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COUNTY OF WELLINGTON O.P.P.

2007 ANNUAL REPORT “Putting Our Community First”

Constable Randy Schubert O.P.P. Bike Patrol

www.opp.ca www.county.wellington.on.ca


COMMISSIONER, JULIAN FANTINO As the Commissioner of the Ontario Provincial Police (O.P.P.), I am pleased to have the opportunity to contribute to the County of Wellington O.P.P. Detachment’s 2007 Annual Report. I regret I have not yet had the chance to visit the new Detachment facility in Rockwood, but it is my hope to do so in the not so distant future. I have now held the position of O.P.P. Commissioner for over a year, a year of which the O.P.P. has experienced many changes. In March 2007, the O.P.P. Provincial Traffic Safety Program was established, making traffic patrol and enforcement the responsi-

POLICE SERVICES BOARD

bility of every uniformed O.P.P. officer 24 hours a day, seven days a week. The focus of the program is to save lives and reduce injuries by incorporating high visibility of police patrol, measurable outcomes, effective communications strategies, public education, and stakeholder and community participation. To increase police visibility, the traditional black and white cruisers were re-introduced, replacing the all white cruiser that has been used since 1989, and red/blue/white emergency light bars are to be installed on all marked black and white patrol vehicles as well as motorcycle units. Further, on August 15, 2007, the Government of Ontario announced funding for an additional 55 O.P.P. officers, who are to be assigned to traffic enforcement provincially, and a new O.P.P. aircraft, which will be used primarily for traffic patrol and surveillance. Also, the Government of Ontario passed The Safer Roads for a Safer Ontario Act, 2007, an amendment to the Highway Traffic Act that allows police officers to administer seven day licence suspensions and seven-day vehicle impoundments at roadside for the offence of operating a motor vehicle at 50 kilometres per hour or more above the posted speed limit. The new legislation sends a clear message that speeding and aggressive driving will result in very serious penalties. You may be interested to know that from Police Services Board have an effect on each and every resident in Wellington County. Secretary of the Wellington County Police Board is Scott Wilson, the CAO of Wellington County. This year marks the year that the board will be working diligently with the Ontario Provincial Police to secure a new contract for policing in Wellington. Contract negotiations will be starting immediately to ensure the best agreement possible for the residents of Wellington and for the officers and staff who serve us so well. You will notice this year that the Annual Report contains information regarding the operating budget for policing in Wellington County. The inclusion of this data was requested last year from a local resident, and it is information that should be of great interest to everyone.

Left to right - Jim Connell, John Green, Lynda White and John McCluskey. Absent Linda Austin and Scott Wilson

It is again a privilege to be elected chairperson for 2008 for the Wellington County Police Services Board. This year the board consists of the County Warden John Green, the Vice Chairman Jim Connell and Provincial Appointee Linda Austin. John McCluskey, the other Provincial Appointee retired in June 2007 to pursue other interests, so we are presently waiting for the province to appoint a new board member. We are all anxious to have a full board again as the decisions that are made by the

DETACHMENT COMMANDER It is my privilege to present the Wellington County O.P.P. Annual Report for 2007. Yearly the Wellington County Police Services Board directs me to prepare a report for you so you can easily evaluate your policing services in Wellington County. Please view this report as our “report card” to you, the Community, the citizens of Wellington County. The O.P.P. has policed Wellington County under contract since September 8, 1999. This year marks the end of the second five year contract we have had with Wellington County. Preliminary discussions for the renewal of the contract will begin soon. It is important that you speak up and be heard as to what policing services you would like to see offered in Wellington County for the next five year period.

On an annual basis the Police Services Board reviews and approves the operating budget for policing in Wellington County. This budget is then submitted to County Council for approval, which usually happens by the end of February. The 2007 operating budget included the following items: • The contract with the Ontario Provincial Police $11,533,000 • Principal and interest payments on long term debt for the Rockwood Operations Centre: $366,400 • Maintenance and operations of County owned police facilities in Rockwood, Palmerston and Fergus: $212,400 • All other items including Board expenses, parking ticket and For example, in 2007 we were able to offer the DARE program (Drug Abuse Resistance Education) to 166 grade 6 students at the four elementary schools in the Town of Erin. One of our community partners there, the Erin Optimist Club funded this venture and what an adventure it was. I was at that graduation in June at Centre 2000. The place was packed with the beaming faces of the graduates and their families. What a gratifying experience it was for me to be there. This venture was such a success that the Erin Optimist Club is again funding this program in the Town of Erin. To those Community Volunteers please accept my humble thanks for supporting your police service. Wellington County Council has always been a supporter of our area youth. Since our first contract they have funded, first two officers and now four full time uniformed Police Officers in our four area high schools. We are the only county in the Province that has full time uniformed Police Officers dedicated full time to our area high schools. It is difficult to measure the success of this program, for the program is pro-active in nature, to make our schools safe for your children. The officers in these schools know our area youth. They are there, prepared to respond before trouble happens. We have seen their successes over and over as peer pressures change within our educational system. Traffic is a major concern to all citizens in Wellington County. The Polices Services Board continually questions what I am doing to make your roadways safe. In 2007 we were probably more pro-active than we have ever been before but 18 persons still died in 17 separate collisions on our roadways. Impaired

