Page 1


THE

Vol. I, No. 2.

SATURDAY, MAY 2, 1891

DISTRIBUTION OF PRIZES. _____

The prizes last year, as usual, were distributed in the big schoolroom, on the evening of Friday, the 13th December. The chair was occupied by Mr. J. R. Blair, and on the platform were Sir James Prendergast, Dr. Henry, Rev J. Paterson, and the staff of the College. There was a very large attendance of ladies and gentlemen. Mr. Mackay, the Principal of the College, read the following report: Sir, - I have the honour to report on the examination of Wellington College for the year 1890 as follows:The examination has this year been conducted by the staff, with the help of Mr. T. K Fleming, M.A.,LL.B., and Mr. Meek, M.A, who kindly examined the fifth form in English for the Barnicoat Memorial Prize. On classics, my colleague Mr. Wilson reports that “The passages set for translation were very well done. This applies not only to the pieces taken from the authors read, but also to those set for translation at sight. A large amount of time has been devoted to practice in translation at sight, in view of the requirements of the University examination, and the result has been so far satisfactory that the boys have shown themselves able to render into good English|and with considerable accuracy, passages not presenting any special difficulties. The composition is fair as to accuracy, though still wanting in style. The lower division of Form V. is. from one to two years behind the upper. As the papers set to the two divisions were almost the same, a much lower per centage was naturally to be expected. Taking this into account, the upper boys have done fairly well, but the work of two or three has been so bad as to be very discreditable to themselves, And to lower seriously the general average of the Form. In Form IVa. considerable stress has been laid on the practice of dictation and of re-translation, with satisfactory results, the boys having thereby acquitted

price

: 3s per Ann

unconsciously some rudimentary knowledge of Latin idiom, and showing a power of tackling a piece of Latin - previously unseen - very creditable in those who have, many of them, been learning Latin for only two years. In the lower Forms the work generally is very satisfactory, the grammar being accurate and the translations rendered in good English. Careful training of this kind, and a sound knowledge of grammar will bear good fruit the future. This is especially true of I Vc., in which quite two-thirds of the boy have done really excellent work. From this general commendation the lower division of IVb must be excluded; two boys have done fairly, the rest are bad. On the English authors of the Fifth Form, Mr Fleming reports that the boys’ answers showed an excellent knowledge of the context and a good critical knowledge of the subject matter. Thomson’s knowledge of the context was exceptionally good, but he was very closely run by Mackay, whose sketch of the character of Jessica was by far the best answer given in any of the papers. On the grammar and composition Mr. Meek remarks that the boys have evidently learned their Morris and Smith well. Most of them wrote fair essays; and two or three, amongst whom Thomson was particularly noticeable, delayed more than a little critical ability in dealing with the piece of Ruskin I asked them consider. The Clarendon was in most cases well done. Mackay’s version was the best. Dunn and one or two others quoted freely from Chaucer in answer to the first question, which they dealt with very completely. Thomson's essay was the best. Myers did a very good allround paper. Carmichael also is to be commended. The English examination of the other Forms was conducted by myself. The great majority of the papers sent in were carefully, neatly, and correctly done, and reflected great credit on Mr. Heine. The standard of the Mathematical examination in Form V, was the University standard for Junior Scholarships. Of the five boys in the upper 5th, four passed with credit and one passed; of the six boys in the lower division, four passed and two failed. Of


2

THE WELLINGTONIAN

the two who failed, however, it is only fair to say that they have for the greater part of the last term been giving their attention to the subjects of the matriculation examination. In form IVa, the standard adopted was the matriculation standard. If those who have entered secure as good a percentage in the University papers as they did in our own, there is little doubt that most, if not all of them, will pass in mathematics. In the lower forms, the results of the mathematical examination were characterised by a good many magnificent successes, and by not a few failures. This is specially the case in the lower division of IVb. In this division the boys are very unequal in age, and the younger boys are the promising. Mr. Bee has struggled as manfully, and in my opinion as successfully, with his many difficulties as could reasonably be expected. The French examination was conducted by Mons. Naverne. The percentage of marks obtained in form V. by a majority of the boys was good, and in a few cases exceptionally good. The results in the lower forms in this subject bear a striking resemblance to the results of the same forms in mathematics. Science - embracing inorganic chemistry, heat, and electricity has been systematically taught throughout the year in all forms except the lowest. The examination results in this subject do not suffer by comparison with the results obtained in any other subject in the school. The shorthand and Sloyd classes have not been so well patronised this year as I could wish; though Mr. Warren and Mr. Robertson have resolutely worked on the face of considerable discouragement. To make such classes a complete success, they must be incorporated, with the regular work of the school, and that cannot at present be done without an increase of the staff. The discipline of the school during the year has been very satisfactory, and maintained with the greatest ease. Though no direct religious instruction is given in the school, it must not be supposed that the teachers exercise no influence on the higher life of their pupils. Every teacher has ample opportunities of associating all that the pupils see, read, and learn in school, with the chastening and refining sentiments of an enlightened piety. Every day the teacher, whose thoughts and anxieties are centred in his pupils, and who is seriously concerned about the formation their character, can find occasions for speaking a word in season; and can thus exercise a wholesome and practical influence upon the conduct and character of those under his charge. At the same time it must never be forgotten that mere personal supervision is not enough to form a boy’s character. There must be implanted in the boy’s heart such principles as will prepare him for becoming “a law unto himself,” and will inspire him with noble affections and a love for that high moral and religious tone, the outcome of which is earnest resoluteness of purpose, stern devotion to duty, and the love of truth. It is pleasant to see the good seed one sows springing up and bringing forth fruit under the eyes of the sower. During the past year that pleasure has been mine in a higher degree perhaps than during any of my previous years in Wellington. The prefects of the school have behaved towards themselves and towards their fellows to my entire satisfaction. They have displayed a strong sense of responsibility, and

May 2, 1891

manifested an earnest desire to uphold and raise the tone of the school. Such fruits are very comforting to one in such a position as mine, amid the cares and worries of his every-day life, and amid the “ungenerous criticism and false standards of estimation by which his work is sometimes judged.” It only remains for me to express my gratitude to my colleagues for their cordial and efficient co-operation, both in and out of the school, and to say that a more earnest and conscientious set of men it would be hard to find. Mr. Blair, in his opening remarks, referred to the fact that the College had for the past year been harassed, and had had a great struggle with its finances. He also deprecated the extension of standards, Which, he said, would injure the second-class schools. Sir James Prendergast, in the course of his remarks, said that schoolmasters were deserving of considerable sympathy. He thought it must be very distressing after a hard day’s work at teaching to find out in the end that their efforts have been void of results. It was not, he thought, because the boys were bad that they did not succeed like other boys, but because boys would be boys. He attributed the success of most boys to the fact that facilities were given them while at home to study, and urged upon parents the desirableness of seeing that their children attended to their studies either at night or morning. The prizes were then presented by Sir James Prendergast as follows:Form V. - Dux and Governor’s gold medallist - Dunn. Rhodes scholarship (£35) - Mackay, primus, 1; Myers, 2. Moore scholarship (£35) - Thompson, 1; Morrah, primus, 2. Turnbull Exhibition (£15) - Dunn. Turnbull Exhibition (£10) Mackay, primus. Barnicoat English prize (£5) - Thompson. Mr. Blair’s prize - Robinson, primus. Form IVa. - 1st Governors’ scholarship (£13) - Brown, primus. 2nd Governors scholarship (£13) - Robertson. Levin languages scholarship (£10) - Wall. Levin science scholarship (£10) - Feltham. Prizemen - Sladden, 1; Stevens, secundus, 2.; McCredie, primus, 3; Gilmer, 4; Kirkcaldie, 5. Honourable mention - Kirk, primus; Duthie, secundus; Stevens, primus; Duthie, primus. Form IVb Prizemen - Smith, primus, 1; Fairchild, 2; Blair, primus, 3; Blair, secundus, 4; Mackay, iii, 5. Honourable mention - Marchant, McDowall, Zohrab, Kidd, Wilson, secundus. Form IVc. -Prizemen - Haslam, 1 ; Wakelin, 2 ; Toogood, 3; Prendeville, 4; Benzoni, 5. Honourable mention - Gibson, Manning, McLeod, Kirk, secundus, Halley. Forms III., II., and I.-Prizemen - Morrah, secundus, 1; Kirkcaldie, secundus, 2; Melville, 3; Wallace,4; (Mr. Page’s prize), West, 5; Richardson and Menzies, honourable mention. Shorthand.- Benzoni; Sloyd, Haslam. After the school prizes had been distributed, Miss Hamilton, amid tremendous cheering, distributed the prizes won at the last annual sports. Thomson won the Old Boys’ Challenge Cup, and also Lady Prendergast cup for the half-mile. Nahr secured the College Challenge Cup, while McGovern won the Junior Championship Cup. Other principal winners were MacDowell and Bodmin. The meeting then broke up, with cheers for Miss Hamilton,


May 2, 1891

THE WELLINGTONIAN

Mr. and Mrs. Mackay, the masters, the Dux, and Thomson. Editorial notes The Wellingtonian is published three times a year, in the last week of each term; the subscription for the future being one shilling a number, and three shillings a year, or three and threepence post paid. The subscription is payable in advance. The Editor invites contributions of all kinds, letters, etc. All articles should be addressed to the Editor, and put in the Editor’s Box. They should be signed with the Writer’s name, though not necessarily for publication.

3

Necessarily almost in the ordinary work of our school life there is a tendency to make us think too much about ourselves and our own individual advantage; and therefore everything which helps, like our games, to counteract that tendency, and leads us to some definite work for the good of the school as a whole, has a special value. And in this respect the Wellingtonian may do good service, and afford an opportunity to many-some of whom, at any rate, might not find it so easily in the playground - for unselfish work. And, as we have already said, it is a work in which all can help, for it is not only those who write for the paper who will contribute to its welfare, but even the youngest member of our community, who denies

Lumen accipe et imperti.

himself the pleasure of a certain amount of indigestion in order to find the necessary shilling to purchase his copy, will be doing

SATURDAY, MAY 2, 1891

his part-a most essential part-towards ensuring our success,

In these days any new publication, however modest it may

that may influence his whole life. To all “Wellingtonians,” then

be, may reasonably be required to show cause why one more

- past and present, old and young alike-we say, subscribe-let

periodical should be added to the almost infinite number

not the editorial locks be whitened untimely by sordid cares

already existing; and therefore we feel bound to say a few

of pence-and further, to all who can, we say, “Write” remember

words as to the objects which we trust the Wellingtonian may

your motto, and as you have received your share of light, do

in some degree help to promote.

your part in passing on the torch.

and may at the same time be laying the foundation of a habit

First and foremost, then, we hope that our paper may serve as a bond of union between all “Wellingtonians” past and present, and with the former specially, may help to keep up their knowledge of, and interest in the school they have left, and in those who were for so long their daily companions-but who are now scattered, as the “Old Boys’ Record” has shown us, all over the world. To that end we shall give, from term to term, a record, not only of all occurrences of interest - whether intellectual or athletic - in the history of the present school, but also, as far as we can ascertain them, of all incidents of note in the lives of our “Old Boys; a record which should, as time goes on, give some indication as to how far our school is fulfilling its purpose as a place of training for the work of life. Again, our paper will be a work in which all may help, and thereby be doing something which is not done for their own personal benefit, but for the good of the school; and that surely is in itself a sufficient justification for its existence.

SCHOOL NOTES W

The new boys this term are:- Boarders: Manoy, Allen, Jackson, Roberts, Webster, Booth, and Oldham. Day boys: Duncan, McGregor, Romeril, Cooper, Gilmer ii., Kember, Smythe, Mee, Bendall, Wilson iii., Cook i. and ii., Bronte, Fordham, Wedde, Hill, Whitcombe, Page, Ward, Stack, Graham, McGowan, Horne, Wall ii., James, Young, Thompson, Gaudin, Evens, and Kirkcaldie iii. The boys who left last term were:- Thompson, Dunn, Powles, Anderson, Hickson, Oldham, Evans, Kirk i., Stevens i., Duthie i., Feltham, Davies, Whiteford, Munro, Smith i., MacDowall, Marchant, Kidd, Nahr, Brown ii., Bodmin, Horne, Morrah ii., Anderson ii., Duff, Smith ii. Night classes have been started this term to prepare students for the University and General Knowledge Exams. At present there are about twenty students. The classes are conducted by Messrs. Bee, Heine, Meek, and Naverne. Last year Dunn, Myers, and Mackay passed the Junior Scholarship Exam, with credit, getting 3083, 2817, and 2808 marks respectively. Besides these, Thomson, Robinson, and


4

May 2, 1891

THE WELLINGTONIAN

Powles passed as for Matriculation; and Brown, Sladden, Stevens, Kirk, Robertson, and Wall passed the Matriculation. Carmichael also passed the Medical Preliminary. Thomson would probably have passed with credit, but he was in ill health, and was very unfortunate with his Greek paper. However, he passed high enough to enable him to take the Presbyterian Divinity Scholarship. For fear of being thought invidious we withhold the names of the unfortunates who did not pass. Appended is a list of the marks obtained in various subjects by those who passed with credit:Lat.

Eng.

Math.

French

Heat.

Chem

Elec.

Dunn

537

498

955

453

320

320

-

Myers

520

513

946

414

269

155

-

Mackay

487

402

820

426

291

-

382

The prefects for the year are Myers, Mackay i., Morrah, Carmichael, and Robinson. Mr. Mackay has this year converted the study on the second floor into a room for their use. It has been hung with pictures, and is found a great convenience during the dinner-hour. Music classes have again been started, and once more the ears of the boarders are delighted during preparation hours with the sounds of the scales and five-finger exercises. The number of subscribers to the library has this year increased considerably, being now nearly forty. We have to express our thanks to the publishers for a copy of Mr. Tregear’s work, “The Comparative Polynesian Dictionary.” We are sorry to say there has not been much demand for it. The librarian will be glad for any additional gifts of books. In spite of the adverse criticisms of some of the College Governors, the attendance at Mr. Warren’s shorthand class has slightly increased, being now nineteen. On the other hand, Mr. Robertson’s workshop classes have been discontinued owing to lack of attendance. At the beginning of the term, an attempt was again made to set up a tennis club. About thirty expressed their willingness to join, but, owing to the impossibility of obtaining a court, the idea had to be abandoned. A. Duncan will prove a very desirable addition to our cricket and football clubs this season. Since he left us to go to Wanganui he has established his reputation as a bat and half-back. Our football team will, we are afraid, sadly feel the loss of Thomson, Powles, MacDowall, Bodmin, and Bell, who all left at the end of last term. On Wednesday, 25th February, the school got a half-holiday to play St. Patrick’s. Our opponents went in first, and stayed in nearly all the afternoon, making the respectable score of 170 odd. To this O’Brien contributed 102, playing a careful innings, but giving several chances, which, however, were all missed.

Two other men got into double figures. Quite a feature of the innings was the bowling of some of our men. Mr. Bee, seeing that there was no time to finish our innings, decided to let the boys go in first, and kept himself and the other masters to the last. When stumps were drawn, we had made thirty-nine for six wickets, Marchant knocking up fourteen. Of course the results would have been very different if the masters had gone in first. A more detailed account will be found in the cricket column. It is seldom that a boy leaves College with such a good allround record as Dunn. In the middle of 1885 he entered the lowest form, and next year got the second place in the third. Ever since then he has continued at the head of his form. In 1887 he went up for a Primary Scholarship, and got one. Next year he obtained the Levin Scholarship for languages, and passed the matriculation. In 1889 he got the Rhodes Scholarship for general work, and passed the Junior Scholarship Examination with credit. In 1890 he obtained the Turnbull Exhibition for general work, and passed high in the Junior Scholarship Examination. For the last two seasons he has been a consistent player in the cricket team. He now goes to Christchurch to study law. When Mr. Smith, “the second Gough,” was here, he very kindly sent tickets for the boarders. All went, and enjoyed the lecture greatly. Nearly all the boys went to hear the phonograph, and were greatly pleased and mystified by the wonderful instrument. Our College in the last race with St. Patrick’s showed up somewhat better than they did the year before. Some of our fellows really ran very pluckily against heavy odds. The hint thrown out by the prefects about half-holidays seems to have had a good effect, and the attendance at practices has materially increased. We are indebted for our report of the distribution of prizes to the excellent account published in the New Zealand Times.

