Page 1

COUNTY OF WELLINGTON O.P.P. www.wellington.ca or www.opp.ca


COUNTY OF WELLINGTON

O.P.P.

As the chairperson of the Wellington County Police Service Board, I am proud of the work that the men and women of the Wellington O.P.P. do in our communities. Again this year we will see continued focus on drinking and driving and domestic violence. It is so important to concentrate on these issues as they are unfortunately widespread issues in Wellington County.

FRONT: WARDEN CHRIS WHITE, LYNDA WHITE, BACK: RUSS SPICER, JEREMY VINK, LINDA AUSTIN A MESSAGE FROM THE POLICE SERVICES BOARD CHAIR 2012 LYNDA WHITE

It is essential for the residents of Wellington to understand that policing is the responsibility of the entire community. If you see a crime being committed please contact the police. Your safety is their priority but they need your help to ensure that Wellington County remains a safe and secure community to live, work and play in. Sincerely Lynda White Chair, Wellington County Police Services Board

It was again an interesting year for the Wellington County Police Services Board. The makeup of the 2012 board did not change with myself Lynda White as Chairperson, Russ Spicer as Vice Chair, Jeremy Vink, Linda Austin, and Warden Chris White. This past year Wellington County was named Canada’s Safest Community for Violent Crime by Maclean’s National Crime Rankings. In January 2012 Inspector Scott Smith discussed with the board the idea of Wellington County striving to get a Safe Communities Canada designation. This designation promotes safe and healthy behaviors that protect people from hurt and harm in all aspects of their lives. The Police Service Board was unanimous in bringing forward this programme and with a lot of hard work by various groups in Wellington County we hope to be the first county in Canada to receive this designation by the spring of 2013. The Police Services Board reviews and approves the operating budget for policing in Wellington County annually. The budget is then submitted to County Council for approval, normally occurring by the end of February. The 2012 operating budget included the following items: - - - -

the Ontario Provincial Police contract at $16,553,000 principal and interest payments on long-term debt for the Rockwood Operations Centre: $362,000 (We also have a budget of $21,100 for interest charges on the first debt issue on the new North Wellington O.P.P. Operations Centre); maintenance and operations of the County owned police facilities in Rockwood, Palmerston and Fergus: $298,900 all other items including Board expenses, mounted police unit, parking ticket and false alarm administration: $167,500.

A small portion of the cost of policing in Wellington County is recovered from rent payments from the province for the use of the Rockwood facility, from certain provincial grant programmes, from parking tickets, false alarms, reserve transfers and other fees and charges. The vast majority of the cost of policing is funded from property taxes. Late last spring Inspector Scott Smith advised the board that he had taken a position with the South Bruce detachment and so began the search for a leader for the Wellington detachment. We are indeed fortunate to welcome Inspector Scott Lawson. Inspector Lawson is very familiar with Wellington County as he has made it his home for many years. On December 3, 2012 there was a ground breaking ceremony for the North Wellington Detachment Centre being built in Teviotdale where County Road 109 and County Road 7 meet. This detachment centre will serve the residents of Mapleton, Minto and Wellington North. It is a very attractive one storey building that will also serve as the Emergency Operations Centre.

INSPECTOR LAWSON NAMED DETACHMENT COMMANDER WELLINGTON COUNTY The dawn of a new year presents us with an opportunity to reflect upon the successes we enjoyed, the challenges we faced in Wellington County in 2012, and where we will go from here. It’s clear it has been a year of dynamic change, which we can expect will continue in 2013 and beyond. The most significant change occurred in October when I returned to lead our Wellington County Detachment where not long ago I worked as a front line Constable for over eight years and where I’ve raised my family for more than 20 years. My career has been wide and varied and I bring a strong, broad-based perspective to policing, having worked in the municipal environment, aboriginal policing in Northern Ontario and in rural policing in Southwestern Ontario. My career has taken me to the Greater Toronto Area as both the Traffic Manager for the busiest highways in North America, and as the Detachment Commander in Aurora. I have also worked at Queen’s Park both in Detachment and in the Deputy Minister of Community Safety and Correctional Service’s office as well as General Headquarters in the Deputy Commissioner’s Office and as the Manager of the O.P.P.’s Specialized Patrol Services. I am honoured to have had the opportunity to come back home to lead the second largest detachment in the Ontario Provincial Police. Since arriving I have witnessed the work of our very dedicated staff of officers and administrative professionals who tirelessly, day in and day out provide the best possible policing service to the citizens of Wellington County. I am also proud of our county-wide policing infrastructure. In December, we officially broke ground on construction of our new North Wellington Operations Centre in Teviotdale, which is expected to open in 2014. Along with new O.P.P. facilities in Centre Wellington and Rockwood (our South Operations Centre), this new building will give our members the tools they need to provide improved police services to the citizens of Wellington County. It’s clear that the strong relationship the O.P.P. enjoys with elected officials and members of the Police Services Board has contributed to a safe environment for those who live in the towns, villages and rural areas we serve.

Wellington County continues to enjoy its status as one of the safest communities in Canada, with a first-place ranking in a recent national Maclean’s Magazine survey. Our success in building a safe place for residents to live and work is the direct result of close collaboration with our municipalities and the people of Wellington County. However, our work is never done. Our Wellington County detachment is leading the drive to achieve a World Health Organization Safe Community Canada designation in 2013. This is not an easy goal to reach; only seven other communities in Ontario can boast of such an accomplishment. The group is the first such committee in Canada to be spearheaded by the O.P.P. I’m confident that through hard work and teamwork we will succeed in attaining this prestigious WHO designation. Wellington County continues to support and value our relationships with our Community Policing Committees, and we are putting the finishing touches on our last committee which will result in all seven of our municipalities being represented by these important volunteer groups that are making a difference in their communities. We are bringing Safeguard Ontario, a crime prevention initiative, to the County where we will provide unique services to those victims of crime following a break-in to their residence or small business. We are also teaming up with the Alcohol and Gaming Commission of Ontario as one of only 12 communities in the province identified by the AGCO to institute phase two of the “Last Drink Program”, a proactive strategy where licensed premises are scrutinized after which a drinking driver has been stopped and charged criminally. So, by working together in concert with all our valued community partners we will strive to make the county the safest and healthiest place in the country in which to live, learn, work and play. Our ability to work together and focus on the task at hand will never be more valuable than it will be in 2013. The province is facing tough economic challenges and we here in Wellington County are not immune, so together we must continue to deliver a professional, capable police service by the most efficient and effective means possible. O.P.P. Commissioner Chris Lewis says it is imperative that we persist in our efforts to manage our resources effectively in an increasingly complex and challenging policing environment. In my tenure Wellington County detachment has already moved to incorporate strategies designed to ensure we continue to be fiscally responsible and accountable. I know I can count on all our members to help us navigate the economic challenges that lay ahead. Despite these financial hurdles, our members will remain resolute in their efforts to work with all our partners to integrate crime prevention and traffic safety strategies that will ensure we continue to make Wellington County a safe community. We must be relentless in our focus on the four biggest contributors to death and serious injury on our area roadways: failure to wear a seatbelt, impaired driving, aggressive driving and distracted driving. Our efforts have been effective, but our job is far from done. In all, 2012 was a year of change that will lay the foundation for an exciting year ahead in Wellington County. I’d like to thank our Wellington County Police Services Board, our municipalities, our uniformed members, civilian employees and each and every member of our community for helping us make 2012 a successful year. I am confident we will be successful in 2013 as we continue our collective efforts to make Wellington County a safe and secure community in which to live, work and play. Thank you. Scott Lawson Inspector Detachment Commander Wellington County O.P.P.

PAGE 2 - COUNTY OF WELLINGTON O.P.P. ANNUAL REPORT 2012


COUNTY OF WELLINGTON

O.P.P.