September 30 to December 31, 2007, County of Wellington Detachment members issued 14 licence suspensions and impoundments for offences under the new legislation. Excessive speeding is a major problem, particularly given the direct correlation between increased speed and the seriousness of collisions, and the fact that the severity of a collision increases with the speed travelled at impact. During 2007, 18 people died in 17 separate collisions that occurred on roadways patrolled by the County of Wellington Detachment. Also, 223 motorists were arrested with impaired driving, the leading criminal cause of death in this country. Please be assured that the members of the County of Wellington Detachment will continue to enforce Ontario’s laws with the goal of reducing the number of deaths and injuries as well as impaired driving incidents occurring on the roadways they patrol. They are committed to providing efficient and effective policing services so that the residents of the County of Wellington can live in safe and secure communities. Yours truly, Julian Fantino false alarm administration: $154,800 A small portion of the cost of policing in Wellington County is recovered from rent payments from the Province for use of the Rockwood facility, from certain provincial grant programmes, and from parking tickets, false alarms and other fees and charges. The vast majority of the cost of policing is funded by property taxes. The Wellington County O.P.P. officers encounter many issues and challenges in our communities. Impaired drivers continue to be a major concern, and the traffic unit is vigilant in ensuring that our roads are kept as safe as possible. One police officer is assigned to each one of the four high schools to work daily with students, teachers and parents on issues such as illegal substances and school violence. As you read through this report and see everything that the Wellington County O.P.P. are responsible for, you will appreciate that public safety is their priority. The Wellington County Police Services Board value the input of the residents of this wonderful county. We are here to serve your best interests so please do not hesitate to contact any member of the Board with any policing questions or concerns. Lynda White Chairperson Wellington County Police Services Board driving has never been so prevalent. How do we explain that? MADD Canada is trying to re-establish a Wellington Chapter for they have recognized that the carnage on our roadways is again growing because some people just don’t get it. Sadly for us, Traffic Sergeant Rick Weiler, who has headed our Traffic Unit since its inception retired January 31, 2008 after 31 years of dedicated service to the citizens of Wellington County. His expertise will be missed but we do wish him all the best in his retirement. Good news, for the fifth year in a row our break and enters in Wellington County have declined. I attribute that to the hard work of all of our front line members. Our Crime Unit members work very hard at providing the uniform side with fresh nformation and relentless follow-up. In summary, we are your police service. We need your support and thoughts on how we can best serve you. Please read this report. If you do not understand a trend, call us. If you wish a police officer to come and meet with your own service group call us. We are here to work with you to make “Safe Communities…A Secure Ontario”.

Steve Walsh Detachment Commander Wellington County O.P.P.

In October of 2007 members of the Wellington County O.P.P. gathered at the Rockwood Conservation Area for photographs used throughout our Annual Report. We would like to extend our gratitude to Ontario Hydro for their assistance with the aerial shot used in the centrespread, to the Conservation Authority for use of the premises and Helen Michel of the Wellington Advertiser for her photography.

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This grizzly scene is an aerial overview of a June 2000 incident. O.P.P. Sergeant Margaret Eve and her partner were on their way to an emergency call when a passing truck hit their cruisers. Sergeant Eve died two days later, leaving behind two small children and her husband. There is hope that the MOVE OVER LAW will assist and protect our paramedics, our firefighters and our police officers from being involved in tragic circumstances such as the devastating collision in June of 2000 which took the life of Ontario Provincial Police Sergeant Margaret Eve. Many motorists are still not moving over for stopped Emergency Vehicles. The law requires that all drivers when approaching a police, fire or ambulance vehicle stopped with its red and blue lights flashing in the same direction, either in a lane or on the shoulder of the road to slow down and pass with caution. If the road has two or more lanes, the motorist MUST move over into another lane if it can be done safely. For the first offence a motorist can receive a fine of $400 to $2000 dollars and 3 demerit points. For a second offence you can receive a fine of $1000 to $4000 dollars, plus possible jail time of up to 6 months and a possible driver’s license suspension of up to 2 years. It is really simple. Pay attention when you see a stopped emergency vehicle. Slow down, move over and proceed with caution. OUR EMERGENCY SERVICE PERSONS’ LIVES DEPEND ON IT.

NEW RACING LEGISLATION Speed is the number one killer of motorists on our roadways throughout Ontario. Every year, there are needless deaths because motorists choose to drive at speeds far above the posted speed limit or too fast for the existing road and weather conditions. On September 30th, 2007, the Ontario government passed a new law into legislation to try and combat this problem. It is known as the “street racing” law and is a tool to help Police to

DRINKING AND DRIVING CAMPAIGN

try and address this issue. The new law states that no person shall drive a motor vehicle in a race, contest, stunt or wager. It includes such things as exceeding the speed limit by 50 or more kilometers, driving with someone in the trunk, spinning or sliding, and driving where the driver does not occupy the driver’s seat. Anyone who is caught breaking the new racing law faces some immediate serious consequences. Firstly, their motor vehicle is impounded for seven days (the owner is responsible for towing and storage charges). Secondly, the driver faces an immediate seven-day suspension of his/her driver’s licence. Upon conviction for an offence of racing, the driver faces a mini-

YOU choose your “R.I.D.E.” "Don't Drink and Drive"

The following ad campaign ran five consecutive weeks prior to Christmas 2007 as half page ads in The Wellington Advertiser, a local County wide newspaper with a circulation of 39,071.

mum fine of $2000.00 (maximum fine of $10,000.00) and/or six months in jail. The driver also faces a suspension of up to two years on a first conviction and ten years on a second conviction. Traffic enforcement on the roads, trails and waterways is the O.P.P.’s core business plan and we take it seriously. We are focusing our efforts on it 24 hours a day, seven days a week. The County of Wellington O.P.P. supports the provisions of Section 172 and Regulation 455/07 of the HTA as an effective tool in our arsenal to take drivers off the road who participate in high-risk behaviours. IN 2007 WELLINGTON COUNTY O.P.P. ISSUED 14 OFFENCE NOTICES UNDER SECTION 172.

Meet Your New

BARTENDER Don’t Drink and Drive!

These ads were well received within the community.

This could be your last

This community service announcement

This community service announcement brought to you by:

brought to you by:

Christmas

We’re doing our part. Are you doing yours? Don’t Drink and Drive!

DON’T DRINK AND DRIVE DON’T DRINK AND DRIVE! This community service announcement brought to you by:

This community service announcement brought to you by:

This community service announcement brought to you by:

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THE COUNTY OF WELLINGTON O.P.P. MOUNTED UNIT

THE COUNTY OF WELLINGTON O.P.P. CANINE UNIT

The County of Wellington O.P.P. Mounted Unit has been in operation for the past 10 years. Initially, the unit was only utilized to do special events and parades. We have constantly worked to expand that role to where we now conduct full-time patrols throughout the summer months as well as participating in special events throughout the year.

During 2007 the County of Wellington O.P.P. Canine Unit responded to 83 calls for service, and conducted 7 public service demonstrations. Constable Barry Reid is the Canine Officer for the County of Wellington O.P.P. He has been a member of the O.P.P. for 13 years and has been assigned as the Canine Handler since 2003. Constable Reid acquired a new dog in 2007 and now has two Police Service Dogs to conduct his investigations.

In 2008, we hope to expand the role of the Mounted Unit even more. Throughout the winter months, we will use the Mounted Unit to conduct cottage patrols throughout Wellington County. Officers will patrol cottages and check to ensure that they are secure.

