Page 1

2015

ANNUAL

REPORT

COUNTY OF WELLINGTON ONTARIO PROVINCIAL POLICE www.wellington.ca | www.opp.ca


COUNTY OF WELLINGTON

O.P.P. VINCE HAWKES COMMISSIONER, O.P.P.

As I approach the start of my third year as Commissioner of the Ontario Provincial Police, I am proud to contribute to the Wellington County O.P.P. 2015 Annual Report. Our members in Wellington County continued to make significant contributions to the communities they served last year, many of which directly support the priorities and goals set out in the O.P.P.’s overall 2014-2016 Strategic Plan. An important element of the Strategic Plan was the December launch of the O.P.P.’s integrated and comprehensive Mental Health Strategy: Our People, Our Communities. The Strategy is a two-pronged approach to supporting people in our workforce and our communities who are experiencing mental health crises. It is the result of considerable effort and commitment on the part of O.P.P. members throughout the province and one of the most comprehensive multi-sector collaborations we have taken part in since I became Commissioner. Through the Strategy, the O.P.P. is working towards achieving two things: The first is to support the mental health of our members and their families. The second goal is to provide our members with the necessary resources and education to enhance police interactions with people who experience mental health issues or a mental health crisis. I was pleased to learn that, in 2015, the Wellington County O.P.P. collaborated with the Canadian Mental Health Association Waterloo Wellington Dufferin (CMHA WWD) to implement an Integrated Mobile Police and Crisis Team (I.M.P.A.C.T.). This programme allows crisis workers from the CMHA to work alongside O.P.P. officers when dealing with calls for service that involve addictions and mental health crisis issues. This proactive approach to supporting individuals with complex needs aims to decrease the number of these types of calls our officers and their emergency service partners respond to, which in turn, contributes to their wellness. I am proud of Wellington County O.P.P. for being one of the first O.P.P. detachments to have full in-house, policedriven mobile crisis response capabilities. This programme is aligned with the principles of the Ontario Mobilization and Engagement Model for Community Policing, a framework through which the O.P.P. and other policing partners are strengthening cross sector, multi-agency partnerships and working towards safer and healthier communities. Another notable accomplishment was the six-year contract Wellington County O.P.P. signed with the County. A contract of this duration is not the norm and it reflects the unique and healthy relationship our Wellington County members have with the people who live and work throughout the region. A contract of this duration allows the O.P.P. and Wellington County to work toward completing various projects as well as develop new strategic public safety programmes. I am pleased to see other O.P.P. detachments and Ontario municipalities continuing to work toward entering into similar contract models. Wellington County O.P.P. provided excellent leadership, emergency management and response following the tornado that touched down in the North Wellington area in August. Our members, the affected townships and counties as well as the various agencies that stepped up to provide emergency and other services were stellar in their collaborative efforts to deal with the many community members who were affected by this devastating weather event. These are just a few examples of the excellent work and accomplishments of our uniform, civilian and auxiliary O.P.P. members who serve in Wellington County. As the O.P.P. enters into the final year of its three-year Strategic Plan, it is clear that the leadership and collaborative role that our O.P.P. members continue to fulfill in the County sets an increasingly high standard in community policing. It is a standard that I am extremely proud of. Please take the time to read the County of Wellington O.P.P. 2015 Annual Report. It serves as an important reminder of what police and communities can accomplish when they work together toward the safety and well-being of all. Commissioner J.V.N. (Vince) Hawkes

JOHN CAIN CHIEF SUPERINTENDENT

SCOTT LAWSON DETACHMENT COMMANDER

Wellington County’s reputation as one of the safest places in Canada didn’t happen by accident; it took the commitment and dedication of the men and women of the O.P.P., along with the assistance and engagement of the community.

As your Ontario Provincial Police (O.P.P.) Detachment Commander, it is again a pleasure to share our O.P.P. Annual Report for 2015. With the support of our Police Services Board, this illustrative overview has become somewhat of a mainstay for us to enable our residents to better understand who we are, what we do and most importantly, how we work together to make Wellington County such a wonderful community.

The O.P.P. is in the midst of a significant shift in the way we deliver policing services. We recognize that no one individual or service can do it all. We need community partners, citizens and neighbours, agencies and police to mobilize for community safety and well-being. Wellington County O.P.P. has already taken steps in that direction with the creation of a special partnership with the Canadian Mental Health Association-Waterloo Wellington Dufferin. The Integrated Mobile Police and Crisis Team (I.M.P.A.C.T.) pairs specially-trained mental health care professionals with Wellington County O.P.P. officers to ensure those in crisis receive appropriate care. Our community stakeholders have been valuable partners as our officers contend with emerging local crime trends, such as cottage burglaries or the theft of transport trucks and cargo. As always, the O.P.P. will continue efforts to encourage safe driving behaviours, through enforcement and education initiatives. In 2015, Wellington County O.P.P. placed sixth out of all O.P.P. detachments in the number of charges laid for impaired driving, aggressive driving, distracted driving and failure to wear a seatbelt. Disappointing results from the 2015 Festive RIDE campaign show there is still work to be done to reduce the number of drivers who drink and drive in Wellington County. The O.P.P.’s “Focused Patrol” project is designed to identify and address growing community crime and traffic problems like impaired driving, through the analysis and interpretation of the data collected by our officers. In 2016, Wellington County O.P.P. will use these analytical tools to get those who drink and drive off the road. Unexpected events are always a challenge for first responders. In August, a category EF-2 tornado touched down in Teviotdale, causing extensive damage to local farms and homes, particularly those owned by the Mennonite community. The O.P.P. worked hard with its partners in Wellington County to help the Mennonite community get back on its feet and repair the destruction. We will confront many other obstacles in the year ahead. The Ontario Provincial Police will continue to work closely with citizens and elected officials in Wellington County to overcome these challenges in our ongoing effort to deliver effective and efficient policing services. Thank you and have a safe year. Chief Superintendent John Cain

PAGE 2 | COUNTY OF WELLINGTON O.P.P. ANNUAL REPORT 2015

Last year I talked about mobilizing and engaging the community, what we meant by community policing and how transparent we need to be to explain how “police work” is done and how “community” fits in as partners in the overall community safety effort. The same theme permeates the pages of this report and reminds every one of the importance of community involvement to help solve crime, traffic and victimization issues.

