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COUNTY OF WELLINGTON

ANNUAL

REPORT 2016

PROVINCIAL CONSTABLE IAN DONALDSON AND ARTHUR RESIDENT HENRY JONES

www.wellington.ca | www.opp.ca


OO.P.P.P.P

COUNTY OF WELLINGTON

VINCE HAWKES COMMISSIONER

I take this opportunity to acknowledge Wellington County (WC) Ontario Provincial Police (O.P.P.) and their contributions towards making 2016 a memorable and successful year for the O.P.P. Throughout the year, our WC members remained focused on the O.P.P.’s overall priorities and helped our organization deliver on its goals during the final year of the O.P.P. 20142016 Strategic Plan. Our sworn officers, civilian and auxiliary members in WC worked hard this past year to make a positive, meaningful impact on the lives of the people they serve. WC O.P.P. continues to lead by example through the Integrated Mobile Police and Crisis Team (IMPACT), in partnership with the Canadian Mental Health Association Waterloo Wellington (CMHA WW). Connecting the people in our communities with the services and supports they need during a time of crisis is one of the cornerstones of the O.P.P. Mental Health Strategy we launched just over a year ago. Through IMPACT, our members have demonstrated a clear understanding that public safety and well-being is a collective responsibility. This initiative also reflects the O.P.P.’s ongoing commitment to the Ontario Mobilization and Engagement Model (OMEM) of Community Policing. Undoubtedly one of WC O.P.P.’s most memorable occasions in recent history is its participation in The Push for Change when it came through the Guelph-Wellington area in December. Our members supported Joe Roberts every step of the way as he pushed his cart through the region as part of a national awareness and youth empowerment campaign aimed at ending youth homelessness. This community safety partnership has been a unique opportunity, as O.P.P. members continue to mobilize and engage with youth and various stakeholders at more than 150 community-based events across Ontario. WC O.P.P.’s strong presence at the 2016 International Plowing Match and Rural Expo in the Town of Minto demonstrates our members’ dedication to building relationships with the community. Over and above the exceptional job they did in managing heavy traffic volumes during this bustling, high-profile event, what an excellent opportunity for members from various WC O.P.P. detachments and specialized services to promote their exceptional work. I am very proud of our WC O.P.P. for these and other efforts this past year in finding new ways to redefine policing excellence in the communities they serve. These members continue to demonstrate the strong leadership, innovation and community collaboration that are necessary to address the challenges of the future and work effectively in our world of modern day policing. O.P.P. Commissioner, J.V.N. (Vince) Hawkes

JOHN CAIN CHIEF SUPERINTENDENT

SCOTT LAWSON DETACHMENT COMMANDER

In Wellington County, 2016 was a year of progress and transition as the men and women of the Ontario Provincial Police worked with the community to build upon the solid public safety foundation laid in years past. The strong relationship the O.P.P. enjoys with its community safety partners will be even more valuable in the year ahead.

2016 has been another rewarding year for the women and men of your Wellington County Ontario Provincial Police Detachment. I am once again excited to, with the support of our Police Services Board, continue to strive for openness and transparency, allowing the community we serve to better appreciate our public safety responsibilities, but more importantly our collaborative efforts to safeguard the residents we are sworn to serve.

The Ontario Provincial Police will continue to mobilize and engage the collective knowledge, skills and expertise of the citizens we serve, as we continue to work together to make Wellington County a safer and healthier community.

The theme this year, as in previous Annual Reports, steadfastly remains that of collaboration; working together for a common purpose with individuals, agencies and organizations. There is a genuine need and acceptance in our policing community to acknowledge shared responsibilities, to reach consensus with the intent of complementing and learning from each other knowing that mutually positive outcomes will be realized. Wellington County O.P.P. has always committed to this collaborative approach but none more beneficial than that of the Integrated Mobile Police and Crisis Team (I.M.P.A.C T) to address community mental health and reduce the probability of harms and victimization.

2016 marked the one-year anniversary and the introduction of a highly-effective mental health intervention programme in Wellington County. The Integrated Mobile Police and Crisis Team (IMPACT) is a partnership between Wellington County O.P.P. and the Canadian Mental Health Association Waterloo Wellington. The programme pairs our officers with speciallytrained mental health care professionals, who collaboratively respond to mental health-related calls in an effort to help residents receive the care they need. Our effort to innovate and modernize the way the O.P.P. delivers public safety services does not end there. 2016 marked the one-year anniversary of the homicide of Frederick “John” Hatch. The body of the 65 year-old man was discovered near Erin. Our investigators are working to solve the case through the use of a variety of high and low-tech solutions. In October, thousands of Ontarians received a text message from the O.P.P. looking for possible witnesses who may have seen or interacted with the victim. In an effort to address privacy concerns, the names of those who received the text as part of the “digital canvass” were not known to police. It’s hoped that this electronic evolution of a traditional witness canvass will lead to the arrest of the person or persons responsible for Mr. Hatch’s death. Investigators have also used live broadcasts on social media, a $50,000 reward and a “billboard” van with photos and contact information as part of the drive to solve the case. I was also pleased to see civic pride and community engagement very much in evidence at this year’s International Plowing Match and Rural Expo in the Town of Minto this past September. With the help of our County partners, our members built and staffed an excellent public safety education display, which proved popular with attendees. I was very proud to attend one of the RCMP Musical Ride events and take the salute on behalf of the O.P.P. The diligent and dedicated efforts of our officers also ensured the public was able to enjoy the event safely. In 2017, we will continue our collaborative efforts to meet the challenges of the New Year. I look forward to working with all of you. O.P.P. Chief Superintendent, John Cain

