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Community Update

OCTOBER 6, 2017 | THE WELLINGTON ADVERTISER | 25

Centre Wellington Council approved five priorities through a Strategic Planning Process. These five priorities set the direction and priorities of Council and staff, drive alignment, give us the ability to communicate efficiently to our residents and set the stage for the future of Centre Wellington.

centrewellington.ca

Reliable Infrastructure

Healthy Growth

Pride of Place

The Township will manage and upgrade the community’s infrastructure assets in an environmentally responsible way.

The Township will plan now for its inevitable growth, so that we retain a vibrant and accessible community and our high quality of life in the future.

The Township will support community initiatives that foster pride in our community and enhance its amenities.

The Township will complete a growth strategy for the development anticipated by the year 2041.

The Township will develop a policy requiring community partnerships for all sports, parks, recreation, arts, culture, and heritage projects.

• A DRAFT Growth Management Strategy (GMS) – Land Use Planning was presented to Council in late May 2017 by Stantec Consulting. The report is now out for review by the community and a public meeting will be held in conjunction with other master plan engagement meetings this fall for final public input. A final report will be presented to Council in the fall.

The Township will replace or reconstruct four bridges by 2019. Bridges Completed to date § 8th Line bridge (21-P) crossing Carrol Creek

§

Heritage designated Irvine St. Bowstring bridge (9-N)

Approved 2% Capital Levy provides funding for the following bridge replacement/rehabilitation prior to 2019. 2017 bridge projects

2018 bridge projects

• Replacement of Sideroad 20 Bridge (27-WG) over the Irvine Creek • Third Line Culvert Replacement 32-WG • Replacement of the eventh Line Bridge (9-WG)

• Replacement of the Fourth Line Bridge (10-P) • Victoria Street Pedestrian Bridge replacement • St David St Bridge replacement

The Township will undertake a Transportation Master Plan in order to anticipate transportation infrastructure needs until 2041.

The final Community Initiated Project Guideline was approved by Council and are posted on the Township website.

On the basis of this community project partnerships policy, during this term of Council, the Township will be particularly prepared to respond to: § proposals that enhance the natural environment and the appreciation of our natural environment by residents and visitors § proposals that enhance pedestrian and cyclist safety § discussions now taking place among Centre Wellington’s community cultural organizations toward a potential cooperative cultural resource centre § programs which support local entrepreneurship

Through its annual construction budgets, the Township will undertake a steadily enhanced program of repaving roads throughout this term of Council. • In 2015, $125,000 of pavement management projects were completed

• WSP has been selected to work with Township in developing the Transportation Master Plan with a public survey currently underway and further public engagement beginning this fall. The Master plan is scheduled for completion in 2018.

• In 2016, $175,000 of pavement management projects were completed

The Township will prepare a Fire Service Master Plan in order to anticipate fire service facility and equipment needs until 2041.

• Dillon Consulting presented a DRAFT Final Master Plan report to Council in June 2017 which is now out for public review and comment. A final master plan report will be presented to Council based on feedback received by Council and the public.

On the basis of this community projects partnerships policy, the Heritage Committee will be asked to identify and prioritize potential heritage conservation projects for the remainder of the term and beyond

The Township will identify and prioritize sports facilities which will be needed to accommodate a growing population until 2041, as well as update the Parks, Recreation, and Culture Master Plan accordingly.