“I AM CERTAIN THAT 2016 WILL BRING A NEW SET OF CHALLENGES. HOWEVER, I AM CONFIDENT THAT AS WE ANALYZE, PREDICT AND FOCUS OUR RESOURCES, WE CAN EFFECTIVELY TACKLE WHATEVER COMES OUR WAY. “ 2015 saw a number of landmark accomplishments starting in January with the signing of a six-year contract with the County of Wellington. This signing is a true testament to the confidence that our Police Services Board, elected officials and the broader citizens in our community have placed on us as their professional policing service. We are humbled but equally challenged to ensure that we always maintain the public’s trust in the services we are sworn to provide. Wellington County O.P.P. realized another significant achievement this year with the true operationalization of our Integrated Mobile Police and Crisis Team (I.M.P.A.C.T.) to address community mental health and addiction. These achievements illustrate the importance of


collaboration as highlighted by Commissioner Hawkes in his remarks. “A framework through which the O.P.P. and other policing partners are strengthening cross sector, multi-agency partnerships and working towards safer and healthier communities”. We just can’t do it alone. I am very proud that Wellington County O.P.P. has and continues to play such a significant leadership role in the delivery of policing to our residents. We have been recognized by our peers across the province as being progressive, forward-thinking, intelligence-led and effectively structured to address the long-term sustainability of our service. The acquisition and implementation of technology has played a key role in our ability to be more effective but equally more strategic as we respond to the ever-changing trends locally, provincially, nationally and even globally. I am certain that 2016 will bring a new set of challenges. However, I am confident that as we analyze, predict and focus our resources, we can effectively tackle whatever comes our way. Our objective is to direct those efforts to the right places, at the right times, addressing the right issues all with a mind to allocate our finite resources to provide the best possible outcomes for all of us. This evidence-based approach will win the day and be sure to better position our delivery of services now and well into the future. So we once again demonstrate throughout the pages of this report that the foundation of public safety is engaging our community, working with our stakeholders, identifying risks and collaborating on solutions. Together, Wellington County O.P.P. will continue to lead the way in delivering professional, efficient, community-based policing services and be a part of the greatest place to work, live and play! Respectfully, Scott Lawson Ontario Provincial Police Detachment Commander Wellington County

cover: ATV patrol with Constables Patrick Mullan and Melissa Tutin Welcome 2 and 3 Bigs In Blue 4 I.M.P.A.C.T. 4 2015 Memorial Run 4 New Technology 4 New Legislation 5 ATV Law Changes 5 Top Ten Calls for Service 5 Roundabouts Nine Roundabout Tips 6 Where to Yield 7 Roundabout Signage 6 and 7 Victim Services 8 MADD 8 Safe Communities 8 Crimestoppers 9 Break and Enters in 2015 9 Auxilliary Unit 10 Retirements /Promotions 11 Emergency Contacts 11 Awards Ceremony 11 Criminal Records Check 11 New Recruits 12 Recruiting: Join the O.P.P. 12 Acknowledgement 12

Back row: Jeremy Vink, Kent Smith, Russ Spicer. Front row: Warden George Bridge, Councillor Lynda White (Chair).

A MESSAGE FROM THE 2015 POLICE SERVICES BOARD CHAIR councillor lynda white In 2015, I was extremely pleased to once again serve as the Chair of the Wellington County Police Services Board. This is the seventh time I have chaired the Board since my election to County Council in 2000. The makeup of the Board this past year did change with the municipal election in the fall of 2014. Joining me on the Board is Warden George Bridge, Past Chair Russ Spicer, Jeremy Vink and Kent Smith. Secretary to the Board is Scott Wilson, the Chief Administrative Officer for the County. One of the major accomplishments of this Board in 2015 was the six-year contract we signed with the Ontario Provincial Police (O.P.P.). This is a significant contract – one that many other municipalities and detachments in the Province are currently working to imitate. The most important aspect of this contract is its length. This gives the O.P.P. and the County six years to work together to complete various projects, develop new programmes and in general, ensure continued public safety for the residents in Wellington County.

“The construction of the Arthur roundabout provided for a great dialogue with the community, resulting in the development of a comprehensive plan to keep motorists, cyclists and pedestrians safe. “ Please take a moment to look through our Annual Report. I know you will be pleased to learn of the many different community initiatives, organizations and special projects our O.P.P. officers are involved with on a daily basis. The Police Services Board reviews and approves the operating budget for policing in Wellington annually. The budget is then submitted to County Council for approval, normally occurring by the end of February. The 2015 operating budget included the following items: - The Ontario Provincial Police contract at $16,432,800; - Principal and interest on the long-term debt for the Rockwood Operations Centre of $365,500; - Principal and interest on the debt for the North Wellington Operations Centre of $229,100; - Maintenance and operations of the County- owned police facilities in Rockwood, Palmerston and Fergus of $450,200; and