COMMISSIONER ONTARIO PROVINCIAL POLICE CHRIS LEWIS This is my third year as Commissioner of the Ontario Provincial Police and I am extremely proud to see Wellington County maintain its status as one of the safest communities in Canada, according to Maclean’s Magazine’s annual crime survey. This speaks to the exceptional work and dedication on the part of the uniform, civilian and auxiliary personnel who serve with Wellington County O.P.P. The O.P.P. continues to evolve dramatically as we continue to deliver our mandate of policing Canada’s most populated province. It has been a period of intense and consistent change and we have been met with equally consistent challenges. Collaborating and sharing information with government partners, First Nations leaders, municipal police services, our law enforcement partners, mayors, councils, boards and with the people in the 322 communities we serve has never been more important than it is now. As we enter the third and final year of the O.P.P. 2011-2013 Strategic Plan, we will work as hard as ever to meet our day-today challenges and shape the future of policing. We will keep our focus on providing excellent, cost-effective policing services to the communities we help keep safe everyday. It is critical to the health, welfare and sustainability of Ontario’s communities and we take this responsibility seriously. Please take the time to read the County of Wellington O.P.P. 2012 Annual Report. You will be reminded of the excellent work our people do and how focused they are on meeting the needs of the wonderful people in Wellington County. Yours Truly, Chris D. Lewis Commissioner Ontario Provincial Police

Local representatives of the Wellington County O.P.P. and members of County Council attended the groundbreaking ceremony for the new detachment in Teviotdale.

CHIEF WESTERN REGION JOHN CAIN

did you

know?

WELLINGTON COUNTY TAKES CANADA’S SAFEST COMMUNITY TITLE

WELLINGTON COUNTY- In December, Maclean’s magazine named Wellington County as the safest community in the country. Another eventful year has drawn to a close in Southwestern “This recognition lets all of Canada know that Wellington County Ontario. The passage of another year presents a timely opportunity is a safe place to live, do business and retire,” said Warden Chris to reflect upon past successes and the challenges that lie ahead in White. “This is an excellent example of what can be achieved when 2013 and beyond. County Council and the O.P.P. have a strong working relationship.” 2012 saw some clear improvements in the area of personal injury The rankings are based on analysis of Statistics Canada’s Crime collisions on O.P.P.-patrolled roads and highways. Compared to the Severity Index for the nation’s 100 largest cities and regions, previous year, Wellington County experienced a nearly 23 percent along with municipal crime data for six offences: homicide, sexual drop in the number of injuries sustained in motor vehicle crashes. assault, aggravated assault, robbery, breaking and entering, and Further, the total number of traffic collisions in Wellington County auto theft. dropped by 14 percent compared to 2011. Still, the numbers from our 2012 Festive RIDE campaign tell us there is room for “Effective policing has always been a key priority for the County,” improvement. Wellington County mirrored a province-wide trend Russ Spicer, County of Wellington Police Services Board Chair said. that saw a sharp increase in alcohol-related driving infractions. In “The County and the O.P.P. will continue to provide responsive and an ongoing effort to reduce impaired driving in Wellington County efficient service to residents and visitors of Wellington.” and beyond, residents can expect our members to continue our strategy of highly visible and professional traffic stops, a strong The nearby Town of Caledon previously held the safest community focus on public education and seeking measurable outcomes as title for the past four years. supported by our Provincial Traffic Safety Program. “Wellington County O.P.P. officers are committed to the safety and 2012 also marked the second year in the three-year O.P.P. well-being of our residents,” Inspector Scott Lawson, Wellington Strategic Plan (2011-2013). The O.P.P. Strategic Plan articulates County O.P.P. said. “County Council has been very supportive of organizational direction and ensures consistency in service the O.P.P.’s programmes and initiatives which help increase public delivery across Ontario. To continue our success as a provincial safety and security.” police force, West Region will continue to support organizational For the entire story and all Maclean’s rankings, visit: priorities and strategies while responding to unique detachment www.macleans.ca. community safety concerns. Governments at all levels continue to deal with a slowly recovering global economy. Our organization is not immune from the effects of austerity measures now being imposed upon all government ministries and services. We will be expected to maintain our customary high level of service, while assisting the province and municipalities we serve in containing costs. The present economic climate has presented a formidable challenge to all police services that are seeking to sustain levels of police service delivery while cutting costs at the same time. The O.P.P. is committed to continuous improvement and innovation, including examining our service delivery options. Focusing on our people to ensure they are provided with the best training, equipment and technology, and the development of extensive partnerships and effective deployment strategies will create a solid foundation for sustaining policing excellence. As we move forward as an organization, the O.P.P. continues to assess whether mechanisms for financial and performance management are robust enough to address new delivery challenges.

One thing remains clear: the fiscal environment in which we operate is ever-evolving and will be more challenging than ever, but our commitment to maintaining public safety in West Region will remain as strong and unwavering as ever. I know I can depend upon the exemplary efforts of our uniformed and civilian NEW TEVIOTDALE DETACHMENT members in maintaining our status as one of the safest regions in Wellington County held a ground breaking ceremony on Ontario. December 3, 2012, celebrating the start of construction on On behalf of the Ontario Provincial Police, I wish you the best in the new North Wellington O.P.P. Operations Centre, located 2013. on County Road 7 in the Town of Minto. The architectural firm +VG has designed the new 18,600 square-foot facility and John A. Cain Collaborative Structures Limited of Cambridge has been selected Chief Superintendent as the contractor. This new location in Teviotdale will enhance Regional Commander community policing needs in the northern end of the County and West Region will ensure responsive and efficient service to local residents.

did you

know?

1-888-310-1122 is the nonemergency number for the O.P.P.

In 2012, the Wellington County O.P.P. responded to 2,683 9-1-1 calls. A large percentage of those calls were unintentional or misdirected. Mistakes do happen. If you accidentally call 9-1-1, save time and stay on the line. Police respond to every 9-1-1 call. You can’t hide from it! • DO lock your phone keypad using the keypad lock feature. A locked keypad prevents a mobile device from responding to keystrokes until the user unlocks it. • DO turn off the 9-1-1 auto-dial feature if your mobile device has one. • DO NOT programme 9-1-1 into any telephone device. • DO speak to the 9-1-1 call takers. If you hang up they call you back. • DO stay on the line so officers can verify your safety as quickly as possible.

PAGE 3 - COUNTY OF WELLINGTON O.P.P. ANNUAL REPORT 2012


COUNTY OF WELLINGTON

O.P.P.

FERGUS - Standing: Colleen McDougall, seated: Rachel Roy Absent: Judy Culp

ROCKWOOD - Pat Zadow, Joanne England seated: Sarah Mogk

WELLINGTON COUNTY TRAFFIC UNIT: L to R: PC Rick Lytle, PC Greg Henderson, PC Rudy Bracnik, PC Adam Houser, PC Henry Van Dyk, Sgt. Bob Uridil, PC Tim Gilligham, PC Frank Thornton, PC Dave Gray, PC Sarah Van Norman

WELLINGTON COUNTY TRAFFIC UNIT Drinking and Driving

Palmerston and Mount Forest - L to R: Marilyn Kock, Jane Buehler, Adam Vranic, Sarah Bowers-Peter. Seated: Tracey White Absent: Kathy Reeves

Impaired driving continues to be the leading criminal cause of death in Canada and Wellington County is no different. In 2012, over 179 people were charged with drinking and driving, with 915 roadside tests being administered.

After weeks of planning and coordinating of resources, the Traffic Unit of Wellington County O.P.P. launched “RIDEzilla” on November 23, 2012. A total of 41 members comprised from Wellington County O.P.P., Cambridge O.P.P. and the Waterloo Regional Police Service coordinated Wellington County employs 11 administrative personnel who are divided efforts to run the largest RIDE spot check the area had amongst the four operations centres in Wellington County. They greet ever witnessed. community members at the front counter and ensure criminal record checks are completed and requests are answered. They also provide There was an enhanced partnership with Madd Canada financial, human resource and general administrative assistance to the and Wellington O.P.P. for 2012 with joint educational and police officers in Wellington County. The experience and dedication of demonstration sessions offered throughout Wellington County at Portage Youth group sessions, Mount Forest these members is the backbone of the organization. Festival of Lights display, and the Fergus Festival display, to name a few.

