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WELLINGTON TODAY / LENT 2018

LENT 2018

TES Awards | Oxbridge Results | Trips & Tours | Cats | National Indoor Hockey Champions OWs Representing England | Service Initiative in Mozambique | Bangkok Construction Underway 1


WELLINGTON TODAY / LENT 2018

FIREWORKS EXTRAVAGANZA 5,000 tickets were sold at this year’s incredible show, with the event raising close to £10,000! Proceeds went to The Rwanda Project and InnerSense, as well as to some of the College’s Service charities. Keep your eyes peeled for next year’s event, rumour has it the display is going to be even better!

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WELLINGTON TODAY / LENT 2018

WELLINGTON COLLEGE WINS ‘BOARDING SCHOOL OF THE YEAR’ On 8th February, we were delighted to be named ‘Boarding School of the Year’ at the prestigious TES Independent School Awards. In this category, the judges were looking for ‘innovation, imagination and efforts to develop children in ways that go beyond the league tables’. The TES judges were impressed by the recent innovations in the College’s curriculum: the introduction of ‘lab time’ to foster independent thinking, learning and coping (ITLC) and the addition of Russian, Computer Science, Astronomy and Psychology have enhanced the Lower School curriculum, while Sixth Form ‘service learning’ has been extended to link placements directly to academic studies. The panel commented on the “unique aspects of boarding life” that continue to flourish at Wellington, including ‘Maniacs’, the early morning open-water swim regularly attended by 250 pupils. The judges said: “This outstanding submission both reflected and far exceeded the criteria for the TES boarding school of the year award. The school’s almost 900 boarders benefit from excellent pastoral care and an exceptional range of service-related, leadership and other activities, several unique to Wellington.” “These challenge individuals, develop their character and resilience, and prepare them thoroughly for life in the modern world.The school justifiably prides itself on its boarders’ induction programme and its positive engagement with boarders’ views.” This is a huge accolade for everyone connected to the College and is thoroughly deserved recognition for the efforts of the whole community.

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WELLINGTON TODAY / LENT 2018

Academic Success 20 WELLINGTONIANS & OLD WELLINGTONIANS OFFERED PLACES AT OXFORD OR CAMBRIDGE Congratulations to the 20 Wellingtonians and Old Wellingtonians who have been offered places at Oxford or Cambridge. This talented cohort will be following in the footsteps of numerous OWs currently studying towards Oxbridge degrees, taking the total number of Oxbridge successes to nearly 100 over the last four years. With so many Wellingtonians heading to the UK’s two most prestigious universities, and similar numbers taking up places at elite universities in the United States each year, these are inspiring times for our Sixth Form at Wellington. Equally inspiring is the generous and positive contribution these pupils have made to the wider life of the school. Among the pupils listed to the right, you will find members of the College Choir, Symphony Orchestra and A Cappella group; a member of the Spanish Debating team; a singer-songwriter who is preparing for the Nashville tour this summer; representatives from the College 1st XV Rugby team, U18 Basketball team and 1st Badminton pair; part of the U20 National Triathlon squad; and a contributor to Ed Club, a charity working to improve IT access for children in Africa – to name but a few. Well done to them all!

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Behr, Josh (OW)

Oxford

Philosophy & Theology

Benkert, Max Oxford Chemistry Evershed Charlotte

Cambridge

Human, Social and Political Sciences

Farah, Eve

Oxford

Archaeology & Anthropology

Frobisher, Amber

Cambridge

Mathematics

Hannon, Matthew (OW)

Cambridge

Human, Social and Political Sciences

Hatch, Charlie (OW)

Cambridge

Human, Social and Political Sciences

Hilder Jarvis, Alice

Oxford

Mathematics and Philosophy

Hind, Zoe

Oxford

Classics

Jackson, Georgie

Cambridge

Human, Social, and Political Sciences

May, Natasha (OW)

Cambridge

Economics

McDaniel, Charlotte (OW) Oxford

French

Nason, Charlotte (OW)

Oxford

Fine Art

Selman, Mia

Oxford

French and Spanish

Smart, Rustan

Oxford

History and Politics

Stoller, Dan

Oxford

Biological Sciences

Tsang, Ian

Cambridge

Natural Sciences

Whiteside, Eleanor

Oxford

Classics

Windebank, Flora

Oxford

French and Italian

Zhu, Richard

Oxford

Physics and Philosophy


WELLINGTON TODAY / LENT 2018

CHEMISTRY IN ACTION Mrs Mitchell writes, ‘In November, a group of Sixth Form Chemistry pupils headed to London for a Chemistry in Action conference aimed at stretching and inspiring future scientists in a variety of Chemistry-based disciplines.

LOWER SIXTH PUPIL WINS OXFORD UNIVERSITY ONCOLOGY COMPETITION Catherine Abraham (W) has recently won Oxford University’s Department of Oncology video competition. This competition requires pupils to produce a simple, narrated video on an element of the department’s research, which is focused on cancer prevention, diagnosis and therapy.

The competition was judged by experts in cancer research and science communication, who commented that it was Catherine’s clarity and quality of understanding that earned her the top prize. She will visit Oxford in April to collect her trophy and visit the department.

Her video looked at how telomeres (the ends of chromosomes) are maintained in cancer cells. Normally, they should shorten over a lifetime, but cancer patients have enzymes which maintain the telomeres. The department is studying how to prevent this, through the potential for drugs to inhibit the effect of those enzymes. Catherine had to distil their cutting-edge research into a two-minute video, using just pen and paper for images. Her video can be viewed on the Wellington College website, under ‘News and Events.’

Catherine entered through the College’s Science Society which encourages all aspects of extra-curricular science endeavor, offering pupil talks and external speakers, as well as Olympiads and essay competitions.