- All other items including Board expenses, parking ticket and false alarm administration of $146,500. In 2015, the County of Wellington constructed two new roundabouts - in Mapleton and Wellington North Townships. The latter in particular generated a lot of interest given its proximity to a school and community centre. The construction of the Arthur roundabout provided for a great dialogue with the community, resulting in the development of a comprehensive plan to keep motorists, cyclists and pedestrians safe. The plan includes initiatives such as two new road safety videos on roundabout use aimed at pedestrians and large vehicular traffic. The videos have been posted on the County of Wellington website. They are also being made available to schools throughout the County, our libraries, the O.P.P., area transport companies, interested safety groups and driving schools, among other businesses and organizations. The centrespread of this report also pertains to roundabout safety. Most enjoyable for me this past year was taking part in the “Shop with a Cop” programme which took place in Arthur in May and Drayton in December. More than 50 students from St. John Catholic School in Arthur and Maryborough Public School took part by shopping alongside Wellington O.P.P. officers, Wellington Guelph Emergency Medical Technicians (EMT’s) and members from the local fire departments. The students shopped at local grocery stores after being given an assignment to plan a week’s menu for an imaginary family. After completing their shopping, the food was donated to the local food bank. This programme helps build relationships between students and First Responders in Wellington while at the same time stocking food bank shelves. The students I teamed with knew their assignment and were knowledgeable and fun. I would like to thank TD/Canada Trust in Arthur and Mount Forest for providing the funds for this initiative. On behalf of the Wellington County Police Services Board, I would like to thank the men and women of Wellington O.P.P. who are dedicated to providing public safety for all of the residents of Wellington County. We appreciate your service. Sincerely, Lynda White Chair, Wellington County Police Services Board

county of wellington O.P.P. annual report 2015 | page 3


COUNTY OF WELLINGTON

O.P.P.

NORTH WELLINGTON OPERATIONS CENTRE PROVINCIAL CONSTABLE DEB FARNELL

BIGS IN BLUE

2015 MEMORIAL RUN

Wellington County O.P.P. has partnered with Big Brothers Big Sisters of Centre Wellington and the Upper Grand District School Board for a 16-week pilot initiative to deliver a mentoring programme to a few lucky local students. Big Brothers Big Sisters provided training to successful applicants and matched each O.P.P. member involved with a child (or children in one Officer’s case) chosen by the school.

The National Peace Officer’s Memorial Run (NPOMR) and Ride took place the last week in September. Four members of the Wellington County Ontario Provincial Police participated. Constables Rudy Bracnik, Christina Barraco and David Banasik rode bicycles and Cheri Rockefeller completed the run. The NPOMR and Ride were both established to raise awareness for the Police and Peace Officer’s Memorial Service held annually on Parliament Hill in Ottawa.

There are six officers currently taking part in the programme spending an hour, once a week in the school setting.

The Run to Remember is a 460 km relay that makes its way through the communities in Ontario between the Ontario Police Memorial in Toronto and the National Memorial on Parliament Hill.

The goal is to establish positive relationships and life skills. They can be seen playing sports, board games, cooking and doing crafts. Local principals, teachers, parents, and kids are praising the merits of this programme and hope to see it grow.

The Ride to Remember made its official departure from the Ontario Police College in Alymer covering 700 kms before ending at the National Memorial on Parliament Hill.

There is now a list of children hoping to take part in the programme at each of the involved schools, and officers are enjoying the benefit of an hour a week mentoring children, and being involved in pro-active community policing.

I.M.P.A.C.T. TEAM

Left to right: Constables David Banasik, Christina Barraco and Rudy Bracnik.

The Run and Ride raised money for the families of police officers who have lost their lives in the line of duty. Donations also go towards the construction of any memorial built for fallen officers as well as other charities.

On December 9, Wellington County Ontario Provincial Police (O.P.P.) and the Canadian Mental Health Association (CMHA) Waterloo Wellington Dufferin signed an agreement bringing a new Integrated Mobile Police and Crisis Team (I.M.P.A.C.T.) to Wellington County. This enhanced service will improve the crisis response for County residents. Officers will work with a mental health clinician allowing the appropriate services to be provided to individuals dealing with complex mental health situations at the right time and in the right place. The clinicians can also make referrals to a wide range of mental health and addiction services in Wellington County. This collaboration involved the input from numerous agencies and services in Wellington County and received support from the County of Wellington. The programme is funded by the Waterloo Wellington Local Health Integration Network. The signing of the agreement formalized an already existing partnership that has been in place since May 2015 when mental health clinicians employed by CMHA co-located at the Wellington County O.P.P. Operations Centre in Fergus, one of the first of its kind for the O.P.P.

Current Wellington County O.P.P. cruiser equipped with Mobile for Public Safety (MPS).

NEW TECHNOLOGY FOR WELLINGTON COUNTY O.P.P. Commissioner Vince Hawkes is implementing new technological advances to focus on analytical processes that will maximize our efficiencies. New cruisers in Wellington County are now equipped with MPS (Mobile for Public Safety) work stations. This is an extension of the Computer Aided Dispatch (I/CAD) system used by the Provincial Communications Centres (PCCs) to manage incidents. MPS provides officers with several in-car functions including viewing, creating and managing incidents. Secure text messaging to call takers, dispatchers and other MPS users as well as access to information about locations, addresses and people involved in an incident. This is information that may be essential to ensure public and officer safety when responding to calls for service. Inspector Scott Lawson and Helen Fishburn sign the Mental Health partnership agreement

Along with the above services, MPS incorporates GPS location reporting, which enhances officer safety and assists with resource and incident management.