“Dekker” is an 80 lb. German Shepherd who was imported from Belgium. P.C. Reid and Dekker attended the General Service Dog course in Gravenhurst throughout the spring and summer in order to train Dekker to track and search for people. Bosco and Constable Keith Robb

Four officers and one Auxiliary officer share the duties of Mounted Patrol. They include, Constable Keith Robb, Constable Steve Smith, Constable Kate Carberry, Constable Terri Stroud and Auxiliary Constable Graham Ross.

Dekker’s first call arrived shortly after his training was completed. A drunk driver on Highway 6 had crossed the centre line and struck an oncoming vehicle. The driver of the oncoming vehicle was pregnant at the time, and suffered serious injuries in the crash. The suspect’s vehicle rolled into a field and the driver immediately fled from the scene. After tracking the suspect through fields, bush and yards, Dekker located the suspect 1.5 km from the scene, hiding in a ditch. Police Service Dog “Riker” is a 7 ½ year old German Shepherd cross who has been in service in Wellington County since 2003. Riker has responded to over 300 tracking calls, and been responsible for locating 48 lost or wanted people. Riker will continue to conduct narcotic searches through 2008, then retire at the end of the year.

Jasper and Constable Steve Smith

We hope to expand our full-time patrols to begin in early April 2008 and end in October 2008. In 2007, we completed 588 patrol hours and we hope to greatly expand that in 2008. The unit consists of two Percheron Cross geldings. Bosco, who is 14-years-old, is 17 ¼ hands high and weighs 2280 pounds as well as Jasper, who is 10-years-old, is 16 ¾ hands high and weighs 1780 pounds. They were both purchased by the County of Wellington 5 years ago.

Both the horses and the officers were trained by the Toronto Police Mounted Unit. All of our officers underwent equestrian training to ensure they were capable of handling these large horses. The Mounted Unit is available to attend parades and major events. If you would like them at your event, please send a letter of request to: The County of Wellington O.P.P. Mounted Unit at 250 Daly Street, Palmerston, Ontario N0G 2P0. Make sure you outline the date and time required, the function they are needed for and a contact person. Constable Barry Reid and Dekker

COUNTY OF WELLINGTON HIGH SCHOOL OFFICERS The County of Wellington O.P.P. has four High Schools within its policing jurisdiction. Centre Wellington, Norwell District High School, Wellington Heights, and Erin District High School. The policing contract has allotted four officers to be assigned to the High School Unit. Each Officer is assigned to a school. Constable Andy Clements Norwell District High School), Randy Schubert (Erin District High School), Steve Smith (Centre Wellington) and Karl Baumann (Wellington Heights).

criminal occurrences along with 52 provincial offences, 60 Controlled Drug & Substance Act offences, 3 bylaw offences. To contact please call your high school or your O.P.P. WHAT TO DO WHEN YOUR CHILD’S SCHOOL GOES INTO LOCKDOWN

Left to right: Constables Andy Clements, Randy Schubert, Steve Smith and Karl Baumann

These Officers were responsible for approximately 3600 students during 2007. The Officers are involved with assisting the school staff with education in policing issues, such as Drug use, Provincial and Federal Legislation. Also, the Officers are responsible for enforcement and investigations within the school and area. The interaction with the students, staff and Officers cultivates a positive environment for learning. High School Officers conducted 2,443.25 hours of patrol in the schools and investigated 184

DO: • Listen to local media for instructions released by the School Board or by Wellington O.P.P. • Inquire with your child’s school about their Lockdown Policy and Procedures prior to an actual Lockdown

DON’T: • Panic (Your child is most likely safe) • Call your child on their cell phone (in the event of a lockdown your child will have been instructed to turn off all electronic devices) • Call your child’s school during a lockdown (School staff are busy and will be unable to answer phones) • Attend your child’s school during a lockdown (O.P.P. will have cordoned off the entire area and you will not be permitted access. Your presence at the scene will take emergency services’ attention away from the task at hand) • Call “911” for information. (Unless you have vital information that may be helpful in resolving the Lockdown issue).

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PHONEBUSTERS Established in January of 1993, PhoneBusters is a national antifraud call centre jointly operated by the Ontario Provincial Police and the Royal Canadian Mounted Police. PhoneBusters plays a key role in educating the public about specific fraudulent telemarketing pitches. The call centre also plays a vital role in the collection and dissemination of victim evidence, statistics, documentation and tape recordings which are made available to outside law enforcement agencies. The original mandate of PhoneBusters was to prosecute key individuals in Ontario and Quebec involved in telemarketing fraud under the Criminal Code of Canada. Our mandate now also includes facilitating prosecution by United States agencies through extradition, and by the Competition Bureau under the Competition Act. PhoneBusters is the central agency in Canada that collects information on telemarketing, advanced fee fraud letters (Nigerian letters) and identity theft complaints. The information is disseminated to the appropriate law enforcement agencies. The data collected at PhoneBusters is a valuable tool in evaluating the effects of various types of fraud on the public. It also helps to prevent future similar crimes from taking place. Here are some of the scams that PhoneBusters investigates: • 900 Scams • Advanced Fee Letter Fraud (419/Nigerian) • Advanced Fee Loans • Cheque Overpayment Fraud • Office Supplies / Directory • Consumer Tips • False Charities

• • • • • • • •

Identity Theft Inheritance Phishing Prize Pitch Puppy Scam Pyramid Schemes Recovery Pitch Travel

1-888-495-8501

www.phonebusters.com


Wellington Results: Last year within the County Of Wellington, the Erin Optimist Club funded the DARE program to be taught at the 4 Erin area schools. Four Erin TWP area schools consisting of 166 grade 6 students (11 - 12 years old) enrolled in the 10 week DARE program this past spring. Our Dare graduation, which celebrated our students accomplishments during the Dare program, and was not held during school time, had every principal, and every teacher and almost 100 % of all the students participating. IF YOU ARE INTERESTED IN SPONSORING A DARE PROGRAM IN YOUR COMMUNITY, PLEASE CONTACT COUNTY OF WELLINGTON O.P.P.

D.A.R.E. DRUG ABUSE RESISTANCE EDUCATION D.A.R.E. is an education program designed to provide school children with knowledge about drug abuse and the consequences of abuse. The emphasis of the D.A.R.E. curriculum is on the negative consequences of drug use and teaches the students skills to resist peer pressure and intimidation. The program also shows kids how

to make healthy, positive choices in their lives as an alternative to drug use. This is done by providing them with accurate information about drugs, including tobacco and alcohol, presented in a fun, interac-

tive way and showing them that there are positive alternatives to drug use. As part of the program the kids are also encouraged to participate in outside activities that reinforce the classroom messages.