“CATHERINE HAD TO DISTIL THEIR CUTTING-EDGE RESEARCH INTO A TWO-MINUTE VIDEO, USING JUST PEN AND PAPER FOR IMAGES”

The day began with a fascinating journey through the history of cosmetics, with renowned Chemist Kathryn Harkup, who provided an intriguing insight into the lengths that people will go in pursuit of beauty. From the lead-laced ‘Tinto Combs’ used by Victorian men to darken their hair, to the use of botulism toxin today, Harkup’s presentation certainly made our pupils re-evaluate the saying ‘beauty is only skindeep’. Pupils were then thrown into the world of organic synthesis to explore how we can manipulate simple concepts to develop some of the world’s most important drugs. From the first extraction of quinine from the bark of the fever tree to treat malaria, to modern developments in the treatment of cystic fibrosis using our own DNA, the pupils got an amazing insight into how the organic chemistry they have been learning in lessons can be easily applied to solve some of the most significant medical issues today. The day ended by looking at energy, exploring how humans can be turned into walking batteries, before our pupils had the opportunity to pit their wits against the other 600 attendees in a mass quiz on thermodynamics. We were all ecstatic to see our very own James Hollingdale take the crown!’

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WELLINGTON TODAY / LENT 2018

BLÜCHER SERVICE TRIP TO TIGER KLOOF

PUPILS VISIT US UNIVERSITIES

CHAPEL CHOIR TOUR TO SEVILLE AND GRANADA

Mr Ewart writes, ‘During the October Half Term 13 pupils, from the Fifth Form and the Lower Sixth, travelled to the USA to visit eight universities on or near to the east coast to gain an insight into the higher education opportunities available. The universities visited (George Washington, Georgetown, University of Virginia, Richmond, Maryland, Swarthmore, Pennsylvania and Johns Hopkins) varied in size and situation, allowing the pupils the chance to experience the full spectrum of options. Swarthmore College, with 1,500 pupils, is set in a 400-acre parkland estate, while the University of Maryland, with an enrolment of about 38,000 pupils, sits in the heart of Baltimore. The University of Pennsylvania – an ‘Ivy League,’ private university – was included in the tour, along with the publicly– funded University of Virginia.

Such was the success of their tour of Salamanca and Burgos in 2016 that the Chapel Choir returned to Spain in October 2017 to sing in the beautiful cities of Seville and Granada. Large and appreciative audiences (including an impressive contingent of parents and friends enjoying the glorious Indian Summer) filled three stunning Baroque churches to enjoy a programme of Purcell, Mozart, Brahms, Fauré and Schubert, accompanied by a home-grown string quintet and organ. Particularly memorable was hearing Ben Cooper (S) singing the baritone solo from Libera me (a Wellington College Chapel favourite!) in an arrangement by Will Campbell (T). The trip also had a five-star cultural rating; visits included Seville’s Alcazar and cathedral (the largest Gothic cathedral in the world), the Alhambra in Granada, and the Mezquita in Cordoba. Pupils returned home well versed in Moorish architecture and Spanish history, as well as having sampled generous quantities of tapas! Thanks go to Mr Williamson, Mr Peat, Miss Slater, Mrs Henwood and Mr de Voil for making this fun and educational week happen.

In addition to the university visits, the pupils had a chance to see the sights of Washington, the highlight of which was a fascinating bespoke tour of Capitol Hill provided by Max Haskell (OW), who is working as an intern for a senator before he begins university at UCLA.’

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Mr Owen writes, ‘During the October Half Term, 21 of the 24 Blücher Sixth Formers visited Tiger Kloof School in South Africa for their biannual service trip. Tiger Kloof has a rich history not only of service and of educating some of the poorest children from the region, but also of educating some of South Africa and Botswana’s eminent leaders. Having raised around £10,000 from our music evening earlier in the year for bursary funds, we were keen to see the impact the school was having and to serve alongside them. We had an intense week, comprising service, cultural activities and a lot of fun. During the day, the boys divided themselves between working in a soup kitchen in the local township – aimed primarily at the younger and most vulnerable children – and creating a vegetable garden for a disabled school in the same township. We were assisted by pupils from Tiger Kloof, who also organised a fabulous music workshop to teach us some African rhythms. During the evenings and free time, the group enjoyed visits to some game farms; they sampled the local Afrikaans’ hospitality of braais, bonfires, and marshmallows; they went stargazing and got up early to see the sunrise and hear the wildlife; they enjoyed paintballing; and visited the Apartheid Museum in Johannesburg. The week was rounded-off with a high-tension football match against the Tigers – with the Blücher team overturning a 2-0 half-time deficit to win 3-2. It was a moving, challenging, and special trip for all, and it was wonderful to see how hard the boys worked, and how much they threw themselves into the whole project.’


WELLINGTON TODAY / LENT 2018

CLASSICS STUDENTS VISIT ITALY

ART STUDENTS VISIT TATLER

RACKETS PLAYERS VISIT THE USA

Mr Allcock writes, ‘In the first week of October Half Term, 12 Classics pupils and two teachers headed off for the annual Classics trip – including our first visit to Sicily. Our first day was spent at Syracuse, where we enjoyed the Greek theatre dating from the early colonisation of the Greeks, and saw the limestone quarries where Athenian slaves were worked to death in 413BC after their disastrous military expedition. We also made a visit to the harbour, the scene of some famous battles, most notably the efforts of Archimedes to ward off the Romans in 212BC. The second day brought a visit to the Valley of the Temples, showcasing four of the best preserved Greek Ionic temples, and then a trip to Piazza Armerina and its world-famous mosaics in the Imperial Villa. Our third day in Sicily was an ascent of the black lava moonscape of Mount Etna, by bus, cable-car and jeep.