PAGE 4 | COUNTY OF WELLINGTON O.P.P. ANNUAL REPORT 2015


NEW RULES OF THE ROAD EFFECTIVE SEPTEMBER 1, 2015 MINISTRY OF TRANSPORTATION FINE* AS LISTED IS A SET FINE INCLUDING VICTIM FINE SURCHARGE AND COURT COSTS. PENALTY EFFECTIVE SEPTEMBER 1, 2015 DISTRACTED DRIVING $490* FINE AND THREE DEMERIT POINTS; MINIMUM 30-DAY SUSPENSION FOR NOVICE DRIVERS

“DOORING” OF CYCLISTS OR VEHICLES $365* FINE AND THREE DEMERIT POINTS IMPROPER LIGHTING ON BICYCLE $110* FINE PASSING CYCLISTS DRIVERS MUST LEAVE A ONE-METRE DISTANCE WHEN PASSING CYCLISTS OR FACE A $110* FINE AND TWO DEMERIT POINTS; $180* FINE AND TWO DEMERIT POINTS FOR FAILING TO LEAVE A ONEMETRE DISTANCE WHEN PASSING CYCLISTS IN A COMMUNITY SAFETY ZONE

TOP TEN CALLS FOR SERVICE 2015

POLICE ASSISTANCE

2,667 TRAFFIC COMPLAINTS

2,347

MOTOR VEHICLE COLLISIONS

1,728

SLOW DOWN, MOVE OVER REQUIREMENT

911 CALL/ 911 MISDIAL (POCKET DIAL)

NOW INCLUDES TOW TRUCKS STOPPED AT ROADSIDE TO ASSIST;

1,513

$490* FINE FOR VIOLATION POLICE INFORMATION

EFFECTIVE JANUARY 1, 2016 DRIVERS MUST YIELD THE WHOLE ROADWAY TO PEDESTRIANS AT SCHOOL CROSSINGS AND PEDESTRIAN CROSSOVERS.

893 FALSE ALARMS

ATV LAW CHANGES ON JULY 1, 2015, THE PROVINCE IMPLEMENTED NEW CHANGES TO ORVs AND ATVs. THESE CHANGES INCLUDE: • Allowing more types of off-road vehicles (ORVs) and all-terrain vehicles (ATVs) - including two-up ATVs, side-by-side ORVs and utility terrain vehicles (UTVs) - on the shoulder of public roads, where permitted • Mandating that all riders - including drivers and passengers of all ages - wear an approved motorcycle helmet and use a seatbelt or foot rests, where applicable

766 THEFTS (DOES NOT INCLUDE AUTO THEFT)

626

• Children under the age of eight will not be allowed as a passenger on any ATV/ORV operating on-road

TRAFFIC HAZARD

• Limiting the number of passengers to the number of available seating positions

516

• Requiring compliance labels on all ATVs/ORVs • Clarifying access and exemptions for farmers and trappers and for Far Northern Ontario municipalities Please see the Ontario Ministry of Transportation website for a full/detailed list of the changes.

DOMESTIC DISTURBANCE

379 R.I.D.E. INITIATIVES

335 COUNTY OF WELLINGTON O.P.P. ANNUAL REPORT 2015 | PAGE 5


COUNTY OF WELLINGTON

O.P.P.

STAFF SERGEANT VICTORIA DAWSON

STAFF SERGEANT KRISTA MILLER

ROUNDABOUT SAFETY HERE ARE NINE ROUNDABOUT TIPS:

1

WHERE TO YIELD IN A ROUNDABOUT

Slow down when approaching a roundabout.

A. YIELD LINES

A

2 3

Vehicles must stop behind the yield lines if other vehicles already occupy the roundabout lane they are attempting to merge into.

Keep right of “splitter island”.

B

Choose the correct entry lane.

4

Observe the crosswalk and yield to pedestrians.

5

Move to the yield line and wait for a gap in traffic before entering the roundabout. Yield to all traffic (including cyclists), regardless of their position.

6

Do not enter beside someone already in the roundabout because they may be exiting. Drivers in the roundabout have the right-of-way.

7

Within the roundabout, always travel counterclockwise and do not stop. You have the right-of-way over entering traffic.

8

Do not pass other vehicles in the roundabout and give large vehicles extra space.

9

As you approach your desired exit, use you right turn signal and take the exit while maintaining a slow speed.

B. YIELD TO PEDESTRIAN Vehicles must yield to pedestrians prior to entering the roundabout.

C. “SHARK TEETH” A series of white triangles have been painted on the roadway at the entrances and exits of the roundabout in Arthur. Called “shark teeth”, the triangles serve as a yieldto-pedestrians line. It is used to indicate the point at which a vehicle approaching a crosswalk must yield to pedestrians. THEY DO NOT SHOW THE DIRECTION OF TRAVEL OF VEHICLES. “Shark teeth” are part of a new provincial standard for non stop-controlled pedestrian crossings. The Arthur roundabout is the first in the County to include these markings in the roundabout design.

C

Whether you are a pedestrian or motorist, the County of Wellington wants you to be safe when in a roundabout. As a pedestrian, cross only when you feel it is safe to do so and always be aware of the traffic around you. As a motorist, proceed at a speed that you feel is safe and always signal your intention to exit.

ROUNDABOUT SIGNAGE: IF TURNING LEFT, GET IN LEFT LANE ROUNDABOUT AHEAD

PAGE 6 | COUNTY OF WELLINGTON O.P.P. ANNUAL REPORT 2015

IF TURNING RIGHT, GET IN RIGHT LANE

IF GOING STRAIGHT THROUGH YOU CAN USE EITHER LANE. DO NOT CHANGE LANES WITHIN THE ROUNDABOUT

KEEP TO THE RIGHT

YIELD TO ALL TRAFFIC IN THE ROUNDABOUT

ONE-WAY TRAFFIC THAT IS COUNTER-CLOCKWISE IN A ROUNDABOUT

YIELD TO PEDESTRIAN

RIGHT LANE ENDS

COUNTY OF WELLINGTON O.P.P. ANNUAL REPORT 2015 | PAGE 7


COUNTY OF WELLINGTON

O.P.P.