CRICKET W

In this game, as in other branches of athletics, the team has come to grief, chiefly through want of practice. At the beginning of the season the practice pitch in the Basin Reserve was given up, and a pitch prepared on our own ground The change, however, has not been productive of much good, The boys seem to have forgotten, or at all events disregarded, that old adage, “Practice makes perfect,” without which success cannot possibly be obtained. Then again the members of the team have been very careless in regard to attendance at matches. Not in one single match have we succeeded in obtaining our full team. Coming to the various departments of the game, the bowling and fielding of the team have been excellent. It is in catching


May 2, 1891

THE WELLINGTONIAN

and in batting, as the averages show, that we have been so sadly deficient. The boys now see where their defects lie, so that next season a more successful record may be expected. The First have played altogether six matches this year, three of which have been won, two lost, and one drawn. The Second have played only two matches, of which one was won and the other not played out. The Cup matches in which we took part are as follows :COLLEGE v. ALBERT II. In this our first match of the season, we had rather hard luck in losing the services of Mr. Bee, who had been suddenly called away to Dunedin. The game was played on a very wet wicket, and ended in a victory for our opponents by 48 runs. Mr. Heine made top score for us in both innings-11 not out, and 29 not out respectively. This was, unfortunately, the only cup match in which Mr. Heine played for us. This is much to be regretted, for there is no doubt that Mr. Heine, had he played in the other matches, would have continued as well as he had begun. In the bowling A. Duthie did best, taking, altogether, ten wickets,while Duff took eight. Several men were caught -four by Myers, two by Oldham, one by Duthie, and one by Dunn. The following are the scores on both sides :Alberts. 1st Innings. 2nd Innings Thompson, b Duthie 22 not out... W.Dagg, c Myers, b Duthie 3 c Myers, b Duthie Deslandes, b Duthie 11 b Duthie F.Dagg, b Duff 4 b Duff Pudney, c Oldham b Duthie 1 st,. b Duff Sommerville, b Duthie 4 b Duff Millward, c Myers, b Duthie 5 b Duff Hunt, b Duthie 1 c Duthie, b Duff A.Curry, c Myers, b Duthie 3 c Dunn, b Heine McLaughlin, b Duthie 0 c Oldham, b Duff W.Curry, c Myers, b Duff 0 absent Extras 16 79 1st Innings Oldham, c Somerville, b Deslandes Gray, b Deslandes Anderson, b Pudley Myers, run out Mr. Heine, not out Duthie, c Thompson b Pudney Bell, b Pudney Morrah, b Pudney Duff, b Deslandes Marchant, b Deslandes

College

26 5 6 10 12 0 0 1 3 0 0 2 64

2nd Innings

7 0 5 1 11

run out c Curry, b Somerville b Deslandes b Pudney not out

4 0 0 1 29

5 0 0 0 0

b Deslandes b Deslandes b Deslandes b Pudney c Curry, b Somerville

2 6 0 2 3

5

Dunn, b Deslandes Extras

8 b Somerville 2 39

9 0 56

COLLEGE v. WELLINGTON THIRD This match was won by default.

COLLEGE v. RIVAL THIRD On February 28th we commenced a match against the Rival Third, in which we had to take on three substitutes. Once again the ground was wet, and so the bowlers had things all their own way. It must, however, be said in our defence that the men who played against us were nearly all in the second eleven a week afterwards, so that really we were playing against almost a Junior Cup team. Appended are the scores:1st Innings. Duff, b Luckie Greenfield, c Warren, b Luckie Dunn, b Port Myers, c Ellis, b Luckie Mr. Bee, c and b Port McGovern, b Port Hannay, b Luckie Morrah, b Luckie Jackson, not out Patterson, b Port Marchant, b Luckie Extras

College 10 absent 2 absent 1 4 7 12 0 4 0 0 2 8 50

2nd Innings

c and b Port b Dryden run out c and b Dryden run out b Dryden not out b Port

Rivals 1st Innings. 2nd Innings Liddle, absent 0 l.b.w. Dryden, st. Mr. Bee. b Duff 5 Ellis, b Marchant 1 Port, c Greenfield, b Duff 12 Luckie, b Hannay 0 Oswin, c Myers, b Hannay 18 Warren, c Mr. Bee, b Duff 25 not out Ashdown, st. Bee, b Hannay 7 Murray, run out 8 Herd, not out 5 b Hannay Harty, absent 0 Extras 8 90

0 0 7 5 2 18 12 17 0 0 5 26 92

15

27 2 10 54


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May 2, 1891

THE WELLINGTONIAN

COLLEGE v. MIDLAND THIRD. This was our only other Cup match, and was won by our opponents by 57 runs. The Midlands, who went in first, made 64 and 99 in their two innings. We did not succeed in making more than 51 and 56. For the Midlands, Wilson (51), Kelling (23), Upham (24), and Esson (13) batted bast, while Upham and Proudfoot did most of the bowling. On our own side, Duthie (29), Mr. Bee (20), Page (17), and Greenfield (13) were the highest scorers, and Mr. Bee, Duff, Duthie, and Wilson were the most successful in bowling. Besides the above matches, we played at the beginning of the season a one innings match against the Clifton Club, which we succeeded in winning by seven runs. Our team made altogether 61, of which Myers contributed 14, Dunn 12, and Duff 10. The Cliftons responded with 54, Smith being the only player who managed to reach double figures. The bowling analysis was not kept. COLLEGE v. ST. PATRICK’S COLLEGE. On Wednesday, February 25th, as Mr. Mackay was kind enough to allow us a half-holiday, we arranged a match on the Basin Reserve against St. Patrick’s College, which, owing to want of time, ended in a draw. The Blue and Whites went first to the wickets, and before they were all disposed of had made 174 runs. Towards this total O’Brien contributed 104, and Hanning 35. The bad bowling and catching of our boys were quite a feature of the game. As we had only about twenty minutes to play, Mr. Bee decided to send the boys in first. They went in, and came out again without doing much, Marchant being the top scorer with 14. When stumps were drawn, we had lost six wickets for 36, with Messrs. Bee, Collins, and Heine to bat. The game was an enjoyable one, and should go far to show our boys wherein their defects lie, and consequently where much practice is necessary. FIFTH v. SCHOOL. On the afternoon of March 25th the Fifth Form decided to play the rest of the school. The Fifth played with only ten men, the School with thirteen, including two of the masters. The game, however, was a good one, and was won by the School by one wicket. Duncan, Duthie, and Myers batted best for the Fifth, Duncan, Gray, Duthie, and Hannay doing good service in the bowling. For the School Messrs. Bee and Heine did nearly all the work in both departments of the game. These matches between the various forms of the school should be encouraged, as in them everybody has a good chance of making a score, and thus much is done to neutralize that spirit of despondency which sometimes creeps over us after we have perhaps had a run of ill-luck in our outside matches.

THE GYMNASIUM W

This term the special gymnastic classes held last year have been discontinued. We are rather sorry that they have been, for a good number of our boys are rather wanting in their physique. Out of school hours, however, some good work has been done, though the Indian clubs and dumb-bells seem to have been altogether neglected. On the other hand, however, the boarders have this term paid more attention to the boxing-gloves than for some time past. Much to the regret of the juniors, the rope has been taken down, for, though it is very good exercise for the fore-arms, it has been the means of breaking several windows. We might suggest to some of our rising athletes that it is not quite the correct thing to stand upon the horse, bars, and ladders, with their boots on. We understand that the classes are to be resumed during the winter term. It will certainly be of great benefit if they are.

ATHL ETIC.

W Collegiate 250 Yards Handicap. At the meeting of the Amateur Athletic Association held on March 14th last, there was, as usual, an inter-College race, our College and St. Patrick’s both sent representatives, and the honours again fell to St. Patrick’s. Those who started were: from Wellington College - MacGovern, 12yds., Myers, 15yds., Mackay i, 16yds., Stafford, 18yds., Carmichael and Robinson i., 20yds., and Bendall, 25yds. From St. Patrick’sFay, scr., McBride, 13yds., Young, 15yds., Smith, 20yds., and Millar, 25yds. Mr. McCardell’s handicapping, to say the least, did not exhibit much judgment, the limit man winning with the greatest of ease. Those who ran in the first heat were-Fay, McBride Myers, Mackay, Stafford, Carmichael, and Millar. Millard big start enabled him to lead all the way round and win easily. McBride started off very strongly, and at the corner was running second, with Mackay close behind him. When fifty yards from home, however, Mackay soon passed him, and finished second. The scratch man ran third. In the second heat Smith soon came to the front, with Young behind him. Towards the end of the race, McGovern came through in fine style, and pressed Young hard for second place. Eventually Young came second by a few inches. In the final heat, Millar again led all the way round. Young and Mackay soon passed Smith, and coming round the corner, Young was two or three yards ahead. In the straight, however, Mackay drew up again, and a fine race followed between the three leaders. Millar’s handicap, however, was too big, and he finished first, with Young a fair second, and Mackay close up a good third. Time, 282/5secs. We hope next time to be able to chronicle a different result.


May 2, 1891

THE WELLINGTONIAN

FOOTBAL L W

So far there is not much of importance to chronicle in football matters. The annual meeting was held early in March, when Duncan, McGovern, Myers, Mason, and Duthie were elected to act together with the masters as a committee. The season began on March 18th with a scratch match, in which some very good play was shown. The only match that has taken place during the term has been: FIFTH FORM v. SCHOOL. The teams in this match were as follows:Fifth Form.- Full-back, Morrah; three-quarters, Page (subs.), Mackay ii. (subs.), Duthie; halves, Hannay, Hill (subs.); Forwards, Stafford, Myers, Mackay i., Carmichael, Robinson i., Brown, Wall, Stevens, and Bendall (subs.). School.- Full-back, Horne; three-quarters, Jackson, McGovern, Bright; halves, Stack, Duncan; forwards, Bronte, Mason, Paterson, Ziman, Benzoni,Halley, Whitcombe, McLeod. The game throughout was a most one-sided one, and ended in a victory for the School by 21 points to nil. During the progress of the game, an unfortunate accident happened, which marred the whole afternoon’s enjoyment. Paterson, who had been playing very well, had the misfortune to break his arm. He was carried off the field, and a doctor was at once sent for. On his arrival the game was continued. The play was for the most part in the Fifth Form’s twenty-fives. Towards the end of the game, the Fifth men made super-human efforts to score, and indulged in some fine passing, which for a time carried the ball close to the enemy’s line. When no-side was called, however, no alteration had been made in the score. For the winners, McGovern, Jackson, and Duncan among the backs, and Halley, Fannin, and Mason, among the forwards, played the best game. For the Fifth, Duthie was the only back that did any real service. The others were far too small to stop the splendid rushes made by the opposite side. Stafford, Myers, Mackay, and Carmichael were the pick of the forwards. Some outside matches will doubtlessly be played before the end of the term, but too late for reports to be published in this number. The prizes for last year’s kicking match, which was won by McGovern in the seniors, and by Gray and Richardson in the juniors, have not yet been presented, but most probably will be at the end of the term. The football field is at present in a very bad condition. It is a great pity that we should have to play on such a ground, when the expenditure of a few pounds would set matters right. A subscription list ought to be started at once, in order to drain it properly and make it fit to play on. The following matches have been played since our first football article was written :-

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FIFTH AND FOURTH v. SCHOOL. The Fifth, after their defeat by the School, attempted, three weeks afterwards, to retaliate on the victors by calling in the aid of the IVc. In spite, however, of the help afforded by Jackson and Bright, the Fifth was again beaten, this time by nine points. The teams were as follows :Fifth. - Full-back, Horne; three-quarters, Jackson, Morrah and Bright; halves, Hannay and Duthie; forwards, Myers, Mackay i., Stafford, Bronte, Carmichael, Stevens, Brown, Wall i., and Whitcombe. School.- Full-back, Mackay iii., three-quarters, Mr. Bee, MacGovern and Booth; halves, Duncan and Stack ; forwards, Fannin, Halley, Benzoni, Mackay ii., McCleod, Ziman, Blair i., Richardson and Bendall. For the winners, MacGovern scored two tries, which he converted, and Mr. Bee one try, from which he also kicked a goal. The game was a fast one, and more even than the scores would appear. For the School, Mr. Bee, MacGovern and Duncan, among the backs, and Fannin, Halley and McCleod, among the forwards, were the most prominent. JUNIORS v. NEWTOWN SCHOOL. This match resulted in a win for the Newtown School by five points to one. Sweeney and Blowe scored for the winners, and Wilson i. (capt.) for our Juniors. Gray, Horne, Wilson i., and Seccombe were the pick of our team. During the term we have had the misfortune to lose two of our forwards, Robinson i. and Mason, who both left toward the end of the term. We hear that Fannin is also going to leave at the end of the term. A match has at last been arranged with St. Patrick’s. It will be played on the last Wednesday of the term. The St. Patrick’s are of course a stronger team than ours, rating as they do as a second class, but as our fellows play with the help of Mr. Collins, a tight game may be expected.

Cadets

W This term the number of cadets in the company is about the same as last year, namely, forty-four. Of these more than twenty joined this year. Last Easter encampment took place at Palmerston, and so the corps, contrary to custom, did not attend it. The squad has been regularly drilled on Tuesdays and Fridays, under the direction of Sergeant-Major Finn, and Messrs. Bee and Collins. The marching and forming company is not so well done this term as last, which is probably owing to the centre files being recruits. The company has been put through the physical drill several times, but it has not been so regularly practised as it was last year. In view of the shooting competition, firing at the two hundred and three hundred ranges has been steadily carried on, front rank on Mondays, rear rank on Thursdays, recruits, short-hand and officers on Wednesdays. Mr. Bee officiates as marker, and Mr. Collins as


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THE WELLINGTONIAN

scorer. This term part of the marker’s pit has been boarded over, as in its old state it was considered unsafe. The shooting, so far, has not been quite up to the mark of last year’s. In connection with the corps, a Morris-tube Club has been formed. Shooting with the tube will commence next term, when there is no regular firing at the target. The following appointments have been gazetted:- Corporals Mackay i., Carmichael, Myers, and McGovern to be sergeants, vice Thomson, Robinson, Oldham and Powles, left.

Old boys’ column.

W In a corporate capacity the Old Boys of Wellington College have never made much noise in the world. Numerically they now run into four figures; in point of years, some of them are finding it an impossibility to part their hair, because it took unto itself wings long ago; as regards their occupations, you meet them in every walk of life. They are scattered far and wide. You can hardly throw a brick anywhere in New Zealand without hitting one of them, and you may be certain of one thing - that if your missile does reach its mark, the said mark will give good evidence of its athletic training, and exact a full and fitting reparation. But numerous and energetic as they are they have seldom united in any act as one body, or shown the world what they can do when pulling together. The reason is simple. There is enthusiasm enough in your average Old Boy when you get him out of his shell. The strength is in reserve, and there is need of one thing only - a leader to take command, to unite his scattered forces in one strong phalanx, and to carry it with him to victory in whatever field has to be fought. After some spasmodic efforts at united action five or six years back, the Old Boys seemed inclined to rest on the laurels they had not won. Under the auspices of the Old Boys’ Association, a few heroic spirits put their hands to the plough with the laudable intention of producing a school list. How they found the task too much for them, how they gave up the good work, how after many years Mr. Heine girded up his loins and achieved the impossible, how, in short, the appearance of the “Old Boys’ Record” makes the year 1890 an “annus mirabilis” in college history is well known to all good Collegians. The “Record ” has met with kindly critics in spite of all “its blushing imperfections thick upon it;” and an appreciative notice appears elsewhere within these covers. Perfect it is not, and does not pretend to be; but something has been attempted, something done, and Mr. Heine has at all events laid the foundations for future building. On the appearance of the “Record,” the warm heart of the Principal waxed yet warmer, and impelled him to summon some two hundred of the older Old Boys to the enthusiastic meeting of March 14th. What happened then is put shortly in the following extract from the New Zealand Times of March 16th:At the invitation of Mr. Mackay about a hundred and fifty of the Old Boys assembled at Wellington College on Saturday

May 2, 1891

evening for the purpose of a social reunion, and spent a most enjoyable evening in talking over their school days with their old masters and with one another. Mr. A. de B. Brandon took advantage of the occasion to propose that the Old Boys’ Association, which ceased active operations some years ago, should be resuscitated, and the motion, seconded by Mr. E. G. Pilcher, was carried by acclamation. To further this project, Mr. W. G. Tustin proposed, and Mr. M. F. Luckie seconded, the appointment of a committee to formulate rules for the Association, and to report to a further meeting within a month. The committee consists of Messrs. A. de B. Brandon, A. Gray, G.G. Knight, A. R. Meek, C. Richardson, E.G. Pilcher, J. A. Tripe, W. G. Tustin and T. Young. Another suggestion, fathered by Mr. Kenneth Wilson and Mr. W. D. Lyon, found much favour. This was that the Old Boys dine together annually on some day to be agreed on. The meeting passed a formal resolution to this effect, and Mackay suggested that the dinner might appropriately take place on June 18th, the anniversary of the Battle of Waterloo. The business over, supper was discussed, and songs and toasts filled up the rest of the evening. Instrumental music was contributed by Mr. J. H. Pope and his orchestra, songs by Messrs. W. D. Lyon, A. T. Easton, G. H. Wallace, E. Pope, H. M. Speed, A. Heine, F. Pope and Hoffman. The toast list comprised “The College,” “The Old Boys’ Association,” “The Old Masters,” and “Mr. Mackay,” the evening concluding with ringing cheers for Mr. and Mrs. Mackay. The evening was indeed an extremely pleasant one, and left in the minds of all a keen desire for similar gatherings in the future - in particular for the Old Boys’ Dinner. The dinner promises to be what the newspapers term “a boom.” The wish expressed by Mr. Lyon - that it may come off soon - was echoed by all his hearers, and we may be sure that our first annual dinner will be quite the event of the season. Mr. Wilson, by the way, delivered himself of an extremely cannibalistic sentiment in introducing the matter. “A dinner of Old Boys,” said he, “is a very wholesome thing,” as if roast Old Boy and red currant jelly, or boiled Old Boy with brain sauce were a favourite dish of his. We rather incline to the opinion that Old Boy in any shape or form would be tough, but of course we defer to Mr. Wilson’s experience. As to the doings of Old Boys in the scholastic and athletic worlds, there are one or two interesting items to chronicle. A. R. Meek has taken his Bachelor of Laws degree by way of concluding a successful University career. Meek seems to be what a young friend of ours calls “a perfect whale” for examinations, and reminds us of that hero of the old world, who “...was more than x examiners Could plough from morn till night.” R. F. Page has passed the first section of the B.A. degree, and will be heard of again in a year’s time. J. A. Tripe, C. P. Knight, R. M. Tolhurst, E. W. Smyth, G. W. Chatwin, and E. W. Beaglehole are all working for degrees in the University of New Zealand. L.E. Barnett returned to the colony in the spring with half the alphabet attached to his


May 2, 1891

THE WELLINGTONIAN

name, and with a trunkful of diplomas. He is now in practice in Dunedin. Glasgow has recently passed very high in his examination at Sandhurst. In cricket, rowing and tennis some of the Old Boys have been active and successful. The only champion we have produced this season is J. G. Duncan, who rowed stroke, with Biss as bow, in the Champion Double Sculls at Wanganui, and won easily. We have many good men coming to the fore in the Amateur Athletic Club, and our footballers are sure to be prominent this season.

