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Tanner 2013

• Please dispose of trash and recycle appropriate materials in the designated bins. • This program was printed on recyclable • Please remember to recycle your paper with soy-based ink. conference booklet when you’ve • finished Please remember enjoying it!to recycle your conference booklet when you’ve finished enjoying it! A sustainable community

2013

event brought to you by the Sustainability Advisory and Tanner Conference Committees. A sustainable community event brought to you by the Sustainability Advisory and Tanner Conference Committees.

THE TANNER CONFERENCE

Tanner Conference Sustainability Initiatives:


TABLE O F CONTENTS 1

Conference Overview

1

Tanner Conference Committee

2

Thematic Overview

5

Conference Schedule

14

Conference Abstracts and Web-Based Scheduler

50

Wellesley in the World

52

Map

54

International Study Programs

56

Internships and Grants Programs

63

Fellowship Programs

66

Wellesley College Supported Internship Recipients 2013

74

Wellesley College Graduate Fellowship Recipients 2012–2013

75

National Fellowship Competition Recipients and Nominees 2012–2013

77

Index

Wellesley College gratefully acknowledges the generous alumnae and friends who support experiential learning. Their support enables student to engage in offcampus learning opportunities that have become an integral part of the Wellesley College educational experience.

The Tanner Conference Committee gratefully acknowledges faculty and staff in the following departments and facilities for their commitment to the Tanner Conference: Campus Police, Communications and Public Affairs, Computer Science, Custodial Services, Physical Plant Administration, Grounds, Library and Technology Services, Mail Services, Motor Pool, Special Events, the Science Center, and The Wellesley College Club.


THE TANNER CONFERENCE It is our privilege to invite your participation in the 2013 Tanner Conference. Established through the generosity of trustee emerita Estelle “Nicki” Newman Tanner ’57, the Tanner Conference explores the relationship between the liberal arts classroom and student participation in an increasingly diverse and interdependent world. The conference is premised on the belief that a greater understanding of the learning that takes place off campus—combined with critical inquiry into the purpose, value, and

effect of such learning—has the potential to move liberal education in new directions. Encompassing the diversity of student experiences and interests, the Tanner Conference takes as its subject internships and service learning, international study, experiential learning in courses, research conducted away from Wellesley, and fellowships. The conference provides a venue for faculty, staff, and students to discuss the challenges to teaching and learning presented by new definitions of

what constitutes the classroom. It also invites alumnae to return to campus to discuss how their decisions to participate in these experiences as Wellesley students later proved to be ones of consequence. We wish to thank all those presenting in the Tanner Conference for their roles in helping us to better understand Wellesley’s place in the world. We invite you to join the conversation that they are seeking to foster.

The 2013 Tanner Conference Committee

Dora Carrico-Moniz Department of Chemistry

Irene Mata Department of Women’s and Gender Studies

Karen Z. Pabon Slater International Center

Lee Cuba Department of Sociology

Martha J. McNamara Department of Art

Shruti Sitaram Class of 2016

Camylle Fleming Class of 2014

Elaine Mehalakes Davis Museum and Cultural Center

Jill A. Syverson-Stork Department of Spanish

Ted Hufstader Center for Work and Service

S. Joanne Murray ’81 Center for Work and Service

Jennifer Thomas-Starck Office of International Study

Pinar Keskin Department of Economics

Salwa Nur Muhammad ’06 Center for Work and Service

Franklyn A. Turbak Department of Computer Science

Peggy Levitt Department of Sociology

Kimberly O’Donnell Department of Biological Sciences

Winifred J. Wood Writing Program

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THEMATIC OVERVIEW

Culture and the Arts Japanese Culture: Co-Existence of Past and Present (Panel)

Panel

9:15am

SCI 261

Punks, Photographs, and Paul McCarthy: The Davis Museum Summer Internships

Panel

9:15am

SCI 278

Politics, Pop, and Polyurethane: Marketing Across Cultures

Individual Presentations

10:45am

SCI 274

Speak the Speech, I Pray You: Playing Shakespeare at Wellesley and Abroad

Panel

10:45am

SCI 277

From New York to Boston: Working Behind the Scenes at Art Internships

Panel

1:30pm

SCI 104

Preservation and Presentation of North American Cultural Landscapes

Individual Presentations

1:30pm

SCI 211

Searching for the Soul of Siberia

Panel

1:30pm

SCI 277

Protecting and Promoting Cultural Heritage

Individual Presentations

3pm

SCI 270

Human Rights and Protections

Individual Presentations

9:15am

SCI 274

The Challenge of Opportunity

Individual Presentations

9:15am

SCI E111

The Hardest Summer You Will Ever Love: Working with the Summer Urban Program

Panel

9:15am

SCI 270

Tools for Empowerment: Art, Money, Language, and Parents

Individual Presentations

9:15am

SCI 104

Violence and the Law

Individual Presentations

9:15am

SCI 264

Strengthening Democractic Organizations and Participation

Individual Presentations

10:45am

SCI 104

Women on Wall Street

Panel

10:45am

SCI 377

Wellesley in Finance: Navigating a Boiler Room

Panel

1:30pm

SCI 377

Education Beyond School Walls

Individual Presentations

3pm

SCI 264

From Theory to Practice: An Understanding of Vulnerable Populations in Boston

Panel

3pm

SCI 396

Strengthening Urban Infrastructure and Health

Individual Presentations

3pm

SCI 104

Empowerment of Youth, Women, and Families

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THEMATIC OVERVIEW

Health and Medicine Beyond Borders Tackling Inequality in Quality: Examining and Overcoming Disparities in Community Health

Panel

9:15am

SCI 396

The Whole Patient: Healthcare and Social Services for the Aging

Individual Presentations

9:15am

SCI 364

Global Health and Science Ambassadors

Individual Presentations

10:45am

SCI 392

Health and Healthcare in the Nation’s Capital

Panel

10:45am

SCI 278

Healthcare Challenges on the Ground

Individual Presentations

1:30pm

SCI 270

Of the Mind

Individual Presentations

1:30pm

SCI 264

From Leukemia to Melanoma: Cancer Research in Boston

Individual Presentations

3pm

SCI 274

Stemming Cancer

Individual Presentations

3pm

SCI 211

The Body

Individual Presentations

3pm

SCI 380

Working in Mental Health: Walker School and Riverside Experiences

Panel

3pm

SCI 392

House of Cards: A Look into Major U.S. Institutions

Panel

9:15am

SCI 392

The Jewish South from a New England Perspective

Panel

9:15am

SCI 277

Unplanned Lessons

Individual Presentations

9:15am

SCI 380

Believing in Service

Individual Presentations

10:45am

SCI 261

Common Currency and Foreign Exchange

Individual Presentations

10:45am

SCI E111

In for the Long Haul

Individual Presentations

10:45am

SCI 211

Security in Constructions of Peace

Individual Presentations

10:45am

SCI 256

Storytelling for Change

Individual Presentations

10:45am

SCI 268

Bring It to Boston: Service Learning in Wellesley’s Backyard

Panel

1:30pm

SCI 268

Fellowship Travels

Panel

1:30pm

SCI 396

Imagined Communities

Individual Presentations

1:30pm

SCI 261

Identity, Community, and Global Citizenship

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THEMATIC OVERVIEW

Meet the Press

Individual Presentations

1:30pm

SCI 274

Missions Impossible

Individual Presentations

1:30pm

SCI 364

View from the Hill

Individual Presentations

1:30pm

SCI 256

From the Margins: Activism in Rural Communities

Individual Presentations

3pm

SCI 261

Movement in Crisis

Individual Presentations

3pm

SCI 256

Visibility and Resistance

Individual Presentations

3pm

SCI 364

Women. World. Partners.: Reflecting on Our Summer in Beijing

Panel

3pm

SCI 268

Corporate Social Responsibility: Beyond the Boardroom

Individual Presentations

9:15am

SCI 211

Studying Across the Pond: Reflections on Higher Education

Panel

9:15am

SCI 268

Unlikely Partners?: Liberal Arts and the Business World

Individual Presentations

9:15am

SCI 256

Aftermath of Hurricane Recovery

Individual Presentations

10:45am

SCI 380

Classrooms Across Continents: Teaching, Coaching, and Learning

Individual Presentations

10:45am

SCI 264

From Wellesley Computer Science to the Technology Industry

Panel

10:45am

SCI 270

Gender in the Classroom: Girls Who Can

Individual Presentations

10:45am

SCI 364

Innovative Farming: The Rural, the Urban, and the Rooftop

Individual Presentations

10:45am

SCI 396

AAA in Education: Administration, Action, and Achievement

Individual Presentations

1:30pm

SCI 278

Spaced Out: From the Moon to the Mind

Individual Presentations

1:30pm

SCI E111

The Secret Life of Plants: Conservation and Biodiversity

Individual Presentations

1:30pm

SCI 392

What You Can Do with Computer Science: Beyond the Code

Panel

1:30pm

SCI 380

Designing, Encoding, and Searching: Advancing Synthetic Biology Through Human-Computer Interaction

Panel

3pm

SCI 278

Hidden Treasures: Exploring Life in Little Cayman

Panel

3pm

SCI 277

www.com: Who, What, and Where of Communication

Individual Presentations

3pm

SCI E111

Technology, Innovation, and Education

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CONFERENCE SCHEDULE

8:30–9:15am Breakfast The Leonie Faroll Focus, Science Center

9:15–10:25am Culture and the Arts Japanese Culture: Co-Existence of Past and Present (Panel) SCI 261 Xueyin Zhang ’16, Undeclared; Ruohan Gao ’16, Undeclared; Prioty F. Sarwar ’16, Undeclared; and Wing Yan Shiao ’16, Undeclared Advisor: Kazuko Ozawa, East Asian Languages and Cultures

Punks, Photographs, and Paul McCarthy: The Davis Museum Summer Internships (Panel) SCI 278 Imani C. Higginson ’14, Undeclared; Anna C. Egeland ’16, Undeclared; and Athena M. Knisley ’15, Anthropology Advisor: Elaine Mehalakes, Davis Museum and Cultural Center

Empowerment of Youth, Women, and Families Human Rights and Protections SCI 274 Amnesty International: The Key to Running a Successful Grassroots Organization Caroline J. Golub ’14, Sociology and English Advisor: Salwa Nur Muhammad, Center for Work and Service

Generations of NOW and the Future of the Feminist Movement Katherine E. Leung ’14, Political Science and History Advisor: Brenna W. Greer, History I Promised Sopia I Would Tell... Keturah A. Schmidt ’15, Undeclared Advisor: Catia C. Confortini, Peace Studies

The Challenge of Opportunity SCI E111 Public Spaces and Gender Perspectives: A Summer at the UNDP Costa Rica Nancy Negrete ’14, Political Science and Latin American Studies Advisor: Alejandra B. Osorio, History Interview with a Vampire: Confessions of an Aspiring Filmmaker 2.0 Ama Y. Adi-Dako ’14, English Advisor: Maurizio S. Viano, Cinema and Media Studies Building Sustainable Communities in Greater Bangalore Mayrah W. Udvardi ’14, Environmental Studies and Architecture Advisor: James M. Turner, Environmental Studies Challenges are Opportunities: Teaching and Learning in Central America Eden C. Littrell ’14, Political Science; Anne E. Corbett ’16, Undeclared; and Helena I. McMonagle ’16, Undeclared Advisor: Nancy A. Hall, Spanish

The Hardest Summer You Will Ever Love: Working with the Summer Urban Program (Panel) SCI 270 Sia Smith-Miyazaki ’14, Sociology; Laura A. Harris-Schlotterbeck ’14, International RelationsEconomics; Susan A. Huang ’14, Economics; and Corena M. Loeb ’16, Undeclared Advisor: Soo Hong, Education

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Tools for Empowerment: Art, Money, Language, and Parents SCI 104 Portrait of a Muanjadi: Brave Women Collaborating to Break Barriers Hanna G. Tenerowicz ’16, Undeclared Advisor: Flavia Laviosa, Italian Studies Using the Tools is the Key Jayne M. Ellis ’14, Psychology and Elizabeth G. White ’15, American Studies Advisor: Noah A. Rubin, Education Education for Some: The Legal Battle of Students with Disabilities in New York City Emily L. Gell ’14, International Relations- History Advisor: Lidwien E. Kapteijns, History Dreams to C.A.S.H.: Providing Access and Tools to People in Need Lena Julia P. Cardoso ’14, Economics Advisor: David L. Lindauer, Economics Youth in Motion: Arts and Advocacy in Underserved Communities Caitlin M. McGrail ’14, Art History Advisor: Martha J. McNamara, Art

Violence and the Law SCI 264 Injustice for All: Battered Women’s Experiences with the Chicago Court System Anne Hamilton ’14, Economics and Women’s and Gender Studies Advisor: Maria D. Natividad, Women’s and Gender Studies “Justice Is More Than Jail”: Providing Legal Representation to Sexual Assault Victims Katharine A. Kadlick ’15, Political Science and History Advisor: Tom Burke, Political Science Fighting Domestic Violence in Fogo, Cape Verde, to Encourage Women’s Empowerement Carine I. Wete ’DS, Undeclared and Ilta Ferko ’14, Spanish and Political Science Advisor: Vanessa M. Britto, Health Services

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Health and Medicine Beyond Borders

and Spanish; and Lindsey G. Shepardson ’14, Women’s and Gender Studies Advisor: Hahrie C. Han, Political Science

Tackling Inequality in Quality: Examining and Overcoming Disparities in Community Health (Panel) SCI 396

The Jewish South from a New England Perspective (Panel) SCI 277 Rebecca S. Fishbein ’15, Economics; Yesenia Ramirez ’15, Italian Studies and Chemistry; and Talia S. Schwartz ’14, Psychology Advisor: Patti Sheinman, Office of Religious and Spiritual Life

Olivia K. Dumont ’15, Women’s and Gender Studies; Gabriela Kovacikova ’14, Health and Society; Dhivya Perumal ’14, Neuroscience; and Milena Radoman ’15, Neuroscience and German Studies Advisor: Ted Hufstader, Center for Work and Service

Unplanned Lessons SCI 380

The Whole Patient: Healthcare and Social Services for the Aging SCI 364 The Second Boom of the Baby Boomers: The Changing Needs of Geriatric Medicine Sarah L. Myoung ’14, Biological Chemistry Advisor: Jonathan B. Imber, Sociology Alzheimer’s: A Future Epidemic Pamela Akametalu ’14, Neuroscience Advisor: Marc J. Tetel, Neuroscience When Aging Becomes Disability: Narratives of Vision Loss Allyson L. Pyers ’15, Political Science and Women’s and Gender Studies Advisor: Charlene A. Galarneau, Women’s and Gender Studies

Identity, Community, and Global Citizenship

Connie C. Shen ’14, Economics and Political Science; Soomi Kim ’14, Economics and English; Eda D. Lee ’14, International Relations-Political Science; Jennifer E. Migliore ’14, American Studies

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Confronting the Past, Changing the Future: Moral Education in the History Classroom Julie E. Censullo ’14, Religion and French Advisor: Barbara Geller, Religion Denmark: Innovative Ideas in Psychology and Special Education Kendrick E. Smaellie ’14, Psychology; Felicia M. Brown ’14, Psychology; and Joanna G. Garcia ’14, Spanish and Psychology Advisor: Joy Renjilian-Burgy, Spanish

Technology, Innovation, and Education Corporate Social Responsibility: Beyond the Boardroom SCI 211

House of Cards: A Look into Major U.S. Institutions (Panel) SCI 392

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From Beijing to Boston: Redefining a Global Education Kaley T. Haskell ’14, English Advisor: Katie D. Koski, Center for Work and Service

Socially Responsible Investing: The Moral Obligation in Financial Decision-Making Holly N. Shreckengast ’15, Economics Advisor: Courtney C. Coile, Economics

Wellesley Women Who Could: Continue the Gender Evolution at the Federal Reserve Arlevea M. Freeman ’15, Economics Advisor: Daniel E. Sichel, Economics t h e w o r l d

Clean Technology Innovation: Creating Corporate Relationships to Strengthen the Clean Tech Sector Juliette L. Chevallier ’14, Applied Mathematics Advisor: Jonathan E. Tannenhauser, Mathematics

Studying Across the Pond: Reflections on Higher Education (Panel) SCI 268 Morgan G. Johnstonbaugh ’14, Economics and Sociology; Cristina L. Ferlauto ’14, Economics; and Anastasia T. Hou ’14, Economics Advisor: Jennifer Thomas-Starck, International Studies

Unlikely Partners?: Liberal Arts and the Business World SCI 256 Public-Private Partnerships for Health and Education Prerana Nanda ’14, Economics and Crystal S. Myung ’14, Spanish and Political Science Advisor: Joseph P. Joyce, Economics Bridging the Gap Between a Liberal Arts Education and the Business World Brittany V. Mscisz ’14, Environmental Studies and Economics Advisor: Pinar Keskin, Economics

10:25-10:45am Break Refresments will be served in the Leonie Faroll Focus, Science Center.


10:45-11:55am Culture and the Arts Politics, Pop, and Polyurethane: Marketing Across Cultures SCI 274 Between a Parisian Office and a Factory in Normandy: Interning Abroad with a Manufacturing Group Alexa P. Keegan ’14, Psychology and French Advisor: Sylvaine V. Egron-Sparrow, French “Wouldn’t You Like to Be a Pepper, Too?”: Exploring Brand Licensing Soo In Yoon ’14, Sociology Advisor: Markella B. Rutherford, Sociology Korea’s National Brand-Making: Why It Matters Seayoung Kim ’16, Undeclared Advisor: Sun-Hee Lee, East Asian Languages and Cultures

Speak the Speech, I Pray You: Playing Shakespeare at Wellesley and Abroad (Panel) SCI 277 Katherine M. Bussert ’16, Undeclared; Elizabeth F. Harper ’15, American Studies; and Kelsey Ridge ’13, English Advisor: Diego Arciniegas, Theatre Studies

Empowerment of Youth, Women, and Families Strengthening Democractic Organizations and Participation SCI 104 Fighting for Democracy: Social Change in Cambodia Nayni Gupta ’14, Economics Advisor: Laura K. Grattan, Political Science

Whatever You Do, Don’t Touch the Price of Bread Emma C. Smith ’14, Economics and Middle Eastern Studies Advisor: Pinar Keskin, Economics

Summer in the Tropics: What I Learned from Bats Connie A. Rojas ’14, Psychology and Biological Sciences Advisor: Emily A. Buchholtz, Biological Sciences

Women’s Foreign Policy Group: Amplifying Women’s Voices on Global Affairs Kelsey N. Heroux ’14, Sociology Advisor: Lee Cuba, Sociology

Ein Sommer in Deutschland: Discovering the International World of Science in Germany Doris C. Berman ’14, History and Chemistry Advisor: David R. Haines, Chemistry

In the Land of Women, Politics, and Public Relations Kayleigh N. Butler ’14, English and Economics Advisor: Casey G. Rothschild, Economics

Health and Healthcare in the Nation’s Capital (Panel) SCI 278

Grassroots Politics at Ready for Hillary Dana E. Marks ’15, Architecture Advisor: Martha J. McNamara, Art

Women on Wall Street (Panel) SCI 377 Ana S. Plascencia Casillas ’14, Economics and Political Science; Hayley T. Goydan ’14, Chinese Language and Literature and Economics; Mengyuan Liu ’14, Economics and Mathematics; and Qiuyu Zhu ’14, Economics and Computer Science Advisor: Irma Tryon, Center for Work and Service

Health and Medicine Beyond Borders

Medicine and Corruption: The Lethal Reality of Mexico Miryam S. Saad ’14, Biological Chemistry Advisor: Paul I. Reisberg, Chemistry The Challenges and Successes of Developing Healthcare in a Tanzanian Hospital Sahar S. Ibrahim ’16, Undeclared Advisor: Adam G. Matthews, Biological Sciences

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Identity, Community, and Global Citizenship Believing in Service SCI 261 Putting Faith in Community Development Mona I. Elminyawi ’14, Urban Studies Advisor: T. James Kodera, Religion Service as Faith Cicia X. Lee ’14, Economics; Katherine Y. Joh ’14, International-Political Science; and Grace E. Roberts ’14, American Studies Advisor: T. James Kodera, Religion

Global Health and Science Ambassadors SCI 392

EMILY’s List: Women and Money in Politics Campbell E. Curry-Ledbetter ’14, Political Science Advisor: Marion R. Just, Political Science

Asha Ayub ’14, Health and Society; Lillian E. Elsner ’14, Philosophy; Lelia G. Gessner ’14, Biological Chemistry; Blair L. Uhlig ’14, Classical Civilization and Health and Society Advisor: Tom Burke, Political Science

Common Currency and Foreign Exchange SCI E111 Twenty-eight Countries in One: International Perspectives at the European Union Laura M. Schiemichen ’14, Economics Advisor: Nancy A. Hall, Spanish Meeting “Abenomics”: Numbers and Cultures QiaoLing Zhang ’14, Economics Advisor: Salwa Nur Muhammad, Center for Work and Service

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Working in the Financial Industry in East Asia Amanda H. Hui ’15, Economics; Ava H. Chang ’15, Computer Science; Siqin Wang ’15, Economics and Computer Science Advisor: Olga Shurchkov, Economics

In for the Long Haul SCI 211

Storytelling for Change SCI 268

Revealing Truths and Paradoxes: A Year in Yaoundé, Cameroon Chelsey L. Baturin ’14, Peace and Justice Studies Advisor: Pashington J. Obeng, Africana Studies A Social Scale: Exploring Links Between Social Class and Culture Emma D. Haley ’14, Media Arts and Sciences Advisor: Jennifer Thomas-Starck, International Studies Year-Long International Study: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly Simone A. Fukuda ’14, Spanish and Political Science; Ariel G. Chao ’14, Chinese Language and Literature; Kathryn L. Clark ’14, Japanese Language and Literature; and Kaisa L. Wayrynen ’14, Biological Sciences Advisor: Carlos Ramos, Spanish

Security in Constructions of Peace SCI 256

Combating Terrorism in the Middle East and North Africa: Economic and Political Perspectives Katherine E. Di Lucido ’15, Economics and Lavanya Ganesh ’15, Political Science and Economics Advisor: Akila Weerapana, Economics

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World University Games in Kazan, Russia Sharon C. Ng ’16, Undeclared Advisor: Ann Velenchik, Writing Program A Chorus of Stones: Histories of Memory and Denial Victoria Yu ’16, Undeclared Advisor: Frances G. Malino, Jewish Studies Little Country, Big World: Policy and War in the Republic of Georgia Marilis E. Dugas ’16, Undeclared Advisor: Stacie E. Goddard, Political Science

Technology, Innovation, and Education Aftermath of Hurricane Recovery SCI 380

The Future of Peace So Yeon Jeong ’15, International Relations-History Advisor: Catia C. Confortini, Peace Studies

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Chinese Views of Themselves and Modern Society Sydney B. Zander ’14, East Asian Studies Advisor: Mingwei Song, East Asian Languages and Cultures

Living Our Values: Biking for a Sustainable Future Julie Rong ’16, Undeclared and Hannah S. Mott ’16, Undeclared Advisor: Monica R. Higgins, Environmental Studies

Learning from Cross-Cultural Military Experience in Thailand Rachel H. Han ’16, Undeclared Advisor: Barbara R. Beatty, Education

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There’s Humanity in Numbers: Lessons from the U.S. Consulate General in Guangzhou, China Audrey M. Wozniak ’14, Music and East Asian Studies Advisor: William A. Joseph, Political Science

Restorative Justice, Christian Spirituality, and the Recovery of a City Suh H. Yoon ’15, Religion; Mwangala P. Akamandisa ’15, Biological Chemistry; Erin Chow ’15, Spanish; Elizabeth G. Mann ’15, Undeclared;

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and Dorothy X. Ren ’16, Undeclared Advisor: Katherine R. Hampson, Office of Religious and Spiritual Life New England Hurricane Recovery: A Look at Modern Steam Gauging Celia M. Honigberg ’15, Geosciences Advisor: Elizabeth L. Davis, Geosciences

Classrooms Across Continents: Teaching, Coaching, and Learning SCI 264 Finding Room to Read: An Exploration in an English-Medium Mumbai Secondary School Brodie R. Mistry ’15, Political Science Advisor: Neelima Shukla-Bhatt, South Asia Studies Teaching, and Learning, at the Math/Science Institute for Girls at Choate Rosemary Hall Emily F. Anderson ’14, Cognitive and Linguistic Sciences Advisor: Angela C. Carpenter, Cognitive and Linguistic Sciences Affordable, Scalable, and World-Class: An Educational Model Bringing Opportunity to South African Communities Margaret C. West ’14, German Studies and Women’s and Gender Studies Advisor: Smitha Radhakrishnan, Sociology Teaching Math in a Ugandan High School Catherine S. Coravos ’15, Mathematics Advisor: Ann Trenk, Mathematics

From Wellesley Computer Science to the Technology Industry (Panel) SCI 270 Veronica J. Lin ’15, Economics and Computer Science; Erin L. Davis ’14, Computer Science and Mathematics; Linda Ding ’14, Computer Science; Olivia V. Kotsopoulos ’14, Computer Science and Mathematics; Amanda C. Poon ’14, Computer Science; and Yi Tong ’15, Computer Science Advisor: Orit Shaer, Computer Science


Gender in the Classroom: Girls Who Can SCI 364

1:30-2:40pm

Empowering Women Through Code: Closing the Gender Gap in Technology Fields Stephanie Lee ’14, Computer Science and Lyndsay R. Coleman ’14, Media Arts and Sciences Advisor: Sohie M. Lee, Computer Science

From New York to Boston: Working Behind the Scenes at Art Internships (Panel) SCI 104

Public School Kids: Teamwork, ProblemSolving, and Kinesthetics in Single-Gender Classrooms Rebecca D. Hamilton ’15, Psychology; Emilyrose Havrilla ’15, Psychology; and Katherine A. Smiley ’14, History and Psychology Advisor: Nancy P. Genero, Psychology

Innovative Farming: The Rural, the Urban, and the Rooftop SCI 396 Farmer on the Roof: Urban Agriculture in NYC Mackenzie A. Klema ’14, History and Environmental Studies Advisor: Kristina N. Jones, Biological Sciences Making Affordable Technology More Human: The Role of Design in Development April P. Zhu ’14, Environmental Studies Advisor: Nadya S. Hajj, Political Science This Is Not a Michael Pollan Book: How Food Really Gets to Your Table Sophia M. Garcia ’15, Environmental Studies Advisor: Rene Alexander D. Orquiza, American Studies

12-1:30pm Luncheon

Searching for the Soul of Siberia (Panel) SCI 277

Culture and the Arts

Lauren M. Richmond ’14, Economics and Art History; Sabrina A. Giglio ’15, American Studies; Michaela R. Haffner ’14, Art History and French; Dominique R. Ledoux ’14, Art History; and Quinn E. Refer ’14, Art History Advisor: Martha J. McNamara, Art

Preservation and Presentation of North American Cultural Landscapes SCI 211 Prehistoric Archaeology in the New Hampshire Wilderness Isabel M. Starr ’16, Undeclared Advisor: Adam Van Arsdale, Anthropology Architectural Preservation in Boston’s Egleston Square: Past, Present, and Future Christina M. Rieth ’14, Architecture and International Relations-History Advisor: Martha J. McNamara, Art From Seminar to Summer Internship: The History of the Charles River Esplanade Rebecca S. Freeman-Slade ’14, American Studies and Architecture Advisor: Martha J. McNamara, Art Preservation at the Intersection of Technology and the Humanities Makenna G. Murray ’14, History Advisor: Martha J. McNamara, Art

All members of the Wellesley College community are invited to lunch, which will be served in the Leonie Faroll Focus and the Science Library.

Ana Gabriela R. Guzman ’15, Russian Area Studies; Graeme L. Durovich ’15, South Asian Studies; Kendall L. Frye ’15, Anthropology; Ashley K. Funk ’16, Undeclared; Margaret M. McClure ’15, Russian and Political Science; and Laura W. Rigge ’14, Russian Advisor: Thomas P. Hodge, Russian

Empowerment of Youth, Women, and Families Wellesley in Finance: Navigating a Boiler Room (Panel) SCI 377 Wenhua Sheng ’14, Mathematics and Economics; Sarena Lin Shan Ahmad ’14, Economics; Wendy M. Foo ’14, Economics and Chinese Language and Literature; Tiange Lei ’14, Economics; and Cherry Y. Shen ’14, Economics Advisor: Joseph P. Joyce, Economics

Health and Medicine Beyond Borders Healthcare Challenges on the Ground SCI 270 The Importance of Oral Health Education in Underserved Communities Sun Joo Paik ’14, Chemistry and Jacquelyn Chou ’15, Biological Sciences Advisor: Sheila P. Brachfeld-Child, Psychology Linking Healthcare to Community-Based Support Services Asia B. Young ’14, Women’s and Gender Studies Advisor: Maria D. Natividad, Women’s and Gender Studies “We’re Not Asking for Money...We’re Asking for Change”: An Investigation into Healthcare and Homelessness in Baltimore Elizabeth M. Olson ’16, Undeclared Advisor: Katie D. Koski, Center for Work and Service

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Breaching Barriers to Provide Care Sebiha M. Abdullahi ’15, Biological Chemistry Advisor: Ted Hufstader, Center for Work and Service

Imagined Communities SCI 261

Missions Impossible SCI 364

Of the Mind SCI 264

Co-housing: Bringing Back the Traditional Sense of Neighborhood Sundus I. Al-Bayati ’14, Architecture Advisor: Phyllis I. McGibbon, Art

Life After Prison: Looking for Second Chances Michelle M. Claros ’15, Peace and Justice Studies Advisor: Christopher Candland, Political Science

Addressing a Critical Need: Mental Health Support for Japan’s International Community Sarah B. Hitchner ’14, Women’s and Gender Studies Advisor: Kazuko Ozawa, East Asian Languages and Cultures

We Developed, but Did We Grow?: The Power of Relationships and Community-Building in Development Work Jennifer Gu ’14, Political Science Advisor: Smitha Radhakrishnan, Sociology

Learning to Look at the Person, Not the Wheelchair: Demystifying Cerebral Palsy Tiffany Chen ’15, Spanish Advisor: Carlos Ramos, Spanish

Creating Community in Chaos Elisabeth K. Ericksen ’14, Peace and Justice Studies Advisor: Jennifer Thomas-Starck, International Studies

Politics Today: Miscommunication Between Congress and Its People Suzanne K. Barth ’16, Undeclared and Claire S. Verbeck ’16, Undeclared Advisor: Lee Cuba, Sociology

Investigating the Inner Workings of Decision-Making Amanda B. Fath ’16, Undeclared Advisor: Deborah E. Bauer, Neuroscience

Meet the Press SCI 274

View from the Hill SCI 256

The Politics of the Press Department at the Clinton Foundation Sarah N. Mahmood ’14, Political Science Advisor: Marion R. Just, Political Science

Rising Up and Making Change: The White House Initiative on Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders Sapna K. Jain ’14, Political Science Advisor: Rene Alexander D. Orquiza, American Studies

Identity, Community, and Global Citizenship Bring It to Boston: Service Learning in Wellesley’s Backyard (Panel) SCI 268 Hannah K. Lindquist ’15, Sociology; Bridgette E. Lemoine ’15, Philosophy; Mara Elissa Palma ’15, Political Science; and Meghan E. Sargent ’15, Economics Advisor: Katie D. Koski, Center for Work and Service

Writing Between the Lines: Navigating Chinese Journalism Xiaolu Han ’14, East Asian Studies Advisor: Mingwei Song, East Asian Languages and Cultures

Fellowship Travels (Panel) SCI 396 Sara Newland ’03, Political Science; Jennifer Hatch ’10, Peace and Justice Studies; and Beilin Ye ’10, English Advisor: Elizabeth A. Mandeville, Center for Work and Service

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International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia: War Criminals in the International Limelight Nora E. Mishanec ’14, Cognitive and Linguistic Sciences and Psychology Advisor: Inela Selimovic, Spanish

Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty: From Propaganda to Journalism and Beyond Ana Lomtadze ’14, Cinema and Media Studies and Political Science Advisor: Winifred J. Wood, Writing Program

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Liderazgo en VOZ: Day Laborer Leadership in the Nonprofit World Sara D. Del Balzo ’14, Spanish and Medieval/ Renaissance Studies Advisor: Elena Gascon-Vera, Spanish

From Wellesley to C Street: Summer at the U.S. Department of State Safaya A. Fawzi ’14, Political Science Advisor: Joseph P. Joyce, Economics Projects, Partnerships, Pushed Boundaries: My Global Affairs Internship in Washington Oluwakemi L. Akin-Olugbade ’14, French and Psychology Advisor: Ted Hufstader, Center for Work and Service Inside the National Economic Council: What It’s Really Like to Work for the President Emma L. Rackstraw ’14, International Relations-Economics Advisor: David L. Lindauer, Economics


Technology, Innovation, and Education AAA in Education: Administration, Action, and Achievement SCI 278 Filling the Gap: The Role of Nonprofits in the Dominican Education System Mabelly Guerrero ’14, Neuroscience Advisor: Mared Alicea-Westort, Office of Intercultural Education In the Trenches: Reforming the American Education System with a StudentsFirst Offensive Lauren A. Tonti ’14, Political Science and Psychology Advisor: Soo Hong, Education Am I Even Qualified to Do This?: Forays into a New Charter School Victoria J. Volker ’16, Undeclared Advisor: Barbara R. Beatty, Education It Takes More than Good Intentions: Lessons from DC Public Schools’ Intervention Efforts Monica Rodriguez ’14, Psychology Advisor: Tom Burke, Political Science

Morphological and Connectional Study in Treatment of Naive ADHD Subjects Using MRI Marcia Frimpong ’15, Neuroscience Advisor: Marc J. Tetel, Neuroscience Boston Children’s Hospital Neighborhood Partnerships: My Psychology Experience in the Medical Field Gabriella F. Freda ’14, Psychology Advisor: Paul M. Wink, Psychology

The Secret Life of Plants: Conservation and Biodiversity SCI 392

Refreshments will be served in the Leonie Faroll Focus, Science Center.