Mrs Carpenter writes, ‘On the 12th January, a group of Wellingtonians visited the Tatler office at one of the greatest magazine powerhouses of the world, Vogue House in London. The day at the office started with a Q&A session with Acting Editor, Gavanndra Hodge, who gave us insight into her 20 years of experience working as a journalist. She spoke candidly about her experiences and offered advice for anyone wishing to follow in her footsteps.

Wellington College Rackets players have visited the tennis & rackets clubs of North America on three previous occasions. Most of the rackets-playing schools have been sending parties regularly since the late 1980s. However, Wellington made history in October 2017 as the first school to send a co-educational touring party to the United States, with seven boys and three girls playing rackets and real tennis in Chicago, Detroit, Philadelphia, Tuxedo Park and New York. Faced with somewhat greater diversity in their opponents than they had previously experienced, our hosts probably learned a little as well.

We boarded the ferry from Catania that night, all slightly in love with Sicily, and with our Athens-centric view of the Greek world slightly challenged. We awoke, cruising past the Amalfi coast, and were soon arriving in Naples. We visited some familiar territory – the extraordinary ruins of the town of Pompeii, the deeply-buried Herculaneum, and the Naples Archaeological Museum (where the ‘secret room’ brought out the inner-child in some of the tourists). For the first time, we stopped at Capri, looking down the cliffs where Tiberius threw his victims, taking the single chair-lift to the top of the island, and feeling a little dowdy next to Italy’s best dressed. Much ancient history was learned, new friendships were formed, and Sorrento’s ice-cream sellers earned a Christmas bonus.’

“FILL YOUR BRAIN WITH BEAUTIFUL WRITING AND YOUR WRITING, IN TURN, WILL BECOME BEAUTIFUL” We were very surprised to find out that the Digital Editor’s team was made up of only two writers, each producing four articles a day and using social networking sites to promote them. As these writers had become established in such a competitive industry we were eager to hear their advice. We finished the visit with a tour of the Tatler, GQ and Vogue offices and found them to be colourful, friendly and very different from your standard cubicle newsroom. The day ended with some wise words from Gavanndra Hodge: “Fill your brain with beautiful writing and your writing, in turn, will become beautiful”.

Tour party: Charlie Vleck (Bd) (Mid-West captain), Charlie St Quinton (Bd) (East Coast captain), Luke Field (Hl), Dmitry Auersperg-Breunner (Bd), Minty Knowles (O), Orlando Mallinson (Pn), Freddie Bristowe (Bd), Raghuv Kanwar (M), Issie Thorneycroft (C), Lauren Gooding (C), Mr Tulley, Miss Brown, Mr Roundell, Mr Oliphant-Callum.

“FACED WITH SOMEWHAT GREATER DIVERSITY IN THEIR OPPONENTS THAN THEY HAD PREVIOUSLY EXPERIENCED, OUR HOSTS PROBABLY LEARNED A LITTLE AS WELL”

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WELLINGTON TODAY / LENT 2018

The Arts CATS Take some magical poetry, add a great score and spectacular choreography and you have all the makings of a hit show – and Cats, which has played to packed houses on Broadway and the West End since premiering in the 1980s, has all that and more. As such it was a perfect, but challenging choice for this year’s Wellington musical – and for four wonderful nights in February the Christopher Lee Theatre was transformed into a feline fantasy-land that allowed Wellington’s singers and dancers to shine. Directed and choreographed by Kirsty Richardson, with Xavier Iles as Musical Director, Cats was a musical extravaganza that quite simply rocked. In many ways it’s a slightly strange show, lacking any obvious storyline, but as the cats gather for the Jellicle Ball we get to learn about their different personalities, just as T. S. Eliot portrays them in his book of poems. Lucy Webb (C) was a wonderful Munkustrap, linking much of the action together, and showing yet again what a talented musical actress she is. Omer Bilgin (Pn) strutted his stuff as a dynamic Rum Tum Tugger that most curious cat, bringing real rock-star status to the role, while Luca Lupino-Franglen (R) was a brilliantly magical Mr Mistoffolees. Hugo Williamson (R) and Honor Crawford (O) as Mungo Jerry and Rumpleteaser were a dynamic and comically mischievous duo, their all-action performance counterpointed nicely by the poignantly sad (and beautifully sung) reminisces of Gus the Theatre Cat, sensitively portrayed by George Oakland (S).

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Ben Cooper (S) brought operatic range and commanding presence as Deuteronomy and Finn Allington (Bn) was a persuasive and punctual Skimbleshanks, while Jemima Huxtable (O), appropriately playing Jemima, almost stole the show with her beautiful rendition of Moments of Happiness. Amélie d’Arenberg (Ap), Zara Anichebe (W) and Emilia Impey (O) all impressed, and Evan Lim (Pn) as Macavity was suitably mysterious. Hayley Canham (O) as Grizabella brought all her professional expertise and talent to the stage to deliver the show’s most famous number – it was a spine-tingling moment and one, as she so eloquently and powerfully suggested, that will live long in the memory. However, brilliant though all the solo moments were, it was the ensemble playing that was perhaps the real standout feature of the show. The dancing was quite simply electrifying, and at times the stage was alive with sound and colour – the closing number at the end of the first act brought the audience to its feet, such was the acrobatic physicality and cat-like intensity of the dance, while the final chorale was utterly awesome in its passion and togetherness – it was, without doubt, the most astonishing climax to what was an outstanding show. Every single member of the 70-plus cast – dancers, singers, musicians, actors, and of course the whole back-stage crew, can look back on the production with genuine pride. The last words should go to the director, Kirsty Richardson, who wrote in the programme: “What the pupils have achieved in such a short space of time is nothing short of spectacular”. It was indeed practically purrfect in every way!