“WELLINGTON COLLEGE OLD BOYS’ RECORD,” Some time ago, at a meeting of Old Boys, it was proposed to publish a record of Old Boys, with a list of those who had distinguished themselves in school-work or in athletics. Mr. M. C. Barnett was chosen to carry out this work; but he found such difficulties in the task that he soon abandoned it. A short time ago Mr. Heine took the matter in hand, and set diligently to work on it. Great difficulties had to be surmounted; there were few dates either of dates or performances. But old papers were hunted up and examined; lists were obtained from the Education Board and the University, and at last the work was completed. The result is the above excellent little publication, which reflects great credit on both Mr. Heine and the publishers, Messrs. Brown, Thomson & Co. The book contains, first, a short history of the College, written by Mr. J. A. Tripe; secondly, the list of Old Boys, with their residences and occupations; thirdly a list of masters past and present; fourthly, of those who have gained scholarships and exhibitions; fifthly, an Honours list; and lastly, a record of the achievements of Old Boys in rowing, football and cricket. The history of the College has been very carefully written, and gives evidence of very full and careful research. It contains plenty of matter which will be found new and interesting to both new and old boys. The article winds up with a stirring appeal to Old Boys to do all they can for the help of the old school where they wore trained for the “sterner school of life.” After the epitome of the history of the College comes the list of Old Boys, which is given as fully as it possibly could be. We have no doubt that Old Boys will read it with interest, and will find it a great convenience when they feel curious as to what an old chum may be doing. Of course there are one or two mistakes and omissions, but they are very insignificant, and, in a work of this sort, almost unavoidable. The honours list, which comes next, gives ample proof that our Old Boys are quite capable of holding their own in the higher branches of education. Among the more prominent names we may mention L. E. Barnett, E. H. Colbeck, E. Hadfield, H. B. Kirk, A. Martin, A. R. Meek and J. C. Webb. Then come the accounts of the doings of Old Boys in different branches of athletics. From the lists it appears that during the last fifteen years eight have represented the province in cricket, and thirty-eight in football - surely a proud record for any college. These lists conclude the work, which we

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believe is the first of its kind ever published in the colony. It has been issued in neat book form, at the modest price of halfa-crown. We should advise as many of our readers as possible to take a copy.

Annual sports.

W Last year’s sports were as successful as in previous years, but their enjoyment was marred by the weather, which was so bad that the jumping had to be postponed for some days. As to the events themselves, no records were broken, but the fields were large, the racing good, and the finishes close. Our best thanks are due to Mr. Collins, who undertook the arduous duties of handicapper and starter, and to Messrs. Wilson and Heine, the judges. The committee consisted of the masters and Thomson, Powles, Anderson. MacGovern, and Oldham; and they fulfilled their duties to the satisfaction of all. The sports began at 2.15pm with Throwing The Cricket Ball. Oldham, 87yds 3in 1 Bodmin, 85yds 2 Rather better than the year before. High Jump, Under 16 (Jun. Cham.). Lee and McGovern, 4ft. 6in. Morrah, i., 4ft, 5in All jumped well.

1 2

Long Jump, Open (Sen. Cham.). Thomson, 17ft. 9in 1 Nahr, 16ft. 4in 2 McDowall, 16ft. 2in. 3 100 Yards, Under 16 (Jun. Cham.). Bodmin 1 MacGovern 2 Ziman 3 Bodmin led all the way, and won by about two yards. 100 Yards, open (sen. Cham.), Thomson 1 MacDowall 2 Mackay, i. 3 Won rather easily. Long Jump, Under 16 (Jun. Cham.). Bodmin, 15ft. 2in. 1 MacGovern, 15ft. 2 Ziman, 14ft. 6in. 3 220 Yards Handicap, Open. MacDowall, 5yds 1 Ziman, 10yds 2 Kidd, 15yds 3 About twenty started. MacDowall won a good race. 220 Yards Handicap, Under 15. Richardson 1 Blair, ii. 2


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Robinson, ii 3 High Jump, Open (Sen. Cham.). Powles, 4ft. 8in 1 Nahr, 4ft. 6in. 2 Oldham, 4ft. 5in. 3 Two inches less than the year before. 100 Yards, Under 13. Robinson, ii. 1 West 2 Half Mile, Open (Sen. Cham, And Lady Prendergast’s Cup). Thomson 1 MacGovern 2 Hickson 3 Thomson led all the way, and MacGovern could not catch him at the finish.

Four-Legged Race. Oldham, MacDowall, Bodmin Duthie, i. and ii., Kirkcaldie, i.

1 2

Hop, Step, And Jump. Oldham, 35ft. 2in 1 MacDowall, 34ft. 8in. 2 Powles, 33ft. llin. 3 440 Yards Handicap, Open. Bodmin, 15yds 1 Stafford, 25yds 2 Kirkcaldie, i., 30yds 3 120 Yards Hurdles Handicap. Bodmin, 5yds 1 Powles, 8yds 2 A close race for first place. Sack Race. Duthie, ii. 1 Blair, i. 2 Mile Handicap. Hickson, 75yds 1 Wilson, ii., 200yds 2 Melville and Gibson, 130yds 3 Hickson ran well, and won a good race. Wilson’s running was greatly admired. Variety Race. MacDowall 1 Duthie, ii. 2

May 2, 1891

THE WELLINGTONIAN

120 Yards Hurdles (Old Boys). C. Gore, owed 20yds A. Gore, owed 15yds

1 2

100 Yards Handicap (Old Boys). Richardson, 4yds 1 Blundell, 10yds 2 Eliott, 6yds 3 440 Yards Handicap (Old Boys).

Blundell, 40yds 1 Richardson, 5yds 2 Hume, 5yds 3

A NIGHT ALARM.

(founded on fact.) On a pitch-dark winter’s night, some twenty years ago, five men were encamped in a valley of central Otago. The night was cold. The fire outside threw a lurid glare on the trees above and rendered the surrounding darkness more pitch-like by contrast. The flames also lit up the burly form of the sentry, sat, revolver in hand, listening intently, and moving only when he rose to put more wood on the dying fire. Well might he watch intently, for gold in large amount was in that tent waiting for the escort. They were known to have gold, and at that time thieves were as plentiful as honest men on the goldfields. Suddenly the watcher hears a noise of softly-moving footsteps. Now and then they stop, as if to reconnoitre. In a moment the sleepers are aroused, and stand together with arms in their hands. Nearer and nearer come the footsteps. Then they stop, and all is still. The suspense is too great to be borne, so one of the campers challenges the suspected thief: “Who goes there? Stand, or I fire!” Sharp and clear comes the reply in the form of a resonant bray. The thief was a stray donkey that had come there for grazing purposes. Glauk.

CORRESP ONDE NCE W

THE GYMNASIUM. [to the editor.] Sir, - Do you not think that it would be an improvement if the rings in the Gymnasium were covered with leather? As they are, they have been worn smooth, and blister the hands. There was a proposal made some time ago to fit up a trapeze, but nothing came of it. Certainly there is not much room for more apparatus, but I think that the rings could be made removable, so as to allow a trapeze to be adjusted to the ropes. I am, etc., Milo. [Matters such as these should be referred to the Gymnasium Committee, but we are afraid that there is not such a body. Steps should be taken to appoint one as soon as possible. With regard to the rings, we certainly agree with “ Milo,” but his idea about the trapeze does not seem very feasible. - Ed. W.]


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THE WELLINGTONIAN

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THE LIBRARY. [to the editor.] Sir, - Would it not be better if the entrance fee for the Library were abolished, as is done in some other Colleges? By this means, a much larger number of readers would be secured. I am, etc., Free Education. [More readers would certainly be secured, but the number of books in the Library would not much increase, unless it were made a practice that each boy should present a book or so each year. Besides, to attend to the increased number of borrowers, a special room would be needed for the Library. - Ed. W.]

verbs are verbs used over and over again.” “Arthur Wellesley was a great reformer who founded the Methodist religion and defeated the French at Waterloo.” “Thomas-á-Becket was a king of England when England was divided into states, and there was not one king over the whole of it. He died defending himself before the altar.”

ODDS AND E NDS.

Someone has remarked that the shorthand master is Warrented to teach the art in one term.

W

“I say, do you know your Ovid this morning?” “ Yes, I know a little of-it.” Translations and answers handed in for publication : “The very men,” “hominissimi.” “ He fortified the city,” “quadragintavit urbem” “Cum grano sails” “with a corn thou dancest.” “Hoc erat in votis” “this happened during prayers.” “Et rera carmine signo,” “and I sign the document with red ink.” “Frequentitive

We have authority for stating that one of our friends in the Fifth is busy writing the “Kaiwarra Tales” a work which is, in our friend’s opinion, to be far superior to the “Canterbury Tales” of Chaucer. We wish this promising youth every success, and hope to secure some of his brilliant productions for a future number.

Those who have started electricity this year say they had no idea what an “’Ohm-ly” science it is. We can assure them that they will find many things to “‘Amper(e)” them in it. Latest French joke from the Fifth : “Oh, si je puis entrer ce beau jardin.” “Et pourquoi pas? Ne voyez-vous pas que c’est tout vert (ouvert)? ”


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THE WELLINGTONIAN

May 2, 1891


THE

Vol. I, No. 2.

SATURDAY, AUGUST 29, 1891

price

: 3s per Ann

SCHOOL NOTES W We may very fairly congratulate ourselves and the school generally on the success that has attended the first appearance of the Wellingtonian. More than a hundred and sixty copies were sold, and although this was the first time of publication, and the printer’s bill was rather heavier than was expected, yet we have in hand a surplus of between two and three pounds, which will be still further increased when all arrears of subscription, etc., are paid in, as we hope they soon will be. As a consequence of this, we hope to be shortly able to increase the size of the paper by several more pages. Even more gratifying is the fact1 that this term the number of literary contributions from outside has greatly increased, thus showing the interest taken in the work. We hope that the Wellingtonian may continue to flourish, and may be a means of binding us all, old and young, closer together.

Germans very kind, good-natured, and intelligent. He has not changed at all, except that his hair is slightly thinner. He intends to reside in Wellington.

The boys that left at the end of last term are: - Hannay, Wilson i., Fannin, Ward, and Allen. The new boys this term are:- Curtis, Dadelszen, and Staples.

The Third Form room has been utilized as a morning preparation room for the borders, as it is warm and well open to the sun. The change has been found very acceptable.

The prefects of the term are: - Mackay i., Myers, Carmichael, and Morrah.

The night classes have been steadily kept on, and are attended by about twenty. They have slightly interfered with the practising time of some of our musical enthusiasts.

Mr Evans returned on the 3rd of July from his two years’ study at the University at Geissen, in Germany, and was warmly welcomed back by many Collegians, past and present. As he visited the College shortly after his return, and extorted a half-holiday from the Principal, his advent was hailed with general satisfaction. Since he left us, early in 1889, he has become a full-blown Doctor of Philosophy, and was publicly complimented by the examiners on the brilliancy of his examinations in Chemistry, Mineralogy, and Physics. His experience in Germany was very pleasant, and he found the

The Shorthand Class continues to exist, though not in its former flourishing state. It is a matter of wonder that more do not learn this most useful and easily acquired art. Probably the hours are unsuitable. Music classes are still carried on, and since the unfortunate illness of Mr. Hardwicke they have been conducted by Messrs. Macintosh and MacDuff Boyd. Workshop classes have been started again, and are fairly well attended. Mr. Robertson attends regularly on Thursdays, and some good work has already been done. The library is still well patronised. Several new books have been added, including some French ones by Mon. Naverne.

During the term Mr. Mackay had to leave us for a few days. All went smoothly, however, in his absence, except for one unfortunate occurrence, which involved the breaking of a large plate-glass window. About the middle for the term, the heavy rainfall which followed the succession of frosts, materially affected the state of the playground. The clay seemed very tenacious of the wet, and for weeks the playground seemed sloppy, and


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August 29, 1891

THE WELLINGTONIAN

sadly in need of draining. A game in the mud may be very amusing to the on-lookers, but the players do not find it so. Besides, a wet ground seriously affects the play of a light team like ours. During the holidays a sad bereavement befell us, no less than the death of a being familiar to at least three generations of Collegians. We refer to the pony, which unfortunately broke its neck round Evan’s Bay. She will be remembered and regretted by nearly all our readers. Her hoofs have been mounted as a memento. The Old Boys’ Dinner was a great success. More than a hundred and fifty were present, and the proceedings were marked with the greatest enthusiasm. We hope that others, no less successful, will follow. Dunn and Thomson are now at the University Colleges at Christchurch and Dunedin respectively. Dunn lately paid us a short visit during the July recess. We have not yet heard for what branch of learning Mr. J. Myers’ generous donation is to be given. It is devoutly to be wished that more gentlemen would follow his good example, as the prize list is rather low. Extra time has been devoted this year to Latin and French. The results will probably be evident in the next University Exams. About the middle of the term Roberts was taken ill with tonsillitis. He was sent home, and has not yet returned. We have an important change to notice as regards the Library. Henceforth, it will be free to all the school, and no subscription will be necessary. It now contains about two hundred books, which is a good number; but the surplus funds of the Wellingtonian will be devoted towards extending it, and it is expected that a good number of books will be presented by the boys. The prefects will constitute a Committee of Management, and the library itself will probably be shifted into the prefects’ room. We hope that all the school will avail themselves of it. Victory at last! On Wednesday, the fifth of August, the College completely wiped out the stain of their previous four years’ defeats. St. Patrick’s fought bravely, but they were outmatched in every department of the game; and at no-time the score stood, Wellington, 8 points; St. Patrick’s, nil. And yet some say the College is going down! It was rather a pity that the High School did not think fit to avail themselves of the holiday we obtained for them. We think that our fellows would have played up even better under the eyes of their “sisters, their cousins, and their aunts.” During the term arrangements were made for a Chess

Tournament between Wanganui College and some of our enthusiasts. The plan was not found feasible, however, and the idea had to be dropped. We regret to have to state that two of our masters are leaving us. Mr. Wilson retires at the end of this term, and Mr. Mackay at the end of the year. We understand that a presentation will be made to Mr. Wilson before he leaves. EDITORIAL NOTICES. __________ The Wellingtonian is published three times a year, in the last week of each term ; the subscription being one shilling a number, and three shillings a year, or three and three-pence post paid. The subscription is payable in advance. Subscribers who have not yet paid are requested to do so as soon as possible. The Editor invites contributions of all kinds, letters, etc. All articles should be addressed to the Editor, and put in the Editor’s Box. They should be signed with the writer’s name, though not necessarily for publication. To Correspondents. - C.E.Z. Your story from Roman history is not exactly what we require. Try again. - We would like to impress upon Correspondents sending us mistranslations, etc., that we want them not stupid, but funny. We have to acknowledge with thanks the receipt of the following exchanges : - “Wanganui Collegian,” “High School Reporter.”

LUMEN ACCIPE ET IMPERTI. SATURDAY, AUGUST 29, 1891. VALE! _____ A Re-arrangement of the staff is, perhaps, the most undesirable and disastrous event that can befall a College. The system has become defined, the students and masters have become identified with each others’ peculiarities, when suddenly a change takes place, and the work must be commenced anew. The masters have now to learn the peculiarities of the pupils, the students to study the idiosyncrasies of their masters. In this way much valuable time is wasted, and experience alone can adequately measure its drawbacks. Want of funds seems to be the parent of the “remodelling system,” and general, if only temporary, disorder, the offspring. In this respect Wellington College has been especially unfortunate, but we trust that the future will see a material and lasting improvement in its


August 29, 1891

THE WELLINGTONIAN

income, which will free the Principal from embarrassments, and also from all misgivings that he may be obliged, through motives of economy, to dispense with the services of any of his staff. As must be generally known by this time, the College staff is again about to be subjected to sweeping alterations. Mr. Wilson has received notice that after this term his services will not be required; while Mr. Mackay has found it necessary to hand in his resignation, and will leave at the end of the year. Want of funds is alleged as the reason for these alterations. It is an open fact that the financial condition of the College has long been unsatisfactory, a state of affairs which is rendered more acute by the fact that of late years the College has lost its former popularity, and its attendance has considerably fallen Off. We do not profess to be able to account for this, but we can safely affirm that it is through no fault of the masters. Be this as it may, we do not intend to dwell longer on it. All must regret such a state of affairs, and trust that it will soon be remedied. We sincerely hope that a change may do the College good. But, at the same time, we are sure that everyone must have heard with deep sorrow the tidings of two of our masters leaving us, and must heartily sympathize with and wish well to those two gentlemen who have held the reins of our College so long and so ably. The services of Mr. Wilson were secured for the College in 1874, through the agency of Dr. Vaughan, and early in the same year he assumed his office as head master. Shortly after his arrival, part of the new building was erected, owing to the increasing number of pupils. Through the agency of Mr. Wilson, Wellington was made a centre for the Canterbury Local Examinations, until the New Zealand University Examinations made this no longer necessary; and, as a proof of the advancement of the College, we may mention that out of twenty-four who passed in one year in the British Colonies, no fewer than six came from Wellington College. In 1878, the Governors, owing to financial embarrassments, were obliged to remodel the staff. Several masters were changed, but Mr. Wilson still retained his position as head master. This he continued to do till 1881, when existing arrangements were again found unsatisfactory, and, after careful and mature deliberation, a scheme of reorganisation was again entered into by the Governors. As a consequence of this, Mr. Wilson and his staff were dismissed, and fresh masters appointed in their stead. The choice of Principal fell on Mr. Mackay, then second master of Nelson College. In the selection of Mr. Mackay, the Governors were indeed fortunate, and after events fully realised their anticipations of his marked capabilities. During his time of office he has witnessed several changes and some unhappy events, but he has always proved equal to the occasion. Under his guidance the College attained to a degree of prosperity never before experienced ; and although at the present time its progress has sustained a check, his services are still as valuable as ever, and his energies in no way lessened. In 1886 Mr. Wilson again joined us as classical master, and has continued with us up till now. Nearly everyone in the

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school must bear testimony to the efficient way in which he has taught his subject, and to his uniformly kind and gentlemanly demeanour. Both he and Mr. Mackay have been shining lamps to us during their stay here, and have done much to inculcate in us that Christian and gentlemanly spirit which it is the chief aim of all education to impart. These then are the gentlemen of whose services the College is about to be deprived. Tempora mutantur, et nos mutamur in illis; “the old order changeth, giving place to new.” We have no desire to criticise the action of the Governors, but of this we are sure, that more conscientious, more upright, and more efficient masters than Messrs. Wilson and Mackay it would be impossible to find. They have been here so long, and have so identified themselves with the advancement and prosperity of our College, that their departure will leave a great blank in our midst. It will indeed be hard to fill their places.

