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Guelph Township

Horticultural A member of the Ontario Horticultural Association founded in 1906

Society

1922-2013

CELEBRATING OVER 90 YEARS


Our Purpose • to bring people together with a common interest in horticulture •

to increase our knowledge in all matters pertaining to horticulture, from the environment to landscaping, from trees to houseplants, from flower shows to photography and everything in between

• to instruct and encourage youth in the skills of gardening and related activities • to accomplish special community projects that can only be achieved by volunteers working together

President’s Message Greetings to members of the Guelph Township Horticultural Society in 2013. We are entering our ninety-first year of existence and in that time our society has been an active part of our community. The speakers at monthly meetings, the flower and vegetable shows, the trips, the community work, the youth programmes, the construction and upkeep of civic gardens and, the Marion Brennan Enabling Garden, have all been sources of information, inspiration and community spirit. Our society is and has been a great place to get together, to learn and to share our enjoyment in horticulture. Thanks to all those who planned and carried out events that made 2012, our 90th Anniversary year, a special year to remember. We look forward to another exciting year. Spread the word. Tell your friends and neighbours about our active, friendly horticultural society and encourage them to join.

Sylvia Grant 519-823-5045 sylviamgrant@gmail.com

Membership Fees: Adults: $10 Youth: $2 Visit our website: www.guelphtwphortsociety.org


Table of Contents Acknowledgements...................................................... 24 Awards and Prizes.......................................................... 21 Civic Planting Report......................................................22 Committees..................................................................... 4 Fall Flower and Vegetable Show.............................. 16/17 Getting Back to Nature..................................................23 June Mini-Show and Family Event ...............................10 Officers, Board Members............................................... 5 Photographic Competition.............................................11 Programme................................................................... 2/3 Rules for Exhibitors...................................................... 6/7 Spring Flower and Vegetable Show............................8/9 Summer Flower and Vegetable Show......................12-15 Terms............................................................................. 20 Year-at-a-Glance......................................................... 18/19 Youth Yearbook....................................................... 25-36

Cover photo by Brenda Doherty

Dates to Remember

Saturday, April 27 - District 7 Annual General Meeting Hosted by the Fergus Horticultural Society Melville United Church, St. Andrew St. (details to follow)

Saturday, May 4 - Green Legacy Tree Distribution & Society Plant Sale at Marden Library

Saturday, May 11 - Society Plant Sale at Marden Library

Saturday, June 1 - Harriston Garden Festival Fri-Sun, July 19-21 - Ontario Horticultural Assoc. Convention & AGM Thunder Bay (see www.gardenontario.org) Saturday October 26 - District 7 Fall General Meeting Hosted by Guelph Horticultural Society, First Canadian Reformed Church, Water Street. (details to follow)

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Programme 2013 All meetings and shows are held at the Marden Library and Community Centre, 7368 Wellington County Rd. 30, on the 3rd Tues. of each month, 7:30 p.m. unless otherwise stated. * In case of inclement weather listen to CJOY 1460 am for cancellation information

March 19* general meeting Topic: Xeriscaping Speaker: Shannon Kavanaugh of Aboud & Associates Convener: Jane McDonald Social: Mary Campagnaro, Helen Synott, Vera Kotoba April 16* potluck Dinner and awards - 6:30 p.m. Please bring your own cutlery and dishes and an entrée or dessert. Convener: Phil Sweet Committee: Board Members Entertainment: : Nicole Brenner may 4 green legacy tree distribution and society plant sale Location: Marden Community Centre, 9:00 a.m. Contact: Ruth Robinson Committee: See Page 4 Please bring plant donations between 8:00-9:00 a.m. may 11 spring plant sale Location: Marden Community Centre from 7:00 a.m. to noon *Donated plants to be taken to Ruby Thompson’s, 5628 Wellington County Rd. 39, before Friday evening, May 10th. Contact: Jane McDonald Committee: See Page 4 may 21 spring show Topic: Water Designs Speaker: Melanie Marjoram Convener: Jean Gordon Social: Lorna Brooks, Jane McDonald ­Page 2


june 18 Mini-Show and Family Event Marion Brennan Enabling Garden (behind the library)- 6:30 p.m. Entries to be placed between 6:00 and 6:30 p.m. We will start the evening with dessert. Create your own ice cream sundae with the many toppings supplied (strawberries, chocolate sauce, sprinkles etc.)We will then break up into groups (families, friends, etc.). We will be making obelisks for the enabling garden and your own garden. Materials will be supplied. Please bring your own pruning shears. Show Convener: Jean Gordon Event Co-ordinator: Ruth Robinson august 20 & 21 summer flower and vegetable show Entries placed Tues. Aug. 20, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Results: Wed. Aug. 21 Open 2:00-4:00 p.m. with Afternoon Tea and reopen at 7 p.m. Awards: 8:00 p.m. Committee: Volunteers Required Social: Ruby Thompson september 17 general meeting Speaker: Kim Delaney of Hawthorn Farm, Palmerston Topic: Seed Saving Social: Linda Van Norman, Roberta Wilson october 15 fall flower and vegetable show Speaker: Moritz Sanio Topic: Native Plants Social: Elizabeth Taborek and Margaret Hall november 19 annual meeting & potluck supper - 6:30 p.m. Please bring your own cutlery and dishes and an entreé or dessert. Enjoy our own ‘Garden Game Show’ Convener: Jean Gordon Committee: 2013 Board Members Page 3


2013 Committees

adopt-a-road: Contact: Pat Pritchard, 519-846-1412 Committee: Mary Campagnaro, Jean Gordon, Stuart McCartney, Jane McDonald Weather permitting – April 23 and Sept. 24 6:00 p.m., Marden Library cheers: Marion Campbell, 519-822-4169 civic planting: Convener: Ruth Robinson 519-824-8399 Committee: Brenda Doherty, Phil & Jean Sweet, Linda Van Norman, Ron Taborek Flower and Vegetable Shows: Convener: Jane McDonald, 519-836-9535 Set-up: McDonald and Pritchard crew Committee: Need volunteers historian: Joyce Blyth, 519-822-8129 membership: Mary Campagnaro, 519-822-9287 nominating committee (for 2014 Executive & Board): Sylvia Grant and Jean Gordon plant sale #1 (May 4): Contact: Ruth Robinson, 519-824-8399 Committee: Linda Van Norman, Joyce Flewelling, Linda Gobbi plant sale##2 (May 11): Contact: Jane McDonald, 519-836-9535 Committee: Mary Campagnaro, Jean Gordon, Sylvia Grant, Donna Rowe photo competition: Convener: Ruth Robinson, 519-824-8399 Committee: Joyce Blyth, Sylvia Grant, Donna Rowe web page: Monica Skinner, 519-821-1758 yearbook (2014): Lorna Brooks, Mary Campagnaro Jean Gordon, Sylvia Grant, Jane McDonald, Pat Pritchard, Ruth Robinson youth: Jane McDonald and Leslie Zinger Page 4

If you would like to volunteer on any one of these Committees, please contact the Convener or any Board Member.