WELLINGTON COUNTY ADMINISTRATIVE PERSONNEL AND CIVILIAN DATA ENTRY

The Festive RIDE Team was an enormous success! Wellington County led the province during the Festive RIDE campaign; this would not have been possible without the hard work of each of the platoons supported by paid duty members and the Festive RIDE Team. Three officers recognized on January 31 in front of the Warden, Mayors and Councilors with well-deserved appreciation. One in every 24 vehicles stopped in Wellington County over the period of the campaign had been drinking to the extent an approved screening device test was warranted. Fergus - Foreground: Catherine Zalischuk, back: Sarah Thornton Other Data Entry employees not pictured are: Rosemary Wilson, Leasa Cloes, Kelly Knox, Theresa Langhorn, Jessica Gray Since 2009, Wellington County O.P.P. has had Civilian Data Entry. The clerks in this department enter dictated police occurrences into the record keeping system. This translates into hundreds of hours that police officers are able to be doing front line police related duties in the county, increasing efficiency and consistent reporting. The civilian data entry employees have been a welcome addition to the Wellington County O.P.P.

O.P.P. Wellington reminds everyone “Drive sober or get pulled over.” marine patrol Wellington O.P.P. Marine unit continued its vigilant patrols of the four main lakes in Wellington County (Belwood, Guelph, Conestogo, Puslinch). A total of 389.5 hours of Marine Patrol was logged in 2012. The implementation of night Marine Patrol continued and the public is recognized for their compliance resulting again in zero marine deaths for 2012 in our County.

o.p.p. festive r.i.d.e. team recognized by county council Wellington County Council recognized three members of the Wellington County O.P.P. Festive Ride Team for their dedication and commitment to making Wellington County safe by focusing on drinking and driving related offences. “On behalf of the residents and visitors of Wellington County, I would like to commend Detachment Commander Scott Lawson and his dedicated Festive Ride Team for their hard work keeping impaired drivers off of County Roads,” said Warden Chris White. “The efforts of Constables Jody Bigger, Henry VanDyk and Frank Thornton have prevented accidents and saved lives in Wellington County”. In a six week period the O.P.P. Festive Ride Team stopped 10,785 vehicles in all seven of the Wellington County municipalities, which resulted in them leading the entire province for drinking and driving enforcement efforts. “Wellington County O.P.P. has always been committed to detecting impaired drivers and conduct year-round RIDE programmes and this increased effort by these officers is exemplary and worthy of our recognition”, Ray Tout County Councillor and Police Service Board Vice Chair said. “The officers made personal sacrifices over the holiday season in order to ensure this initiative was a success and they achieved excellent yet somewhat alarming statistics.” The Wellington County O.P.P. will continue their dedicated efforts to combat drinking and driving, making our roadways safer for all of us to travel on.

PAGE 4 - COUNTY OF WELLINGTON O.P.P. ANNUAL REPORT 2012


COUNTY OF WELLINGTON

O.P.P.

COMMUNITY “Boost Me Up “ A Booster Car Seat Safety Awareness Campaign Members of the County of Wellington O.P.P. are building on the success of the previous car seat safety campaign entitled “BOOST ME UP”, focusing on Booster Car Seats for children aged approximately 4 to 10 years of age. The “BOOST ME UP” pilot project was initiated in October 2011. The group visited three schools in Fergus, Rockwood and Mount Forest, where they spoke directly to 283 parents and caregivers about safety and booster seat awareness. Now’s the time to build upon that initiative. Officers of the County of Wellington O.P.P. have discovered that children of this age group are at risk as parents and caregivers often take children out of their booster car seats too early. A booster car seat raises up a child so that the adult seat belt is properly and safely positioned over his/her body. A child needs to be at least 40 pounds to use a booster car seat. According to the Ontario Highway Traffic Act, a child must stay in a booster car seat until they reach 8 years of age, or 80 pounds or are at least 4’ 9”. During our education programme, there will be members of the County of Wellington O.P.P. along with the O.P.P. Auxiliary Unit, The Co-Operators Insurance and the East Wellington Community Services; who will be attending various community schools. They will be increasing awareness of booster car seats over a three day period by answering questions, providing tips, and undertaking courtesy spot checks.

Remember: 1 Booster car seats are the law, with a fine of $240 and two demerit points which is assigned against the vehicle driver. 2 Fasten in your booster car seat even when your child is not in it - during a sudden stop, an empty unbelted booster car seat can be a dangerous projectile in your vehicle.

From left are: Donald Way, Laurie Nixon, O.P.P. Inspector Scott Lawson, Matt Heidinga and Wellington-Halton Hills MPP Ted Arnott. special olympics Wellington County O.P.P. held a “Be a Fan Day” on October 25 to celebrate a 25-year partnership between law enforcement agencies and Special Olympians.

O.P.P. Constable Rick Hopkins, slain in the line of duty in 1982, now has a bridge bearing his name, following a dedication ceremony on October 12.

“When Special Olympics began 40 years ago we had one or two athletes. Today there are 35,000,” said Heipel, adding the “attention this partnership between the law enforcement agencies and the Torch Run has brought to Special Olympics has been amazing.”

The dedication was held at the sports complex in Mount Forest with about 150 O.P.P. dignitaries, O.P.P. officers (both retired and on active duty), politicians, and friends joining family members to remember the officer who gave the supreme sacrifice in the line of duty on May 9, 1982.

PROJECT LIFESAVER WELLINGTON COUNTY

An official dedication at the bridge at the south end of town was also held with the unveiling of Constable Rick Hopkins Memorial Bridge signs posted at both sides of the bridge.

Victim Services Wellington, in coordination with the Wellington County O.P.P. and Guelph Police Service, are pleased to announce the launch of a new program. Project Lifesaver Guelph Wellington is dedicated to assisting and responding to the challenges caregivers face in finding wandering loved ones who suffer from Alzheimer’s, autism or other forms of cognitive impairment. Project Lifesaver originated in Virginia in 1999.There are now over 1,200 participating agencies across the United States, Canada and Australia. Currently there are chapters located in Essex County, Norfolk County, Peel Region/Caledon and York Region. These agencies have performed 2,610 searches in the last 13 years with no serious injuries or fatalities.

When a caregiver notifies the Wellington County O.P.P. that a client has gone missing, specially trained police officers use portable directional antennae to search for and locate the missing person.

Wellington County 2012 Charity Golf Classic On August 28, 40 of our finest O.P.P. officers from Wellington County descended on Ariss Valley Golf Course to take part in the annual Charity Golf Classic. They raised $1,300 for the Guelph Wish Fund for Children. Organizer Officer Tyler Cowie along with Mike Polan, Mark ‘One Time’ Grasman and Curtis Warren won the event. Officer Tyler has promised an even bigger and better event for this year. Special congratulations to Greg Eurig who won a trip to Las Vegas. Nice !

Bridge dedication honours slain O.P.P. constable

Ron Heipel, who coaches the Fergus Phantoms Special Olympic swim team, said the 25-year milestone is a significant one.

Participants of the programme wear a bracelet that has a batteryoperated wrist transmitter that emits a unique radio frequency every second, 24 hours a day.

Communication Constable Cheri Rockefeller, Peter Baldasso Executive Director with the GWFC, and Constable Tyler Cowie.

From left to right: Jane and Steve Hopkins, Emily and Tyler Hopkins (kids), Ada Mason, Dave Hopkins and Andrea Phillips.

Wellington County O.P.P. currently has 12 trained search specialists and two trainers. Each year, the trained members of the O.P.P. are recertified to keep their skills sharp.