THE WELLINGTON COUNTY TRAFFIC MANAGEMENT UNIT The Wellington County Traffic Management Unit was created on the May 5th, 2001 to address traffic issues in Wellington County. The unit consists of a Sergeant and six constables. Each member has at least one area of specialized skill such as marine handler, motorized snow vehicle operator, technical traffic collision investigator, photography, truck inspector, radar instructor and intoxilyzer technician. Four members are also motorcycle riders.

Rob Nixon and Rick Weiler

Tim Gillingham and Ryan Martin

The unit supports front line policing by responding to traffic complaints. Each complaint is evaluated and verified. Measures are then implemented to address the complaint and the complaint is monitored on a regular basis to ensure the action taken is effective. The Traffic Management Unit partners with municipal police agencies, Ministry of Transportation, Alcohol and Gaming Commission, snowmobile clubs, and others to conduct initiatives that promote safe vehicle operation. The unit conducts regular marine patrols on our waterways to enhance the safety of all persons enjoying our lakes, and in the winter, patrols the O.F.S.C. snowmobile trail network throughout the County. The TMU attends serious motor vehicle collisions to provide investigative expertise and more importantly, analyze the cause of the collision to implement strategies to reduce these incidents. The Traffic Unit is responsible for the training of front line members on radar and other traffic monitoring devices. They also give presentations to public groups on a wide variety of traffic safety subjects.

Left to right - Dave Gray, Rob Nixon, Sgt. Rick Weiler, Dave Brazier, Henry Heidinga

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OCCURRENCES BY AREA IN 2007

DO YOU KNOW HOW TO CONTACT THE O.P.P.? 9-1-1

1-888-310-1122 OR * 6-7-7 CELLULAR

EMERGENCY

Provincial Highways

7.68 %

City of Guelph

1.84 %

Centre Wellington

28.04 %

Town of Minto

10.44 %

CALL FOR SERVICE

Town of Mapleton

5.54 % Did you know County of Wellington O.P.P. responded to 22,408 calls for service in 2007? They also conducted 4,024 criminal record checks

Town of Erin

9.24 %

CALLS

APPREHENSIONS

2003 2004 2005 2006 2007

171 188 249 274 295

46 51 69 68 78

14.71 %

Puslinch Township Guelph/Eramosa

9.15 %

MENTAL HEALTH ACT CALLS YEAR

Wellington North

13.35 %

Did you know Snow removal is an issue for every residence? Parking by-law enforcement for 2007 served 1,984 notices

CRIMESTOPPERS 1-800-222-tips 440 222 144 12 62

new tips received were Guelph Police services information O.P.P. other ministries were directed to other crime stoppers programs

TOP TEN CALLS FOR SERVICE IN 2007: 2,240

1,868

VEHICLE COLLISIONS

TRAFFIC COMPLAINTS

R.I.D.E. COUNTY OF WELLINGTON TRAFFIC COLLISIONS IN 2007 Total motor vehicle collisions Property damage MVC’s Personal Injuries MVC’s Fatal MVC’s Number of persons killed Number of persons injured

2240 1809 417 17 18 566

Did you know Wellington County holds R.I.D.E. all year round?

IN 2007 THERE WERE 17,665 PROVINCIAL OFFENCE NOTICES INCLUDING SPEEDING 0-15 km 16-30 km 31-49 km Over 50 km

2,292 4,882 2,386 44

In 2007 there were 131,318 vehicle stops, 101 12 hour licence suspensions

(PLEASE NOTE: The County of Wellington O.P.P. seizes thousands of dollars worth of recovered stolen property, however if the rightful owner is not able to identify it, it cannot be returned. Please record all makes, models and serial #’s or ID mark on each piece.)

1,168 POLICE

1,144 FALSE

ASSISTANCE

ALARMS

1,111 FALSE 911 CALLS

919 THEFT UNDER $5000

606

TROUBLE WITH YOUTH

555

MISCHIEF UNDER $5000

473

TRAFFIC HAZARDS

405 FOUND PROPERTY


OCCURRENCES BY AREA IN 2007

DO YOU KNOW HOW TO CONTACT THE O.P.P.? 9-1-1

1-888-310-1122 OR * 6-7-7 CELLULAR

EMERGENCY

Provincial Highways

7.68 %

City of Guelph

1.84 %

Centre Wellington

28.04 %

Town of Minto

10.44 %

CALL FOR SERVICE

Town of Mapleton

5.54 % Did you know County of Wellington O.P.P. responded to 22,408 calls for service in 2007? They also conducted 4,024 criminal record checks

Town of Erin

9.24 %

CALLS

APPREHENSIONS

2003 2004 2005 2006 2007

171 188 249 274 295

46 51 69 68 78

14.71 %

Puslinch Township Guelph/Eramosa

9.15 %

MENTAL HEALTH ACT CALLS YEAR

Wellington North

13.35 %

Did you know Snow removal is an issue for every residence? Parking by-law enforcement for 2007 served 1,984 notices

CRIMESTOPPERS 1-800-222-tips 440 222 144 12 62

new tips received were Guelph Police services information O.P.P. other ministries were directed to other crime stoppers programs

TOP TEN CALLS FOR SERVICE IN 2007: 2,240

1,868

VEHICLE COLLISIONS

TRAFFIC COMPLAINTS

R.I.D.E. COUNTY OF WELLINGTON TRAFFIC COLLISIONS IN 2007 Total motor vehicle collisions Property damage MVC’s Personal Injuries MVC’s Fatal MVC’s Number of persons killed Number of persons injured

2240 1809 417 17 18 566

Did you know Wellington County holds R.I.D.E. all year round?

IN 2007 THERE WERE 17,665 PROVINCIAL OFFENCE NOTICES INCLUDING SPEEDING 0-15 km 16-30 km 31-49 km Over 50 km

2,292 4,882 2,386 44

In 2007 there were 131,318 vehicle stops, 101 12 hour licence suspensions

(PLEASE NOTE: The County of Wellington O.P.P. seizes thousands of dollars worth of recovered stolen property, however if the rightful owner is not able to identify it, it cannot be returned. Please record all makes, models and serial #’s or ID mark on each piece.)