WELLINGTON TODAY / LENT 2018

THE VOTE

CORAM BOY

“THIS WAS AN ENSEMBLE PERFORMANCE FEATURING PUPILS FROM ACROSS THE SCHOOL. THEIR DYNAMIC PRODUCTION REALLY BROUGHT THIS PERIOD OF HISTORY ALIVE”

Mrs Brayton writes, ‘I have wanted to direct Coram Boy for many years and I couldn’t think of a better play with which to start my time at Wellington. I am drawn to plays that entertain, provoke and inspire their audiences and Coram Boy, although set in the 18th century, explores themes relevant to us all: social responsibility, culpability and the power of music to change lives. The characters, aged between 8 and 58, provided me with the opportunity to cast pupils from the Third Form to the Upper Sixth and, whilst the senior pupils led by example and set the tone of an industrious rehearsal room, the newer members of the school contributed significantly with their energy, playful approach and determination to improve their craft on stage. Mounting such a largescale production in ten weeks was a hugely ambitious task and I could not have done it without such a committed and talented cast of pupils. I would also like to thank Mr de Voil and Miss Slater, and all members of the Drama Department.’

One hundred years ago in 1918, after an epic struggle, British women over the age of 30 were finally given the right to vote. To mark the centenary of this landmark decision, the Drama Department opened the new year with The Vote. Performed in the atmospheric surroundings of Waterloo Hall, this ‘docu-drama’ dramatised some of the key moments of the suffrage movement using a collection of writings from the time. There were excerpts from speeches in the Houses of Parliament, passionate letters published in the newspapers of the day, poetry, music and drama of the time. The production focused on Emmeline Pankhurst and her powerful speeches as she led the women’s campaign into militancy. Most moving was the scene showing the suffering of the suffragettes in prison and the barbaric practice of force-feeding.

This was an ensemble performance featuring pupils from across the school. Their dynamic production really brought this period of history alive. This theme of equality for women will be reflected again towards the end of 2018 with a production of Blue Stockings by award-winning playwright Jessica Swale. This powerful drama features the first female pupils at Cambridge, and their long struggle to have their studies recognised on the same basis as men.

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WELLINGTON TODAY / LENT 2018

Art at a Glance

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WELLINGTON TODAY / LENT 2018

MONTGOMERY RECITAL COMPETITION Congratulations to Will Campbell (T) on winning the prestigious Montgomery prize. Against very tough opposition from the seven other performers, he performed works by Brahms and Debussy. The adjudicator, Quentin Thomas, Director of Music of Oundle, was hugely impressed with the overall standard. The Finalists Rose Hodgson (HgG) Violin Will Ryan (Pn) Trombone Erika Smith-Gordon (C) Violin Alice Hilder Jarvis (Ap) Cello Oli Crosby (R) Piano Will Campbell (T) Violin Mia Selman (C) Flute Sandro Jaeckle (Hg) Violin

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DUKEBOX

ST JOHN’S SMITH SQUARE

DukeBox – the radio station of the Wellington family of schools – celebrated its first birthday in October 2017. On air 24/7, we now broadcast more than 50 hours of original programming each week from both The Wellington Academy and Wellington College. In the Summer Term, we enjoyed some news bulletins from Wellington College International Tianjin’s Year 5 pupils. Regular slots include weekly music and chat shows from pupils of all year groups, as well as recordings of lectures given in both schools. The ‘Welly Music’ slot on weekend mornings, which features our instrumentalists and singer-songwriters, and MFL FM, in which student contributors take on the world, have both become popular features. The newest show on the block is our weekly bilingual Mandarin-English programme – a cultural fusion of language, music and interviews. Our revision podcasts were also a big hit in the summer among GCSE pupils. Audiences can listen live to DukeBox through our free app, or download our podcasts at www.dukeboxradio.com.

In the first week of Lent Term, the Music Department took over 100 pupils up to London to perform at St John’s Smith Square. Beginning with our string ensemble, Camerata, (performing Bernstein’s One hand, One heart from West Side Story and Libertango by Piazzolla) there was an immediate rapport with the audience and the acoustics of the building allowed for even greater confidence than in our usual setting of Wellington’s Old Gym. One of the surprises of the evening was being welcomed by OWs Peter de Souza and Todd Harris, who were working as ushers, and even more rewarding for was the Wellingtones performance of one of Todd’s arrangements. The Chapel Choir also performed, accompanied by a small string group, and particular mention must be made

“THE PERFORMANCE WAS SIMPLY SPECTACULAR AND WE ALL RETURNED TO WELLINGTON DELIGHTED WITH OURSELVES AND HUMMING THE TUNES”

of Amélie d’Arenberg’s beautiful solo from Mozart’s Laudate Dominum. The second half of the concert featured solely the Symphony Orchestra, with music by Dvořák, Arnold, Beethoven and Bizet. Under the direction of Natalia Luis-Bassa, the performance was simply spectacular and we all returned to Wellington delighted with ourselves and humming the tunes.


WELLINGTON TODAY / LENT 2018

DANCE ACCOLADES Gabrielle de Souza Jacquet (O) has passed RAD Advanced 2 Ballet with Distinction – an amazing achievement. Advanced 2 is the highest ballet grade you can pass and for Gabrielle to achieve Distinction is a fantastic result. Not many dancers outside of full-time ballet schools achieve this accolade. Belle Banwell (Ap) passed RAD Intermediate ballet with Distinction and Anna Morgan (Ap) passed RAD Intermediate ballet with Merit. Congratulations to them all!