3–4:10pm Culture and the Arts Protecting and Promoting Cultural Heritage SCI 270 Stepping Through the Glass: Immersive Environments at the Field Museum Gabriela S. Cooper-Vespa ’15, Biological Sciences Advisor: Connie L. Bauman, Physical Education, Recreation and Athletics

Duke Farms: Transforming a Country Estate into an Ecological Sanctuary Hannah C. Davelman ’16, Undeclared Advisor: Robin L. McKnight, Economics

Treasures of the Caribbean: Fine Arts and Urbanism in Puerto Rico Hannah L. Ahlblad ’14, Art History and Art Studio Advisor: James Oles, Art

Plant Conservation Is Important, Right? Geralle N. Powell ’16, Undeclared Advisor: Kristina N. Jones, Biological Sciences

Art Research and Preservation of Cultural Heritage Laura Fandino ’14, Biological Sciences Advisor: Flavia Laviosa, Italian Studies

Investigating the Importance of Biodiversity Olivia B. Astran ’14, Biological Sciences Advisor: Kristina N. Jones, Biological Sciences

Response of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to Oxidative Stress and Limits of Habitability Michelle R. Brann ’15, Biological Chemistry Advisor: Louise E. Darling, Biological Sciences

What You Can Do with Computer Science: Beyond the Code (Panel) SCI 380

The Effects of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation on Memory Consolidation During Sleep Haley B. Troy ’16, Undeclared Advisor: Adam G. Matthews, Biological Sciences

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Refining Plant Biomass to Be the New Petroleum Jeanne J. Xu ’15, Chemistry Advisor: Nolan T. Flynn, Chemistry

Spaced Out: From the Moon to the Mind SCI E111

It’s Not Rocket Science, It’s Industrial Hygiene: A Summer at NASA Emily L. Kurtz ’15, Mathematics Advisor: Karen M. Lange, Mathematics

2:40-3pm

Yu Mei Lay He ’14, Economics; Amy Hu ’14, East Asian Studies and Computer Science; Irene C. Kwok ’14, Computer Science and Chinese Language and Literature; and Karen Su ’14, Media Arts and Sciences Advisor: Stella Kakavouli, Computer Science

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La Dolce Vita: Peggy Guggenheim and Her Legacy Emily K. Weddle ’14, Music and Art History Advisor: Gurminder K. Bhogal, Music

Empowerment of Youth, Women, and Families Education Beyond School Walls SCI 264 Empowering Women Through the Women’s Bureau Michelle C. Sit ’15, Psychology Advisor: Tom Burke, Political Science

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Educational Nonprofits as a “Third Space”: The Impact and Limitations of 826LA Charlotte J. Weiss ’16, Undeclared Advisor: Barbara R. Beatty, Education Humanizing Education Through the Arts: Peace, Justice, and Youth Leadership in Boston Katherine H. McCann ’15, Peace and Justice Studies; Luisa S. Reyes ’15, Economics; and Lauren E. Walsh ’14, Peace and Justice Studies Advisor: Soo Hong, Education

From Theory to Practice: An Understanding of Vulnerable Populations in Boston (Panel) SCI 396 Victoria C. Rines ’15, Biological Sciences; Shelby A. Baptista ’15, Women’s and Gender Studies; Natalie Chaidez ’15, Latin American Studies; Bethany L. Cohen ’15, Psychology and Women’s and Gender Studies; and Alison Z. Nikyar ’15, Neuroscience and Women’s and Gender Studies Advisor: Katie D. Koski, Center for Work and Service

China’s Housing Market: Is There a Bubble Ready to Burst? Yuhe Zhang ’14, International Relations-Economics Advisor: Jennifer Thomas-Starck, International Studies

Women Deserve Choice: Championing Reproductive Justice from the Heart of Its Movement Beatriz Aldereguia ’14, Spanish Advisor: Maria D. Natividad, Women’s and Gender Studies 12

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Innovating the Next Generation of Design Leaders in Social Enterprise Naureen Mazumdar ‘14, Architecture and Art History Advisor: Martha J. McNamara, Art

Streamlining Stem Cell Transplantation: Creating a Dynamic Formula for Specialized Cancer Treatment Sahitya C. Raja ’15, Biological Sciences Advisor: Sally K. Sommers Smith, Biological Sciences Supporting Cancer Research at the National Cancer Institute with Computational Solutions Tricia C. Lu ’14, Biological Sciences Advisor: Adam Van Arsdale, Anthropology

A Thirst for Change: Water and Sanitation’s Gendered Discrimination Rebecca M. George ’15, Political Science Advisor: Neelima Shukla-Bhatt, South Asia Studies

The Promised Land of Personalized Medicine in Breast Cancer Treatment Nancy A. Zhang ’16, Undeclared Advisor: Jeffrey E. Hughes, Biological Sciences

Health and Medicine Beyond Borders

The Body SCI 380

From Leukemia to Melanoma: Cancer Research in Boston SCI 274

A Summer Studying Cartilage: The Seemingly Unglamorous Field of Orthopaedic Research Audrey A. Tran ’15, Biological Chemistry Advisor: Louise E. Darling, Biological Sciences

From Diagnosis to Cure: One Does Not Simply Have Cancer Zi Wei Liao ’15, Biological Chemistry Advisor: Nancy H. Kolodny, Faculty emerita

Strengthening Urban Infrastructure and Health SCI 104

Yuca, Tepuys, and Rainbows: A Summer in Rural Venezuela Emma R. Howey ’16, Undeclared Advisor: Elizabeth L. Davis, Geosciences

Hurricane Sandy as a First Responder: My Year with AmeriCorps and FEMA Alexandra K. Azzi ’15, American Studies Advisor: Katie D. Koski, Center for Work and Service

Reflections on Cancer Research in Boston Victoria M. Hills ’14, History and Biological Sciences; Angela C. Ai ’15, Biological Chemistry; Emily L. Cockey ’15, Neuroscience; and Amy Zhou ’14, Chemistry Advisor: Ted Hufstader, Center for Work and Service

Stemming Cancer SCI 211 From Bench to Bedside and Back: My Summer Stranded on the Bench Veronica G. Yu ’15, Sociology Advisor: Simone M. Helluy, Biological Sciences

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In Vitro Muscle Vascularization and the Impact of Collaborative Biological Engineering Sarah R. Clarkson ’14, Biological Sciences Advisor: Heather R. Mattila, Biological Sciences Immunology: A Summer of Research in Boston Zena K. Chatila ’16, Undeclared Advisor: Yuichiro Suzuki, Biological Sciences Cochlear Implantation Technology: Improving Lives or Committing Ethnocide? Aileen Y. Ro ’16, Undeclared Advisor: Kimberly O’Donnell, Biological Sciences

Working in Mental Health: Walker School and Riverside Experiences (Panel) SCI 392 Stephanie C. Eby ’15, Psychology; Seowoo Lee ’15, Psychology; Margaret C. McConnell ’14, Psychology; Erica R. Perez ’14, Psychology; Leigh D. Pinkston ’15, Psychology; and Taylor D. Stewart ’15, Psychology and English Advisor: Paul M. Wink, Psychology


Identity, Community, and Global Citizenship From the Margins: Activism in Rural Communities SCI 261 Mother Tongue: Education and Healthcare in the State of My Forefathers Pooja M. Jayaprakash ’15, English Advisor: Neelima Shukla-Bhatt, South Asia Studies Indigenous Mazahua Culture in Twenty-first Century Mexico Deborah E. Ransom ’15, Political Science Advisor: Nadya S. Hajj, Political Science A Latina Gringa: Perspectives on Discrimination and Interculturality in Chile Jannet G. Sanchez ’14, Women’s and Gender Studies Advisor: Charlene A. Galarneau, Women’s and Gender Studies Doing Socially Conscious Research in Rural India Grace S. Atherton ’15, Economics and Fiona J. Almeida ’DS, Undeclared Advisor: Pashington J. Obeng, Africana Studies

Movement in Crisis SCI 256

The Egyptian Revolution: An Insider’s Perspective Leila T. Elabbady ’16, Undeclared Advisor: Stacie E. Goddard, Political Science

Economics; Lynn U. Hsu ’15, Chinese Language and Literature; Alice Sun ’15, Art History and Chemistry; and Claire J. Tam ’15, Political Science Advisor: Joseph P. Joyce, Economics

I’ll Call When I’m Online: How Migrants in Morocco Use Communication Technologies Kelly H. Kern ’14, Political Science Advisor: Nicholas A. Knouf, Cinema and Media Studies

Technology, Innovation, and Education

Visibility and Resistance SCI 364 Breaking the Political Bamboo Ceiling Grace Y. Park ’16, Undeclared Advisor: Karen Y. Shih, Office of Intercultural Education “There Are No Pretty Girls in Bread”: Interning as a French Boulangère Rachel Swengel ’14, French Advisor: Sylvaine V. Egron-Sparrow, French La Jaula de Oro: Latinos’ Social Media Reactions to Immigration Reform in the United States Yesenia Trujillo ’14, Computer Science Advisor: Eniana Mustafaraj, Computer Science

The Impact of the Syrian Conflict on Jordan’s Economy Rayah H. Al-Farah ’14, Economics Advisor: David L. Lindauer, Economics

New York City Chinatown 1940s-1960s: Stories of Discrimination, Resistance, and Resilience Bernice Y. Chan ’16, Undeclared Advisor: Linda Charmaraman, Wellesley Centers for Women

Uploading Japan: The Importance of Social Media in Spreading Cultural Awareness Athena M. Kihara ’15, Media Arts and Sciences Advisor: Kazuko Ozawa, East Asian Languages and Cultures

Transition, Translation, and Transparency: My Eight-Month Stretch in China Navaporn McClean ’14, East Asian Studies Advisor: Mingwei Song, East Asian Languages and Cultures

The Crisis You Have Never Heard Of: The Plight of North Korean Refugees and Defectors Jordan E. Lee ’14, International-Political Science Advisor: Sun-Hee Lee, East Asian Languages and Cultures

Women. World. Partners.: Reflecting on Our Summer in Beijing (Panel) SCI 268 Josie-Dee Seagren ’14, Chinese Language and Literature; Wenyan Deng ’15, InternationalPolitical Science and History; Narayani Gupta ’15, t h e

Designing, Encoding, and Searching: Advancing Synthetic Biology Through Human-Computer Interaction (Panel) SCI 278 Casey E. Grote ’14, Computer Science; Joanna A. Bi ’15, Computer Science; Heather H. Petrow ’DS, Media Arts and Sciences; Elina S. Segreto ’15, Computer Science; and Sravanti Tekumalla ’16, Undeclared Advisor: Orit Shaer, Computer Science

Hidden Treasures: Exploring Life in Little Cayman (Panel) SCI 277 Jingjing Li ’15, Neuroscience; Amanda M. Gardner ’DS, Geobiology; Madeline E. Gorchels ’16, Undeclared; Priya D. Patel ’16, Undeclared; and Roza Trilesskaya ’16, Undeclared Advisor: Martina Koniger, Biological Sciences

www.com: Who, What, and Where of Communication SCI E111 There Must Be a Better Way: Solutions for a Modern Web Gabriela A. Lanza ’14, Media Arts and Sciences Advisor: Scott D. Anderson, Computer Science Engineering to English: Communicating the Science of Environmental Solutions Stephanie L. Gebhardt ’14, Environmental Studies Advisor: Monica R. Higgins, Environmental Studies When in Rome, Do as the Romans: Communication Across Disciplines Nikita U. Saladi ’16, Undeclared Advisor: Adam G. Matthews, Biological Sciences

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CONFERENCE ABSTRACTS

Complete Tanner Conference abstracts are also available online through a Web-based conference scheduler at www.wellesley.edu/ tanner. Please visit the Web site to create, print, and share a personalized schedule for the day.

8:30–9:15am The Leonie Faroll Focus, Science Center

9:15–10:25am Culture and the Arts Japanese Culture: Co-Existence of Past and Present (Panel) SCI 261 Xueyin Zhang ’16, Undeclared; Ruohan Gao ’16, Undeclared; Prioty F. Sarwar ’16, Undeclared; and Wing Yan Shiao ’16, Undeclared Advisor: Kazuko Ozawa, East Asian Languages and Cultures This is the story of four international students who traveled to Japan to experience a culture vastly different from the one they experienced in the United States. Through summer language immersion programs in Hokkaido and Ishikawa, we unlocked the secrets of beautiful Japanese festivals, Japanese delicacies, and healthy long lives. While appreciating the beautiful landscape and the quaint shrines and Shinto temples, Rohana has seen how the Japanese relate to religion in their culture. Feeling beautiful while wearing elegant kimonos, Prioty has researched on the changing trends in how women are portrayed in Japanese media. Singing her heart out to karaoke all night long, Sharon has looked into Japanese popular culture including anime and otaku culture. Snow has spent countless hours in Japanese w e l l e s l e y

Punks, Photographs, and Paul McCarthy: The Davis Museum Summer Internships (Panel) SCI 278 Imani C. Higginson ’14, Undeclared; Anna C. Egeland ’16, Undeclared; and Athena M. Knisley ’15, Anthropology Advisor: Elaine Mehalakes, Davis Museum and Cultural Center

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libraries and talking to Japanese math teachers and found out about Japanese college entrance exams. This presentation aims to highlight how the Japanese culture has been continuously transformed and adapted in response to the pressure of globalization while the traditional values and customs remain unchanged and widely practiced.

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This year marked the tenth anniversary of the Davis Museum Summer Internship Program, and five intrepid interns enjoyed a hands-on experience in one of the top academic museums in the country. We researched objects in the collection, explored prospective acquisitions, and maintained the collections over the course of a ten-week internship. We also had the opportunity to visit local and regional museums, galleries, and studios, networking with art professionals and alumnae in the field; these visits were invaluable as they expanded our knowledge of new media in art, exhibition planning, and institutional critique. Our time at the Davis introduced us to the vast web of possibility within the scope of a museum, taught us about the importance of every role within an institution, and exposed us to the power of a tangible work of art. Our panel will focus on our projects, our discoveries, our experience, and the importance of art in our world today.

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Empowerment of Youth, Women, and Families Human Rights and Protections SCI 274 Amnesty International: The Key to Running a Successful Grassroots Organization Caroline J. Golub ’14, Sociology and English Advisor: Salwa Nur Muhammad, Center for Work and Service My interest in human rights, from both the serviceoriented and sociological points of view, led me to seek out Amnesty International in college. I found my niche at the Wellesley chapter on campus and decided to extend my involvement by doing an internship at the New York headquarters this summer. While I worked in development and production strategy, I also had the opportunity to engage in youth activism and demonstration efforts. I observed that while every staff member had a specific role, there was an overarching commitment to collective activism that tied everyone together to work toward a larger cause. The experience not only strengthened my commitment to human rights, but also helped me gain a better understanding of the operations behind a large and successful grassroots organization, and provided a guiding path for my future career. Generations of NOW and the Future of the Feminist Movement Katherine E. Leung ’14, Political Science and History Advisor: Brenna W. Greer, History Working at the National Organization for Women (NOW) provided me with the opportunity to teach other activists how to organize and promote feminism; discover many brands of feminism; and observe different approaches to feminism as members of the same national nonprofit. I was involved in constructing two National Action Campaigns; redesigning the Campus Action Network; acting as a spokesperson for NOW after the Supreme Court ruling on DOMA and Prop-8; and helping run the National NOW


Conference as a member of a 25-woman team. This powerful experience helped me to understand myself and feminism on a deeper level, and it has dramatically altered the way I understand social movements and the future of NOW and organizations like it in the United States. I Promised Sopia I Would Tell... Keturah A. Schmidt ’15, Undeclared Advisor: Catia C. Confortini, Peace Studies This summer, I lived with children and women rescued from sex trafficking in Cambodia. Volunteers developed relationships with the survivors, creating a space of love and security in which they could begin to heal. We led art and drama therapy sessions, as well as activities and dancing, both partnering in their pain and offering distraction from it. Witnessing survivors battle trauma and disease daily, and a society trying to throw them away, was heartwrenching in its injustice, but it was inspirational to see their hopeful determination to move toward a better life. I will candidly share how the volunteers moved from abstract humanitarian concepts to concrete expressions of love and relationships. I will also provide an overview of the historical, political, cultural, and economic backgrounds that create a system in which lives can be so traumatically exploited. Finally, I will discuss how these factors drive the same issue within the United States.

The Challenge of Opportunity SCI E111 Public Spaces and Gender Perspectives: A Summer at the UNDP Costa Rica Nancy Negrete ’14, Political Science and Latin American Studies Advisor: Alejandra B. Osorio, History I worked for the Democratic Governance and Gender Equality Office at the United Nations Development Program (UNDP) in San José, Costa Rica. During my time there, I worked on two main projects. One focused on the social inclusion of youth in public spaces, while the

other introduced a gender perspective to the domestic violence curriculum in the National School of Police. Both projects were part of a larger strategy by the Central American Integration System (SICA) that uses gender and youth as a venue to promote peaceful communities. While in Costa Rica, I learned about the structure and institutional makeup of the United Nations; how to work with local governments to promote peace in their communities; and the importance of sensitizing others to youth and women, domestic violence, and the strengthening of local institutions. Interview with a Vampire: Confessions of an Aspiring Filmmaker 2.0 Ama Y. Adi-Dako ’14, English Advisor: Maurizio S. Viano, Cinema and Media Studies After surviving Hollywood’s unpredictable, behind-the-scenes world last summer at Warner Bros., I spent this summer working on the production of the upcoming film Dracula, on location in Belfast, United Kingdom. I had the privilege of observing the creativity and politics behind the making of a film, conduct research for and work directly with the film’s director, and, most of all, be on the set where the magic happens. With the help of my Dracula family, I challenged the expectations and harsh realities of an intern in the film industry by treading the fine line between contributing meaningfully to the process and being a gofer. Most importantly, by observing and interacting with the producers and various members of the Dracula team, I learned how to make opportunities for myself as an aspiring filmmaker and screenwriter in an industry full of rejection and uncertainty. Building Sustainable Communities in Greater Bangalore Mayrah W. Udvardi ’14, Environmental Studies and Architecture Advisor: James M. Turner, Environmental Studies My Albright internship took me to Bangalore, a rapidly developing city in southern India. t h e

I worked with Global Citizens for Sustainable Development (GCSD) and Vedike, two nonprofit nongovernmental organizations that collaborate in urban and rural pockets of Bangalore to promote low-income housing, sustainability, crosscultural exchange, and youth empowerment. I served as the organizations’ program manager and networked with activists, professors, politicians, and students around the city. My experience was significant for both my academic and personal growth. I learned about the subtleties of development work in a region that is notorious for bribery, embezzlement, and anti-progress movements. I spent time with families in villages where climate change, corruption, and economic liberalization are tangible forces at play in their lives. My third visit to India, this summer added further layers of complexity to my understanding of sustainable development. I am excited to share these experiences and their impact on my thesis topic, “Bangalore: Urban Development and Design for the Underclass.” Challenges are Opportunities: Teaching and Learning in Central America Eden C. Littrell ’14, Political Science; Anne E. Corbett ’16, Undeclared; and Helena I. McMonagle ’16, Undeclared Advisor: Nancy A. Hall, Spanish

We spent one month in Central America volunteering for Aprendizaje Global (Global Learning), a nonprofit organization working in elementary schools to “educate for peace and justice.” Friendships were formed, teachers and students learned from each other, and theory met practice. A motto of Aprendizaje Global is “retos son oportunidades” (challenges are opportunities). We faced challenges working in a second language, with limited resources and diverse groups of people. All of these challenges were also tremendous opportunities that helped to prepare us for life at Wellesley and after. The audience at our presentation will gain a clearer understanding of nonprofit pedagogy and practice. We hope to maintain and strengthen the

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history and relationship between Aprendizaje Global and Wellesley College by sharing our experiences with our peers and others. The Hardest Summer You Will Ever Love: Working with the Summer Urban Program (Panel) SCI 270 Sia Smith-Miyazaki ’14, Sociology; Laura A. Harris-Schlotterbeck ’14, International RelationsEconomics; Susan A. Huang ’14, Economics; and Corena M. Loeb ’16, Undeclared Advisor: Soo Hong, Education Summer Urban Program (SUP) is a network of affordable, student-run neighborhood programs in the Boston-Cambridge area, serving more than 800 youths each summer. The SUP motto, “the hardest summer you’ll ever love,” sounded cliché during training, yet it proved to be true. As senior counselors, we were responsible for developing curriculums and teaching a particular age group. For those of us who were directors, we were in charge of all aspects of running a program including fundraising, staff hiring, field trip planning, and transportation. Using our personal experiences working in different roles as well as programs, we will discuss the importance of SUP and other summer programs like it, which address educational inequity through academic curriculums, enrichment activities, and collaboration between neighborhoods historically in tension.

Tools for Empowerment: Art, Money, Language, and Parents SCI 104 Portrait of a Muanjadi: Brave Women Collaborating to Break Barriers Hanna G. Tenerowicz ’16, Undeclared Advisor: Flavia Laviosa, Italian Studies This summer, I raised funds for a trip to the Democratic Republic of the Congo by making and selling paintings. I traveled with Sandra Bea, founder of the Muanjadi Organization, which runs a scholarship program for female students at the Muanjadi High School in Mbuji-Mayi, 16

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D.R.C. I asked several Muanjadi scholars about their ideas for sustainable improvements to their school and community, recording their responses to create short documentaries for each idea. These aim to encourage viewers to use art to raise awareness about these students’ ideas, and generate money for their implementation. I learned so much from these muanjadi, or “brave women,” and my work this summer has truly shown me the importance of exchanging ideas interculturally as a means of reciprocal inspiration. From conducting business en français to filmmaking, this experience has allowed me to connect my studies at Wellesley to the real world in a very meaningful way. Using the Tools is the Key Jayne M. Ellis ’14, Psychology and Elizabeth G. White ’15, American Studies Advisor: Noah A. Rubin, Education We worked at Camp Starfish, a summer respite facility specifically designed to offer children with behavioral, social, emotional, and learning disorders “individualized attention as part of structured, nurturing, and fun group programs.” While neither of us had previous experience working with “Starfish kids,” we emerged after ten weeks of intensive interaction with a newfound passion for working with these children, and a well-honed set of skills for doing so. As counselors, we used the 18 Starfish Tools and 12 Starfish Keys to teach campers valuable coping mechanisms and social skills, such as using words to express needs and feelings and respectfully disagreeing with others. We look forward to continuing to use the Starfish Tools and Keys, not only in our future work with these children, but also in our interactions with the Wellesley community and the world at large.

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Education for Some: The Legal Battle of Students with Disabilities in New York City Emily L. Gell ’14, International Relations- History Advisor: Lidwien E. Kapteijns, History I began my summer internship at Advocates for Children of New York hoping I would be able to use my Wellesley education to serve a group of young people —low-income students with disabilities —whom I expected to be underserved. In the ten weeks I worked for this nonprofit organization, I engaged in a wide range of legal and nonlegal work, including research for a federal lawsuit and picketing alongside grassroots organizations throughout the city in protest of devastating budget cuts to education. The most significant lesson I learned about my clients was that, in contrast to my expectations, they were not struggling alone. The tireless efforts these students’ parents made to prevent their socioeconomic status from hindering their children’s education and their responsiveness to and appreciation of my services reaffirmed my hope to enter the world of public interest law after graduating from Wellesley College. Dreams to C.A.S.H.: Providing Access and Tools to People in Need Lena Julia P. Cardoso ’14, Economics Advisor: David L. Lindauer, Economics I interned at Washington C.A.S.H. (Community Alliance for Self Help), a nonprofit group in Seattle that provides microlending and business development classes in support of small business start-up or expansion for low income populations in the greater Puget Sound region. Inspired by the Grameen Banks in Bangladesh, Washington C.A.S.H. has tailored a program for the United States, with the goal of providing clients with access to sustainable tools and the confidence to pursue their business goals after they have completed the program. As the evaluations intern, I interviewed clients about their experiences with the organization. I also learned their data entry system, generated summary statistics, and used


regression analysis to try to identify important variables for predicting the probability that a client received a loan. Youth in Motion: Arts and Advocacy in Underserved Communities

Caitlin M. McGrail ’14, Art History Advisor: Martha J. McNamara, Art I had the opportunity to work with the Boston Ballet on its project to revitalize interest in dance. Through the Education and Community Initiatives department, I worked with two summer programs: Taking Steps and Boys in Motion. Both programs use the arts to foster self-development among urban youth populations. The experience was particularly valuable because, growing up, I assumed my engagement with the arts would end when I didn’t pursue a professional career, a reality for most arts students. The Boston Ballet seeks to change this situation by approaching dance education from a multidisciplinary perspective and exposing students to the variety of careers available in the arts. The most exciting part of my experience was realizing that I learned, along with my students, how to integrate our academic skills with our interest in the arts. I witnessed the effectiveness of this holistic approach to arts education for the students with whom I worked, and I hope to continue to advocate for this type of arts education in my future career.

Violence and the Law SCI 264 Injustice for All: Battered Women’s Experiences with the Chicago Court System

Anne Hamilton ’14, Economics and Women’s and Gender Studies Advisor: Maria D. Natividad, Women’s and Gender Studies Identifying as a woman is the leading risk factor to being abused. According to the World Health Organization, domestic violence affects women across all classes, races, sexual orientations, and religions. This summer I worked as an intern for the Chicago Metropolitan Battered Women’s

Network (The Network), which deepened my understanding of how domestic violence is perpetuated by societal and cultural attitudes as well as institutions and laws that refuse to name the violence as wrong. I worked with The Network’s Court Watch Project, which was specifically implemented to monitor and evaluate the Cook County Domestic Violence Court. I will discuss the institutional barriers, such as inequalities within the justice system, that battered women face while pursing safety as well as deconstruct some myths and misconceptions surrounding domestic violence.

tant for the organization to research this issue. Domestic violence was treated as a private matter before a law was passed in 2010 categorizing it as a public crime. This caused an increase in the number of police reports, signifying shifting attitudes as opposed to an acceptance of this practice. However, there is currently no support for women victims and no significant community awareness and prevention work. Together with the members of the Fogo branch, we conducted research on causes and prevention of domestic violence on the island. Our observations, meetings, and data led us to plan to build a shelter for women victims.

“Justice Is More Than Jail”: Providing Legal Representation to Sexual Assault Victims

Health and Medicine Beyond Borders

Katharine A. Kadlick ’15, Political Science and History Advisor: Tom Burke, Political Science For many victims of sexual assault, the criminal justice system fails to provide a solution to their most pressing concerns. The Victim Rights Law Center (VRLC), where I was an intern last summer, is a nonprofit organization that offers victims a chance to rebuild their lives by offering direct civil legal representation to sexual assault victims. During my time at the VRLC, I not only learned a great deal about the most effective ways to work within the civil legal system, but also gained knowledge of the operation of a nonprofit organization. Through my work, I gained a sense of how VRLC staff attorneys work directly with victims to see their case through from beginning to end, and help them to seek the justice they often cannot receive through the criminal justice system. Fighting Domestic Violence in Fogo, Cape Verde, to Encourage Women’s Empowerement

Carine I. Wete ’DS, Undeclared and Ilta Ferko ’14, Spanish and Political Science Advisor: Vanessa M. Britto, Health Services We spent this summer interning on the island of Fogo, Cape Verde, with Organização das Mulheres de Cabo Verde. Fogo has the highest number of domestic violence occurrences of all the Cape Verdean islands, therefore it was import h e

Tackling Inequality in Quality: Examining and Overcoming Disparities in Community Health (Panel) SCI 396 Olivia K. Dumont ’15, Women’s and Gender Studies; Gabriela Kovacikova ’14, Health and Society; Dhivya Perumal ’14, Neuroscience; and Milena Radoman ’15, Neuroscience and German Studies Advisor: Ted Hufstader, Center for Work and Service Four students spent their summers engaging in community health research and outreach both domestically (Chicago and Boston) and internationally (Delhi, India). In their presentations, the panelists will explore determinants of health that contribute to health inequality specific to their sites. Each student focused on a facet of public health of unique interest to her: young women’s health, neighborhood health, pediatric health, and infectious disease. They investigated different strategies being implemented in their respective fields in order to alleviate health disparities. These strategies included developing novel technologies, using medical research to support public policy, improving quality of health information, and promoting grassroots community health activism. As pre-medical students, their summer

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experiences were critical in exposing them to the potential doctors have to catalyze change in their communities.

The Whole Patient: Healthcare and Social Services for the Aging SCI 364

When Aging Becomes Disability: Narratives of Vision Loss

The Second Boom of the Baby Boomers: The Changing Needs of Geriatric Medicine

Sarah L. Myoung ’14, Biological Chemistry Advisor: Jonathan B. Imber, Sociology The 2010 U.S. Census shows the population of people age 65 years and older growing at a more rapid rate than that of younger populations. The Baby Boom generation has reached its second boom as numbers predict that by 2035, one in five people will be considered elderly. While improvements in healthcare have led to increased life expectancies, the increasing elderly population is also straining the healthcare system as unprecedented numbers of elderly patients enter the hospital system needing more long-term care than ever before. This summer, I carried out a service-based Wellesley Serves! internship in the Long Term Care department of Bergen Regional Medical Center, where I directly observed the workers in various sectors of geriatric healthcare (medicine, recreation, therapy, counseling) as they endeavored to stay abreast of the changing and diverse needs of this new aging population. Alzheimer’s: A Future Epidemic

Pamela Akametalu ’14, Neuroscience Advisor: Marc J. Tetel, Neuroscience I worked with Alzheimer’s patients at a Keiro Senior HealthCare facility in Gardena, California. While there I saw firsthand how a holistic approach to patient treatment was the key to handling individual care. I also saw Alzheimer’s for the problem it will be. With age being the biggest risk factor for the disease, America is soon to enter into an epidemic as the Baby Boomer generation ages. Lack of awareness has made us an ill-prepared society, but if we can get America as a whole interested, we 18

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can find ways to fund the research that looks at cures for this disease as well as its causality. I will discuss my work at Keiro, the importance of social awareness to research, and why a holistic approach to senior healthcare is the key to addressing what will soon be an epidemic.

Allyson L. Pyers ’15, Political Science and Women’s and Gender Studies Advisor: Charlene A. Galarneau, Women’s and Gender Studies As a student interested in social work, I spent my summer interning with the Low Vision Center (LVC) in Bethesda, Maryland. The LVC is a nonmedical service organization for visually impaired people whose eye conditions cannot be cured. I found my niche conducting individual appointments with seniors with degenerative vision conditions, such as diabetic retinopathy and macular degeneration, to discuss potential services and resources to pursue and to teach clients to use visual aids and strategies. As clients told me their stories and articulated their needs, I was intrigued by the manner in which they constructed their own definitions of disability and aging on the spectrum of low vision. Drawing from ideas about identity from my coursework, I found that the most effective service must occur within the framework established by each client’s narrative. At the LVC, I found real-world applications of academic concepts and developed a new interest in disability theory.

Identity, Community, and Global Citizenship House of Cards: A Look into Major U.S. Institutions (Panel) SCI 392 Connie C. Shen ’14, Economics and Political Science; Soomi Kim ’14, Economics and English; Eda D. Lee ’14, International Relations-Political Science; Jennifer E. Migliore ’14, American

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Studies and Spanish; and Lindsey G. Shepardson ’14, Women’s and Gender Studies Advisor: Hahrie C. Han, Political Science During this more than eventful year in politics, a group of Wellesley students got to take a look beyond the red tape and Secret Service agents by interning in various corners of the U.S. government, including the Senate, the Department of Treasury, the Department of State, and the White House. We learned how these institutions function and interact to create impactful policies. In this presentation, we will share our insight into the complexities of these institutions, as well as our experience in representing our nation. Ultimately, we discovered that all of these institutions are fighting hard to make the United States and the world a better place.

The Jewish South from a New England Perspective (Panel) SCI 277 Rebecca S. Fishbein ’15, Economics; Yesenia Ramirez ’15, Italian Studies and Chemistry; and Talia S. Schwartz ’14, Psychology Advisor: Patti Sheinman, Office of Religious and Spiritual Life Repairing the world (in Hebrew, tikkun olam) is an inherent aspect of Judaism often accomplished through community service. In March 2013, Wellesley College Hillel led a trip to the South with Hillel members and students representing other religious and cultural backgrounds. We traveled to New Orleans and Natchez, Mississippi, volunteering at a synagogue, animal shelter, the Second Harvest Food Bank, and the Children’s Hospital of New Orleans. We learned from local scholars and historians about the progression of local communities before and after Hurricane Katrina. Hearing personal narratives made us more aware of the struggles that are still being addressed by individuals, particularly in New Orleans. While there is still much recovery needed in the areas affected by Katrina, we also


witnessed the rebuilding and pride in those reviving communities. The knowledge we gained and personal growth we experienced from a week filled with discussions and service opportunities allows us to expose the Wellesley community to the area and its strengths.

Unplanned Lessons SCI 380 From Beijing to Boston: Redefining a Global Education Kaley T. Haskell ’14, English Advisor: Katie D. Koski, Center for Work and Service Before I was 21 years old, I had never left the United States. I did not have a passport or a proper birth certificate. Through the generosity of the Albright Institute, I started my summer visiting my first foreign country, China. However, upon returning to the United States to join the summer workforce, I was faced with a challenge: How do I integrate my current knowledge as an at-risk youth educator with my existence as a newly ordained global citizen? In my presentation, I will speak about my time at both the Chinatown Adventure program in Boston and the Wellesley College-Peking University partnership in Beijing and how these two enriching experiences coalesced to enhance my personal and professional growth. Confronting the Past, Changing the Future: Moral Education in the History Classroom Julie E. Censullo ’14, Religion and French Advisor: Barbara Geller, Religion Founded in 1976 in Brookline, Massachusetts, Facing History and Ourselves is an organization that develops educational resources that examine the Holocaust and other examples of genocide and mass violence as a means of encouraging students to stand up against bigotry and intolerance. As an intern at Facing History this summer, I wrote lesson plans that focused on the late nineteenth-century Yiddish author Sholem Aleichem (upon whose stories Fiddler

on the Roof is based). My project was part of an initiative to teach about the richness and complexity of Jewish life in Eastern Europe before the Holocaust. This was an opportunity for me to translate my religion major and my love of stories and storytelling into work that strives to promote more tolerant communities. This presentation will explore my project as illustrative of how the study of religion, history, and literature can be a vital tool in creating a more humane world. Denmark: Innovative Ideas in Psychology and Special Education Kendrick E. Smaellie ’14, Psychology; Felicia M. Brown ’14, Psychology; and Joanna G. Garcia ’14, Spanish and Psychology Advisor: Joy Renjilian-Burgy, Spanish During a semester in Copenhagen, we examined Scandinavian society through unique education models, with specific approaches to special needs in the classroom, as well as applications of the “positive psychology” movement. What are the special characteristics of Denmark, as part of Scandanavia, that foster innovative ideas and policies in education and psychology? As we immersed ourselves in Danish society, we learned how the Danes apply particular principles related to education and pychology in daily life. Come see and hear about the diverse aspects we studied and how our new knowledge has enriched our American lifesyles.

Technology, Innovation, and Education Corporate Social Responsibility: Beyond the Boardroom SCI 211 Socially Responsible Investing: The Moral Obligation in Financial Decision-Making Holly N. Shreckengast ’15, Economics Advisor: Courtney C. Coile, Economics What happens when it is revealed that a teachers’ pension fund is invested in weapons holdings t h e

that includes the manufacturer of the gun used to murder 20 children in the Sandy Hook shooting? This is the predicament the California State Teachers Retirement System found itself in last year, and a clear issue of morality arose over what types of investments the fund comprised. This past summer, I interned in private wealth management at Morgan Stanley in Glendale, California, and spent time researching socially responsible investing (SRI), or investing that is driven by environmental, religious, or ethical concerns. As an economics major, I found that I placed an increased importance on making morally sound financial decisions. I will discuss the components of SRI, and the reasons why it is important to make financial decisions with the same moral core one uses to make personal decisions in daily life. Wellesley Women Who Could: Continue the Gender Evolution at the Federal Reserve Arlevea M. Freeman ’15, Economics Advisor: Daniel E. Sichel, Economics Working at the Federal Reserve Bank (FRB) of Chicago as the Statistics Department intern was unforgettable. Using my economics background, I collected financial data regarding macroeconomic changes within the FRB Chicago District. In this presentation, I reflect on my enlightening experience as one of many women within a quantitative field, while examining the history and powerful presence of women within the FRB Chicago. Using Fed archives, experiences of women on staff, and data gathered from the Office of Diversity and Inclusion, I will describe my narrative of the ongoing woman-led Fed evolution toward gender equality. While I believe progress has been made, I will also share my experiences regarding the limitations of the FRB Chicago in enacting change within the entire Federal Reserve System and the greater financial community. Finally, I will make the case that Wellesley women can continue this effort through careers in finance and economics.

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Clean Technology Innovation: Creating Corporate Relationships to Strengthen the Clean Tech Sector Juliette L. Chevallier ’14, Applied Mathematics Advisor: Jonathan E. Tannenhauser, Mathematics Clean technology is striving to help people live more sustainable lives without sacrificing their modern comforts. Even though more people are trying to be more sustainable, the clean technology sector has been suffering. After large investments in clean tech have failed dramatically, many new innovations are not receiving the support they need to thrive. I spent this past summer at a startup called Cleantech Group that seeks to connect start-ups, corporations, and investors and help facilitate more growth in clean technology markets. As an intern, I worked within the research team to understand the companies that are developing, adopting, and investing in clean tech innovations. In particular, I analyzed and wrote about business models, commercial relationships, products, and technologies, mainly focusing on start-ups and multinational corporations. This internship provided me the unique opportunity to build knowledge of and insight into the exciting world of clean technology by making important contributions to Cleantech Group’s research and analysis.