FOOTBAL L.

W So far, we are pleased to be able to say, the football season has been a most successful one. The players, both senior and junior, have practised assiduously throughout the season, and herein lies the secret of their success. Seniors. - The First Fifteen, who have been competing in the Third Class Championship, have played altogether eight cup matches, winning six and losing two. We managed to obtain second place in these contests, coming second to the Melrose Third. As this team is quite as good as many of the teams competing for the Junior Cup, our performance cannot but be considered extremely satisfactory. Besides these matches, the First have, up to the present, played two outside matches, one against the Selwyn Second and one against the St Patrick’s College, the former being lost and the latter won. We have not perhaps as many really good individual players this year as last, but this year’s team play with combination, a quality which is surely better than individual brilliancy. To Mr Bee for his excellent coaching, and to McGovern for his generalship in the field, the success of the First Fifteen must be in a great measure attributed. The following are the matches, in their order, played by the First Fifteen: COLLEGE v. SELWYN SECOND. In this the first match of the season we were rather badly beaten by 10 points to 7. Sealy, Ames, and Buck scored tries for the winners, Buck converting two. The last-named player also potted a goal. For the College, Duncan, McGovern and Mr Bee touched down, Mr Bee and McGovern converted two of the tries. Buck, for the Selwyns, as a three-quarter, played a rattling game. Of the others Sealy (back), F. Barber and Reay (forwards), played well. Of the College Mr Bee, Duncan and McGovern (backs), Myers and Innes (forwards), were the best. The ground was in splendid condition, being neither too hard nor too sloppy. The umpiring was, however, very much against us and evoked unfavourable criticism from the spectators.


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COLLEGE v. PIRATE SECOND. This match, which was played on the 3rd of May, was the first of our championship matches, and ended in a victory for us by 8 points to 3. McGovern potted a beautiful goal from half-way, and also kicked a goal from a mark. Duncan and Duthie each touched down, but neither try was converted. During the game the latter made several fine runs. Mackay and Duthie (backs), and Jackson (forward), were the pick of the winners. COLLEGE v. PIONEER SECOND. On the 20th of June we played the Pioneer Second and won by 8 points to 1. The game was played directly after our holidays, so that we were at a considerable disadvantage. In fact all the team seemed to have made up their minds they going to loose, but nevertheless played well and by dint of hard work won the match as stated above. Mr Bee touched down for the winners and also potted a goal. Mackay (2) and Duthie secured tries, and one was converted by Duncan. Waters scored a try for the Pioneers. COLLEGE v. MELROSE THIRD. It is true that we were beaten in this match by 10 points to nil. But such a defeat under the circumstances cannot be considered a dishonourable one. It was not altogether by superior play that the Melrose beat us, but rather by their roughness, or as the numerous spectators were pleased to term it, their brutality. Such being the case we feel that no further comment is necessary. COLLEGE v. ATHLETIC THIRD. This game was won by the former team by default, owing to the Athletics not turning up. COLLEGE v. PETONE THIRD. On July 11th we played the Petone Third, which was regarded as one of the best teams competing for the Third Class Championship, and came off victorious by 6 points to 2. It is, however only fair to state that both teams were slightly weakened. The College team played without Jackson and Bright, their places being taken by Ziman and Horne respectively. For the winners, McGovern and Myers scored tries, both of which were converted by Mr Bee, while for the Petones, Ryan and King each secured tries. Owing to the state of the ground no very brilliant play was exhibited on either side. COLLEGE v. SELWYN SECOND, AND COLLEGE v. WELLINGTON THIRD. Both these matches, owning to the non-appearance of our opponents, were won by us by default, the former on July 18th, the latter on July 25th. COLLEGE v. ORIENTAL SECOND. Once more, on August 1st, we were pitted against a very rough team. Not once have the Collegians played so badly as they did in this match against the Orientals. The only boys who played

August 29, 1891

anything like up to form were W. and G. Stevens. The less said about the play of the others the better. The Orientals won by 4 points to 1. For the former team Driscoll potted a goal and McAnally obtained a try, while the only score obtained for the College was a try obtained by Myers. JUNIOR FOOTBALL. The Juniors during the term have played six matches, winning five and losing one. The following is the report of the matches played by the juniors, as given to us by one of their team. COLLEGE JUNIORS v. RUBY FIRST. This match, which was played on the railway ground on June 6th, was won by the Rubys by 13 points to nil. The winners obtained 11 tries, only one of which was converted. It is only fair to say the boys had just returned to school after the holidays, and that the College team had not had, therefore, any practice. Page and Horne (backs), and Ziman, Whitcombe and Benzoni (forwards), played best for the juniors. JUNIORS v. TE ARO SCHOOL. The College team was victorious in this game by 6 points to 4. For the winners Richardson scored a try, which he converted, and Morrah potted a goal. For the losers, Mackenzie kicked a goal from a mark, and Ferguson secured a try. Morrah, Page and Stack (backs), and Whitcombe, McLeod and Richardson (forwards), played best for the juniors. JUNIORS v. COLLEGIATE SCHOOL. This match, about which great excitement had for some time beforehand prevailed, was won by 5 points to 4. For the winners Gray kicked a goal off a penalty kick, and also converted a try made by Morrah. For the losers Morpeth secured a try, which he converted, and Denton also obtained a try. Those who played best for the juniors were Gray, Morrah, Horne, and Page (backs), and Halley, Whitcombe, McLeod, and Blair i.(forwards). JUNIORS v. CLYDE QUAY SCHOOL. Once more our small boys were victorious, this time by 8 points to nil. For the juniors Halley (2), McLeod (2), Morrah and Horne scored tries, one of which was converted by Gray. The ground was very sloppy, and the game a mere rough and tumble affair. JUNIORS v. MT. COOK SCHOOL. This match, was won by 4 points to nil. Gray and Morrah secured tries, the latter’s being converted by the former. All the backs played well, especially Gray, Morrah and Page. The forwards played well except on the line-out, where the Mt. Cook gained a great advantage. The best were Whitcombe, McLeod, Bonzoni and Blair i. JUNIORS v. WILLIS ST. SCHOOL This was won by 9 points to 2. For the juniors, Thompson, (substitute,) (2), Halley and McLeod secured tries one of


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which was converted by Gray; Staples also potted a goal. For the juniors, Gray, Staples, Morrah and Horne (backs), Halley, McLeod, Curtis, and Mackay ii. (forwards), played best. ________________________________

INTER-COLLEGIATE FOOTBALL. WELLINGTON COLLEGE v. ST. PATRICK’S COLLEGE. It was arranged that we should play the St. Patrick’s College team on Wednesday, 29th April but on account of the rain the match was postponed for a week. When the week expires both teams found it would be inconvenient to play, so by mutual consent the match was indefinitely postponed and was not played until the 5th of August. With regard to our team we can only say one and all of them played splendidly. Everybody did the work assigned to him, and not a single mistake was made. As, however, we had nobody on the ground to report the match, we clip the ‘following from the New Zealand Times of August 6th: - “The annual Inter-College match played at Newtown Park yesterday resulted in an easy win for the Wellington College boys by 8 points to nil. Collins, McGovern and Bee secured tries for the winners, the latter player converted his try, and also potted a goal. Collins, Bee, McGovern and Duncan (backs), Jackson, Gilmer, Mackay and Myers (forwards) played splendidly for the older College. The most prominent of the St. Patrick’s College team were Jones, Fay, Hanning and Cullen (backs), and Smith, Prendegast, Ryan and Henley (forwards). The match, which was a very fast one, was played throughout in a most friendly spirit. This is the first win scored by Wellington College for the last five years, and with steady practice the local Collegians should give a good account of themselves in the coming College tournament, which takes place at the end of the present month. Messrs Mackay and Hodgins acted as touch-line umpires and Mr S. Cockroft as referee.” __________ As the inter-College football tournament is now so near at hand, the following criticism of the seventeen from whom our team will be picked will not be out of place:BACKS: Bright (8st. 21bs.). - Full-back. Very cool player; collars well. Duncan (10st. 10lbs.). - Centre three-quarter; also plays halfback. Passes capitally; has both running and dodging powers. Duthie (8st. 51bs.). - Half-back. Good punt and tackier; picks up very cleanly; strong in defence. Gray (7st. 121bs.). - Three-quarter or half-back. Picks up very well; rather slow; good drop kick. Halley (8st. 61bs.) - Half-back ; also good forward. Kicks and tackles well. Kirkcaldie (9st. 51bs.). - Wing three-quarter. Runs and backs up well; fair catch. McGovern (11st. 61bs.). - Wing three-quarter. Heavy and fast. Has an excellent style of tackling, going for his man straight and low; good drop kick. Captain of team.

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FORWARDS: Bronte (10st. 121bs.) - Good hardworking forward. Of great use in scrum; dribbles well. Carmichael (9st. 81bs.). - Follows up very well; tackles fairly. Dyer (11st. 61bs.). - Heavy forward ; also plays half. Good on line-out; should pass more. Gilmer (10st. 61bs.). - Fine all-round forward. Does good work both in scrum and in open; first-class tackier. Jackson (12st. 41bs.). - Tall heavy forward. Takes ball splendidly on line-out; long place-kick. Mackay i (10st. 61bs.). - Fast forward. Has improved much lately; good in open. Myers (10st. 91bs.). - One of the fastest in the team; backs up and passes well; always on the ball. Stafford (11st.). - Works hard in scrum; might improve in taking ball on line. Stevens (10st.). - Good in scrum; fairly fast in open. Ziman (9st. 41bs.). - Fast forward. Shines up in loose play; collars well. Of the above players, McGovern, Myers, Stafford, and Stevens are all that remain of last year’s first fifteen. We hear, however, that Myers will not, owing to an affection of the throat, be able to play in this year’s tournament. The average weight of the team is 10st. 1lb.

The gymnasium. W

We are sorry to have to say that the gymnasium has not been so well patronised this term as it might have been. Mr. Beaglehole has come regularly twice a week, but his example has been followed by only one or two enthusiasts, who naturally are discouraged that more do not follow their lead. Some of the juniors, however, have set a good example to the seniors in this direction, and have put in some useful work at odd times. We would like to remind the school generally that the gymnasium is quite as good training, both for football and other branches of athletics, as running about after the ball at punt-about time. We are afraid that it is rather too late to think about organising special classes, but we hope to see some effort made in this direction next term. The school generally is wilfully neglecting a most important means of physical culture.

Athletics. W

The inter-College races for Mr. Kohn’s cup will come off on Saturday, October 3rd, on which date the Wellington Football Club’s sports will be held. The Hurdle Race will probably be cut out, no doubt owing to last year’s fiasco. We have not yet heard whether another event is to take its place. As our representatives are to be picked shortly after our return from the holidays, the following are requested to get as far


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as possible into training during the holidays: - Mackay i., McGovern, Stafford, Myers, Carmichael, Ziman, Dyer, Duncan, Morrah, Kirkcaldie i., Gilmer i., Bronte, Duthie, Halley, and Stevens. We hope that the College may be more successful this year than last.

Old boys’ column. W

There are many of our Old Boys who owe a heavy debt of gratitude to Mr. J. P. E. Francis, and who will hear of his untimely death with the deepest sorrow. Mr. Francis was with us at the College from 1878 to 1881, and on leaving went to Wanganui. Then he accepted a responsible position in the Auckland Grammar School, retaining it until his death, news of which came to us last April. In the “Old Boys’ Record” it is stated that he held the position of Assistant Mathematical Master, but so far as our memory serves Latin and English were the subjects taught by him. And exceedingly well he taught them! Able, conscientious, and painstaking in school, a first rate all-round cricketer and athlete in the playground, as well as a swimming enthusiast, Mr. Francis was just the man to acquire a strong influence over boys, and to use it for their lasting good. May the earth lie lightly on him! Another master of a later day, who is remembered by hundreds of Old Boys with affection and respect, is Mr. W. G. Thistle. His old friends will be glad to hear that he is now in practice as a physician in Brighton, England. His address is 57, Norton Road, Brighton. Mention was made in the last number of the Wellingtonian of those who distinguished themselves in University Examinations last year. And herein an injustice was done to E. W. Beaglehole, by the omission of his name from the list. We hasten to make amends. Beaglehole passed for the first section of the B.A. Examination, and is now reading for the final. We hope to be among the first to congratulate him next year. To the list of those now reading for degrees should be added the names of J. de B. Galwey and A. Dunn, who are both attending lectures at Canterbury College. Though the “Cricket Annual” has not yet made its appearance, we are able to give some information about Old Boys’ performances last season. C. Benbow won a bowling trophy in the Phoenix C.C.’s Senior Eleven, but was not a great success with the bat. Several Old Boys played in senior matches for the Wellington Club, to which a majority of Old Boys gravitate on leaving school. C. Gore wins a batting trophy, having scored 251 runs in 13 completed innings, figures which give him an average of a little under 20. R. J. Pope and R. Gose also have double figure averages, but Sanderson has hardly fulfilled his early promise. In bowling M. F. Luckie, E. Y. Sanderson, and R. J. Pope head the list with averages of 8•3, 9•4, and 9•9

August 29, 1891

respectively. Luckie was tried in but a few matches, yet he showed his worth in undeniable style. Sanderson got wickets when none else could, and Pope bowled with steadiness and pluck in the longest and most trying of innings. He is a rapidlyimproving cricketer, and his club will feel the want of him next season. He is now teaching in Featherston. Among the Wellington Club juniors B. M. Wilson did well with the bat, M. F. Luckie, K.W. Bethune, and C. Y. Kreeft with the ball. Luckie’s figures are particularly good - 476 balls, 12 maidens, 175 runs, 30 wickets; average, 5•8. The most noteworthy scores made by Old Boys during the season stand to the credit of Sanderson and C. Gore, the former having run up 99, not out, and 22 in a junior match, and the latter 89, not out, and 43 in a match played for the Senior Cup. In Europe the advent of Mayday is now looked for with much interest by all sections of society, with some perturbation indeed by not a few to whom the socialist is as the Prince of Darkness. So in our little Old Boy world Mayday was this year an occasion of note, but we met to build, not to destroy; and, working with a will, we had the Old Boys’ Association revived and flourishing almost before we knew where we were. The meeting in the Exchange Buildings was a large and enthusiastic one. The rules suggested by the Provisional Committee were carried with a slight alteration here and there; Committee and Secretaries were elected; brief mention was made of coming events, and the evening’s business was over with a promptitude that the House might well envy. With a good deal of sagacity the committee had called the meeting for the first of the month, a day when half-crowns are plentiful, and the Secretaries had a busy time, as will be understood when we state that sixty members of the Association were enrolled that evening. Since then the members have largely increased, over a hundred having given in their names. To let the boys now at school know what their elder brethren are doing, and what they too are to do on leaving school, we print the Rules of the Association, and call special attention to Rules 1, 2, and 14. THE WELLINGTON COLLEGE OLD BOYS’ ASSOCIATION. ––––– The Wellington College Old Boys’ Association is instituted for the association of those who have been members of the Wellington College, and for promoting and continuing a mutual interest and fellowship between them; for the purpose of holding meetings for the discussion of subjects of interest to the Association; for publishing list and records of all past members of the College, and their achievements in life; for promoting sports among its members and the boys attending the College; and generally for fostering and keeping up an active interest in the welfare of Wellington College, its past and present scholars. RULES AND REGULATIONS 1. All Old Boys and the past and present Masters of Wellington College shall be qualified to become members of the Association.