STAFF SERGEANT VICTORIA DAWSON

STAFF SERGEANT KRISTA MILLER

ROUNDABOUT SAFETY HERE ARE NINE ROUNDABOUT TIPS:

1

WHERE TO YIELD IN A ROUNDABOUT

Slow down when approaching a roundabout.

A. YIELD LINES

A

2 3

Vehicles must stop behind the yield lines if other vehicles already occupy the roundabout lane they are attempting to merge into.

Keep right of “splitter island”.

B

Choose the correct entry lane.

4

Observe the crosswalk and yield to pedestrians.

5

Move to the yield line and wait for a gap in traffic before entering the roundabout. Yield to all traffic (including cyclists), regardless of their position.

6

Do not enter beside someone already in the roundabout because they may be exiting. Drivers in the roundabout have the right-of-way.

7

Within the roundabout, always travel counterclockwise and do not stop. You have the right-of-way over entering traffic.

8

Do not pass other vehicles in the roundabout and give large vehicles extra space.

9

As you approach your desired exit, use you right turn signal and take the exit while maintaining a slow speed.

B. YIELD TO PEDESTRIAN Vehicles must yield to pedestrians prior to entering the roundabout.

C. “SHARK TEETH” A series of white triangles have been painted on the roadway at the entrances and exits of the roundabout in Arthur. Called “shark teeth”, the triangles serve as a yieldto-pedestrians line. It is used to indicate the point at which a vehicle approaching a crosswalk must yield to pedestrians. THEY DO NOT SHOW THE DIRECTION OF TRAVEL OF VEHICLES. “Shark teeth” are part of a new provincial standard for non stop-controlled pedestrian crossings. The Arthur roundabout is the first in the County to include these markings in the roundabout design.

C

Whether you are a pedestrian or motorist, the County of Wellington wants you to be safe when in a roundabout. As a pedestrian, cross only when you feel it is safe to do so and always be aware of the traffic around you. As a motorist, proceed at a speed that you feel is safe and always signal your intention to exit.

ROUNDABOUT SIGNAGE: IF TURNING LEFT, GET IN LEFT LANE ROUNDABOUT AHEAD

PAGE 6 | COUNTY OF WELLINGTON O.P.P. ANNUAL REPORT 2015

IF TURNING RIGHT, GET IN RIGHT LANE

IF GOING STRAIGHT THROUGH YOU CAN USE EITHER LANE. DO NOT CHANGE LANES WITHIN THE ROUNDABOUT

KEEP TO THE RIGHT

YIELD TO ALL TRAFFIC IN THE ROUNDABOUT

ONE-WAY TRAFFIC THAT IS COUNTER-CLOCKWISE IN A ROUNDABOUT

YIELD TO PEDESTRIAN

RIGHT LANE ENDS

COUNTY OF WELLINGTON O.P.P. ANNUAL REPORT 2015 | PAGE 7


COUNTY OF WELLINGTON

O.P.P.

CENTRE WELLINGTON OPERATIONS CENTRE PROVINCIAL CONSTABLE CHRISTOPHER BIONDI

VICTIM SERVICES WELLINGTON IS GRATEFUL FOR THEIR VOLUNTEERS The kindness of strangers can make the difference in the life of a victim. Victim Services Wellington (VSW) is grateful to their team of approximately 100 Volunteer Crisis Responders who are available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, all year to support victims and their families through difficult times. VSW is a non-profit organization, established in 1997, which has partnered with the Ontario Provincial Police and Guelph Police Services to deliver support to approximately 1,000 victims of crime and tragedy in our area each year. On average, VSW Volunteers responded to 166 calls for service in Wellington County during 2015. Crisis Responders are responsible for providing short-term emotional support during immediate, on-scene assistance and to provide information and referrals to community groups and organizations. VSW volunteers complete 50 hours of comprehensive training, both in-class and e-learning. Each volunteer is trained extensively in communication, grief and bereavement, crisis intervention and trauma. Crisis Responders come from all walks of life and bring their own life experience and knowledge of victims’ issues. POSITION REQUIREMENTS • Mature, responsible.

PROJECT LIFESAVER Project Lifesaver Guelph Wellington is dedicated to assisting and responding to the challenges caregivers have in finding wandering loved ones who suffer from Alzheimer’s, Autism or other forms of cognitive impairment. Participants of the programme wear a bracelet that is a battery-operated wrist transmitter. It emits a unique radio frequency every second, 24 hours a day. When a caregiver notifies the O.P.P. that a client has gone missing, specially-trained Police Officers will use portable directional antennae to search for and locate the missing person. Project Lifesaver Guelph Wellington is not a replacement for the attention and supervision of caregivers, but is a valuable tool that can be utilized to save lives and reduce search times. For additional information on Project Lifesaver, please contact Victim Services Wellington at 519.824.1212.

MADD The Wellington Chapter of MADD (Mother’s Against Drunk Driving) is extremely thankful for all of the hard work the Ontario Provincial Police do to stop the senseless tragedies that occur when people choose to drink and drive. The Wellington Chapter of MADD is lucky to have an extremely dedicated member in Sergeant Steve Thomas who actively attends meetings and participates in the local MADD activities. In September 2015, Sergeant Thomas was honoured with an award to thank him for the countless hours he dedicates to our MADD chapter. In November 2015, our chapter participated in the Elora Night Parade, with our largest group of volunteers to date. Over 15 volunteers walked the parade and handed out candy canes to the children and insurance folders to the adults. Our chapter continues to grow but we are always looking for volunteers! We look forward to an exciting start to 2016 and if you are interested in volunteering, please email madd.wc@gmail.com.