Studying Across the Pond: Reflections on Higher Education (Panel) SCI 268 Morgan G. Johnstonbaugh ’14, Economics and Sociology; Cristina L. Ferlauto ’14, Economics; and Anastasia T. Hou ’14, Economics Advisor: Jennifer Thomas-Starck, International Studies Many students enter college knowing they want to study internationally at some point, and most cite experiencing a new culture as their primary reason. What many students don’t consider is the way a different educational system and academic environment will affect them. Fresh from a year at

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the London School of Economics (LSE), we will discuss the differences in teaching and learning in U.K. and U.S. higher edcuation (specifically differences between LSE and Wellesley), and the challenges inherent in adapting from one educational system to another. In addition to introducing them to institutional differences in education systems, studying at LSE immerses students in an academically and culturally diverse environment, encouraging them to adapt and eventually thrive in diversity. Cultural diversity is apparent through the international student body at LSE, which gave us the opportunity to interact with, debate, and learn from peers of different nationalities, ethnicities, and religions. We will also discuss how this immersion influenced our perspective on problem solving, debate, and tolerance.

Unlikely Partners?: Liberal Arts and the Business World SCI 256 Public-Private Partnerships for Health and Education Prerana Nanda ’14, Economics and Crystal S. Myung ’14, Spanish and Political Science Advisor: Joseph P. Joyce, Economics Public-private partnerships (PPPs) are increasingly being recognized and implemented as a means of expanding access and increasing quality of services across a multitude of sectors. Our summer internship at the International Finance Corporation in Washington exposed us to the ways in which PPPs are designed, implemented, and financed to coordinate private and public sector objectives in developing nations. In our presentation we will provide an introduction to PPPs as a project framework to maximize the efficiency and impact of development work at the grassroots and local levels. We will focus specifically on the challenges, constraints, and advantages of PPPs in the areas of health and education.

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Bridging the Gap Between a Liberal Arts Education and the Business World Brittany V. Mscisz ’14, Environmental Studies and Economics Advisor: Pinar Keskin, Economics I, like other Wellesley students, find myself wondering how to apply my liberal arts education beyond school. We are great at thinking about issues, but businesspeople must know how to take those ideas and present them while having data and analysis to back up their position. Using my educational and athletic experiences from Wellesley, I participated in a business “boot camp” this summer with the Fullbridge Program. I found I was able to make many more connections between my background and that of a business professional. Throughout this course, I attained valuable hard and soft business skills while also applying the skills I had already developed to have an impact. To wrap up the program, we had to complete a buy/build company analysis and present recommendations to the CEO and industry professionals. Throughout this program, I really came to understand how liberal arts degrees are valuable in the business world.

10:25–10:45am Break Refresments will be served in the Leonie Faroll Focus, Science Center.


10:45-11:55am Culture and the Arts Politics, Pop, and Polyurethane: Marketing Across Cultures SCI 274 Between a Parisian Office and a Factory in Normandy: Interning Abroad with a Manufacturing Group Alexa P. Keegan ’14, Psychology and French Advisor: Sylvaine V. Egron-Sparrow, French A foam manufacturing plant is not usually where a psychology and French double major would find herself for her ideal senior-summer internship, but this is how I spent the most challenging and rewarding summer of my life. To my delight, I ended up helping make significant contributions to one of Europe’s largest manufacturers of polyurethane products. My summer with Recticel was split between its offices in Paris and its factory in Normandy, with an eight-week-long goal of helping revamp the company’s entire system of how it presents itself to potential clients. As a psychology major, my work in the marketing field became extremely relevant as I was asked to present the best strategies that would appeal to French and Belgian clients. Through the generosity of the Michele Respaut French House Fellowship, I benefited from a work environment entirely in French, learning not only the language but also the nuances of how French companies are run. “Wouldn’t You Like to Be a Pepper, Too?”: Exploring Brand Licensing Soo In Yoon ’14, Sociology Advisor: Markella B. Rutherford, Sociology

nies utilize consumer loyalty to extend their brand into new product categories, such as Dr Pepper barbecue sauce and MasterChef kitchen tools. The work I did made me question what brands mean and how they affect our behavior and consumption choices, and it sparked my interest to learn more about marketing strategy and brand development. This presentation will discuss the decisions that are made behind the scenes to develop, package, and market products. With better knowledge about brand licensing, we can all be more informed consumers in the marketplace. Korea’s National Brand-Making: Why It Matters Seayoung Kim ’16, Undeclared Advisor: Sun-Hee Lee, East Asian Languages and Cultures Through my work experience last year as secretary to the Speaker of the Korean National Assembly, I observed the importance of creating a national brand in diverse fields of politics, economy, foreign relations, and diplomacy. A national brand refers to an index showing how a nation is internationally perceived, and it identifies how Korean products and culture circulate in the global space. While recognizing the great benefits of a high-ranking national brand, the Korean government has taken various steps to elevate the global recognition of the nation. The renovation of the Speaker’s reception room in the Korean National Assembly was in line with this agenda. In spite of surging efforts and progress, one of the serious concerns is that the unique identity of Korea is being diluted in the middle of the process. Based upon my firsthand experience, I will explore the impact and implications of Korea’s brand-making projects.

I worked at a brand consulting agency that does consumer products licensing for brands including Dr Pepper Snapple Group, Coleman, Sanrio, and MasterChef. Before this internship, I had little knowledge of the impact the licensing industry has on the products we consume on a daily basis. Through working with brand executives and manufacturers, I gained insight on how compa-

Speak the Speech, I Pray You: Playing Shakespeare at Wellesley and Abroad (Panel) SCI 277 Katherine M. Bussert ’16, Undeclared; Elizabeth F. Harper ’15, American Studies; and Kelsey Ridge ’13, English Advisor: Diego Arciniegas, Theatre Studies In this inaugural summer version of the standard Theatre Studies course, three Wellesley students collaborated with two professors to embark upon a cross-departmental and cross-continental study of Shakespeare. The class focused on translating a close read of Shakespeare’s text to performance onstage. To augment the lessons learned at Wellesley, the class traveled to Stratford-uponAvon for the final week of work. We visited the Royal Shakespeare Company, where we could see the techniques we had learned being put into practice by professionals, and even got to do a bit of outdoor performing ourselves! This taught us how to put Shakespeare in a global and historical context, as well as adapt it to modern themes and concepts. While the class during the academic year is superb, the summer class was an immersive experience that was formative for all involved, and we’d like to see it continue into the future.

Empowerment of Youth, Women, and Families Strengthening Democractic Organizations and Participation SCI 104 Fighting for Democracy: Social Change in Cambodia Nayni Gupta ’14, Economics Advisor: Laura K. Grattan, Political Science Cambodia’s future as a democracy is uncertain. Working at the Cambodian Center for Independent Media this summer, I had the unique opportunity to witness the fifth general election of this nascent democracy. The ruling party in Cambodia, Cambodian People’s Party

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(CPP), holds disproportionate power, limiting government transparency and stifling dissent. While interviewing nonprofits about the elections, I encountered individuals who had been working tirelessly to promote and protect democracy. I helped my organization to petition other countries for their support in this endeavor. Ultimately these efforts paid off, and Cambodia experienced a major breakthrough as the opposition party, Cambodian National Rescue Party (CNRP), won enough votes to deny CPP legislative majority. While I had been ambivalent about the real impact of social movements before coming to Cambodia, this experience has convinced me that ordinary people can effect change. My presentation will discuss the role of youth and social media in upsetting the current power structure in Cambodia, and my perspective on the future of the Cambodian democracy. EMILY’s List: Women and Money in Politics Campbell E. Curry-Ledbetter ’14, Political Science Advisor: Marion R. Just, Political Science Political action committees (PACs), Super PACs, and bundlers are often perceived as secretive, manipulative, and a threat to fair elections.These organizations, however, have come to play a central role in both Democratic and Republican politics. This summer I had the opportunity to intern at a PAC, EMILY’s List. EMILY’s List is a Democratic organization that recruits, trains, and supports pro-choice women candidates in local, state, and federal elections. I worked with the national fundraisers to research prospective donors, prepared memos for fundraising calls, and created briefings for fundraisers. The experience showed me the incredible influence that money has in politics. Even candidates who support campaign finance reform are forced to accept campaign donations from PACs to be viable. Ultimately, I determined that big money in politics has become a necessary part of winning elections.

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Whatever You Do, Don’t Touch the Price of Bread Emma C. Smith ’14, Economics and Middle Eastern Studies Advisor: Pinar Keskin, Economics Studying this past year in Egypt, I witnessed tumultuous political events, such as the liberal camp’s withdrawal from constitutional negotiations and former President Morsi’s declaration of supreme power. This formed the backdrop to my conversations with everyone from professors to street vendors, where rising food prices and unemployment were recurring complaints. The several gasoline shortages that occurred also led to fierce criticism, warranted or not, of international economic pressures. While working as a research assistant this summer at the Middle East Institute in Washington, I had the opportunity to explore more deeply the details of the reform demands that Egypt faces. These experiences illuminated to me the void of communication that must be filled before Egyptians will accept economic reforms and the international community will understand what changes are and are not feasible in Egypt. I look forward to discussing these insights with the Wellesley community. Women’s Foreign Policy Group: Amplifying Women’s Voices on Global Affairs Kelsey N. Heroux ’14, Sociology Advisor: Lee Cuba, Sociology The Women’s Foreign Policy Group (WFPG) is an independent, nonprofit organization dedicated to promoting women’s voices and engagement in global affairs. WFPG organizes events with women government officials, academics, journalists, and experts to discuss current global issues, honor women involved in international affairs, and promote the establishment of networks of future women leaders. During the course of my internship we held events on Syria, Mexico, Pakistan, Iran, Switzerland, Egypt, and Kuwait. My responsibilities as an intern included compiling research for program content and executing events. I also worked on the Guide to Women

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Leaders in International Affairs, an index of women within the international affairs community. I will focus my presentation on my work as the lead intern for our programs on Mexico, Egypt, and Kuwait. My internship reinforced my appreciation for the liberal arts education and space dedicated to women that we enjoy here at Wellesley College. In the Land of Women, Politics, and Public Relations Kayleigh N. Butler ’14, English and Economics Advisor: Casey G. Rothschild, Economics As a public relations intern at the Massachusetts Women’s Political Caucus (MWPC), I approached my position with an open mind and the simple hope to gain insight about my career preferences. With its mission to increase the number of women in politics and public policy by strengthening the women’s pipeline and endorsing female candidates, the MWPC immediately proved to be an environment in which I could learn from inspiring women making a difference, both locally and nationally. In ten weeks, I performed myriad tasks within the realm of public relations, like writing press releases, newsletters, and articles, and became acquainted with politics by conducting research on candidates and nominees, working on phone banks, and interacting with passionate voters. At the same time, the acronym “PR” came to also mean to me to “progress and receive,” in that all experiences aid in selfdevelopment and provide lessons worth retaining. Grassroots Politics at Ready for Hillary Dana E. Marks ’15, Architecture Advisor: Martha J. McNamara, Art I interned at the Ready for Hillary PAC (RFH), the Super PAC raising money to encourage Hillary Clinton ’69 to run for president in 2016. To be a successful Super PAC, we needed to stay organized and focused on our mission to create a base of grassroots supporters ready to mobilize should Clinton decide to run. RFH functions differently than most Super PACs, because it caps donations at $25,000, focusing instead on


amassing numerous smaller donations. Often people see Super PACs as exclusive, intended for only the politically astute. At RFH we made our Super PAC accessible to everyone who has an interest in politics. Our mission is to include, not exclude. As an architecture major, I haven’t been very involved in politics, but after my internship, I now realize it is incredibly important to involve everyone in the political process, something for which RFH strives.

Women on Wall Street (Panel) SCI 377 Ana S. Plascencia Casillas ’14, Economics and Political Science; Hayley T. Goydan ’14, Chinese Language and Literature and Economics; Mengyuan Liu ’14, Economics and Mathematics; and Qiuyu Zhu ’14, Economics and Computer Science Advisor: Irma Tryon, Center for Work and Service Reflecting on our summer internships at Goldman Sachs, Bank of America, Merrill Lynch, and Morgan Stanley, we will discuss the following four major lessons we learned from our experiences as summer analysts: the benefit of defining your own goals and shaping your learning experience; the nuances of identifying where and how to make an impact; tips for succeeding in an office environment; and the importance of utilizing the strength of your firm’s resources to develop professional and academic skills. In addition to these lessons, we will discuss how our Wellesley liberal arts education prepared us for these experiences and where we see our professional lives taking us after we graduate.

Health and Medicine Beyond Borders Global Health and Science Ambassadors SCI 392 Medicine and Corruption: The Lethal Reality of Mexico Miryam S. Saad ’14, Biological Chemistry Advisor: Paul I. Reisberg, Chemistry I returned to my home country, Mexico, and interned at the local public hospital, El Hospital General. I began my experience excited to uncover the reality of medicine, but soon realized my views were too idealistic and naïve; medicine is not all about helping people. Fortunately, I was able to uncover the harsh truth of medicine in Mexico, where corruption decides your fate. Every single day turned into a cruel life-changing experience, where I met the face of poverty in Mexico, the one everyone, including the government, prefers to ignore. I understood the complex structures of power that contributed to poverty, racism, sexism, and violence, but struggled in communicating these to my peers, who thought of me as an irrational feminist for defending human rights. Although I left home feeling disappointed in the country where I was brought up, I left encouraged knowing that one day I would return to change it #womenwhowill. The Challenges and Successes of Developing Healthcare in a Tanzanian Hospital Sahar S. Ibrahim ’16, Undeclared Advisor: Adam G. Matthews, Biological Sciences

the alarming number of motor vehicle accidentrelated injuries and fatalities, and I was also able to gain a broader sense of what it means to run a hospital in a developing country. This experience has helped to realize that in addition to simply labeling myself as a pre-med student, it is essential to tie my intentions of pursuing medicine with the greater context of global health so as to be able to have a sustainable impact. Summer in the Tropics: What I Learned from Bats Connie A. Rojas ’14, Psychology and Biological Sciences Advisor: Emily A. Buchholtz, Biological Sciences I participated in the Organization for Tropical Studies Research Experiences for Undergraduates program in Costa Rica. Not only did I get to live, breathe, and explore the tropics, but I also got to design my own research project. My project, funded by the National Science Foundation, asked whether variation in diet affects the parasite load of fruit-eating bats. I field-captured bats at night, took their blood samples and bone measurements, and counted their parasites. The experience taught me that scientific research and fieldwork can be demanding and stressful, and yield unexpected challenges. However, it can also be incredibly fun and enriching, despite the bat bites! This opportunity allowed me to apply the material I had learned from my biology courses, exposed me to the life of a researcher, and solidified my career goals. I want to keep pursuing a career in tropical biology, and I know that another adventure is waiting!

I participated in an internship at the Aga Khan Hospital, a nonprofit hospital in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Through a series of initiatives and projects, I gained an understanding of the widely used term “international medicine” as it related to this hospital and witnessed the challenges that healthcare faces there. As a medical administration intern, I was the primary manager for a FirstAid/First Responder program aimed at addressing t h e

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Ein Sommer in Deutschland: Discovering the International World of Science in Germany Doris C. Berman ’14, History and Chemistry Advisor: David R. Haines, Chemistry I conducted biochemical research on the organic synthesis of gold compounds as anticancer drugs at the Technical University of Braunschweig, with funding from the German government. My lab consisted of people from Germany, Austria, Belarus, and Chile, and we collaborated with other labs in places as far away as Israel, Spain, and China. The level of scientific research I encountered was impressive. I know very little German, but I learned so much from being immersed in German culture, and luckily, as in most international labs, the working language was English. Germany is a scientific powerhouse, has a fascinating history, and is a beautiful country. After my time in Germany, I spent a week in New York City training to be an ambassador for study and research oportunities in Germany. This summer showed me the tangible benefits of broadening one’s research horizons outside of the United States, as science is such an international field.

Health and Healthcare in the Nation’s Capital (Panel) SCI 278 Asha Ayub ’14, Health and Society; Lillian E. Elsner ’14, Philosophy; Lelia G. Gessner ’14, Biological Chemistry; and Blair L. Uhlig ’14, Classical Civilization and Health and Society Advisor: Tom Burke, Political Science As part of the Wellesley in Washington summer program, we each spent the summer working within different health departments at the state and federal levels, at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, and at the District of Columbia Department of Health. By reading and analyzing policy, regulations, and legislation we learned about disparities in health quality in vulnerable populations. Through data analysis, we saw how numbers could be turned into action, 24

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and learned to make data accessible and readable for the general public. This presentation will contrast state level policy and program evaluation with work at the federal level, addressing the District of Columbia’s dual function as the nation’s capital and as a state. We will share the unique experiences that the Washington Internship Program afforded us, to study health through our respective internships and glimpse Washington’s culture through mentorships with alumnae in the strong network of Wellesley women.

Identity, Community, and Global Citizenship Believing in Service SCI 261 Putting Faith in Community Development Mona I. Elminyawi ’14, Urban Studies Advisor: T. James Kodera, Religion As an intern with the Neighborhood Preservation Coalition of New York, I was able to see how different organizations across the state work to preserve affordable housing and revitalize their communities. I was particularly interested in looking at the faith-based community development corporations in the coalition’s network that are driven by their religious affiliation to assist the poor and preserve community assets. I wanted to understand the distinction between their development experiences and those of secular groups doing similar work. Does the integration of faith at the organizational level influence and/or improve the outcomes of community development in the places where it is needed most? My internship allowed me to synthesize work experience with various social theories of cities, community development, and religion in society that I have been grappling with in my courses at Wellesley. 

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Service as Faith Cicia X. Lee ’14, Economics; Katherine Y. Joh ’14, International-Political Science; and Grace E. Roberts ’14, American Studies Advisor: T. James Kodera, Religion We interned with three faith-based organizations: Help One Child, Holding Out HELP, and World Vision International, which serve foster families and at-risk youth, people transitioning out of polygamy, and communities around the world living in poverty respectively. We began our internships expecting to gain specific skills or accomplish a set goal, but found instead that our most important lessons came from exploring these questions: What motivates us to serve? What does it mean to incorporate spirituality into our day-to-day work? Can faith-based organizations contribute to making the world a better place, and if so, how? We each saw our spiritual practices and values affect our work, sometimes in surprising ways, and in turn, we experienced personal spiritual growth through our service. As we present our thoughts and observations, we hope our audience is challenged to consider their own answers to these questions of service and faith.

Common Currency and Foreign Exchange SCI E111 Twenty-eight Countries in One: International Perspectives at the European Union Laura M. Schiemichen ’14, Economics Advisor: Nancy A. Hall, Spanish The European Union (EU) represents a group of countries that are divided by language, culture, currency, and more, yet are united by the common interest of a continental union based on free trade, peace, and security. The concept of the EU, though familiar to me through my European citizenship, still inspires many questions. How could so many countries, with so many differences, function as one single unit? Setting out to better understand the EU, I interned with a German


politician at the European Parliament, which gave me valuable insight into these dynamics. I learned how the EU is organized democratically and politically, witnessed how EU policies were designed, voted on, and passed, and ultimately experienced the international atmosphere of working with colleagues from 28 different countries. With this presentation, I will share my personal experiences while also reflecting on life beyond Wellesley. Meeting “Abenomics”: Numbers and Cultures QiaoLing Zhang ’14, Economics Advisor: Salwa Nur Muhammad, Center for Work and Service Tokyo, the largest metropolitan area in the world, is also supposedly one of the most difficult cities in the world in which to do business. I was fortunate enough to intern at Rogers Investment Advisors, a hedge fund started by a Princeton graduate and Washington native this summer in Tokyo. At Wellesley, we come across investment banks, mutual funds, pension funds, and hedge funds as buzzwords during the recruiting process. But what exactly is a hedge fund? I would like to share what I learned about the hedge fund industry; my thoughts on “Abenomics,” which are the current economic policies of Shinzo Abe, the Prime Minister of Japan; and my reflections on living in one of the most densely populated cities in the world. Working in the Financial Industry in East Asia Amanda H. Hui ’15, Economics; Ava H. Chang ’15, Computer Science; Siqin Wang ’15, Economics and Computer Science Advisor: Olga Shurchkov, Economics Asian financial markets experienced rapid growth over the past 20 years, driven by international investor inflows, financial integration, capital account liberalization, and structural improvements to markets. Thus, it is an exciting time to learn about the opportunities and challenges faced by the firms operating in this growing region. Ava and Amanda interned at a financial advisory and commodities trading firm

founded by a Wellesley alumna in Beijing. The work ranged from analyzing real estate properties in the United States for potential Chinese investors to learning about trading cotton yarn and chilies between India and China. There was also an opportunity to work with a newly established organization, Beijing Commons, which organizes events that raise awareness for social innovation and entrepreneurship in Beijing. Frances worked at a fund of hedge fund group in Tokyo. The summer rotational program provided exposure to various parts of the firm, with an emphasis on modeling investment portfolios and research.

In for the Long Haul SCI 211 Revealing Truths and Paradoxes: A Year in Yaoundé, Cameroon Chelsey L. Baturin ’14, Peace and Justice Studies Advisor: Pashington J. Obeng, Africana Studies Cameroon is known as an “Africa in miniature” because of its diversity of climates, languages, religions, and ethnicities found all over Africa. A year abroad in Cameroon taught me that you can never plan for life; you simply have to embrace it. But more importantly, I learned how the daily Cameroonian life is not only full of unpredictable events, but it is also full of unpredictable ideas; ideas that many Westerners would not expect to come from “Africa.” From my experiences living with my host family, interning at a microfinance organization, leading an on-campus women’s awareness campaign, and participating in a national sports competition, I discovered what it means to be a part of the “Other” culture. This presentation will offer insight into the social, cultural, and economic realities of Cameroon and how they contribute to development studies.

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A Social Scale: Exploring Links Between Social Class and Culture Emma D. Haley ’14, Media Arts and Sciences Advisor: Jennifer Thomas-Starck, International Studies As a media arts and sciences major, I was looking for a year abroad that would support both my interests as a designer and as a developer. That is how I came to spend the fall in Copenhagen studying design and the spring in London studying computer science. I did grow as a designer and developer, but the most captivating part of my year was experiencing the “scale” of social structures that emerged out of the differences between class relations in the United States, Denmark, and England. Through the context of my personal experiences, I will explore the relationship between the structure of social class and culture in the United States, Denmark, and the United Kingdom. More specifically, I will explore perceptions of social class mobility and consider how these perceptions vary from country to country. Year-Long International Study: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly Simone A. Fukuda ’14, Spanish and Political Science; Ariel G. Chao ’14, Chinese Language and Literature; Kathryn L. Clark ’14, Japanese Language and Literature; and Kaisa L. Wayrynen ’14, Biological Sciences Advisor: Carlos Ramos, Spanish While studying internationally for a semester is more common and encouraged at Wellesley, there are some unique benefits and experiences that one can gain by going away for a year. Learn about the good, the bad, and ugly of a year of international study from four students who traveled to all corners of the world. From Taiwan to Scotland to Japan to Argentina, we will share our observations of the differences between our first and second semesters and how that affected becoming language proficient, traveling, and getting to know the local culture. The fanaticism of Argentinian soccer will be explored, the

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thrill and frustrations of learning Chinese and Japanese will be addressed, and a free-spirited trek across Europe will be recounted.

Security in Constructions of Peace SCI 256 Learning from Cross-Cultural Military Experience in Thailand Rachel H. Han ’16, Undeclared Advisor: Barbara R. Beatty, Education I had an unforgettable cross-cultural experience in Thailand through Army ROTC. Through the Cultural Understanding Language Proficiency program, I joined a team of cadets from all over the United States to teach English at the Armed Forces Academies Preparatory School (AFAPS), a military high school for boys, in Nakhon Nayok. As U.S. cadets, my team members and I had the chance to work through the Joint U.S. Military Advisory Group in Thailand in pursuit of strengthening Thai-U.S. military relations. From staying at AFAPS for three weeks, interacting with the Thai pre-cadets, who are to be the future officers of Thailand, and traveling around Thailand, I gained firsthand knowledge of Thai military and civil cultures, and of the differences in how the United States and Thailand train military officers. This overseas experience helped me think about my future career in the army and how military service is perceived cross-culturally. Combating Terrorism in the Middle East and North Africa: Economic and Political Perspectives Katherine E. Di Lucido ’15, Economics and Lavanya Ganesh ’15, Political Science and Economics Advisor: Akila Weerapana, Economics The recent attacks on the U.S. consulate in Benghazi and at the Boston Marathon have rekindled the threat posed by terrorism in the United States. The presence of this threat is aggravated by high unemployment and ineffective public institutions in the Middle East and North Africa 26

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(MENA). As an intern in the U.S. Treasury, in the Office of International Affairs, Katherine worked to understand the underlying foundations of social unrest and radicalization in the MENA region. While interning “across the pond” for the Henry Jackson Society, a foreign policy and defense think tank located in London, Lavanya studied the most effective legal and political instruments that are used to combat terrorism. During this presentation, we will discuss the complex economic and political issues that affect international security interests in the MENA region. The Future of Peace So Yeon Jeong ’15, International Relations-History Advisor: Catia C. Confortini, Peace Studies I interned at the nonprofits Massachusetts Peace Action and Peace First. Both organizations promote peace but they do so in very different ways. Massachusetts Peace Action is a traditional peace nonprofit organization, mainly devoted to political activism. It deals with U.S. foreign policy and international peace through topics such as the prevention of wars and nuclear disarmament. Peace First is a youth organization that focuses on education and what they call “youth peacemaking.” It argues that peacemaking is a skill necessary for youth agency and empowerment for a more peaceful future. Working for these two different organizations, I learned a lot about what peace means for us now and what it needs to mean for us in the future. There’s Humanity in Numbers: Lessons from the U.S. Consulate General in Guangzhou, China Audrey M. Wozniak ’14, Music and East Asian Studies Advisor: William A. Joseph, Political Science “What is your purpose of travel? Why do you want to go to the United States?” Interning in the Consular Affairs section’s Fraud Prevention Unit at the world’s largest nonimmigrant visa processing post, I heard thousands of stories stemming

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from these same basic questions. In the process of thwarting international fraud schemes, I gained a wealth of knowledge about U.S. immigration law while getting a crash course in office culture and bureaucracy. My forays into the realm of fingerprinting and fraud prevention challenged my beliefs about the purpose of international boundaries and the role of government, and in the process exposed me to the challenges and rewards of the career diplomat lifestyle.

Storytelling for Change SCI 268 Chinese Views of Themselves and Modern Society Sydney B. Zander ’14, East Asian Studies Advisor: Mingwei Song, East Asian Languages and Cultures This past year while studying abroad in the urban Chinese cities Hangzhou and Beijing, I conducted research on traditional Chinese sociology as well as modern Chinese media. My in-class research on these topics combined with targeted interviews, personal relationships, and everyday meetings allowed me to learn more about modern urban Chinese psychology and outlook on life. My friends, roommates, and even strangers were eager to share their opinions on government, politics, education, love and marriage, and morals in today’s society. I found that opinions regarding some topics, such as the one-child policy, were mostly unanimous while opinions regarding topics such marriage and social justice often differed. The goal of this presentation is to consolidate these views with my research and discuss general findings on the mindset of modern urban Chinese youth and their views on broad life topics.


World University Games in Kazan, Russia Sharon C. Ng ’16, Undeclared Advisor: Ann Velenchik, Writing Program This July, I competed in badminton at the World University Games (WUG) in Kazan, Russia. WUG parallels the Olympics—both are huge international, multisport events, have all-inclusive athlete villages, and include grand, breathtaking opening ceremonies. The main difference is that only college students compete in WUG. Our four-person team was the first badminton team that Team USA had ever sent, sparking the interest of the media. Our team took this opportunity to create new memories with more than 10,000 athletes from 160 countries. We interacted with world-class athletes, learning about their cultures, future athletic and academic aspirations, and love for their sports. We also immersed ourselves in Russian culture, touring the Kremlin, visiting churches, and eating authentic Russian food. Although playing badminton against professional athletes or emerging pros was incredibly challenging, I feel so blessed to have competed at such a prestigious event (and to have won some matches, too!). A Chorus of Stones: Histories of Memory and Denial Victoria Yu ’16, Undeclared Advisor: Frances G. Malino, Jewish Studies I took a six-week European Studies course at Utrecht University in the Netherlands, and was particularly moved by the course’s final module “Genocide and Holocaust.” The lectures were fascinating, but it was the people and places I encountered that made the history come alive in a way that would not have been possible had I taken a comparable course in the United States. Many of my classmates had a family history related to the Holocaust. Another was a refugee of genocide. And another must come to terms with her own country’s treatment of genocide. Hearing real stories and visiting places such as the Anne Frank House, Hollandsche Schouwburg, and the Dutch Resistance Museum helped me better

understand—even if not completely—the Dutch Paradox. History strives to be objective, but sometimes, the emotional value is just as important. A compilation of personal histories can be a strong and powerful voice, offering a more holistic approach to complement and challenge official national memories. Little Country, Big World: Policy and War in the Republic of Georgia Marilis E. Dugas ’16, Undeclared Advisor: Stacie E. Goddard, Political Science I had the unique experience of traveling to the Republic of Georgia during Wintersession to participate in an internship with Georgia’s premiere policy think tank, the Georgian Foundation for Strategic and International Studies (GFSIS). With the assistance of GFSIS staff, I researched and wrote about the 2008 Russo-Georgian War. My research focused on Georgian government policies pursued during the war and the consequences from these policies that still affect Georgians. I used GFSIS resources to research the policy portion of my work, but I became most invested in understanding the lasting consequences. I was able to interview Georgian citizens about their experiences living through the war and gathered a wide range of opinions, from diplomats to photographers. Each Georgian shared a distinctive story with regard to the war. My presentation is the synthesis of these stories and the way the Russo-Georgian War still affects Georgians and their government. Living Our Values: Biking for a Sustainable Future Julie Rong ’16, Undeclared and Hannah S. Mott ’16, Undeclared Advisor: Monica R. Higgins, Environmental Studies We spent nine weeks participating in two internships with the Better Future Project: Climate Summer and Ride for the Future. Traveling exclusively by bicycle through New England with Climate Summer and through the Gulf Coast with Ride for the Future, we worked to t h e

build the climate justice movement through grassroots organizing and by being active listeners to the stories of people in frontline communities. Biking from town to town, we saw the different environmental justice issues communities are facing and not only learned from these people, but were able to work with them, in an effort to move beyond these social and environmental challenges toward a sustainable future for all. After participating in these two internships, we hope to bring a sense of responsibility to Wellesley in our actions toward our environment and climate and gain inspiring insight on the power of relationship-building and community organizing.

Technology, Innovation, and Education Aftermath of Hurricane Recovery SCI 380 Restorative Justice, Christian Spirituality, and the Recovery of a City Suh H. Yoon ’15, Religion; Mwangala P. Akamandisa ’15, Biological Chemistry; Erin Chow ’15, Spanish; Elizabeth G. Mann ’15, Undeclared; and Dorothy X. Ren ’16, Undeclared Advisor: Katherine R. Hampson, Office of Religious and Spiritual Life During last year’s spring break, 19 Wellesley students went to New Orleans on Wellesley InterVarsity Christian Fellowship’s seventh annual ServeUP (formerly KRUP), joining with seven other New England colleges. The purpose of ServeUP was to address racial, economic, and academic disparities; access to healthy food; and contractor fraud—issues that became rampant and apparent in New Orleans following Hurricane Katrina and Hurricane Rita. Working with a New Orleans-based community organization, Project Homecoming, Wellesley students focused on contractor fraud in the aftermath of these disasters, and helped rebuild homes on three work sites for low income families who fell victim to fraud. Small groups facilitated by various

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speakers also explored the connections between restorative justice and Christian spirituality in the efforts of renewing the city. Also in inter-campus groups, we explored the city’s rich culture, history, and foods, and listened to personal stories. This presentation will highlight the larger systemic issues facing the New Orleans residents many years post-Katrina and the meaning and measure of restorative justice toward rebuilding New Orleans. New England Hurricane Recovery: A Look at Modern Steam Gauging Celia M. Honigberg ’15, Geosciences Advisor: Elizabeth L. Davis, Geosciences Hurricane Irene was one of the largest and most damaging weather events to hit New England in the recent past. When it touched land in August 2011, it caused an estimated $15.6 billion in damage. Northern Vermont and New Hampshire were hit especially hard, as were the stream gauging sites located in these areas. Having worked for the Unites States Geological Survey (USGS) Hydrologic Technicians for the past three summers, I took part in the clean-up effort, documented post-flood conditions, and conducted data collection. The summer of 2012 included moving a mountainous wall of rock, cleaning out stilling wells, surveying high-water marks, and many other maintenance tasks and measurements. The data collected by USGS gauging stations is part of a 100-year-old record. My presentation will focus on my role in the clean-up effort, as well as my experience maintaining the integrity of these important and longstanding records.

Classrooms Across Continents: Teaching, Coaching, and Learning SCI 264 Finding Room to Read: An Exploration in an English-Medium Mumbai Secondary School Brodie R. Mistry ’15, Political Science Advisor: Neelima Shukla-Bhatt, South Asia Studies Many people are genuinely surprised to hear that India has more English speakers than the United States. In previous classes I’ve taken at Wellesley regarding India I’ve often wondered how those English speakers are created. In a land so different from other English-speaking countries, with strong nationalism and a difficult and sometimes corrupt political system, how are young Indians expected to pass competitive board exams in a foreign language? My time at Diamond Jubilee High School was spent encouraging 11- to 16-year-olds to speak and read English more. Many of the students’ parents could not speak or write English. I had to find less conventional ways to get the students excited to read, as well as work with smaller groups of students diagnosed with learning disabilities. My experiences with specific segments of DJHS students enlightened me to the plight of students who do not receive enough “room to read.” Teaching, and Learning, at the Math/Science Institute for Girls at Choate Rosemary Hall Emily F. Anderson ’14, Cognitive and Linguistic Sciences Advisor: Angela C. Carpenter, Cognitive and Linguistic Sciences Have you ever revisited a childhood dream? When I was little, I was convinced I wanted to teach, but soon lost sight of this goal. By teaching in the Math/Science Institute for Girls at Choate Rosemary Hall this past summer, I realized how much I enjoy being in the classroom. My program gave me teaching experience, but also residential, coaching, and chaperoning responsibilities. In the classroom, I observed experienced teachers and graded assignments, and eventually

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designed and presented my own lessons. This internship taught me about teaching’s intricacies and difficulties, as well as its rewards. After experiencing the positive impact I could have on young learners, I now plan on looking at future education opportunities. My Wellesley math courses prepared me for my subject area, but also provided me with inspiration and techniques. In this presentation, I will discuss many of the challenges and triumphs from this summer. Affordable, Scalable, and World-Class: An Educational Model Bringing Opportunity to South African Communities Margaret C. West ’14, German Studies and Women’s and Gender Studies Advisor: Smitha Radhakrishnan, Sociology One of the greatest impediments to social and economic equality in post-apartheid South Africa is the lack of access that citizens living in townships have to high-quality education. This summer I worked with an organization called African School for Excellence (ASE), which is using a unique educational model to create a network of scalable, affordable, and world-class independent schools in Johannesburg-area townships. While interning at ASE I taught an intensive threeweek academic program for sixth-graders. I also completed development projects for the school, including designing a teacher training, codifying the teacher hiring process, writing school policies, and creating a quality evaluation for the growing network of schools. The positive effect that ASE has had on the students’ self-confidence, work ethic, and dreams for the future makes me optimistic that this innovative educational model will enact change for entire communities in South Africa and around the world. Teaching Math in a Ugandan High School Catherine S. Coravos ’15, Mathematics Advisor: Ann Trenk, Mathematics I spent the summer of 2013 working as a high school math teacher at the Aga Khan High School in Kampala, Uganda, as a Global Engagement intern. This talk will explore my observations on


the educational environment at the Aga Khan school as well as my personal day-to-day experiences confronting a culture very different from my own. I will discuss my experiences as a woman and the gender relations I experienced among my colleagues. I will also discuss my interactions with my senior female students, as I worked with them specifically to prepare their college essays and as a guidance counselor to a group of eighthgrade girls.