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2. Any person qualified under Rule 1 shall be entitled to become a member of the Association upon payment of the first year’s subscription, and upon signing the roll of members. 3. The entire affairs of the Association and its funds shall be managed by the Committee who shall call meetings, arrange the business thereat, conduct such publications as the Association shall undertake, arrange for such sports as it is desirable the Association shall take part in, and generally conduct affairs of the Association so as best to promote the objects for which it is formed. 4. The Committee shall consist of ten members and two officers, who shall jointly perform the duties of Secretary and Treasurer. The Committee shall be elected by ballot at the Annual General Meeting and shall hold office until their successors are elected. At their first meeting they shall elect one of their number to be their Chairman. Five members of the Committee shall form a quorum. 5. The Committee shall have power to fill up any vacancies which may occur. Such appointments shall hold good only till a General Meeting when all such vacancies shall be filled. 6. Any member may be expelled from the Association at any General Meeting, on the vote of a majority of not less than three-fourths of the members present, and shall not be again admitted as a member unless the Committee approve. 7. The Annual General Meeting shall be held in the month of May in each year. The Association shall also meet on such occasions as shall seem desirable to the Committee. At all General Meetings fifteen members shall form a quorum. 8. The Annual Dinner of the Association shall be held in the month of June. 9. A Special Meeting of the Association shall be called by the Committee on receiving a written requisition from any ten members. 10. The Secretaries shall give notice of all meetings to members by circular at least one week prior to the date of meeting. 11. Any member desiring to obtain a change in the rules of the Association shall give written notice of the same to the Secretaries, and the matter shall be discussed at the next meeting which shall be held after the date of the notice. 12. The annual subscription shall be two shillings and sixpence, payable on the first day of May in each year. The subscription for a life-member shall be one guinea. Any member whose subscription is in arrear shall lose the rights of membership until his subscription be paid. 13. The accounts of the Association shall be checked and confirmed by an auditor appointed at the Annual Meeting. 14. It shall be the duty of the Secretaries to add to the “Old Boys’ Record” the names of such boys as shall leave the College from time to time, and to make such alterations in the list as may be necessary; and it shall be obligatory upon all members to inform the Secretaries of their fresh achievements in life, and of any change in their addresses and occupation.

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OFFICERS FOR 1891-92. Committee—A, de B. Brandon (Chairman), M. C. Barnett, W. H. Field, A. Heine, W. D. Lyon, W. H. Morrah, E. G. Pilcher, C. Richardson, P. P. Webb, T. Young. Joint Secretaries and Treasurers - A. R. Meek, c/o E. P. Bunny, Featherston Street; J. A. Tripe, Government Buildings. It will be seen that Mr. Alfred Brandon has been chosen Chairman of the Committee, an honor justly his due in consideration of his seniority among Old Boys and the keen interest he has always taken in the affairs of the Association. He has also been elected a life member without payment of any further subscription. This is but a bare piece of justice, for Mr. Brandon paid three guineas to become a life member of the Association some years ago, and the money has passed into the Coffers of the Association as at present constituted. The secretaries are always glad to give an opportunity of signing the roll to would-be members, and especially to see Old Boys from the country. We have their authority for saying that their work has been a source of the greatest pleasure to them by reason of the shower of visits and of letters they have received from fellows who had almost passed beyond their ken. The Association bids fair to flourish, and to be successful in its chief aim—the promotion of a healthy sentiment and esprit de corps amongst Old Wellingtonians. The dinner on June 20th was successful in the extreme, in spite of a little confusion at the outset, due to the fact that, not only Mr. Gilmer, but the Committee themselves were surprised at the large attendance. The New Zealand Times gets a good many facts about the dinner into a short space, and we cannot do better than quote the report that appeared in its columns on the 22nd of June. The reporter begins, it will be noticed, in an appropriately classical style:The first annual dinner held under the auspices of the Wellington College Old Boy’s Association on Saturday evening was a thorough success “ab ovo usque ad mala.” The accommodation of the Royal Oak Hotel was taxed to the utmost, upwards of 120 guests sitting down to dinner. Mr. A.de B. Brandon presided, supported on his right by Mr. Mackay, Principal of the College, and on his left by the Rev H. Tuckey, one of the first College Masters. Mr. Gilmer’s came in for innumerable compliments on the excellence of the menu. The toast list was short but appropriate. After the Queen and the Governor had been duly honoured, Mr. W. G. Tustin proposed “Success to the College” in a glowing speech. The toast was received with enthusiasm, and was feelingly responded to by Mr. Mackay. Next on the list came “The Old Boys Association,” proposed by the Chairman. Dr Martin, Mr. W. F. Kitchen, and Mr. J. A. Tripe also spoke to the toast. Mr. Tuckey and Mr. E. G. Pilcher proposed “Absent Masters and Old Boys,” and Mr. E. P. Bunny “The Ladies,” for whom Mr. F. Hartmann responded. Dr. Martin and Mr. Noel Barraud amused the company with recitations, and Mr. W. D. Lyon (who was never heard to better


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advantage), Mr. F. Pope, Mr. G. H. Wallace, and Mr. W. E. Reid contributed songs. Instrumental selections were given by a small orchestra, composed of Messrs R. J., F., and R. Pope and W. Denton. Mr. A. King was at the piano. The grand object of the gathering - to bring Old Boys together and promote good fellowship among them - was undoubtedly attained, men coming together from as far south as Dunedin and as far north as Wanganui. All present on Saturday night will look forward to many a pleasant meeting of the same kind in the future. The Association has secured verbatim report of the speeches made at the dinner, and this, with a list of those present, will be inserted in the minutes. And one word more on the subject of the dinner. The secretaries of the Association have asked us to express in this column their sense of the debt of gratitude due to Mr. T. Young, who took a leading part in making arrangements for the evening, and is largely responsible for the success attained.

CORRESP ONDE NCE W

A SUGGESTION. To the Editor. Dear Sir, - We have four flagstaffs on the tower, and a good supply of bunting, including a flag of the College colours, but we hardly ever see any of our flags flying. Surely it would not be much trouble to hoist at least our colours on Saturdays when we are playing matches, and on breaking-up and coming-back days. We have not a regular football banner, but I am sure that the colours flying above them would encourage our fellows. Hoping that my suggestion will meet with approval, I am, etc., Macbeth, Act. V, Sc. 5, v. 1. ______ THE LIBRARY. To the Editor Sir, - I for one am willing to pay my subscription, but I have not been asked. Do not you think a committee of three should be appointed to look after it ? I am, etc., Would-Be Subscriber [If you had applied to the librarian on Mondays or Thursdays, he would have willingly received your shilling. The prefects, we believe, constitute a committee to look after the library.—Ed Wellingtonian]. _____ THE SPORTS. To the Editor. Sir,—I hope that the sports will be held a little later this year than they were last. We will then have better weather and better time for training. I also hope that this year the 220yds. will be run in heats. Last year the scratch men were placed at a great disadvantage, and, besides this, there were several narrow escapes from spiking. I am, etc., Sprint.

August 29, 1891

[To Correspondents. - No letters can be received unless the writer’s name is appended. - Ed Well.]

Obituary

W A.T. EASTON. It is with deep regret that we have, in the second number of the Wellingtonian, to chronicle the death of one well known to the College five or six years ago, and even to some who are here yet. We refer to Mr. A. T. Easton, son of Mr. T. Easton, of College Street, who died in the hospital on July 31st. He was only twenty-two years of age when he died, and had already given great promise for the future. He had for the last two months been suffering from a brain affection, and with a view to having an operation performed he was removed to the hospital about a month before his death. As a last hope of saving his life, Dr. Fell administered injections of Koch’s Tuberculine, but with no good results; in fact, since the operation the deceased rapidly sank, succumbing as before stated on July 31st. He attended the College in 1883 and 1884, and held a primary scholarship here. He entered the Government service on March 19th, 1885, on which date he received an appointment in the Stamp Department, but for some time previous to his death he was in the Audit Department. Easton, who was well known in musical circles here, was formerly librarian of the Harmonic Society, and up till recently acted as secretary to the St. Paul’s Church choir. His funeral took place on Monday 3rd August, and was largely attended.

ONE TOO MANY FOR HIM Tim Brexton, a clever young man of twenty-four, used to boast to his friends that nobody could swindle him in any way. Well, he did not get imposed upon for some time, but at last he was so greatly imposed upon, that ever afterwards he used to say that he was a born idiot. It happened thus:Tim was taking a pleasure trip in Mexico. One night he went to a gaming house, and there met an Englishman, who professed to be very glad to meet Brexton, because, he said, he so rarely saw one of his countrymen in Mexico. This Englishman introduced Tim to some Mexicans, and then proposed a game of cards, Tim and the Mexicans readily assented. Now, Tim had a lot of money about him, that he had brought to pay his expenses with. They began to play and Tim had every bit of the luck at first. When they had played for about an hour, Tim had won a lot of money, and, moreover, had become immensely excited. After this he began to loose rapidly. When he had lost about a third of what he had won, Tim had his attention called by his friend the Englishman to a trick in dealing by which one of the Mexicans used to bring the good cards to himself. Tim immediately accused the Mexican of this, and when the latter denied this, struck him a blow on the face.


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The Mexican appeared very much enraged, and challenged Tim to a duel. “What shall the weapons be?” asked one of the others. “Swords!” suggested the challenger. “No! No!” said the Englishman; “my friend cannot use a sword, it must be pistols. He then took Tim up on to a hill just outside the town, whither his adversary, with his friend, soon followed. The challenger’s friend came forward and arranged with the Englishman about distances, and who should fire first. “Take off your coat,” said Tim’s second to him. As all his money, besides, his winnings, was in his coat, Tim objected but on his friend insisting, he took it off, intending to transfer it to his waist-coat. But before he could do this, a voice was heard shouting, “Ready!” The Englishman then thrust a pistol into Tim’s hand, and telling him not to fire too high, walked away a few steps, and answered, “Yes!” Then a shot whistled over Tim’s head. He levelled his pistol and shot in return. Hearing a heavy body fall he thought he had killed his adversary, and ran forward. He did not see the Mexican’s seconds, but thought they might not have heard their man fall. Going up to the prostrate form he found to his great surprise that it was a dummy. He ran back to tell the Englishman, but that worthy had disappeared, taking Tim’s coat with him. Tim then saw he had been cleverly swindled, and went back to his hotel. In the morning he abandoned his pleasure trip, as he found he had just enough money left to pay his bill and his passage to the town where his uncle resided. Having made his way there he was supplied with money by his uncle, and went home direct to England. When he arrived he vowed he would play cards no more, as he had been so easily imposed upon. “Hicombolui.”

TEN DAYS’ WHARF-LUMPING. (by an amateur blackleg.) _____

The incidents of the great strike of last year are so familiar to everybody that it would be neither necessary nor interesting to give any account of it here. I merely propose, in this paper, to give the experiences of a party of our fellows as free labourers during the September holidays. The strike broke out towards the end of August, and at the beginning of the September holidays was, if I may so express it, in full swing. One Monday morning, at the beginning of the holidays, I and two others were lounging about the wharf discussing the prospect. We were talking over the action of a prominent Wanganui College footballer, who was reported to have, at the beginning of the strike, taken out a temporary carter’s license, and started driving an express, when the thought struck one of us that we should put in part of our holiday time as wharf-lumpers. No soon said than done. We repaired to the Union Company’s office, and returned armed with passes to “admit bearer on Company’s business.” With these we pushed through the crowd and readily gained admission past the barriers. We had been told to apply to Captain Strang for instructions, and, on making enquiries, we were directed to a little bearded

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man in the Company’s uniform. When we told him of our purpose, he looked rather surprised, but took down our names, and we found ourselves bound to unload and store goods from the Company’s vessels at the pay of one and threepence per hour. He then led us over to the “Southern Cross,” which had come in that morning and was waiting to unload. A small knot of free labourers was already there, waiting for the hatches to be opened. I soon found out that they comprised a merchant, two or three clerks, several tradespeople and sailors, while the remainder consisted of general loafers. In short, I think we were rather a motley crew, but at all events we “got there all the same.” The fore-hatches were soon off, and, armed with a couple of slings and a hook apiece, we set to work on the cargo. One of our company took command of the winch, and worked it very effectively. The first part of the cargo consisted of boxes of travellers’ samples. These were very easily dealt with, as they had convenient handles to take hold of. They were soon arranged on the slings and hoisted ashore, and then the real business of unloading began. The cargo in the forehold consisted chiefly of bales of wool, flanked with bags of potatoes. Of all the disagreeable things to unload commend me to sacks of potatoes. The potatoes are very heavy, and so hard and rough that they soon blister the hands, and when the sacks hit you on the shins you soon become aware of it. Their awkwardness is increased by the fact that you cannot use hooks with them, for, if you do, the badly-made sacks tear and let the potatoes tumble out, which is awkward when they are swinging above your head. The bales of wool were much better to handle, as they had not to be lifted, but simply rolled over and over. The way we slung potatoes was to pile five or six sacks together, while with bales of wool we put two alongside of each other. They were then coupled to the chain and hoisted out by the crane. While they were being lifted out we had to be careful, as the load swung from side to side, and there was not much room to get out of the way. The swinging loads, too, seemed to have a special genius for following us into corners. After the wool and potatoes came boxes of oranges and lemons, though why the fruit was put at the bottom is more than I can tell. The boxes were easy work, as they were small and light. The wood was very frail, however, and several boxes got broken, of course altogether by accident! I am rather afraid that some of the fruit which fell out found its way into our pockets. Thus we worked all the morning, until at one o’clock we were summoned to dinner. This was provided by the Company on board the “Waihi.” The cook had not counted on this addition to his mess, but had made gallant efforts and provided liberally for our wants. After some difficulty we were all furnished with knives, forks, plates, etc., and sat round upon the deck to discuss our meal. Our manner of procedure was simple, but effective. Each man hacked a piece off the leg of mutton, helped himself to vegetables, and poured out a pannikin of tea for himself. As to sugar and salt, each helped himself to the latter with his knife, and dipped his spoon into the can of sugar, or if he had no spoon, borrowed his neighbour’s. I will not say that the mutton was of the best, nor that the sugar and salt were scrupulously clean, but we were hungry and thirsty, and could


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afford to ignore such details. After dinner we had a rest, and then proceeded to unload the “Kanieri,” which had come in at noon. She was loaded with flour, oats, and chaff, and we spent all the afternoon on her. The chaff was light, but the oats were rather heavy, while the flour, which was in the little white 40lb. bags, was very difficult to sling, as the bags kept slipping to one side or the other. On board of this vessel I met, among others, with a young fellow who told me that he was in business in a music warehouse in town here, but at the commencement of the strike had shipped as a sailor, and was enjoying himself immensely. All the morning there had been a large crowd collected at the barriers, but about half-past two it suddenly decreased. The reason of this was soon clear. The leaders of the strike had scented us from afar off, and had called a mass meeting to discuss the matter. This meeting was held on the reclamation, and could be plainly seen from where we were working. A rough platform had been erected, and from it several speakers were haranguing the mob with violent gesticulations. Now and then a hoarse roar could be heard from the crowd, but they contented themselves with roaring. We worked steadily on, and in about an hour the meeting dispersed. At five o’clock we stopped work. Some of our party preferred to spend the night on board the “Takapuna,” which was lying in the harbour on account of the strike. She came alongside the wharf regularly about five in the evening, took aboard those of the free labourers who wished to sleep in her, and then moved out into the stream. Bedding, supper, and breakfast were provided on her by the Company. For ourselves, we walked past the barriers and then home. The crowds of strikers and larrikins had not yet commenced to gather at five, as they did after a few days, to see the men come off. Next morning, which was wet, we were down again, this time in clothes more suited for the occasion. We worked on again as we did the day before, and so on for several days. In a day or two more and more of our fellows began to join us eager for the fun, until at last there must have been ten or eleven of us. Among the party were Guy Powles, Fatty Marchant, Tabby Ziman, Nob Mason, and other well-known characters. We generally worked together, and soon got used to the business, though none of us escaped without cuts and bruises. Some of us were rather badly knocked about by falling bits of coal when coaling the “Tarawera.” Every night when the free labourers came off there were larger and larger crowds assembled to watch them, until in about a week there must have been about three thousand. Of course the police had to be in attendance, and formed lines for the free labourers to pass through, while the mounted police did yeoman service in keeping order. I myself never noticed much beyond “barrack” and chaff, but on one or two occasions some men would have been rather badly treated had not the police protected them. Several arrests were made, but though the crowd seemed disposed to resist them, nothing ensued but a little stone-throwing. I remember also, when the crowd was being backed by the mounted troopers, a man got his head cut open by an accidental stroke of the stirrup. At last it was found necessary to call out special constables, and they were regularly mustered on the wharf at five o’clock. Very determined did those old gentlemen look with their badges and

batons. One of the commanders of the different squads was Mr. Chantrey Harris. How fierce and martial-looking was he as he mustered his men and strode alongside at their side head in air ! To do the crowd justice, they loudly cheered the specials as they marched out. I was not working on the “Australia” when the unfortunate man Gerrard was injured, but some of us were. John Lowe, too, was superintending the winch at the time when the man was knocked down the hold. He afterwards gave evidence at the court, saying that if he had been in Allen’s place he would have done the same. Fancy meek John Lowe knocking anybody down! Shortly after the strike a book of caricatures was published about it. There were two pictures in it reflecting on us. One represented a deputation of us waiting on the headmaster to request special holidays to go down and “wharf-lump,” while another represented Mr. Collins informing the Principal that all the boys were down on the wharf. I am bound to say that the portraits of both of both Mr. Collins and Mr. Mackay has no resemblance whatever to the originals. In about ten days the end of the holidays arrived, and with it the end of our work at the wharf. By that time the excitement had greatly cooled down. We all found ourselves stronger in body for our work, and stronger in pocket too, for each of us had a snug sum of pocket money for the ensuing term. Taking it all round we had a very good time, and it was unanimously agreed that we all had thoroughly enjoyed our Ten Days’ Wharflumping.