His son David Hopkins read the tribute for his father, known affectionately as “Hoppy.” David was joined by his brother Steven, mother Ada Mason and grandchildren Emily and Tyler Richard, who wore his grandfather’s police hat at the ceremony. Constable Hopkins was born in Toronto on May 27, 1950 and joined the O.P.P. on November 4, 1971, just four months after his 21st birthday. “On May 9,1982, Constable Hopkins and another officer,(Constable Brad Henderson) were on routine patrol in the Mount Forest detachment area when they responded to a report of someone shooting at a car from the side of the road in the Highway 6 and Highway 9 area,” an O.P.P. release for the dedication stated. “They didn’t locate either the car that had been shot at or the suspected shooter. Three hours later, officers responded to a call from the Arthur fire chief of an armed man behind a store on fire. The officers located a man carrying a gun in each hand close by,” the release said. “The suspect turned and fired a shotgun directly at Constable Hopkins, hitting him in the upper chest and neck where his Kevlar vest didn’t protect him. Despite the assistance of two nurses who happened to be in the area, Constable Hopkins died within minutes.”

Project Lifesaver Guelph Wellington is not a replacement for the attention and supervision of caregivers, but is a valuable tool that can be utilized to save lives and reduce the enormous expenses generated by long and exhausting searches.

O.P.P. chief superintendent John Cain said 38 bridges now bear the names of fallen officers.

To become part of this programme, applicants must fill out an application and meet certain criteria. A one-time fee is charged with a monthly battery cost. The members of the Lions Clubs of Zone 51 support the programme through monetary donations.

O.P.P. Association president Jim Christie said the bridge dedication will serve as a reminder of the “life of Constable Rick Hopkins,” and “serves as a reminder of the inherent risk of our O.P.P. officers.”

The motto of Project Lifesaver International is “Bringing loved ones home”. For additional information on Project Lifesaver, please contact Victim Services Wellington at 519.824.1212 x205.

“Hopefully this bridge dedication goes toward closing a loop in your lives,” he told family members.

The family was presented a memorial plaque in honour of the officer. Excerpt from an October 12, 2012 article courtesy of The Wellington Advertiser.

PAGE 5 - COUNTY OF WELLINGTON O.P.P. ANNUAL REPORT 2012


O.P.P. training in wellington county

safely storing, transporting and displaying firearms Be Safe! Prevent Firearms Accidents!

The Township and the O.P.P. have an agreement that this location will be maintained for training purposes until the lease is up for renegotiation in 2015. Not only do officers from Wellington County attend, but those from Perth County, Grey County, Dufferin County, South Bruce, Bruce Peninsula, Huron County and Shelburne Police Service also participate in training exercises.

■ Obtain an Authorization to Transport (call 1-800-731-4000).

■ It is important to store, transport and display your firearms safely to prevent accidents and deter loss or theft. Protect yourself and others. ■ These rules apply to individuals.There are different rules for businesses.

STORING FIREARMS SAFELY ■ Unload and lock your firearms! ■ Store the ammunition separately or lock it up. It can be stored in the same locked container as the firearms. Non-restricted firearms

Leaving any class of firearms in an unattended vehicle

The Mount Forest In-Service Training unit consists of three full time instructors and one Sergeant, as well as numerous part-time instructors. The unit conducts scheduled Block Training for 32 weeks per year and trains 460 officers and 58 Auxiliary officers each year. The training unit consists of two training venues – Kenilworth Training Center and an outdoor firearms range located approximately 10 km from Kenilworth.

■ Lock non-restricted firearms and locked containers carrying restricted or prohibited firearms in the trunk or in a similar lockable compartment. ■

Police officers from Wellington County attend annual training at the former Sacred Heart School located on Highway 6 in Kenilworth. The site is owned by the Township and is rented out to the O.P.P. for front line training purposes. The O.P.P. is mandated to provide training and re-qualify all officers so they are able to effectively perform their duties.

Every 12 months, officers must successfully complete four days of training which includes updates in advance patrol techniques, reviewing new legislation, practical training in Immediate Rapid Deployment, First Aid and CPR recertification, Defensive Tactics and Firearms training. Officers are assessed on their skill set and ability to make sound decisions given a variety of dynamic scenarios.

If the vehicle does not have a trunk or lockable compartment, put firearms and firearm containers out of sight inside the vehicle and lock the vehicle.

The unit also conducts an annual night shoot from October 1 – 19 at three different outdoor range locations within Wellington County, Perth County and Grey County. We are fortunate to have the O.P.P. Training Center in Wellington County as it relies on many local businesses to meet operational needs. Gravel pits are used for outdoor firearms ranges, portable washrooms for use on the ranges, catering services for officer lunches during training, various janitorial services and local mechanics are called upon for vehicle maintenance and repairs.

■ If you are in a remote wilderness area and cannot lock ■ Attach a secure locking device, such as a trigger lock or cable lock (or remove the bolt) so the firearms cannot your nonrestricted firearms inside your vehicle, unload them and put them out of sight. Attach a secure locking be fired; or device to the firearms unless they are needed for predator control.

DISPLAYING FIREARMS SAFELY ■ Lock the firearms in a cabinet, container, or room that is difficult to break into.

■ Unload and lock your firearms! ■ Here are the rules for displaying firearms in your home: Ammunition cannot be displayed with, or accessible to, the firearms. Non-restricted firearms ■ Attach secure locking devices to the firearms; or

Restricted and prohibited firearms

Lock the firearms in a cabinet, container or room that is difficult to break into.

■ Attach a secure locking device so the firearms cannot be fired and lock them in a cabinet, container or room that is difficult to break into; or

Restricted and prohibited firearms ■ Attach secure locking devices to the firearms; and ■ Lock the firearms in a vault; safe or room that was built ■ Securely attach them to something that cannot be moved. or modified specifically to store firearms safely ■ For automatic firearms, also remove the bolts or bolt carriers (if removable) and lock them in a separate room that is difficult to break into.

TRANSPORTING FIREARMS SAFELY Non-restricted firearms

■ For automatic firearms, also remove the bolts or bolt carriers [if removable] and lock them in a separate room that is difficult to break into. ■ Some rules may be different for firearms displayed away from home - for example, at a gun show.

Remember

■ Non-restricted firearms must be unloaded during Don’t forget to renew your firearms licence before it expires. transportation. Contact the CFP within 30 days if your address changes. Restricted and prohibited firearms

This page is intended to provide general information. For legal references, please refer to the Storage, ■ Unload the firearms, and Display, Transportation and Handling of Firearms ■ Attach secure locking devices to the firearms and ■ Lock the firearms in a sturdy, non-transparent container, by Individuals Regulations. Provincial, territorial and municipal laws, regulations and policies may also apply. and ■ Remove the bolts or bolt carriers from any automatic firearms (if removable)

Information courtesy of the Canadian Firearms Program - RCMP

THE TOP TEN O.P.P. CALLS FOR SERVICE:

1

3667 TRAFFIC COMPLAINTS

2

2683 911 CALLS NO EMERGENCY

3

2046 POLICE ASSISTANCE

4

1872 MOTOR VEHICLE COLLISIONS

5

1146 POLICE INFORMATION

6

911 ALARMS

7

872 THEFT UNDER

8

746 R.I.D.E.

9

518 MISCHIEF

10

436 LOST PROPERTY


O.P.P. training in wellington county

safely storing, transporting and displaying firearms Be Safe! Prevent Firearms Accidents!

The Township and the O.P.P. have an agreement that this location will be maintained for training purposes until the lease is up for renegotiation in 2015. Not only do officers from Wellington County attend, but those from Perth County, Grey County, Dufferin County, South Bruce, Bruce Peninsula, Huron County and Shelburne Police Service also participate in training exercises.

■ Obtain an Authorization to Transport (call 1-800-731-4000).

■ It is important to store, transport and display your firearms safely to prevent accidents and deter loss or theft. Protect yourself and others. ■ These rules apply to individuals.There are different rules for businesses.