• In 2017, $ 225,000 of pavement management projects were completed • By 2019, this funding will increase to $300,000 annually Through its annual construction budgets, the Township will do more to connect existing neighbourhoods for pedestrians and cyclists, by means of sidewalks, trails, cycling routes and/or parks. • Improvements to Trestle Bridge trail from Bridge St to South River Road will occur this fall • Staff successfully applied to the County of Wellington for grant funding of $50,000. The Township will conduct a feasibility study in 2016 to examine the business case for meeting the emergency power need at the Sportsplex by means of an energy co-generation solution. • In June 2017 Council approved a Power of Purchase Agreement with Centre Wellington Energy Innovations Inc. (CWEI) to design, implement, and manage a hybrid combined heat and electrical generator and backup generators to provide green energy to the Sportsplex, to be operational in 2018 Throughout the term, the Township will implement a Tree Management Program • Staff presented to Council the Emerald Ash Borer program and have allocated funding in the capital budget to address the removal of affected ash trees and plant new trees throughout the community. • In Spring 2017, an Urban Forestry Project Manager was hired on a 3-year contract who will; § Develop a draft Public Forest Policy which will go out for public engagement during the fall of 2017. The Township will lobby the Ontario Government that commercial water-taking should not be permitted unless there is clear and publicly available scientific evidence that there will be no significant impact on the quality and quantity of our local water supply • Mayor Kelly Linton, CAO Andy Goldie, Managing Director of Infrastructure Colin Baker and the Township’s Hydrogeologist Ray Blackport, joined by MPP Ted Arnott on two occasions met with the Minister of the Environment and Climate Change Glen Murray and Ministry staff at Queens Park to discuss the Nestlé’s water taking permit and acquisition of the Middlebrook Well property. The Township was seeking assurance for the long term protection of our water supply in regards to quality and quantity to meet our future growth requirements.

Monteith Planning has been hired to undertake the Parks, Recreation & Culture Master Plan with public engagement beginning this fall.

• The MOECC has placed a moratorium on all new and existing water taking permits for water bottling companies taking from ground water until January 1, 2019. • The GRCA, in partnership with the Township, are currently undertaking a “Scoped Tier 3 Water Study” which will be completed in 2018. • The MOECC has released new regulations and increased fees in regards to water taking permits for bottled water. • The Township’s Long Term Water Supply Master Plan will begin in the fall of 2017 and be completed by end of 2018. Information and data from the Scoped Tier 3 study will be used as part of this master plan.

Heritage Centre Wellington is currently working on the following initiatives: § The Municipal Register of Heritage Properties § Council approved the designation of the Belwood School House (24 North Broadway Street) and Township-owned Craighead (495 Union Street West) § Developed a Heritage Brochure

Economic Prosperity

Good Government

The Township will help the business community to excel and expand, and to create jobs, so that Centre Wellington’s economic vitality keeps pace with its population.

As a government, the Township will make wellinformed decisions, operate efficiently, get results, communicate openly and engage the public in all important decisions.

A campaign will be launched to market the plentiful supply of property in Centre Wellington for new industrial and commercial businesses.

The Township will prepare a plan for open and frequent communication with the public, and will initiate and sustain throughout the term a high level of service in communicating with the public

• The Township has provided comments on the Nestle well pumping permit through the Province’s Environmental Bill of Rights (EBR). • The Township continues to work with the MOECC and GRCA in regards to long term water quality and quantity protection for our community.

With the approval of the Community Initiated Project Guidelines staff will begin to undertake this work.

Council approved the hiring of Watson & Associates to prepare a Business Case Assessment which explores the potential return on investment (ROI) and net fiscal impact of developing one or more municipal fully-serviced industrial business parks in Centre Wellington. The Economic Development Task Force (EDTF) has created a Properties Working Group to look at current barriers to remediation and redevelopment of high priority brownfield and underutilized properties and make recommendations to Council regarding these sites.

Committee of the Whole and Council meetings are live streamed on the Township’s website.

The Township is now on social media. Facebook and Twitter are tools for fast, two way communication about programs, services and news affecting our community.

www.ConnectCW.ca launched, a website whereby residents will be able to review key project reports, ask questions, and provide feedback on major planning projects. Launched in June 2017 staff will be using this new tool to assist in seeking out public engagement on various projects like the Transportation Master Plan, Parks, Recreation & Culture Master Plan, Long Term Water Study, Urban Forestry Plan, and Fire Master Plan.