From Wellesley Computer Science to the Technology Industry (Panel) SCI 270 Veronica J. Lin ’15, Economics and Computer Science; Erin L. Davis ’14, Computer Science and Mathematics; Linda Ding ’14, Computer Science; Olivia V. Kotsopoulos ’14, Computer Science and Mathematics; Amanda C. Poon ’14, Computer Science; and Yi Tong ’15, Computer Science Advisor: Orit Shaer, Computer Science At Wellesley, our computer science courses and research experiences equipped us with technical knowledge and problem solving skills. This past summer, we used these skills to solve real business problems. Our internship experiences were as diverse as the companies we interned for, from the travel search engine Kayak to a social media security start-up to the large financial firm Fidelity Investments to the software giants Google and Microsoft. While we were challenged with different projects, we each learned valuable lessons. We had the opportunity to learn new (programming) languages and work with unfamiliar platforms, and we also gained insight into how our companies function and the technology industry as a whole. We are excited to share our full experiences as software interns: the application process, the corporate atmosphere, our projects, and our future plans.

Gender in the Classroom: Girls Who Can SCI 364 Empowering Women Through Code: Closing the Gender Gap in Technology Fields Stephanie Lee ’14, Computer Science and Lyndsay R. Coleman ’14, Media Arts and Sciences Advisor: Sohie M. Lee, Computer Science We were co-teachers at a nonprofit called GirlsWhoCode. Started in 2012, the mission statement of GirlsWhoCode is to close the gender gap in the technology field and reach gender parity by immersing high school girls from low-income areas and diverse backgrounds in computer science. The eight-week program taught more than four programming languages, facilitated meetings with inspirational speakers and accomplished mentors, and taught the girls soft skills such as presenting and networking to help them become well-rounded future leaders of the field. After seeing all the amazing things these girls could accomplish in just eight weeks, we started thinking about what it means to empower women, how we can effectively change the technology industry, how to raise awareness of the need for female computer scientists, and exactly what it means to us—and them—to be a girl who codes. Public School Kids: Teamwork, ProblemSolving, and Kinesthetics in Single-Gender Classrooms Rebecca D. Hamilton ’15, Psychology; Emilyrose Havrilla ’15, Psychology; and Katherine A. Smiley ’14, History and Psychology Advisor: Nancy P. Genero, Psychology In an attempt to improve student-centered education, South Carolina is pioneering a voluntary K-12 single gender program in its public schools. During January 2013, a group of students from Wellesley College traveled to South Carolina to observe the overall social dynamics of female and male classrooms. A total of 385 task reports were generated from observations of elementary and t h e

middle schools. Three students will speak about their individual research projects regarding the impact of classroom setting on peer problemsolving and engaged learning. Preliminary results reveal the significant impact of single-gender classrooms on overall instruction and social dynamics, indicating a need to continue to collect data in this field.

Innovative Farming: The Rural, the Urban, and the Rooftop SCI 396 Farmer on the Roof: Urban Agriculture in NYC Mackenzie A. Klema ’14, History and Environmental Studies Advisor: Kristina N. Jones, Biological Sciences Cities rely on rural farms for the bulk of their food. However, unused urban rooftops offer exciting opportunities to build more local and sustainable food systems in cities where real estate is at a premium. This summer, I interned with Brooklyn Grange, the leading rooftop farming business in the United States. While toiling in the summer sun, I received training in organic farming practices, taught children about where their food comes from, and learned how smallscale urban farming can be profitable. During this work I became part of a diverse team of engineers, refugees, consultants, and students committed to reshaping the landscape of New York City while building community. The experience made me a firm believer in the transformative power of urban agriculture. My talk will explore the benefits and technical challenges of rooftop agriculture, issues of access and inclusion in the local food movement, and the sustainability of commercial rooftop farming.

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Making Affordable Technology More Human: The Role of Design in Development April P. Zhu ’14, Environmental Studies Advisor: Nadya S. Hajj, Political Science For “wicked problems” as increasingly complex as global poverty, creating and delivering solutions to bottom-of-the-pyramid users demands the abilities of designers as prototyping, systemsbased observers and thinkers. The tools designers use for developed-world consumers—like user research and ethnography, material and manufacture optimization, market targeting and segmentation, constructing effective distribution channels—are just as crucial, if not more so, in developing world markets than in developed ones. For ten weeks, I joined Global Cycle Solutions (Tanzania) as a product development intern to create “the next labor-saving innovation for women smallholder farmers”—an affordable, portable multicrop thresher that would increase labor productivity for processing rice, wheat, sorghum, and maize. Our team engaged local users in participatory co-design, prototyped in-house using local materials and methods, and focused on human-centered design methods. “On the field,” I learned firsthand both the importance and inherent challenges of targeting and serving women smallholder farmers effectively. This Is Not a Michael Pollan Book: How Food Really Gets to Your Table Sophia M. Garcia ’15, Environmental Studies Advisor: Rene Alexander D. Orquiza, American Studies I love reading Michael Pollan, talking about slow food, and eating locally grown foods, but this lifestyle represents a small niche in our country. I interned with the Kern County Department of Agriculture in Bakersfield, California, to see how a large-scale agriculture operation really works. Kern County is the size of Massachusetts, leads the world in its production of carrots, tomatoes, and table grapes, and exports to more than 90 countries. I worked with a Geographic Information System (GIS); sitting at a desk for 30

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eight hours is not glamorous, but without maps the entire department would not be able to function. We often do not think about how food really gets to our table, on a global scale. It has to pass not only through the hands of farmers and people harvesting in the fields but also through the hands of departments that ensure the consumers’ safety. Throughout my presentation I challenge you to rethink your perceptions of our food system.

12–1:30pm Luncheon All members of the Wellesley College community are invited to lunch, which will be served in the Leonie Faroll Focus and the Science Library.

1:30–2:40pm Culture and the Arts From New York to Boston: Working Behind the Scenes at Art Internships (Panel) SCI 104 Lauren M. Richmond ’14, Economics and Art History; Sabrina A. Giglio ’15, American Studies; Michaela R. Haffner ’14, Art History and French; Dominique R. Ledoux ’14, Art History; and Quinn E. Refer ’14, Art History Advisor: Martha J. McNamara, Art Five Wellesley students embarked on a whirlwind adventure in the arts this summer. We participated in internships at different institutions in the art world, including Sotheby’s, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, and the Museum of Modern Art in New York, and, in Boston, the Museum of Fine Arts and Historic New England. Individually, we learned about the operations of an auction house; organized special events and worked in development for a nonprofit; and conducted curatorial research and archival work for a regional heritage organization. From these

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experiences, we have discovered the diverse nature of the art world and the importance of the art institution in our communities.

Preservation and Presentation of North American Cultural Landscapes SCI 211 Prehistoric Archaeology in the New Hampshire Wilderness Isabel M. Starr ’16, Undeclared Advisor: Adam Van Arsdale, Anthropology When pondering archaeology, a person’s most likely thoughts are of Indiana Jones and hours digging in the hot sands, probably underneath some pyramids—not in the humid and mosquito-filled forests of western New Hampshire. While Egypt and Greece have been romanticized and idolized for their treasure troves of archaeological artifacts, archaeological sites can in fact be found around the globe—including in your own backyard. Over the course of the summer I attended the New Hampshire State Conservation and Rescue Archaeology Program (SCRAP) field school, which focuses on archaeological field techniques and looks for prehistoric Paleo-Indian artifacts from roughly 9,000 years ago. The goal of this presentation is to answer questions about basic archaeological skills learned at the SCRAP field school and to examine the overlooked prehistory of my home state. Architectural Preservation in Boston’s Egleston Square: Past, Present, and Future Christina M. Rieth ’14, Architecture and International Relations-History Advisor: Martha J. McNamara, Art Through Wellesley’s Grace Slack McNeil Internship Program, I worked as an intern at the Boston Preservation Alliance, a nonprofit organization that protects and improves the quality of Boston’s distinct architectural heritage through advocacy and education. In this presentation, I will share my experiences at the alliance, including fighting to save a historical building in the Longwood Medical area and presenting an inter-


active bilingual walking tour of historical sites in Boston’s Egleston Square. Egleston Square, which overlaps Boston’s Jamaica Plain and Roxbury neighborhoods, is home to many historical sites, including the Samuel Adams Brewery and one of the United States’ oldest transit substations. By working alongside several Jamaica Plain organizations and participating in Egleston Square meetings and events, I connected with members of the community and listened to the issues they care about most in their neighborhood. From Seminar to Summer Internship: The History of the Charles River Esplanade Rebecca S. Freeman-Slade ’14, American Studies and Architecture Advisor: Martha J. McNamara, Art I worked as a development and docent intern for the Esplanade Association, a nonprofit organization that seeks to restore and enhance Boston’s Charles River Esplanade. While many Bostonians view the Esplanade as comprising only the Hatch Shell, where Boston’s Fourth of July extravaganza takes place, in fact the park extends nearly two miles from the BU Bridge to the Science Museum, and it has undergone three major “renovations” due to the building out of the Back Bay and subsequent addition of Storrow Drive. In my position, I researched and wrote a tour that not only instructs about the history of the park but connects the history to the ongoing and future work of the Esplanade Association. This experience helped me understand the importance of green space in an urban environment and the challenges to effective conservation and advocacy. Preservation at the Intersection of Technology and the Humanities Makenna G. Murray ’14, History Advisor: Martha J. McNamara, Art The rate of deterioration and disappearance of the historical built environment is accelerating, not only due to inevitable factors such as environmental exposure, but also human action ranging from poorly managed tourism to deliber-

ate destruction. Unfortunately, what little information there is concerning many historic sites is kept private, only accessible to governments and heritage professionals. New technologies offer a means for expanding the audience for preservation. Utilizing the latest in reality capture technologies, including 3D laser scanning and high definition photography, we now have the ability to share information about historic sites with those who might never be able to experience them in person. We can now convey the beauty that historic structures and landscapes can bring to a community as well as the power they have to teach mutual respect and understanding. Digital technology enables us to increase public awareness of the challenges facing heritage sites and advocate for their documentation and continuing conservation.

Searching for the Soul of Siberia (Panel) SCI 277 Ana Gabriela R. Guzman ’15, Russian Area Studies; Graeme L. Durovich ’15, South Asian Studies; Kendall L. Frye ’15, Anthropology; Ashley K. Funk ’16, Undeclared; Margaret M. McClure ’15, Russian and Political Science; and Laura W. Rigge ’14, Russian Advisor: Thomas P. Hodge, Russian This August, 11 Wellesley students willingly exiled themselves to Siberia for a month to explore Lake Baikal and the surrounding region. Our time in Siberia was the field component of a joint Russian Area Studies and Environmental Studies course we took during the spring and summer of 2013. Conducting research at the world’s largest and most biologically diverse lake, we learned, as expected, about the species and relationships that make the lake so unique, but also about life at sea with classmates, professors, and Siberian friends, and about culture from the Siberians themselves. We discovered that Siberia is home to people with whom we share connections,

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Empowerment of Youth, Women, and Families Wellesley in Finance: Navigating a Boiler Room (Panel) SCI 377 Wenhua Sheng ’14, Mathematics and Economics; Sarena Lin Shan Ahmad ’14, Economics; Wendy M. Foo ’14, Economics and Chinese Language and Literature; Tiange Lei ’14, Economics; and Cherry Y. Shen ’14, Economics Advisor: Joseph P. Joyce, Economics Five Wellesley seniors interned in different areas of finance, where they had firsthand experience in participating in merger and acquisition deals, conducting industry research, building investment ideas and portfolios, and shadowing the bidding and offering of financial securities. Today they are here to share their thoughts and reflections on their summer—the culture of Wall Street, the skills and resources needed to be successful as a young professional, and most importantly, the ways to leverage their Wellesley experience into this male-dominated business world.

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Health and Medicine Beyond Borders Healthcare Challenges on the Ground SCI 270 The Importance of Oral Health Education in Underserved Communities Sun Joo Paik ’14, Chemistry and Jacquelyn Chou ’15, Biological Sciences Advisor: Sheila P. Brachfeld-Child, Psychology Tooth decay affects 40 percent of all children between the ages of two and 11, with an even higher likelihood among low-income children and racial/ethnic minorities. These staggering statistics illustrate the pressing issue of oral health disparities, which remains a public health concern. Our internship at the Harvard School of Dental Medicine gave us a better understanding of the complicated issues of effectively educating patients in Boston about oral health and tackling oral health-care inequality. We collaborated with advisors and organizations that are advocates of change in their communities. For instance, we had the opportunity to assist in free mass oral-health screenings for low-income families. This presentation will emphasize the importance of oral-health education as a catalyst for equal health-care demands in underserved communities. Linking Healthcare to Community-Based Support Services Asia B. Young ’14, Women’s and Gender Studies Advisor: Maria D. Natividad, Women’s and Gender Studies The needs of minorities often go unmet in many hospital and clinical settings due to race, ethnicity, culture, language, and other factors that are seen as barriers because they present a cultural difference between physicians and their patients. Due to lack of cultural competence, physicians are sometimes unaware of underlying obstacles, such as socioeconomic status, education, and domestic issues that can affect one’s health. 32

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My internship at Mary’s Center for Maternal and Child Care in Washington allowed me to participate in a multipronged approach to improving individuals’ well-being, consisting of healthcare, social services, and education. This presentation will argue that incorporating a holistic approach to healthcare is key to addressing the complex needs of individuals; suggest how this can be applied in both public and private health-care settings; and present reasons why solely treating individuals for their illness without addressing the social determinants of health is inadequate. “We’re Not Asking for Money...We’re Asking for Change”: An Investigation into Healthcare and Homelessness in Baltimore Elizabeth M. Olson ’16, Undeclared Advisor: Katie D. Koski, Center for Work and Service Health Care for the Homeless (HCH) is a national policy and advocacy organization that works to eliminate homelessness by ensuring comprehensive healthcare and secure housing for everyone. As a summer research intern in Baltimore, I was afforded the opportunity to investigate firsthand the relationship between housing and health status while working with a variety of homeless support services. This experience revealed to me the incredible challenges of poverty and has inspired me to join the movement to minimize its impact and reach. I have returned to my studies at Wellesley with a new sense of urgency and a greater desire to use my education to help people in need. I will discuss the inextricable connection between healthcare and housing, describe the impact of new healthcare legislation on those experiencing homelessness, and share how HCH works to prevent and end homelessness through direct service, advocacy, and community engagement.

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Breaching Barriers to Provide Care Sebiha M. Abdullahi ’15, Biological Chemistry Advisor: Ted Hufstader, Center for Work and Service As an intern in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, I collected data on tuberculosis prevalence among Ethiopian migrants at St. Yared Hospital, and I cared for children with autism spectrum disorder and related disabilities at Nehemiah Autism Center. Although these two experiences were different, both taught me that healthcare is complex; it involves generating resources and connecting patients to the social support services they need. As fairly new centers, Nehemiah Autism Center and St. Yared Hospital strived to collaborate with local and foreign institutes to create and reform policies in support of their cause. Their staffs also actively informed and involved community members as they worked to overcome financial and cultural obstacles. As a person interested in healthcare and education, I learned the value and importance of addressing cultural and socioeconomic issues involved in delivering proper healthcare.

Of the Mind SCI 264 Addressing a Critical Need: Mental Health Support for Japan’s International Community Sarah B. Hitchner ’14, Women’s and Gender Studies Advisor: Kazuko Ozawa, East Asian Languages and Cultures In a country where the stigma of mental health problems continues to be a growing concern, finding help for those who are foreigners or returnees can be especially difficult. Tokyo English Lifeline (TELL) is a nonprofit organization providing mental health support for the international community in Japan through faceto-face therapy, anonymous telephone counseling, and outreach programs ranging from suicide prevention to disaster preparedness. As an intern at TELL, I observed therapist supervision meetings and calls to the lifeline, and I worked with


the director, a psychiatrist, who leads the organization. In addition, through my involvement in working on a disaster preparedness training program for embassies in Japan, I better understood how the March 2011 earthquake, tsunami, and nuclear disaster of Japan called for an ongoing effort to better prepare Japan for future disasters. TELL’s efforts are crucial not only for Japan’s international community but for the country’s future to understand and overcome stigma.

two regions of the prefrontal cortex, the medial prefrontal cortex and the orbital frontal cortex, and how they played dissociable roles in regulating decision-making. In order to conduct these experiments, I learned many techniques including brain slicing, immunohistochemistry, rodent behavioral tasks, and data analysis. My experience in the lab spurred my passion for research and further encouraged me to be an independent scientific thinker.

Learning to Look at the Person, Not the Wheelchair: Demystifying Cerebral Palsy Tiffany Chen ’15, Spanish Advisor: Carlos Ramos, Spanish

Identity, Community, and Global Citizenship

Working with people who have disabilities often inspires questions. Will I offend them if I do this? Should I help? This summer, I interned in Córdoba, Spain, where I had the chance to become a part of a wonderful community. ACPACYS, a nongovernmental organization that provides educational and therapeutic services for adults and children with cerebral palsy, demystified working with people with disabilities for me. In the end, people just want to be treated as people, not as their condition or limitation. I learned as much as I taught them; I improved my own Spanish as I taught someone how to read, I learned the recipe for Cordobesan salmorejo as I taught someone the best way to cut a tomato. My coworkers embraced me into their community, and taught me that simple compassion and taking notice of the human connection is really what it is all about. Investigating the Inner Workings of Decision-Making Amanda B. Fath ’16, Undeclared Advisor: Deborah E. Bauer, Neuroscience Although a seemingly simple task, decision-making is regulated by several cognitive processes in the prefrontal cortex region of the brain. Within the prefrontal cortex there are distinct areas that regulate different aspects of decision-making. This summer, I worked at the Molecular Psychiatry Department at Yale University investigating

Bring It to Boston: Service Learning in Wellesley’s Backyard (Panel) SCI 268 Hannah K. Lindquist ’15, Sociology; Bridgette E. Lemoine ’15, Philosophy; Mara Elissa Palma ’15, Political Science; and Meghan E. Sargent ’15, Economics Advisor: Katie D. Koski, Center for Work and Service While participating in Wellesley’s Lumpkin Summer Institute for Service Learning, we had the opportunity to work at nonprofit organizations in the Boston area and to serve the local community, both directly and indirectly. Although we worked on the local level, we learned about the ways in which local nonprofit organizations impact social change on a regional and national level. We all learned that the small day-to-day processes of local organizations are extremely important in creating large-scale positive change for low-income and underserved communities. Throughout the summer, we participated in important decision-making that affected our organizations and their clients. The independent projects that we each completed allowed us to have a direct positive impact on our organizations. Our experience in the Lumpkin Institute allowed us to apply the knowledge we have learned in Wellesley’s classrooms to realworld situations. t h e

Fellowship Travels (Panel) SCI 396 Sara Newland ’03, Political Science; Jennifer Hatch ’10, Peace and Justice Studies; and Beilin Ye ’10, English Advisor: Elizabeth A. Mandeville, Center for Work and Service A fellowship brings more than a period of intense learning and adventure. Its effects will reach into the future and transform one’s plans in subtle and significant ways. How have their fellowship experiences influenced the personal and professional lives of these Wellesley alumnae? Sara Newland’s interest in Asia was sparked by the two years she spent as the Wellesley-Yenching Fellow at Chung Chi College. She is currently completing a Ph.D. in political science at UC-Berkeley and teaches courses on Chinese politics in the Expository Writing Program at Harvard. As an undergraduate, Jennie Hatch was already an accomplished activist working to improve our environment with an impressive record that won her both a Udall Scholarship and a Truman Scholarship. Her current master’s study of international affairs and the environment at the Kennedy School is supported in part by a Wellesley College Elizabeth F. Fisher Fellowship. Beilin Ye is now teaching English at Newton South High School. She honed her skills on a Fulbright Teaching Assistantship in South Korea, where she taught English to South Korean middle-school students, working extensively with them both in the classroom and in their extracurricular activities.

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Imagined Communities SCI 261 Co-housing: Bringing Back the Traditional Sense of Neighborhood Sundus I. Al-Bayati ’14, Architecture Advisor: Phyllis I. McGibbon, Art In contemporary cities and suburbs, our sense of neighborhood, or more specifically our sense of community, has been dwindling. As people seek housing options, they often have to make distinct choices between living in single-family homes or communal, co-op communities. But there are alternatives. I interned with McCamant and Durrett Architects, based in California, who specialize in designing and developing co-housing communities throughout North America. The internship gave me the opportunity not only to live in co-housing but also to engage in the decision-making process as I proposed a footbridge design to be approved by co-housers. I will discuss the concept of co-housing and its growing importance in North America. I will explain what makes co-housing different from other “intentional communities,” and how the choice between privacy and community unfolds as a day-to-day matter of preference. We Developed, but Did We Grow?: The Power of Relationships and Community-Building in Development Work Jennifer Gu ’14, Political Science Advisor: Smitha Radhakrishnan, Sociology Development interventions often stress strong communities to help motivate and empower the marginalized. Parinaam Foundation, a nongovernmental organization (NGO) based in Bangalore, India, aims to “graduate” women into a more manageable state of poverty. The NGO relies on community workers who counsel participants through various interventions, such as helping them find jobs, sending their children to school, or locating government resources. During

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my internship at Parinaam, I helped create a training manual for new staff, and I saw the positive impact of community among participants and the trusting relationships between participants and staff. What I didn’t expect to learn was the necessity of community among staff workers as well. It seemed that due to the highly intensive nature of their work, a strong support system was crucial to sustain them. This experience strengthened my background in community organizing while also challenging my idealized notions of development work in the nonprofit sector. I will share the stories of the people who make development projects possible with the Wellesley community. Creating Community in Chaos Elisabeth K. Ericksen ’14, Peace and Justice Studies Advisor: Jennifer Thomas-Starck, International Studies Last fall, I had the opportunity to study urban culture, politics, and planning in five cities across the globe as part of the International Honors Program. Making sense of urban centers as massive as São Paulo and as ancient as Hanoi became possible through homestays and fieldwork with public agencies, planners, nongovernmental organizations, and community organizations. From New Orleans to Cape Town, I witnessed the struggles and resiliency of communities that withstood natural and man-made disasters, in narratives about hurricanes and apartheid. Thousands of miles away from the Wellesley Bubble (but not outside of its reach) I also became part of a learning community of young people actively engaged with issues of urban inequality, social justice, and sustainability. My session will aim to present the various configurations of community, and the lessons I have brought home to Wellesley’s community of learners and leaders.

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Meet the Press SCI 274 The Politics of the Press Department at the Clinton Foundation Sarah N. Mahmood ’14, Political Science Advisor: Marion R. Just, Political Science I interned at the Press Department of the Clinton Foundation. As a budding journalist, I wanted to understand the inner workings of a press department so that I could have a better appreciation for the organizations I’d be covering one day. The Clinton Foundation was an especially interesting organization to study, as it shed light on both politics and charity work. While there, I observed how political celebrity could be channeled to bring attention to issues such as malaria and world hunger. However, this was often a struggle, as the media was sometimes more interested in creating controversies (such as President Clinton’s opinion of Anthony Weiner) than in covering these pressing world matters. My presentation will explore this relationship between advocacy, journalism, and public relations based on my experiences at the Clinton Foundation. The International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia: War Criminals in the International Limelight Nora E. Mishanec ’14, Cognitive and Linguistic Sciences and Psychology Advisor: Inela Selimovic, Spanish The International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) came to life on May 23, 1993, via the United Nations Security Council and in response to Bosnia’s inexorable hemorrhaging across its ethnic groups. At the time, its creation was greeted with little optimism by the international community; 20 years later, the


ICTY has prosecuted more than 150 of those most responsible for the worst atrocities in Europe since World War II and served as a model for several other international courts. My presentation examines the contradictions inherent in its model of transitional justice. First, the protracted judicial process does the important work of establishing the facts of the wartime atrocities, but has had mostly negative effects on reconciliation efforts in the region. Second, the ICTY’s formal voice—the Media Office—plays an intricate role: it increases the ICTY’s visibility, yet often gives the accused a platform to disseminate their views. The tribunal and its media office keep the accused in the public eye and, in turn, facilitate their pseudo-celebrity status. Using my recent internship in the ICTY Media Office as a departure point, I discuss these contradictions in conjunction with several cases at trial. Writing Between the Lines: Navigating Chinese Journalism Xiaolu Han ’14, East Asian Studies Advisor: Mingwei Song, East Asian Languages and Cultures In 2012 the watchdog group Reporters without Borders ranked China 174 out of 179 countries in its worldwide index of press freedom. China’s constitution promises citizens freedom of speech and press; however, Chinese law contains vague loopholes that allow authorities to place regulations on stories that “endanger the country.” Furthermore, while the foreign press is supposed to enjoy complete interview rights and freedom of press, a byproduct of the Olympic period, when correspondents begin to take interest in delicate matters such as Tiananmen, Xinjiang, and the protests in Hong Kong, they can often find themselves obstructed by the Chinese government. My presentation will focus on my experiences as an intern at the Beijing office of ABC News and the struggles I faced while attempting to find my voice as a writer in a country that so stringently controls what is shown to the public.

Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty: From Propaganda to Journalism and Beyond Ana Lomtadze ’14, Cinema and Media Studies and Political Science Advisor: Winifred J. Wood, Writing Program I spent three months at Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty (RFE/RL), a media organization that has changed its mission from anti-Communist propaganda to the promotion of objective news analysis and of human rights. Currently RFE/ RL broadcasts in countries where free media is either banned or underdeveloped. As a Georgian national, I was initially placed at the Georgian Service. However, during my time at RFE/RL, I also got to have brief experiences at the Central Newsroom and the Multimedia Department. The rotational nature of my internship allowed me to gain insight into RFE/RL’s unique potency, as well as its current struggles. Based on my observations and conversations with RFE/RL staff, I will discuss these struggles in two ways: in the context that is specific to RFE/RL and in the view of, what seems to me, contemporary challenges in the field of journalism. The internship at RFE/ RL, while an incredibly rewarding experience, confirmed my worries about having a career in journalism.

Missions Impossible SCI 364 Life After Prison: Looking for Second Chances Michelle M. Claros ’15, Peace and Justice Studies Advisor: Christopher Candland, Political Science Every other person who leaves a U.S. prison returns within three years. This summer, I worked at a nonprofit that assists formerly incarcerated people to find employment and stay out of prison. The Center for Employment Opportunities, based in New York, has an intensive and comprehensive, evidence-based approach. Through my interactions with staff and participants, I learned about the issues that formerly incarcerated people face including substance abuse,

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trauma, and stigma. Our legal system fails to treat these problems—instead, it increases the likelihood that low-risk offenders will return to prison. Through my fellowship, I learned about the logistics of running of a nonprofit, but even more importantly, I got insight into the difficulties that formerly incarcerated people face, which gave me another perspective on our legal system and a better understanding of second chances. Liderazgo en VOZ: Day Laborer Leadership in the Nonprofit World Sara D. Del Balzo ’14, Spanish and Medieval/ Renaissance Studies Advisor: Elena Gascon-Vera, Spanish The experience I had working for VOZ Workers’ Rights Education Project, a nonprofit organization in Portland, Oregon, reaffirmed my desire to work on behalf of immigrant communities in the United States. The organization’s mission is to promote day laborer leadership and empowerment regarding their working conditions. The day laborers are primarily from Mexico and Central and South America, so Spanish was the primary language spoken during my summer. It was very enlightening to have my conversations in Spanish with the day laborers, which helped me to learn from their experiences and gave me the opportunity to translate and, consequently, to assist them. Due to the Immigration Reform Bill being debated in Congress during this time, I learned the meaning and impact of political concessions on immigrant families. While working for VOZ, I saw the complex situation of nonprofit organizations. Despite its good intentions, there was inevitable tension between the mission of the organization and the day-to-day needs of the worker center. At times the desire to empower and to involve the day laborers in decision-making hampered much-needed changes from being implemented.

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Politics Today: Miscommunication Between Congress and Its People Suzanne K. Barth ’16, Undeclared and Claire S. Verbeck ’16, Undeclared Advisor: Lee Cuba, Sociology We were given the opportunity to intern for U.S. Senator Claire McCaskill of Missouri. Despite working in different offices, in Washington and in Kansas City, our experiences proved to be similarly focused. Our primary roles were communicating with constituents and aiding the senator’s caseworkers in assisting Missouri residents with their federal issues. These roles gave us significant insight into the level of misunderstanding and miscommunication that currently plagues our government and its citizens. The experience also, however, gave us hope for the democratic process, which may be stalled, but is not broken. Our internships allowed us to draw from our Wellesley-instilled understanding of the interconnectedness of various topics and our previous sociology classes at Wellesley and subsequently inspired us to continue our study. We hope those who attend our presentation might also consider a political internship to learn about their government, their fellow constituents, and themselves.

View from the Hill SCI 256 Rising Up and Making Change: The White House Initiative on Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders Sapna K. Jain ’14, Political Science Advisor: Rene Alexander D. Orquiza, American Studies The U.S. Census states that the Asian population has increased four times faster than the U.S. population between 2000 and 2010, yet Asian Americans are still underrepresented in the highest levels of government. This is just one of the problems that the White House Initiative on Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders (WHIAAPI) is addressing. This sum36

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mer, I worked with a team focused on the needs of Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders (AAPI) to increase access to the resources that the federal government provides to the community. Understanding the needs of more than 21 AAPI groups is challenging, especially when data collection and disaggregation has not accounted for many communities. WHIAAPI launched its first series of in-language Google Hangouts this summer to increase awareness about the Affordable Care Act. In this presentation, I will discuss different WHIAAPI projects and highlight the importance of initiatives like WHIAAPI. From Wellesley to C Street: Summer at the U.S. Department of State Safaya A. Fawzi ’14, Political Science Advisor: Joseph P. Joyce, Economics While working at the Office of International Religious Freedom, I learned about the bureaucracy inherent in our government, all while learning more about my own interests and learning style. While I realized that my passions lie outside of the rigid structure of State Department, it was eye-opening work within the human rights field on the government level. I was primarily researching ways to bolster initiatives aimed at broadening partnerships with female faith leaders, as well as increasing departmentwide awareness of anti-Shi’ism as a religious freedom issue. I found my Wellesley education and Albright Institute experiences in exploring the many intricacies and nuances of the nebulous “global affairs” category of work intersecting at many avenues with my research. Projects, Partnerships, Pushed Boundaries: My Global Affairs Internship in Washington Oluwakemi L. Akin-Olugbade ’14, French and Psychology Advisor: Ted Hufstader, Center for Work and Service I worked at the Corporate Council on Africa (CCA), a membership-based association founded to promote business and trade between the

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United States and African countries. As a psychology and French cultural studies major, I was skeptical about what I could contribute to some of the projects assigned to me. Unfamiliar with trade policy in East Africa and the process of Web content development, I decided to apply the knowledge and skills I acquired or developed in classes and at the Albright Institute. I listened, asked questions, and established relationships with professionals based on mutual respect and a desire to learn from each other. Now I fully appreciate the benefits of interdisciplinary work and a liberal arts education. I will share my work at CCA, and will discuss how the lessons I learned there can be applied to a variety of settings. Inside the National Economic Council: What It’s Really Like to Work for the President Emma L. Rackstraw ’14, International Relations-Economics Advisor: David L. Lindauer, Economics As the intern to the deputy director of the National Economic Council (NEC) at the White House, I worked on a range of issues on the president’s agenda, including comprehensive immigration reform, employment for the long-term unemployed, and education in conflict-affected countries. At the same time, I was intimately involved in the inner workings of White House staffing, as I helped one deputy director transition out of NEC and another transition in. I learned countless lessons about how to survive in a dynamic, high-stakes and impossibly fast-paced work environment. In this presentation I will describe the structure of the White House Office and the work of the NEC, and I will share a few of the stories and takeaways from my time at the White House.


Technology, Innovation, and Education AAA in Education: Administration, Action, and Achievement SCI 278 Filling the Gap: The Role of Nonprofits in the Dominican Education System Mabelly Guerrero ’14, Neuroscience Advisor: Mared Alicea-Westort, Office of Intercultural Education Education in the Dominican Republic is not accessible to everyone. Factors such as poverty and legal status prevent thousands of children from receiving an education. I spent the summer working with Caring Foundation, a nonprofit based in New York City that runs a school of 485 children in the poverty-stricken community of Bayaguana, Dominican Republic. I expected to just learn more about poverty and the Dominican Republic’s educational system. Instead, I left with a deeper understanding not only of the challenges the Dominican Republic faces in educating its population, but also of the effects of immigration, race, and politics within the country. Dominican definitions of citizenship and historically strained relationships with Haiti leave many children of Haitian descent without access to education. This presentation explores how nonprofits like Caring Foundation work to fill in the gaps left by the Dominican Republic’s current education system and serves those omitted. In the Trenches: Reforming the American Education System with a StudentsFirst Offensive Lauren A. Tonti ’14, Political Science and Psychology Advisor: Soo Hong, Education StudentsFirst, founded by former DC Public Schools Chancellor Michelle Rhee, is a national grassroots movement of more than 2 million parents, teachers, students, administrators, and citizens fighting to improve the current state

of the American education system. As a communications associate, I gained perspective on contentious education reform issues and the policy pillars StudentsFirst rallies behind: elevating the status of teaching, empowering parents, and spending public education dollars wisely. Through these lenses, I expanded my knowledge of education policy and observed the daily operations of a hybrid grassroots-political lobbying organization while monitoring media, crafting communications, and researching teacher pension reform nationwide. I aim to focus my presentation on nationwide research and media monitoring in Pennsylvania, Missouri, Iowa, and Maine, all while summarizing reform debates and lessons learned. My summer experience has fueled my interest in nonprofit sector work, specifically in public interest law, and has strengthened my commitment to the Wellesley College motto.

It Takes More than Good Intentions: Lessons from DC Public Schools’ Intervention Efforts Monica Rodriguez ’14, Psychology Advisor: Tom Burke, Political Science This summer I interned at the District of Columbia Public Schools Office of College and Career Readiness, where I worked closely with Summer Bridge, an intervention program for middle-school students transitioning to high school. My involvement with the program taught me that the success of such transition programs depends on several factors: 1) a positive relationship between the central office, school staff, and students; 2) a good sense of the academic level of the students the intervention targets; and 3) teacher preparation and enthusiasm for the intervention. In my presentation I will reflect on what I have learned about schools and school reform through this internship.

Am I Even Qualified to Do This?: Forays into a New Charter School Victoria J. Volker ’16, Undeclared Advisor: Barbara R. Beatty, Education

Spaced Out: From the Moon to the Mind SCI E111

As the first and sole intern for Austin Achieve Public Schools in the summer of 2013, one could say that I wore many hats. Hired to create a social and emotional learning (SEL) curriculum (based on my on-campus job at Open Circle), I began my internship endeavoring to build a curriculum for Austin Achieve that not only aligned with common SEL standards, but that fit the needs and hopes of this new charter school system. As with any new charter school, however, my responsibilities expanded in surprising ways—including coordination and oversight of Austin Achieve’s new campus, interim manager of school operations, and development of cultural competency training for staff and teachers. Working with a team of two to seven other staff members over the course of the summer, I learned the value of leaps of faith and the importance of a commitment to educational opportunity for all.