• Good communication, interpersonal, and problem solving skills.

SAFE COMMUNITIES

• Able to commit to one year of service and the minimum monthly shift requirements (four 8-hour shifts per month).

Safe Communities Wellington County (SCWC) is a County-wide, non profit charitable organization with the primary focus of making Wellington County the safest and healthiest place in which to live, learn, work and play in Canada.

• Satisfactory reference and criminal records check with no outstanding issues before the courts. • Valid driver’s license and access to a reliable vehicle. • Cell phone and email. The staff and volunteers of VSW are dedicated to providing the best services to victims of crime and tragedy. They are grateful to local individuals, agencies and community organizations that encourage our efforts to support all victims in Guelph and Wellington County.

Sergeant Steve Thomas receiving an award from MADD Wellington President Liz Kent.

SCWC encompasses local community groups, including;, Erin COPs, Guelph Eramosa Safe Communities, Minto Safe Communities, Puslinch COPs and Wellington North Safe Communities. Motor vehicle collisions, falls, and intentional selfharm continue to be priorities within Wellington County with active priority groups spearheading each. The RedThumbReminder Campaign to eliminate texting and driving, older adult falls prevention, and SafeTalk workshop’s have been organized throughout Wellington County in 2015 to help prevent injuries from happening, and raise awareness about SCWC and programmes and services that are available. The inaugural Safe Communities Day was held on October 1 at the Royal Distributing Athletic Performance Centre in Guelph-Eramosa Township. Grades 5 and 6 students from Wellington Catholic District School Board learned about safety and injury prevention from public and private organizations throughout Wellington County.

To apply to volunteer, please go to www.vswguelph.on.ca and click on Volunteer with Us.

Community involvement is paramount to the success of Safe Communities Wellington County. Any individual or organization interested in participating in Safe Communities is invited to contact Programme Co-ordinator Christine Veit at safecwc@hotmail.com or 226.820.1413. Follow SCWC on Twitter @safecwc and on Facebook.

PAGE 8 | COUNTY OF WELLINGTON O.P.P. ANNUAL REPORT 2015

Two local Wellington County youth standing beneath the Safe Communities sign on Wellington Road 18.


CRIME STOPPERS Growth has been the motto for Crime Stoppers Guelph Wellington (CSGW). Not only has the programme been able to increase its profile to attract new, qualified board members, but it has also been able to broaden awareness within the community. Whether it is interest in partnering on road signs in the north end of the county, conducting student presentations in Guelph, Wellington North Township, and Town of Minto, or offering seniors presentations throughout the area, CSGW is constantly looking for new ways to share its message to new audiences. Even more new and exciting initiatives are planned for 2016, starting with the Decal Programme which launched in January. In its twenty-eighth year of offering an anonymous, confidential method of reporting information about criminal activity, CSGW has embraced social media, such as Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and YouTube, to further its impact on the community. It is now easier than ever to get up to date information on outstanding CSGW fundraisers, awareness events, volunteer opportunities, and most importantly, crimes within the County of Wellington and City of Guelph. The board, led by Chair Raymond Tout and Vice Chair Peter Canning, along with Treasurer John Svensson and Secretary Therin Andrew, is comprised of men and women from the community who are committed to reducing, resolving and preventing crime. If you want to know how you can be part of the CSGW family, go to our website www.csgw.tips. Crime Stoppers Guelph Wellington held its first fundraiser in Wellington North in October 2015. The shredding event was well received with more than $900 raised. Here, board members, local dignitaries, FileBank representatives, and CSGW staff take a break for a photo. Not only was the event a financial success, but it also helped countless area residents reduce their chance of becoming victims of identity theft.

Remember, “It’s YOUR community … MAKE THE CALL!” Toll-free 1.800.222.TIPS (8477)

Mount Forest

90

BREAK AND ENTERS IN WELLINGTON COUNTY - 2015

Harriston MINTO

Palmerston

WELLINGTON NORTH 9

Arthur CENTRE WELLINGTON

6

ERIN

MAPLETON Drayton

Elora

Fergus

86 24

GUELPH ERAMOSA

2015 BREAK AND ENTER DAY OF THE WEEK Mon

42

Tues

31

Wed

36

Thurs

Fri

22

27

Sat

25

Sun

7

42

6

Guelph

2015 BREAK AND ENTER - TIME OF DAY

PUSLINCH

39

BETWEEN 12:00AM - 4:00 AM

35

BETWEEN 4:00 AM - 8:00 AM

61

BETWEEN 8:00 AM - 12:00 PM

33

BETWEEN 12:00 PM - 4:00 PM

33

BETWEEN 4:00 PM - 8:00 PM

24

401

BETWEEN 8:00 PM - 12:00 AM

COUNTY OF WELLINGTON O.P.P. ANNUAL REPORT 2015 | PAGE 9


COUNTY OF WELLINGTON

O.P.P.

SOUTH WELLINGTON OPERATIONS CENTRE PROVINCIAL CONSTABLE JENNIFER TSCHANZ

WELLINGTON COUNTY AUXILIARY UNIT The Auxiliary Unit of the Wellington County O.P.P. is part of a contingent of over 850 dedicated volunteers across the province. The Auxiliary Programme operates under the mandate of Ontario’s Police Services Act, with the official Mission Statement: “To provide fully trained volunteer Auxiliary members to assist in the delivery of traffic safety and community-based crime prevention initiatives and; to perform police duties only in special circumstances, including an emergency that the police officers of the O.P.P. are not sufficiently numerous to deal with.” In Wellington County, the 21 members of the Auxiliary Unit are utilized extensively to help meet community policing, crime prevention, and public service objectives. They assist with many community events including parades, fairs, food drives, R.I.D.E. programmes and marine patrols, SafeGuard property inspections, and much more. Auxiliary members are also regularly found on patrol with front line officers. In 2015, the Auxiliary Unit volunteered 4,644 hours to the County.