Officers president Sylvia Grant 519-823-5045 first vice-president Position Vacant second vice-president Position Vacant past president Jane McDonald 519-836-9535 secretary/treasurer Jean Gordon 519-822-5289 assistant secretary Position Vacant show secretary Pat Pritchard 519-846-1412 financial examiners Evelyn Cleghorn and Deb Walker

BOARD MEMBERS 2012 – 2013 Pat Pritchard Ruth Robinson Mary Campagnaro

519-846-1412 519-824-8399 519-822-9287

2013 – 2014 Lorna Brooks Elizabeth Taborek Ron Taborek Phil Sweet Linda Van Norman

519-853-4966 519-829-2374 519-829-2374 519-821-3184 519-822-5031

board meeting dates: April 2, June 4, August 27, November 5, 2013 and January 21, 2014 Page 5


Rules for Exhibitors 1. All exhibitors must be paid-up members of the Guelph Township Horticultural Society unless otherwise specified. 2.

Judging will be done in accordance to ONTARIO JUDGING and EXHIBITING STANDARDS for Horticulture and Floral Design. A copy can be purchased from the secretary for approx. $6.00. The judge’s decision is final.

3. Exhibitors: one entry per section unless otherwise specified. 4.

All horticultural entries must be grown by the exhibitor. In design classes, material used need not be grown by the exhibitor. Fruit may also be used. Accessories are permitted in design classes unless otherwise indicated. Dyed or painted fresh plant material is not allowed.

5. All live plant material must be in water, water retaining material or be able to stay fresh for the duration of the show. 6. No person is allowed in the show area before and during judging except the judge(s) and the Flower show personnel. Exhibitors in the design classes may place their own entries. 7. Prior to judging, flower show exhibits will be checked for conformance by the show personnel. Decision of the committee will be final. 8. A special prize may be created for material that is of special interest but is not included in the schedule. 9. Each exhibitor is responsible for his/her own containers. Society provides trays to exhibit vegetables. Bottles and jars are acceptable. Page 6


10. Prize money is calculated on the point system: each point is equal to 25 cents. Adult members will receive prize money at the November Annual Meeting.

Flowers and vegetable classes First 6 points $1.50 Second 5 points $1.25 Third 4 points $1.00

Design and special classes (unless otherwise stated) First 9 points $2.25 Second 7 points $1.75 Third 5 points $1.25

11. Exhibitors are responsible for removal of their exhibits after each show. 12. The Society will not be responsible for any loss, damage or injury resulting from these shows. 13. Highest Points for Spring & Fall Shows combined cannot win the ‘Championship Exhibitor’ award for the next two years. 14. Highest Points for Summer Show cannot win the ‘Grand Championship Exhibitor’ award for the next two years.

R&A Harris Farm Produce Rhubarb | Sweet Corn | Gladiolus 394 St. Charles St. East, Maryhill 519.648.3364 Page 7


Spring Flower & Vegetable Show Tuesday May 21, 2013 Marden Library and Community Centre, 7368 Wellington County Road 30 Entries placed between 6:30 and 7:30 p.m.

Class A - Flowers and Vegetables Prizes: 1st - $1.50, 2nd - $1.25, 3rd - $1.00 Points 6-5-4

Section: 1. Narcissi, trumpet or large cup, one cultivar, 3 2. Narcissi, small cup, one cultivar, 3 3. Narcissi, miniature, one cultivar, 3 4. Narcissi, double, one cultivar, 3 5. Narcissi, multiflora, 3 stems 6. Small bulbs, one cultivar, 5 stems, named 7. Tulips, single, red shades, 3 8. Tulips, single, pink shades, 3 9. Tulips, single, yellow shades, 3 10. Tulips, single, white or near white, 3 11. Tulips, single, purple shades, 3 12. Tulips, single, bicoloured, 3 13. Tulips, double, any colour(s), 3 14. Tulips, any other type, any colour(s), 3 15. Lily of the valley, 10 stems 16. Pansies, with own foliage, 6 blooms 17. Any other spring flower, 1 spray or stem, named 18. Flowering branch, max. 30� (75 cm) incl. container, named 19. Gesneriad (African Violet), 1 plant, in flower 20. Pelargonium (Geranium), 1 plant, in flower 21. House plant, any other kind, in flower, named 22. Cactus or other succulent, named (if possible)

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23. Asparagus, 5 spears, approx. 8” (20 cm) in length 24. Rhubarb, 5 stalks, base of stalk & 2” (5cm)

of leaf to be included

25. A planter, containing at least 4 different kinds of plants 26. A spectacular bloom, 1, named 27. Bedding plants, flowers, a cell pack* 28. Bedding plants, vegetables, a cell pack*

*Plants must be home grown from seed in 2013, name of variety and planting date to be given

CLASS B - Design Prizes: 1st- $2.25; 2nd- $1.75; 3rd - $1.25 Points 9-7-5 (Refer to Ontario Judging and Exhibiting Standards for Horticulture and Floral Design for full details. Accessories permitted unless explicitly excluded in the section).

29. Cool of the Evening – a design using foliage and white flowers 30. Puddles – a design 31. Dainty Touch – a small design 32. Dutch Delight – a bouquet 33. Sunset – your interpretation

CLASS c - photography Prizes: 1st- $1.50; 2nd - $1.25; 3rd - $1.00 Points 6-5-4

34. Blossom Time 35. Jack Frost 36. Birds or Bees

Marion Brennan Memorial Award Prizes: 1st- $2.25; 2nd - $1.75; 3rd - $1.25 Points 9-7-5 To be selected from classes 19-22

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June mini-show Tuesday June 18, 2013 Marden Library and Community Centre, 7368 Wellington County Road 30 Entries placed between 6:00 and 6:30 p.m.