DANCE SHOW Mrs Cooke writes, ‘This year’s dance show took the audience on a spellbinding performance journey through the world of literature. The show opened in 1920s New York, where Mr Gatsby was hosting one of his infamous parties, and from there the show travelled through the pages of well-known pieces of literature that ranged from the classics to modern masterpieces. Highlights included an incredibly slick performance from the Wellington Street Crew who became the patients on Nurse Ratched’s ward and the Wellington Dance Company gave a spine-tingling performance in the piece inspired by The Woman in Black.

“IT WAS A TRULY INSPIRING EVENING OF DANCE WHICH SHOWCASED THE HUGE ARRAY OF DANCE STYLES ON OFFER HERE AT WELLINGTON”

FAGIN’S TWIST through the eyes of Christopher, the protagonist of The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time. During the second half, there were emotional performances given by the Fourth and Fifth Form GCSE Dance pupils as the subjects of love and loss were explored, while our A-Level pupils displayed their immense talent performing three powerful solos.The Third Form dancers delighted the audience with their fun and bright Candy Man routine inspired by Charlie and the Chocolate Factory and the Physical Theatre team wowed us with their dramatic take on The Hunger Games. Our commercial dancers took us into Alice’s Wonderland and our senior girls flew the flag for feminism in a piece created by Lottie Leach (C). It was a truly inspiring evening of dance, which showcased the huge array of dance styles on offer here at Wellington. ‘

On 3rd October 2017, the members of Wellington Dance Company performed alongside the professional dancers from Avant Garde Dance in their version of the story of Oliver Twist: Fagin’s Twist. Wellington Dance Company took part in a two-day work shop and created an overture piece that was performed before the full-length work. Our dancers were sensational, so much so that, during the after-show talk, many members of the audiences thought they were part of the company! It was a truly inspiring few days for the performers who gained a real insight into the lives of professional touring dancers.

The Wellington Boys Dance Company introduced some new members to the team and performed a dynamic piece as seen

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Sports TRIATHLON Triathlon is thriving at Wellington.The team competes during the summer months at venues including Eton Dorney and Thorpe Park, and training sessions in all three disciplines are available throughout the year. Last summer’s highlights included a successful morning at Eton Dorney, in which the team (Mia Selman (C), Kelly Brick (OW), Charlotte Oglesby (Ap), Denzel Teow (Hg),Tara Sallaba (A) and Zack Sadleir (S)) impressed in their various age groups. Our very own Mrs Granville-Chapman and Miss Brown both competed successfully in the ITU sprint qualifier and the SuperSprint event respectively. In June, Mrs Granville-Chapman, Mia Selman and Kelly Brick headed off to Dßsseldorf for the European Age Group Triathlon Championships. The team tackled rain, a huge set of stairs after the swim, and a very technical bike course. Mia and Mrs Granville-Chapman both finished 10th in their age group and Kelly finished 17th: all had successful races in very competitive conditions! Later that summer, Mia also travelled to Rotterdam to compete in the World Age Group Championships. Again, the route entailed an extremely challenging bike course, but Mia managed to finish the race in one piece, coming 42nd in the U20 age group category. The team is currently training hard over the winter months to be fully prepared for the coming season. We are also welcoming an increasing number of new members to the team, which is testimony to the ever-growing popularity of the sport at all levels.

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CANADA CUP Paolo Rossi (Bd), Ski Captain writes, ‘After a long 24 hours of travelling, we finally arrived at our destination: Jasper, Alberta, Canada – anticipating the Canada Cup’s tenth anniversary. We were ready to take the mountain by storm. Over the next six days, intensive slalom and GS training was to be the norm, and two days of highly competitive racing were to follow. The trip began with six days of training led by two seasoned guides. Four days in, and the team was as strong as ever as we took our first race: the parallel slalom. Tom Beardmore (Bl) charged ahead with his team and won first place, while the women, captained by Margaux Gathy (W) won the plate. After one more day of training, the races began. The GS course was set, and the racers were ready. A gruelling slope, named Dromedary (not for its slow pace, but for its inescapable hills and rolls) was a test for even the most experienced racers. However, the Wellington skiers more than rose to the challenge. Charlie O’Connor (Bd) took the gold in the U16 category, with Sebastian Bachelor (Bn) in 2nd, and Oliver Turner (Bn) not far behind – allowing us to lift the U16 team trophy. Margaux Gathy took gold for the women’s team and Stella Lindfors (Ap) took bronze to win the girls’ GS trophy. The next day we turned our attention to the Slalom and another daunting course lay before us: diverse features, from verticals to dummy gates, offered fresh challenges. Our very own men’s captain, Paolo Rossi (Bd)

HOCKEY CHAMPIONS managed to straddle a vital gate, taking himself out of the competition in dramatic fashion. Our other veterans, George Barrow (S) and Will Beardmore (Bl), managed impressive times. Charlie O’Connor and Margaux Gathy impressed once again by finishing first in their respective categories, allowing us to claim the U16 trophy. Overall, in the Canada Cup, we narrowly placed 2nd by a few points for the second year running. We all improved our skiing and performed to our highest capability – and enjoyed ourselves along the way. ‘

“WE ALL IMPROVED OUR SKIING AND PERFORMED TO OUR HIGHEST CAPABILITY – AND ENJOYED OURSELVES ALONG THE WAY.”