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COUNTY OF WELLINGTON O.P.P. ANNUAL REPORT 2016

In 2013, my message spoke about “what’s next?” relating to the future of policing. Well, here we are some three years later, continuing to build on the foundation principles of community safety and well-being. We have been relentlessly promoting collaborative partnerships, improving interactions between police and those most vulnerable, and enhancing our accountability and transparency to the community we police. This local Wellington approach continues to directly align with the O.P.P.’s vision, “Safe Communities….A Secure Ontario,” and positions our Detachment to make a long-term impact in the lives of those in Wellington County. One of many immerging challenges remains the sustainability and cultivation of a healthy workforce; wellness of the very people dedicated to the safety and security of those in our community. It has been widely acknowledged that first responders have one of the most stressful forms of employment with an undeniable potential for adverse physical and mental health consequences. Wellington County O.P.P. Detachment has wholly committed to and has adopted a culture of employee health and wellness. I am proud that under my leadership our workplace environment always considers the health and wellness of each member as a foundational component to daily operations. Being proactive has ensured a philosophy of awareness, understanding and support which sets the benchmark when our members are tested by the most trying and difficult of situations while responding to the needs of our residents. We will remain committed to sustaining a healthy workforce, and to be leaders in assisting those first responders in our County who we feel benefit from a shared partnership of wellness and compassion. Day after day I continue to be reassured and comforted by our community’s response to the challenges that lie ahead. Whether it is drugs, motor vehicle collisions, cyber-crime or mental health, together we will look to invest and improve upon our collective efforts to identify those at imminent risk of harm or victimization. Collectively, we must face head-on, the long-term social determinants of health, which ultimately consumes much of our police officer’s daily workload. It is this area we must continue to focus our partnership efforts. I am certain 2017 will be another successful year. I am equally confident that as we work together to implement evidence-based strategies to reduce local priorities we will prevail in the long run. This approach will ensure our policing


mandate here in Wellington County remains effective and responsive, now and well into the future.

Retirements

I hope you feel a sense of “pride in community,” just as much as we do, from reading the pages of this report. That “pride” abounds as we strive to provide and serve our residents the best way we know how; professionally, dedicated and with confidence. My responsibility is to ensure that Wellington County O.P.P. continues to lead the way, delivering the best possible policing service, while being a part of the greatest place to work, live and play!

Sergeant Steve Ingham, Supervisor of our Court Bureau retired after 34 years of service with both Municipal and Provincial Police Services.

Colleen McDougall, a civilian member in the Centre Wellington Operations Centre retired after 27 years of service.

Sergeant Roger Woods, who worked on platoon in our North Wellington Operations Centre, retired after 34 years of service.

Provincial Constable Steve Smith, platoon member in the North Wellington Operations Centre and former High School Resource Officer, retired after 30 years of service.

Scott Lawson Ontario Provincial Police Detachment Commander Wellington County

Provincial Constable Tim Gillingham, a member of our Traffic Management Unit and Golden Helmets team member, retired after 30 years of service.

awards In December, the West Region O.P.P. Awards Ceremony was held in London. Officers and civilian staff were recognized for their dedicated service. Citizens were also recognized for assisting the O.P.P. with serious incidents. Commissioner’s Commendation -Provincial Constable Kirk MacDonald In December 2015, Wellington County O.P.P. Provincial Constable Kirk MacDonald provided much-needed support to then 11-year-old Nathan Vandertol who tragically witnessed his mother pass away from a motor vehicle collision. Provincial Constable MacDonald organized a special night for him, including a Maple Leafs game from a private box and a visit with Hockey Night in Canada stars. Provincial Constable MacDonald then organized a charity hockey game with proceeds going to a trust fund for Nathan’s education and medical expenses. Over $6,700 was raised.

Jeremy Vink, Russ Spicer, Councillor Lynda White (Chair), 2015-2016 Warden George Bridge. Kent Smith (absent).

Commissioner’s Citation for Bravery -Provincial Constables Debra Farnell and Angelica Hastings Commissioner’s Citation for Lifesaving -Sergeants Shawn Jones and John Kummer In September 2015, officers were sent to a residence in Wellington North Township for a report of a 17-yearold youth under the water in a pond on his family’s property. Provincial Constable Farnell arrived on scene and immediately removed her use of force equipment and entered the murky pond water to search for him. Provincial Constable Hastings retrieved a rope from the cruiser to secure around Provincial Constable Farnell’s waist for her safety. Sergeant Jones entered the water to maintain a secure contact with the rope, while Provincial Constable Farnell dove under the water. He was found in the water and brought to the surface. Sergeant Kummer and Jones immediately performed CPR and continued it for 20 minutes until the victim was transported to hospital. Unfortunately, the young man did not survive. 

PSB

Commissioner’s Citation for Bravery -Provincial Constables Tyler Cowie and Christopher Goreski In October 2015, a man was mowing his neighbour’s lawn when the riding lawn mower he was on fell into a pond and trapped him under the water.

2016 was the third year of the six-year contract we signed with the Wellington County Ontario Provincial Police (O.P.P.). The Police Services Board reviews and approves the operating budget for policing in Wellington County annually. The budget is then submitted to County Council for approval, normally occurring by the end of January. This is a significant contract – one that many other municipalities and detachments in the Province are currently working to imitate. The most important aspect of this contract is its length. This gives the O.P.P. and the County six years to work together to complete various projects, develop new programmes, and in general, ensure that residents in Wellington County receive policing that is second-to-none.