The Economic Development Task Force was requested to explore and recommend appropriate action in several areas such as: •

Programs for promoting entrepreneurship and for coaching and training new local entrepreneurs, including young entrepreneurs. § The Township has partnered with Guelph Wellington Business Enterprise Centre to create The Business Advisor in Residence Program. § The Township of Centre Wellington is the first municipality in the County of Wellington to launch the BizPaL online licensing portal.

The Township will review and clarify its intended role in the enforcement of Township bylaws •

Staff is currently reviewing various bylaws which require re-writing, researching bylaw services at other municipalities including expenditures/ revenues, staffing levels, and enforcement practises, in order to present Council with options to provide Municipal By-law Enforcement services in 2018.


A PROUD COMMUNITY SUPPORTER IN

Centre–Wellington

26 | THE WELLINGTON ADVERTISER | OCTOBER 6, 2017

OCTOBER 6, 2017 | THE WELLINGTON ADVERTISER | 27

A proud Community Supporter in Centre Wellington Summary

SUMMARY

Since 1975, Ontario Lottery and Gaming Corporation (OLG) has provided $47 billion to the province and the people of Ontario. OLG’s payments to the province have helped support the operation of hospitals and other provincial priorities; problem gambling prevention, treatment and research; amateur sport through the Quest for Gold program; and local and provincial charities through the Trillium Foundation. OLG is also helping to build a more sustainable horse racing industry in Ontario. In fiscal 2016-17 alone, OLG contributed $2.36 billion in net profit to the province to support these programs.

Since 1975, Ontario Lottery and Gaming Corporation (OLG) has provided $44 billion to the Province and the people of Site opened December 2003 Ontario. OLG’s payments to the province have helped support of hospitals; problem gambling prevention, Number of tablesthe operation n/a treatment and research; amateur sport through the Quest for Number of slots 252 Gold program; and local and provincial charities.

155

Life-to-date

Number of slots

252

Number of employees (full-time and part-time)

158

Together, OLG and the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care allocated $58 million to responsible gambling and problem gambling prevention, treatment and research

$36.4 million Charitable Gaming proceeds distributed to 600,000 participating 7.3 million

local charities

$2.5 million Dedicated to the sponsorship of community

HOW OLG BENEFITS 7.8 millionCENTRE–WELLINGTON

festivals and events

Host municipality’s share of slot machine revenue and table game revenue, where applicable

$2.2 million

$24.6 million

Wages and benefits for gaming employees

$7.3 million

$80.8 million

Wages and benefits for gaming employees

Purchase from local and regional vendors

$594,735

„ Bridge Repairs and Remediation Purchases from local and regional vendors* $646,786 $6.3 million „ Victoria St (Elora) - McNab Roundabout to York St John Value of OLG’s sponsorship of festivals and events in„the localSt., andSalem - Geddes St. to Salem St. $54,680 $530,645 „ St David St Bridge (Highway #6) - 2-F surrounding areas „ Sideroad 20 - Fifth Line to Sixth Line Reconstruction *excludes facility lease costs „ First Line (WG) - Side Road 10 to Municipal #6641 Numbers have been rounded or truncated for ease of readability. „ Colborne St - Phase II - Geddes St to North Queen St „ Princess St (Elora) - Church St to Grand River „ Pavement Management – 2017Information as of March 31, 2016 „ Trunk Storm - Moir St. to the Gorge „ Gibbons Drive Stormwater Management Ponds Sediment Cleanout

$64,090

$7.0 million

$754,728

$88.1 million

2017 OLG Funded Projects in Centre Wellington

$7.3 million

$26.8 million

n/a

Centres, policy and program development, staff training and self-exclusion capital costs.

In Centre Wellington, we are fortunate to have an organization like the OLG in our community. Their purpose is to make life better for people across Ontario and in the communities where they reside, like ours. The OLG generates substantial FISCAL 2015–16 LIFE-TO-DATE employment and economic benefits in Centre Wellington.