STORING FIREARMS SAFELY ■ Unload and lock your firearms! ■ Store the ammunition separately or lock it up. It can be stored in the same locked container as the firearms. Non-restricted firearms

Leaving any class of firearms in an unattended vehicle

The Mount Forest In-Service Training unit consists of three full time instructors and one Sergeant, as well as numerous part-time instructors. The unit conducts scheduled Block Training for 32 weeks per year and trains 460 officers and 58 Auxiliary officers each year. The training unit consists of two training venues – Kenilworth Training Center and an outdoor firearms range located approximately 10 km from Kenilworth.

■ Lock non-restricted firearms and locked containers carrying restricted or prohibited firearms in the trunk or in a similar lockable compartment. ■

Police officers from Wellington County attend annual training at the former Sacred Heart School located on Highway 6 in Kenilworth. The site is owned by the Township and is rented out to the O.P.P. for front line training purposes. The O.P.P. is mandated to provide training and re-qualify all officers so they are able to effectively perform their duties.

Every 12 months, officers must successfully complete four days of training which includes updates in advance patrol techniques, reviewing new legislation, practical training in Immediate Rapid Deployment, First Aid and CPR recertification, Defensive Tactics and Firearms training. Officers are assessed on their skill set and ability to make sound decisions given a variety of dynamic scenarios.

If the vehicle does not have a trunk or lockable compartment, put firearms and firearm containers out of sight inside the vehicle and lock the vehicle.

The unit also conducts an annual night shoot from October 1 – 19 at three different outdoor range locations within Wellington County, Perth County and Grey County. We are fortunate to have the O.P.P. Training Center in Wellington County as it relies on many local businesses to meet operational needs. Gravel pits are used for outdoor firearms ranges, portable washrooms for use on the ranges, catering services for officer lunches during training, various janitorial services and local mechanics are called upon for vehicle maintenance and repairs.

■ If you are in a remote wilderness area and cannot lock ■ Attach a secure locking device, such as a trigger lock or cable lock (or remove the bolt) so the firearms cannot your nonrestricted firearms inside your vehicle, unload them and put them out of sight. Attach a secure locking be fired; or device to the firearms unless they are needed for predator control.

DISPLAYING FIREARMS SAFELY ■ Lock the firearms in a cabinet, container, or room that is difficult to break into.

■ Unload and lock your firearms! ■ Here are the rules for displaying firearms in your home: Ammunition cannot be displayed with, or accessible to, the firearms. Non-restricted firearms ■ Attach secure locking devices to the firearms; or

Restricted and prohibited firearms

Lock the firearms in a cabinet, container or room that is difficult to break into.

■ Attach a secure locking device so the firearms cannot be fired and lock them in a cabinet, container or room that is difficult to break into; or

Restricted and prohibited firearms ■ Attach secure locking devices to the firearms; and ■ Lock the firearms in a vault; safe or room that was built ■ Securely attach them to something that cannot be moved. or modified specifically to store firearms safely ■ For automatic firearms, also remove the bolts or bolt carriers (if removable) and lock them in a separate room that is difficult to break into.

TRANSPORTING FIREARMS SAFELY Non-restricted firearms

■ For automatic firearms, also remove the bolts or bolt carriers [if removable] and lock them in a separate room that is difficult to break into. ■ Some rules may be different for firearms displayed away from home - for example, at a gun show.

Remember

■ Non-restricted firearms must be unloaded during Don’t forget to renew your firearms licence before it expires. transportation. Contact the CFP within 30 days if your address changes. Restricted and prohibited firearms

This page is intended to provide general information. For legal references, please refer to the Storage, ■ Unload the firearms, and Display, Transportation and Handling of Firearms ■ Attach secure locking devices to the firearms and ■ Lock the firearms in a sturdy, non-transparent container, by Individuals Regulations. Provincial, territorial and municipal laws, regulations and policies may also apply. and ■ Remove the bolts or bolt carriers from any automatic firearms (if removable)

Information courtesy of the Canadian Firearms Program - RCMP

THE TOP TEN O.P.P. CALLS FOR SERVICE:

1

3667 TRAFFIC COMPLAINTS

2

2683 911 CALLS NO EMERGENCY

3

2046 POLICE ASSISTANCE

4

1872 MOTOR VEHICLE COLLISIONS

5

1146 POLICE INFORMATION

6

911 ALARMS

7

872 THEFT UNDER

8

746 R.I.D.E.

9

518 MISCHIEF

10

436 LOST PROPERTY


COUNTY OF WELLINGTON

O.P.P. YOUTH

St. Joseph’s Catholic School - Two grade six classes graduating the D.A.R.E program taught by PC Bob Bortolato D.A.R.E. (Drug Abuse Resistance Education) D.A.R.E. is a non-profit program that originated in 1983 in Los Angeles. Today, the programme runs in 43 countries and has grown to be a cooperative effort that involves police, schools and the community. D.A.R.E was brought to Wellington County in 2006, beginning at the Town of Erin schools for grade six students. Since then it has been established at schools throughout the County. With roughly 1000 grade six students graduating each year. There are four trained officers in the County able to deliver this program. D.A.R.E. is in a transition phase and is moving to a new curriculum. New topics to be covered over the 10 weeks include tobacco, alcohol, risk and consequences, peer pressure, stress, bullying, confidence, communication skills, decision making, listening, getting help and helping others. Funding is received from local service clubs, including the Optimist Clubs throughout the County and the Lions and Lioness of Rockwood. tips to help your teen live a drug-free life When it comes to drugs, teens are a savvy bunch. Drugs and messages about living drug-free have been part of their lives for years. They can make distinctions not only among different drugs and their effects, but also among trial, occasional use and addiction.They’ve witnessed many of their peers using drugs — some without obvious or immediate consequences, others whose drug use gets out of control. By the teen years, kids have also had to make plenty of choices of their own about drug use: whether they should give in to peer-pressure and experiment with drugs, or go against some of their peers and stay clean. Here are six tips from The Partnership at Drugfree.org to help you help your teen continue to live a healthy, drug-free life: 1. Don’t speak generally about drug- and alcohol-use— your older teen needs to hear detailed and reality-driven messages. Topics worth talking about with your teen: using a drug just once can have serious permanent consequences; can put you in risky and dangerous situations; anybody can become a chronic user or addict; combining drugs can have deadly consequences. 2. Emphasize what drug use can do to your teen’s future. Discuss how drug use can ruin your teen’s chance of getting into the college she’s been dreaming about or landing the perfect job. 3. Challenge your child to be a peer leader among his friends and to take personal responsibility for his actions and show others how to do the same. 4. Encourage your teen to volunteer somewhere that he can see the impact of drugs on your community. Teenagers tend to be idealistic and enjoy hearing about ways they can help make the world a better place. Help your teen research volunteer opportunities at local homeless shelters, hospitals or victim services centers. 5. Use news reports as discussion openers. If you see a news story about an alcohol-related car accident, talk to your teen about all the victims that an accident leaves in its wake. If the story is about drugs in your community, talk about the ways your community has changed as drug use has grown. 6. Compliment your teen for the all the things he does well and for the positive choices he makes. Let him know that he is seen and appreciated. And let him know how you appreciate what a good role model he is for his younger siblings and other kids in the community. Teens still care what their parents think. Let him know how deeply disappointed you would be if he started using drugs. Drugs in your teen’s world can include: Tobacco, alcohol, prescription drugs such as Ritalin, Oxycontin, Vicodin, Valium and Xanax, inhalants, marijuana, ecstasy, herbal ecstasy, cocaine/crack, GHB, heroin, rohypnol, ketamine, LSD, mushrooms. Discovering that a teen is using drugs or alcohol can be a scary experience for parents — you may feel alone, ashamed and confused about what to do next. If you suspect or know your child is experimenting, using or has a problem with drugs and alcohol, visit TIME TO ACT! for support and answers to your questions. © The Partnership at Drugfree.org. Used with Permission. www.drugfree.org

