education

D. Community-based operational mode

E. Reciprocal relationships with whānau

F. Continuous improvement through professional development and support


W E L LI N GTON KI N D E RGA RT E N S | ST RAT EG IC PLAN 2013 – 2017

7. Nga Whainga – Strategic Goals

In the five-year period 2013–

We will continue to:

2017 we will focus on seven key goals through which we will

A. lead in the delivery and provision of high-quality early childhood education

seek to improve and extend

B. improve access for children and their families

the provision of early childhood

C. attract, inspire, develop and retain great teachers

education.

D. build strong relationships with our communities of interest E. strengthen our bicultural capacity F.

maintain and improve our financial position

G. improve our organizational robustness, including governance and management.

A. Lead in the delivery and provision of high-quality early childhood education

›› Our strategic goals include providing an environment where whānau and wider community feel welcome and able to engage in children’s learning and where children continue to develop as confident, lifelong and competent learners. ›› The quality of early childhood education is proven to have a very significant impact on how well children develop and progress in the short and long term. There is a big difference in outcomes for children experiencing quality education from 100% qualified teachers and those involved in education of a lower standard. ›› Our Association will provide high-quality learning environments for children, teachers and whānau, reflecting our bicultural foundation and the diverse communities from which the children come. ›› We therefore see this as our most important goal and we aim to be leaders in the implementation of teaching and learning theory that is current and valued. We are committed to Te Whāriki early childhood curriculum and to the criteria of Te Manawa as being the foundation for all future learning and implementation to guide our practice.

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7. Nga Whainga – Strategic Goals

B. Improve access for children and their families

›› We aim to improve availability of suitable services for any child or whānau who seeks access to quality early childhood education. ›› We recognise that part of providing quality means creating greater choice and flexibility in order to meet the specific requirements of individual children and whānau.

C. Attract, inspire, develop and retain great teachers

›› We have a team of qualified, motivated and skilled teachers who are actively involved in self-review and ongoing professional learning. ›› Teachers are supported and encouraged to be creative and innovative educators. ›› We provide professional development that is meaningful, relevant and challenging. This includes an extensive two-year teacher registration programme. ›› We have resources and environments that are safe, stimulating and of high quality. ›› We seek to be the leading organisation where teachers want to work and where teachers are respected and appreciated as professionals.


W E L LI N GTON KI N D E RGA RT E N S | ST RAT EG IC PLAN 2013 – 2017

D. Build strong relationships with our communities of interest

›› We will actively communicate with our communities and be responsive in the provision of services. ›› We will act as a hub for our communities and a preferred point of call for families with young children. ›› We seek to be fully integrated into our local communities so that we reflect the cultures from which the children are drawn and our teachers can work with parents and the community to create an integrated learning environment for the children. ›› We will build on existing partnerships and actively seek new partnerships with a wide range of community, local and national agencies.

E. Strengthen our bicultural capacity

›› The national early childhood education curriculum, Te Whāriki, is a bicultural document, founded on the principles of Te Tiriti o Waitangi, recognising Māori as the tangata whenua of Aotearoa/New Zealand. ›› To this end, we will work to ensure that all children who attend our services will know and enjoy the dual cultural heritage of Te Tiriti o Waitangi along with his/her own cultural heritage. In this way, the mana of every child will be enhanced. ›› At an organisational level we will strengthen our bicultural capacity by further developing our kawa – our way of doing things.

F. Maintain and improve our financial position

›› We continue to be committed to growth and providing greater access for children and so are determined to maximise the value we realise from our resources. ›› We will maintain and improve our properties and other physical assets. ›› We will actively seek alternative sources of funds, particularly for new and innovative projects. ›› We seek to operate within budget despite decreased funding from the Government.

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7. Nga Whainga – Strategic Goals

G. Improve our organisational robustness, including governance and management

›› Organising a successful ECE service relies on teamwork. Similarly the successful operation of an association of over 60 ECE services relies on teamwork also. ›› The governance of the Association is carried out by the elected Board of parents, whānau, community members and staff. It is tasked with setting and monitoring the strategic direction of the organisation, ensuring it remains financially sound and legally compliant, and that it maintains the values and professional integrity of the organisation. ›› Good governance depends on developing trusting professional relationships with the management, staff and stakeholders that contribute to the day-to-day operation of the organisation – that’s where the teamwork comes in. ›› We are committed to maintaining effective operations between governance and management. Roles and responsibilities are clearly defined and communicated. In addition, all levels of the organisation will be provided with ongoing support to be successful.