A neighbour observed the mower tracks disappear into the pond and called Police. Provincial Constables Cowie and Goreski arrived and dove in to the water searching for the man but were unsuccessful. Both officers were forced to exit the cold water due to the onset of hypothermia. Unfortunately, the man did not survive.

service awards recipients Police Exemplary Service Medal (20 years) Detective Constable Kevin Detweiler Auxiliary Service Bar (30 years) Auxiliary Staff Sergeant Bruce McGimsie Civilian Service Medal (20 years) Jane Buehler Police Exemplary Service Medal (30 years) Sergeant (Retired) Jeffrey Oakley Quarter Century Club Premier’s Scroll (35 years) Sergeant Donald Clark Sergeant Michael Ashley

A MESSAGE FROM THE 2016 POLICE SERVICES BOARD CHAIR councillor lynda white

2016 marked a year of transition for the Wellington County Police Services Board. Late in the year, the makeup of the board changed with Russ Spicer and Kent Smith, the two Provincial Appointees retiring. The board also experienced a change in the Warden’s seat. I welcome Warden Dennis Lever to the board and wish outgoing Councillor George Bridge much success as the Chair of the County’s Economic Development Committee. As the Police Board Chairperson, I would like to extend my sincere appreciation to each of them for their service to the community and their commitment and dedication to the Wellington County Police Service Board.

Please take a moment to look through our Annual Report. I know you will be pleased to learn about the many different community initiatives, organizations and special projects our O.P.P. officers are involved with on a daily basis. In 2016, under the administration of the Police Services Board, Detachment Commander, Inspector Lawson initiated the new Bicycle Patrol

Unit, continued usage of the Automated License Plate Reader cruiser, increased significantly the presence of Crime Stoppers in Wellington, and continued to refine the IMPACT (Integrated Mobile Police and Crisis Team) partnership with Canadian Mental Health Association (CMHA). We are thrilled to be a part of this ground-breaking programme where police and clinicians are able to provide a comprehensive response to people with mental health and addictions issues in their time of need, in the comfort of their homes and community. The ability to respond to the person’s needs, complete a full assessment, provide support, and ensure their safety is maintained only enhances the ability to improve health outcomes. Keeping people out of hospital emergency rooms is another benefit to this innovative team and collaborative approach. Continuing in 2017, we will see continued focus on drinking and driving, domestic violence, drug and cyber-crime issues. It is very important to concentrate on these public safety concerns as they are an unfortunate reality in our community and those around us. As the chairperson of the Wellington County Police Service Board, I am proud of the work that the women and men of the Wellington O.P.P. do in our communities. I would like to sincerely thank these officers. It is also essential for the residents of Wellington County to understand that policing is the responsibility of the entire community. Your safety is their priority, but they need your help to ensure that Wellington County remains a safe and secure community to live, work and play in. Sincerely,

Lynda White Chair, Wellington County Police Services Board

county of wellington O.P.P. annual report 2016

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O.P.P.

COUNTY OF WELLINGTON

SGT. ROB NIXON - TEAM LEADER

NORTH WELLINGTON OPERATIONS CENTRE

UNSOLVED CRIMES There remains three very serious unsolved cases in Wellington County. The O.P.P. continues to investigate these incidents and officers are dedicated to solve each one. The Government of Ontario is offering a reward in the amount of fifty thousand dollars ($50,000) for information leading to the arrest and conviction of the person(s) responsible in each incident. This reward will be apportioned as deemed just by the Minister of Community Safety and Correctional Services for the Government of Ontario and the Commissioner of the Ontario Provincial Police.

THE LUCAS SHORTREED “HIT AND RUN” During the late evening of October 10, 2008, Lucas SHORTREED, age 18 years (at time of his death), was seen walking from a party on Wellington Road 17 near Alma, Ontario in Wellington County. Investigators believed that a 1995-1997 white NEON motor vehicle was traveling eastbound, struck and killed SHORTREED. A passing motorist found SHORTREED lying on Wellington Road 17 where he was pronounced dead at the scene. Investigators determined that the motor vehicle sustained damage to the front, hood, windshield and side passenger window. Any person having information regarding the person(s) responsible for the death of Lucas SHORTREED should contact the Wellington County Ontario Provincial Police at 1.888.310.1122 or their nearest police agency. If you wish to remain anonymous, you may call Crime Stoppers at 1.800.222.TIPS (8477), where you may be eligible to receive a cash reward of up to $2,000.

WHO IS “JANE DOE”? The remains of this medium build, 25 – 45 year old white female were found in a wooded location at a Ministry of Transportation (MTO) picnic area on Highway 7, west of Rockwood, Ontario, on August 28, 2005.

$50,000

The female was discovered a short distance into the woods beside the picnic area and had been there for approximately a month before being discovered. A “Woods” sleeping bag had been placed over top of the deceased, covering her. The autopsy revealed that the deceased had no recent injuries, but she had experienced a broken left cheek, nose and left eye socket. These injuries were well healed and likely resulted in a facial deformity. As a result of these injuries, the deceased lost two upper teeth on the left front and wore a two-tooth partial plate. Her clothing was found to have been purchased in the Montreal area. O.P.P. investigators believe the circumstances of her death are suspicious and foul play cannot be ruled out. Investigators urge any person with information regarding the identity of this woman to immediately contact the Director of the Ontario Provincial Police Criminal Investigation Branch at 1.888.310.1122 or 705.329.6111, or their nearest police agency. Further information about this case, including photographs of the woman’s clothing and partial plate, are available at the O.P.P. website address: www.opp.ca. CIB File # 955-10-2005-086

REWARD

Do you know who killed

Jane Doe?