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Response of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to Oxidative Stress and Limits of Habitability Michelle R. Brann ’15, Biological Chemistry Advisor: Louise E. Darling, Biological Sciences I interned in an astrobiology lab at NASA Ames Research Center. My lab sought to determine how life adapts to habitable extreme environments and to microgravity during spaceflight. We hypothesized that this adaptation for survival in extreme environments is due to regulating a universal stress response through intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). My project focused on characterizing the response of C. reinhardtii, a model for growing life support systems in space, to heat shock as a form of oxidative stress by examining metabolic, biochemical, and gene expression changes. In the lab, I focused on molecular biology research but learned the importance of collaboration with those of difference backgrounds. Over the summer, I fell in love with the interdisciplinary field of astrobiology and

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now see it as a possible career choice. Through my presentation, I hope to demonstrate how NASA is more than human spaceflight. It’s Not Rocket Science, It’s Industrial Hygiene: A Summer at NASA Emily L. Kurtz ’15, Mathematics Advisor: Karen M. Lange, Mathematics I was an industrial hygiene intern in the Safety, Health, and Environmental Division at NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland. Industrial hygienists maintain a healthy workforce in three ways: they monitor workplaces for hazards; predict situations in which there may be health risks and help workers avoid these risks; and fix workplace health problems when they arise. To help my branch, I monitored buildings to ensure that temperature, noise, and ozone levels were within acceptable limits. I also checked rooms for mold, and taught my supervisors how to use new hearing protection software. My NASA experience went beyond my personal duties. I toured many interesting labs, such as the largest zero gravity drop tower in the United States. My experiences in and out of the office were invaluable, because they taught me how I can merge my two academic interests, mathematics and environmental studies, in my career. The Effects of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation on Memory Consolidation During Sleep Haley B. Troy ’16, Undeclared Advisor: Adam G. Matthews, Biological Sciences I was fortunate to have the opportunity to intern in the Neurology Department at the Berenson Allen Center for Noninvasive Brain Stimulation at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. While learning how to conduct one of several behavioral research studies, I was trained in two important skills: the noninvasive brain stimulation technique known as transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and polysomnography. Throughout the summer, I learned about the underlying principles of memory consolidation that occur in off-line processing. In addition, through shadowing a 38

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neurologist, I was exposed to patients diagnosed with various neurological disorders including Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, depression, and epilepsy, and I learned about the remission of symptoms following the utilization of diverse treatments, including TMS. As I study neuroscience and pursue a pre-medical path, it is clear that this experience will help further my involvement with research and strengthen my desire to pursue medicine. Morphological and Connectional Study in Treatment of Naive ADHD Subjects Using MRI Marcia Frimpong ’15, Neuroscience Advisor: Marc J. Tetel, Neuroscience At Psychiatry Neuroimaging Lab in Boston, I had the opportunity to work on a research project on attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in adults. Using state-of-the-art computer software such as 3D Slicer and Caret, I was responsible for analyzing this clinical population for brain anomalies. Combined with twice-weekly meetings with the primary investigator and weekly lab meetings, I gained an in-depth understanding of neuroanatomy of the human brain and the process of running an efficient and successful laboratory. As a neuroscience major, this experience showed me the importance of collaborative work among clinicians and researchers as the lab I worked at was collaborative among departments. Having never worked in a software centered lab, the exposure to this information has shown me that technology is indeed a necessary tool for further progress in the sciences. Boston Children’s Hospital Neighborhood Partnerships: My Psychology Experience in the Medical Field Gabriella F. Freda ’14, Psychology Advisor: Paul M. Wink, Psychology I interned for Children’s Hospital Neighborhood Partnerships (CHNP), a program affiliated with the psychiatry

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department at Boston Children’s Hospital. My work focused on CHNP’s research; I analyzed data collected throughout the school year in preparation for the annual report and learned about mental health workshops, such as Break Free From Depression, implemented into many Boston public schools. As a psychology major interested in child development, this program gave me the opportunity to view life as a psychologist at Boston Children’s Hospital and experience the myriad possibilities available in the medical field. I shadowed psychologists on their daily rounds through the spina bifida, brain tumor, and learning disabilities clinics and discovered that clinical psychologists did more than work in psychiatry. My internship was eye-opening, and I hope that other psychology majors, unsure of what they want to do, will join and benefit from this program.

The Secret Life of Plants: Conservation and Biodiversity SCI 392 Refining Plant Biomass to Be the New Petroleum Jeanne J. Xu ’15, Chemistry Advisor: Nolan T. Flynn, Chemistry Plant biomass, a renewable resource rich in carbon and chemical potential, is a promising feedstock to displace nonrenewable petroleum. This summer, I had the opportunity to pursue research under the National Nanotechnology Infrastructure Network (NNIN) on catalysts for the utilization of plant biomass. In addition to learning the applications of nanotechnology and laboratory techniques, this experience taught me to think critically, to fearlessly ask questions, and to be confident in both my thoughts and actions. These were all put to the test in one of the most enriching moments of this program: Convocation. Participating in Convocation with 100 other interns encouraged me to critically analyze the current efforts in nanotechnology, and it sparked an interest in pursuing a career involving


nanotechnology. In this presentation I will discuss the processing of the catalysts, the global perspectives and impact of nanotechnology, and the overarching experience of working in an NNINaffiliated lab facility. Duke Farms: Transforming a Country Estate into an Ecological Sanctuary Hannah C. Davelman ’16, Undeclared Advisor: Robin L. McKnight, Economics In the most densely populated state in the nation, New Jersey’s Duke Farms would be notable for its 2,740 acres of open space alone. Add to this Duke Farms’ dedication to educating the public about land stewardship and sustainability, partnerships with NJ Audubon and Rutgers University, and incredible research programs, and it becomes clear that Duke Farms is on its way to becoming one of the foremost institutions in ecological preservation. This presentation will provide an overview of how Duke Farms has changed and developed over the past hundred years, and discuss both its present projects and its goals for the future. Plant Conservation Is Important, Right? Geralle N. Powell ’16, Undeclared Advisor: Kristina N. Jones, Biological Sciences With all the problems that plague mankind, conservation of biodiversity is often dismissed as an issue of lesser importance. Under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) there are more than 1,200 plant and animal species listed as either endangered or threatened in the United States alone. This past summer I researched the effects of management practices and environmental impact on the conservation of the white lady’s slipper orchid, Cypripedium candidum, at the Chicago Botanic Garden. Although I met amazingly passionate people and gained valuable research skills, I often fought to understand the importance of a single endangered plant found only in the Northern Hemisphere. Ultimately, I began to better understand the role plants such as Cypripedium candidum have in their respective ecosystems and directly to human existence. With this knowledge I plan to become an environmental scientist and to make educating others about conservation a

lifelong goal. Investigating the Importance of Biodiversity Olivia B. Astran ’14, Biological Sciences Advisor: Kristina N. Jones, Biological Sciences The National Science Foundation (NSF) supports 26 Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) experiments throughout the world to study how diverse organisms respond to environmental change. I was a plant community ecology intern at Cedar Creek Ecosystem Science Reserve in Minnesota, where I helped to maintain and sample the “Big Biodiversity” experiment. This decades-long experiment follows a series of research plots with different levels of biodiversity to determine how different numbers of plant species affect the environment in which they live, from soil nutrients to plant biomass. Understanding how organisms connect with each other and function within their environments helps scientists and policy makers make more informed management decisions. After studying biology and ecology at Wellesley, I was able to put my knowledge to use in the field and see how this critical research operates. My talk will introduce this amazing long-term experiment and my role within it.

What You Can Do with Computer Science: Beyond the Code (Panel) SCI 380 Yu Mei Lay He ’14, Economics; Amy Hu ’14, East Asian Studies and Computer Science; Irene C. Kwok ’14, Computer Science and Chinese Language and Literature; and Karen Su ’14, Media Arts and Sciences Advisor: Stella Kakavouli, Computer Science Do you have some background in computer science, but you’re not sure what your full range of career options might be? Do you enjoy tackling problems on your problem set, but can’t see yourself programming 40 hours a week? Do you ever wonder what Wellesley computer science alums are doing with their degrees? Do you have dreams of developing your entrepreneurial t h e

spirit and starting your own company? Current Wellesley computer science and media arts and sciences students interned at various companies and start-ups this summer, in the roles of quality assurance engineer, product manager, IT business analyst, and art director. Panel members will compare their experiences working in a range of fields, from financial services to the courier industry, with established companies such as UBS and UPS, start-ups, and advertising agencies; share information about company culture, products, and internship opportunities; and explain how Wellesley and other resources have prepared them for these internships and beyond.  

2:40–3pm Break Refreshments will be served in the Leonie Faroll Focus, Science Center.

3–4:10pm Culture and the Arts Protecting and Promoting Cultural Heritage SCI 270 Stepping Through the Glass: Immersive Environments at the Field Museum Gabriela S. Cooper-Vespa ’15, Biological Sciences Advisor: Connie L. Bauman, Physical Education, Recreation and Athletics The Field Museum of Natural History in Chicago, world-renowned for its research and exhibitions, strives to foster immersive environments that promote public learning and curiosity. But what exactly is an immersive environment? My work as an intern in the exhibitions development department explored this question. The data I collected through visitor observations and interviews helped characterize the successful immersive components of preexisting exhibits and will serve

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as a valuable reference for future exhibitions. Developers shape the visitor’s experience using text, media, graphics, and interactive displays that highlight and support the artifacts that are on display. No assumptions are made regarding visitor expectations and reactions; thus, I found myself working in a lab different than any I have encountered at Wellesley: the museum floor. Through my daily interactions with visitors, I was able to fully appreciate how the developers bring the Field Museum’s collections to life. Treasures of the Caribbean: Fine Arts and Urbanism in Puerto Rico Hannah L. Ahlblad ’14, Art History and Art Studio Advisor: James Oles, Art As an intern at the Museo de Arte de Ponce, I worked on the curatorial team of the Caribbean’s largest museum of European and Latin American art. Working for two curators with multiple departments, I joined in team-based projects and conducted independent research. I was thrust into Spanish, which I had never before studied, and a community from all over Latin America and Spain that shared my passion for the arts. Outside the museum, I discovered Ponce, Puerto Rico, and explored urban planning issues that restrict its rich potential for development. As I gained excellent experience in the art world, I also was able to consider the social and economic possibilities for art and cultural institutions to generate urban growth. My thoughts about art and economics extended beyond the white stucco walls of the museum and into the historic town and the people who live there. Art Research and Preservation of Cultural Heritage Laura Fandino ’14, Biological Sciences Advisor: Flavia Laviosa, Italian Studies

Research into Crimes against Art (ARCA) seeks to promote awareness by proving an interdisciplinary conference and program in which the fields of law, criminal justice, security, museum studies, art history, archaeology, and cultural resource management come together to fully disclose the complexity of such an advanced and specialized area. In its fifth year, ARCA held the academic intensive ten-week program in Amelia, Italy, a small medieval town in the heart of the region of Umbria. The program selected international experts who contributed to the exchange of strategies that prevent, fight, and penalize crime against art. La Dolce Vita: Peggy Guggenheim and Her Legacy Emily K. Weddle ’14, Music and Art History Advisor: Gurminder K. Bhogal, Music Peggy Guggenheim stands out among many as one of the most unconventional and successful patrons of twentieth-century modern art. She spent her life collecting and commissioning works from a vast array of artists, often mixing business with pleasure. Throughout her life, she continually desired to share her private collection with the public, and she finally gave her home to create what today is the Peggy Guggenheim Collection in Venice, Italy. While interning at the collection this summer, I held public talks to educate visitors about Guggenheim’s life. Their purpose was to dispel any preconceived societal notions about the patroness, and to emphasize to the public her importance as a woman in the masculine art world. In this presentation, I will discuss the formative events of Guggenheim’s life that enabled her to acquire her collection, and the impact her life has had on mine.

The field of art crime and cultural heritage protection is often underexamined despite the ongoing crimes against our collective artistic heritage. In an attempt to raise awareness about the vulnerability of our artistic history, the Association for 40

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Empowerment of Youth, Women, and Families Education Beyond School Walls SCI 264 Empowering Women Through the Women’s Bureau Michelle C. Sit ’15, Psychology Advisor: Tom Burke, Political Science I interned with the U.S. Office of the Department of Labor, Women’s Bureau, and primarily focused on helping more women become interested in green and science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) careers. During the internship I learned about what stops women from becoming interested and successful in these careers, and the resources that are available for women to overcome the roadblocks they face in these fields. I organized a roundtable that brought together leaders in government, businesses, and college career centers to discuss how to get more women into green and STEM careers. In my presentation I will reflect on the lessons I learned in trying to help empower women through my work at the Women’s Bureau. Educational Nonprofits as a “Third Space”: The Impact and Limitations of 826LA Charlotte J. Weiss ’16, Undeclared Advisor: Barbara R. Beatty, Education I interned at 826LA, a nonprofit writing and tutoring center based in Los Angeles that is dedicated to supporting elementary through high school students with their writing skills and helps teachers inspire their students to write through after-school programming, workshops, and inschool tutoring. The organization believes that success in learning stems from one-on-one attention and that strong writing skills are essential to success in the future. As an intern at 826LA, I had the opportunity to support the organization’s English Language Learner Camp, co-lead volunteer orientations, and assist in outreach. 826LA seeks to be a “third space” for the students it


serves; not their home or their school, but a space where they can creatively learn and grow as writers and young adults. I will explore how 826LA successfully achieves being a “third space” for its students, and will examine where the organization falls short in its focus and mission. Humanizing Education Through the Arts: Peace, Justice, and Youth Leadership in Boston Katherine H. McCann ’15, Peace and Justice Studies; Luisa S. Reyes ’15, Economics; and Lauren E. Walsh ’14, Peace and Justice Studies Advisor: Soo Hong, Education What do rapping, murals, kites, and youth leadership-building have in common? As interdisciplinary curriculum designers and teaching specialists, we facilitated these explorations through the implementation of art, peace, and justice programming for elementary and middle-schooler students at seven St. Stephen’s Youth Programs summer camp sites in Boston and Chelsea. Our work, which centered on children’s understanding of their influence on their local and global communities, framed knowledge of self, community, world, and action as conduits for making the most of that personal influence and power. Students’ artwork and performances engaged the processes of envisioning the self as a role model, developing one’s message to the world, and looking to local communities as gardens that nurture and fuel human flight, while always calling one back to cultivate the soil. Wellesley College’s Stronger Communities, Stronger Schools organization continues this project. As individuals, we support innovative, humanizing, and communityfocused education.

From Theory to Practice: An Understanding of Vulnerable Populations in Boston (Panel) SCI 396 Victoria C. Rines ’15, Biological Sciences; Shelby A. Baptista ’15, Women’s and Gender Studies; Natalie Chaidez ’15, Latin American Studies; Bethany L. Cohen ’15, Psychology and Women’s and Gender

Studies; and Alison Z. Nikyar ’15, Neuroscience and Women’s and Gender Studies Advisor: Katie D. Koski, Center for Work and Service The term “vulnerable population” is often used as a theoretical category to define those who remain at increased risk. In today’s world, especially in urban communities, it seems that the plight of the vulnerable is increasingly characterized by struggles of poverty, ill-health, and inadequate educational opportunities. As part of the Lumpkin Summer Institute for Service Learning, we actively observed many of these difficulties. Our direct service and behind-the-scenes work in Boston provided us with an opportunity to step beyond the theoretical and to move into a space where vulnerabilities were raw and exposed. As we integrated into the urban communities we served and witnessed the challenges of poverty, domestic violence, and discrimination, a more practical understanding of the concept of vulnerability emerged. We will discuss how our internships and seminars changed our views of cities and their populations to deepen and clarify our classroom experiences.

Strengthening Urban Infrastructure and Health SCI 104 China’s Housing Market: Is There a Bubble Ready to Burst? Yuhe Zhang ’14, International Relations-Economics Advisor: Jennifer Thomas-Starck, International Studies During my semester in China at the Shanghai University of Finance and Economics, I studied the country’s economic development since the formation of the People’s Republic of China. With the 2008 United States recession still fresh on most people’s minds, real estate is a hot topic of discussion, with many speculating that there is a bubble in the Chinese housing market. There seems to be good evidence to support this claim. t h e

The Chinese population has been urbanizing quickly, thereby increasing the demand for housing in urban areas. With this increase in demand, the real estate market has boomed, and housing prices have been increasing exponentially within the last ten years. I will utilize research and data on prices in different cities, and conclude whether there will be a bursting bubble in the near economic future in China. Yuca, Tepuys, and Rainbows: A Summer in Rural Venezuela Emma R. Howey ’16, Undeclared Advisor: Elizabeth L. Davis, Geosciences There were no roads in or out; the only way was by plane. I spent June and July living and working in Uriman, an indigenous community in southeastern Venezuela. Alongside my four counterparts, I led public-health workshops and painted village buildings, addressing tangible community needs. Some things were less tangible, like my relationships with local children and neighbors. One 24-year-old friend, Maria, became a second sister. She’s bright, ambitious, and hardworking, so much of what defines a Wellesley woman. But Maria already has three daughters and she won’t finish high school, let alone attend college. This summer, I saw the harsh consequences of a life with different opportunities. I came to Uriman armed with years of academics, but I returned with an awareness of what it means to live. I want to take you there, too. Women Deserve Choice: Championing Reproductive Justice from the Heart of Its Movement Beatriz Aldereguia ’14, Spanish Advisor: Maria D. Natividad, Women’s and Gender Studies Serving nearly 5 million individuals worldwide each year, Planned Parenthood Federation of America (PPFA) stands today as the nation’s leading provider of sex education and high-quality, affordable healthcare for women, men, and young people. This summer I had the privilege of con-

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tributing to the organization’s mission to expand reproductive self-determination from the office of its national president, Cecile Richards. Through 15 weeks of secretarial and scheduling responsibilities, I gained insight into the infrastructure of a top-ranked nonprofit, its preferred messaging for abortion advocacy, and the crisis management work performed within a political office. This presentation will encompass an analysis of why PPFA’s organizational foundation has allowed it to thrive in the midst of opposition, an overview of the hectic dynamics embraced on a daily basis at the Office of the President, and a few personal reservations about the organization’s future trajectory. Hurricane Sandy as a First Responder: My Year with AmeriCorps and FEMA Alexandra K. Azzi ’15, American Studies Advisor: Katie D. Koski, Center for Work and Service Last year I took a gap year from Wellesley and volunteered ten months of my life to do national service. I packed my possessions into a red duffle bag and set off across the country with a team of ten people I had never met before. Two months later, Hurricane Sandy struck, and my team was deployed to New York. Decked out in our FEMA uniforms, we were on the ground in Breezy Point three days after the storm made landfall and were the first source of information for members of the community who had lost their homes and possessions. My year as an AmeriCorps FEMA Corps member certainly had its share of challenges and triumphs. During my Tanner presentation, I will discuss how responding to a major national disaster has shaped my perspective of this country and given me a new outlook on my time at Wellesley. Innovating the Next Generation of Design Leaders in Social Enterprise Naureen Mazumdar ‘14, Architecture and Art History Advisor: Martha J. McNamara, Art I interned at the nonprofit organization Enterprise Community Partners and worked in 42

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its National Design Initiatives office in Wellesley to help promote the highest standards of excellence, leadership, and sustainability in affordable housing design. I was involved in the Enterprise Rose Architectural Fellowship process, which helps emerging architects to lead the way for design by liaising with local community development organizations on various housing projects. I also had the privilege of participating in the organization of the Affordable Housing Design Leadership Institute in Chicago, where leaders on the front line of affordable housing design and development gather to explore possible improvements in livable and sustainable housing. My experience has encouraged me to pursue my interest in affordable housing to serve populations in need and to do so through community engagement, capacity building, and, most important, excellent design. A Thirst for Change: Water and Sanitation’s Gendered Discrimination Rebecca M. George ’15, Political Science Advisor: Neelima Shukla-Bhatt, South Asia Studies I interned with Action India in New Delhi, where I researched the water and sanitation (WATSAN) budget’s impact on Delhi citizens. Action India, a grassroots organization that works to secure the rights of the most marginalized, gave me insight into the importance of working directly with communities to fully understand their struggles, strengths, and hopes. Through my research, I saw that women and girls in slum communities are overwhelmingly disadvantaged due to inadequate WATSAN services. Delhi’s current WATSAN programs and schemes address people’s needs through a principle of gender neutrality, which does not account for the different needs and priorities between women and men. My internship provided me with a better understanding of the inherent inefficiencies and complexities within governments and deepened my interest in political science as it gave me new perspectives on how to assess and eventually address the issues through community involvement.

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Health and Medicine Beyond Borders From Leukemia to Melanoma: Cancer Research in Boston SCI 274 From Diagnosis to Cure: One Does Not Simply Have Cancer Zi Wei Liao ’15, Biological Chemistry Advisor: Nancy H. Kolodny, Faculty emerita Epidemiology, the study of patterns, causes, and effects of a disease, is an important tool of inquiry in medicine. At Dana-Farber/Children’s Cancer Center this summer, I worked on two clinical epidemiology projects. My first project was a retrospective review of risk factors associated with Clostridium difficile-related diarrhea in children with cancer. My second project was to examine, using national cancer registry data, whether patients who had been diagnosed and treated for a germ cell tumor, a cancer that arises from the primordial germ cell destined to become either the egg or the sperm, were at a high risk of developing a secondary cancer due to treatment. The position gave me the opportunity to see what clinical research entails, from initial literature review to study design to carrying out the study, and how it differs from basic research. The experience affirmed my desire to become a physician scientist. Reflections on Cancer Research in Boston Victoria M. Hills ’14, History and Biological Sciences; Angela C. Ai ’15, Biological Chemistry; Emily L. Cockey ’15, Neuroscience; and Amy Zhou ’14, Chemistry Advisor: Ted Hufstader, Center for Work and Service We had the opportunity to contribute to different forms of cancer research. Victoria analyzed the cost effectiveness of a type of diagnostic surgery for patients with thin melanoma; Amy conducted outcomes research in pediatric oncology; Emily worked on clinical annotation for a biology


study on pediatric hematologic malignancies; and Angela investigated the role of autophagy in siRNA therapy. This research contributed to and advanced existing knowledge in various subspecialties of oncology. On a more personal level, this research allowed us to immerse ourselves in clinical or medical research, which each of us wishes to pursue professionally in the future. Our experiences taught us the importance of research in the translation of science to health-care services and patient care.

Stemming Cancer SCI 211 From Bench to Bedside and Back: My Summer Stranded on the Bench Veronica G. Yu ’15, Sociology Advisor: Simone M. Helluy, Biological Sciences Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and aggressive form of malignant brain tumor in humans, with recurrence killing most patients within months after initial tumor resection. Working under a team of postdoctoral fellows and MDs at the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) this summer, I studied the role of cancer stem cells in the post-resection recurrence of GBM in mice. However, the first few weeks of summer were fraught with unexpected setbacks of mycoplasma infections, rogue cell lines, and equipment malfunctions. Projects were set in motion, only to be sidetracked a day later. While these obstacles were initially disheartening, they characterized my experience and trained me to appreciate the smallest successes, like single luminescent cancer cells tagged brightly for resection during surgery. This presentation chronicles my approach to studying glioblastoma at MGH and the lessons I learned about research, adaptability, and patience along the way.

Streamlining Stem Cell Transplantation: Creating a Dynamic Formula for Specialized Cancer Treatment Sahitya C. Raja ’15, Biological Sciences Advisor: Sally K. Sommers Smith, Biological Sciences Patients undergoing stem cell transplants endure long and sometimes uncomfortable procedures in order to collect enough cells for therapy. My summer was devoted to making these procedures more efficient and comfortable for patients. I worked at the Regenerative Medicine Center at Aurora St. Luke’s Medical Center in Milwaukee. The Autologous Stem Cell Transplant (ASCT) program treats hematological malignancies like lymphoma, leukemia, and multiple myeloma. I focused on streamlining treatment by creating a dynamic formula to determine how long a patient must undergo collection to obtain enough cells for transplantation. My summer served as an introduction to translational research and clinical care. I was reminded of the impact of scientific research as I learned new perspectives on medicine, useful for my intended career as a physician. My presentation will provide insight into the workings of clinical trials and reveals one example of the use of stem cells in medicine. Supporting Cancer Research at the National Cancer Institute with Computational Solutions Tricia C. Lu ’14, Biological Sciences Advisor: Adam Van Arsdale, Anthropology Genomic sequencing has allowed cancer researchers to produce massive amounts of molecular data about cancer each day, posing challenges for both the storage and usage of genetic data. During my summer internship at the National Cancer Institute’s Center for Biomedical Informatics and Information Technology (CBIIT), I had the opportunity to explore and investigate the computational solutions to alleviate these challenges. I participated in the planning for several projects, including a computational cancer cloud for the easier access of genomic data and platforms that allow for collaborative input of community-drivt h e

en initiatives. Communication to the biomedical informatics community was a crucial aspect of my internship, and I became well versed in utilizing various social media platforms. In addition to highlighting some things I learned about informatics, cancer, and genetics, I will share how collaboration and open-development are key in supporting cancer research initiatives. The Promised Land of Personalized Medicine in Breast Cancer Treatment Nancy A. Zhang ’16, Undeclared Advisor: Jeffrey E. Hughes, Biological Sciences Both the challenge and the bane of cancer lie in its intrinsic ability to vary among individuals. This summer, I researched a personalized approach to cancer treatment in the Blau Lab at the University of Washington School of Medicine. By fusing genomics, metabolomics, and proteomics, we hoped to streamline a protocol in which information from genetically sequencing a patient’s tumors would be used to inform the doctor’s treatment decision, an immediate bench-to-bedside translation. This protocol was especially useful for diagnosing triple negative breast cancer (TNBC), which comprises 20 percent of breast cancers, yet remains difficult to treat. I focused on the interactions of TNBC tumors with immune system cytokines, and how understanding these mechanisms can lead to smarter clinical treatment choices. From growing TNBC cell lines to algorithm development, this experience not only pushed the frontier of personalized medicine, but also pushed me to think independently and to investigate curiously.

The Body SCI 380 A Summer Studying Cartilage: The Seemingly Unglamorous Field of Orthopaedic Research Audrey A. Tran ’15, Biological Chemistry Advisor: Louise E. Darling, Biological Sciences I had the opportunity to conduct research in the Johnstone Lab at Oregon Health and Sciences University (OHSU), a teaching hospital in

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Portland, Oregon. I studied cartilage in both a clinical and research setting. For ten weeks, I tried to detect the presence of certain proteins present only in unhealthy cartilage. Although not wholly successful, I saw firsthand how a professional research lab operates, and I picked up many useful bits of knowledge in addition to techniques and orthopaedic jargon. It turns out that cartilage research is not as unglamorous as it sounds! My experience at OHSU reaffirmed my passion for medicine and the sciences because it showed me that the long road to medicine and research is as fun as you decide it to be. I return to Wellesley with a renewed sense of wonder for all the things we have yet to learn. In Vitro Muscle Vascularization and the Impact of Collaborative Biological Engineering Sarah R. Clarkson ’14, Biological Sciences Advisor: Heather R. Mattila, Biological Sciences Growing large, viable sections of muscle in vitro is a field that opens advancements in drug testing, regenerative medicine, and “biobot” creation. Before these potential benefits can be achieved, vascularization—the creation of blood supply—is needed to generate larger, experimentally useful constructs of muscle. This summer, I conducted research as a part of the Emergent Behaviors of Integrated Cellular Systems (EBICS) Research Experience Undergraduate Program at MIT. My research focused on whether muscle and endothelial cells self-assemble into functional vascularized muscle tissue in vitro. The opportunity to conduct biological engineering research taught me about the process of experimental optimization and the numerous applications of biology to many different fields. The experience of being part of the EBICS team showed me the importance, impact, and benefits of collaboration between labs while providing an in-depth look at the process behind scientific advancements.

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Immunology: A Summer of Research in Boston Zena K. Chatila ’16, Undeclared Advisor: Yuichiro Suzuki, Biological Sciences At Boston Children’s Hospital, I had the unique experience of conducting my own project while working as a research assistant in an immunology lab. I studied a STAT3 gene mutation, which causes the immune disease Hyper IGE syndrome, commonly found in Turkish populations. The goal of my project was to investigate why certain patients with mutated STAT3 genes were presenting with reduced symptoms. While learning many important scientific techniques, I also learned the responsibility that accompanies working in a medical research lab and doing research on patients. This increased responsibility and the independent nature of my work allowed me to gain confidence in my scientific skills. While I had conducted research before, the experience of working with patients across the globe, rather than mice or bacteria, allowed me to realize the immediate clinical importance of such work, and has heightened my interest in pursuing a career in healthcare or medicine. Cochlear Implantation Technology: Improving Lives or Committing Ethnocide? Aileen Y. Ro ’16, Undeclared Advisor: Kimberly O’Donnell, Biological Sciences My internship at the House Ear Institute in Los Angeles allowed me to engage in biomedical research addressing the effects and treatment of hearing loss and related disorders. In the midst of conducting research, observing ear surgeries, and immersing myself in the implications of translational research in the clinic downstairs, I found that the most valuable learning experience culminated in the aftereffects of a protest at the institute by members of the Deaf community (with a capital “D”) against the perceived ethnocide committed by cochlear implantation. This event spurred conversations at the institute about the clashing forces of well-intentioned biomedical and clinical advances made within its walls and the reactionary backlash from the Deaf communi-

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ty, driving me to reflect upon the complexities of the cultural impact that biotechnology can have on our society at large. This internship experience has put into humbling perspective my role in the world as a growing student and passionate scientist, driving me to expand my curricular experiences at Wellesley past the purely scientific realm into the ever-relevant sector of medical ethics and social justice.

Working in Mental Health: Walker School and Riverside Experiences (Panel) SCI 392 Stephanie C. Eby ’15, Psychology; Seowoo Lee ’15, Psychology; Margaret C. McConnell ’14, Psychology; Erica R. Perez ’14, Psychology; Leigh D. Pinkston ’15, Psychology; and Taylor D. Stewart ‘15, Psychology and English Advisor: Paul M. Wink, Psychology This summer, six Wellesley students participated in the Summer Internships in Psychology Program. They interned at either the Walker School, a residential treatment center for children with complex behavioral, emotional, and psychological needs, or Riverside Community Care, an organization that offers a wide range of programs in mental healthcare, addiction treatment, developmental disabilities, and brain injury services. Through classroom-based interactions at Walker, Maggie, Erica, Taylor, Stephanie and Christina explored both developmental and clinical psychology, gaining firsthand experience with psychotherapy in a clinical setting. Leigh, who interned at Riverside, served in an adult day-treatment center, where she observed and participated in both the professional and patient side of mental healthcare. At Riverside, she was exposed to the variety of therapeutic techniques employed under the umbrella of milieu therapy. For all interns, daily challenges, combined with small breakthroughs, made this summer experience highly enriching and educational.


Identity, Community, and Global Citizenship From the Margins: Activism in Rural Communities SCI 261 Mother Tongue: Education and Healthcare in the State of My Forefathers Pooja M. Jayaprakash ’15, English Advisor: Neelima Shukla-Bhatt, South Asia Studies A summer working in a rural district of Karnataka, India, brought my familial culture to life for me. I worked for a local nongovernmental organization, the Swami Vivekananda Youth Movement, helping to develop its hospital’s psychiatric program and teaching English in its school. In both of my projects, I worked to create a new perspective on a central issue: in the hospital, a new community perception of psychiatric disorder, and in the classroom, a new approach to a foreign language. The many differences between the Indian and American healthcare and education systems were quickly apparent, but my understanding of the people behind the systems developed over time. Living in the hospital, I came to know the traditions, prejudices, and little kindnesses of the people of Karnataka. It was these people, from security guards to ninth-grade students, who taught me the mother tongue of my parents and ultimately built for me a second home. Indigenous Mazahua Culture in Twenty-first Century Mexico Deborah E. Ransom ’15, Political Science Advisor: Nadya S. Hajj, Political Science In fostering indigenous Mazahua culture, language, and identity in Fresno Nichi (a small community of about 3,000 people in the State of Mexico) through participative workshops, I immersed myself within the contradictions and difficulties underlying rural and indigenous life in an increasingly modern Mexico. The seemingly old questions of communal landownership and lack of higher education remain and continue

accounting for migration patterns to larger cities within the country as locals seek to improve their own quality of life. The disconnect between a Mexican state eager to provide allowances to its impoverished citizens, while failing to provide basic services restrains and hinders Mexico’s growth in unforeseeable ways—for which, however challenging they may be, I’m passionate about finding possible solutions. A Latina Gringa: Perspectives on Discrimination and Interculturality in Chile Jannet G. Sanchez ’14, Women’s and Gender Studies Advisor: Charlene A. Galarneau, Women’s and Gender Studies After centuries of discrimination, marginalization, and displacement, the Mapuche indigenous communities of the Araucania region of Chile demand self-determination, justice for their cultural identity, and the return of their ancestral lands. Intercultural health was created in response to the communities’ demands. Last spring, I worked alongside Mapuche indigenous communities through an international study program focused on public health, traditional medicine, and community empowerment. I conducted a research project oriented around one theme: cultural identity. I investigated the extent to which intercultural health could help overcome discrimination and how it might help generate new forms of discrimination. While in Chile, I also reexamined, and reaffirmed, my cultural identity as a Latina/Chicana in a Latin American country that characterizes and defines me as an American “gringa.” Doing Socially Conscious Research in Rural India Grace S. Atherton ’15, Economics and Fiona J. Almeida ’DS, Undeclared Advisor: Pashington J. Obeng, Africana Studies

community. We also taught the teachers and students in the villages and encouraged those who were doing good work. We saw firsthand the interactions of ethnicity, gender, religion, and culture, as well as their effects on healthcare, education, and the local economy. We scrutinized the effects of national policy at the ground level through observing daily life in a range of rural and urban areas. Most strikingly, we witnessed the beginning stages of a political, social, and economic movement among Siddi community leaders to support other Siddis and stand up against forces that would have them remain silent and oppressed.

Movement in Crisis SCI 256 The Impact of the Syrian Conflict on Jordan’s Economy Rayah H. Al-Farah ’14, Economics Advisor: David L. Lindauer, Economics The Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan has been at the center of refugee accommodation for many years, hosting a total of 2 million individuals as of January 2013 from countries such as Palestine, Iraq, and Syria. The recent escalation of the Syrian conflict has resulted in an accelerated influx of additional refugees, with the U.N. Refugee Agency (UNHCR) officially listing a total of more than 500,000 Syrians dispersed within the Jordanian borders, with an added 30,000 awaiting registration. This significantly increases pressure on Jordan’s resource-poor economy. Jordan’s informal labor market is under duress as it faces competition from the Syrian nationals. Despite Jordan’s effort to maintain its open border and hospitality, the kingdom faces growing economic challenges in its attempt to find a balance between public goods provision and budget austerity.

We traveled to Uttara Kannada, India, to live and learn in a village with a large number of Siddi people (African-Indians), an ethnic minority. We were able to see our professor at work, interviewing as well as being a force for social good in the t h e

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Uploading Japan: The Importance of Social Media in Spreading Cultural Awareness Athena M. Kihara ’15, Media Arts and Sciences Advisor: Kazuko Ozawa, East Asian Languages and Cultures

to study East Asian security (my academic area of interest) from a humanitarian perspective, I learned a greater lesson on the moral obligations of being a global citizen, which I hope to share with my audience.

Many nonprofit organizations have begun to use social media as tools to help promote their causes. Over the summer, I had the unique opportunity to work at the Japan Society in New York City, an organization dedicated to deepening mutual understanding between the United States and Japan in a global context. As a digital media intern, I assisted with various projects such as documenting cultural events, researching how to successfully use social media, maintaining the organization’s YouTube page, and corresponding with superiors on the importance of social media in our technology- and Internet-driven society. Through my efforts in spreading Japan Society’s name and building a community capable of interacting with others on a global scale, I experienced the benefits and challenges faced by nonprofit organizations and strengthened my ability to think both creatively and critically.

The Egyptian Revolution: An Insider’s Perspective Leila T. Elabbady ’16, Undeclared Advisor: Stacie E. Goddard, Political Science

The Crisis You Have Never Heard Of: The Plight of North Korean Refugees and Defectors Jordan E. Lee ’14, International-Political Science Advisor: Sun-Hee Lee, East Asian Languages and Cultures All too often, North Korea is discussed solely in the limited context of being governed by a capricious, violent regime. This summer, I learned about the side mentioned less often: the people suffering under the regime, who are at constant risk of starvation and deportation to prison camps and whose defection from the state often only breeds more problems, such as being trafficked, or tortured and/or executed upon repatriation. I will present my experience of transcribing and translating North Korean defectors’ testimonies while working at Citizens’ Alliance for North Korean Human Rights—testimonies that document their lives both in and after North Korea. Although I was initially drawn to work at Citizens’ Alliance 46

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What started as an internship for U.N. Women Cairo quickly became an eye-opening experience of witnessing, participating, and living in the midst of one of the largest uprisings in history. Two and a half years after the revolution of January 2011, Egyptians took the streets once again in hopes of democracy. As the summer progressed, issues of media, politics, security, and development all came into play. Whether it was working under extreme safety measures with the uncertainty of work being possible the next day, or reading conflicting news around the world and finding myself on the opposite side of popular international opinion. Maybe it was marching alongside millions, in determination and celebration of the hope to rebuild the nation. Perhaps it was the disappointment of watching the country’s weak foundation crumble from chaos and strife. Spending the summer of 2013 in Cairo became an opportunity to understand firsthand what many of us just read on the news. I’ll Call When I’m Online: How Migrants in Morocco Use Communication Technologies Kelly H. Kern ’14, Political Science Advisor: Nicholas A. Knouf, Cinema and Media Studies Walk through the streets of Rabat, Morocco, a city crowded with Sub-Saharan migrants, and you will pass by countless vendors selling phones. Keep walking and you’ll pass hole-in-the-wall cyber cafés where people from Cameroon, Ghana, and other Sub-Saharan countries will sit for hours on Facebook and Gmail. These people, often living “undocumented” lives, might not have electricity, but they make sure they have a phone

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and cyber-café money. My research explored how Sub-Saharan migrants use mobile phones and the Internet to navigate their everyday lives. How do they use these tools to communicate with their networks inside and outside of Morocco? How do these tools help them negotiate their safety in times of crisis and make future plans? This research shows the varied uses and potential for these communication forms. It also explores the challenges communication tools present to their users and to the Moroccan state.