CLASS A - FLOWERS Prizes: 1st - $1.50, 2nd - $1.25, 3rd - $1.00 Points 6-5-4

Section: 1. Iris, bearded, single colour, 1 stem 2. Iris, bearded - bi-colour, 1 stem 3. Iris, any other cultivar, 1 stem 4. Peony, single, 1 bloom 5. Peony, double, 1 bloom 6. Peony, red, double, or semi-double, 1 bloom 7. Rose, miniature type, 1 spray 8. Rose, Hybrid Tea, any colour, 1 bloom 9. Rose, Floribunda, or Grandiflora, 1 truss 10. Any other spring flower, 1 bloom CLASS B - DESIGN Prizes: 1st - $2.25, 2nd - $1.75, 3rd - $1.25 Points 9-7-5 11. As Clear As Glass - an underwater design 12. Pretty in Pink - a pavĂŠ design 13. Mon Petit - a miniature design

CLASS C - PHOTOGRAPHY Prizes: $1.50, 2nd-$1.25, 3rd-$1.00 Points:-6-5-4

14. Flutter By 15. Reflection - a mirrored image (in glass or water) 16. Helping Hands Page 10


Calling all shutterbugs

Photographic Ccmpetition Results Show: Tues. Feb.18th, 2014 Submit by Dec 31st, 2013, to Ruth Robinson, 5873 8th Line E., R.R.#1 Ariss, N0B 1B0

Categories: 1. The Enabling Garden – What do You See? 2. Vine(s) 3. Prickles or Bristles 4. Are You Nuts? – any kind of nut(s) 5. The Colour Purple 6. Fence(s) 7. Water Under the Bridge 8. Feathered Friend(s) 9. Icy Image 10. Best Shot Prizes: 1st - $4.00, 2nd - $3.00, 3rd - $2.00 Prize money to be given out at the annual meeting in November

Rules: This amateur competition is open to senior and junior members of the Guelph Township Horticultural Society. Photos may be in colour or black and white. Each entrant is allowed one entry per class. Prints may be a maximum size of 5”x7.” No matting please. The photos should be taken in the past two years. Print your name and class no. on the back, of each photo, at the top. Note: If you are interested in entering the OHA photo competition, check the web site: www.gardenontario.org Page 11


Spring Flower & Vegetable Show August 20-21, 2013 Marden Library and Community Centre, 7368 Wellington County Rd. 30 Entries placed between 6:30 and 8:30 p.m., Tuesday August 20 Show & Tea: Wed. August 21, 2-4 p.m. Reopens: 7:00 p.m. Award Presentations: 8:00p.m.

CLASS A - FLOWERS Prizes: 1st- $1.50; 2nd- $1.25; 3rd- $1.00 Points: 6-5-4

Section: 1. Bachelor Buttons (Centaurea Annual), one cultivar, 3 blooms 2. Calendula, any colour, 3 blooms 3. Cosmos, any colour(s), one cultivar, 3 sprays 4. Dahlia, under 4” (10 cm), any colour, 3 blooms 5. Dahlia, 4” (10 cm) or over, any colour, 1 bloom 6. Echinacea (Coneflower), 5 blooms 7. Gladiolus, white or near white, 1 spike 8. Gladiolus, pink or red shades, 1 spike 9. Gladiolus, purple shades, 1 spike 10. Gladiolus, yellow shades, 1 spike 11. Gladiolus, any other colour, 1 spike 12. Lilium (Lily), any colour, 1 spike 13. Marigolds, (Tagetes), under 3” (7.5 cm), 3 blooms 14. Marigolds, (Tagetes), 3” (7.5 cm) and over, 3 blooms 15. Nasturtiums, 3 blooms 16. Pelargonium, (Geranium), with own foliage, 1 bloom 17. Petunias, single, 3 blooms 18. Petunias, double, 3 blooms 19. Phlox, perennial, one colour, 3 stems 20. Phlox, perennial, 3 stems of different colours 21. Rudbeckia (Gloriosa Daisy), 3 blooms 22. Salvia, annual, one colour, 3 spikes 23. Snapdragon (Antirrhinum), one cultivar, 3 Page 12


24. Sunflower (Annual Helianthus), under 6” (15cm) diameter, 1 bloom 25. Sunflower (Annual Helianthus), 6” (15 cm) and over, 1 bloom 26. Sweet peas, annual or perennial, 5 stems 27. Tuberous Begonia, 1 bloom floating with own foliage in bowl 28. Verbena, any colour(s), 3 blooms 29. Zinnia, any type, one cultivar, any colour(s), 3 blooms 30. Annual, any other, named, 3 stems/spikes or 1 spray 31. Perennial or Biennial, any other, named, 3 stems/spikes or 1 spray

CLASS B - Designs Prizes: 1st-$2.25; 2nd-$1.75; 3rd- $1.25 Points: 9-7-5 Accessories permitted unless explicitly excluded in the section.

32. Lazy, Hazy Days of Summer – your interpretation 33. Fit to Eat – design featuring edible produce 34. When the Swimmers Go Home – a water-viewing design** 35. Northern Getaway – a design to include evergreen branch(es) 36. Wedding Day – a corsage for the Mother of the Bride

CLASS C - A GROWING EXPERIENCE (Something you grew for the first time in 2013 and would grow again.) Prizes: 1st-$1.50; 2nd-$1.25; 3rd- $1.00 Points: 6-5-4

37. A Flower – annual, perennial or biennial, 1 bloom, stem or spray, named 38. A Vegetable or Herb – one cultivar, standard entry*, named *See Ontario Judging and Exhibiting Standards for Horticulture and Floral Design ** See Terms Page 20

Snider’s Pork Sausage 5883 8th Line, RR#1 Ariss (40 year old family recipe) $3.50/lb.

Available from:

Carolyn Snider 519-648-2426 or snidersporksausage@gmail.com

snidersporksausage.blogspot.com Page 13


CLASS D - Specials Prizes: 1st- $2.25; 2nd-$1.75; 3rd - $1.25 Points: 9-7-5 39. 40. 41.