ODDS AND E NDS W

About the beginning of the term, a prominent boarder on the occasion of his attaining the thirteenth anniversary of his birth, was presented by his fellows with an illuminated address (in red ink), and a purse containing sixteen-coppers. Needless to say, the recipient suitably acknowledged the gift. It is not now considered good form to apple-pie the beds of the fellows in the next dormitory. That expedient for contributing to their night’s rest is rather old. It is not now considered good form to apple-pie the beds of the fellows in the next dormitory. That expedient for contributing to their night’s rest is getting old. The following is stated to be the unaided production of a Fifth Form luminary:- “Agedum, lictor, excide hane radicem incommodam ambulantibus.” “I pray you, lictor, exterminate this root which is unable to walk!’ The burning question just now seems to be where are some of the recruits to get uniforms small enough to fit them. What is the difference between the prefects’ room and a fat cadet? - One is a private room and the other is a roomy private!


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THE WELLINGTONIAN

Correct style for answering the Conversational Questions in the Havet:- “Avez-vous tm crayon? ” - “Non, maisf ai un cheval!” One would have thought that the translation, “Magna fuit quondam capitis reverentia cani” The great Captain Dog was once universally respected,” could not be beaten. It is, however, surpassed by the following:- “Atque metus omnis, et inexorabile fatum,” “And meet us, O miss, eatin’ eggs or a billy of fat! ” According to a certain University undergraduate, a consecutive clause is one that follows another, and a final clause is one that comes at the end.

Poetry

W THE GREAT MATCH [After the match with St. Patrick’s one of our bards was impelled to burst forth into song. We give his effusion below as an example of what we can (and sometimes do) turn out.] ‘Twas on the fifth of August when St. Patrick’s we did play, O day of happy omen, O true red-letter day ! And I am sure that all our life fond mem’ry linger will, On the day we beat St. Patrick’s by a good eight points to nil! All the morning it was cloudy, and the rain fell now and then, But in the afternoon it cleared, and we buckled to like men; St Patrick’s in their blue and white, we in our good old black, And till the setting of the sun we pushed St. Patrick’s back. Their backs were fast and steady, and in furious rushes came, But then our backs were just as fast, and played a shining game. Their forwards were a heavy lot, and packed into the scrum, But our fellows were a bit too good, and fairly made things hum. Our Mr. Bee by smartness made up for want of length, And Mr. Collins on his left was a very tower of strength ; And then there was our captain - all honour and all praise To the uniformly brilliant game McGovern always plays ! And Arthur Duncan worked away, as only Arthur can; Alf. Duthie ably aided him, and played up like a man; Our forwards pushed well in the scrum, and magnificently played, And in the loose and the line-out skill and judgment they displayed. Ten minutes after kicking-off Mr. Collins got a pass, He scrambled to the line and laid the ball upon the grass; And though we didn’t kick a goal, one could very plainly see, That the way we were playing would result in victory. In vain did Jones come rushing down - he was always brought

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to grass; In vain did Cullen try to pot, and Hanning try to pass; Their forwards played up manfully, but couldn’t get it through, Though Ryan, Smith, and Prendegast did everything they knew. Then Jones was shifted up to half, and swore he’d give us fits, But Jackson was too good for him, and knocked him all to bits; In vain he tried his dodges, and played off his little tricks, For “Jo-Jo” would come down on him just like a ton of bricks. Look! Mr. Bee has got the ball from a grand long pass by Duncan, And sends it spinning o’er the bar with a kick that take the bun can. Oh, how we cheer and shout! that’s three points added more! But St. Patrick’s chaps look rather glum at this increase to our score. But see here’s Mackay got the ball, and breaks into the loose, With half-a-dozen after him - why don’t you pass, you goose He’s collared now, but not before it’s sent to Mr. Bee, And now it’s down behind the posts, as fair as it could be. A goal was kicked, that made us seven; but St. Pat’s were mad to score; They rushed the ball right down the field, but they could not rush it o’er, For “Haughty” Bright was there quite calm, and cool in eye and limb, And the St. Patrick’s lad is not yet born that can get the ball past him. But now McGovern got the ball, and rushed clean through them all, He slipped right past the full-back, and he fell upon the ball. Hurrah ! hurrah ! that made us eight! St. Patrick’s case was done; And though we did not score again, yet the battle we had won. And so the game was ended, and we all went back to tea, To celebrate in fashion due our famous victory. And I am sure that all our life, fond mem’ry linger will, On the day we beat St. Patrick’s by a good eight points to nil 1! Vae Victis


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THE WELLINGTONIAN

August 29, 1891


THE

Vol. I, No. 3.

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 12, 1891

Inter-Collegiate Football Tournament.

W Wanganui Collegiate School V. Wellington College. The First of the Inter-College matches in connection with the tournament was played at Newtown Park on Saturday, 29th August, in the presence of a goodly number of spectators. The weather was very fine, being in fact, rather warm for football. Saxby set the ball in motion for the blues with a good kick, which was returned by Duthie to Bennet, who made a good run down the touch-line, until he was collared by McGovern in the black 25. Stafford and Ziman helped to remove the ball to the centre of the ground, but it was quickly brought back by a fine passing rush among the blue three-quarters, which enabled Bennet to cross the goal-line. He, however, lost the ball before touching down, and a force was the result. Jackson kicked out to Downes, who returned it to the black 25, when there was a series of scrums. After some good passing by Wanganui, Willis scored the first try for the blues; Bennet took the kick and placed a goal amid the cheers of the Wanganui supporters. The ball was kicked off from half-way, and after an interchange of kicks by the backs, it was rushed down to the blue quarters. Williams was instrumental in bringing the play back to neutral ground, when he was collared by McGovern. From a loose rush by Wanganui’s Bennet obtained a chance to pot, but the ball did not rise, and a force down resulted. Mackay being in front of the ball at the kick out, a scrummage took place, from which Saxby made a short run, and when collared by Stafford passed to Bennet, who in turn transferred to Downes. This latter player attempted to pot, but without success. Duncan kicked out, and after a series of loose scrums, Williams attempted to get away, but was quickly taken by Jackson and Duncan. From this scrummage Cameron obtained the ball and

price

: 3s per Ann

scored near the corner flag. Bennet took the place, which was unsuccessful. After exchange of kicks between Jackson and Marshall, Duthie carried the ball into touch at half-way flag. In spite of good work by Bronte and Ziman, the play was brought back to black quarters, where Wellington got a free kick for offside play. Jackson kicked to Bennet who made a good run, and was collared in front of goal by McGovern. In the scrums which followed, Dyer, Gilmer; Stevens, Saxby, and Krull, did good work for their respective sides. McGovern obtaining the ball kicked well up the line, but Montgomerie and Saxby helped to bring it back. Shortly after, Wanganui obtained a free kick in black quarters. Bennet took a place, which was unsuccessful. Tripe missed the return and Bennet essayed a pot, which did not rise from the ground. Duncan kicked out to Williams who punted into touch. Through the exertions of Bronte, Gilmer, and Duthie, the play was removed to Wanganui quarters. Downes relieved the pressure, and the ball was soon back on Wellington goal-line, From a maul in goal, Montgomerie was enabled to secure a try; Bennet was again unsuccessful. Halftime was then called, the score being: Wanganui, 5 points; Wellington, nil. Jackson started the second spell by a good kick, which was returned into touch by Marshall. From the line-out, Downes obtained the ball, and, being collared, passed to Bennet, who was well tackled by McGovern. Soon afterwards Downes had a fine opportunity to pot, but failed to lift the ball off the ground. Williams taking the ball from the kick-out, ran to the Wellington’s 25, when he was splendidly tackled by Bright. Mackay here attempted to get through, but was collared in front of goal. Marshall was granted a free kick for infringement of the rules, but it was fruitless. The Wanganuis continued to play their passing game, and Bennet had another unsuccessful shot, which resulted in a force-down. Bennet returned the kickout well down the touchline, from which Cameron attempted to struggle through, but was prevented by Halley and Bronte.


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THE WELLINGTONIAN

However, the blues were not to be denied, and Krull, after a fine dodgy run, scored near the corner; no goal was kicked. After the kick-out, were loose scrums, in which the blacks gained a momentary advantage. Williams removed the play, and was well collared by Bright when he was looking dangerous. Williams again obtained the ball, but was unable to get past Bright. By a passing rush Willis was enabled to score his second try. Marshall made a very poor attempt to increase the score. A good exhibition of kicking by the opposing backs ended in the ball being in touch at halt-way flag. The black forwards tried to get away with a dribbling rush, but it soon came back, and Downes had another unsuccessful shot at goal. Shortly after the kick-out Norton crossed the line but was collared by Tripe, and a maul ensued, which terminated in the ball being carried across the goal-line. From the following scrum the ball was heeled out and passed to Bennet, who, failing to take it cleanly, was collared by Jackson. Montgomerie made a big effort to get in, but was collared by Duthie. Mackay obtaining the ball made a short run, and to the surprise of most people, finished up with a fine punt, which was missed by Cameron. Ziman, Stevens and Gilmer carried the play into blue territory, but this was neutralised chiefly by the execution of Saxby and Montgomerie. Mackay made a short run, but failing to pass soon enough, was collared. Williams then tried to bullock his way through, but did not get far. After some give and take play, Bennet got a pass, and running round the Wellington backs scored a try, which he was unable to convert. Time was then called, the score being: Wanganui, 8 points; Wellington, nil. The visitors were far too heavy for the local Collegians, the Wellington backs having no show owing to their forwards being completely overmatched, consequently they were engaged almost the whole time in defence. Of the Wanganui backs, Bennet ran and punted very well, but his drop and place kicking were at fault. The half-backs passed out well, Johnston especially so. Of the forwards, Saxby, Willis, Montgomerie and Krull were the pick. On the Wellington side, Bright, full-back, played very well, kicking and collaring splendidly; McGovern also collared well; Tripe and Duncan have played much better. The halves had little opportunity to distinguish themselves, being engaged most of the time in stopping rushes. Gilmer, Bronte, Jackson, Stafford and Stevens were the best of the forwards. Nelson College V. Wellington College. This, the last of the tournament, took place on Tuesday, the 31st August, at Newtown Park, in the presence of a large number of spectators, and resulted in a win for Nelson College by 14 points to five. The match was a very interesting one, and was much better contested than might be imagined from the scores. The teams were as follows:McGovern winning the toss, McQuillan kicked off for Nelson to Tripe who returned it to the centre. McQuillan obtained possession, and with the assistance of C. Broad carried the ball into black quarters, when Sigley made a good run, but went into touch near the corner flag. After a force-down, Jackson kicked

December 12, 1891

off to Sigley, who returned it into touch. Jackson took the ball from the throw-out and passed to Kirkcaldie, who failed to take it. Duncan however averted the danger by kicking down to the full-back, who was prevented from returning it by the fastfollowing up of Kirkcaldie. Bennet broke through the scrum which was formed and dribbled up to neutral territory. After a series of scrummages, which were very even, Sigley made a good run and passed to C. Broad who potted unsuccessfully at goal. After the kick-out, Sigley, Broad and McQuillan by a passing rush brought the ball near the Wellington goal-line. In attempting to return it Bright knocked against a blue forward, and Gibb was enabled to score near the goal-post. W. Broad took the kick which was successful. Jackson kicked off and after an exchange of kicks between the respective backs, Blick obtained a mark, Bright fumbled the ball and Wanden scored the second try for Nelson. The ball was placed for W. Broad but was not a success. From the kick-out McQuillan obtained possession and following up his kick, passed Bright and scored near the corner ; he converted the try himself. Jackson again kicked off, and C. Broad returned to Tripe who failed to take the ball. Shortly after, Duncan, Duthie and McGovern made a good passing rush which carried the play into Nelson quarters. It did not remain there long but was soon brought back by Sigley, who, after a fine dodgy run, took a pot at goal, which however went very wide. Shortly afterwards Sigley made a short run and passed to W. Broad, who, when well collared by Bright, transferred it to McQuillan, who scored behind the posts. McQuillan was successful in the kick at goal. After the kick out the blacks removed the play to Nelson quarters by a loose rush, in which Jackson, Bronte and Gilmer were prominent. This was neutralised by the Nelson Captain, Sigley, who made a grand run from the half-way flag past McGovern and Bright and scored near the corner. McQuillan was entrusted with the kick, but failed to increase the score. Half-time was then called, and the score stood : Nelson, 11 points ; Wellington, nil. Jackson opened the second spell, and the ball was returned into touch by W. Broad. Gilmer broke through the line and dribbled the ball until stopped by Sigley, who returned it to the middle of the ground. Duthie and Duncan carried it back, and Sigley attempting to get away was collared by McGovern. Stafford, Jackson, Halley and Tripe were instrumental in taking the ball to Nelson goal-line. W. Broad relieved his side by kicking into touch. From the line-out, Gilmer, Carmichael and Halley broke away in a loose rush, and were only stopped on the goal-line. Blick attempted to run, but was collared before going far, when Mackay and Duncan were very nearly in. The blue forwards led by Wanden and Harkness transferred the play to mid-field. It was soon back again in Nelson boundary by the agency of Dyer and Halley. McQuillan then ran and passed to Sigley who was collared by Duthie in Wellington’s 25. A dribbling rush in which Mackay and Stafford showed up, was neutralised by McQuillan and C. Broad, the latter player when collared passed to Sigley, who was brought down by McGovern and Bright. Almost immediately afterwards, Duthie, Tripe and Duncan by good passing transferred the ball to the centre of the field. Duthie then made a fine dodgy run and was not collared until within a


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THE WELLINGTONIAN

few yards of the goal-line. A scrum was now formed from which Tripe got the ball and crossed the line, thus scoring the first try for Wellington. Jackson made a good attempt at goal, but was not successful. McQuillan kicked out to Duthie, who returned it into touch in Nelson quarters. Jackson taking the ball from the line by a fine run scored a try, which he succeeded in converting. McQuillan kicked off, and Tripe by a good kick returned it to touch about half-way. From the throwout the black forwards broke away and dribbled to the full back, Bonar, who punted into touch. A series of scrummages now took place, after which McGovern received a pass, which he failed to take. A good rush by Sigley, McQuillan and C. Broad enabled Nelson to again invade Wellington territory. McGovern relieved the pressure and getting clear away made a fine run of about 50 yards, until he reached the full-back who was successful in bringing him down. The blue forwards now dribbled the ball well up the field and a score was only prevented by McGovern who kicked well into touch. Tripe and Duthie rushed the ball down to Nelson quarters, but it was brought back by Sigley. In a short time the Nelson full-back failed to take the ball and Duncan who had followed up smartly was enabled to score the third try for Wellington. Jackson took the kick but did not increase the score. Just before the spell ended Blick scored under the posts and W. Broad had no difficulty in converting. The game was a much better exhibition of football than either of the preceding. It was faster, more open, and consequently, there were fewer scrimmages. This was no doubt partly due to the fact that no “dead ball ” was played. The Nelson players, Bonar, the full-back, did all his work well. The three-quarters played a fine game, especially Sigley, whose running was much admired. The halves McQuillan and Blick kicked very well. Wanden, Harkness and Gibb were the pick of a good lot of forwards. Coming to the blacks, Bright, the full-back, did not play nearly so well as against Wanganui, both his collaring and kicking being frequently at fault. McGovern played a good game, and Tripe was much better at centre three-quarter than Duncan. The halves, Duthie and Duncan, were seen to better advantage than in the previous Saturday’s match. The forwards all did well, the best being Stevens, Jackson, Bronte and Gilmer. Had it not been for the mistakes made by the backs, the result might have been different. The defeat could not be said to be due to the play of the forwards. The game was played in the best possible spirit. Mr. A. D. Thomson was referee, and Messrs. Gibb and Collins acted as touch judges.

SCHOOL NOTES W

Before Mr. Wilson left at the end of last term he was accorded a hearty send-off by the boys, and was presented on their behalf with a purse of sovereigns. Mr. Mackay, on making the presentation, feelingly referred to the cordial relations that had always existed between him and Mr. Wilson for the last 20 years, and to Mr. Wilson’s efficiency as a teacher. He concluded by wishing him God speed in his new vocation. Mr.