1,168 POLICE

1,144 FALSE

ASSISTANCE

ALARMS

1,111 FALSE 911 CALLS

919 THEFT UNDER $5000

606

TROUBLE WITH YOUTH

555

MISCHIEF UNDER $5000

473

TRAFFIC HAZARDS

405 FOUND PROPERTY


WELLINGTON COUNTY CRIMINAL INVESTIGATION UNIT

on various committees, monitoring high risk domestic and conducting safety plans for victims. Domestics are defined as any use of physical or sexual force, actual or threatened, in an intimate relationship, including emotional/psychological abuse or harassing behavior. Intimate relationships include those between the opposite-sex and same-sex partners. These relationships vary in duration and legal formality, and include current and former dating, common-law and married couples.

THE WELLINGTON COUNTY STREET TEAM

DOMESTIC STATISTICS FOR 3 YEAR PERIOD: YEAR 2005 2006 2007

DOMESTICS 315 423 384

These crimes are often committed in a context where there is a pattern of assault and / or controlling behavior. This violence may include physical assault, and emotional, psychological and sexual abuse. It can include threats to harm children, other family members, pets and property. The violence is used to intimidate, humiliate or frighten victims, or to make them powerless. Domestic violence may include a single act of abuse. It may also include a number of acts that may appear minor or trivial when viewed in isolation, but collectively form a pattern that amounts to abuse. The unit is under the direction of Detective Sergeant Ray Collins

The unit’s Detectives are responsible for the following areas of expertise: The investigation and follow up to benchmark crimes such as: • homicides • property crime, exceeding $5,000 • frauds and false pretences exceeding $5,000 • drug occurrences • crimes related to domestic violence occurrences • assault Level 3 (aggravated) • a sexual offence, including child pornography, child luring, voyeuristic • criminal harassment/stalking • hate/bias offence • non-traffic death investigation • attempted murder • robbery • specialized investigations and analyzes intelligence These investigations are managed and assigned to unit members by the Detective Sergeant in charge of the unit. Investigators can draw on the numerous resources available to them through our Region Headquarters in London or the General Headquarters in Orillia. The following is a short list of some of the resources that are available to them: • • • • • • • • • •

Child pornography Anti-Rackets Organized Crime Drug Enforcement Crime Prevention Anti Terrorism Intelligence Liquor Enforcement Tactics and Rescue Team Emergency Response

The Criminal Investigations Unit often calls upon the assistance of the Forensic Identification Unit which is located in Mount Forest. This unit performs those intriguing and scientific feats that are so often seen on television programs. The physical evidence they collect and analyze plays a critical role in the overall investigation and resolution of criminal cases. The unit is responsible for the forensic examination of crime scenes. Duties include the location, preservation and collection of fingerprints, footwear evidence as well as trace evidence including DNA evidence such as bodily fluids, hair and fibers. The Identification members are trained to record crime scenes, using video and digital photography. They are also responsible for the presentation of such evidence in our courts. The unit can also call upon the help of a bloodstain pattern analyst to assist them at homicide scenes. Detective Paula King is assigned to the unit as the Domestic Violence Coordinator. She is responsible for training uniformed officers, quality control of reports, conducting interviews, sitting

SCENES OF CRIME OFFICERS (S.O.C.O.)

CSI WELLINGTON - Not quite. From attending and examining the scene, collection of evidence, expert examination and comparison, and possible suspect identification, crimes are not solved in an hour as portrayed by the media.

Left to right: Detective Constables Andy Hooper, Larry Drew, Kevin Detweiler

The Wellington County Street Team is assigned to conduct and follow up on property crimes. The team is made up of Detective Constable Larry Drew, who acts as the supervisor and two seconded officers, Detective Constable Kevin Detweiler and Detective Constable Andy Hooper. Their primary focus is auto theft, robbery and break and enter offences but they are utilized to assist with other criminal and drug investigations when extra officers are needed. Constable Hooper is also the founder and coordinator of the High Enforcement Repeat Offender (H.E.R.O.) program which came into force in October of 2007. The purpose of this program is to monitor persons bound by conditions of a probation order or bail. It also concentrates on the execution of outstanding arrest warrants.

PARENTAL AWARENESS

Situated at the Mount Forest O.P.P. Detachment, in Wellington County is the Forensic Identification Unit, for Western Region. Created to enhance the existing services of this Forensic Unit, is the implementation of Scenes of Crime Officers. (S.O.C.O). This enables expedience and efficiency in responding to calls in the field, thus allowing Forensic personnel to focus on investigations of a more serious nature. In Wellington County there are 10 trained SOCO officers. They attend the following: break and enters, assaults, domestic assaults, mischief, fires, sudden deaths (natural or traumatic), Post Mortems, drug warrants, stolen property, recovered stolen vehicles, traffic accidents. Roles of the SOCO officer include: attending scenes of criminal and non-criminal incidents, and providing scene examination that may involve crime scene sketches, photography, and the collection and preservation of evidence including: DNA, fingerprints, footwear, tire and tool mark impressions. Exhibits are submitted to the Forensic Identification Unit for expert examination. DNA is submitted to the Center of Forensic Science in Toronto, Ontario, for examination regarding suitability for DNA upload to the existing National DNA Data bank, and for requests for known suspect DNA comparison. S.O.C.O Equipment: • Nikon D200 digital camera • Fingerprint kit complete with powders, brushes, and ink for printing cadavers • Casting material for tool impressions and fingerprints • Casting equipment for footwear impressions • Swabs for the collection of DNA Scenes of Crime Officers may apply for the invaluable opportunity of a 3 month placement within the Mount Forest Forensic Identification Unit. “Evidence only knows one thing: The Truth. It’s what it is.” ~ Gil Grissom

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IS YOUR CHILD USING DRUGS? Things to look for: Withdrawn, depressed, tired, or careless about personal grooming - Hostile, uncooperative, and frequently breaks curfews Relationships with family members have deteriorated - Hangs around with a new group of friends - Grades have slipped and school attendance is irregular - Loss of interest in hobbies, sports, and other favorite activities - Change in eating and sleeping patterns - Has a hard time concentrating - Red eyes or runny nose without allergy problems or a cold - Household money has been disappearing – You have found any of the following in your home: pipes or water pipes/bongs (including homemade), rolling papers, small medicine bottles or film canisters, eye drops(Visine),butane lighters, small handheld scales, loose tobacco.