Visibility and Resistance SCI 364 Breaking the Political Bamboo Ceiling Grace Y. Park ’16, Undeclared Advisor: Karen Y. Shih, Office of Intercultural Education I am a minority of minorities. As an Asian American woman interning for the California State Legislature this summer, I experienced firsthand the ramifications of that statement. I represented the Asian Pacific American Public Affairs Association in Assemblymember Ian Calderon’s office and was almost always the only Asian American and the only woman in the room, even in one of the most diverse states in the nation. The constituents I worked with were surprised to see someone of their own race handle their casework and write talking points for a white male California state legislator. With my unique perspective, I discovered my identity as a proud Asian American woman. I was given the opportunity to find my voice, and now I have an obligation to share it and use it. “There Are No Pretty Girls in Bread”: Interning as a French Boulangère Rachel Swengel ’14, French Advisor: Sylvaine V. Egron-Sparrow, French Few things seem so essentially French as the baguette. With support from the Michèle Respaut French House Fellowship, I had the incredible opportunity to help produce thousands in a French boulangerie this summer. They ranged from the baguette de tradition, made by law with


only flour, water, salt, and yeast, to the flavorful pains aromatisés, studded with olives, sundried tomatoes, and rosemary. I experienced every part of the production of French breads, from scaling ingredients to grabbing armfuls fresh from the oven to bring to the front of the shop, while their scorching crusts blistered my palms. It was enthralling to get hands-on experience in bread production, which I intend to do professionally after Wellesley, and I hope to share some of what I learned with you. In presenting various Frenchbreadmaking techniques, I will reflect on what it means to work as an artisan in a globalized world; the place bread baking, eating, and buying occupies in French culture; and the tension between my identity as an American woman at a liberal arts college and my aspiration to excel in a field so decidedly manual, male-dominated, and French. La Jaula de Oro: Latinos’ Social Media Reactions to Immigration Reform in the United States Yesenia Trujillo ’14, Computer Science Advisor: Eniana Mustafaraj, Computer Science Immigration has been a recurring issue in the United States for hundreds of years, but it was not until 2005 that the United States started to impose stricter policies on immigration by creating the Mexico-United States barrier. Because of the coverage the immigration debate started to receive in popular media, we saw a shift in activism in which several activists, such as the Dreamers (the young undocumented immigrants affected by the Development, Relief, and Education for Alien Minors [DREAM Act]), took to social media to create awareness. This past summer, with the help of a Spanish Department grant, I researched the reactions of Latinos, on social media platforms, to the immigration reform debate and used community detection algorithms to discover how these communities interact with each other on those platforms. In this research, I am combining my personal experiences with immigration with the technological skills I’m getting from my computer science education.

New York City Chinatown 1940s-1960s: Stories of Discrimination, Resistance, and Resilience Bernice Y. Chan ’16, Undeclared Advisor: Linda Charmaraman, Wellesley Centers for Women From gang members to garment workers and laundry owners, residents of Chinatown in the 1940s to 1960s describe it as a small village in the bustle of New York City and home to immigrants largely from the farming villages of Toisan, China. Sandwiched between World War II and the Civil Rights Movement, this generation experienced the rise of anti-Chinese sentiment from territorial disputes with the Italian Americans in Little Italy to the national fear of Communism. I synthesize interviews to reveal, through video clips and audio snippets, a larger theme of accomplishments through resiliency despite the historical turbulence and heavy discrimination. This presentation sheds light on the rarely documented experiences of that Chinese generation and their lasting impact on youth today. Transition, Translation, and Transparency: My Eight-Month Stretch in China Navaporn McClean ’14, East Asian Studies Advisor: Mingwei Song, East Asian Languages and Cultures This past spring and summer, I was in China furthering my Chinese language skills on a Middlebury College Language Intensive Program in Kunming and interning at China Policy, an Australian research and advisory company, in Beijing. I joined China Policy as a member of the translation team, translating texts on the Chinese policy debate. Through a turn of events, I ended up being placed as the translation manager and leading the translation team during my ten-week internship. The experience of using Chinese and managing others in a professional setting was eye-opening. I got a taste of what it was like to live abroad independently and put my liberal arts learning to use. I hope to share the highs and lows of my eight-month experience in China. t h e

Women. World. Partners.: WELLESLEY INReflecting THE on Our Summer in Beijing (Panel) WORLD SCI 268 Josie-Dee Seagren ’14, Chinese Language and Literature; Wenyan Deng ’15, InternationalPolitical Science and History; Narayani Gupta ’15, Economics; Lynn U. Hsu ’15, Chinese Language and Literature; Alice Sun ’15, Art History and Chemistry; and Claire J. Tam ’15, Political Science Advisor: Joseph P. Joyce, Economics Twenty Wellesley women and 20 Peking University (PKU) women collaborated this summer at Beijing’s PKU with faculty from both institutions and other outstanding individuals, including Madeleine Albright ’59. Based on the model of the Albright Institute, the ten-day program included lectures, group research presentations on the topic “Challenges of an Urban Future,” and visits to cultural heritage sites of Beijing, culminating in an international women’s leadership conference. A panel of six program participants from the United States, China, and India are excited to reflect on and share how this cross-cultural experience shaped their perspectives on China, Wellesley, their summer internships, and global issues. Working together in a new environment presented challenges to all involved, and the panelists will discuss how this intensive program enhanced their leadership, teamwork, communication, adaptability, research abilities, and problem-solving skills. They are optimistic about this ongoing partnership and invite you to learn more about it.

Technology, Innovation, and Education Designing, Encoding, and Searching: Advancing Synthetic Biology Through Human-Computer Interaction (Panel) SCI 278 Casey E. Grote ’14, Computer Science; Joanna A. Bi ’15, Computer Science; Heather H. Petrow ’DS, Media Arts and Sciences;

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Elina S. Segreto ’15, Computer Science; and Sravanti Tekumalla ’16, Undeclared Advisor: Orit Shaer, Computer Science This summer, the Wellesley Human-Computer Interaction Lab collaborated with biological researchers at Boston University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology for iGEM, an international synthetic biology competition. After researching existing data on human-computer interaction, observing synthetic biologists in their field, and experiencing wet lab research protocols firsthand, our team designed and developed a variety of interactive software tools to help scientists. Eugenie is a multitouch application that uses a visual language to aid synthetic biologists in the design of novel genetic devices. Bac to the Future is a Web-based, interactive application that communicates fundamental synthetic biology concepts to the public. zTree is a tool for visually representing hierarchical data to support sensemaking; zTree utilizes zSpace technology, a revolutionary virtual-holographic 3D computing environment. We will present our work, share aspects of the design and creation process, and speak to our experiences collaborating with researchers of varied academic backgrounds.

Hidden Treasures: Exploring Life in Little Cayman (Panel) SCI 277 Jingjing Li ’15, Neuroscience; Amanda M. Gardner ’DS, Geobiology; Madeline E. Gorchels ’16, Undeclared; Priya D. Patel ’16, Undeclared; and Roza Trilesskaya ’16, Undeclared Advisor: Martina Koniger, Biological Sciences After attending lectures in biological sciences, which focused on organismal biology in the tropics, we spent ten days at a research station on Little Cayman. We explored the dry forest and the coral reef ecosystems by conducting research in both settings and were afforded a glimpse into the world of conservation. Our field studies in Little Cayman offered the opportunity to design and implement original research while demon48

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strating the inevitable challenges of conducting field research. We became more aware of the career options in marine biology. By talking to graduate students working in the field, we gained insight into the paths they took to pursue their careers. Through our conversations, we were also exposed to local environmental issues such as the plight of the Nassau grouper and the hunt for the lionfish, an invasive species. We learned how researchers are working to solve these problems and the progress they have made.

www.com: Who, What, and Where of Communication SCI E111 There Must Be a Better Way: Solutions for a Modern Web Gabriela A. Lanza ’14, Media Arts and Sciences Advisor: Scott D. Anderson, Computer Science The lives of most Americans today are inextricably linked to the Web, where we continue to spend more and more of our time shopping, learning, working, and communicating. This talk explores the relationship between what I’ve learned about Web design and development both in the classroom and in the real world during my summer as an intern at HubSpot, and how I’ve applied that knowledge to solve problems that have faced Wellesley’s radio station, WZLY, for years. I will discuss what to plan for in a world where more than 20 percent of traffic on the Internet comes from mobile devices, how the simplest solutions in Web design can sometimes be the most surprising, and how working on one of the 250 mostviewed Web sites in the United States taught me that if you can dream it, you can build it. Engineering to English: Communicating the Science of Environmental Solutions Stephanie L. Gebhardt ’14, Environmental Studies Advisor: Monica R. Higgins, Environmental Studies The Savannah River Site in South Carolina introduced me to working with highly specialized engineers, politicians, and scientists who all collaborate on cleaning up nuclear waste. w o r l d

I applied my experience from the Sustainability Certificate Program to facilitate clear interaction between the parties mentioned above. I felt confident working in environmental compliance this summer because of the base of knowledge in environmental studies and the experience of working in interdisciplinary teams from Wellesley, Olin, and Babson. This summer I had experience communicating between engineering and compliance departments, as well as informing the public on the site’s progress and company capabilities. When communicating something scientific, the details should be explained in layman’s terms without reducing the work or sounding juvenile. I now understand even more why environmental problems need to be approached from multiple disciplines as well as the means by which these different disciplines intertwine and communicate. When in Rome, Do as the Romans: Communication Across Disciplines Nikita U. Saladi ’16, Undeclared Advisor: Adam G. Matthews, Biological Sciences I interned in the Refugee and Community Services division of Heartland Alliance, a Chicago-based nonprofit. There, I taught large English classes, tutored students in computer use and interview preparation, and developed a workshop in methods to improve doctor-patient communication. Not only did I became keenly aware of the problems immigrants face when assimilating to the United States, but more importantly I also learned firsthand how to communicate more effectively. I discovered six general techniques to facilitate effective communication. As an aspiring physician, I plan to use these skills to interact more effectively with patients, but I believe these techniques are broadly applicable to a wide range of careers. I hope that attendees of my presentation will become more aware of these communication skills and will leave my presentation with a better understanding of how to best convey their own ideas.


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WELLESLEY IN THE WORLD

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WELLESLEY IN THE WORLD

The Tanner Conference provides students the opportunity to learn about Wellesley’s international study, internship and grant, and fellowship programs through presentations and panels. International Study Every year, about 45 percent of Wellesley College juniors participate in semester or full-year international study programs in three dozen countries. Roughly a third of those who study internationally are enrolled in Wellesley Collegesponsored programs, with the remainder selecting programs sponsored by other colleges, universities, or international study providers. Internships and Grants Wellesley College supports a large and diverse number of summer internships and community service projects in the United States and around the world. This summer, more than 300 students participated in internship programs in more than 30 countries. Fellowships Wellesley College offers fellowships for graduate study or research that are open to graduating seniors and Wellesley alumnae. Each year, the College supports approximately 40 women in both national and international programs of study or research. In addition, faculty committees assist candidates in applying for national fellowships, such as the Rhodes, Marshall, Fulbright, Truman, and Goldwater.

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M AP International Study Argentina Australia Austria Brazil Cameroon Chile China Denmark Egypt France Germany Ghana Greece Hungary India Ireland Italy Japan

Mexico Morocco Netherlands New Zealand Poland Russia Scotland South Africa South Korea Spain Sweden Switzerland Turkey Turks & Caicos United Arab Emirates United Kingdom

Internships and Grants Programs Argentina Belgium Brazil Cambodia Cape Verde China Costa Rica Czech Republic Dominican Republic Ethiopia France Germany Hong Kong SAR India Indonesia Italy Japan

Jordan Morocco Namibia Netherlands South Africa South Korea Spain Sri Lanka Switzerland Tanzania Turkey Uganda United Kingdom United States Vatican City

Fellowship Programs Argentina Australia Austria Belgium Brazil Cambodia Canada Chile China Costa Rica Czech Republic East Timor Egypt Finland France Germany Ghana Greece Haiti Hong Kong SAR

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Hungary India Ireland Israel Italy Jordan Mexico Peru Romania Russia South Africa South Korea Taiwan Thailand Netherlands Turkey United Kingdom United States Uruguay

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International Study Programs Department of Classical Studies College Year in Athens This program is designed for students interested in the study of ancient, medieval, or modern Greece and its environs. Courses are offered in archaeology, art history, classical languages and literature, ethnography, history, international relations, modern Greek language and literature, philosophy, political science, and religion. This semester or yearlong program in Athens emphasizes ancient Greece, with some attention paid to modern Greece and the Greek language. Intercollegiate Center for Classical Studies in Rome This program focuses on the archaeology and topography of ancient Rome and is taught by American faculty. Approximately 35 students are enrolled in the program each semester. Each student takes four units: a required twounit course on “The Ancient City”; one unit of Greek or Latin; and one other unit, such as art history or the Italian language. Department of East Asian Languages and Literatures CET Beijing Chinese Language Program Based in one of China’s most dynamic cities (and the home of “standard” Chinese), the CET Beijing program immerses students in local Chinese life. Students have the opportunity to live with Chinese roommates from local universities and to enroll in innovative language courses that challenge their skills inside and outside the classroom. The program’s unique activities further capitalize on Beijing’s rich learning environment and show students a side of China not seen by tourists. This program is available in the spring, summer, or fall terms.

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Associated Kyoto Program, Japan Wellesley College is a member of a consortium of 16 liberal arts colleges that sponsors the Associated Kyoto Program at Doshisha University in Kyoto, Japan’s ancient capital. This two-semester program is an enriching, rigorous experience that provides an opportunity for students to study the Japanese language and take related courses in the humanities and the social sciences while living with a homestay family in the Kyoto area. Courses are taught by professors from the participating colleges and by Japaneselanguage teachers. Students take courses in English and Japanese, and are encouraged to participate in travel and cultural activities. Ewha Womans University, Seoul, South Korea Wellesley College offers a student-for-student exchange program with Ewha Womans University in Seoul. Wellesley students attend classes in Ewha’s international coeducational programs. All classes, with the exception of Korean, are taught in English. Students who have mastered the Korean language also may take courses at the university outside of the international program. Japan Women’s University, Tokyo, Japan This is a challenging, total-immersion, yearlong, student-for-student exchange program for one or two students per year between Wellesley College and Japan Women’s University, which is located in the heart of Tokyo. Students take courses at the university in addition to intensive Japanese-language courses for a total of 30 to 32 credits and receive full credit for the year. One academic-year course may be taken at the coeducational Waseda University’s International Division (in English) at no additional expense. Students have the choice

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of living in a dormitory or with a homestay family. In addition to a versatile liberal arts curriculum with a strong emphasis on Japanese studies, the university offers a wide range of club and extracurricular activities. Department of French Wellesley-in-Aix The Wellesley-in-Aix program offers an exciting and challenging course of study as well as an authentic experience of French life and culture. The program is open to women and men, and its modest size (30 to 35 participants) allows close attention to be paid to individual interests and academic needs. Students begin with a pre-session of preparatory course work and cultural excursions in Paris. In Aix, students are fully matriculated at the University of Provence (Aix-Marseille) and take the same courses as French students. Majors in political science, international relations, and economics are also registered at Sciences Po-Aix. Participants share studio apartments in Aix’s centre ville (downtown); homestays with selected families also are available. Department of German Wellesley-in-Berlin Wellesley College’s Department of German sponsors a junior-year-abroad program at the Freie University in Berlin, hosted by Middlebury College. The program offers academic-year and spring-semester options that allow students in almost all majors to pursue their academic interests. A resident director and tutors assist students with integration into university life. The opportunity to participate in internships at various political, cultural, and social institutions is a feature of the program. Internship stipends are made available by the Susan Rappaport Knafel ’52 International Internship Fund with an application through the Center for Work and Service.


Office of International Study

Department of Spanish

The Wellesley College Office of International Study provides advice and support for Wellesley students who elect to study in a foreign country for a semester or an academic year. Each year, almost half of the junior class pursues academic course work internationally for at least one semester. Of those, about a third enroll in one of Wellesley’s international study or exchange programs in Canada, Egypt, Germany, France, Hong Kong SAR, Italy, Japan, Mexico, South Korea, Spain, or the United Kingdom. The remainder enroll in one of more than 150 approved programs or direct-enrollment options. All students considering spending a semester or year in a foreign country during their junior year should begin the process early in their sophomore year.

Middlebury in Chile Wellesley students can study either at the Universidad Católica in Santiago or the Universidad Católica in Valparaíso. Students take four courses at one of these two universities. Courses are available in all areas of the liberal arts curriculum. The program director, Dr. Jeff Stevenson, and native instructors work one-on-one with students to develop advanced levels of language proficiency in the four areas of speaking, listening, reading and writing as defined by the ACTFL Proficiency Guidelines and carry out an original small-scale sociolinguistic study as part of the “Writing for Linguistic and Cultural Competence” course that all program students take. Students are encouraged to connect to a specific societal need through a variety of volunteer opportunities in order to devote their energies, and passions while in-country toward addressing it in ways that promote sustainability and social justice. Interested program students can also apply for a Middlebury Sustainability in Study Abroad grant to undertake an in-country project that promotes economic, social and/or environmental sustainability. Several local and all-group excursions are planned throughout the semester.

Department of Italian Studies Eastern College Consortium (ECCO), Bologna, Italy The ECCO in Lecce is an intensive threeweek summer program offered in the month of August. It is a rigorous linguistic and valuable cultural full-immersion experience recommended before the semester or yearlong program in Bologna. The language course consists of a fast-paced and thorough grammar review presented in the context of contemporary Italian issues, with a particular focus on Southern Italian art, history, customs, and traditions. Learning of the language and understanding of the culture are also fostered through a rich program of social and artistic events, extracurricular activities, and guided tours in the region of Puglia.

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Programa de Estudios Hispánicos en Córdoba (PRESHCO), Spain A consortium of Oberlin College, Smith College, The College of Wooster, Trinity College, Wellesley College, and Wheaton College (Massachusetts) created the Programa de Estudios Hispánicos en Córdoba in 1981 to encourage the intellectual and personal growth that comes from cultural immersion. The program offers students an opportunity to strengthen their acquisition of the Spanish language while fostering an appreciation of Spanish history and culture through studies in a variety of disciplines. The PRESHCO program is designed not only for Spanish majors, but for anyone wishing to develop fluency in Spanish for future professional endeavors. Academic study centers on courses taught by regular faculty from the Universidad de Córdoba, but developed to address the requirements of American universities and colleges; the program also offers direct matriculation at the Universidad de Córdoba. Course offerings are extensive, both in terms of PRESHCO courses and general university offerings, ranging from the fine arts to environmental sciences and engineering, from comparative law and politics to seminars in literature and film. Depending on individual preferences, students are housed in privately run dormitories or with Spanish host families. A variety of planned excursions complements and enhances the program of study.

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Internships and Grants Programs The Madeleine Korbel Albright Institute for Global Affairs The Madeleine Korbel Albright Institute for Global Affairs completed its fourth successful year in 2013. Forty students were chosen as Albright Fellows and participated in an intensive Wintersession program in January. As the second component of the Institute’s program, Albright Fellows each pursued summer internships in global affairs. A combination of new and existing internship opportunities allowed the students to apply what they learned to their work in the field. The following donors have made endowed gifts to support the internships of Albright Fellows: Mahnaz Ispahani Bartos ’79 Paula Phillips Bernstein ’58 Class of 1959 Arthur Vining Davis Foundation Sandra Brown Eakins ’59 Maryam Homayoun-Eisler ’89 The EFW Memorial Fund Amelia C. Fawcett ’78 Beth Langerman Friedman ’82 Mary Sidell James ’65 Dorothy Chao Jenkins ’68 Susan Saltzbart Kilsby ’80 Lia Gelin Poorvu ’56 Center for Work and Service Global Engagement Internship Programs American Cities Internship Program What is it like to have a job in a major American city? The American Cities Internship Program translates Wellesley College’s liberal arts education into action by providing interns with an intensive, careerrelated experience and the opportunity to live in such cities as Chicago, Los Angeles,

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New York City, and San Francisco. Students are placed in for-profit and nonprofit organizations, with alumnae mentors when possible. Through their internships, students become familiar with professional responsibilities, create networks for future employment, and learn the importance of cultivating relationships with coworkers of diverse ages and backgrounds. By living independently, students gain an understanding of city living from a multidisciplinary perspective. Anchor Point Internships in Global Leadership These internships were established through the generosity of Amy Batchelor ’88 and Brad Feld. Wellesley College students undertake 10-week summer internships in programs that foster their connections to the global community and encourage their global leadership skills and activities. Anchor Point internship placements have been available in a number of countries, including Cape Verde, Germany, and South Africa, for students from a variety of academic backgrounds. Internship sites have included a foundation dedicated to young women’s scientific and technological education and a local women’s nongovernmental organization working to improve economic and social conditions. These community development-based projects will enable students to encounter the diversity, creative dynamism, and humanity existing throughout the world. Boston Children’s Hospital, Division of Hematology/Oncology This internship provides an opportunity for students to learn skills related to basic, translational, and clinical research in pediatric blood diseases, cancer, and stem cell biology. The intern will work with a mentor to conduct basic research in a laboratory or to contribute to the development of a clinical research effort. The intern is expected to become

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familiar with the research approaches used by her mentor. At the mentor’s discretion, she may develop a specific project with a current member of the research team. Clinton Health Access Initiative (CHAI) Internship Program The Clinton Foundation was established to address poverty and health inequalities across the globe by expanding access to lifesaving medicines and by helping developing countries systematize their approaches to healthcare. The Clinton Foundation established CHAI in 2002, and interns at the organization conduct 10-week summer internships in areas of the world where CHAI has a presence. In the past, students have worked in China, Ethiopia, and South Africa. Internships in International Human Rights Organizations This program places students in international and domestic organizations working on human rights problems. During their internship, students address the issues of civil rights, equality, and justice throughout the world. Placements vary from year to year.

The Elisabeth Luce Moore ’24 Summer Internships in Asia The Elisabeth Luce Moore ’24 Summer Internships in Asia aim to prepare students for lives and careers in a global economy. Through internships in East Asian business, government, and nonprofit organizations, students gain a knowledge of local business and cultural norms that informs their liberal arts education and prepares them for professions in an interconnected world. The program, which currently sponsors internships in China, Hong Kong SAR, Japan, and South Korea, was established in 1999 with a grant from the Henry Luce Foundation and builds on ties between Wellesley College and Asia that date from the late nineteenth century.


Lumpkin Summer Institute for Service Learning Designed for students with a commitment to service, the 10-week Lumpkin Summer Institute for Service Learning challenges students to explore and participate in social change in the greater Boston area. During the program, students live together in Boston while undertaking full-time internships with local nonprofit organizations. Led by Wellesley College faculty, staff, and nonprofit practitioners, weekly seminars integrating experiential and traditional classroom learning benefit not only the Wellesley interns but also the communities in which they serve. SoundWaters Summer Internship Program This program funds a student to work as a head educator, deckhand, and mate aboard SoundWaters, an 80-foot, three-masted schooner docked in Stamford, Connecticut. This “floating classroom” program offers a multidisciplinary environmental curriculum for children and adults in Westchester, Nassau, and Suffolk counties in New York and in Fairfield County, Connecticut. Educators live and teach aboard SoundWaters. Summer Internships in Psychology at the Walker School and Riverside Community Care The Summer Internships in Psychology Program was developed to give students the opportunity to gain highly valuable clinical experience that helps them make informed career choices. Working in a communitybased agency sensitizes the students to issues of cultural diversity and poverty and increases their understanding of the bio-psychosocial model of mental disorders. Thus the interns develop a deeper appreciation of the complex interface between genetic makeup, psychological coping strategies, and the larger sociocultural forces determining how individuals negotiate the vicissitudes of life.

Vieques Conservation and Historical Trust Internship Program During this Wellesley College Wintersession and summer internship, students at the Vieques Conservation and Historical Trust (VCHT) help advance the organization’s mission of promoting environmental stewardship and community activism. Vieques Island, 21 miles long and five miles wide, is located 10 miles off the eastern shore of Puerto Rico’s main island. The VCHT works to protect and preserve local natural resources, including the most abundant bioluminescent bay in the world. Interns contribute to the implementation of several educational and research programs. Wellesley Internships in Africa Through Wellesley Internships in Africa, students undertake 10-week summer internships in Ethiopia, Morocco, and Uganda. Placements are available to students from a variety of academic backgrounds in organizations ranging from an international educational program to a local nongovernmental organization working to create stronger cross-cultural relationships. These education and community development-based projects enable students to encounter the diversity, creative dynamism, and humanity of the continent. Wellesley Internships in Cambodia Founded in 2012, Wellesley students participating in this program lived in Phnom Penh, Cambodia for the summer while completing 10-week internships with nonprofit organizations. These organizations’ missions focus on important global public health issues and leadership development and training programs for women and girls. Students gain first-hand knowledge of nonprofit management while experiencing life in Southeast Asia.

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Wellesley Internships in Europe Established in 2009, the Wellesley Internships in Europe program provides an intensive, career-related internship in a student’s field of interest. In 2013, students pursued placements in Italy, Spain, and the United Kingdom. Among them is a long-standing opportunity at the Peggy Guggenheim Collection in Venice, Italy, where students become familiar with museum management in one of the great art cities of Europe. Wellesley Internships in India Established in 2007, the Wellesley Internships in India program provides students in all majors the opportunity to undertake 10-week summer internships in New Delhi and Mumbai. Placements are available in grassroots educational, organizing, and advocacy organizations. Responsibilities and projects include research, teaching, mentoring, communications, and office projects. Participation will enable students to develop flexibility, knowledge of the complexities and cultures of India, and the ability to work in varying cultural contexts. Students are exposed to the culturally rich regions and diverse populations of the Indian subcontinent. Wellesley Internships in Latin America The Wellesley Internships in Latin America program provides placements in varied fields such as political and environmental sciences, economics, Latin American politics, history, and sociology. Students gain real-world experience and learn about the challenges facing this region. Through the program, interns gain an insider’s perspective on some of the most dynamic areas of the world.

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Center for Work and Service Global Engagement and Service Grant Programs The Paul B. Beal and Mona Phillips Beal Internship Fund The Paul B. Beal and Mona Phillips Beal Internship Fund has been established to encourage and facilitate practical learning experiences that will help Wellesley College students better define their career choices and develop a more informed understanding of the challenges and rewards of such choices. It is hoped that as a result of internship participation, students will make more effective course selections at both the undergraduate and graduate levels, learn more from those courses because of the perspective and experience they have acquired in their internship work, and become more competitive candidates for future opportunities in their chosen career paths. Carolyn Shaw Bell Internship Fund The Carolyn Shaw Bell Internship encourages and supports sophomores and juniors seeking internship experience in business or economics. This program provides stipends for internships in nonprofit or for-profit organizations. Blessing Way Summer Public Service Internship Fund This grant supports a Wellesley College student committed to making a difference in her community. It is designed for a student who is interested in working with a nonprofit or public organization and in building a longterm commitment to service. In addition, it will support students who show leadership potential in this area or in their past service work. The intern’s project can focus on any important issue affecting a community, including youth, the environment, education, healthcare, and the arts.

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Barbara Bush Award for Volunteerism This grant funds a student pursuing a volunteer experience in disability services for the elderly or for young children. The placement must be with a nonprofit organization. C-ROM Student Internship Fund This fund supports a Wellesley College student committed to making a difference in her state and/or local community by working directly with a woman involved in any aspect of state or local government in the United States. The stipend enables the student to take an unpaid internship and learn more about state or local government and the important role that women play in the governmental process. The Wei Fong Chu Chao Endowed Fund for International Internships This fund supports Wellesley College students pursuing summer internship opportunities outside the United States in for-profit and nonprofit organizations. Preference is given to internships in Asia. Class of 1962 Student Internship Fund This grant provides a stipend for a student pursuing a summer internship with a woman in a governmental position in the United States at the local, state, or national level. Class of 1969 Community Service Internship Fund This fund provides a summer stipend that supports student involvement in community service and encourages community service as a lifelong activity for Wellesley College women. Placement must be with a nonprofit community organization. Class of 1989 Endowed Internship Fund This fund supports one student every summer to experiment in her career choice and gain valuable work experience in either a nonprofit or for-profit organization.

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Margaret C. Gordon Law and Education Public Service Award This fund supports a Wellesley College student committed to serving disadvantaged communities through an unpaid summer internship in public-interest law and/or in an urban public-school reform or support program. The grant enables a student to take an unpaid internship to learn more about the legal and educational issues surrounding disadvantaged urban communities. Susan Todd Horton 1910 Internship Fund This fund supports Wellesley College students interested in seeking summer internships in nonprofit and for-profit organizations. The Jeniam Foundation Internship Grant This grant supports students wishing to work in a nonprofit dedicated to preserving and protecting the environment. Susan Rappaport Knafel ’52 Internship Fund This fund supports Wellesley College students pursuing summer internships outside the United States in for-profit and nonprofit organizations. Sherley Heidenberg Koteen ’40 Endowed Internship Fund for Jewish Studies This fund will provide support for either international or domestic internships that encourage students to examine the many facets of Jewish civilization through interdisciplinary study of Jewish religion, history, philosophy, art, literature, social and political institutions, and cultural patterns. Rosemary Lonergan ’44 and John Todd President’s Discretionary Fund The income from this endowed fund is to be used at the discretion of the president of Wellesley College to support special projects that the president deems worthy of support, and also travel-related activities for students and faculty of Wellesley College, including student internships, travel to conduct thesis


research, faculty research and development, travel related to the Madeleine Korbel Albright Institute for Global Affairs, and faculty and student travel to conferences. The Mollie Green Lumpkin ’25 Fund for Experiential Learning in Latin America This fund supports Wellesley College students seeking summer internships in Spanishspeaking countries. Preference will be given to students interested in working in the area of environmental protection and preservation. The Lumpkin Family Internships for the Environment Fund This fund encourages and supports Wellesley College students seeking summer internships in nonprofit organizations dedicated to preserving and protecting the environment. The Emily Cohen MacFarquhar ’59 Internship for International Journalism Fund This fund was established to encourage and support Wellesley College students who have demonstrated an interest in journalism or photojournalism. The stipend provides the recipients with the opportunity to learn about journalism through an internship at an international news organization or to travel in order to document a foreign culture outside the United States. MasterCard Microfinance Internships This fund supports Wellesley students working in nonprofit microfinance organizations all over the world. Interns are exposed to the process of connecting low-income individuals with capital and new business opportunities. The Barbara Scott Preiskel ’45 Endowed Fund for Internships This fund supports a student seeking an internship to develop her career goals. It provides a stipend for any internship that is unpaid, full-time, and consistent with the applicant’s career interests. The internship

may be with a nonprofit, for-profit, or public service organization in the United States. Public Service Internship Fund This fund encourages and enables Wellesley College students to use their talents and skills in public service. Each summer, it supports students working full-time in nonprofit organizations that otherwise could not employ them. Priority is given to applicants whose work relates to young children and their families, particularly those who are economically or otherwise disadvantaged. Raquet Family Foundation The Raquet Family Foundation supports students pursuing an internship focused on social justice and/or work with underserved populations, preferably with a faith-based organization. Responding to World Crises This fund supports students seeking to make a difference in the world by tackling contemporary crises worldwide. Students work at both rights-based advocacy and service nongovernmental organizations. Students have addressed HIV/AIDS, human rights in North Korea and Iran, Darfur-related initiatives in the United States and abroad, and justice for women in India. Responding to World Crises is funded through the Office of the President. Service Opportunity Stipend This stipend funds summer placements that offer direct student involvement in frontline community service and that foster the spirit of volunteerism. The applicant must intend to pursue an experience in a nonprofit organization that involves a particular community, population, or issue related to a personal interest or concern. Priority is given to applicants pursuing a full-time community service experience for the first time. This fund also supports one stipend with the Low Vision Center in Bethesda, Maryland.

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Beth K. Smith Internship in Public Service This award provides students the opportunity to experience work in the nonprofit sector, with the hope that they will continue in this field. In addition, it supports two placements with Social Accountability International in New York City. Tanner Technology Initiative The Department of Computer Science and the Center for Work and Service collaborated on improving accessibility, sharing, and scheduling features of a Web-based conference scheduler that was initiated in the 10th anniversary of the Tanner Conference. Conference abstracts are now made available online through this application, leading to engagement with a wider audience. The Helen Wallace Health Sciences Internship Fund This fund supports an unpaid summer career development internship in a health profession, with preference given to those interested in the field of maternal and child health. Wellesley Serves! The Wellesley College motto, Non Ministrari sed Ministrare, underscores Wellesley’s commitment to community service. The Center for Work and Service translates the college motto into action by providing opportunities for direct service to others, and enables our students and alumnae to foster community and embrace diversity through lifelong learning, community involvement, civic engagement and global citizenship. Oprah Winfrey Award for Volunteerism This award provides a summer stipend for a student wishing to explore a volunteer position with a nonprofit social service organization. The award honors the important connection between Oprah Winfrey’s speech at the Commencement of the Class of 1997 and the Wellesley College motto, “Not to be ministered unto, but to minister.” Each year,

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this award enables a student to follow Ms. Winfrey’s example of service.

Office of the Provost and Dean of the College

The Davis Museum and Cultural Center

Mary M. and Edward B. Allen Endowed Fund for Summer Undergraduate Research in Biological Chemistry Annual income will be used to provide stipends and supplies for students who are participating in summer research in biological chemistry, including microbiology. Students receiving an award from the Fund shall be named Allen Fellows.

The Summer Fellowship Program at the Davis Museum and Cultural Center Each summer, a select group of Wellesley College students joins the Davis staff for 10 weeks of hands-on professional experience. This residential, paid, and highly competitive opportunity ensures that students earn marketable skills, gain broad exposure to museum operations, and acquire an overview of best museum policies and practices. The internship engages students with the collections and programs of one of the most active academic museums in the United States. Through focused work in one or more of the Davis departments, interns may undertake research, collections care, curatorial planning, technology/social media support, and/or educational content development. Activities also include field trips to museums and arts events with opportunities to meet arts leaders throughout the region. Additional opportunities offered by the Davis include the Eleanor P. DeLorme Museum Internship and the Liliane Pingoud Soriano Curatorial Fellowship at the Musée du Louvre, Paris, an exchange program between the Davis and the Musée du Louvre. Both are curatorial in focus and are made available to recent Wellesley College graduates through an application process. Office of the President Discretionary Funds for the Support of Educational Initiatives These discretionary funds support a wide range of activities at the College, including providing research awards to Wellesley students doing scientific research during the summer.

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Gladys L. Bode Faculty and Student Research Endowment in Sciences This fund supports faculty and student research in the sciences. The T.T. and W.F. Chao Summer Scholars Program in Natural Sciences Endowed Fund Dorothy Chao Jenkins ’68 established this fund to support the Chao Summer Scholars Program, which is intended to provide opportunities to engage students in scientific research central to developing and retaining strong science students. The Fund will be used for stipends targeted primarily at students after their first or second year at the College, encouraging them to begin their research early in their Wellesley career. Nellie Zuckerman Cohen and Anne Cohen Heller Professorship in the Health Sciences This fund is used to support a professorship in those sciences that are related to health in the broadest sense of the word. Faculty Research Fund for Science and Math (IBM) This fund supports faculty development and student-faculty collaborative research in all of the sciences, and for help in procuring equipment for that research. Frost Endowed Environmental Science/ Studies Fund This fund provides general support of the Environmental Science/Studies Program.