The girls’ U16 Indoor Hockey side travelled to Bromsgrove School for the National Indoor Hockey Finals in January, having qualified as runners-up of the South Region. The girls won all three games on the first day: 7-0 vs Queenswood; 7-1 vs RGS Newcastle; and a narrow 3-2 win against a strong Trent College side, with the winning goal being scored from a corner after the final whistle. Although the girls had already qualified for the semi-finals, the final group game against Millfield would determine which side would finish the day as pool winners and, in a hardfought game, Millfield triumphed 3-1. This meant that our girls finished second in the pool and therefore set up a semi-final against RGS Worcester, who had topped the other group. In a tough semi-final, the girls played brilliantly to come out 1-0 winners, setting up a final against old friends and rivals St George’s Weybridge, who had defeated Millfield in the other semi-final. The girls were full of desire to avenge their loss to St George’s in the South Region final and they took the lead in the first half after a superbly taken goal by Kitty Baccanello (A). The second half saw the opposition press hard to get back into the game, but the resilience of the Wellington side was outstanding and, once they had defended two penalty corners after the final hooter, they were crowned National Indoor Champions for the first time in the College’s history.

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OWs take to the Field

TOM CURRAN ASHES DEBUT

JACK DAVIES: ENGLAND U19 WORLD CUP

FOUR OWs IN VARSITY MATCH 2017

It is most cricketers’ childhood dream to play for England in an Ashes test match. For OW Tom Curran, this dream became a reality when he was selected for the final two test matches of England’s tour of Australia over the winter. Tom’s debut was in the Boxing Day test in front of a crowd of 90,000 people at the MCG. After the heartache of dismissing David Warner only to discover that he had bowled a no-ball, Tom’s first test wicket was none other than the Australian captain, Steve Smith, widely regarded as one of the finest players in the world. Tom also contributed with the bat in both test matches, and we are confident that this will not be the last time we see him in the full England team. Well done, Tom!

Current Upper Sixth Former, Jack Davies (Bl), has had quite a cricketing year. Following an outstanding season for the College, for Berkshire Men’s XI, and for Middlesex CCC 2nd XI, Jack was selected to represent England in the U19 World Cup to be held in New Zealand. The young wicket-keeper/ batsman is following in the footsteps of OW Sam Curran, who played in the same event two years ago. Jack played in the first game against Namibia – a thumping 8-wicket victory for England – and we will continue to follow his progress closely.

No fewer than four Old Wellingtonians graced the Twickenham turf back in December as Cambridge and Oxford competed for the annual Varsity Match. Will Wilson (S ’15 & Oxford) and Buchan Richardson (Pn ’12 & Cambridge) battled directly as Number 8 for the two universities, with Kieran Ball (Bd ’10) and Sam Edgerley (Bd ’09) also representing the Dark Blues at prop and full-back respectively. The contest was fierce with the OW contingent playing superbly for both sides. Will scored for Oxford and Buchan was unlucky to have a try for the Light Blues disallowed as replays showed his elbow scraped the touch-line, although he was able to console himself with a victory as Cambridge edged the match 20-10. The match marked Kieran’s second and Will’s third blue – a remarkable achievement for the History undergraduate who has started for the Oxford XV in every year of his time at the university. With current Wellington and London Irish Academy winger, Dan Stoller (Hg), recently winning a place at Oxford to read Biological Sciences, hopes are high that this success will continue for many years to come.

Tom went on to further success in the ODI matches, where his five-wicket haul in the last match saw England secure a dramatic win to secure the series against Australia.The short-form version of the game clearly suits the Currans, as Tom’s younger brother Sam, still only 19, has been called up to the full England squad, who will be competing in the Tri-nations T20 tournament in New Zealand. Well played and good luck to them both!

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WELLINGTON TODAY / LENT 2018

FIVE OWs SELECTED FOR ENGLAND U20 Many congratulations to the five Wellington College graduates who have recently been selected for the England U20 Elite training squad. Ben Loader (Hl ’17) and Josh Basham (Hl ’17) join Rory Brand (Bl ’16), Tom Parton (Hl ’16) and Matt Williams (Bn ’16) in the squad. All five players are currently pursuing professional rugby careers with London Irish, despite securing outstanding academic results during their time at the College. Ben scored 42 points in the IB Diploma and Josh A*A*A in his A-Levels last year, to add to the success of Rory (A*AA), Matt (AAB) and Tom (34 points) in 2016.We wish them every success as they prepare for their Six Nations campaign and we will be following the results closely.

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WELLINGTON TODAY / LENT 2018

Service Projects EDGBARROW LATIN PROJECT

GLOBAL SOCIAL LEADERS

NORWOOD AWARD

Dr Cromarty writes, ‘The academic year 2017-2018 is an exciting one for the Edgbarrow Latin Project. Our Year 10 pupils performed very well in the GCSE Short Course qualification: each of them met their Target Grades meaning that we finished the course with 2 A*s, 2 As, and 1 B. The pupils were very excited by these results and were justly rewarded for their efforts over the previous three years.

Wellington’s outward-facing programme, Global Social Leaders, has grown rapidly this term. We now have pupils aged between 9 and 19 participating from over twenty countries in our GSL programmes, which we run with our partners, Future Foundations. Pupils learn to create and run innovative and high impact social action projects, tackling local and global issues. A Jordanian GSL team, for example, improved the design of the solar panels at their school and a group from India organised swimming lessons for local women, giving them the chance to learn this vital life skill.

In the Michaelmas Term, Mr Attenborough and Dr Tapley had the honour of representing the College at the fifth annual Norwood Volunteer Recognition Awards. Joining over 200 guests in a night of celebration at Allianz Park, it was a superb evening of glitz and glamour, topped off by being called on stage to receive the ‘Community Award’.

Unfortunately, due to the GCSE reforms, the Short Course Qualification that had been such a success at Edgbarrow was discontinued, but the strength of the project entailed that the Edgbarrow School Governing Body elected to allow their pupils to pursue the full WJEC GCSE Latin qualification, sitting the papers in Year 11 along with their other subjects. This is a fantastic endorsement of the efforts that have been made by the Wellington College Classics Department, namely Dr Cromarty, Dr Johncock, and Miss Hewes, along with our outstanding Sixth Form teaching assistants, two of whom – Stephanie Davis (Hn) and Daisy Robinson (Hn) – have been awarded Service Colours for their commitment to the Project over the last two years. We now have three sets of Latin (Years 8, 9, and 10) running at Edgbarrow, and are also training some Edgbarrow staff to deliver some basic Latin, so that the Project can become self-sustaining. All in all, we feel that this is an excellent example of Independent and State School partnership at work.’