Basket of Gladioli – not over 12 spikes Basket of Mixed Garden Flowers – a minimum of 5 cultivars, basket not to exceed 8” (20 cm) in width. Gardener’s Delight – display of garden produce, container not to exceed 20 in. x 20 in. Must include fruit and/or vegetables. May also contain herbs and flowers. Minimum of 5 cultivars.

CLASS E - Containers Prizes: 1st- $2.25; 2nd-$1.75; 3rd - $1.25 Points: 9-7-5

42. 43. 44. 45.

Hanging Container – Suitable for outdoors. Outdoor Planter** – conventional container. Outdoor Planter** – novelty container. Outdoor Planter** – which includes growing vegetables.

CLASS F - photography Prizes: 1st- $1.50; 2nd- $1.25; 3rd- $1.00 Points: 6-5-4

46. I Made That! – something you made 47. Watchful Eyes 48. Amazing! – a spectacular bloom, vegetable or fruit

**See Terms on page 20

Outdoor Services grounds management • Lawn Care

John Cruickshank

519-821-4764 Fax: 519-821-9811

johnc.outdoorservices@rogers.com Page 14


CLASS G - Fruit and Vegetables Prizes: 1st- $1.50; 2nd- $1.25; 3rd- $1.00 Points: 6-5-4

49. Beans, one cultivar, 5 50. Beans, climbing variety, one cultivar, 5, named 51. Beets, one cultivar, 3 52. Carrots, one cultivar, 5 53. Corn, 1/3 husk removed, named, 3 ears 54. Cucumbers, pickling, 2-4� (5-10 cm), 5 55. Cucumbers, slicing, 2 56. Garlic, bulbs, 3 57. Herbs, fresh, in water, in separate containers, named, 3 varieties 58. Onions, one cultivar, not peeled, 3 59. Peppers, hot or sweet, one cultivar, named, 3 60. Potatoes, one cultivar, named, 3 61. Summer Squash, any variety, named, 1 62. Tomatoes, named, 3 63. tomatoes, miniature, named, 10 64. Any other vegetable, not listed, named, standard entry* 65. Fruit, 1 cultivar, standard entry* 66. Oddity of Nature, not contrived

*See Ontario Judging and Exhibiting Standards for Horticulture and Floral Design

Steve Allen

5624 Hwy #6 North, RR#5, Guelph Phone: 519-767-5800 Fax: 519-767-6711 Toll Free: 1-888-349-0783 www.powersportjunction.ca steve@powersportjunction.ca

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Fall Flower & Vegetable Show Tuesday, October 15, 2013 Marden Library and Community Centre, 7368 Wellington County Road 30 Entries placed between 6:30 – 7:30 p.m.

CLASS A - Flowers and Vegetables Prizes: 1st - $1.50; 2nd - $1.25; 3rd - $1.00 Points 6-5-4

Section: 1. Anemone, 1 stem, any colour 2. Chrysanthemum, single or double, 1 spray 3. Sedum, 3 stems 4. Sunflower, 1 large head in seed 5. Ornamental grass, named if possible, 3 stems 6. Dried Flowers, any variety, named, 3 stems 7. Branch of Coloured Foliage, max. 30” (75 cm), incl. container 8. House Plant, grown for bloom, named, pot not to exceed 10” 9. House Plant, grown for foliage, named, pot not to exceed 10” 10. Seed Heads, one cultivar, named, 3 stems 11. Any Other Flower, named, 1 stem, spike, or spray 12. Carrots, one cultivar, 5 13. Garlic, 3 bulbs 14. Herbs, dried, 3 cultivars, named 15. Onions, one cultivar, 3 bulbs 16. Ornamental Gourds, 3 17. Pie Pumpkin, 1 18. Potatoes, one cultivar, named, 3 19. Squash, any variety, named, 1 20. Any Fruit or Vegetable, not listed above, named, standard entry*

*See Ontario Judging and Exhibiting Standards for Horticulture and Floral Design

CLASS B - Design Prizes: 1st-$2.25; 2nd-$1.75; 3rd-$1.25 Points: 9-7-5 Accessories permitted unless explicitly excluded in the section.

21. Burning Sun – your interpretation. 22. Thanksgiving Day – a design in a pumpkin or gourd, not to exceed 60 cm. Page 16


23. Pretty as a Picture – a landscape design

(See Terms on Page 20)

24. ‘Wooden’ it be Lovely – a design featuring weathered wood 25. Mummy – a design for Halloween featuring chrysanthemums CLASS c - For Men Only Prizes: 1st - $2.25; 2nd - $1.75; 3rd - $1.25 Points 9-7-5

26. A display of your choice – craft, hobby or special interest

CLASS D - photography Prizes: 1st - $1.50; 2nd - $1.25; 3rd - $1.00 Points 6-5-4

27. Harvest Time 28. Autumn Splendour – the colours of fall 29. Party Time – your interpretation

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Meetings at a Glance 2013 January

February February 18, 2014

Photographic Competition Results Come and learn from the judges remarks

May

June

May 4 - Green Legacy

June 18

Tree Distribution / Society Plant Sale

May 11 - Plant Sale

Mini Flower Show and Family Event

May 21 - Spring Show

Ice-cream sundaes & garden obelisks (see programme for details)

September

October

September 17

October 15

General Meeting

Fall Flower and Vegetable Show

Kim Delaney, Hawthorn Farm “Seed Saving”

Moritz Sanio “Native Plants”

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Meetings at a Glance 2013

March

April

March 19

April 16

General Meeting

Potluck Supper and Awards

Shannon Kavanaugh “Xeriscaping”

Entertainment: Nicole Brenner Mini-Demo: Pavé design

July

August

July 19-21

August 20 & 21

Ontario Horticultural Association Convention

Summer Flower Show

Thunder Bay

See programme for details

November

December

November 19

Merry Christmas

Annual Meeting and Potluck Supper

See you February 18, 2014 at the Photographic Competition Meeting.