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Wilson suitably replied, stating the satisfaction he had always felt with the boys, and hoping that the College might flourish, as for its pluck and courage it deserved to do. Three cheers having been given for Mr. Wilson, and three more for “Puppy,” the assembly dispersed. The boys that left at the end of last term were:- Boarders, Booth, Blair i., and Seccombe; day boys, Cederholm, Duncan, Foster, Kirkcaldie, Menzies and Robertson. The new boys are:Boarder, Macnamara; day boys, Tripe and Langdon. Shortly after the term commenced, Mr. Mackay entertained the team at a supper. The good things having been exhaustively treated, and the usual loyal and patriotic toasts having been honoured, Mr. Mackay proposed the toast of the evening, “The Football Team.” The toast was drunk with musical honours and three times three. The Captain, in reply, made a stirring speech, congratulating the team on their general success, and demonstrating to everybody’s satisfaction that we ought to have won all the inter-college matches. The other toasts were as follows “Success to the College,” proposed by Mr. J Bee, responded to by Mr. Mackay; “The Masters,” proposed by Myers, replied to by Messrs. Mackay and Collins; “Absent members of the team - coupled with be name of the Vice-captain, A. Duncan,” proposed by Mackay i.; “The ladies,” proposed by Stafford, replied to by Mackay i. During the evening, songs, recitations, or musical selections were given by Messrs. Collins, Morrah, Stafford, Innes, Gray, Kirkcaldie and Manoy. About 11 o’clock the party broke up, with three Cheers for Mr. and Mrs. Mackay. We must not forget to thank the Wanganui College old boys for the entertainment given by them to the football teams. A sumptuous “spread” was provided in the Exchange Hall, and refreshments, toasts, songs, speeches and recitations, whiled away the rapid hours till 12 o’clock, when we finished with “Auld Lang Syne.” The shorthand and musical classes are still kept up; but, for want of support, the workshop has been closed. The night-classes are still steadily kept up, and are now graced by the presence of several of our old boys, who are preparing for their exams. We wish them every success. We rather miss Mr. Wilson’s fine voice at prayers, but some of the Fifth make efficient substitutes. A little nervousness was visible at first, but all traces of that soon disappeared. In this connection we are glad to see that Mr. Paterson has offered two prizes for reading and recitation. The new scheme of making the library free, has been found to work admirably. Nearly all the boys take out books, and, we hope, are thereby edified. We would suggest that a small fine should be levied on those who keep out the books more than - say a fortnight. The following were among the books presented this term:- ‘‘Nicholas Nickleby,” “Dombey and Son,”


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December 12, 1891

THE WELLINGTONIAN

“Old Curiosity Shop,” “Peveril of the Peak,” “The Caxtons,” “Yeast,” “Hypatia,” “Hereward the Wake,” “Earl of Chatham,” “Frank Mildmay,” “Masterman Ready,” “Hendrick the Hunter,” “Treasure Island,” “Mrs. Caudle’s Curtain Lectures,” “Ninetythree,” “Gil Bias,” “The Decameron” and “Lazare Hoche.” The librarians will be glad of any additional gifts of books. At the end of last term a portrait of the football team was taken. Most of them came out very well, but one or two are quite unrecognisable. The prefects also had their photo taken; all came out well. A chess match, three aside, was arranged between the Wanganui College and us, and was played out at the end of last term. Our fellows were clearly over-matched, and the redoubtable pair, Parker and Atkinson, had it nearly as they liked. Our only success was a draw by Mackay i. against Hankins. The authorities are evidently going on the maxim “That all work and no play makes Jack a dull boy.” Not to speak of markhalfs and practice days, we have had the picnic, Demonstration Day, the sports, and the Prince of Wales’ Birthday. The medal that McGovern received for winning the Intercollege 440 yards, is a very handsome one. It consists of a wreath of laurel leaves of frosted silver surrounding a central shield, embossed with the monogram of the Wellington Football Club. On the reverse side are the words: “Inter-college 440 yards, F. McGovern, 3/10/91.” The medal was made by Hislop and Co. The influenza swooped down upon us about the middle of the term; and for a time placed several cricketers, including the Captain, hors de combat. It also incapacitated several men for the sports. We are glad to be able to announce that several donations have been made to the prize list. Besides Mr. Paterson’s prizes mentioned above, Messrs. Morrah and Myers give liberally, and Mr. Izard repeats his offer of a prize for New Zealand history. As regards the sports fund, the Old Boys’ Association has responded freely. Besides a sum of 2 guineas, they offer two trophies for cricket, one for batting, the other for bowling. Mr Wilson is reported to be doing well at his school in Palmerston North. We are not sending up so many boys as usual for the University Exams: 5 for the Junior Scholarship, and 7 or 8 for the Matriculation. We trust and expect that all will do justice to themselves and honour to the school; and we hope that, for the sake of both examiners and examined, the geography paper will not be after the style of last year’s. Thomson and Dunn arrived here on the 1st November for the summer vacation.

Our own exams this year will be conducted by Mr. Meek in Classics and English, by Mons. Merlet in French, and probably by Mr. Hulke in Science. The anniversary of the gunpowder plot was celebrated by the boarders with all due solemnity. A bonfire of respectable dimensions was made and burnt on The Knob, and till late at night the stilly eve was roused by the din of crackers, rockets, and “double bangers.” Fortunately there were no accidents beyond a few singed eyebrows. We must not forget to congratulate Mr. Bee on an auspicious domestic event that happened during last holidays. Considerable interest was evinced in the sports this year, and many enthusiasts went in for quite a systematic training. In this respect a strong favourite for the mile was especially prominent. We succeeded in lowering several of St. Patrick’s records for this year. This season we have been able to play several of our cup matches on the Basin. Our cricketers have found this a welcome change. Extensive alterations are to be made in the staff. Our readers will regret to hear that Mr. Collins and Mons. Naverne, as well as Mr. Mackay, leave at the end of the year. Their places are to be taken by Messrs. Firth and Evans, whom many old and present Collegians will remember. Our readers will kindly excuse any shortcomings in this number of the Wellingtonian, as our editors have been down with influenza.

Cricket W

At a meeting held at the beginning of the season, the following were elected officers of the Cricket Club:- Captain, Duthie; Vice-Captain, Myers; Committee, Morrah, McGovern, Tripe, Gray, with the Captain, Vice-Captain, and Masters. The first eleven have been competing for the third-class championship, and under Duthie’s able captainship have done remarkably well. They have, up to the present, played seven matches, of which they have won five and lost two. The only outside match played, was that against St. Patrick’s College, in which we were rather badly, though not disgracefully beaten. The Junior eleven too, have done fairly well, having played three matches, of which they won two. Our success can be attributed only to the assiduity with which all our players, big and small alike, have practised throughout the season. The bowling especially, has been quite a feature of our play this year, Staples and Tripe doing a good deal of damage amongst our opponents’ “timber yards,” whilst Duthie, Gray, and Mr. Bee have not been backward when required. The fielding also


December 12, 1891

THE WELLINGTONIAN

has been a great improvement on that of last year. The batting is not so good perhaps as it might be, but this is owing in a great measure to the nervousness of some of our players. The season was opened on Wednesday, the 23rd September, when a half holiday was given to members of the club. Sides were picked on the ground by Myers and McGovern. The teams scored respectively 76 and 33 runs. For the winners Mr. Bee, 21, Myers, 9, were most successful in batting, while Staples and Morrah did best in bowling. For the other side Duthie 7, and Gray 5, both batted and bowled well. The following is a list of the matches played by our senior eleven:College V. Rival 3rd. This the first of our championship matches, was played on Saturday, 17th October, on the college ground, and was won by our team by six runs on the first innings. Staples and Duthie bowled best for the College, the latter, however, had to bowl against a strong northerly wind, and was not so successful as usual. The fielding was bad on both sides. Some of our players were missed, fortunately for us, at least three or four times. Duthie, our highest scorer, was missed before he had made a run. Appended are the scores made by both teams:College Gilmer, c Haldane, b Smythe Duthie, b McBain Anderson, b Haldane Myers, b Haldane A. Heine, c Ingram, b McBain J. Bee, not out Staples, b McBain Morrah, c Warren, b Haldane McGovern, b Smythe Gray, b Haldane Tripe, b Hannay Byes Total Haldane, run out Rush, c Duthie, b Staples Smythe, c and b staples McBain, c Tripe, b Staples Ledger, b Duthie Oswin, b Staples Thompson, b Staples Butts, not out Warren, l.b.w. Staples Ingram, b Duthie Hannay, b Gray

Rivals

Byes, & c Total

4 21 3 2 0 22 0 2 0 0 9 5 68 0 5 0 9 1 0 17 17 0 8 0 5 68

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College V. Thorndon 3rd. This is the only cup match we have lost up to the present. The wicket was a very bad one, in fact what might be called a regular bowler’s wicket. The fielding was somewhat better an this occasion than on the previous Saturday. We give the scores below. Messrs. Beale and E. Read kindly officiated as umpires in this match. College Duthie, b Port McGovern, c Haggart, b Port Gilmer, c Yates, b Morton J. Bee, b Port A. Heine, b Morton Anderson, not out Myers, not out Tripe, c Morton, b Haggart Gray, b Haggart Morrah, c King, b Gardner Staples, b Gardner Byes Total

11 1 3 10 2 12 3 6 0 0 0 6 62

Thorndon Gardner, run out Haggart, c Gilmer, b Staples Port, b Staples Moorehouse, b Staples Cooney, b Staples Tiddy, c Anderson, b Duthie Laws, b J. Bee King, run out Thirkell, c Gray, b Tripe Davies, not out Morton, l.b.w. Duthie Byes Total

39 0 8 9 0 1 8 0 5 5 2 6 74

College v Phoenix 3rd On Saturday, October 31, we played on No. 3 pitch in the Basin Reserve, when we beat the Phoenix by 34 runs on the first innings. In this match, and also on the succeeding Saturday, we played without the services of Duthie, who was laid up with the prevailing epidemic - influenza. Playing on the Basin seemed to enliven our representatives, for they bowled, batted and fielded splendidly. The fielding of our opponents was also fairly good, but they lost several chances by throwing in badly. On the College side, Staples, Tripe and Gray, and for the Phoenix, Fordham, Deslandes and Arden bowled best. The following are the scores made during the match:-

Tripe, b Deslandes Benzoni, b Fordham Anderson, b Fordham

College

0 2 21


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THE WELLINGTONIAN

J. Bee, c Fordham, b Hueston McGovern, b Fordham Gilmer, c Andrews, b Deslandes Myers, c Fordham, b Arden A. Heine, c and b Hueston Morrah, b Arden Staples, l.b.w. Hueston Gray, not out

Extras Total

2nd Innings

20 0 0 9 8 0 0 0 10 79

Tripe, not out Benzoni, b Arden Anderson, c Deslandes, b Fordham J. Bee, b Fordham McGovern, c Hueston, b Deslandes Gilmer, b Stevens Myers. c Stevens, b Arden A. Heine, c Andrews, b Arden Morrah, c Fordham, b Deslandes Staples, c Millward, b Fordham Gray, c and b Arden Extras Total

7 0 12 5 0 9 6 3 3 8 0 7 60

Phoenix Andrews, c Tripe, b Staples Stevens, c Myers, b Staples Arden, b Tripe Hueston, c Morrah, b Staples Fordham, run out Grady, c and b Staples Millward, not out Deslandes, b Tripe Farley, b Gray Kendall, b Tripe Bock, c Tripe, b Gray Extras Total

7 6 3 6 1 0 8 1 2 0 0 2 36

College V. Wellington 3rd. Once more we were victorious, this time against the Wellington 3rd, and on our own ground. The Wellingtons won the toss and went in first. Their score amounted to 56, of which Smythe made 17 and Meek 11 (not out). The College followed with 71, McGovern 13, Staples, 11, and Morrah 10, pulling the match out of the fire for us at a time when all seemed lost. The Wellingtons again went to the wickets, and had made 28 for six wickets when time was called. Staples, J Bee and Morrah bowled well for us, while Willis and Brookfield were the most successful trundlers on the other side. Several difficult catches were made by the College in this match, two by Myers, and one each by Morrah, Anderson and Gilmer.

December 12, 1891

College V. Midland 3rd. On the following Saturday, 14th November, we played again on the Basin Reserve, when we met the Midland 3rd. The match was won by our representatives by 34 runs on the first innings. The College team went first to the wickets and made 54, Tripe 18 (not out) and J. Bee 15, being the most successful scorers. In our second innings we made 51, J. Bee 13. Our opponents scored 20 and 37 for nine wickets. Staples and Tripe again bowled well for the College. Duff, Upham and Thawley doing most execution with the ball for the Midlands. Wellington College v. St. Patrick’s College. On Wednesday the 18th November, we played our annual match with St. Patrick’s College, suffering defeat at their hands by 123 runs on the first innings. O’Brien, the St. Patrick’s skipper, winning the toss, elected to take the field. Our fellows started fairly well, losing two wickets for 44. Then came the crash, our score altogether totalled only 67. J. U. Collins 24 and Staples 15 were the highest scorers. Our opponents made a very good stand, and caused us no small amount of leather hunting. Their score amounted to 190, of which J. Maher made 49, and Hanning, who hit freely for his runs, 47. The fielding was good on both sides, notwithstanding the fact that several catches were dropped. For the College, Staples took six wickets for 63 runs, Tripe two for 27, and J. Bee two for 49. For St. Patrick’s Mahoney, Lafferty and Hanning were the most successful bowlers. College v. Karori. Our next match was against the redoubtable Karori team, of whom we have heard such startling accounts. Notwithstanding this, we managed to win by 36 runs. It must, however, be said in favour of Karori, that Attree, one of their bowlers, was absent. Our team, who batted first, made 71, Duthie 22, and J. Bee 12, being the highest scorers. In our second innings we made 57, Anderson 21, Gilmer 11. Our opponents scored only 35. Staples and Tripe took three wickets for 20 and five wickets for 15 respectively. Spiers and Lowe, for Karori, took all the wickets, the former taking 21, the latter 9. College v. Kilbirnie. This match, the last of the first round of championship matches, was played on Kilbirnie Park(?) on the 28th November, when we suffered our second defeat. Our skipper winning the toss, decided to go to the wickets. To the wickets we accordingly went, and scored 37 - our lowest score for the season - and 55. The ground was very deceptive, the long grass impeding the motion of the ball very much, so much so that in our first innings, no fewer than three men were run out. The Kilbirnie team on going to the wickets responded with 75, thus beating us on the first innings by 38. For the College, J. Bee 20, Staples 11, Myers and Duthie 10, were the highest scorers, while Barron 17, Alpe 11 did best for our opponents. Our fielding was not so good on this occasion as in previous matches owing in part no doubt, to the unevenesses of the ground, which is worse, far worse even than our own.


December 12, 1891

THE WELLINGTONIAN

This match leaves us even with the Thorndon and Kilbernie terms for first place in the third class championship, but, as we have finished our matches, while the other teams mentioned have several more to play, we have still a chance of leading on the first round. In view of the intercollegiate matches which take place at the end of this term, the following players have been selected to represent the school:1. BENZONI. - Bats very steadily. Good catch, but poor thrower. 2. DUTHIE (Captain). - Most consistent scorer in the team. Does not bowl so well this season as previously. 3. GILMER. - Very patient bat. Can block by the hour. Capital field and very fair wicket-keeper. 4. GRAY. - Good change bowler and field. Bats freely at practice, but is not so successful in matches. 5. MCGOVERN. - Very good long stop. Throws in well. Is rather inclined to “slog.” 6. MORRAH. - Very fair batsman. Catches splendidly. 7. MYERS. - Excellent field. Has so far been rather unfortunate with the bat this season. 8. PATERSON. - Fair all-round player. 9. STAPLES. - Very good medium bowler. Also bats and fields well. 10. TRIPE. - Good fast bowler with easy delivery. Uncertain bat. 11. ZIMAN. - Bats freely. Very fair slow bowler. Indifferent field.

ATHL ETIC S. W

Inter-College Races For Mr. Kohn’s Cup. In these races St. Patrick's were again victorious, but under circumstances by no means discreditable to us. Out of two races we secured one win. Then we had but two weeks to train. And again, such was the bashfulness of our runners that a third man could not be found. Altogether, McGovern’s performance was not a bad one. A change was made this year, the hurdles being cut out. On account of a very strong head-wind - a young hurricane in fact - the times, especially over the 100 yards, were not very brilliant. The two races were:100 Yards. 1. Hanning (St. Patrick’s). 2. Jones „ 3. McGovern. Fay (St. Pat’s) and Mackay i., also ran. Hanning, who owed a yard for baulking, ran a good race, and won rather easily. A good go for second place. Time, 121/5secs. 440 Yards. 1. McGovern. 2. Hanning. 3. Fay. Also started, Mackay i. and Smith (St. Pat’s). Mackay lead for

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about 200 yards, when he was passed by McGovern and Fay, who raced neck and neck almost up to the tape. McGovern then, amidst tremendous cheering, shook off his opponent, and won by about a yard. Hanning came with a great rush at the finish, and secured second place. Time, 603/5secs. Since 1887 the Cup has been held as follows: - 1887, Wellington College; 1888, St. Patrick’s; 1889, St. Patrick’s; 1890, St. Patrick’s; 1891, St. Patrick’s. It is a pity that other colleges are not able to come and take part in these contests, as it would make it more interesting, and the result (perhaps) more varied.

The sports. W

The Sports were held with the greatest success on Monday, the 16th of November. We were fortunate in at length securing a fine day. Though none of the school records were broken, yet the times generally were good. The fields were generally large; the racing good, and most of the finishes pretty close. Most of the handicapping was very good, but of course there were one or two slips. We were glad to see so many of the old boys turning out. Our best thanks are due to the handicappers (Messrs. Bee and Collins), to the starter (Mr. Collins), to the judges (Messrs. Bee and Knapp), to the timekeeper (Mr. Hislop), and to the general committee (Myers, Mackay i., McGovern, Morrah, Jackson, Duthie, Tripe and Gray) for the efficient manner in which they performed their duties. The sports started at 2 p.m., with 1. 2. 3.

Throwing The Cricket Ball. Jackson (78yds. 1ft.) Gilmer (74yds.) McGovern (73yds.)

High Jump (Junior Championship), Under 16. 1. Staples (4ft. 4in.) 2. McLeod (4ft. 3in.) 3. Whitcombe (4ft. 2in.) Blair also jumped. Close jumping for all three places. Long Jump, Open (Senior Championship). 1. McGovern (17tt. 7in.) 2. Ziman (15ft. 10in.) 3. Tripe (15ft. 5in.) Bright also jumped. This year’s jump was not so good as last year’s. 100 Yards (Junior Championship), Under 16. 1. Halley. 2. Gibson. 3. Broom. 11 entries. Time, 13secs. Halley led from the first and won as he liked. Gibson easily second.