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Norma Wilentz Hess Faculty and Program Fund in Computer Science This fund is used to support visiting faculty who have expertise in computer science and related disciplines. The fund may also be used for salary and additional expenses such as travel, research, equipment, and other academic needs. The Keck Foundation Endowment Fund This fund supports the purchase of scientific equipment, especially equipment used for student-faculty research. George and Adelaide McCague Keller ’45 Science Fund This fund supports research and curriculum development for new and emerging fields of science. Georgeanne Miller Mulhern Fund This fund supports faculty and student research in the sciences with a preference for plant science and zoology. Priscilla C. Patton Endowment Fund This fund supports training for students in oral and written communication of scientific findings, with a preference for environmental and earth sciences. Barbara Peterson Ruhlman ’54 Fund for Interdisciplinary Studies This fund supports new course development or modification of existing courses, including stipends for exceptional students who will serve as teaching fellows with faculty mentors in interdisciplinary courses; student-faculty projects across disciplines, such as the publication of an interdisciplinary journal of student research papers, or the design and production of conferences of multidisciplinary interest; support for interdisciplinary student honors experiences; and support for studentfaculty interdisciplinary collaboration.


Barbara Peterson Ruhlman Endowed Fund for Summer Research in the Social Sciences This fund supports students and faculty advisors who participate in the social sciences summer research program. Students receiving an award from the Fund shall be named Ruhlman Fellows. Allene Lummis Russell ’46 and Paul S. Russell Fund for Neuroscience This fund provides general support to the Neuroscience Program. Science Reserve Fund This fund supports research in the natural sciences and mathematics. Department of Economics Audrey Freedman ’51 Endowed Fund for Students in Economics This fund encourages and supports students who are interested in the study of economics. The internship supports students seeking experience in the field of domestic or international economics. Department of English and Writing Program Department of English and Writing Program Summer Internships This fund supports three summer internships with organizations involved in activities related to publishing, literary research, and journalism (or other media involving writing). In 2013, students interned at Kneerim and Williams Literary Agency, AGNI magazine, W.W. Norton and Co., Library of America, and Slate. Department of French Michele Respaut French House Fellows Program This program funds students pursuing internships in a francophone country, in the field of their choice. The program is open to junior year French majors who have completed

a year or a semester of study in France through the Wellesley-in-Aix program. Priority will be given to students who have spent the entire year in France. Department of German Wellesley Internships in Berlin Wellesley College’s Department of German sponsors a junior year abroad program at the Freie University in Berlin, hosted by Middlebury College. The opportunity to participate in internships at various political, cultural, and social institutions is a feature of the program. Internship stipends are made available by the Susan Rappaport Knafel ’52 International Internship Fund with an application through the Center for Work and Service. Department of Political Science Washington Internship Program This program provides an opportunity for a funded summer internship in Washington, DC. Students can seek placements from among the wide array of government offices, public-interest groups, media and cultural institutions, scientific and medical institutes, and research groups in Washington. Eighteen to 20 interns—who must be in their junior year—are selected without regard to academic major. Each intern is provided a stipend and housing. In addition to the internship placement, the ten week program involves weekly seminars and a mentor program with the Wellesley Club of Washington. Wellesley College’s Department of Political Science has run this program since 1943. The program is supported through the following endowed funds: Bertha S. Adkins ’28 Washington Internship Fund; Washington Summer Internship Fund in Memory of Marguerite Stitt Church ’14; Alona Evans Scholarship Fund for the Washington Internship Program; Sherley Heidenberg Koteen ’40 Washington

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Internship Fund; Anne Livingstone Williamson Quackenbos ’41 Memorial Fund; Laurence S. Rockefeller Fund; Ruth Goldman Schapiro ’47 Washington Internship Fund; and the Washington Internship Anniversary Fund. Department of Psychology Psychology Practicum Program This program allows students to gain hands-on experience in the field of psychology and to acquire course credit through their participation in unpaid internships. The program is run collaboratively by the Department of Psychology and the Center for Work and Service. All participants have an advisor in the psychology department who oversees their internship work through scheduled meetings. The Center for Work and Service consults with potential and currently participating organizations about possible internships, and assists students in determining the placement that best matches both their interests and the organization’s needs. Department of Religion Severinghaus Summer Internship Program in Ministry/Human Services in Memory of Emmavail Luce Severinghaus ’22 This program supports students who wish to pursue internships in ministry or undertake the study of religion and/or the role of religion in society. Students may engage in hands-on work or research through positions with humanitarian or social action agencies, charitable or religious organizations, or policybased institutes. Applications are reviewed by a Department of Religion committee.

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Peace and Justice Studies Emily Greene Balch Class of 1950 Summer Stipend This fund supports one or more students conducting a summer project that analyzes the ways injustice is linked to conflict and that encourages the study of the relationships among peace, justice, and social change. The project must include both analytical and experiential components. The program is funded by the Wellesley Class of 1950. Science Center Summer Research Awards Beckman Scholars Program This award supports student research in the biological sciences and chemistry departments. Wellesley students undertake cutting-edge scientific inquiry over a 15-month period, which covers an academic year and the preceding and following summers. Molly McClelland Bloomfield ’66 Research Scholars Gift This award provides a stipend for summer research for one or more students majoring in science with preference to those with an interest in chemistry or biochemistry. Jean Dreyfus Boissevain Lectureship for Undergraduate Institutions The Jean Dreyfus Boissevain Lectureship award to Wellesley College supports chemistry summer research opportunities for two undergraduate students. It also brought to campus an outstanding scientist who spent two days in the Chemistry Department, meeting with faculty and students and delivering lectures both public and within courses. Brachman Hoffman Fund Faculty Awards Marilyn Brachman Hoffman ’52 has endowed this fund to encourage members of Wellesley College’s science faculty to be creative in their work. These awards are made to faculty 62

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members who may use their funding to support student summer research. The Sally Etherton Cummins Summer Science Research Endowed Fund This endowed fund supports students doing research in the natural sciences under the supervision of a Wellesley faculty member Susan Todd Horton Class of 1910 Trust This gift is designed to support the Science Center’s Summer Research Program and will support Wellesley students in their scientific research projects.

Hubel Summer Research Fellowship The Hubel Summer Research Fellowship is a gift provided by Dr. David Hubel. Students work under the supervision of a Wellesley College Neuroscience faculty member. Amabel Boyce James ’74 Fund for Summer Research in the Sciences Awards from this fund are given to sophomores and juniors to encourage and strengthen their early interest in science. Students work under the supervision of a Wellesley College faculty member. Keck Northeast Astronomy Consortium The Keck Northeast Astronomy Consortium comprises astronomy faculty and students at eight small liberal arts colleges and universities in the northeast. Our goals are to promote astronomy research among our students and to foster faculty and student interaction among the eight campuses. Sara Langer Fund for Research in the Geosciences This fund is awarded to an undergraduate, majoring in geology, who exhibits eager curiosity in the field of geology, a dedication to excellence inside and outside the classroom, and a generosity of spirit in her day-to-day contributions to the College. In addition, the Fund may be used by the Geology Department for student travel stipends.

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Janina A. Longtine ’76 Endowed Fund for Summer Research in the Natural Sciences This fund provides stipends for the “Longtine Fellows” doing research in the natural sciences under the supervision of a Wellesley faculty member. Claudine Malone ’63 Summer Science Research Scholars Gift This gift supports Wellesley students in their summer scientific research projects. Massachusetts Space Grant (MASGC) This is a NASA-funded consortium of fouryear colleges, and universities, community colleges, and public outreach organizations. MASGC’s primary goal is to represent NASA in Massachusetts, to promote public understanding of and support for space exploration and research, and to encourage students to choose courses of study that will lead them to enter the technical work force. One of MASGC’s primary activities is providing fellowships to Massachusetts students to enable them to engage in study and research projects and to attend meetings that they would not be able to do without Space Grant support. National Science Foundation REU (Research Experiences for Undergraduates) This program supports active research participation by undergraduate students in any of the areas of research funded by the National Science Foundation. REU projects involve students in meaningful ways in ongoing research programs or in research projects specifically designed for the REU program. Patterson Summer Research Fellowship The Patterson Summer Research Fellowship is awarded in recognition of a student’s academic excellence and their potential for success in research. Patterson Fellows display an excitement for original discovery and a desire to communicate knowledge to others, and embody the ethos of a Wellesley education. In addition to a summer research


stipend, the Fellowship provides an additional award of $300. The fellowship is awarded to a student nominated by a faculty member in the Neuroscience Program or affiliated departments, including chemistry, biology, psychology, physics, and computer science, and is not normally given to students who have received other major research fellowships or prizes. Roberta Day Staley and Karl A. Staley Fund for Cancer-Related Research Awards This program provides awards in any discipline, including the social sciences and humanities, to undertake cancer-related research. The awards may be used to conduct research with a Wellesley College faculty member or at an off-campus site. Students on Individual Faculty Awards Faculty grants and awards from the following institutions supported undergraduate research at Wellesley: National Institutes of Health National Science Foundation The Eleanor Webster Fund in Chemistry This fund was established by a bequest from our late Professor Eleanor Webster to benefit students. A summer research stipend was awarded in 2013 from this fund. F. Wilson and D. Birney Fund in Astronomy This fund supports faculty and student travel and research. Wellesley Centers for Women Through dynamic internships at the Wellesley Centers for Women (WCW), Wellesley College students help drive social change through research and action programs that put women’s perspectives and experiences at the center of the inquiry. Work at WCW addresses three major areas: the social and economic status of women and girls and the advancement of their human rights in the United States and around the globe; the education, care, and development of children

and youth; and the emotional well-being of families and individuals. Department of Women’s and Gender Studies The Women’s and Gender Studies Department (WGST) offers a stipend to support one summer internship directly involving gender and social change. Applicants must secure their own internship, which may be anywhere in the world.

FELLOWSHIP PROGRAMS For Wellesley College Graduating Seniors Only Jacqueline Krieger Klein ’53 Fellowship in Jewish Studies This award encourages graduating seniors to pursue further education in the field of Jewish Studies. Application information is available from Professor Frances Malino, Department of Jewish Studies and History. Susan Rappaport Knafel ’52 Scholarship for Foreign Study This scholarship is awarded to a member of the graduating class who displays a desire for learning and an ability to impart knowledge to others. The scholarship will fund a year of study at a foreign institution to pursue a specific subject that requires contact with foreign scholars, libraries, or other resources. Susan Rappaport Knafel ’52 Traveling Fellowship This fellowship is awarded to a member of the graduating class who displays an interest in and an acceptance of others, and who displays the ethos of a Wellesley College education. The fellowship will fund a year of purposeful international travel to explore a particular interest, with the requirement that the recipient not remain in the same area for more than two months. t h e

Trustee Scholarship This scholarship is awarded on a competitive basis to graduating seniors who are applying to graduate school. To be considered a candidate, a senior must apply for a Trustee Scholarship or for any of the Wellesley College fellowships for graduate study. The title “Trustee Scholar” is honorary. For Wellesley College Graduating Seniors and Alumnae Anne Louise Barrett Fellowship This fellowship supports graduate study or research, preferably in music, with an emphasis on study or research in musical theory, composition, or the history of music internationally or in the United States. Margaret Freeman Bowers Fellowship This memorial fellowship supports a first year of study in the fields of social work, law, public policy, or public administration, including M.B.A. candidates planning a career in the field of social services. Eugene L. Cox Fellowship This fellowship supports graduate study in medieval or Renaissance history and culture, internationally or in the United States. Professor Elizabeth F. Fisher Fellowship This fellowship supports research or further study in geology or geography, including urban, environmental, or ecological studies. Preference is given to applicants in the fields of geology and geography. Ruth Ingersoll Goldmark Fellowship This fellowship supports graduate study in English literature or composition or in the classics. Horton-Hallowell Fellowship This fellowship supports graduate study in any field, preferably for the last two years of candidacy for the Ph.D. degree or its equivalent, or for private research of an equivalent standard.

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Peggy Howard Fellowship in Economics This fellowship provides financial aid for Wellesley College students or alumnae continuing their study of economics. The economics faculty administers this fellowship and may name one or two recipients, depending on the funding available.

Alice Freeman Palmer Fellowship This fellowship supports study or research internationally or in the United States. The holder must be no more than 26 years old at the time of her appointment and must remain unmarried throughout her tenure. Kathryn Conway Preyer Fellowship This fellowship supports advanced study in history. Vida Dutton Scudder Fellowship This fellowship supports study or research in the fields of literature, political science, or social science.

Mary Elvira Stevens Traveling Fellowship This fellowship supports a student taking up to a year of travel or study outside the United States to benefit from the knowledge and understanding of a global education. Any scholarly, artistic, or cultural purpose may be considered. Except under unusual and compelling circumstances, the committee in recent years has not chosen to fund formal

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Fanny Bullock Workman Fellowship This fellowship supports graduate study in any field. Wellesley-Yenching Graduate Fellowship at Chung Chi College, Hong Kong SAR The fellow’s time may be divided between helping to organize and promote English language activities at Chung Chi College as a whole and serving as a teaching or research assistant for an academic department. Wellesley-Yenching Graduate Fellowships at Ginling College, Nanjing, China The fellows teach English in the classroom for about 12 to 14 hours each week, with office hours as needed.

Harriet A. Shaw Fellowship This fellowship supports study or research in music, art, or allied subjects in the United States or in a foreign country. Preference is given to music candidates; undergraduate work in the history of art is required of other candidates.

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Maria Opasnov Tyler ’52 Scholarship in Russian Studies This scholarship is for graduate study in Russian studies. Sarah Perry Wood Medical Fellowship This fellowship supports the study of medicine at an accredited medical school approved by the American Medical Association.

Edna V. Moffett Fellowship This fellowship is for a young alumna, preferably for a first year of graduate study in history.

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graduate study or Ph.D. dissertation research. Candidates must be at least 25 years old in the year they apply.

Wellesley-Yenching Graduate Fellowship at the National Palace Museum, Taipei, Taiwan Approximately one-half of the fellow’s work is with the National Palace Museum Secretariat, where she writes, translates, and revises English documents for various departments. The other half of the fellow’s work is with one of the museum’s other departments.

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For Women Who Are Graduates of Any American Institution Mary McEwen Schimke Scholarship This scholarship provides a supplemental award to a candidate at least 30 years old and currently engaged in graduate study in literature and/or history. Preference is given to those who major in American Studies. M.A. Cartland Shackford Medical Fellowship This fellowship is for the candidate studying medicine with a view to general practice, not psychiatry.


WELLESLEY COLLEGE SUPPORTED INTERNSHIPS 2013

WELLESLEY COLLEGE GRADUATE FELLOWSHIP RECIPIENTS 2012–2013

NATIONAL FELLOWSHIP COMPETITION RECIPIENTS AND NOMINEES 2012–2013

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WELLESLEY COLLEGE SUPPORTED INTERNSHIP RECIPIENTS 2013 The Madeleine Korbel Albright Institute for Global Affairs Internships Oluwakemi L. Akin-Olugbade ’14, Corporate Council on Africa, Washington, DC Sundus I. A. Al-Bayati ’14, The Cohousing Company: McCamant & Durrett Architects, Nevada City, CA Marsin R. Alshamary ’13** Samantha G. Burke ’14 *** Juliette L. M. Chevallier ’14, Cleantech Group, San Francisco, CA Laura Coffin ’13** Yi Ling Dai ’13** Zarah Z. Devji ’13, Responsive Law, Washington, DC Safaya A. Fawzi ’14, U.S. Department of State, Washington, DC Maia G. Fitzstevens ’13, The Sarvodaya Shramadana Movement, Moratuwa, Sri Lanka Shuyu Gao ’13* Carly L. Gayle ’13, Alam Santi Design, Bali, Indonesia Jennifer Gu ’14, Parinaam Foundation, Bangalore, India Mabelly Guerrero ’14, Caring Foundation, New York, NY Jiwon Hahn ’13, WorldReader, Barcelona, Spain Kelsey N. Heroux ’14, Women’s Foreign Policy Group, Washington, DC Jiun-Yiing Hu ’14* Florence W. Kamonji ’13, Transition Brasilândia, São Paulo, Brazil Shogher T. Keskinyan ’13, charity: water, New York, NY Kat Y. Keung ’14** Nuha Khan ’13** Ana Lomtadze ’14, Radio Free Europe, Prague, Czech Republic Tricia C. Lu ’14, National Cancer Institute, Rockville, MD Sarah N. Mahmood ’14, The Clinton Foundation, New York, NY 66

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Jessica L. Malekos-Smith ’13** Nora E. Mishanec ’14, International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia, The Hague, Netherlands Crystal S. Myung ’14, International Finance Corporation, Washington, DC Prerana Nanda ’14, International Finance Corporation, Washington, DC Nancy Negrete ’14, United Nations Development Program, San José, Costa Rica Dhivya Perumal ’14, Northwestern University’s Center for Healthcare Studies, Chicago, IL Ana S. Plascencia Casillas ’14, Goldman Sachs, Salt Lake City, UT Elze Rackaityte ’13, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA Emma L. Rackstraw ’14, National Economic Council at the White House, Washington, DC Farheen G. M. Rahimtoola ’13** Taibat Salami ’13, UNAIDS, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania Cherry Y. Shen ’14, Bank of America Merrill Lynch, New York, NY Sara M. B. Simon, ’13, Tranquil Tuesdays, Beijing, China Ada P. Smith ’13, The Mariposa Foundation, Cabarete, Dominican Republic Emma C. Smith ’14, The Middle East Institute, Washington, DC Lois K. Taylor-Kamara ’13, The Albright Stonebridge Group, Washington, DC Mayrah W. Udvardi ’14, Global Citizens for Sustainable Development and Vedike, Bangalore, India Anisha Vishwanath ’13** Margaret C. West ’14, The African School for Excellence, Gauteng, South Africa Audrey M. Wozniak ’14, U.S. Department of State, Guangzhou, China Kirstin Yanisch ’13, The United Nations Foundation, Washington, DC *Exempt from internship requirement ** Completed internship in summer 2012 *** Will intern in 2014

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Center for Work and Service Global Engagement Internship Programs American Cities Internship Program Bethesda Allyson L. Pyers ’15, Low Vision Center, Bethesda, MD Chicago Gabriela S. Cooper-Vespa ’15, The Field Museum, Chicago, IL Shuangxou Long ’15, WTTW Chicago Tonight, Chicago, IL Dhivya Perumal ’14, Northwestern University’s Center for Healthcare Studies, Chicago, IL Los Angeles Helen F. Driftmier ’14, Lin Pictures, Burbank, CA Brittany J. Saunders ’14, Michael De Luca Productions, Culver City, CA New York Bridget N. Dunn ’15, Social Accountability International, New York, NY Elena Mironciuc ’13, Blackburn Printmaking Studio, New York, NY Sabrina A. Zurga ’15, Social Accountability International, New York, NY San Francisco Martha P. M. Andrews ’15, The Contemporary Jewish Museum, San Francisco, CA AnnaJoy M. Gillis ’15, The Women’s Foundation of California, San Francisco, CA Rebecca R. Layton ’15, YMCA of the Central Bay Area, Berkeley, CA Christine V. Prevel ’14, Annie’s Homegrown, Berkeley, CA Sadie L. Shelton ’15, The Office of Supervisor Wilma Chan, Oakland, CA Anchor Point Internships in Global Leadership Ilta Ferko ’14, Organização das Mulheres de Cabo Verde (OMCV), São Filipe, Cape Verde


Nora E. Mishanec ’14, International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia, The Hague, Netherlands Taibat Salami ’13, UNAIDS, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania Carine I. Wete ’DS, Organização das Mulheres de Cabo Verde (OMCV), São Filipe, Cape Verde Boston Children’s Hospital Angela C. Ai ’15, Boston Children’s Hospital, Boston, MA Emily L. Cockey ’15, Boston Children’s Hospital, Boston, MA Zi Wei Liao ’15, Boston Children’s Hospital, Boston, MA Amy Zhou ’14, Boston Children’s Hospital, Boston, MA Clinton Health Access Initiative Program Monica A. Setaruddin ’14, Clinton Health Access Initiative, Windhoek, Namibia The Elisabeth Luce Moore ’24 Summer Internships in Asia Beijing Ava H. Y. Chang ’15, Red Fields Partners, Beijing, China Xiaolu Han ’14, ABC News, Beijing, China Amanda H. Hui ’15, Red Fields Partners, Beijing, China Michelle S. Lam ’14, The Economist Group, Beijing, China Hong Kong Pongyupa Siribodhi ’14, Hong Kong Monetary Authority, Hong Kong SAR Xiu Wang ’15, Hong Kong Civic Exchange, Hong Kong SAR Shanghai Lucy Zhu ’15, China Market Research Group, Shanghai, China South Korea Jordan E. Lee ’14, Citizens’ Alliance for North Korean Human Rights, Seoul, South Korea

Japan Sarah B. Hitchner ’14, Tokyo English Life Line, Tokyo, Japan Siqin Wang ’15, Rogers Investment Advisors, Tokyo, Japan QiaoLing Zhang ’14, Rogers Investment Advisors, Tokyo, Japan Lumpkin Summer Institute for Service Learning Shelby A. Baptista ’15, Crittenton Women’s Union, Boston, MA Natalie Chaidez ’15, Renewal House, Roxbury, MA Bethany L. Cohen ’15, The Fenway Institute, Boston, MA Brooke S. Gier ’15, Medical Legal Partnership, Boston, MA Bridgette E. Lemoine ’15, LIFT, Boston, MA Hannah K. Lindquist ’15, Boston Chinatown Neighborhood Center, Boston, MA Loren J. Lock ’15, St. Stephen’s, Boston, MA Alison Z. Nikyar ’15, St. Francis House, Boston, MA Mara Elissa Palma ’15, Office of Senator Harriette L. Chandler, Boston, MA Victoria C. Rines ’15, Boston Area Rape Crisis Center, Boston, MA Meghan E. Sargent ’15, Boston Community Capital, Boston, MA Summer Internships in Psychology Program Stephanie C. Eby ’15, Walker School, Needham, MA Seowoo Lee ’15, Walker School, Needham, MA Margaret C. McConnell ’14, Walker School, Needham, MA Erica R. Perez ’14, Walker School, Needham, MA Taylor D. Stewart ’15, Walker School, Needham, MA Leigh D. Pinkston ’15, Riverside Community Care, Needham, MA

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Vieques Conservation and Historical Trust Internship Wintersession 2013 Alexandra M. Dunn ’15, Vieques Conservation and Historical Trust, Vieques, Puerto Rico Loren J. Lock ’15, Vieques Conservation and Historical Trust, Vieques, Puerto Rico Summer 2013 Maria A. Acosta ’15, Vieques Conservation and Historical Trust, Vieques, Puerto Rico Wellesley Internships in Africa Catherine S. Coravos ’15, Aga Khan Education Services, Kampala, Uganda Faith C. Fells ’15, Aga Khan Educational Services, Kampala, Uganda Elizabeth Y. Kapnick ’15, Centre for CrossCultural Learning, Rabat, Morocco Soojin Kim ’15, The Kusasa Project, Franschhoek, South Africa Eliza W. Marks ’15, The Kusasa Project, Franschhoek, South Africa Jillian N. Seymour ’15, Centre for CrossCultural Learning, Rabat, Morocco Wellesley in Cambodia Nayni Gupta ’14, The Harpswell Foundation, Phnom Penh, Cambodia Wellesley in Europe Tiffany Chen ’15, La Asociación Cordobesa de Parálisis Cerebral y Otras Afecciones Similares (ACPACYS), Córdoba, Spain Lavanya Ganesh ’15, The Henry Jackson Society, London, United Kingdom Kathryn W. Griffith ’15, Photo Library Vatican Museums, Vatican City Emily K. Weddle ’14, Peggy Guggenheim Collection, Venice, Italy Wellesley Internships in India Fiona J. Almeida ’DS, Holy Cross Convent, Karnataka, India Grace S. Atherton ’15, Holy Cross Convent, Karnataka, India Rebecca M. George ’15, Action India, New Delhi, India

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Brodie R. Mistry ’15, Aga Khan Educational Services, Mumbai, India Milena Radoman ’15, Operation ASHA, New Delhi, India Elizabeth H. Yows-Johnson ’15, Observer Research Foundation, Mumbai, India Wellesley Internships in Latin America Hannah L. Ahlblad ’14, El Museo de Arte de Ponce, Ponce, Puerto Rico Nancy Negrete ’14, United Nations Development Program, San José, Costa Rica Elizabeth A. Smith ’14, Poder Ciudadano, Buenos Aires, Argentina Center for Work and Service Grants Programs Mahnaz Ispahani Bartos ’79 Endowed Internship Fund Mayrah W. Udvardi ’14, Global Citizens for Sustainable Development and Vedike, Bangalore, India The Paul B. Beal and Mona Phillips Beal Internship Megan J. Mills ’14, Jean V. Naggar Literary Agency, Inc., New York, NY Makenna G. Murray ’14, 3D Virtual Design Technology Inc., Sonoma, CA Bernstein Endowed Internship Fund Elze Rackaityte ’13, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA Emma L. Rackstraw ’14, National Economic Council at the White House, Washington, DC Blessing Way Summer Public Service Internship Sadie L. Shelton ’15, The Office of Supervisor Wilma Chan, Oakland, CA Barbara Bush Award for Volunteerism Yassmina Macer ’13, Resilient Sisterhood Project, Boston, MA Sarah L. Myoung ’14, Bergen Regional Medical Center, Paramus, NJ Ana K. Oritz ’14, University of North Texas Health Science Center’s HABLE Program, Fort Worth, TX 68

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C-ROM Student Internship Fund Karina A. Gonzalez de Real ’15, Office of Congresswoman Michelle Lujan Grisham, Albuquerque, NM Maya C. Robles-Wong ’15, Office of Assemblymember Joan Buchanan, Sacramento, CA Wei Fong Chu Chao Endowed Fund for International Internships Nayni Gupta ’14, The Harpswell Foundation, Phnom Penh, Cambodia Class of 1959 Endowed Fund for Internships Oluwakemi L. Akin-Olugbade ’14, Corporate Council on Africa, Washington, DC Safaya A. Fawzi ’14, U.S. Department of State, Washington, DC Kelsey N. Heroux ’14, Women’s Foreign Policy Group, Washington, DC Class of 1962 Student Internship Fund Zoe R. Magid ’15, State Representative Danielle Gregoire, Boston, MA Alejandra D. Muniz ’15, El Paso County Government, El Paso, TX Class of 1969 Community Service Internship Fund Pamela Akametalu ’14, Keiro Nursing Home, Gardena, CA Maeghan M. Provencher ’14, Breakthrough Manchester, Manchester, NH Arthur Vining Davis Internship Fund Zahrah Z. Devji ’13, Responsive Law, Washington, DC Tricia C. Lu ’14, National Cancer Institute, Rockville, MD Crystal S. Myung ’14, International Finance Corporation, Washington, DC The EFW Memorial Endowed Fund for Internships Maia G. Fitzstevens ’13, The Sarvodaya Shramadana Movement, Moratuwa, Sri Lanka

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Sandra Brown Eakins ’59 Fund for Internships Juliette L. M. Chevallier ’14, Cleantech Group, San Francisco, CA Maryam Homayoun-Eisler ’89 Endowed Internship Fund Sundus I. A. Al-Bayati ’14, The Cohousing Company: McCamant & Durrett Architects, Nevada City, CA Emma C. Smith ’14, The Middle East Institute, Washington, DC Amelia C. Fawcett ’78 Endowed Fund for Internships Jiwon Hahn ’13, WorldReader, Barcelona, Spain Ana Lomtadze ’14, Radio Free Europe, Prague, Czech Republic Beth Langerman Friedman ’82 Endowed Fund for Internships Sarah N. Mahmood ’14, The Clinton Foundation, New York, NY Kirstin Yanisch ’13, The United Nations Foundation, Washington, DC Susan Todd Horton 1910 Internship Fund Helen F. Driftmier ’14, Lin Pictures, Burbank, CA Charlotte J. Hulme ’14, U.S. Department of State, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia Emma R. Mrkonic ’14, Pizza Hut Inc., Plano, TX Rachel F. Reed ’14, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA Brittany J. Saunders ’14, Michael De Luca Productions, Culver City, CA Mary Sidell James ’65 Endowed Fund for Internships Sara M. B. Simon ’13, Tranquil Tuesdays, Beijing, China Ada P. Smith ’13, The Mariposa Foundation, Cabarete, Dominican Republic The Jeniam Foundation Internship Grant Shogher T. Keskinyan ’13, charity: water, New York, NY Mackenzie A. Klema ’14, Brooklyn Grange, New York, NY Nicole A. Lobodzinski ’14, Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC


Dorothy Chao Jenkins ’68 Endowed Fund for Internships Jennifer Gu ’14, Parinaam Foundation, Bangalore, India Florence W. Kamonji ’13, Transition Brasilândia, São Paulo, Brazil Susan Rappaport Knafel ’52 Internship Fund Ama Y. Adi-Dako ’14, Fingerling Films, Belfast, United Kingdom Dana F. Al-Jawamis ’14, Royal Hashemite Court, Amman, Jordan Eileen Y. L. Cham ’14, ArtPod, Berlin, Germany Catherine S. Coravos ’15, Aga Khan Education Services, Kampala, Uganda Faith C. Fells ’15, Aga Khan Educational Services, Kampala, Uganda Lavanya Ganesh ’15, The Henry Jackson Society, London, United Kingdom Rebecca M. George ’15, Action India, New Delhi, India Kathryn W. Griffith ’15, Photo Library, Vatican Museums, Vatican City Elizabeth Y. Kapnick ’15, Centre for Cross Cultural Learning, Rabat, Morocco Brodie R. Mistry ’15, Aga Khan Educational Services, Mumbai, India Lamiya Mowla ’13, Department of Physics, Oxford University, Oxford, United Kingdom Milena Radoman ’15, Operation ASHA, New Delhi, India Laura M. Schiemichen ’14, The European Parliament, Brussels, Belgium Monica A. Setaruddin ’14, Clinton Health Access Initiative, Windhoek, Namibia Jillian N. Seymour ’15, Centre for Cross Cultural Learning, Rabat, Morocco Emily K. Weddle ’14, Peggy Guggenheim Collection, Venice, Italy Elizabeth H. Yows-Johnson ’15, Observer Research Foundation, Mumbai, India

The Shirley Heidenberg Koteen ’40 Endowed Internship Fund for Jewish Studies Martha P. M. Andrews ’15, The Contemporary Jewish Museum, San Francisco, CA Oset Babur ’15, The Diarna Project, New York, NY Shawna C. Burhans, ’15, The Diarna Project, Boston, MA Susan Saltzbart Kilsby ’80 Endowed Fund for Internships Margaret C. West ’14, The African School for Excellence, Gauteng, South Africa Kilsby South Africa Internship Gift Soojin Kim ’15, The Kusasa Project, Franschhoek, South Africa Eliza W. Marks ’15, The Kusasa Project, Franschhoek, South Africa Marian H. Littleford Endowed Internship Fund Maria A. Acosta ’15, Vieques Conservation & Historical Trust, Vieques, Puerto Rico Alexandra M. Dunn ’15, Vieques Conservation & Historical Trust, Vieques, Puerto Rico Loren J. Lock ’15, Vieques Conservation & Historical Trust, Vieques, Puerto Rico The Rosemary Lonergan ’44 and John Todd President’s Discretionary Fund Carly L. Gayle ’13, Alam Santi Design, Bali, Indonesia Mabelly Guerrero ’14, Caring Foundation, New York, NY The Elisabeth Luce Moore ’24 Summer Internships in Asia Ava H. Y. Chang ’15, Red Fields Partners, Beijing, China Eve C. Davis ’14, U.S. Department of State, Shenyang, China Xiaolu Han ’14, ABC News, Beijing, China Sarah B. Hitchner ’14, Tokyo English Lifeline, Tokyo, Japan Bailu Huang ’15, China First Capital, Shenzhen, China t h e

Amanda H. Hui ’15, Red Fields Partners, Beijing, China Michelle S. Lam ’14, The Economist Group, Beijing, China Jordan E. Lee ’14, Citizens’ Alliance for North Korean Human Rights, Seoul, South Korea Navaporn McClean ’14, China Policy, Beijing, China Pongyupa Siribodhi ’14, Hong Kong Monetary Authority, Hong Kong SAR Yang Tian ’14, Toyota Motor Co., Tokyo, Japan Siqin Wang ’15, Rogers Investment Partners, Tokyo, Japan Xiu Wang ’15, Hong Kong Civic Exchange, Hong Kong SAR Audrey M. Wozniak ’14, U.S. Department of State, Guangzhou, China QiaoLing Zhang ’14, Rogers Investment Partners, Tokyo, Japan Yijia Zhao ’16, Shenzhen Museum, Shenzhen, China Lucy Zhu ’15, China Market Research Group, Shanghai, China The Mollie Green Lumpkin ’25 Fund for Experiential Learning in Latin America Nancy Negrete ’14, United Nations Development Program, San José, Costa Rica Elizabeth A. Smith ’14, Poder Ciudadano, Buenos Aires, Argentina The Lumpkin Family Internships for the Environment Hannah C. Davelman ’16, Duke Farms, Hillsborough, NJ Olivia P. Froehlich ’14, Technische Universität München, Freising, Germany MasterCard Microfinance Internships Fund Fiona J. Almeida ’DS, Holy Cross Convent, Karnataka, India Grace S. Atherton ’15, Holy Cross Convent, Karnataka, India Lena J. P. Cardoso ’14, Washington C.A.S.H., Seattle, WA

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The Lia Gelin Poorvu ’56 Internship Fund Prerana Nanda ’14, International Finance Corporation, Washington, DC Lois K. Taylor-Kamara ’13, Albright Stonebridge Group, Washington, DC Barbara Scott Preiskel ’45 Endowed Fund for Internships Hannah L. Ahlblad ’14, El Museo de Arte de Ponce, Ponce, Puerto Rico Madeline B. Buckley ’14, All Heart PR, Boston, MA Alexa L. Williams ’14, Liberty Square Group, Washington, DC Public Service Internship Fund Emily L. Gell ’14, Advocates for Children of New York, New York, NY Anne Hamilton ’14, Chicago Metropolitan Battered Women’s Network, Chicago, IL Raquet Family Foundation Grace H. Bachman ’15, Massachusetts Commission on the Status of Women, Boston, MA Kayleigh N. Butler ’14, Massachusetts Women’s Political Caucus, Boston, MA Katherine E. Leung ’14, National Organization for Women, Washington, DC Service Opportunity Stipend Tiffany Chen ’15, La Asociación Cordobesa de Parálisis Cerebral y Otras Afecciones Similares (ACPACYS), Córdoba, Spain Tong Chen ’16, AES World Languages and Cultures Institute, Boston, MA Katherine E. Di Lucido ’15, U.S. Department of the Treasury, Washington DC Stephanie C. Eby ’15, Walker School, Needham, MA Ilhan A. Esse ’16, Pillsbury United Communities, Minneapolis, MN Laura A. Harris-Schlotterbeck ’14, Phillips Brooks House Association, Cambridge, MA Kaley T. Haskell ’14, Phillips Brooks House Association, Cambridge, MA Rebecca R. Layton ’15, YMCA of the Central Bay Area, Berkeley, CA 70

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Seowoo Lee ’15, Walker School, Needham, MA Rebecca P. Lucas ’14, Iktisadi Kalkinma Vakfi/ Economic Development Foundation, Istanbul, Turkey Margaret C. McConnell ’14, Walker School, Needham, MA Kaden A. Mohamed ’14, Class Action, Jamaica Plain, MA Leigh D. Pinkston ’15, Riverside Community Care, Needham, MA Erica R. Perez ’14, Walker School, Needham, MA Jeni N. Prater ’14, 826 Boston, Roxbury, MA Allyson L. Pyers ’15, Low Vision Center, Bethesda, MD Michele F. Ross ’DS, Boston CASA, Boston, MA Nikita U. Saladi ’16, Heartland Alliance, Chicago, IL Connie C. Shen ’14, U.S. Department of State, Washington, DC Taylor D. Stewart ’15, Walker School, Needham, MA Diana S. Su ’14, The Legal Aid Society, New York, NY Asia B. Young ’14, Mary’s Center, Washington, DC Thea A. Zerbe, ’16, Center for Gender and Refugee Studies, San Francisco, CA Beth K. Smith Internship in Public Service Olivia A. Baker ’14, Massachusetts Commission on the Status of Women, Boston, MA Gabriela S. Cooper-Vespa ’15, The Field Museum, Chicago, IL Bridget N. Dunn ’15, Social Accountability International, New York, NY Laura Fandino ’14, Association for Research into Crimes Against Art, Amelia, Italy Camylle J. Fleming ’14, Center for Strategic and International Studies, Washington, DC AnnaJoy M. Gillis ’15, The Women’s Foundation of California, San Francisco, CA Michaela R. Haffner ’14, The Museum of Modern Art, New York, NY Sarah A. Halbert ’14, Picower Institute of Learning and Memory, Cambridge, MA