$

$2.2 million

Number of tables

500,000

$

Value of OLG’s sponsorship of festivals and events

John Street, Salem

Colborne St. Phase II

Geddes St. to Salem St.

Geddes St. to N. Queen St.

centrewellington.ca

billion

$20.0 million What OLG directed to its Responsible Gaming December Resource 2003

OLG and the local gaming site are proud to be a part of the community. The gaming site not only offers entertainment, but it also creates jobs and stimulates the area economy through purchases of goods and services. In addition, OLG supports community festivals and events though its sponsorship program, and makes payments, based on slot machine revenue and table game revenue, where applicable, to the municipality for hosting the gaming facility. This money is used at the discretion of the municipality.

How OLG Benefits Centre Wellington Fiscal 2016-17 Life-To-Date

Host municipality’s share of slot machine revenue and table game revenue, where applicable

Site opened

Customer visits Fiscal 2015–16 Life-to-date

Customer visits Fiscal 2016-17

In addition to OLG’s payments to the province, there are several direct beneficiaries of gaming proceeds, including host municipalities and Ontario First Nations.

QUICK FACTS

Quick Facts

Number of employees (full-time and part-time)

$ 4.1

This year, OLG generated $4.1 billion economic activity in Ontario. This includes ...

„ Reverse and Dash Mounted Cameras „ Urban Forestry „ Neighbourhood Interconnections - Active Transportation, Trails and Sidewalk Enhancements „ Barrier Free Path of Travel in Community Service Buildings „ Sportsplex Maintenance Building Insulation, Plumbing and Heating „ Sportsplex Pad A Roof Replacement „ Forfar Park - Convert to Soccer Fields and Parking Lot Expansion (Fergus) „ Fergus Grand Theatre - Front Lobby Washroom & Accessibility

Sideroad 20

Fergus Grand Theatre

Fifth Line to Sixth Line Reconstruction

Front Lobby Washroom & Accessibility

centrewellington.ca


A PROUD COMMUNITY SUPPORTER IN

Centre–Wellington

26 | THE WELLINGTON ADVERTISER | OCTOBER 6, 2017

OCTOBER 6, 2017 | THE WELLINGTON ADVERTISER | 27

A proud Community Supporter in Centre Wellington Summary

SUMMARY

Since 1975, Ontario Lottery and Gaming Corporation (OLG) has provided $47 billion to the province and the people of Ontario. OLG’s payments to the province have helped support the operation of hospitals and other provincial priorities; problem gambling prevention, treatment and research; amateur sport through the Quest for Gold program; and local and provincial charities through the Trillium Foundation. OLG is also helping to build a more sustainable horse racing industry in Ontario. In fiscal 2016-17 alone, OLG contributed $2.36 billion in net profit to the province to support these programs.

Since 1975, Ontario Lottery and Gaming Corporation (OLG) has provided $44 billion to the Province and the people of Site opened December 2003 Ontario. OLG’s payments to the province have helped support of hospitals; problem gambling prevention, Number of tablesthe operation n/a treatment and research; amateur sport through the Quest for Number of slots 252 Gold program; and local and provincial charities.

155

Life-to-date

Number of slots

252

Number of employees (full-time and part-time)

158

Together, OLG and the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care allocated $58 million to responsible gambling and problem gambling prevention, treatment and research

$36.4 million Charitable Gaming proceeds distributed to 600,000 participating 7.3 million

local charities

$2.5 million Dedicated to the sponsorship of community

HOW OLG BENEFITS 7.8 millionCENTRE–WELLINGTON

festivals and events

Host municipality’s share of slot machine revenue and table game revenue, where applicable