ONTARIO PROVINCIAL POLICE

CALL OPP:

1-888-310-1122

If you wish to remain anonymous, you may call Crime Stoppers at 1.800.222.TIPS (8477), where you may be eligible to receive a cash reward of up to $2,000.

WHO KILLED FREDERICK “JOHN” HATCH

$50,000

On December 17, 2015, at 6:42 a.m., the body of 65-year-old Frederick “John” HATCH was discovered east of the 10th Line off Wellington Road 124 near the Town of Erin, Ontario.

Do you know who killed

HATCH was last seen in the Ottawa area on December 16, 2015 at 1:05 p.m., at a Dollar Tree Store. HATCH’s mode of travel between Ottawa and Erin is unknown; however, he was known to hitchhike. HATCH was wearing a denim vest with Mickey Mouse characters on the back, black leather jacket, a blue/white bandana, glasses, black Harley Davidson boots, and was carrying a red duffel bag.

Frederick ‘John’ Hatch?

Investigators urge any person with information regarding the person(s) responsible for the murder of Frederick “John” HATCH to immediately contact the Director of Ontario Provincial Police Criminal Investigation Services at 1.888.310.1122 or 705.329.6111, or their nearest police agency. If you wish to remain anonymous, you may call Crime Stoppers at 1.800.222.TIPS (8477), where you may be eligible to receive a cash reward of up to $2,000.

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REWARD

ONTARIO PROVINCIAL POLICE

CALL OPP:

1-888-310-1122

COUNTY OF WELLINGTON O.P.P. ANNUAL REPORT 2016


VICTIM SERVICES WELLINGTON Victim Services Wellington (VSW) is dedicated to providing short-term emotional support to victims and their families at times of crisis. This nonprofit organization was established in 1997 and is a partner with the O.P.P. and Guelph Police Service. With 24 volunteers in the County, they are available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. In 2016, VSW assisted with 118 incidents in Wellington County. Victim Services Wellington also partners with the O.P.P. and Guelph Police Service for Project Lifesaver. If you have a loved one who suffers from Alzheimer’s, Autism, or another form of cognitive impairment and may wander, this programme may be right for your family. Participants wear a battery powered bracelet that emits a unique radio frequency. When a caregiver notifies the police that a client is missing, trained officers use a portable directional antennae to search and locate the person. This valuable tool is proven to reduce search times and save lives. For more information please call Victim Services Wellington at 519.824.1212 ext. 7205.

TOP 10

CALLS IN 2016 CRIMINAL OFFENCES

THEFT UNDER

456

The volunteers with VSW are provided with extensive training in communication, grief, bereavement, crisis intervention and trauma. The staff and volunteers of VSW are dedicated to providing the best services to victims of crime and tragedy. We are grateful to local individuals, agencies and community organizations that encourage our efforts to support all victims in Guelph and Wellington County. To apply to volunteer, please go to www.vswguelph.on.ca and click on Volunteer with Us.

MISCHIEF

337

MOTHERS AGAINST DRUNK DRIVING Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD) Wellington County continues to be profoundly thankful for the O.P.P. in Wellington County for their dedicated efforts in putting a stop to impaired driving in our community. At our Annual General Meeting in September, we were pleased to honour Constable Jody Bigger for his commitment and dedication in combating impaired driving. His persistence and genuine concern for this initiative has not gone unnoticed and we sincerely appreciate his hard work. This is the second year in a row that an officer from the Wellington County O.P.P. has received this award. This has been an incredible year of growth for our Chapter. We were pleased to be invited to participate in the Festive Reduce Impaired Driving Everywhere (RIDE) launch in November where we also launched our Project Red Ribbon campaign alongside the O.P.P. and Guelph Police Service. We also held a “Comedy Night” fundraiser at Shoeless Joe’s and an “Eat Wings, Raise Funds” fundraiser at Buffalo Wild Wings. With funding from Transport Canada, MADD has erected Campaign 911 boating signs at Belwood Lake Conservation Area and Conestogo Lake Boat Launches. The signs feature the message Report Impaired Boating – Call 911. Volunteers also handed out MADD red ribbons to University of Guelph students on campus before a couple long weekends. Our growing Twitter and Facebook following also serves to increase our awareness.

FRAUD

284 ASSAULT - LEVEL 1

191

BREAK AND ENTER

184

As we all know, there is still much work to be done to cease impaired driving arrests, injuries and fatalities. We welcome all volunteers to help us continue our mission in stopping the senseless tragedies resulting from this violent crime. If you are interested in volunteering, please email madd.wc@gmail.com or call 519.515.0623. We look forward to working with the Wellington O.P.P. in the coming year.