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This year, the programmes have not only been delivered in the UK, but also in India and China, with further dates set for Abu Dhabi in February. Our pupils and OWs are involved in the design and delivery of these programmes and many have travelled abroad to train others to become Global Social Leaders. We are particularly looking forward to our GSL awards, which will form part of our Festival of Education programme this June, and will be a chance to come together both virtually and physically to celebrate all that we have achieved.

The event was to recognise the huge contribution Norwood’s volunteers make to the UK’s largest Jewish children’s, family and learning disability charity. Over the evening, Norwood trustees handed out an impressive nine awards. The organisation hugely values their volunteers who do everything from working in Norwood’s charity shops, to befriending and mentoring families in need of support. The ‘Community Award’ recognises the support and friendship our community action and connected curriculum groups have given to the Ravenswood community each Wednesday afternoon. Over many years, groups have come up with innovative ideas to help the service users and staff. Music has been a common theme for activities, but groups have also been commended for their work in producing a mural and in helping their grounds staff. Receiving the award is a great honour and we look forward to continued collaboration, helping young people and adults maximise their potential throughout their lives.


WELLINGTON TODAY / LENT 2018

“DREAMING WITH OUR EYES WIDE OPEN. THAT IS HOW WEDNESDAY 17TH JANUARY FELT, WHEN A NEW SCHOOL IN MOZAMBIQUE OPENED FOR THE FIRST TIME.”

SERVICE ON THE COLLEGE SSSI Many of you will know that our beautiful College grounds include a site of special scientific interest (SSSI). Situated behind the golf course on the route of the annual Kingsleys run, the site includes small but significant patches of two rare habitats: lowland heath and lowland bog. More than 85% of UK lowland heath has been lost since the 19th century and, globally, the habitat is rarer than rainforest. Maintaining the condition of our site requires significant ongoing effort because, in the absence of grazing livestock, heathland can quickly revert to mixed woodland. In collaboration with Mark Dodd and the Estates Department, a group of Lower Sixth pupils have been actively managing the site. The recent report by Natural England, published last term, states that “the site has seen much-improved management since the last SSSI assessment, such that it is now in favourable condition, which is an excellent achievement”. Our site supports specialist fauna including bog bush-cricket, keeled skimmer dragonflies, green hairstreak butterflies, and common reptiles. It is also a valuable habitat for rare heathland birds – nightjar have been recorded annually for the last few years, and Dartford warbler and stonechat are regularly seen. The site also provides a peaceful place for members of the public and College community to walk, run or just relax.

NEW PARTNERSHIP IN MOZAMBIQUE ‘Dreaming with our eyes wide open.’ That is how Wednesday 17th January felt, when a new school in Mozambique opened for the first time. This partnership between Wellington College and Benga International started with a dream, a dream that our values of inclusivity could be put into practice on an international scale. By using our experience and resources, the pupils and staff involved in this project hope to make a difference in a country which ranks 181st out of 188 on the Human Development Index and has one of the worst education systems in the world. The school is situated on the banks of the Zambezi, in Tete, a fast-growing industrial city

in the heart of Mozambique. It is an English-speaking international school, following the IB Primary Years Programme. The Wellington pupils involved in this service project have had the chance to a build a partnership that will be genuinely two-way and targets economic development, not simply charity. The pupils have been thinking strategically about how we can add value in terms of teacher training, IB expertise and trips, as well as raising money to augment the scholarship fund. Partnering in this new school is providing an amazing opportunity to share some of the best of the Welly DNA, from wellbeing, to character education, to coaching and leadership.

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WELLINGTON TODAY / LENT 2018

THE JIMMY HIGHAM ‘WELLING10K’ 1,300 RUNNERS RAISED £7,470 FOR BURSARY FUNDING 20


WELLINGTON TODAY / LENT 2018

WELLINGTON SERVICE DAY A FULL DAY OF ACTIVITIES AND REFLECTION ON POSITIVE MENTAL WELLBEING

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WELLINGTON TODAY / LENT 2018

REMEMBERING THE FALLEN & THE OPENING OF THE SEBASTIAN FAULKS BUILDING Founded as a living memorial to the Duke of Wellington, but also to provide an education for the sons (and now daughters) of servicemen killed in the service of their country, it is entirely appropriate that Wellington College takes Remembrance week seriously. Each House gathers for candlelit readings in Great School during the week, where the Memorial boards that list the fallen from both World Wars lend a poignantly heroic backdrop to the simple ceremonies – the sheer numbers involved (an esitmated 725 from the two World Wars alone) a reminder of the sacrifice that so many young Wellingtonians willingly made. Few writers have ever captured the horror of the First World War as well as Sebastian Faulks, (OW) and in his novel Birdsong (conservatively estimated to have sold in excess of 5 million copies world wide) he gives that conflict a human face and through his art tells the truth of those terrible events. As Wellington’s greatest living writer it was with pride that the school named its new English and Philosophy building after him, and on Saturday, 11th November, Armistice Day, Sebastian was guest of honour at a formal opening of the building, which also saw another great Wellington writer, Dr Joanna Seldon, honoured with a reading room bearing her name. After the opening of the Sebastian Faulks Building, the whole school gathered on South Front for the Colour Parade, the laying of wreaths, the two-minute silence, and a reading from Birdsong by the author. As the last haunting notes of the bugle died away, it was hard not to think that the spirits of those brave young men were still very much a part of all that Wellington College is today.