COMMON FACTS ABOUT STREET DRUGS COCAINE Cocaine is a stimulant and is extremely addictive Cocaine hydrochloride - the form in which cocaine is snorted or injected - is a white crystalline powder. It is sometimes "cut," or mixed, with things that look like it, such as cornstarch or talcum powder, or with other drugs, such as local anesthetics or amphetamines. Powder cocaine can be chemically changed to create forms of cocaine that can be smoked. These forms, known as "freebase" and "crack," look like crystals or rocks. Cocaine is often used with other drugs, especially alcohol and marihuana. Cocaine and heroin, mixed and dissolved for injection, is called a "speedball."

REGULAR USE Chronic fatigue - Lack of motivation-academic-professional performance-family relations. “A Motivational Syndrome”-in teenagers it is characterized by a drop of dynamics, lack of ambition, apathy (indifference and listlessness) and the “What do I care” or “Who gives a damn” attitude.

2007 Drug Investigations Possession of Cocaine Possession of Marihuana Possession of Other Drugs Trafficking Cocaine Trafficking Marihuana Trafficking of Other Drugs Production of Controlled Substance

11 115 32 6 12 12 21

Value of drugs seized during investigations $456,226.00 Value of property seized during investigations $12,131.56 Weapons seized during investigations 2 Value of drugs seized during eradication $1,143,000.00

CHRONIC & GENERAL EFFECTS ON HEALTH Respiratory problems One “joint” has as much carcinogenic substances as one pack of cigarettes Immune system is affected and susceptible to bacterial / viral infections Effects reproductive system in males

ILLEGAL DRUGS FOUND

SYMPTOMS OF METHAMPHETAMINE USE (Physical) – Sweating - Weight loss/malnutrition - Increased heart rate, blood pressure, body temperature - Shortness of breath – Insomnia - Rotting teeth - Itchy dry skin, open sores (crank bugs) -Uncontrollable body movements/seizures - Continuous/excessive dilation of pupils - Damage to internal organs (heart, liver, brain) (Psychological) - Hallucinations/ delusions - Increased alertness Anxiousness/ nervousness - Panic attacks - Excited delirium Extreme paranoia - Mood swings/ irritability - Prolonged depression/ suicidal tendencies - Aggressiveness/ violence MARIHUANA (Cannabis Marihuana) Refers to the leaves and flowering tops of the plants. Provincial Constables Ron Smith (left) and John Devine with items seized following a traffic stop.

In one night, officers made two drug seizures in Wellington County. Uniform officers stopped a car in the Guelph area and a subsequent investigation yielded approximately $115,000 worth of cocaine; $5,000 worth of marihuana, ecstasy and OxyContin; and $1,549 in cash. In a separate development, a drug officer executed a search warrant on a grow operation in Guelph and removed approximately $134,000 worth of marihuana, $15,100 worth of cocaine, $4,538 worth of hashish and $2,900 worth of ecstasy.

SYMPTOMS OF COCAINE USE Temporary euphoria - Transitory feeling of power - Increased energy - Loss of weight – Agitation - Accelerated heart beat Increase in blood pressure - Profuse sweating CONTINUOUS USE Addiction - Anxiety and depression - Mood swings – Insomnia Defensive attitude - Paranoia and hallucinations - Suicide ADDITIONAL PROBLEMS Financial – Legal - Loss of employment - Weight loss - After heavy use, irrepressible need to sleep - Diseases such as Hepatitis C and AIDS (needles/sex) METHAMPHETAMINE Meth, “Speed” or ”‘Crystal Meth” is an extremely addictive and potent amphetamine, typically produced from over-the-counter cold medications and sold illegally in pill form, capsules, powder and crystal pieces. Meth stimulates the central nervous system and is known to cause paranoia and violent behaviour. Severe brain damage can result

It is a tobacco-like substance produced by drying the leaves and flowering tops. THC - delta-9 Tetrahydrocannibinol is the ingredient that gives the drug the psychoactive affects.

EMERGENCY RESPONSE TRAINING UNIT

DRUGS THAT COME FROM CANNABIS Marihuana Hashish Hashish Oil

APPEARANCE (Unfinished Product) Powder Base-Liquid Base May not resemble what is thought to be Methamphetamine

(Finished Product) Granular Powder-White to off-white, pink, yellow-May have tacky or oily texture

EFFECTS OF CANNABIS MARIHUANA Loss of co-ordination Unable to make spur of the moment decisions Memory loss Slurred speech Distorted sense of time and space Bloodshot eyes Laughter and giggling Sudden hunger drive Single but strong dose can trigger panic and hallucinations

DID YOU KNOW ... County of Wellington O.P.P. added 43 contributions to the Sexual Offender registry, and 14 submissions to the National DNA databank in 2007.

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Left to right: Rudy Bracnik and Pete Fischer

Wellington County has 3 Emergency Response Team (E.R.T.) members. P/C Pete Fischer, P/C Rick Lytel and P/C Rudy Bracnik are stationed in Wellington County but respond to calls throughout West Region and the Province. These highly trained members are responsible for K9 Backup, Containment, Public Order, VIP Security, High Risk Prisoner Escort, Search and Rescue and assisting the Crime and Drug Units with warrants and other duties such as evidence searches. In 2007 the 42 member West Region E.R.T. responded to 600+ calls for service, 58 of those calls were in Wellington County. It is a busy unit able to respond in a moment’s notice.


A FEW WAYS YOU CAN HELP Make a cash donation. Make a difference. With donations, our “tipsters� will receive a cash reward for contributing towards making our community a safer place. All donations over $10.00 are tax deductible.

CRACK. METH. COCAINE.

MARIHUANA. ECSTACY. OXYCONTIN. PERCOCET. These drugs are slowly killing people in our community everyday. Please contact us with any information that can HELP US PUT DRUG DEALERS AWAY!

Become a board member. Every great team is made of great people.

our community. To get involved or to get more information, go to: www.crimestoppers-wellington.com or give us a call at 519-846-5371. Please send cheques to: Crime Stoppers of Wellington County P.O. Box 391 Fergus, Ontario N1M 3W2

Volunteer at one of our awareness and fundraising events. Feel the impact you’ll make in

VICTIM SERVICES WELLINGTON

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2007 - Another Successful Year for Wellington County Crime Stoppers.

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Established in 1988, Crime Stoppers of Wellington County is a community-based non-profit charitable organization that brings the public, media, and police together in a cooperative team effort to help solve crime. This is accomplished by offering cash rewards and guaranteeing anonymity to callers.