AUXILIARY MEMBERS COME FROM VIRTUALLY ALL WALKS OF LIFE INCLUDING FARMERS, STUDENTS, MECHANICS, BUSINESS PROFESSIONALS, AND TEACHERS. Auxiliary members come from virtually all walks of life including farmers, students, mechanics, business professionals, and teachers. Many join the programme to obtain “hands-on” experience in policing, while others volunteer strictly to give back to their community. All members undergo a series of screening tests including general aptitude and psychological assessments and a thorough background check. Successful candidates receive training in self-defence, use of force, powers of arrest, communications, firearms qualification, note taking, and O.P.P. policies and procedures. Volunteering with the O.P.P. Auxiliary is an experience like no other. Auxiliary members get to experience first-hand the excitement and challenges of policing the County of Wellington. Auxiliary members regularly patrol with Wellington County officers, giving them the chance to attend calls for service and work closely with the officer during their tour of duty. The Wellington County Auxiliary Unit is highly respected both locally and provincially, with members having received numerous awards including the Commissioner’s Citation for Bravery, the Commissioner’s Citation for Lifesaving, St. John’s Ambulance Lifesaving Award, and various Auxiliary Programme awards. Further information on the Auxiliary Programme, including details on the application process, can be found under the “What We Do” section of www.opp.ca.

Wellington County O.P.P. Auxiliary members at the stuff a cruiser event at Zehrs, Fergus.

CONESTOGA COLLEGE STUDENTS PAIR WITH WELLINGTON COUNTY O.P.P. OFFICERS Advanced Police Studies is a year-long graduate programme available through Conestoga College. Each semester concludes with a five-week block placement where students are paired with a police officer from a local and/ or university police service. During placement, students shadow their coach officers and attend the majority of calls their coach officers respond to. This past fall semester, four students from Conestoga College completed their placement at the South and Centre Wellington Operations Centres. The partnership between the O.P.P. and Conestoga College allows students to observe how a rural area is monitored by police and how officers respond to potentially stressful situations. While on shift, students are exposed to a variety of emergencies, including mental health calls, domestic situations, motor vehicle collisions, other traffic violations and sudden deaths. In addition to responding to calls, students observe other officer responsibilities such as attending court and completing paperwork. Overall, the students had a positive experience and would consider a career working for the Wellington County O.P.P. Pictured left to right: Emily Richardson (Fergus), Alex Taylor (Rockwood), Adam Shutsa (Fergus), Reta Jones (Rockwood).

PAGE 10 | COUNTY OF WELLINGTON O.P.P. ANNUAL REPORT 2015


WELLINGTON COUNTY RETIREMENTS AND PROMOTIONS The Wellington County O.P.P. lost four dedicated members to retirement in 2015. Congratulations to Sgt. Jeff Oakley, Sgt. Bob Uridil, Provincial Constable David Beckon and civilian staff member Judy Culp. Thank you all very much for your years of exemplary service. The O.P.P. wishes only the best of health and happiness in the next chapter of your lives.

Sgt. Jeff Oakley receiving a retirement plaque from Inspector Scott Lawson. In 2015 Wellington County O.P.P. promoted two constables to the position of Sergeant. Congratulations to Sergeant Darryl Porterfield and Sergeant Steve Thomas in their new positions with the Wellington O.P.P.

O.P.P. Commissioner Vince Hawkes (center) with award recipients (from left to right) Provincial Constable Josh Debock, Provincial Constable Dave Banasik, Provincial Constable Aleisha Lusk and Provincial Constable Ian Donaldson.

AWARD CEREMONY In November 2015, the West Region O.P.P. Award Ceremony was held in London to recognize officers, civilian staff and community members. Officers and civilian staff were recognized for their dedicated service to the Province of Ontario. Also recognized were the contributions of citizens and visitors who assisted the O.P.P. during traumatic incidents. Wellington County O.P.P. officers Josh DeBock and Ian Donaldson along with Mr. Darryl Fowler received the Commissioner’s Citation for Lifesaving. Mr. Fowler also received the St. John Award for Lifesaving. All three performed CPR and saved the life of a 74-year-old man in Centre Wellington Township. Wellington County O.P.P. constables David Banasik and Ian Donaldson were recognized with the Commissioner’s Citation for Lifesaving and a St. John Award for helping a woman in distress in Centre Wellington.

Sgt. Darryl Porterfield

Sgt. Steve Thomas

EMERGENCY CALLS FOR SERVICE (24 HR TOLL FREE) 911 OR 1.888.310.1122 (ANYWHERE IN ONTARIO) NON-EMERGENCY CALLS FOR SERVICE (24 HR TOLL FREE/ANYWHERE IN ONTARIO) 1.888.310.1122 (TTY) 1.888.310.1133 TWITTER: GENERAL INFORMATION @OPP GENERAL NEWS AND INFORMATION @OPP_NEWS OPP WEST REGION/WEST REGION ACCOUNT @OPP_WR TRAFFIC AND ALERTS OPP PCC WEST REGION @OPP_COMM_WR WEBSITE www.opp.ca

Wellington County O.P.P. Emergency Response Team member Aleisha Lusk was recognized with the Commissioner’s Citation for Lifesaving and a St. John Award for responding to a 9-1-1 call involving a serious motor vehicle collision. After crashing a vehicle, a young man and woman fled the scene and ran into a wooded area during a snow storm. After five hours of searching, they were arrested and treated for hypothermia. Wellington North Township resident Mr. Stephen Riopel was awarded the Commissioner’s Citation for Lifesaving for calling 9-1-1 when he observed a fire at a residence in Wellington North Township and ensured the occupants were able to get out of the home safely.