THEFT FROM MOTOR VEHICLE UNDER $5,000

148 POSSESSION OF CANNABIS

CRIME STOPPERS Crime Stoppers Guelph Wellington (CSGW) was recognized in 2016 for its outstanding efforts in crime reporting, resolution, and community safety. In June, the Ontario Association of Crime Stoppers handed down provincial accolades to CSGW in the Under 300,000 Population categories for Best Video Feature Over 2 Minutes, Best Radio Feature Over 2 Minutes, and the Marla Moon Memorial Award of Excellence. This final category is impactful, as it encapsulates a large number of factors, including; the number tips handled by a programme, the amount of rewards issued, relationships with police and investigative agencies, media partnerships and outreach in the community. This recognition proves to the residents of Wellington County and City of Guelph that their Crime Stoppers programme works. CSGW expanded it’s programme awareness to communities in the East of Wellington County, with regular radio features on Erin Radio, poster presence in local businesses, participation in the Erin Santa Claus Parade, and poster presence at the Rockwood Conservation Area. Fundraising initiatives are being developed for these communities, following a strong response to these awareness efforts. CSGW also participated in the 2016 International Plowing Match in the Town of Minto, which increased the programme’s awareness in the North West corner of the County. It is an ongoing task to educate the public on how the programme works, and that CSGW is not a police organization. This anonymous and confidential method of reporting information about criminal activity is operated by a civilian Board of Directors who are volunteers from the community. The main role of the Board is to raise the funds necessary to pay cash rewards to Tipsters. Rewards are funded through community fundraising events, as well donations from businesses, community organizations and generous individuals. Rewards are NOT funded through tax dollars. CSGW is currently accepting applications for the Board and more information is available on the newly revamped website – www.csgw.tips. CSGW engaged the students at Centre Wellington District High School, Wellington Heights Secondary School, Norwell District Secondary School, Erin District High School and elementary and secondary schools in the City of Guelph. CSGW is also a great opportunity for students looking to obtain their volunteer hours for high school. CSGW has also increased its social media reach, with visibility on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and Youtube.

124

THEFT OF MOTOR VEHICLE

121

IMPAIRED OPERATION RELATED VIOLATIONS/OVER 80

120

BAIL VIOLATIONS

98

If you are interested in how you get involved with CSGW, whether it is booking a presentation, making a donation or applying to volunteer, go to www.csgw.tips As always tip information can be provided by calling 1.800.222.TIPS or going online www.csgw.tips and click “Report A Crime”. Remember, It’s YOUR Community…MAKE THE CALL!

COUNTY OF WELLINGTON O.P.P. ANNUAL REPORT 2016

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PROTECT YOURSELF

COUNTY OF WELLINGTON

FRAUDS AND SCAMS

TOP 10

SCAMS REPORTED TO THE CANADIAN ANTI-FRAUD CENTRE (CAFC) DURING 2015 (MOST RECENT STATISTICS RELEASED)

EXTORTION 18,342 COMPLAINTS | 1,113 VICTIMS

$3,115,564.08 SERVICE

5,706 COMPLAINTS | 2,148 VICTIMS

STAFF SGT. VICTORIA DAWSON

AN AVERAGE REPORTED DOLLAR LOSS OF $81,000,000

EMAIL AND TEXT SCAMS

In 2016, Wellington County O.P.P. responded to a high number of frauds and scams. Fraudsters develop elaborate stories and scenarios to make you believe they are legitimate. Below are a few of the scams being used to trick victims into giving fraudsters their personal information and/or money.

PHISHING

Fraudsters telephone and email pretending to be employees that are calling from the Canadian Revenue Agency (CRA). They tell victims that they owe ‘back taxes’ which must be paid right away to avoid legal consequences. Gift cards are being used as repayment to the fake CRA by purchasing the cards, activating them and providing the fraudster with the codes from each card. In 2016 alone, approximately $85,000 was fraudulently sent via popular gift cards.

PRIZE 4,003 COMPLAINTS | 728 VICTIMS

$7,102,183.41 MERCHANDISE

2,996 COMPLAINTS | 2,072 VICTIMS

$3,572,616.38 PERSONAL INFO

2,760 COMPLAINTS | 887 VICTIMS

$211,336.90

SALE OF MERCHANDISE 2,542 COMPLAINTS | 1,421 VICTIMS

$2,211,159.19 COUNTERFEIT

2,421 COMPLAINTS | 2,363 VICTIMS

$575,684.19

FAMILY EMERGENCY SCAMS: In the typical scenario, the fraudster telephones a grandparent claiming to be one of his or her grandchildren. The fraudster goes on to say that they are in some kind of trouble and need money immediately. Due to the emergency need for the funds, the victims don’t normally verify the story until after the money has been sent. Money is normally sent through well known money transfer companies.

EXTORTION SCAMS: In many of these scams, victims receive a message, email or pop-up on their computer. The messages range from warning victims that their computer has been used for illegal web browsing, or receive a threat from a hitman or a terrorist threat. Sometimes malicious programmes are spread through email attachments. Once opened, a programme installs itself to the home or business computer and searched for files to encrypt. The file then tells the victim that they must pay a ransom in order for it to be unlocked. Victims are told that they must do so within 72 hours or their files will be deleted.

ONLINE SCAMS

JOB 2,084 COMPLAINTS | 674 VICTIMS

$5,312,929.48 INHERITANCE

1,751 COMPLAINTS | 65 VICTIMS

$1,510,624.87 PAGE 6

TAX SCAMS:

|

ROMANCE SCAMS: Fraudsters steal photos and use dating sites through social media to lure potential victims into sending money for various reasons. The fraudsters try to develop a relationship over an extended period of time to gain the trust of the victim through display of affections and sometimes sending gifts or flowers. While the fraudster is usually located in a faraway country, eventually they will say that they want to meet the victim in person. They then say that they cannot afford to travel and seek financial assistance from the victim.

COUNTY OF WELLINGTON O.P.P. ANNUAL REPORT 2016

• Do not take immediate action. Verify that what you are being told is the truth.

VIDEO RECORDING SCAMS:

THE CAFC RECEIVES ON AVERAGE, 50,000 COMPLAINTS A YEAR.

TELEMARKETING SCAMS

$487,271.78

STAFF SGT. DAVE SINKO

Victims are messaged by an unknown fraudster on a social media platform and eventually are tricked into sending pornographic video or photographs. The fraudster uses these photographs immediately as blackmail telling the victim that they will be forwarded to members of the victim’s friends list.