“Garden Game Show” with Jean Gordon

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Terms Cultivar - A word meaning “cultivated variety”. Forms of plants originated and maintained only in cultivation, which when reproduced retain their distinguishing features. For example: ‘Homesteader’ peas. design - A combination of fresh and/or dried plant materials and/or organic objects arranged to create an artistic unit. The designer uses the elements of design: space, line, form, colour, texture and pattern in the accepted principles of art: balance, rhythm, proportion, scale, contrast and dominance to interpret the theme. Landscape Design - A realistic style capturing a moment from nature. It can be completely naturalist or stylized. miniature design - A design with maximum dimensions of 12.7cm. (5in.) in any direction (height, width, depth, diagonal). For good proportion, the container should not exceed 3.5cm. in height. Judged at eye level. Pavé - In jewellery making a term that refers to setting stones so close together that no metal shows. In flower design pave is a technique of placing groups of plant material that have been cut very short, close together to form undulating mounds of colours, textures, shapes and sizes. Any plant material, e.g., flowers, foliage, cut stems, fruit, vegetables, moss can be used. Planter – A number of different kinds of plants artistically grouped growing in a single open container for either indoors or outdoors. Small Design – A design from 13.9cm - 25.4cm (5 ½ -10in.) and which must not exceed 25.4cm. in any direction (height, width, depth, diagonal). Under Water Design – A design with part(s) placed under water to create interest. Although the design must have part(s) under water no definite percentage is required. The entire design may not be under water. Waterviewing Design – Usually a line design in a shallow container(s) with one-half to two-thirds of container surface showing water. Page 20


2012 Awards and Prizes SPRING AND FALL SHOW AWARD Championship Exhibitor for the highest points in Spring and Fall Shows combined. Prize to be presented April 16, 2013:

Jean Gordon

SUMMER SHOW AWARDS Championship Exhibitor – Class A: Prize donated by Royal City Nursery: Margaret Pearson Championship Exhibitor – Class B: Prize donated by Outdoor Services: Jean Gordon

Championship Exhibitor – Class F: Prize donated by Canadian Tire: Iris Lambert

Judges’ Choice: Class H. Sec. 58 “Herbs”: Iris Lambert

Grand Champion Exhibitor: Highest points in show, donated by Belgian Nurseries: Jean Gordon Current members who have been awarded Service Certificates: Alberta Auger (1989), Theresa Fischer (1990), Marion Campbell (1996), Isobel Harris (1997), Betty Lambert (1997), Evelyn Cleghorn (1998), Betty Larter (2000), Jean Sweet (2001), Phil Sweet (2001), Ruth Robinson (2002), Mavis Heming (2003), Jane McDonald (2004), Joan Gordon (2005), Marlene Bruckhardt (2005), Cindy Donafeld (2006), Linda Van Norman (2006), Mary Campagnaro (2012), Ruby Thompson (2012) Current Life Members: Alberta Auger (1995), Isobel Harris (1995), Betty Lambert (2001), Betty Larter (2006), Theresa Fischer (2006), Marion Campbell (2008), Mavis Heming (2009)

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Civic Planting Report 2012 Spring began in March this year, with a two week warm spell that caused a number of plants to break dormancy. That was followed by a two week freeze, which killed off or set back some adventurous spirits, of the plant world. If you were an apple grower, it was a most distressing start to the season. The average gardener worried about what was to come. A cool April lacking the usual showers did not bring the usual May flowers. Summer began in May and it remained much hotter and drier than normal through August. It became the endless summer. We began our season optimistically enough, by planting a few new shrubs and perennials in the enabling garden and wrapping chicken wire around the posts for a more solid climbing structure for the vines. From then on, it was a watering program of once or twice a week that kept us very busy. Most of the effort was concentrated in the Enabling Garden, since the mulch supply was rather low. Occasionally we did water at the front of the Library, but no watering was done in the Millennium Garden, except for the two new shrubs we planted there. Some of the plants did amazingly well in spite of the lack of rain and there are no losses to report. The advantage of so little precipitation was that there was less weed growth. Besides watering, a moderate amount of dead-heading was the only other maintenance. In late August, we were happy to get a huge load of wood chips from the township, which we spread in the beds at the Enabling Garden, so we shouldn’t need any more mulch there for quite a while. The Millennium Garden was in need of additional gravel on the paths and luckily for us, the township was removing the softball diamond near the garden, so we were able to get the screenings dumped nearby and from there we added a good depth to the paths. Next spring we hope to have an obelisk workshop, and add some to the Enabling Garden for some Clematis vines to clamour over. We will add a few more plants to the garden and hope for a just a little more rain. I would like to thank Linda van Norman and Brenda Doherty for all of their steadfast attention to the gardens and Ron and Jamie Robinson for helping out on a number of occasions. Thanks also to Phil Sweet for adding some hooks to the shed to tidy up the storage of our tools and to our planter partners, the West End Women’s Institute, the Junior Horticultural Society, led by Jane McDonald, and Sarah McDonald, Christa Pecore and her charge. The gardens thrived in a stressful season due to the 150 hours spent on them. Submitted by: Ruth Robinson, Committee Chair – 824-8399

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Getting back to nature In light of the more unpredictable weather that is becoming the trend with global warming, perhaps it is time to take a different strategy when landscaping around your home. Embracing a more natural look, instead of an overly manicured look, will make gardening easier and more fun. Some ways to do this are: Substitute the traditional lawn – Use a mix of fescues and ryegrasses with the bluegrasses. Add low growing white clover. For lesser used areas, add white yarrow or birdsfoot trefoil. Reduce the size of the lawn – Mow the area nearest the house more regularly than the fringe areas. Skip mowing the ditch – Plant some asters, black-eyed Susan, early goldenrod, switchgrass, etc. Enjoy the array of colours and textures offered as the season progresses. It will be far more attractive than dormant grass and easier to maintain. Develop a shady nook – Choose plants that withstand dry shady conditions, so that you have a place of reprieve. Add a bench. Plan for winter interest – Consider the structure, bark colour, and texture of the shrubs and trees you choose. Fruiting shrubs and trees attract an abundance of birds too. Seed heads of grasses and many perennials are interesting and useful for bird food as well. Plant a variety of plants – to encourage a diversity of birds and butterflies, to avoid pest invasions and to be sure to have some plants that thrive in whatever conditions the weather brings. Worth a try are some perennials and grasses that were outstanding performers in the drought of 2012 and are planted in the Enabling Garden, Millennium Garden and garden at the front of the Library. Hemerocallis (day lily) – sun or shade Heuchera (coral bells) – some tolerate full sun, others full shade Hosta – shade Penstemon ‘Husker’s Red’ (beard tongue) – sun Perovskia (Russian sage) – sun Peonia (peony) – sun for most of the day Vernonia (ironweed) – sun Yucca – sun Andropogon (big bluestem) – sun Calamagrostis ‘Karl Foerster’ (feather reed grass) – sun or part shade Luzula ‘Ruby Stiletto’ (woodrush) – sun or part sun Miscanthus sinensis (maiden grass) – sun Panicum virgatum (switchgrass) – sun or part sun

Page 23


Acknowledgements The Guelph Township Horticultural Society would like to thank all the individuals, organizations, the Township of Guelph/Eramosa and the Ontario Ministry of Agriculture and Food for their contributions to our Society. Our Society continues to be an important part of our community. These donations go towards prize money for our three Flower and Vegetable Shows, civic plantings, supporting the youth programme, the cost of providing qualified speakers, judge’s fees and the publication of our yearbook as well as operating expenses.