LONG TERM SERVICE AWARDS POLICE EXEMPLARY SERVICE MEDAL (20 YEARS) Sergeant Debra Anderson Provincial Constable Steven Hunter Sergeant Karen Marquis Provincial Constable Barry Reid Provincial Constable Cheri Rockefeller

QUARTER CENTURY CLUB (25 YEAR PIN) Provincial Constable Louis Berthelot Provincial Constable Linzi Edwards Staff Sergeant Jack Hunjan Sergeant Shawn Jones Provincial Constable Sean Slessor Civilian member Patricia Zadow

POLICE EXEMPLARY SERVICE MEDAL (30-40 YEARS) Provincial Constable David Beckon Provincial Constable Timothy Gillingham Sergeant Bob Uridil

CRIMINAL RECORD CHECKS Wellington County O.P.P. completes thousands of criminal and volunteer record checks each year. Criminal and volunteer record checks are processed at all three Wellington O.P.P. Operation Centres.

Volunteer Employment/Paid Position Criminal Record Search for Pardon Applications Fingerprints

FREE $30.00 $30.00 $26.50

COUNTY OF WELLINGTON O.P.P. ANNUAL REPORT 2015 | PAGE 11


COUNTY OF WELLINGTON

O.P.P.

RECRUITING NEW RECRUITS TO WELLINGTON COUNTY In September 2015 Wellington County O.P.P. had five new recruits join the team. Pictured above, left to right: Dave Green, Brian Kielman, Tyler Beukema, Dave Clark and Brad Griffin. PROVINCIAL CONSTABLE (PC) DAVE GREEN is from Essex County. He grew up in the Georgian Bay area and attended the University of Windsor for a Bachelor of Commerce and MBA. PC Green has owned his own business and worked for a number of years in the financial services industry. PC Green is looking forward to joining the Wellington County O.P.P. team and to serving the visitors and residents of Wellington County. PROVINCIAL CONSTABLE (PC) BRIAN KIELMAN lived with his wife in Moosonee, Ontario prior to being hired by the O.P.P. PC Kielman worked as a Grade 6 Teacher and has completed an undergraduate degree in Forensic Science and Criminology at the University of Windsor. PC Kielman completed his teaching degree at Nipissing University, and is looking forward to starting his career at the South Wellington Operations Centre. PROVINCIAL CONSTABLE (PC) DAVID CLARK was born and raised on a farm in Southwestern Ontario. PC Clark holds a diploma in Police Foundations, as well as an Honours Double Major in Criminology and Psychology from the University of Western Ontario. PC Clark has worked for an armoured car company and part time as a farmer. Prior to joining the O.P.P., PC Clark volunteered as a member of Victim Services and coached flag football. PROVINCIAL CONSTABLE (PC) TYLER BEUKEMA was born in Hanover, Ontario. After graduating high school, PC Beukema attended Seneca College taking Police Foundations. PC Beukema has spent the last 10 years working for the Canadian Border Services Agency as a border services officer. PC Beukema is excited to start his career as Police Officer with the Wellington County O.P.P.

RECRUITING JOIN THE

O.P.P.

HIRING FOR THE PRESENT AND THE FUTURE

DIVERSITY IN OUR PEOPLE AND OUR OPPORTUNITIES The Ontario Provincial Police maintains its tradition of excellence by reflecting the culture and racial diversity of the people it serves.

Become a Constable. A career of Opportunities!

Basic Conditions of Appointment for a Constable

Do you enjoy working with people? Do you value and nurture relationships with members of your community? Become a provincial police constable and take full advantage of a wide range of opportunities that await you. As a Provincial Police Service, the O.P.P. offers a variety of career paths, reflecting law enforcement needs throughout the province, today and in the future. Become a part of our tradition.

• Canadian citizen or permanent resident,

CONTACT INFORMATION

• Certified in First Aid and CPR; and possess a valid Certificate of Results (C.O.R.).

T: 705.329.6660 or T: 1.877.O.P.P..HIRE E: opp.uniform.recruitment@ontario.ca www.opp.ca facebook.com/ oppcareers

• Minimum 18 years of age, • Ontario Grade 12 or equivalent, • Class ‘G’ drivers license, • Full driving privileges with no more than 6 demerit points, • No criminal record for which a pardon has not been received or an absolute/ conditional discharge that has not been sealed,

“THE FUTURE OF OUR ORGANIZATION IS BUILT ON THE TALENT WE HIRE TODAY”

twitter.com/ opp_hire

PROVINCIAL CONSTABLE (PC) BRAD GRIFFIN was raised in Waterloo Region. PC Griffin completed post-secondary schooling at Conestoga College in the policing field. Before joining the O.P.P., PC Griffin worked as a Special Constable at the University of Waterloo. PC Griffin enjoys baseball, hockey, golf and for the past 11 years, has actively participated as a minor hockey coach.

COMMITTEE ACKNOWLEDGEMENT Thank you to Acting Sergeant Adam Houser, Constable Bob Bortolato and Constable Tim Sturgeon for their hard work and dedication in completing this year’s Annual Report. - Staff Sergeant Victoria Dawson

ALTERNATE FORMATS OF THIS PUBLICATION AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST

THE COUNTY OF WELLINGTON O.P.P. ANNUAL REPORT IS DESIGNED AND PUBLISHED BY THE WELLINGTON ADVERTISER. PAGE 12 | COUNTY OF WELLINGTON O.P.P. ANNUAL REPORT 2015

OPP Annual Report 2015  

Wellington County OPP 2015 Annual Report. Ontario Provincial Police. Wellington County OPP.

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