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WANTED Crime Stoppers

Of Wellington County is looking for dedicated

VOLUNTEERS and BOARD MEMBERS. If interested call 519-846-5371 or go to www.crimestoppers-wellington.com

A group of dedicated, concerned citizens make up the voluntary civilian Board of Directors. They are responsible for all the decision-making and fundraising to pay our callers for their information. It is NOT a police program and we receive no government funding for this. Callers to Crime Stoppers will never be asked to give their name, never have to testify in court, and if their information leads to an arrest or a closed case, the caller may be eligible for a cash reward of up to $2,000. Crime Stoppers of Wellington County saw another successful year in 2007 for which the active community based crime-fighting program credits the investigative skills of their local police partners, the Ontario Provincial Police and the Guelph Police Service. More than 822 calls came into the Wellington Crime Stoppers in 2007 and those calls helped members of law enforcement: Lay 216 charges Make 66 arrests Recover over $54,166.00 worth of stolen property Help take over $189,980.00 worth of illegal narcotics off the street! THE NUMBERS SPEAK FOR THEMSELVES â&#x20AC;Ś CRIME STOPPERS WORKS!

Joshua Sykes and Chere Ramore are volunteers for Victim Services Wellington.

Since 1996, highly skilled volunteers have been providing emotional and practical assistance to victims when they need it most, when crime and tragedy first happen. Under the authority of the Ministry of the Attorney General we are committed to addressing the needs of victims through, the Victim Crisis Assistance and Referral Service Program (V.C.A.R.S). Immediate intervention helps people to recover from victimization more quickly, and referrals to community agencies can help victims to play an active role in their recovery. We reached out to over 866 individuals during 2007 and our goal is to increase that number each year. VICTIM SERVICES WELLINGTON is a non-profit charitable organization that works with Police and emergency services 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year in every community in Wellington County. We are always looking for additional Volunteers to enhance our team. Interested? Call one of our offices to learn more about qualifications and for an application. VICTIM SERVICES OFFICE LOCATIONS: O.P.P.- Mount Forest: 519-323-9660, O.P.P.- Rockwood: 519-856-4929 Guelph Police Service: 824-1212 x 304

helping

COMMUNITY PARTNERS

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COMMUNITY SERVICE OFFICERS

COMMUNITY SERGEANTS COMMUNITY ORIENTED POLICING SERVICES IN MAPLETON Left to right: Palmerston – Sgt. Warren Fink, Mount Forest – Sgt. Glen Deitrich, Fergus – Sgt. Patrick Horrigan, Rockwood – Sgt. Mike Gordon

Left to right: Constables Keith Robb and Mark Cloes

There are two Community Services Officers in Wellington County. They are: 1) Constable Mark CLOES Rockwood O.P.P. Office 5145 Wellington Road 27, Rockwood, ON N0B 2K0 Phone: (519) 856-1506 Pager # 1-888-806-3593 Email: mark.cloes@ontario.ca

2) Constable Keith ROBB Palmerston O.P.P. Office 250 Daly Street, Palmerston, ON N0G 2P0 Phone: (519) 343-5770 Pager # 1-888-796-3984 Email: keith.robb@ontario.ca

The role of the Community Services Officers in Wellington County is an extremely demanding position. Community Services Officers are responsible for the delivery of all crime prevention programs to the public as well as the business community.

Along with Sergeants assigned to each platoon, each of the four offices within Wellington County, Fergus, Mount Forest Palmerston and Rockwood have a community Sergeant assigned to them.

DRAYTON COPS COMMITTEE Back Row Left to right: Mike Downey, Jim curry, Dennis Craven, Scott Cooper, Tom Woods Front Row Left to right: Rick Richardson, (Warden) John Green, Prov. Const. Laura Gromeder Absent: Paul Day, Ray Ellis, Prov. Const. Mark Grasman

WHAT IS COPS? It is Community Oriented Policing Services

Community Services Officers also deliver all of the school programs to students in all elementary schools throughout Wellington County. They are available to help homeowners and business owners with security evaluations and tips to help make their premises more secure. They educate the public about current crime patterns as well as personal security issues. Community Services Officers are available to do presentations to community groups, service clubs and to local businesses free of charge. If you wish to have one of them come and do a presentation for you, please contact either of the above officers.

MADD WELLINGTON CHAPTER

And what does that mean? It is the improved delivery of police services, resulting from a community and police partnership, which identifies and resolves issues to maintain social order. Social order is accomplished by addressing community issues and concerns that contribute to a safe environment.

All four Sergeants work together out of their respective offices. Duties include the general administration of the office, vehicle maintenance, property management, inventory control, and disposal of items seized – firearms, drugs, and property. The Sergeants are also a liaison for the community. Sergeants are involved with the local BIA, Chamber of Commerce, Municipal Counsels, and attend social events and assist with the organization of large community events, e.g.: Fall Fairs, Highland Games, and Hillside Festival.

ONTARIO LIEUTENANT GOVERNORS

BOOK DRIVE

Community Policing is a collaborative effort that identifies problems of crime and disorder, and involves all elements of the community in the search for solutions to these problems. It is founded on close, mutually beneficial ties between police and community members. O.P.P. Service Philosophy Community Policing is the fundamental principle on which all of our policing services are delivered. Too this end, we shall: Involve the people of the community in the identification of crime, traffic and social order problems and solutions. Provide policing services that are consistent with the identified concerns, expectations and needs of the community.

Left to right: Sergeant Mike Gordon and MPP Liz Sandals

On the 20th of December 2007 the Honourable David C. Onley announced he would be continuing the annual event of the Aboriginal Youth Book Drive. In the County of Wellington, several hundred children’s books were collected at the four detachments. This event will continue again near the end of 2008.

Participate with other concerned agencies and interest groups to effectively address police and community concerns.

Left to right: Constable Dan Mosey - Guelph City Police, Laurie Stevenson-Bullock, Catherine Wells, Scott Hammond, Cindy Johnston, Christine McCallum, Emer Earley, and Sergeant Mike Ashley - County of Wellington O.P.P.

Create an open and responsive working environment, which encourages commitment and creativity in the design and application of community policing services. Increase our effectiveness through the application of innovative, reactive and proactive policing services.

P.A.C.T. Participants

(Police and Community Together) Do you want to learn more about policing in this community?