SRO SCHOOL RESOURCE OFFICERS: (L to R) PC Rhonda Watt, PC Andy Clements, PC Randy Schubert, PC Bob Bortolato, seated: PC Steve Smith

THE WELLINGTON COUNTY O.P.P. STREET CRIME UNIT The Wellington County O.P.P. Street Crime Unit is comprised of nine officers. Five are uniform officers working in the secondary and primary schools; the remaining four officers work in plain clothes and act in a support capacity to the front-line platoon members. They provide investigative expertise in the area of break and enter, thefts, auto thefts, mischiefs and street level drug possession and trafficking. The four School Resource Officers (SROs) attend secondary schools in Wellington County on a daily basis, where they act as liaison between the O.P.P., students and staff. They are responsible for maintaining a presence in the schools and act as a resource for resolving issues that arise in that environment.While they enforce both provincial and criminal statutes when necessary, they regularly make use of diversion programs offered by a variety of social agencies. These diversion programs stress the importance of a student understanding the impact their poor judgment or behavior has on others and taking responsibility for their actions. These programs are recognized as an important and valuable first step before provincial or criminal charges are laid. The fifth school officer is referred to as a D.A.R.E. officer. D.A.R.E. is an acronym for Drug Abuse Resistance Education, and this officer deals with students before they enter secondary school. The program is designed to inform students of the pitfalls of drug and alcohol use. In addition to these activities, the school officers provide instruction and presentations on a variety of topics, including but not limited to, bullying, avoiding negative peer pressure and other issues students face on a daily basis. Through their efforts, these officers are able to intervene at crucial times in a student’s life, resulting in a positive outcome.

The Wellington County Crime Unit remains focused on investigating all major crimes and drug-related incidents within the county. Incidents involving youth and the illegal use of drugs in our communities are an ongoing concern.

For the year ending December 2012 these officers directed over 50 students into social diversion programs, thereby negating the need for any provincial or criminal charges being laid. When these programs did not have the required outcome, they laid 33 criminal charges, 19 drug related charges, and 10 provincial statutes.

Crime Unit members work closely with O.P.P. – Drug Enforcement Section to provide assistance in investigation of drug related incidents. Wellington County also works closely with the Drug Enforcement Strategy to provide ongoing education to community members.

The four officers rounding out the Street Crime Unit are assigned to criminal investigations and support the activities of the front-

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COUNTY OF WELLINGTON

O.P.P. CRIME

line officers.Their expertise is in the area of criminal investigations The Wellington County Crime Unit remains focused on relates to break and enters, thefts, auto thefts, property damage, investigating all major crimes and drug related incidents within warrant writing and drug-related investigations. the county. Incidents involving youth, elder abuse and the illegal use of drugs in our communities are an ongoing concern. Given the transient nature and sophistication of today’s criminal, officers interact regularly with their counterparts from other O.P.P. Technology is advancing at a rapid rate, impacting the O.P.P. both in Detachments, along with Regional and Municipal Police Services. the manner we conduct business and in the types of occurrences These associations proved invaluable in 2012; these individuals we are called upon to investigate. Internet-related and mobile were successful solving a high number of the criminal cases they technologies create new opportunities for criminals and new investigated. These officers routinely take physical and biological challenges for Wellington County crime unit investigators. evidence collected at crime scenes and through DNA or search Technology related crimes include Internet crimes against warrants, developing suspects and eventually leading to the children, debit and credit card fraud, dating site issues and identity arrest and charging of those responsible for a variety of criminal and information theft, all of which are constantly increasing. acts.

• Mistreating and controlling another person through their feelings. • Insulting, giving orders and saying things which confuse them.

For the year ending December 2012 these officers executed 10 DNA or criminal code warrants. This, combined with other investigative techniques, saw this group of officers lay 51 criminal charges, 12 provincial statutes, and 7 drug related offences. In addition to those charges, this unit recovered over 10 kilograms of cannabis marijuana and took 23 illegal firearms off the street.

• • • • •

Over all, this group of officers enjoyed a successful 2012 and contributed in a meaningful way to the safety of the citizens of Wellington County.

Self-Neglect • Inability of older or vulnerable persons to adequately take care of themselves. What are some of the signs of possible abuse or neglect? Unexplained injuries or a history of “accidents”, poor hygiene, bed sores. Depression, fear, anxiety, withdrawal or weight loss. Dehydration or lack of food, clothing, medicine or other necessities of life. Unnecessary purchases or repairs to house or property. Unexplained loss or misuse of property items such as banking records or wills.

Abuse can happen to any person, but certain factors can make people more vulnerable. These include mental or physical impairment and/or cultural or language barriers. Abused, older or vulnerable persons are often socially isolated with few friends or family in whom to confide.

Wellington County Criminal InvestigationS Unit

Anyone can be an abuser. Abusers can be any family member and are often people who depend on the older person for shelter or financial support. Abusers can also be neighbours, hired caregivers, friends or strangers canvassing or selling products door to door.

The Wellington County Criminal Investigations Unit is responsible for the delivery of a variety of highly technical operational policing functions in support of criminal investigations that included, but are not limited to: homicides, death investigations, missing persons, sexual assaults, robberies, frauds, arson and domestic violence investigations. Support is provided to both front line members and other police agencies. The crime unit remains committed to making our communities safer by being tough on crime through strong enforcement and effective crime prevention. In 2012, we partnered with Community Services agencies such as Victim Services of Wellington County and Trellis Mental Health Services to provide enhanced educational resources to the community, supporting crime prevention measures that are effective and suitable to both individual and community needs.

Neglect • Failing to give someone who is dependent what he/she needs. • Over/under medication. • Abandonment or leaving someone in an unsafe or isolated place.

Abuse can occur in institutions, like long-term care facilities or retirement homes. The abusers here could be frustrated staff members who are not able to do their jobs properly (lack of training, inadequate staffing levels). Other residents or visitors may also be abusers. Abuses or neglect is seldom reported for a variety of reasons: CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS UNIT: Top: (L to R) PC Marylou Schwindt, PC Steve Skanes, PC Heidi Pautsch, PC Jen Foley, (seated): Sgt. Caren Ashmore Bottom: D/C Kevin Detweiler, D/C Eric Ballantyne, D/C Tanya Beckon, D/C Don Watson. Absent: missing D/C Mark Allen, D/C Andy Hooper and D/C Dave Telfer ABUSE AND NEGLECT OF OLDER OR VULNERABLE PERSONS IS ANY ACTION OR INACTION BY ANY PERSON THAT CAUSES HARM TO THE OLDER OR VULNERABLE PERSON

• Some victims don’t know what their rights are or what can be done. • Some think the police or other agencies can’t help them. • Some don’t speak English. • Some are afraid of what the abuser will do if they report the abuse. • Some fear being placed in an institution. • Some feel ashamed because their family or caregiver is mistreating them. • Some feel embarrassed at having been taken advantage of or scammed.

What are the types of abuse or neglect? Physical • Slapping, hitting, shaking, pinching, punching or other rough handling. • Sexual assault - any unwanted from of sexual activity. • Forced confinement in a room, bed or chair. Financial • Frauds, forgery, theft or dishonest use of a person’s money or assets. • Misuse of Power of Attorney or forcing someone to sign a will. • Overcharging or high-pressure sales for services or products. Traffic stop on Wellington Road 125, Erin Township 16lbs of marijuana seized $63,820 in cash seized COWIE and GRASMAN

detachment Domestic ViolencE coordinator

PC Marylou Schwindt fulfills the role as the Domestic Violence Coordinator for Wellington County. She is responsible for ensuring compliance and integrity of all domestic violence investigations. She continues to support our front line officers and provides monitoring, training and direction. PC Schwindt works closely Psychological/Emotional with community stakeholders and colleagues to maintain strong, • Humiliating, threatening or frightening an older or vulnerable effective partnerships. She provides continued support and person. enhanced safety tools to victims of domestic violence to assist • Not allowing an older or vulnerable person to make decisions them through these difficult investigations. or deliberate social isolation.