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WELLINGTON TODAY / LENT 2018

“SOME CRIME AGAINST NATURE IS ABOUT TO BE COMMITTED. I FEEL IT IN MY VEINS. THESE MEN AND BOYS ARE GROCERS AND CLERKS, GARDENERS AND FATHERS FATHERS OF SMALL CHILDREN. A COUNTRY CANNOT BEAR TO LOSE THEM.” - SEBASTIAN FAULKS, BIRDSONG

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WELLINGTON TODAY / LENT 2018

The Wellington Family EAGLE HOUSE SCHOOL CELEBRATES ‘EXCELLENT’ INSPECTION REPORT Towards the end of last term, Eagle House School underwent an inspection by the Independent Schools Inspectorate. The report rated the school as ‘Excellent’ in all areas and we are delighted to be able to share some of the highlights.

The inspectors described Eagle House pupils as being “proud of their school” and “keen to be part of it”. They were impressed by the pupils’ “excellent levels of confidence and self-awareness” as well as their “considerable perseverance”.

Inspectors praised the high standards of teaching at Eagle House and commented on the pupils’ “highly positive” attitudes to learning. The “extensive programme of co-curricular activities”, which allows pupils to “flourish” beyond the classroom, was also celebrated.

These are just some of the report’s findings; they provide a snap-shot of the hard work and commitment that parents, children and staff at Eagle House exhibit daily.

The caring nature of Eagle House School was highlighted in the report. The fact that pupils, from an early age, “develop a mature understanding of right and wrong and demonstrate excellent social awareness” was noted. Boarders spoke most enthusiastically of the benefits of boarding to their personal development.

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We are delighted by this excellent inspection report. Well done to everyone involved.

THE INSPECTORS DESCRIBED EAGLE HOUSE PUPILS AS BEING “PROUD OF THEIR SCHOOL” AND “KEEN TO BE PART OF IT”.

EDUCATIONAL VISIT TO WELLINGTON COLLEGE Year 6 pupils from Wellington College International Tianjin took part in an educational visit to England, including visits to famous land-marks and museums. They also visted Wellington College to meet the Master, teachers and pupils, where they learned about the rich heritage of the College.


WELLINGTON TODAY / LENT 2018

Julian Thomas meets with key representatives from Wellington College International Tianjin, Wellington College Bilingual Hangzhou,Wellington College Hangzhou & Wellington College Bilingual Shanghai.

Construction well under way at Wellington College International, Bangkok.The latest member of the Wellington family will open its doors in August 2018.

OUR FAMILY IN CHINA The Michaelmas Term proved to be an exciting and busy start to the academic year across the Wellington College China group of schools. Links between China and the UK continue to strengthen; partnership and collaboration is strong and remains a unique feature for the group. In July, new staff to the group attended an induction event held at Wellington College and new leaders to the group from Hangzhou, Shanghai and Tianjin schools experienced a thorough induction as part of an extended visit. Last term, Iain Henderson, Deputy Head of Educational Development and Partnerships, visited all of the Chinese schools and led foundational and advanced coaching programmes for a wide range of staff. This reflects the ongoing commitment of the group to fostering a coaching culture. Moreover, Iain was able to work with leaders and teachers on academic issues, such as how

we can more effectively promote independence in our pupils. A regular meeting of all the Masters across the Wellington family of schools continues to be an effective means for promoting collaboration and exchange within the group. High quality governance is essential for our schools to be effective and achieve the very high standards set by the Wellington College China board. From summer 2018, our governance and leadership across the group was further strengthened by the appointment of Helen Kavanagh to the position of Wellington College China Chief Executive Officer (CEO), who will also serve as a governor on the Wellington Collge China Board of Governors.

ton College, has recently visited both sites to assure the construction process and was impressed with the quality and speed of construction of both schools in China. One of Wellington’s greatest strengths lies in the close and colourful nature of its community: a diverse mix of multicultural parents, pupils and teachers, drawn together by Wellington’s Values (Courage, Respect, Integrity, Kindness, and Responsibility) and by the Wellington Identity – what we want our staff and our children to be (Inspired, Intellectual, Independent, Individual, and Inclusive). ‘We are Wellington’ is a phrase frequently in use, and one which has deep meaning within the colleges and to the Wellington families who feel proud to be part of the community.

We are also delighted to reveal that preparations for our bilingual schools in Shanghai and Hangzhou are going well. Both are scheduled to open in August 2018. Malcolm Callender, the Works Bursar from Welling-

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WELLINGTON TODAY / LENT 2018

Son et Lumière

Over its long and distinguished history Wellington’s buildings have been the backdrop to countless dreams and dramas as generation after generation calls the school their own. On the evening of Friday 8th December, South Front was home to a Son et Lumière spectacular which combined projection, lights, sound and pyrotechnics to tell the story of College’s 160 years. The event took the spellbound audience through two World Wars and other moments of high drama, while also bringing us right up to date with changes of fashion and music. Although Wellington College was the central

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character, the real star of the show was Sixth Former James Wilson (S): not only was the evening his brainchild, but he also choreographed and programmed the whole event. James has been working in the field of film and concert production for four years now and is hoping to continue to work in the music industry when he leaves College. It was a stunning and unique experience for the many hundreds who gathered to see the years unfold in the space of 30 spellbinding minutes. Thanks must also go to Visions and Force FX who supplied the technology and sponsorship for the event.


WELLINGTON TODAY / LENT 2018

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WELLINGTON TODAY / LENT 2018

Photography All event photography to be found on the College flickr www.flickr.com/wellingtoncollege

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Wellington today lent 2018  
Wellington today lent 2018