$2.2 million

$24.6 million

Wages and benefits for gaming employees

$7.3 million

$80.8 million

Wages and benefits for gaming employees

Purchase from local and regional vendors

$594,735

„ Bridge Repairs and Remediation Purchases from local and regional vendors* $646,786 $6.3 million „ Victoria St (Elora) - McNab Roundabout to York St John Value of OLG’s sponsorship of festivals and events in„the localSt., andSalem - Geddes St. to Salem St. $54,680 $530,645 „ St David St Bridge (Highway #6) - 2-F surrounding areas „ Sideroad 20 - Fifth Line to Sixth Line Reconstruction *excludes facility lease costs „ First Line (WG) - Side Road 10 to Municipal #6641 Numbers have been rounded or truncated for ease of readability. „ Colborne St - Phase II - Geddes St to North Queen St „ Princess St (Elora) - Church St to Grand River „ Pavement Management – 2017Information as of March 31, 2016 „ Trunk Storm - Moir St. to the Gorge „ Gibbons Drive Stormwater Management Ponds Sediment Cleanout

$64,090

$7.0 million

$754,728

$88.1 million

2017 OLG Funded Projects in Centre Wellington

$7.3 million

$26.8 million

n/a

Centres, policy and program development, staff training and self-exclusion capital costs.

In Centre Wellington, we are fortunate to have an organization like the OLG in our community. Their purpose is to make life better for people across Ontario and in the communities where they reside, like ours. The OLG generates substantial FISCAL 2015–16 LIFE-TO-DATE employment and economic benefits in Centre Wellington.

$

$2.2 million

Number of tables

500,000

$

Value of OLG’s sponsorship of festivals and events

John Street, Salem

Colborne St. Phase II

Geddes St. to Salem St.

Geddes St. to N. Queen St.

centrewellington.ca

billion

$20.0 million What OLG directed to its Responsible Gaming December Resource 2003

OLG and the local gaming site are proud to be a part of the community. The gaming site not only offers entertainment, but it also creates jobs and stimulates the area economy through purchases of goods and services. In addition, OLG supports community festivals and events though its sponsorship program, and makes payments, based on slot machine revenue and table game revenue, where applicable, to the municipality for hosting the gaming facility. This money is used at the discretion of the municipality.

How OLG Benefits Centre Wellington Fiscal 2016-17 Life-To-Date

Host municipality’s share of slot machine revenue and table game revenue, where applicable

Site opened

Customer visits Fiscal 2015–16 Life-to-date

Customer visits Fiscal 2016-17

In addition to OLG’s payments to the province, there are several direct beneficiaries of gaming proceeds, including host municipalities and Ontario First Nations.

QUICK FACTS

Quick Facts

Number of employees (full-time and part-time)

$ 4.1

This year, OLG generated $4.1 billion economic activity in Ontario. This includes ...

„ Reverse and Dash Mounted Cameras „ Urban Forestry „ Neighbourhood Interconnections - Active Transportation, Trails and Sidewalk Enhancements „ Barrier Free Path of Travel in Community Service Buildings „ Sportsplex Maintenance Building Insulation, Plumbing and Heating „ Sportsplex Pad A Roof Replacement „ Forfar Park - Convert to Soccer Fields and Parking Lot Expansion (Fergus) „ Fergus Grand Theatre - Front Lobby Washroom & Accessibility

Sideroad 20

Fergus Grand Theatre

Fifth Line to Sixth Line Reconstruction

Front Lobby Washroom & Accessibility

centrewellington.ca


28 | THE WELLINGTON ADVERTISER | OCTOBER 6, 2017

Key Township Projects

e s u o H n e Op Let’s Talk! Let’s Connect! Let’s Go CW! We offer many ways for you to get the latest Township news – right at your fingertips! Connect with us and have your say about what happens in your community.

Monthly Newsletters Sign up now to receive our newsletters directly to your email box www.centrewellington.ca/newsletters

Social Media Have a question? Come right to the source. Engage with us at; www.facebook.com/CentreWellington www.twitter.com/centrwellington

Town Hall/Open Houses We hold a number of meetings throughout the year – stop in, say hi, meet your Mayor and Councillors and get informed. www.centrewellington.ca/communications

Weekly Radio Show – The Grand 101 Listen every Tuesday at 8:15 a.m. for Mayor Kelly Linton’s weekly Township update.