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COUNTY OF WELLINGTON

O.P.P. CRIME

RURAL CRIME PREVENTION Don’t let your guard down just because you live in the country!

• • •

Never leave keys in vehicles or farm equipment. Always lock your trucks and other vehicles when they’re not in use. And don’t leave tools in the open back of a pick-up truck or in an unsecured truck bed toolbox. Don’t leave major equipment in a field overnight. Lock it in a barn or shed near the house, or park where it can be seen from your house or a neighbour’s. If machines must be left our for long periods of time, disable them by removing the rotor, distributor, or battery.

Guard Your Crops • Store harvested crops in protected and locked locations. • Consider marking grain, hay, or similar crops with non-toxic confetti that is easily removed by storage or processing facilities. • Keep a record of your timber. Mark each with a paint strip. • Keep storage areas neat and well-organized so that any theft will be noticed immediately. This also warns potential thieves that the owner is watchful. • Check employees’ references. Before they start, talk to them regarding your crime prevention measures.

Rural communities have their own unique crime problems - like theft of crops, timber, livestock and expensive farm equipment. Vandals do more than break mailboxes, they can destroy crops and fields. Alcohol and drug abuse problems plague rural youth as well as those in the suburbs and in cities. And, of course, crimes like burglary, rape, assault and auto theft happen in rural areas, but less frequently than in cities. Invest some time and money in prevention now. What’s the payoff? Better security around your property and less worry about crime and your family’s safety. Be Help Your Neighbours a good neighbour - when you’re out and about, keep an eye on • Get together with others in the community to start a neighbours’ homes, livestock and equipment. Tell them and the Neighbourhood or Farm Watch group. Involve all ages, and police about anything that makes you uneasy or suspicious. work with law enforcement. Recruit from churches and civic groups. Use CB radios or cellular phones to patrol and report Check the doors and locks: • Make sure external doors in your home and outbuildings are suspicious activities to the police. solid wood or metal and have dead bolt locks. • When you go away, stop delivery of your mail or newspapers or ask a neighbour to pick them up. You want to create the • Use the locks! illusion that someone is at home following everyday routines. • Secure sliding glass doors with commercially available locks or Have neighbours check your property, and return the favour with a broomstick or wooden dowel in the track to jam the when they leave on business or vacation trips. door in case someone tries to pry it open. • Insert screws in the upper track going into the fixed frame, to prevent anyone from lifting the door from its track. • Secure double-hung windows by sliding a bolt or nail through a hole drilled at a downward angle in each top corner of the inside sash and part way through the outside sash. • Secure basement windows well. • Thieves hate bright lights. Install outside lights and keep them on at night. • Keep your house, driveway, barns, and other buildings well lighted at night. Use timers that automatically turn on outside Participants discussing injury data during the Priority lights when it gets dark. Setting Exercise of the Safe Communites Committee. • Consider motion sensors that set off lights or alarms. • Prune back shrubbery that hides doors, windows, lights and safe communities committee would-be burglars. Wellington County is presently in the process of becoming a • Keep your fences in good repair. Secure all access roads with designated “Safe Community”. gates or cables stretched between posts cemented in the “A Safe Community is one which reflects the passion and ground. Make them visible with flags or steamers. commitment of people who DREAM of a community that is free • Warn thieves that you’re on the alert with “No Trespassing” of injury and pain, and who DARE to commit to DO something “No Hunting” and other signs around your property. tangible to realize that dream”. (www.safecommunities.ca) Protect Equipment and Livestock • Operation identification - marking tools, guns and equipment The purpose of Safe Communities Wellington County is “to support the establishment and implementation of a coordinated with a permanent identification number such as a license approach to addressing safety issues in the County of Wellington plate number - has helped reduce theft in many rural areas. through inter-agency and local community group awareness, • Work with law enforcement to determine the best methods, communication, co-operation and action”. and make it a community project. The Wellington County Safe Community Committee includes • To help stop modern rustlers, tattoo all livestock (usually on representation from the County, emergency services, public the ears). Although it’s easier to use ear tags or neck chains, health, school boards, hospitals, private businesses and social these can be removed. Mark young stock soon after birth. services. Take regular counts of all livestock. Secure gas pumps, gas tanks, storage bins, and grain elevators with sturdy padlocks or A priority exercise was held in November 2012 which identified dead bolts. Wellington County’s top three priorities as; falls, motor vehicle collisions on/off road and intentional self harm. • Keep small equipment - like mowers, bikes, snowmobiles locked in a barn or garage. The committee is presently at step five of ten towards attaining • Keep guns locked and unloaded in a secure place away from this designation. It hopes to have secured its designation by curious children and would-be thieves. summer of 2013.

PC Kate Carberry, Aux. Brad Hall at the first annual Elora Horse and Hound Parade.

Mounted Unit The Wellington County O.P.P. Mounted Unit provides public service and operational support throughout the county, and occasionally elsewhere in Ontario. We are the only O.P.P. Mounted Unit in the entire province. From humble beginnings in 1998, the Unit has continued to expand to its current full-time status. The Mounted Unit attends parades, fairs, and other community events on a year-round basis. The horses provide a unique and non-confrontational way for community members to interact with police and are frequently the highlight of local events. Large crowds often gather to learn about our mounts, the Unit’s mandate, and policing in general.The Unit also provides general operational support through routine patrols of trails, parks, conservation areas and residential neighbourhoods. Specialized operational support is provided for missing persons searches where the horses are able to access remote areas quickly and provide an elevated view of the surrounding terrain. The Unit is comprised of three equine members. Bosco and Jasper were purchased by Wellington County in 2003 and Moose joined us in 2011. All three horses are Percheron-cross geldings specifically selected for their size and temperament. The “boys” are ridden by four regular constables and two auxiliary members assigned to the Unit. Regular training is a requirement for all members. Every two years all members must attend training sessions provided by either the Toronto Police Service Mounted Unit or the RCMP Musical Ride Mounted Police Seminar. The Mounted Unit is available for parades and major events throughout Wellington County. To request attendance at your event, please complete the request form that is available on the Emergency Services – Police section of www.wellington.ca, or send a written request to: Wellington County O.P.P. Mounted Unit, 250 Daly Street, Palmerston, Ontario N0G 2P0 or call 519.343.5770. Please be sure to include details on the date, time and length of the event, a description of the event, and the name and phone number of the contact person.

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COUNTY OF WELLINGTON

O.P.P. CRIME

you

Myth Busters Busting these common myths will minimize your chances of being scammed. • All companies, businesses and organizations are legitimate because they are licensed and monitored by the government: this is not always true. While there are rules about setting up and running a business or a company in Canada, scammers can easily pretend to have approval when they don’t. Even businesses that are licensed could still try to scam you by acting dishonestly. • All Internet websites are legitimate: this is not always true. Websites are quite easy and cheap to set up. The scammers can easily copy a genuine website and trick you into believing it is legitimate. • There are short cuts to wealth that only a few people know: this is not always true. Ask yourself the question: if someone knew a secret to instant wealth, why would they be telling their secret to others? • Scams involve large amounts of money: this is not always true. Sometimes scammers target a large number of people and try to get a small amount of money from each person. • Scams are always about money: this is not always true. Some scams are aimed at stealing personal information from you. Golden rules Remember these golden rules to help you beat the scammers: • Always get independent advice if an offer involves money, personal information, time or commitment. • There are no guaranteed get-rich-quick schemes—sometimes the only people who make money are the scammers. • Do not agree to offers or deals right away. If you think you have spotted a great opportunity, insist on time to get independent advice before making a decision. • Do not hand over money or personal information or sign anything until you have done your homework and checked the credentials of the company that you are dealing with. • Do not rely on glowing testimonials: find solid evidence of a company’s success. • Log directly on to a website that you are interested in rather than clicking on links provided in an email. • Never send money or give credit card or online account details to anyone you do not know and trust. • If you spot a scam or have been scammed, get help. Contact the Canadian Anti-Fraud Centre, the Competition Bureau or your local police for assistance. Scammers are imaginative and manipulative. They know how to push your buttons to produce the response they want. If you think you have spotted a scam or have been targeted by a scam, there are a number of government and law enforcement agencies that you can contact for advice or to make a report.

can

help

Help Solve thEsE CrimeS

On August 28, 2005, human remains were located by a pedestrian walking in a wooded rest stop/picnic area on Highway 7, west of the Town of Rockwood, Ontario. O.P.P. Criminal Investigation Branch, in conjunction with the Guelph Crime Unit, are investigating this as a suspicious death.