$2,802,733.75

4,862 COMPLAINTS | 1,643 VICTIMS

STAFF SGT. KRISTA MILLER

• Ask yourself why the CRA would be asking for personal information over the phone or email, which they most likely already have on file. • Ask yourself why the CRA would be asking for payment through a gift card service, and over the phone or as a text message. • Contact the CRA to confirm the information that was provided over the telephone/ email BEFORE providing any personal information. The CRA can be reached by telephoning: 1.800.959.8281

CAR WRAPPING SCAM: Victims receive an unsolicited text message stating they can earn $300-$500 per week by wrapping their car, truck, SUV or bike with a “company” logo. An email link is provided and consumers who respond receive instructions and a contract followed by a cheque in the mail. Consumers are instructed to deposit the cheque, withdraw a portion of the funds and deposit it into a specific account. Consumers then learn that the cheque is counterfeit and they are responsible for any funds withdrawn. Fraudster’s will use the name of legitimate companies in an attempt to make the job seem real.

• If you receive a cheque or another form of payment from someone online and they ask you to cash it and send them a portion of the funds – don’t do it! It is most likely a counterfeit cheque and you will be responsible to cover any fees from the bank. • Remember that once a photograph or video is taken and shared, you cannot delete it. It is now part of the world wide web.

MYSTERY SHOPPER SCAM: Fraudsters use free online classified websites and employment websites to recruit potential victims. Consumers answer a tempting online post, email or text message ad to become a mystery shopper. The fraudster sends a letter with shopping tasks to be completed by the victim at a particular store. They enclose a cheque with the letter to assist the victim with purchasing goods to fulfill the shopping tasks. The victim is told to deposit the cheque and keep a portion of the money as a payment. The remaining funds are to be used to send money through well known and respected money transfer services to test the company’s procedure and customer service skills. Eventually, the cheque is returned as counterfeit and the victim is accountable to pay for the funds that were wired.

• If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is. You might have been told that you’ve won a big prize in a contest, or you’ve been offered a once-in-a-lifetime investment that offers a huge return, remember it probably isn’t true. • If you are asked for your private financial information on the telephone, be sure that you know who you are speaking with. Honest businesses do not require these details unless you are using that specific method of payment.

INHERITANCE SCAM:

• Often criminal telemarketers ask you to send cash or a money order, rather than a cheque or credit card. Cash is untraceable and can’t be cancelled.

An email or letter will be received from a scammer claiming to be a lawyer or bank representative and that a long-lost relative has died and left a large inheritance. They will ask for personal information and bank account details to confirm your identity. There is also a fee that needs to be paid to receive the “inheritance” that does not exist.

• Be leery if the person calling calls you by your first name and asks about personal lifestyle questions, claiming to be a police officer, government official, tax officer, banking official, lawyer or some other person in authority.

OVERPAYMENT SCAM: If you are selling a product, you may be targeted by an overpayment scam. The scammer will make a generous offer by cheque or money order with the amount more than the agreed price. They may say it was a mistake or invent an excuse and want you to refund the excess amount by a money transfer. Their hope is that you will transfer the money before you learn that the cheque or money order was counterfeit and you will be responsible for the money owing to the financial institution.

• Keep in mind that fraudsters love finding out if you’re lonely and willing to talk. Once they know that, they’ll try to convince you that they are your friend.

If your organization or service would like a presentation on Fraud Prevention, please contact the Community Safety Officer at the Centre Wellington O.P.P. Operations Centre, 519.846.5930.

• If you are pressured to make a big purchase decision immediately, it’s probably not a legitimate deal. Real businesses or charities will give you a chance to research their credibility or think about it.

COUNTY OF WELLINGTON O.P.P. ANNUAL REPORT 2016

| PAGE 7


PROTECT YOURSELF

COUNTY OF WELLINGTON

FRAUDS AND SCAMS

TOP 10

SCAMS REPORTED TO THE CANADIAN ANTI-FRAUD CENTRE (CAFC) DURING 2015 (MOST RECENT STATISTICS RELEASED)

EXTORTION 18,342 COMPLAINTS | 1,113 VICTIMS

$3,115,564.08 SERVICE

5,706 COMPLAINTS | 2,148 VICTIMS

STAFF SGT. VICTORIA DAWSON

AN AVERAGE REPORTED DOLLAR LOSS OF $81,000,000

EMAIL AND TEXT SCAMS

In 2016, Wellington County O.P.P. responded to a high number of frauds and scams. Fraudsters develop elaborate stories and scenarios to make you believe they are legitimate. Below are a few of the scams being used to trick victims into giving fraudsters their personal information and/or money.

PHISHING

Fraudsters telephone and email pretending to be employees that are calling from the Canadian Revenue Agency (CRA). They tell victims that they owe ‘back taxes’ which must be paid right away to avoid legal consequences. Gift cards are being used as repayment to the fake CRA by purchasing the cards, activating them and providing the fraudster with the codes from each card. In 2016 alone, approximately $85,000 was fraudulently sent via popular gift cards.

PRIZE 4,003 COMPLAINTS | 728 VICTIMS

$7,102,183.41 MERCHANDISE

2,996 COMPLAINTS | 2,072 VICTIMS

$3,572,616.38 PERSONAL INFO

2,760 COMPLAINTS | 887 VICTIMS

$211,336.90

SALE OF MERCHANDISE 2,542 COMPLAINTS | 1,421 VICTIMS

$2,211,159.19 COUNTERFEIT

2,421 COMPLAINTS | 2,363 VICTIMS

$575,684.19

FAMILY EMERGENCY SCAMS: In the typical scenario, the fraudster telephones a grandparent claiming to be one of his or her grandchildren. The fraudster goes on to say that they are in some kind of trouble and need money immediately. Due to the emergency need for the funds, the victims don’t normally verify the story until after the money has been sent. Money is normally sent through well known money transfer companies.