Our governance and management processes and practices will be subject to ongoing self-review and audit.


W E L LI N GTON KI N D E RGA RT E N S | ST RAT EG IC PLAN 2013 – 2017

8. Te whakahononga o nga ropu tautoko – Connecting with our Communities of Interest

As part of the strategic planning

We will continue to:

process, seven groups with

A. Children

a particular interest in the

B. Parents and whānau

development and performance

C. Kindergarten committees/whānau groups

of the Association were

D. Teachers and support staff

identified as follows:

E. Local communities F.

Partners in early childhood education, including health providers and tertiary institutions and other financial supporters

G. Primary and secondary schools H. The Ministry of Education, including Group Special Education.

A. Children

›› Children learn in an environment in which they will have fun, are safe, are active and in which they develop social skills, building upon their social competency to support group involvement and participation. A secure environment offers children the stability to take risks, to fully participate and progress as learners. Children’s self-image as a learner will be affirmed and reaffirmed, ensuring they gain a strong foundation that leads them to being lifelong learners. ›› We always put the child first when making decisions that affect them and are careful to enhance and maintain their mana in our actions and responses. Children’s dignity will always be respected and uplifted. ›› We implement the core principles of Te Whāriki:

B. Parents and whānau

› Empowerment – Whakamana

› Holistic Development – Kotahitanga

› Family and Community – Whānau Tangata

› Relationships – Ngā Hononga

and are guided by the criteria in Te Manawa and let the uniqueness of the child guide our work. Ko te ahurei o te tamaiti arahia ō tātou māhi.

›› Every kindergarten includes and involves parents and whānau and takes into account individual families’ needs that are responsive to individual families’ requirements.

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8. Te whakahononga o nga ropu tautoko – Connecting with our Communities of Interest

C. Kindergarten committees/ whānau groups

›› Kindergarten committees and whānau groups are a valued part of the kindergarten community. They provide a valuable vehicle for parent and whānau involvement in the effective operation of the kindergarten. They provide support through fundraising but more importantly through creating a sense of community. ›› Children see their parents and whānau involved in kindergarten and gain a sense of the important place it has in their lives.

D. Teachers and support staff

›› Teachers work in an environment that supports their identified professional development, respects their commitment and offers opportunities for a rewarding career. ›› We promote a positive, safe and fair working environment with strong links between teachers, parents, the community and the Association. ›› Teachers take pride in the quality of the education they provide in the kindergarten environment and the respect with which they are regarded by parents, whānau, the community and the Association. ›› Support staff are vital members of the kindergarten team and are appreciated for the positive and essential contribution they make to the environment created for children, parents and whānau.

E. Local communities

›› Local communities are encouraged to have a sense of ownership of their kindergarten and to see it as a positive expression of the community’s care for its members and particularly for the younger ones. ›› Wherever the community is not defined by geography but by some other circumstance such as parents’ workplace, duration of access or other common need, deliberate steps will also be taken to involve the parents, whānau and, where appropriate, employers. ›› For all communities every effort is made to engage them in the activities of the kindergartens and to show a genuine appreciation for their help. Individual kindergartens are encouraged to identify with and be responsive to the specific needs and culture of their community, to reflect the positive things about their community and seek to become a source of local pride.

F. Partners in early childhood education, including health providers and tertiary institutions and other financial supporters

›› We work as partners in early childhood education with agencies and other early childhood education providers/centres and groups including health providers and tertiary institutions and other financial supporters to ensure children receive comprehensive, high-quality, holistic education and care.