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THE WELLINGTONIAN

100 Yards, Open (Senior Championship). 1. McGovern. 2. Jackson. 3. Tripe. Five entered. Time, ll4/5secs. McGovern got a fair start and won by about a yard. Good race for second and third places. Long Jump (Junior Championship), Under 16. 1. Gibson (14ft. 7in.) 2. Staples and Hill, tie, (13ft. 10in.) Eight jumped. 220 Yards Open Handicap. 1. Tripe (10yds.) 2. Ziman (10yds.) 3. Broom (25yds.) 15 started. Time, 26secs. Tripe came through well and won easily. Broom ran very pluckily. 220 Yards Handicap, Under 15. 1. Blair (10yds.) 2. Young (15yds.) 3. Mackay iii. (15yds.) Seven started. Time, 292/5secs. Splendid race, Blair just winning. High Jump, Open (Senior Championship). 1. Morrah (4ft. 9in.) 2. McGovern and Tripe, tie, (4ft. 5in.) Ziman also jumped. Morrah jumped well and prettily. 100 Yards Handicap, Under 13. 1. Mackay iv. 2. Wilson i. By some misunderstanding these were the only two that ran. Time, 142/5secs. Half-Mile Open (Senior Championship And Lady Prendergast’s Cup) 1. McGovern. 2. Stafford. 3. Tripe. Ziman and Morrah also ran. Time, 2 min. 23secs. Stafford and Ziman led for the first lap, when Ziman dropped out. McGovern then came with a rush and won easily by about 20 yards. Tripe a poor third. Four-Legged Race. 1. Tripe, Gilmer and Duthie. 2. Halley, Ziman and Morrah 3. Curtis, Blair and Staples. These were all that started. Time, 18secs. Won by about 2 yards; splendid race for second place. 1.

Hop, Step And Jump. Tripe (35ft. 10in.)

December 12, 1891

2. Ziman 440 Yards Open Handicap. 1. Stafford (20yds.) 2. Whitcombe (35yds.) 3. Ziman (20yds.) 18 ran. Time, 583/5secs. Stafford ran well and won a good race. Whitcombe ran very pluckily. Macnamara had hard luck, he was leading strongly when he fell. 440 Yards Handicap, Under 16. 1. McLeod (10yds.) 2. Curtis (20yds.) 3. Broom (30yds.) Time, 63secs. Eleven started. A good race between McLeod and Curtis. Sack Race. 1. Gray. 2. Whitcombe. Seven started. A very amusing race. 1. 2. 3.

Mile Open Handicap. Whitcombe (90yds.) Wall i. (50yds.) Kirk (110yds.)

100 Yards Old Boys’ Handicap. 1. Smythe (10yds.) 2. Pownall (1yd.) 3. Blundell (7yds.) 11 entered. Time, llsecs. Very good race for all three places. 440 Yards Old Boys’ Handicap. 1. Stuart (10 yds) 2. Pownall (scratch) 3. Morrah (scratch) 15 started. Time, 57secs, Stuart ran well and won a close race. The points for the Senior Championship are as follows:McGovern, 11; Tripe, 5; Morrah, 3; and Ziman, Stafford and Jackson 2 each. For the Junior Championship they are:- Staples and Gibson, 5 each; Halley, 3; McCleod and Hill, 2 each; Whitcombe and Broom, 1 each. 250 Yards InterCollege Handicap. At the Amateur Athletic Meeting, held on the 20th November, there was as usual an InterCollege race. For this about twenty from the College and St. Patrick’s were entered, but owing to the awkwardness of the date, and for several other reasons, several of our fellows did not intend to run. When the day arrived, however, the St. Patrick’s representatives being (it was reported) laid up with La Grippe, did not come up to time. McGovern (1yd.) therefore enjoyed the privilege of a walk over and won in fine style.


December 12, 1891

THE WELLINGTONIAN

In connection with this race, dissatisfaction has frequently been expressed with the handicapping. The handicappers do not seem to have much knowledge of those with whom they have to deal, and in the last two races they have made several obvious slips. We might suggest that careful records of times, &c., should be sent in; for, though one of the handicappers at least is .familiar with St. Patrick’s College performances, yet he has not much knowledge of ours.

SHOOTING COMPETITION. The Cup presented for shooting last year, was shot off for last Monday, 30th November. The weather was by no means propitious, as a strong wind was blowing and the light was very bad. The ranges were the 200 and 300 yards, five shots at each. Mr. Collins as Judge, and Mr. Bee as marker, gave every satisfaction. Bright won the cup with 26 points, Bendall being next with 24. Considering the little practice we have had this term, the results are very good. Following are the scores :Bright Bendall Staples Wall ii. Stafford Myers Toogood Gray Paterson Wakelin Graham Gibson Horne Evans Whitcombe Curtis

200 20 9 13 12 11 8 14 7 7 10 8 4 8 10 2 6

300 6 15 8 5 5 7 0 6 5 2 4 8 3 0 8 4

Total. 26 24 21 17 16 15 14 13 12 12 12 12 11 10 10 10

It will be seen that Bright performed well at the 200, but fell off considerably at the 300. For this, we think, the state of the 300 mark is at least in degree responsible. There is no good rest to lie on, and, in addition, the mark is almost overgrown with gorse. We hope to see it cleared up before next year. The state of the 400 mark might also be improved, and shooting, especially with recruits, might be profitably indulged in at 100 yards. We also hope to see a Morris tube club successfully started next season; it would keep our hands in during the winter.

The picnic. W

The picnic, a new idea at the College, was a glorious success. To begin with, the weather was simply perfect. The sun shone down from an unclouded sky, and a gentle zephyr hardly ruffled

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the glassy surface of the sea. About 9 o’clock we embarked in the gallant “Mana,” and under the skilful guidance of Captain Jones, steamed towards the Heads. On the passage down, the air-gun and ship’s band afforded ample food for entertainment. When we got to the Heads, some really fine views of the forts and the lighthouse were obtained. Then the vessel’s prow was turned for Lowry Bay, where we were to land. Arrived there, we soon scattered. The majority steered their course for Days Bay, where some delightful bathing was indulged in. Others preferred to ramble about the hills: and a few adventurous spirits said that they had gone as far round as the lighthouse. Many brought back large quantities of fine ferns; and some proudly showed strings of fish, which to the ignorant appeared remarkably like bullies, but which the owners affirmed were mountain trout. On our way back we skirted close to Soames’ Island, and had a good view of it. The list of casualties comprised three hats, and nearly included a certain popular member of the Fifth, who, when we had just got nicely clear of the wharf, came rushing down with a bundle of manuka sticks in his hand and wild dismay in his face. Town was reached about 6 o’clock, all having thoroughly enjoyed themselves, and hoping that this might be the first of a series of similar pleasant excursions.

Old boys’ column. W

Some of our old boys have gained more than a little distinction in the football field this last season, so many indeed that it would be a hard task to call to mind their names. But who does not know how well H. Speed, G. Eliot, F. Pownall, G. Hume, W. H. Morrah and others played in championship games, and some of them for the province P Of the multitudinous juniors who were to the fore, probably none surpassed A. M. Stuart, who gave promise of doing even better things in the future. But the football season has come to an end in its own good time, yielding place to cricket and rowing; and we now hear more of junior fours and l.b.w. than of set urns and potted goals. Old boys of course are equally as busy as in the winter; and in running, cricket, tennis, and rowing, find plenty of opportunities for distinguishing themselves. The results of the season will, without doubt, shed a little lustre on the institution where one may say they served their apprenticeship as athletes. Honours of a higher kind are being won in College and University examinations. One or two of those who were with us at the College have come to grief in their “terms” examination, which, as everyone ought to know, have to be passed in addition to (or rather previously to) those for the B.A. and other degrees. These victims have our sympathy. Others we are glad to be able to congratulate - Dunn, Thompson, Lloyd, Beaglehole and Galway - on the successful issue of this their preliminary canter. The examination season has indeed set in with all its accustomed severity. Degrees and Law on 16th November, Matriculation and Junior Scholarships on 1st December. Terms just over - Balaclava was nothing to it. We trust, however, that those who are rushing into the valley of death, there may be


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THE WELLINGTONIAN

left surviving a higher proportion than remained of the heroic Light Brigade. Since the appearance of the last number of the Wellingtonian the Old Boys’ Association has had no meeting to chronicle. The committee, however, met on the 32rd October, and transacted important business. The funds are found to be in a satisfactory state. With a view of encouraging athletics at the College, it was decided to present two trophies to the cricket club, and to give 2 guineas to the sports funds. A sub-committee was appointed to make arrangements of some interest in connection with Mr. Mackay’s retirement. An old schoolfellow - Y. L. Willeston - has been travelling along the Mediterranean and Black Seas, visiting most of the places we have heard of, and a good many of those we haven’t; he is returning by the “Aorangi” which arrives on the 1st December. N. Nathan is also having what is known as “a high old time” on the Continent, and does not return for some months.

Correspondence. W

ATHLETICS. To the Editor. Sir, - Why should we not arrange a running tournament, after the style of our football tournament ? It is true we have races against St. Patrick’s; but why not invite other Colleges to join? Such a tournament could be arranged without much trouble. I am, etc., Sprint. A SUGGESTION. To the Editor. Sir, - We have managed to raise several good subscriptions this year, and I would suggest that next term a subscription should be started for some outside object - say, the Free Public Library. As this institution is to have a special room for boys, I think we might do something. I am, etc., Nemo.

A TRIP ROUND THE SOUTH ISLAND. It was about 8 o’clock on a Sunday evening when we set sail from Wellington on the good steamer “Stella” for a month’s trip round the South Island. There was a good number of boys like myself, and two young ladies on board. The first night was, as may be expected, not a very enjoyable one, for the sea was very rough, and we were not yet accustomed to it. Nearly all of us were as sick as dogs, but we soon got our “sea legs.” About noon the following day we came up Lyttelton harbour, but stopped at Godley Head to land stores for the lighthouse. All of us boys went ashore in the first boat and stayed there a good time. When the sailors had finished bringing over the stores we got into the last boat and came on in the steamer to Lyttelton. It was about 2 o’clock before we got to the wharf, where we amused ourselves catching dogfish.

December 12, 1891

About 10 the next morning we went on to Akaroa, a pretty, but rather small place situated at the head of a long sound. The hills which surround this sound are not very high except at the entrance where the lighthouse stands. The sea was so rough at the entrance that the whaleboat could not land the stores for the lighthouse. The steamer did not remain here long, but left in about an hour for Moeraki, leaving the lighthouse stores to be taken from the small wharf by land to their destination. After leaving Akaroa it was very rough, and so we were all sick. As we were coming out of Akaroa we saw some small yachts trying to return to Lyttelton after sailing in the regatta. The steamer did net go fast down the coast and therefore did not arrive at Moeraki until the next morning. The shore near the lighthouse at Moeraki is very rough, and so the stores have to be hauled up out of the boat by a wooden crane. We all went up to look at the lighthouse and wrote our names in the visitors’ book. After visiting the lighthouse all we boys went down to a small beach, and having bad a good bathe, left for Dunedin. It was not long before we got to Taiaroa Head, just outside Port Chalmers. As we were not allowed to go ashore we began to fish. After landing the stores we steamed up to Port Chalmers wharf, but remaining there only a few minutes, we went on to Dunedin and arrived there just after dinner. We stayed in Dunedin only 2 hours, because we were in a hurry to go to the sounds to look for Professor Brown, who, while exploring had been lost in the bush, I went to visit some friends, but when I got back to the wharf I found that the steamer was about to leave. We took on some passengers as a search party, and when we get back to Port Chalmers took on board a large quantity of supplies for different lighthouses. During this time we boys amused ourselves by shooting seagulls with our catapults. Although one of the boys stopped on shore till we came back to Dunedin, we were rather pressed for room, on account of which two of us had to sleep in one bunk for about a week. It was not very comfortable, as you may suppose, considering the size of an ordinary bunk. We had, however, got over our sea-sickness by that time and were regular sailors. After calling at the Bluff we went on to Puysegur Point at the entrance of Preservation Inlet. We stayed there the greater part of the morning and afternoon. During the morning we fished from the steamer and caught a great number of blue-cod, with now and then a crayfish. These crawl over the lines, and so two were hauled on board, while others, of which the hook did not get a proper hold, when they came to the surface fell off. In the afternoon we went on shore for a few hours’ shooting. Although we only had twenty-two cartridges to begin with, out of that number we only missed one. Two caw-caws, however, that had been shot, could not be found. The lighthouse keeper’s dog which we had with us brought in the game after it had been shot. Late in the afternoon we resumed our trip, and arrived in Smith Sound early the next morning. The water in this sound is just like glass, while all around in the thick bush and undergrowth on the hill-sides reach down to the water’s edge. There is no beach except at the head of the sound. On all sides are very pretty waterfalls falling in steps from the high, steep


December 12, 1891

THE WELLINGTONIAN

hills into the waters of the sound. Having obtained the dinghy, we went out for a row, The search party went up a stream in one of the boats and landed on the bank a good way up. The steamer then went up Gear arm and some other arms of the sound where the foghorn was blown in case anybody might be there. You can imagine how loud the foghorn sounded in a place like Smith’s Sound surrounded as it is with hills. When at the head of Gear Arm we saw a swan and four young ones swimming about. We lowered a boat and began to chase them. The young ones when the mother flew away were left to our tender mercies, but were not caught so easily as we anticipated, for they could swim very fast. Two boats went after them, the sailors in one, and we in the other. The birds scattered, the sailors going after some, and we after the rest. After a long chase and a lot of rowing, especially for us, the cygnets were caught. When we went back to the place where we had left the search party, we found a large fire on the beach as a signal to return. In a little while, therefore all were on board again. The searchers, though unsuccessful, found a wide waterfall about 150ft. high, which they named after the steamer. The next day we had a chase after some ducklings, which got under rocks and small bushes while their mother did her best to lead us astray by going in another direction. We then went into Dusky Sound and sailed through Cook’s harbour, through which Captain Cook is said to have passed in one of his big ships. The channel is between a small island and the mainland, and is only about three times as wide as the ship. After that we went back to Dunedin, calling at Centre Island and landing stores for the lighthouse. We also called at the Bluff and at Waipapa Point, landing stores at the latter place. Waipapa is a very rough and dangerous place. The boilers and engines of the s.s. “Tararua,” which was wrecked there, are visible above the water at the end of a long reef. Although a small passage has been blown out, the whaleboat had great difficulty in landing. We soon reached Dunedin again, arriving at 4 o’clock on Christmas morning. We stayed in port on Xmas Day and Boxing Day, during which time I stayed on shore. At an early hour in the morning we left for the Bluff via Dog Island. The lighthouse on this island is very high, and can be seen a great distance away. We wrote our names in the visitors’ book, and had a good look round. The light revolves by means of a truck pulled round by an iron weight. This weight has to be hauled up to the top of the lighthouse and then it gradually descends pulling the light round. There are about 50 small lamps, each of which has a big magnifying glass in front of it, and a very bright reflector behind it. The light is held together by a large iron frame. After leaving Dog Island we went to the Bluff, into which I and another boy steered the vessel. After a day’s stay we left for Dog and Centre Islands, from which we returned to the Bluff on New Year’s Eve. At 12 o’clock we set off rockets and blew the foghorn, much to the discomfort of the passers-by. Next day the annual regatta was held, in which our boat won the race for captains’ gigs, receiving £10 as a prize. Early the next morning we left for Puysegur Point, for the second time. From this place we took a few diggers to Brown’s

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Bay. Going into Dusky Sound, we visited Docherty who lives a good way up the sound. We went into Breaksea Sound, and spent Sunday in Wet Jacket Arm, where there were large numbers of porpoises and cow-fish. These cow-fish when hurt rush ashore and bellow like a cow. We stayed in North Port, in Dusky Sound, for nearly two days, as were not able to get out on account of the sea. While there, however, we caught a great number of crayfish. We went into George Sound and saw the place where the “Tarawera” goes every summer. In this sound the water is so deep that the “ Stella ” could be moored to trees on each side of an inlet. We hauled a boat up a dry waterfall to a lake some height above the sea Marble can be seen sticking out of the sides of the hill around the lake, which is about three miles long and half of that in width. At one end of the lake is a big stream which comes down a long valley. The day was not altogether a fine one, and so we did not enjoy our trip as much as we might have done. When we returned to the ship all hands had to change their clothes being wet through by the rain. Next morning on going on deck we found ourselves in Bligh Sound. The captain had not been here for nearly thirteen years, with the result that when we got near the end of the sound the steamer ran aground. She was got off allright early the next morning about 4 o’clock, and when we awoke she was steaming gaily down Milford Sound. The hills in this sound, as in most of the others, are very high and steep, and also covered with snow. At the head of this sound the Union Company have anchored a buoy from which, as an anchorage, can be seen a splendid glacier running down a pretty valley. Whilst some of the men proceeded to the Sutherland Falls, the boys bad some good duck-shooting on the beach. After supplying ourselves with fresh water we proceeded up the coast. The next place at which we landed was Brown’s Bay, from which we took some wool. We then went to the Steeples at Westport and got hundreds of sea-swallows’ eggs, but as the steamer could not cross the Westport bar, we were compelled to land at that town in boats. Early next morning we were at Cape Farewell, and having landed stores there, were, about noon, in Astrolabe Road, where a buoy was painted. We next went to Stephen Island, and caught an assortment of lizards. On Sunday morning at 8 o’clock we arrived back in Wellington after a most pleasant and enjoyable trip, during which time we had sailed completely round the South Island of New Zealand. Wiramu Parea.

Editorial Notice. We should feel obliged if subscribers, when sending their subscriptions by post, would enclose us a note, or at all events, write their names inside the envelope, Only a day or two ago we received a P.O.O. for 3s., but, as no name was written inside the envelope, we do not know to whom we are indebted. Would the sender kindly write to us as soon as possible, so that we shall be able to know whom to credit.


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THE WELLINGTONIAN

December 12, 1891


December 12, 1891

THE WELLINGTONIAN

13

The Wellingtonian 1891 (MAY/AUG/DEC)  

The three inaugural issues of the Wellingtonian Newsletter

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