Crime Stoppers Guelph Wellington

“ It’s your community - make the call”

Crime Stoppers Guelph Wellington had another successful year in 2012.The efforts of this community-based crime fighting program have resulted in 35 arrests, 25 cases cleared, 79 charges laid and $87,340 drugs and property seized. Crime stoppers continues to receive support from the community through fund raising events Description: Race: White Age: 25- 45 years and donations. Height: 5`4” to 5`6” Weight: 130 lbs (approx.) Crime Stoppers Guelph Wellington will be celebrating its 25th Hair: Medium Brown anniversary in 2013. Other: Partial upper dental plate; previous injuries include: a broken nose, left eye socket and left 7th rib of front rib cage. Clothing: Brassiere: Pink, label “725 Originals” with the number “31” printed on the left cup. Panties: Thong style with a small pink bow at the waist, label “Rivage Intimate” T-Shirt: Tank style, label “Atmosphere” with one inch straps and a round neck line, size 10/12 Shorts: Corduroy, label “Illegal Jeanswear” with two horizontal zippered front pockets, two back pockets with button down flaps, size 9. COUNTY AUCTION PROCEEDS TO SUPPORT CRIME STOPPERS Warden Chris White, Crime stoppers board member Dirk Kuemmling, Cst Jennifer Beaupre.

GUELPH SANTA CLAUS PARADE - Crime Stoppers Board members Brandon Yanchus, Dirk Kuemmling and Peter Canning.

Canadian Anti-Fraud Centre www.antifraudcentre.ca 1.888.495.8501 The Competition Burearu’s Information Centre www.competitionbureau.gc.ca 1.800.348.5358 An exerpt from The Canadian Edition of The Little Black Book of Scams. The book is available online at: www.competitionbureau.gc.ca. 3rd ANNUAL GUELPH MULCH SALE FUNDRAISING EVENT.

Police are seeking the assistance of the public in the hope of determining the identity of the deceased. Anyone having information that would assist police with identifying this women is asked to contact Crime Stoppers at 1.800.222.TIPS (8477).

Sometime between the hours of 11:45 pm on Friday October 10 and 12:08 am on Saturday October 11 2008, a fatal hit and run occurred on Wellington Road 17, just east of Alma in Mapleton Township. The victim was an 18-year-old man from Fergus, who was hit while walking along the south side of the road in an eastbound direction. The suspect vehicle has been determined to be an older model, white, 1995-1997 Dodge Neon, similar to photo of vehicle shown here. The vehicle will have damage to the passenger front corner, side panel and window. The police and the family of the victim really need your help. If you have any information about this crime, please call Crime Stoppers at 1.800.222.TIPS (8477). You will remain anonymous. Crime Stoppers does not subscribe to call display or *69. You will not have to testify in court. If your information is used in an arrest you may be eligible for a cash reward of up to $2,000.

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COUNTY OF WELLINGTON

O.P.P.

AUXILIARY Wellington County Auxiliary Unit Standing: Aux Sgt. Brian Black, Neil Mossman, George Prestaya, Aux Sgt. Brad Hull, Aux Staff Sgt. Bruce McGimsie, Andrew Pronk, Danielle Ellis, Josh Sykes, Steve Jamieson, Neil Watterson

The Auxiliary Unit of the Wellington County O.P.P. is part of a contingent of over 850 dedicated volunteers across the province. The Auxiliary Programme operates under the mandate of Ontario’s Police Services Act, with the official Mission Statement: “To provide fully trained volunteer Auxiliary members to assist in the delivery of traffic safety and community-based crime prevention initiatives and; to perform police duties only in special circumstances, including an emergency that the police officers of the O.P.P. are not sufficiently numerous to deal with.”

Seated: Chris Carey, Alida Hesselink, Bob Marsland

In Wellington County, the 15 members of the Auxiliary Unit are utilized extensively to help meet community policing, crime prevention and public service objectives. They assist with many community events including parades, car seat inspections, fairs, food drives, R.I.D.E. programs, mounted unit events, marine patrols,“Lock It or Lose It” campaigns and much more. In addition, Auxiliary members can regularly be found on patrol with front line officers. In 2012, the Auxiliary Unit volunteered over 4,500 hours to Wellington County. Auxiliary members come from virtually all walks of life including farmers, students, mechanics, business professionals and teachers. Many join the program to obtain“hands-on”experience in policing, while others volunteer strictly to give back to their community. All members undergo a series of screening tests which include general aptitude, psychological assessments and a thorough background check. Successful candidates receive training in selfdefence, use of force, powers of arrest, communications, firearms qualification, note taking and O.P.P. policies and procedures.

Right: Celebrity encounter at the Sunrise Hoofbeats Challenge – Ronald McDonald, Aux Sgt. Brad Hull, Bosco

Volunteering with the O.P.P. Auxiliary is an experience like no other. Auxiliary members get to experience first-hand the excitement and challenge, as well as the routine and uneventful in any tour of police duty. Further information on the Auxiliary Programme, including details on the application process, can be found under the “What We Do” section of www.opp.ca.

PC Daniel Dusto, PC Ryan McNally, PC Shannon Carey, PC Adam Wilfong, PC Eric Cheng, Sgt. Don Clark, PC Nicholas Oudshoorn, PC Andrew Smith, PC Christina Barraco , seated: PC Randy Dedman, PC Michael Wraight, PC Darryl Porterfield

O.P.P. Deputy Commissioner Larry Beechey presents the Kruger Family Award for Excellence in Auxiliary Policing to Auxiliary Sergeant Brad Hull of the Wellington County O.P.P. Auxiliary Unit. Auxiliary Award In 2012, Auxiliary Sergeant Brad Hull received the Kruger Award for Excellence in Auxiliary Policing. This award is presented annually to one Auxiliary member in the entire province who exhibits superior leadership, awareness of community needs, dedication and motivation, and upholds the overall good morale of the O.P.P. Auxiliary Sergeant Hull was recognized for his work with the Mounted Unit as well as his extensive participation in all aspects of the Auxiliary programme.

SERVICE AWARDS Life Saving Recognition: Cst. M. Wraight PC S.Langhorm PC K. Bajinksi Quarterly Century Club Pin: PC S. Carey Sgt. D. King Cst. P. Johnson PC M. Quick PC K. Krpan Cst. N. Tait Cst. S. Smith Sgt R. Smith CRO T. Jones Cst. P. Gonzalex CRO M. Price Aux Sgt. B. Hull Commissioner’s Citation for Bravery: PC T. Sturgeon Commissioner’s Citation for Lifesaving: Aux. Sgt B. Hull Civilian Radio Operator T. Jones Civilian Radio Operator M. Price Exemplary Service Medal: Cst. M DeBoer

ALTERNATE FORMATS OF THIS PUBLICATION AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST.

Regional Commanders Letter for Exemplary Performance of Duty: PC S.Langhorm PC K. Bajinksi PC S. Carey PC M. Quick PC K. Krpan Sgt R. Smith Retirements: St. W. Fink Cst. M. Cloes

Wellington OPP 2012 Annual Report  

Ontario Provincial Police, OPP, Wellington County OPP, Wellington County OPP 2012 Annual Report

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