EXTORTION SCAMS: In many of these scams, victims receive a message, email or pop-up on their computer. The messages range from warning victims that their computer has been used for illegal web browsing, or receive a threat from a hitman or a terrorist threat. Sometimes malicious programmes are spread through email attachments. Once opened, a programme installs itself to the home or business computer and searched for files to encrypt. The file then tells the victim that they must pay a ransom in order for it to be unlocked. Victims are told that they must do so within 72 hours or their files will be deleted.

ONLINE SCAMS

JOB 2,084 COMPLAINTS | 674 VICTIMS

$5,312,929.48 INHERITANCE

1,751 COMPLAINTS | 65 VICTIMS

$1,510,624.87 PAGE 6

TAX SCAMS:

|

ROMANCE SCAMS: Fraudsters steal photos and use dating sites through social media to lure potential victims into sending money for various reasons. The fraudsters try to develop a relationship over an extended period of time to gain the trust of the victim through display of affections and sometimes sending gifts or flowers. While the fraudster is usually located in a faraway country, eventually they will say that they want to meet the victim in person. They then say that they cannot afford to travel and seek financial assistance from the victim.

COUNTY OF WELLINGTON O.P.P. ANNUAL REPORT 2016

• Do not take immediate action. Verify that what you are being told is the truth.

VIDEO RECORDING SCAMS:

THE CAFC RECEIVES ON AVERAGE, 50,000 COMPLAINTS A YEAR.

TELEMARKETING SCAMS

$487,271.78

STAFF SGT. DAVE SINKO

Victims are messaged by an unknown fraudster on a social media platform and eventually are tricked into sending pornographic video or photographs. The fraudster uses these photographs immediately as blackmail telling the victim that they will be forwarded to members of the victim’s friends list.

$2,802,733.75

4,862 COMPLAINTS | 1,643 VICTIMS

STAFF SGT. KRISTA MILLER

• Ask yourself why the CRA would be asking for personal information over the phone or email, which they most likely already have on file. • Ask yourself why the CRA would be asking for payment through a gift card service, and over the phone or as a text message. • Contact the CRA to confirm the information that was provided over the telephone/ email BEFORE providing any personal information. The CRA can be reached by telephoning: 1.800.959.8281

CAR WRAPPING SCAM: Victims receive an unsolicited text message stating they can earn $300-$500 per week by wrapping their car, truck, SUV or bike with a “company” logo. An email link is provided and consumers who respond receive instructions and a contract followed by a cheque in the mail. Consumers are instructed to deposit the cheque, withdraw a portion of the funds and deposit it into a specific account. Consumers then learn that the cheque is counterfeit and they are responsible for any funds withdrawn. Fraudster’s will use the name of legitimate companies in an attempt to make the job seem real.

• If you receive a cheque or another form of payment from someone online and they ask you to cash it and send them a portion of the funds – don’t do it! It is most likely a counterfeit cheque and you will be responsible to cover any fees from the bank. • Remember that once a photograph or video is taken and shared, you cannot delete it. It is now part of the world wide web.

MYSTERY SHOPPER SCAM: Fraudsters use free online classified websites and employment websites to recruit potential victims. Consumers answer a tempting online post, email or text message ad to become a mystery shopper. The fraudster sends a letter with shopping tasks to be completed by the victim at a particular store. They enclose a cheque with the letter to assist the victim with purchasing goods to fulfill the shopping tasks. The victim is told to deposit the cheque and keep a portion of the money as a payment. The remaining funds are to be used to send money through well known and respected money transfer services to test the company’s procedure and customer service skills. Eventually, the cheque is returned as counterfeit and the victim is accountable to pay for the funds that were wired.

• If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is. You might have been told that you’ve won a big prize in a contest, or you’ve been offered a once-in-a-lifetime investment that offers a huge return, remember it probably isn’t true. • If you are asked for your private financial information on the telephone, be sure that you know who you are speaking with. Honest businesses do not require these details unless you are using that specific method of payment.

INHERITANCE SCAM:

• Often criminal telemarketers ask you to send cash or a money order, rather than a cheque or credit card. Cash is untraceable and can’t be cancelled.

An email or letter will be received from a scammer claiming to be a lawyer or bank representative and that a long-lost relative has died and left a large inheritance. They will ask for personal information and bank account details to confirm your identity. There is also a fee that needs to be paid to receive the “inheritance” that does not exist.

• Be leery if the person calling calls you by your first name and asks about personal lifestyle questions, claiming to be a police officer, government official, tax officer, banking official, lawyer or some other person in authority.

OVERPAYMENT SCAM: If you are selling a product, you may be targeted by an overpayment scam. The scammer will make a generous offer by cheque or money order with the amount more than the agreed price. They may say it was a mistake or invent an excuse and want you to refund the excess amount by a money transfer. Their hope is that you will transfer the money before you learn that the cheque or money order was counterfeit and you will be responsible for the money owing to the financial institution.

• Keep in mind that fraudsters love finding out if you’re lonely and willing to talk. Once they know that, they’ll try to convince you that they are your friend.

If your organization or service would like a presentation on Fraud Prevention, please contact the Community Safety Officer at the Centre Wellington O.P.P. Operations Centre, 519.846.5930.