W E L LI N GTON KI N D E RGA RT E N S | ST RAT EG IC PLAN 2013 – 2017

G. Primary and secondary schools

›› We actively create relationships with primary schools in order to optimise the positive transition of every child from kindergarten to primary school. As an Association we encourage and support individual kindergartens to build strong communication links with the primary schools in their area and to work with them to ensure children become lifelong learners. ›› We will engage with secondary schools when appropriate with the same goal and to build mutual understanding of our respective practices and educational objectives. ›› Similarly, we ensure that transitions between kindergartens will be positive experiences for children. This includes children moving from our “toddler” kindergartens into those licensed for older children.

H. The Ministry of Education, including Group Special Education

›› We are committed to working collaboratively with the Ministry of Education to meet licensing requirements and in advocating for increasing participation in quality early childhood education. We provide information and advice to the Ministry of Education to help them make positive policy decisions. ›› We will build effective and professional working relationships with all our financial supporters, including the Ministry of Social Development and our valued private sponsors.

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9. Whakatinanatanga o nga tikanga whakahaere – Operational Planning and Implementation

process of annual planning, regular

We have adopted the principles of selfreview and continuous improvement which include:

reviews and project management

•• being focused on our vision and mission

to ensure these strategic goals

•• being values driven

are achieved during the five years

•• being inclusive in planning and engaging with our communities

covered by this plan.

•• adopting positive and solution-focused attitudes to challenges and opportunities

The Association management and teaching teams are committed to a

•• being innovative and evidence based when adopting new practices •• using objective indicators to measure progress, evaluate programmes and support self-review. As an organisation the Association will foster a team culture between the board, management and staff in line with our core values of mana, excellence, partnership, fairness and fun.


W E L LI N GTON KI N D E RGA RT E N S | ST RAT EG IC PLAN 2013 – 2017

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Whakarapopoto – Strategic Plan Elements At a Glance Ngā Uara – Our Values

•• •• •• •• ••

Te Uaratanga – Our Mission

We provide quality teaching in welcoming and innovative learning environments for infants, toddlers and children, in partnership with whānau, reflecting diverse communities.

Whakakitenga – Our Vision

Leaders in and strong advocates for quality early childhood education for every child.

Te Kaupapa – Our Philosophy

•• •• •• •• •• ••

Qualified teaching staff Affordable early childhood education Accessible early childhood education Community-based operational mode Reciprocal partnerships with whānau Professional development and support

Ngā Whāinga – Strategic Goals

•• •• •• •• •• •• ••

Lead in the provision of quality early childhood education Improve access for children and their families Attract, inspire, develop and retain great teachers Build stronger relationships with our communities of interest Strengthen our Treaty partnership and enact our Treaty obligations Achieve and maintain a financially sustainable position Improve the effectiveness of governance, planning and management

Te Whakahononga o ngā Rōpu Tautoko – Connecting with our Communities of Interest

The eight groups are:

Whakatinanatanga o ngā Tikanga Whakahaere – Operational Planning and Implementation

The management team is committed to a process of annual planning, monthly reviews of progress and project management to ensure these strategic goals are achieved during the five years covered by this plan.

(These are used to guide our decisions and to govern how we work with others.)

(This is a statement of our purpose, our services and for whom we seek to provide them.) (This is a statement of what we aspire to achieve and/or become in the long term.) (These are our characteristics that define who we are and that differentiate us from other providers of early childhood education.)

(This is a high-level statement of the steps on which the Association will focus during 2013–2017 and through which we will make progress towards our vision.)

Mana Excellence Partnership Fairness Fun

•• •• (Here we define our specific commitments •• to groups who have a particular interest in •• our performance and service delivery.) •• ••

(This expresses our commitment to support the management team as they implement the strategy through a process of annual planning and management.)

children parents and whānau kindergarten committees/whānau groups teachers and support staff local communities partners in early childhood education, health providers and tertiary institutions •• primary and secondary schools •• the Ministry of Education, including Group Special Education.

There is an overall approach by management and teams to implement the principles of continuous improvement and inclusion to maximise the benefits for all our communities.


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211 Main Road, Tawa | PO Box 51143, Tawa T (04) 232 3069 | F (04) 232 3096 | E info@wn-kindergarten.org.nz

wn-kindergarten.org.nz


Strategic Plan 2013-2017  

Wellington Kindergartens Strategic Plan 2013-2017

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