We wish to thank the following corporate sponsors for their support in 2012: Belgian Nursery RR#2, Breslau 519-648-2608

Campbell’s Garage & Sanitation 5463 Hwy 6, RR#5 Guelph 519-822-1521

Canadian Tire Corporation 10 Woodlawn Rd. E. Guelph 519-821-3414

EastGen 5653 Hwy 6, RR#5 Guelph 519-821-2150

J & N Martin Produce & Flowers Mosborough Country Market 5284 Wellington Rd. 32 Guelph 5982 8th Line, RR#1 Ariss 519-823-1995 519-763-5224 Outdoor Services Powersport Junction 5481 Hwy 6, RR#5 Guelph 5624 Hwy. 6N, RR#5 Guelph 519-821-4764 519-767-5800 R & A Harris Farm Produce 394 St. Charles St. E. Maryhill 519-648-3364

Royal City Nursery 305 Woodlawn Rd. W., Guelph 519-824-4998

Snider’s Pork Sausage Carolyn Snider, 519-648-2426 Page 24


Fun Experiences

Good Friends

2013 Guelph Township

Youth Horticultural Society

YOUTH HORTIC Exciting Challenges ULTUR Great Prizes Y AL SOCIET Page 25


Youth Club Programme 2013 Youth Members meet at the Marden Library & Community Centre on the 2nd Tuesday of the month at 7:00 p.m., unless otherwise stated. Our mission is to create in our youth an interest in horticulture and nature. Each meeting consists of at least one “hands on” activity. tuesday, April 9, 6:30 p.m. Make a terrarium and learn how to create a pavé design. tuesday, April 16, 6:30 p.m.

Pot Luck Supper and Award Presentations Please bring your dishes & cutlery. See page 2. saturday, May 11

Spring Plant Sale Marden Library and Community Centre. See Adult Programme. tuesday, may 14, 7:00 p.m Create a floral door stop and a seed mosaic. tuesday, may 21

Spring Flower and Vegetable Show Entries placed from 6:30-7:30 p.m. Meeting 8:00 p.m. See Adult Programme for more details. tuesday, june 11 Marden Park, pavilion behind the library. Make a garden sign(s) using a variety of materials and paint. Please dress accordingly. tuesday, june 18, 6:30 p.m.

June Mini-Show and Family Event See Adult Programme for more details and ask your parents to come. tuesday, july 9 Marden Park, pavilion behind library. Make a butterfly house. July 24-28, Judging of gardens

Page 26


tuesday, august 13 Marden Park, pavilion behind the library. Make a wind chime using recycled material and a veggie-mobile using garden produce. Please bring one large vegetable and 2 small ones. tuesday, august 20, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Marden Library & Community Centre. Place entries for Summer Show. wednesday, august 21

Summer Flower & Vegetable Show Marden Library & Community Centre. Viewing and refreshments: 2:00-4:00 p.m. Viewing: 7:00-8:00 p.m. Awards presentations: 8:00 p.m. tuesday, september 10 Make a ‘stained glass’ flower design using pressed flowers and create a cover page for our 2014 yearbook using drawings, photos etc. tuesday, october 8 Make a winter bird feeder. It might be messy so dress accordingly. tuesday, october 15, 6:30-7:30 P.M.

Fall Flower & Vegetable Show Entries placed from 6:30 - 7:30 p.m. Meeting 8:00 p.m. See Adult Programme for details. NOTE: Parents are always welcome to stay and participate with their child, however it is not mandatory.

Fruits & Vegetables

Domestic & exotic meats

Home grown sweet corn and pumpkins

Made from scratch baking

phone: 519-763-5224

Dickieson Family

5284 Wellington Road #32 at Speedvale Ave., W., Guelph email: info@mosboroughmarket.ca website: www.mosboroughmarket.ca Page 27


2012 Service Certificate Award Winners 5 – 8 years: Matthew Wulff Johnny Zinger 9 – 18 years: Nicole Brenner Elizabeth Zinger A Service Certificate is awarded to a Youth Member for outstanding effort in horticulture. These awards are presented at the Pot Luck Dinner April 16, 2013. To receive this award, members 5-8 years of age must earn 20 points or more and members 9-18 years of age must earn 25 points or more. points are awarded for: Attendance- 1 point for each meeting Entries in our Shows- Spring, Summer and Fall 1-2 entries 3 entries 4 entries 5 entries 6 or more

1 point 2 points 3 points 4 points 5 points

A judged Regulation or Theme Garden, 5 points A judged Theme Garden, 5 points An entry in Class F in the Spring Show, 5 points An entry in Class K in the Summer Show, 5 points An entry in Class E in the Fall Show, 5 points

Page 28


Garden Prizes 1st Plaque + $5.00, 2nd $4.00, 3rd $3.00, 4th $2.00 junior regulation garden 1st West End Women’s Institute Plaque, Matthew Wulff 2nd Lizzy Zinger 3rd Johnny Zinger senior regulation garden 1st Mosborough Country Market Plaque, Carrie Ilic 2nd Nicole Brenner Prize money donated by: Mosborough Country Market

summer show awards Boy - most points: Jonathan Wulff Prize: H. E. Markle Honour Award Boy - second highest points: Matthew Wulff Prize: donated by Pat Pritchard

Girl - most points: Nicole Brenner Prize: donated by Pat Pritchard Girl - second highest points: Lizzy Zinger Prize: donated by Pat Pritchard

Judges’ Choice: Nicole Brenner Class K Sec. 16, “Rainbow” a design

spring and fall show awards Highest points combined, boy and girl.