The O.P.P. are glad to announce that the MADD Wellington Chapter is up and running again. Call the National office at 1800-665-MADD to get in touch with the chapter. The above picture is of the newly elected board for MADD Wellington County.

Call Sgt. Pat Horrigan 519-843-4240 We’re looking for 2008 P.A.C.T. Participants 1 night per week for 8 weeks

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ARE YOU INTERESTED IN BECOMING AN O.P.P. OFFICER? WE’RE HIRING! Constable Selection Process The O.P.P. is actively hiring qualified candidates for Provincial Constable. Here in Wellington County, we hired 9 new recruits in 2006. We are always encouraging people to choose Policing as a career and to consider Wellington County as their home. The O.P.P. is looking for people with integrity, who are accountable, courageous, caring and fair, people from diverse backgrounds who represent the communities we serve, people who enjoy working with others and want to build strong relationships characterized by mutual respect in all types of settings and circumstances. We want people who really want to make a difference in the lives of others. The information contained within the recruitment pages relates specifically to the O.P.P. constable hiring process as well as valuable links to assist you. It is recommended that you review all the information in detail to gain insights into the O.P.P. recruitment process, the Constable Selection System and your own readiness to challenge them. Basic Conditions of Appointment • Canadian citizen or permanent resident. • Minimum 18 years of age. • Ontario Grade 12 or equivalency. • Class ‘G’ driver’s license with: • No more than 6 demerit points; and • Full driving privileges. • No criminal record for which a pardon has not been received or an absolute/conditional discharge that

If you’ve been retired for less than three years, you may apply to become a part-time officer and work up to 20 hours per week.

O.P.P. SALARY GRID CADET Service Time -----

Salary (per year) $31,491.00

PROBATIONARY CONSTABLE 0-12 months

$40,470.00

CONSTABLE 12-18 months 18-24 months 24-36 months 36 mos. - 7 years

$51,600.00 $58,975.00 $65,610.00 $73,714.00

has not been sealed. • Certified in First-Aid and C.P.R. • Pass credit, background and investigation checks. • Possess a valid Certificate of Results (C.O.R.). O.P.P. applicants must be willing to serve anywhere in the province. Preferences for posting are taken into consideration. Part-time Constables Are you a retired Police Officer? Have you considered working part-time for the County of Wellington O.P.P.? We are recruiting former Police Officers to work parttime. Their duties will include conducting video bail hearings, transporting prisoners, serving summonses and subpoenas as well as other general law enforcement duties.

Role of an O.P.P. Cadet The County of Wellington O.P.P. is also looking for people to join our Cadet Program. Cadets are uniformed members who are responsible for providing a vast array of policing support services in detachments under the leadership of the Detachment Commander. Specific assignments and assigned shifts may vary at different detachment locations but every Cadet is provided with the opportunity to gain insights into the policing environment, as well as developing skills beneficial to pursuing a career as a police constable. Cadets actively contribute in the delivery of policing services to the people and communities of Ontario. Answering basic inquiries, assisting officers with criminal and traffic investigations, public displays promoting safety, collecting data and assisting with the security of property and evidence are only a few of the duties regularly encountered by O.P.P. Cadets. Whether working directly with O.P.P. personnel, members of the public or other agencies, Cadets gain significant experiences and insights into the policing environment and have established themselves as respected and dedicated members of the Ontario Provincial Police. Applications can be obtained at any local O.P.P. office as well as on the internet at www.opp.ca under the recruitment section.

THE AUXILIARY PROGRAM The County of Wellington O.P.P. is home to a 20 member Auxiliary Unit. The O.P.P. Auxiliary provides fully trained volunteer members to assist the full time members in times of emergency and times when additional personnel are needed.

Minimum Qualifications • Be at least 18 years of age, • Be a Canadian Citizen or permanent resident of Canada with a valid driver’s licence, • Have completed the Ontario Secondary School Diploma program or equivalent, • Have completed CPR and First Aid Certification • Be of good moral character, and mentally and physically able to perform the duties of the Auxiliary position. • Standard First Aid and Basic Rescuer (level C) CPR

The Auxiliary Unit plays a large role in assisting the County of Wellington O.P.P. to meet its Community Policing objectives by providing members to assist with community events such as parades, car seat inspections and fairs. Auxiliary members also attend regular training throughout the year on various topics, including firearms qualifications, first aid, self-defense, car seat inspections, and many other topics.

Be a Volunteer • Be able to commit the time and effort required of the program – a minimum 10 hours per month In addition to training and special 2007 Western Region O.P.P. Annual Auxiliary Inspection was held June 9, 2007 at the Fergus Community Centre. on patrol with a regular force events, Auxiliary members can be Members of the public were welcome to attend to view police displays including traffic and marine, emergency response, officer and six hours in-service found on routine patrols with the regtactical response unit, mounted unit and forensic identification services. training (minimum of 180 hours ular members to provide support to the total per year). front line officers on the road. • Work with the community and the O.P.P. in Working in a highly structured environment, Auxiliary Auxiliary members come from various backgrounds Members are expected to maintain the high standards identifying and resolving problems. including farmers, students, pilots, mechanics, and of the O.P.P., sometimes working under very difficult sit- • Perform many duties outdoors, often in unfavourable teachers. Many Auxiliaries join the program to get uations. Please consider all aspects of the Program weather conditions. “hands-on” experience in policing, while others volun- before you decide to become an Auxiliary Member. teer strictly to give something back to the community in Prospective members are required to complete a series which they live. of tests, which include general aptitude and psychologDuties Auxiliary Members, as part of their duties, may assist ical assessment. If successful, a 60-hour recruit orientaIn 2007, the members of the County of Wellington tion course follows. Topics include Community policing, regular O.P.P. Officers with the following: O.P.P. Auxiliary Unit volunteered approximately 4178 federal and provincial laws, O.P.P. policy and procedures. • Community policing initiatives and projects, hours of service. Other topics are problem resolution, communication • Regular patrol, skills, victim assistance, race relations, note-taking, selfIf you are interested in joining the Unit, or would like • Crime and disaster scenes, defence, traffic control and firearms training. more information, please contact Constable Dave • Large gatherings or parades for crowd and traffic control O’LEARY at the Fergus Office at (519) 842-4240. Applications • Traffic collisions. Applications can be obtained on the internet at Being an O.P.P. Auxiliary Member is exciting and chalwww.opp.ca. lenging.

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Wellington OPP 2007 Annual Report