Mayor’s Monthly Minute – Wellington Advertiser Each month Mayor Kelly Linton provides a quick update in the paper sharing on-going projects and announcements.

Council Meetings Our Council meetings take place on the last Monday of every month. Can’t join us? Don’t worry, we live stream our meetings so you can enjoy from the comfort of your couch! www.centrewellington.ca/communications

Connect CW Your one-stop-shop for all CW. Connect CW provides two way dialogue between you and the Township. Tell us how we are doing, fill out ongoing surveys, learn more about major projects happening in YOUR community. www.connectcw.ca

Have other ideas on how we can communicate with you?. Tell us how at www.connectcw.ca

centrewellington.ca

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 17

ex Hall CW Community Sportspl 6-8 p.m. KEY PROJECTS nity to You will have an opportu ts tan SHOWCASED : meet the staff and consul ts. for our major projec

out the Ask questions and find key of s ne eli status and tim in te ipa rtic pa d projects, an on ati orm inf d an surveys rs gathering on what matte most to you. a www.centrewellington.c

Budget Meeting Do you know how much money from your taxes goes to the Fergus Grand Theatre or Winter Sidewalk plowing? Did you know that your tax dollars are split between the school boards, the County of Wellington and The Township of Centre Wellington, with the Township retaining 26.7%? These are only some of the reasons that the Township is reaching out to residents about the 2018 Operating Budget and the impact to taxpayers. Join us for our Budget Town Hall to learn more about where your tax dollars go, and have a say. Budget Town Hall Wednesday, November 1, 7 p.m. Wellington County Museum 536 Wellington Road 18, Aboyne

MacDonald Trust Fund Guidelines and Application Do you have an idea or project that you would like Council to consider as part of the MacDonald Trust Fund application process? This is your opportunity to make a difference in Elora! In 2016, the Township of Centre Wellington received a very generous gift from Jack R. MacDonald in the amount of $3,436M that must be used for the long term positive impact in the former Village of Elora. Council approved $1.805M to be used towards enhancement of Downtown Elora in the means of reconstructing the Victoria Street Bridge for pedestrians, and the public realm improvements to West Mill Street. Council has determined to use the remaining $1.509M towards exciting projects/ideas proposed by the community. The MacDonald Trust Guidelines are intended to provide clarity on the process, commitments and expectations by The Township to community individuals and/or Organizations who are pursuing the implementation of enhancements in the former Village of Elora. The projects brought forward are to promote healthy sustainable community amenities, programs and/or services for the benefit of Centre Wellington residents and visitors, with the intent of enhancing the overall wellbeing of the community.

Centre Wellingt

Urban Forestry

on Fire Master

Master Plan

Plan

Growth Manag ement Strategy 2018 Budget Pr ocess MacDonald Trus t Process Parks, Recreatio n & Culture Master Plan Transportation M

aster Plan

It’s time to Connect CW

cw connect

Our new online engagement website allows you to: · Have a voice on Township initiatives 24 hours a day, 7 days a week · Empowers you to be more active in shaping our community and future · Have one location to learn about all of the major projects taking place in your Township We will listen to what you say, take your opinions into account and report back to you on how community input contributes to key decisions.

So what are you waiting for? It’s time to Connect CW!

Make CW a great place to live, work and play in. www.connectcw.ca

If you have a question about the process, please email Macdonaldtrust@centrewellington.ca. The application process will close on January 31, 2018 at 2 p.m. To obtain a copy of the application form, please visit www.centrewellington.ca/ communications.

A special supplement to The Wellington Advertiser | Friday October 6, 2017

Centre Wellington Community Update, Oct 6, 2017  

Centre Wellington Council approved five priorities through a Strategic Planning Process. These five priorities set the direction and priorit...