Boy: Girl:

Jonathan Wulff & Johnny Zinger Nicole Brenner

Youth prize money donated by: Theresa Fischer in memory of Helena Dalzilio

Page 29


Junior Regulation Garden Ages: 6-8 years Approx. 25cm

Tomato

Approx. 25cm

Tomato

Size: 120 cm. x 120 cm.

Sweet Peas and Pole Beans

Pepper Pepper

Approx. 25cm

Cucumber

Zinnias

Approx. 20cm

Marigolds

Cosmos

Approx. 20cm

Carrots

Onions

Senior Regulation Garden Ages: 9-16 years

Size: 150 cm. x 150 cm.

Approx. 25cm

Cosmos

Approx. 25cm

3 Hills of Potatoes

Approx. 25cm

Giant Zinnias

Cucumbers

Approx. 25cm

4 Tomato Plants

4 Pepper Plants

Beets

Marigolds

Carrots

Swiss Chard

Approx. 50cm total

Onions

Sweet Peas and Pole Beans

Herb

Leaf Lettuce

Note: Tomatoes must be staked. All gardens must have a sign with your name on it. TEEPEE (shaded area on diagram) - Use 5 - 6 poles approx. 6-7ft.long. Push poles into the earth creating a circle and securely tie all poles together at the top. Run heavy string down each pole and make X’s of string between poles. Tie securely. Leave a space between 2 poles to form the door of your teepee. Plant seeds around the teepee & spread straw inside for a mulch. Help your plants twine around poles as they grow. Don’t go into the teepee when plants are wet. Page 30


Junior Theme Garden

Age 6-8 Years Minimum 120 cm. x 120 cm. • Maximum 240 cm. x 240 cm. Must contain vegetables and flowers. May contain herbs. Sign should include theme and name.

Senior Theme Garden

Age 9-15 Years Minimum 150 cm. x 150 cm. • Maximum 240 cm. x 240 cm. Must contain vegetables and flowers. May contain herbs. Sign should include theme and name.

Judging of Gardens Regulation Garden

Points

Growth & health of plants 40 Care, neatness and general appearance 30 Planting according to plan 15 Effort 15 Total: 100 THEME Garden

Points

Growth & health of plants Care, neatness and general appearance Compliance to theme Varieties of plant material Total:

40 30 15 15 100

Campbell’s Portable Toilets Phone: (519) 822-1521 Fax: (519) 822-2760 Toll Free: 1-877-818-7295 E-mail: campbellspt@rogers.com Web: www.campbellsportables.com 5463 Hwy #6, Guelph, ON N1H 6J2 Page 31


Spring Flower and Vegetable Show Tuesday, May 21, 2013 Marden Library and Community Centre, 7368 Wellington Road 30 Entries placed between 6:30 and 7:30 p.m.

CLASS D - FLOWERS AND VEGETABLES Prizes: 1st-$1.50. 2nd-$1.25, 3rd-$1.00 Points: 6-5-4

Section:

1. A flowering branch - named, not over 30” (75cm.), incl. container

2. Lily of the Valley - 7 stems

3. Narcissi - one cultivar, 3 stems

4. Tulips - any colour(s), 3 stems

5. Any other spring flower - 1 spray or stem, named

6. Rhubarb - 5 stalks (base of stalk & 5cm (2”) of leaf to be incl.)

7. Bedding Plants - cell pack, home grown from seed in 2013, named

CLASS E - DESIGN Prizes: 1st-$2.25, 2nd-$1.75, 3rd-$1.25 Points: 9-7-5 8. Green Legacy - your interpretation Ages: 5-8 Ages: 9-18 9. Happy 90th Thunder Bay Society – a pavé design of dried materials to look like icing on a cupcake. Use accordion folded paper to cover the base of container to look like a cupcake liner. Design not to exceed 15 cm. in any direction. Ages: 5-8 Ages: 9-18

Page 32


CLASS F - creative

Prizes: 1st-$2.25, 2nd-$1.75, 3rd-$1.25 Points: 9-7-5

10. “Blue Power” - Create a graphic design of an action figure that represents the nutritional power of blueberries on 21.5 x 28 cm. card stock. Picture may be coloured with any suitable colouring medium. If pressed plant material is used, picture should be covered with MacTac or similar material. Both common and botanical name must be used. See- www.blueberrycouncil.org/health-benefits-of-blueberries-nutrition/ Ages: 5-8 Ages: 9-18

11. “Nature’s Bounty”

Create a picture on 21.5cm. x 28cm. card stock of the Fragrant Water-Lily Nymphaea Odorata, using drawings (hand or pre-drawn), pictures and/or pressed plant materials. Coloured pencils, crayons, markers and/or paints may be used. Picture should be covered with clear Mactac or similar material if pressed plant materials are used. See: http://www.naturia.per.sg/buloh/plants/water_lily.html Ages: 5-8 Ages: 9-18

12. “My Favourite Tree of the Boreal Forest”

Entry to be a picture. May be a drawing (hand or pre-drawn) on a 21.5. x 28cm. sheet of paper. You may use crayons, paint, pencil crayons, magazine pictures, etc. in any combination. You must include tree name (both common and botanical) and information about the tree, how it is used, where it came from etc. (on a separate 21.5 x 28cm. sheet of paper if necessary). Ages: 5-8 Ages: 9-18

13. “Paddle-to-the-Sea”

In the book by Holling Clancy Holling, is a canoe with a figure inside which was carved by a young Indian boy. Paddle’s journey through the Great Lakes provides both a geographical and historical picture of the area. Your interpretation may be a drawing, sculpture or any other form of artistic expression using any media. Should not exceed 30 cm. in any direction. Ages: 5-8 Ages: 9-18 Entries from Sections 9, 10, 11, 12 and 13 may be forwarded to the

O.H.A Convention in Thunder Bay in July. Page 33


Summer Flower and Vegetable Show

August 20-21, 2013 Marden Library and Community Centre, 7368 Wellington Rd. 30 Tues. Aug. 20: Entries to be placed between 6:30 and 8:30 p.m. Wed. Aug. 21: Show 2:00 – 4:00 and 7:00 – 8:00 p.m. Award Presentations at 8:00 p.m.