• If you are pressured to make a big purchase decision immediately, it’s probably not a legitimate deal. Real businesses or charities will give you a chance to research their credibility or think about it.

COUNTY OF WELLINGTON O.P.P. ANNUAL REPORT 2016

| PAGE 7


O.P.P.

COUNTY OF WELLINGTON

SGT. PAT HORRIGAN - ADMINISTRATION CENTRE WELLINGTON OPERATIONS CENTRE

SAFE COMMUNITIES WELLINGTON COUNTY (SCWC)

CITIZEN

SELF REPORTING

Safe Communities is a County-wide, non profit charitable organization with the primary focus of making Wellington County the safest and healthiest place in which to live, learn, work and play in Canada. SCWC encompasses local community groups, including; Community On Patrol (COP) - Town of Erin and Puslinch Township, and Safe Communities - Guelph-Eramosa Township, Town of Minto and Wellington North Township. Motor vehicle collisions, falls, and intentional self-harm continue to be the priorities for SCWC with active priority groups spearheading each. The National Teen Driver Safety Week’s Positive Ticketing Blitz at all Wellington County High School’s was a great success along with our older adult falls prevention strategies. SafeTalk and Lions Quest Workshops occurred throughout the County to help prevent injuries from happening and raising awareness about SCWC and the programmes and services that are available. Safe Communities Day was held in October at the Royal Distributing Athletic Performance Centre in Guelph/Eramosa Township. Grade 6 students from the Upper Grand District School Board representing 13 schools, learned about safety and injury prevention from public and private organizations. Community involvement is paramount to the success of Safe Communities Wellington County. Any individual or organization interested in participating in Safe Communities is invited to contact Programme Co-ordinator Christine Veit, at: safecwc@gmail.com or 226.820.1413. Follow SCWC on Twitter @safecwc and on Facebook.

MAKING AN I.M.P.A.C.T. O.P.P. and IMPACT (Integrated Mobile Police and Crisis Together) celebrated their first anniversary in December of 2016, marking one full year of this collaborative response model, bringing policing and mental health together to the front lines. The programme is a partnership between Canadian Mental Health Association (CMHA) Waterloo Wellington and Wellington County O.P.P. The funding comes from the Waterloo Wellington Local Health Integrated Network which enables specially trained Mental Health Clinicians to attend mental health related calls alongside Wellington County O.P.P. officers. This enhanced service model improves the experience of residents and their families by providing an immediate and comprehensive crisis response in their home and/or community. Individuals benefit from less intrusive service interventions by reducing the need for emergency room and hospital involvement. The IMPACT Team has provided support to more than 289 individuals, including both live calls and referrals. There have been more than 462 total referrals in this first year. IMPACT has provided more than 70 hours of community-based education and training to stakeholders and care providers in the community. The team has also assisted in providing timely compassion fatigue support services to frontline emergency responders. Both O.P.P. and CMHA WW look forward to continued partnership and growth in 2017.

HERE

24 SEVEN

PAGE 8

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1.844.437.3247 (HERE 247)

Call anytime to access

Addictions, Mental Health and Crisis Services Waterloo-Wellington-Dufferin

The O.P.P. would like to remind the public to take advantage of Citizen Self Reporting at www.opp.ca. It is a quick and easy way to report your concerns to police. The O.P.P. utilizes an online reporting system that will enable the public to report specific occurrences from a computer. Citizen Self Reporting offers the public another way to report select incidents which are not an emergency, by completing a report online at their convenience. The site will guide you step-by-step with clear and simple instructions. The O.P.P. is one of several Ontario police services who have adopted an Internetbased crime reporting system where people can report certain crimes such as: ·

Mischief/Damage to Property under $5000

·

Theft from Vehicle

·

Mischief/Damage to Vehicle under $5000

·

Theft under $5000

·

Lost/Missing Property under $5000

·

Driving Complaints

·

Stolen Licence Plates or Validation Stickers

DO NOT USE THIS SYSTEM IF IT IS AN EMERGENCY! CALL 911 FOR EMERGENCIES. Only occurrences that do not involve an injury, a suspect or evidence are applicable. If you prefer, you may still contact the O.P.P. by phone to report a crime or to have an officer attend. Citizen Self Reporting is beneficial to both the public and the police. It provides a convenient alternative to the citizens of Ontario, while allowing frontline officers to focus their efforts on other enforcement and crime prevention strategies within our communities. By providing people with another option for reporting crimes, the O.P.P. is hopeful that more incidents will be reported, resulting in the collection of information to develop future crime prevention initiatives.

THE O.P.P. CAN BE CONTACTED TOLL FREE ANYTIME FOR NON-EMERGENCY CALLS FOR SERVICE (24 HR TOLL FREE/ANYWHERE IN ONTARIO) 1.888.310.1122 (TTY) 1.888.310.1133 TWITTER: GENERAL INFORMATION GENERAL NEWS AND INFORMATION O.P.P. WEST REGION/WEST REGION ACCOUNT TRAFFIC AND ALERTS O.P.P. PCC WEST REGION WEBSITE

@OPP @OPP_NEWS @OPP_WR @OPP_COMM_WR www.opp.ca

Free call. 24 hours every day. Anonymous and confidential. Professional counsellors. We don’t trace calls. We don’t use call display. We listen. We help.

KIDS HELP PHONE

COUNTY OF WELLINGTON O.P.P. ANNUAL REPORT 2016

1.800.668.6868

OPP Annual Report 2016  

Wellington County OPP 2016 Annual Report. Ontario Provincial Police. Wellington County OPP

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