CLASS H - FLOWERS Prizes: 1st-$1.50, 2nd-$1.25, 3rd-$1.00 Points: 6-5-4

Section:

1. Cosmos - one cultivar, any colour(s), 3 sprays 2. Marigolds - one cultivar, under 7.5cm (3 in.), any colour(s), 5 blooms 3. Marigolds - one cultivar, over 7.5cm (3 in.), any colour(s), 3 blooms 4. Sweet peas - any colour(s), 5 stems 5. Zinnias - one cultivar, any colour(s), 3 blooms 6. Any perennial - 1 spray or 3 stems, named

CLASS I - VEGETABLES Prizes: 1st-$1.50, 2nd-$1.25, 3rd-$1.00 Points: 6-5-4

7. Beans - green, one cultivar, 5 8. Beans – any other colour, one cultivar, 5 9. Carrots - over 15 cm., 5 10. Peppers - one cultivar, named, 2 11. Potatoes - one cultivar, named, 3

J&N Martin

Produce & Flowers • Maple Syrup & Honey • Potted Flowers • In-season vegetables • Chicken • Summer Sausage Page 34

Joseph & Nancy Martin 5982 8th Line, RR#1 Ariss, ON 519-823-1995 No Sunday Calls Open Monday-Saturday, 9am-7pm


12. Tomatoes - over 50 cm (2”), ripe with calyx,

named, 3

13. Any other vegetable - named, standard entry 14. Most unusual shaped vegetable - natural or contrived

CLASS j - DESIGN Prizes: 1st-$2.25, 2nd-$1.75, 3rd-$1.25 Points: 9-7-5 Accessories permitted unless otherwise indicated. Refer to Ontario Judging and Exhibiting Standards for Horticultural and Floral Design for full details.

15. Fun Time - a design in or incorporating a toy 16. Sunset - a landscape design (See Terms on Page 20) 17. In a Nutshell - a miniature design using dried plant material

(not to exceed 5 inches/12.7 cm. in any direction) 18. At The Beach - your interpretation

CLASS K - SPECIAL Prizes: 1st-$2.00. 2nd-$1.50, 3rd-$1.00 Points: 8-6-4

19. ­­ Terrarium - from April meeting 20. Veggie-mobile - from August meeting 21. Zucchini Madness** - Keep a gardening journal depicting the

growth of your giant zucchini. Take photos and measurements. Describe care, difficulties etc. 22. Display from Junior Garden (5-8 yr.) - Grown by the exhibitor 23. Display from Senior Garden (9 – 18 yr.) - Grown by the exhibitor

**In memory of Marjorie Szewc who loved to grow zucchini. Prize money donated by her friend Denise Gismondi.

CLASS L - PHOTO COMPETITION Prizes: 1st-$2.00. 2nd-$1.50, 3rd-$1.00 Points: 8-6-4 Note - photograph is to be taken by Youth member. Digital photographs allowed.

24. Come On In! - a photo of the doorstop you made at May meeting 25. My Space - a photo of the sign(s) that you made at the

July meeting.

(Can be entered in Photographic Competition)

26. Best Shot - your best photo

Page 35


Fall Flower and Vegetable Show Tuesday, October 15, 2013 Marden Library and Community Centre, 7368 Wellington Road 30 Entries placed between 6:30 p.m. and 7:30 p.m.

CLASS E - FLOWERS AND VEGETABLES Prizes: 1st-$1.50, 2nd-$1.25, 3rd-$1.00 Points: 6-5-4

Section:

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

A branch of coloured foliage - max. 75 cm. (30“) including container Any fall flower - named, 3 stems or 1 spray Seed Heads - one cultivar, named, 3 stems Carrots - 5, long Any other vegetable - named, standard entry

CLASS F - DESIGN Prizes: 1st-$2.25, 2nd-$1.75, 3rd-$1.25 Points: 9-7-5 Accessories permitted unless otherwise stated.

6. 7.

Nature’s Bounty - a design including fruit and/or vegetables Ages: 5 – 8 Ages: 9 – 18 White Christmas – a design suitable for a dinner table Ages: 5 – 8 Ages: 9 – 18

CLASS G - Special Prizes: 1st-$2.00. 2nd-$1.50, 3rd-$1.00 Points: 8-6-4 8. Spooktacular - a carved or painted pumpkin, accessories permitted. Ages: 5 – 8 Ages: 9 – 18 9. Next Year’s Garden - a booklet with samples of seeds that you collected from the gardens in your neighbourhood. Each page should contain a sample of the seed(s) and drawings or photographs of the seed head and the flower or vegetable it produces. Ages: 5 – 8 Ages: 9 – 18 10. Forever Beautiful - from our September meeting Ages: 5 – 8 Ages: 9 – 18 11. Feast for our feathered friends - from our October meeting Ages: 5 – 8 Ages: 9 – 18 Page 36


Our Purpose • to bring people together with a common interest in horticulture •

to increase our knowledge in all matters pertaining to horticulture, from the environment to landscaping, from trees to houseplants, from flower shows to photography and everything in between

• to instruct and encourage youth in the skills of gardening and related activities • to accomplish special community projects that can only be achieved by volunteers working together

President’s Message Greetings to members of the Guelph Township Horticultural Society in 2013. We are entering our ninety-first year of existence and in that time our society has been an active part of our community. The speakers at monthly meetings, the flower and vegetable shows, the trips, the community work, the youth programmes, the construction and upkeep of civic gardens and, the Marion Brennan Enabling Garden, have all been sources of information, inspiration and community spirit. Our society is and has been a great place to get together, to learn and to share our enjoyment in horticulture. Thanks to all those who planned and carried out events that made 2012, our 90th Anniversary year, a special year to remember. We look forward to another exciting year. Spread the word. Tell your friends and neighbours about our active, friendly horticultural society and encourage them to join.

Sylvia Grant 519-823-5045 sylviamgrant@gmail.com

Membership Fees: Adults: $10 Youth: $2 Visit our website: www.guelphtwphortsociety.org


Guelph Township

Horticultural A member of the Ontario Horticultural Association founded in 1906

Society

1922-2013

CELEBRATING OVER 90 YEARS

Guelph Township Horticultural Society 2013  

Guelph Township Horticultural Society 1922-2013. Celebrating Over 90 Years.

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