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Victoria M. Hills ’14, Brigham & Women’s Hospital/Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Jamaica Plain, MA Anna Krauthamer ’15, The Library of America, New York, NY Alison K. Lanier ’15, AGNI Magazine, Boston, MA Shuangxou Long ’15, WTTW Chicago Tonight, Chicago, IL Sarah V. Mejia ’14, UNLV Auditory Cognition and Development Lab, Las Vegas, NV Elena Mironciuc ’13, Robert Blackburn Printmaking Studio, New York, NY Sun Joo Paik ’14, Harvard School of Dental Medicine, Boston, MA Sabrina A. Zurga ’15, Social Accountability International, New York, NY The Helen Wallace Health Sciences Internship Fund Gabriela Kovacikova ’14, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL Dhivya Perumal ’14, Northwestern University’s Center for Healthcare Studies, Chicago, IL The Oprah Winfrey Award for Volunteerism Susan A. Huang ’14, Phillips Brooks House Association, Cambridge, MA Davis Museum Summer Internship Program (Internships took place on the Wellesley College Campus unless noted otherwise.) Curatorial Imani C. Higginson ’14 Morgan E. Moore ’15 Maria Nitkin ’13 Collections and Care Management Athena M. Knisley ’15 Technology Anna C. Egeland ’16 Liliane Pingoud Soriano Curatorial Fellowship at the Musée du Louvre, Paris Julia G. Orlov ’13


Office of the Provost and Dean of the College Mary M. and Edward B. Allen Fellows for Undergraduate Research in Biological Chemistry Serry Park ’16 Gladys L. Bode Faculty and Student Research Endowment in Sciences Melissa M. D’Andrea ’14 Ethel K. Bowers Dean’s Discretionary Fund Elizabeth C. M. Kashinski ’15 T.T. and W.F. Chao Summer Scholars Program in Natural Sciences Joanna A. Bi ’15 Monica A. T. Gates ’15 Estelle Kim ’15 Rebecca J. Rubinstein ’15 Elena N. Shaw ’15 Faculty Research Fund for Science & Math (IBM) Xixi Lu ’15 Ana S. Sandu ’14 Frost Endowed Environmental Science/Studies Fund Tania Ahmed ’16 George and Adelaide McCague Keller Science Fund Alexandra M. Dunn ’15 Heather L. Kosakowski ’DS Georgeanne Miller Mulhern Fund Nevatha Mathialagan ’15 Dania N. Wright ’14 Priscilla C. Patton Endowment Fund Shivani Kuckreja ’16 Caroline K. Templeton ’14 Barbara Peterson Ruhlman Endowed Fund for Summer Research in the Social Sciences Asha Albuquerque ’14 Elizabeth K. Ericksen ’14 Rebecca S. Fishbein ’15 Em F. Gamber ’14 Joanna G. Garcia ’14

Abigail L. Golden ’15 Rosa I. Guzman ’14 Tinsa A. Harding ’16 Suhayla Islam ’15 Keira C. Kennedy ’14 Syeda M. Mahbub ���15 Christina G. Rozek ’15

Department of Economics The Audrey Freedman ‘51 Endowed Fund for Students in Economics Klaudia Marku ‘14, Deloitte Albania, Tirana, Albania

Barbara Peterson Ruhlman ’54 Fund for Interdisciplinary Studies Charlotte H. Benishek ’16, Science Center Claire I. Milldrum ’15, Science Center Heather H. Petrow ’DS, Science Center Lindsey L. Tang ’15, Science Center Barbara Peterson Ruhlman ’54 Fund for Interdisciplinary Studies and Endowed Fund for Summer Research in the Social Sciences Helen M. Willis ’14 Janna M. M. Zimmerman ’14 Allene Lummis Russell ’46 and Paul S. Russell Fund for Neuroscience Jingjing Li ’15 Science Reserve Fund Mavis D. Boamah ’14 Jenny Chen ’16 Amyeo A. Jereen ’14 Erin Yeagle ’13

Department of English and Writing Program Remy O. Cawley ’13, Kneerim and Williams Literary Agency, Boston, MA Anna Krauthamer ’15, The Library of America, New York, NY Alison K. Lanier ’15, AGNI Magazine, Boston, MA Lucie E. Lozinski ’14, W.W. Norton and Co., New York, NY Mariana Zepeda ’14, Slate, Washington, DC Department of French Michele Respaut French House Fellows Program Alexa P. Keegan ’14, Recticel, Gennevilliers, France Rachel Swengel ’14, Le Fournil de Notre Dame, Marseille, France Department of German Wellesley-in-Berlin Eileen Y. L. Cham ’14, ArtPod, Berlin, Germany

Department of Art Grace Slack McNeil Student Internships, New England Arts and Architecture Program Mary E. Benn ’14, Anne Whitney Project, Wellesley College Archives, Wellesley, MA Rebecca S. Freeman-Slade ’14, The Esplanade Association, Boston, MA Dominique R. Ledoux ’14, Historic New England, Boston and Haverhill, MA Naureen Mazumdar ’14, Enterprise Rose Architectural Fellowship, Enterprise Community Partners, Wellesley, MA Lauren M. Richmond ’14, Arts of the Americas Department, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, MA Christina M. Rieth ’14, Boston Preservation Alliance, Boston, MA t h e

Department of Political Science Wellesley in Washington Internship Program Michelle M. Al-Ferzly ’14, Middle East Institute, Washington, DC Ayan A. Ali ’14, Open Government Partnership, Washington, DC Asha Ayub ’14, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Women’s Health, Washington, DC Kristina A. Bracero ’14, International Arts and Artists, Washington, DC Lillian E. Elsner ’14, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Disability, Aging and Long-Term Care Policy, Washington, DC

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Bacall I. Furmaniuk ’14, New Organizing Institute, Washington, DC Lelia G. Gessner ’14, DC Department of Health, Washington, DC Mollie S. Hutchings ’14, DC Office of Historic Preservation, Washington, DC Gabrielle D. Jones ’14, EcoAgriculture Partners, Washington, DC Soomi Kim ’14, U.S. Department of the Treasury, Washington, DC Eda D. Lee ’14, U.S. Korea Initiative of SAIS, Washington, DC Jennifer E. Migliore ’14, The Office of U.S. Senator Elizabeth Warren, Washington, DC Monica Rodriguez ’14, Urban Education Leaders Internship Program (UELIP), Washington, DC Lindsey G. Shepardson ’14, Office of the Vice President, Washington, DC Liyang Sun ’14, The Brookings Institution (Global Economy & Development Center), Washington, DC Maria M. Taha ’14, Washington DC Office of Volunteerism, Washington, DC Blair L. Uhlig ’14, DC Department of Health, Director’s Office, Washington, DC Mai Yer Xiong ’14, Southeast Asian Resource Action Center (SEARAC), Washington, DC Laura W. M. Yan ’14, American-Arab AntiDiscrimination Committee, Washington, DC Department of Psychology Psychology Practicum Program Hannah E. Friedman ’13, Boston Children’s Hospital, Boston, MA Meredith G. Healy ’13, Walker School, Needham, MA Katherine S. Howe ’14, Brigham & Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA Jessica A. Mullen ’13, Neponset River House, Norwood, MA Emma R. Pajer ’13, Judge Baker Children’s Center, Boston, MA

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Temple R. Price ’13, Riverside Community Care, Needham, MA Emaline K. Surgenor ’13, Walker School, Needham, MA Department of Religion Emmavail Luce Severinghaus ’22 Summer Internship Program in Ministry/Human Services Julie E. Censullo ’14, Facing History and Ourselves, Brookline, MA Mona I. Elminyawi ’14, NYS Neighborhood Preservation Coalition, Albany, NY Katherine Y. Joh ’14, Help One Child, Los Altos, CA Cicia X. Lee ’14, World Vision International, Monrovia, CA Grace E. Roberts ’14, Helping out HELP, Draper, UT

Susan Todd Horton Class of 1910 Trust Iglika B. Atanassova ’15 Bao Minh T. Dang ’14 Sarah D. Finkelstein ’14 Anika M. Guha ’14 Anjali L. Kayal ’14 Yeon J. Lee ’15 Shonda R. Luke ’15 Arden C. Radford ’15 Hailey Scofield ’13 Susan Tang ’15 Hubel Summer Research Fellowship Jiun-Yiing Hu ’14

Department of Peace and Justice Studies

Amabel Boyce James ’74 Fund for Summer Research in the Sciences Paige E. Miranda ‘14 Catherine M. Oleskewicz ’14 Jody F. Platto ’DS Tejaswini P. Reddy ’15 Hannah A. Stone ‘14

Emily Greene Balch Class of 1950 Summer Stipend Ace Wang ’14, Summer of Solutions, Ithaca, NY

Sara Langer Fund for Research in Geosciences Michaela A. Fendrock ’15 Kennedy E. Stomps ’15

Science Center Summer Research Awards

Janina A. Longtine ’76 Fund for Summer Research in the Natural Sciences Karin Darakananda ’14 Allyn V. Morris’14

Beckman Scholars Program Katherine D. Tran ’15 Molly McClelland Bloomfield ’66 Research Scholars Gift Clarissa A. Verish ’16 Brachman Hoffman Fund Faculty Small Grants Summer Research Awards Danielle C. Gore ’15 Serena Liu, Post-Bac Fellow The Sally Etherton Cummins ’58 Summer Science Research Fellowship Fund Wanyi Li ’16

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Claudine Malone ’63 Summer Science Research Scholars Gift Napim Chirathivat ’15 Massachusetts Space Grant Consortium Rose K. Gibson ’16 Ashley A. Iguina ’16 National Science Foundation REU (Research Experiences for Undergraduates) Rebecca Berger, Mt. Holyoke College Katie Callahan, University of Massachusetts-Amherst


Kimberly Duarte, Bunker Hill Community College Lucica Hiller, Bunker Hill Community College Abigail J. Kanyer ’14 Bethany Kaufman, Case Western Reserve University Jane E. Lodwick ’14 Erin Nissen, Colorado Mesa University Elizabeth A. McLoughlin ’14 Sara N. Musetti ’15 Wellesley College Office of the President Andrea J. Bae ’14 Kaitlin S. Bohon ’14 Victoria K. Brown ’15 Kendall R. G. O. Tada ’14 Patterson Summer Research Fellowship Savannah Hauge ’16 Catherine E. Ho ’16 Petroleum Research Fund Hong Zhang ’15 Roberta Day Staley and Karl A. Staley Fund for Cancer-related Research Awards Alyssa F. Bacay ’14 Tamara Biary ’15 Connie Chen ’15 Sarah A. Halbert ’14 Kellen M. Kartub ’14 Maria A. LaBouyer ’15 Yuka I. Milton ’14 Zoe E. Moyer ’15 Harini Natarajan ’15 Helena W. Qi ’14 Sukin Sim ’16 Penny Wang ’14 Students on Individual Faculty Awards: National Institutes of Health Julia A. Klaips ’14 Raji R. Nagalla ’14 Stephanie Schmitt ’13 Karina P. Verma ’14

Students on Individual Faculty Awards: National Science Foundation Tiffany Chen ’15 Casey E. Grote ’14 Catherine Guo ’14 Nicole E. Hatem ’14 Cassandra L. Hoef ’15 Farah Mahmud ’15 Margaret A. O’Keefe ’16 Johannah L. Okerlund ’14 Jane Qu ’14 Bhargavi Ramanathan ’16 Abigail J. Raz ’14 Rebecca T. Scanlon ’15 Elina S. Segreto ’15 Sravanti Tekumalla ’16 Victoria R. Wang ’16 Catherine Wright ’13 Laura Zeng ’16 The Eleanor R. Webster Fund in Chemistry Jung Y. Kwon ’14 F. Wilson and D. Birney Fund in Astronomy Michaela A. Fendrock ’15 Wellesley Centers for Women (Internships took place on the Wellesley College campus unless noted otherwise.) Kristen Ferguson ’12, Anne Murray Ladd Student Research Intern Sarah B. Hitchner ’14, The Shirley R. Sherr Student Research Intern Temple R. Price ’13, Class of ’67 Intern Meredith W. Stoner ’13, Morse Fellow Department of Women’s and Gender Studies Olivia K. Dumont ’15, Center for Young Women’s Health, Boston Children’s Hospital, Boston, MA

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WELLESLEY COLLEGE GRADUATE FELLOWSHIP RECIPIENTS 2012-2013 Trustee Award Mariya Ivanova Chokova ’13, United States Kathryn Alexa Jackson ’13, South Africa Lucy Yichu Liu ’13, United States Carolyn Therese McHugh ’13, United States

Alice Freeman Palmer Fellowship Olivia Anna Kristina Bergman ’12, United States

Anne Louise Barrett Fellowship Anne Helene Goldberg ’10, United States

Vida Dutton Scudder Fellowship Julia Lisa Denardo Roney ’12, United States

Margaret Freeman Bowers Fellowship Marsin Rahim Alshamary ’13, United States

M.A. Cartland Shackford Medical Fellowship Mita Vikram Shah ’10, United States

Eugene L. Cox Fellowship Liise Lehtsalu ’09, Italy

Harriet A. Shaw Fellowship Beatrice Patricia Hunt ’07, United States

Professor Elizabeth F. Fisher Fellowship Jennifer Bliss Hatch ’10, United States Ruth Ingersoll Goldmark Fellowship Laura Virginia Hill ’07, United States Horton-Hallowell Fellowship Fatima Burney ’10, United States Aileen Cruz ’05, United States Kathleen Elizabeth Scott ’10, United Kingdom Joanna Elizabeth Swafford ’06, United States Peggy Howard Fellowship in Economics Jahanara Ahmad ’11, United States Siobhan O’Keefe ’10, United States Sheng Shen ’10, United States Tejaswi Velayudhan ’10, United States Lin Zu ’09, United States

Edna V. Moffett Fellowship Sarah Elizabeth Olsen ’08, United States Kathleen Elizabeth Scorza ’07, United States

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Maria Opasnov Tyler ’52 Scholarship in Russian Studies Anne Christine Burke ’11, United States Elena Mironciuc ’13, United States Sarah Perry Wood Medical Fellowship Laura Huang ’09, United States Fanny Bullock Workman Fellowship Alia Noelle Gurtov ’07, United States Susan Rappaport Knafel ’52 Scholarship for Foreign Study Elze Rackaityte ’13, France Susan Rappaport Knafel ’52 Traveling Fellowship Tenzin Yewong Dongchung ’13, Canada, Israel, Peru, Turkey and the United Kingdom

Jacqueline Krieger Klein ’53 Fellowship in Jewish Studies Abigail Rose Weitman ’13, India and Israel Gayron Louise Berman ’13, Israel

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Kathryn Conway Preyer Fellowship Amy Lynn Damon ’09, United States

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Mary Elvira Stevens Traveling Fellowship Christine Harland Chamberlain, B.A., Wellesley College, ’67, Argentina, Brazil, Chile, United Kingdom, the Netherlands and Uruguay Mary Hampson Minifie, B.A., Wellesley College, ’73, Cambodia, Costa Rica, Haiti, and Jordan

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Ana Phakhin, B.A., Wellesley College, ’06, Australia, Belgium, Brazil, Chile, Czech Republic, France, Germany, Netherlands and Turkey Maria San Filippo, B.A., Wellesley College,’ 98, Argentina, Austria, Chile, Czech Republic, Finland, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Romania and Turkey Wellesley-Yenching Graduate Fellowships Virginia Hung ’13, Wellesley-Yenching Graduate Fellow at Chung Chi College, Hong Kong Christina Jen-Chia Hsieh ’13, WellesleyYenching Graduate Fellow at Ginling College, China Lela Ashton Paultre ’12, Wellesley-Yenching Graduate Fellow at Ginling College, China Amy Wang ’13, Wellesley-Yenching Graduate Fellow at National Palace Museum, Taiwan


NATIONAL FELLOWSHIP COMPETITION RECIPIENTS AND NOMINEES 2012-2013 Acumen Global Fellow Kathleen Berroth ’02, Ghana Beckman Scholarship Katherine Davina Tran ’15, United States Boren Scholarship Emma Claire Smith ’14, Egypt Berit Paxson-Tarnai ’15, China Chinese Government Scholarships Quynh-Diem Lam ’12, China Stella Bolade Odewumi ’13, China Kathryn Wasserman Davis 100 Projects for Peace Award Michelle Hyei Jung Kang ’13, South Africa French Government Teaching Assistantship in English Molly Rose Cyr ’13, France Simone Margueretha Deslarzes ’13, France Rebecca L. Reeve ’13, France Kirstin Michelle Yanisch ’13, France Elizabeth Ashley Yazgi ’13, France Fulbright Student Program Carolyn Bonner Campbell ’13, Binational Business Internship to Mexico Claire Ames Fogarty ’12, English Teaching Assistantship to Mexico Rebecca Danielle McClain ’13, Full Grant to Germany Rebecca Kathleen Ruhl ’13 English Teaching Assistantship to Russia Christina Moriah Smith ’13, English Teaching Assistantship to Brazil Madeline Rose Weeks ’11, Fulbright-Garcia Robles Grant to Mexico Fulbright UK Summer Institute Claire Jun Tam ’15, United Kingdom

Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarships Emma Claire Smith ’14, Egypt Nancy Negrete ’14, Argentina Joanna Emilia Poget ’14, South Korea Barry M. Goldwater Scholarship Farrah Christina Yhee ’14, Scholar, United States Killam Fellowship Katherine Eugenie di Lucido ’15, Canada James Madison Graduate Fellowship Kathleen Elizabeth Scorza ’07, United States Mellon Mays Undergraduate Fellowship Fiona Jamal Almeida ’15, United States Nicole Lynn Blansett ’15, United States Imani Caroline Higginson ’15, United States Diana Lee ’15, United States National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship Susan Claflin ’09, United States Emily Estes ’10, United States Lily Tsoi ’11, United States Shannon Mary Ward ’13, United States Point Foundation Scholar Erika N. Turner ’13, United States Paul and Daisy Soros Fellowship Dana Im ’10, United States Thomas J. Watson Fellowship Alice Choe ’13, East Timor, India, Jordan and Thailand Whitaker International Fellows and Scholars Program Kathryn Alexa Jackson ’13, South Africa Woodrow Wilson-Rockefeller Brothers Fund Fellowship for Aspiring Teachers of Color Rusi Li ’13, United States t h e

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INDEX Advisors and Organizers Alicea-Westort, Mared 11, 37 Anderson, Scott D. 13, 48 Arciniegas, Diego 7, 21 Bauer, Deborah E. 10, 33 Bauman, Connie L. 11, 39 Beatty, Barbara R. 8, 11, 12, 26, 37, 40 Bhogal, Gurminder K. 11, 40 Brachfeld-Child, Sheila P. 9, 32 Britto, Vanessa M. 5, 17 Buchholtz, Emily A. 7, 23 Burke, Tom 5, 7, 11, 17, 24, 37, 40 Candland, Christopher 10, 35 Carpenter, Angela C. 8, 28 Charmaraman, Linda 13, 47 Coile, Courtney C. 6, 19 Confortini, Catia C. 5, 8, 15, 26 Cuba, Lee 1, 7, 10, 22, 36 Darling, Louise E. 11, 12, 37, 43 Davis, Elizabeth L. 8, 12, 28, 41 Egron-Sparrow, Sylvaine V. 7, 13, 21, 46 Flynn, Nolan T. 11, 38 Galarneau, Charlene A. 6, 13, 18, 45 Gascon-Vera, Elena 10, 35 Geller, Barbara 6, 19 Genero, Nancy P. 9, 29 Goddard, Stacie E. 8, 13, 27, 46 Grattan, Laura K. 7, 21 Greer, Brenna W. 5, 14 Haines, David R. 7, 24 Hajj, Nadya S. 9, 13, 30, 45 Hall, Nancy A. 5, 7, 15, 24 Hampson, Katherine R. 8, 27 Han, Hahrie C. 6, 18 Helluy, Simone M. 12, 43

Higgins, Monica R. 8, 13, 27, 48 Hodge, Thomas P. 9, 31 Hong, Soo 5, 11, 12, 16, 37, 41 Hufstader, Ted 1, 6, 10, 12, 17, 32, 36, 42 Hughes, Jeffrey E. 12, 43 Imber, Jonathan B. 6, 18 Jones, Kristina N. 9, 11, 29, 39 Joseph, William A. 8, 26 Joyce, Joseph P. 6, 9, 10, 13, 20, 31, 36, 47 Just, Marion R. 7, 10, 22, 34 Kakavouli, Stella 11, 39 Kapteijns, Lidwien E. 5, 16 Keskin, Pinar 1, 6, 7, 20, 22 Knouf, Nicholas A. 13, 46 Kodera, T. James 7, 24 Kolodny, Nancy H. 12, 42 Koniger, Martina 13, 48 Koski, Katie D. 6, 9, 10, 12, 19, 32, 33, 41, 42 Lange, Karen M. 11, 38 Laviosa, Flavia 5, 11, 16, 40 Lee, Sohie M. 9, 29 Lee, Sun-Hee 7, 13, 21, 46 Lindauer, David L. 5, 10, 13, 16, 36, 45 Malino, Frances G. 8, 27 Mandeville, Elizabeth A. 10, 33 Matthews, Adam G. 7, 11, 13, 23, 38, 48 Mattila, Heather R. 12, 44 McGibbon, Phyllis I. 10, 34 McKnight, Robin L. 11, 39 McNamara, Martha J. 1, 5, 7, 9, 12, 17, 22, 30, 31, 42 Mehalakes, Elaine 1, 5, 14 Muhammad, Salwa Nur 1, 5, 7, 14, 25 Mustafaraj, Eniana 13, 47

Natividad, Maria D. 5, 9, 12, 17, 32, 41 Obeng, Pashington J. 8, 13, 25, 45 O’Donnell, Kimberly 1, 12, 44 Oles, James 11, 40 Orquiza, Rene Alexander D. 9, 10, 30, 36 Osorio, Alejandra B. 5, 15 Ozawa, Kazuko 5, 10, 13, 14, 32, 46

Weerapana, Akila 8, 26 Wink, Paul M. 11, 12, 38, 44 Wood, Winifred J. 1, 10, 35

Radhakrishnan, Smitha 8, 10, 28, 34 Ramos, Carlos 8, 10, 25, 33 Reisberg, Paul I. 7, 23 Renjilian-Burgy, Joy 6, 19 Rothschild, Casey G. 7, 22 Rubin, Noah A. 5, 16 Rutherford, Markella B. 7, 21 Selimovic, Inela 10, 34 Shaer, Orit 8, 13, 29, 48 Sheinman, Patti 6, 18 Shih, Karen Y. 13, 46 Shukla-Bhatt, Neelima 8, 12, 13, 28, 42, 45 Shurchkov, Olga 8, 25 Sichel, Daniel E. 6, 19 Sommers Smith, Sally K. 12, 43 Song, Mingwei 8, 10, 13, 26, 35, 47 Suzuki, Yuichiro 12, 44 Tannenhauser, Jonathan E. 6, 20 Tetel, Marc J. 6, 11, 18, 38 Thomas-Starck, Jennifer 1, 6, 8, 10, 12, 20, 25, 34, 41 Trenk, Ann 8, 28 Tryon, Irma 7, 23 Turner, James M. 5, 15 Van Arsdale, Adam 9, 12, 30, 43 Velenchik, Ann 8, 27 Viano, Maurizio S. 5, 15 t h e

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Presenters Abdullahi, Sebiha M. 10, 32 Adi-Dako, Ama Y. 5, 15, 69 Ahlblad, Hannah L. 11, 40, 68, 70 Ahmad, Sarena Lin Shan 9, 31 Ai, Angela C. 12, 42, 67 Akamandisa, Mwangala P. 8, 27 Akametalu, Pamela 6, 18, 68 Akin-Olugbade, Oluwakemi L. 10, 36, 66, 68 Al-Bayati, Sundus I. 10, 34, 66, 68 Al-Farah, Rayah H. 13, 45 Aldereguia, Beatriz 12, 41 Almeida, Fiona J. 13, 45, 67, 69, 75 Anderson, Emily F. 8, 28 Astran, Olivia B. 11, 39 Atherton, Grace S. 13, 45, 67, 69 Ayub, Asha 7, 24, 71 Azzi, Alexandra K. 12, 42 Baptista, Shelby A. 12, 41, 67 Barth, Suzanne K. 10, 36 Baturin, Chelsey L. 8, 25 Berman, Doris C. 7, 24 Bi, Joanna A. 13, 47, 71 Brann, Michelle R. 11, 37 Brown, Felicia M. 6, 19 Bussert, Katherine M. 7, 21 Butler, Kayleigh N. 7, 22, 70 Cardoso, Lena Julia P. 5, 16, 69 Censullo, Julie E. 6, 19, 72 Chaidez, Natalie 12, 41, 67 Chan, Bernice Y. 13, 47 Chang, Ava H. 8, 25 Chao, Ariel G. 8, 25 Chatila, Zena K. 12, 44 Chen, Tiffany 10, 33, 67, 70, 73 Chevallier, Juliette L. 6, 20, 66, 68 Chou, Jacquelyn 9, 32 Chow, Erin 8, 27 Clark, Kathryn L. 8, 25 Clarkson, Sarah R. 12, 44

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Claros, Michelle M. 10, 35 Cockey, Emily L. 12, 42, 67 Cohen, Bethany L. 12, 41, 67 Coleman, Lyndsay R. 9, 29 Cooper-Vespa, Gabriela S. 11, 39, 66, 70 Coravos, Catherine S. 8, 28, 67, 69 Corbett, Anne E. 5, 15 Curry-Ledbetter, Campbell E. 7, 22 Davelman, Hannah C. 11, 39, 69 Davis, Erin L. 8, 29 Del Balzo, Sara D. 10, 35 Deng, Wenyan 13, 47 Di Lucido, Katherine E. 8, 26, 70, 75 Ding, Linda 8, 29 Dugas, Marilis E. 8, 27 Dumont, Olivia K. 6, 17, 73 Durovich, Graeme L. 9, 31 Eby, Stephanie C. 12, 44, 67, 70 Egeland, Anna C. 5, 14, 70 Elabbady, Leila T. 13, 46 Ellis, Jayne M. 5, 16 Elminyawi, Mona I. 7, 24, 72 Elsner, Lillian E. 7, 24, 71 Ericksen, Elisabeth K. 10, 34, 71 Fandino, Laura 11, 40, 70 Fath, Amanda B. 10, 33 Fawzi, Safaya A. 10, 36, 66, 68 Ferko, Ilta 5, 17, 66 Ferlauto, Cristina L. 6, 20 Fishbein, Rebecca S. 6, 18, 71 Foo, Wendy M. 9, 31 Freda, Gabriella F. 11, 38 Freeman, Arlevea M. 6, 19 Freeman-Slade, Rebecca S. 9, 31, 71 Frimpong, Marcia 11, 38 Frye, Kendall L. 9, 31 Fukuda, Simone A. 8, 25 Funk, Ashley K. 9, 31 i n

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Ganesh, Lavanya 8, 26, 67, 69 Gao, Ruohan 5, 14 Garcia, Joanna G. 6, 19, 71 Garcia, Sophia M. 9, 30 Gardner, Amanda M. 13, 48 Gebhardt, Stephanie L. 13, 48 Gell, Emily L. 5, 16, 70 George, Rebecca M. 12, 42, 67, 69 Gessner, Lelia G. 7, 24, 72 Giglio, Sabrina A. 9, 30 Golub, Caroline J. 5, 14 Gorchels, Madeline E. 13, 48 Goydan, Hayley T. 7, 23 Grote, Casey E. 13, 47, 73 Gu, Jennifer 10, 34, 66, 69 Guerrero, Mabelly 11, 37, 66, 69 Gupta, Narayani 13, 47 Gupta, Nayni 7, 21, 67, 68 Guzman, Ana Gabriela R. 9, 31 Haffner, Michaela R. 9, 30, 70 Haley, Emma D. 8, 25 Hamilton, Anne 5, 17, 70 Hamilton, Rebecca D. 9, 29 Han, Rachel H. 8, 26 Han, Xiaolu 10, 35, 67, 69 Harper, Elizabeth F. 7, 21 Harris-Schlotterbeck, Laura A. 5, 16, 70 Haskell, Kaley T. 6, 19, 70 Hatch, Jennifer 10, 33, 74 Havrilla, Emilyrose 9, 29 Heroux, Kelsey N. 7, 22, 66, 68 Higginson, Imani C. 5, 14, 70, 75 Hills, Victoria M. 12, 42, 70 Hitchner, Sarah B. 10, 32, 67, 69, 73 Honigberg, Celia M. 8, 28 Hou, Anastasia T. 6, 20 Howey, Emma R. 12, 41 Hsu, Lynn U. 13, 47 Hu, Amy 11, 39 Huang, Susan A. 5, 16, 70 Hui, Amanda H. 8, 25, 67, 69

Ibrahim, Sahar S. 7, 23 Jain, Sapna K. 10, 36 Jayaprakash, Pooja M. 13, 45 Jeong, So Yeon 8, 26 Joh, Katherine Y. 7, 24, 72 Johnstonbaugh, Morgan G. 6, 20 Kadlick, Katharine A. 5, 17 Keegan, Alexa P. 7, 21, 71 Kern, Kelly H. 13, 46 Kihara, Athena M. 13, 46 Kim, Seayoung 7, 21 Kim, Soomi 6, 18, 72 Klema, Mackenzie A. 9, 29, 68 Knisley, Athena M. 5, 14, 70 Kotsopoulos, Olivia V. 8, 29 Kovacikova, Gabriela 6, 17, 70 Kurtz, Emily L. 11, 38 Kwok, Irene C. 11, 39 Lanza, Gabriela A. 13, 48 Lay He, Yu Mei 11, 39 Ledoux, Dominique R. 9, 30, 71 Lee, Cicia X. 7, 24, 72 Lee, Eda D. 6, 18, 72 Lee, Jordan E. 13, 46, 67, 69 Lee, Seowoo 12, 44, 67, 70 Lee, Stephanie 9, 29 Lei, Tiange 9, 31 Lemoine, Bridgette E. 10, 33, 67 Leung, Katherine E. 5, 14, 70 Li, Jingjing 13, 48, 71 Liao, Zi Wei 12, 42, 67 Lin, Veronica J. 8, 29 Lindquist, Hannah K. 10, 33, 67 Littrell, Eden C. 5, 15 Liu, Mengyuan 7, 23 Loeb, Corena M. 5, 16 Lomtadze, Ana 10, 35, 66, 68 Lu, Tricia C. 12, 43, 66, 68 Mahmood, Sarah N. 10, 34, 66, 68 Mann, Elizabeth G. 8, 27


Marks, Dana E. 7, 22 Mazumdar, Naureen 12, 42, 71 McCann, Katherine H. 12, 41 McClean, Navaporn 13, 47, 69 McClure, Margaret M. 9, 31 McConnell, Margaret C. 12, 44, 67, 70 McGrail, Caitlin M. 5, 17 McMonagle, Helena I. 5, 15 Migliore, Jennifer E. 6, 18, 72 Mishanec, Nora E. 10, 34, 66, 67 Mistry, Brodie R. 8, 28, 68, 69 Mott, Hannah S. 8, 27 Mscisz, Brittany V. 6, 20 Murray, Makenna G. 9, 31, 68 Myoung, Sarah L. 6, 18, 68 Myung, Crystal S. 6, 20, 66, 68 Nanda, Prerana 6, 20, 66, 70 Negrete, Nancy 5, 15, 66, 68, 69, 75 Newland, Sara 10, 33 Ng, Sharon C. 8, 27 Nikyar, Alison Z. 12, 41, 67 Olson, Elizabeth M. 9, 32 Paik, Sun Joo 9, 32, 70 Palma, Mara Elissa 10, 33, 67 Park, Grace Y. 13, 46 Patel, Priya D. 13, 48 Perez, Erica R. 12, 44, 67, 70 Perumal, Dhivya 6, 17, 66, 70 Petrow, Heather H. 13, 47, 71 Pinkston, Leigh D. 12, 44, 67, 70 Plascencia Casillas, Ana S. 7, 23, 66 Poon, Amanda C. 8, 29 Powell, Geralle N. 11, 39 Pyers, Allyson L. 6, 18, 66, 70 Rackstraw, Emma L. 10, 36, 66, 68 Radoman, Milena 6, 17, 68, 69 Raja, Sahitya C. 12, 43

Ramirez, Yesenia 6, 18 Ransom, Deborah E. 13, 45 Refer, Quinn E. 9, 30 Ren, Dorothy X. 8, 27 Reyes, Luisa S. 12, 41 Richmond, Lauren M. 9, 30, 71 Ridge, Kelsey 7, 21 Rieth, Christina M. 9, 30, 71 Rigge, Laura W. 9, 31 Rines, Victoria C. 12, 41, 67 Ro, Aileen Y. 12, 44 Roberts, Grace E. 7, 24, 72 Rodriguez, Monica 11, 37, 72 Rojas, Connie A. 7, 23 Rong, Julie 8, 27

Tam, Claire J. 13, 47, 75 Tekumalla, Sravanti 13, 48, 73 Tenerowicz, Hanna G. 5, 16 Tong, Yi 8, 29 Tonti, Lauren A. 11, 37 Tran, Audrey A. 12, 43 Trilesskaya, Roza 13, 48 Troy, Haley B. 11, 38 Trujillo, Yesenia 13, 47

Saad, Miryam S. 7, 23 Saladi, Nikita U. 13, 48, 70 Sanchez, Jannet G. 13, 45 Sargent, Meghan E. 10, 33, 67 Sarwar, Prioty F. 5, 14 Schiemichen, Laura M. 7, 24, 69 Schmidt, Keturah A. 5, 15 Schwartz, Talia S. 6, 18 Seagren, Josie-Dee 13, 47 Segreto, Elina S. 13, 48, 73 Shen, Cherry Y. 9, 31, 66 Shen, Connie C. 6, 18, 70 Sheng, Wenhua 9, 31 Shepardson, Lindsey G. 6, 18, 72 Shiao, Wing Yan 5, 14 Shreckengast, Holly N. 6, 19 Sit, Michelle C. 11, 40 Smaellie, Kendrick E. 6, 19 Smiley, Katherine A. 9, 29 Smith, Emma C. 7, 22, 66, 68, 75 Smith-Miyazaki, Sia 5, 16 Starr, Isabel M. 9, 30 Stewart, Taylor D. 12, 44, 67, 70 Su, Karen 11, 39 Sun, Alice 13, 47 Swengel, Rachel 13, 46, 71

Walsh, Lauren E. 12, 41 Wang, Siqin 8, 25, 67, 69 Wayrynen, Kaisa L. 8, 25 Weddle, Emily K. 11, 40, 67, 69 Weiss, Charlotte J. 12, 40 West, Margaret C. 8, 28, 66, 69 Wete, Carine I. 5, 17, 67 White, Elizabeth G. 5, 16 Wozniak, Audrey M. 8, 26, 66, 69

Udvardi, Mayrah W. 5, 15, 66, 68 Uhlig, Blair L. 7, 24, 72 Verbeck, Claire S. 10, 36 Volker, Victoria J. 11, 37

Xu, Jeanne J. 11, 38 Ye, Beilin 10, 33 Yoon, Soo In 7, 21 Yoon, Suh H. 8 Young, Asia B. 9, 32, 70 Yu, Veronica G. 12, 43 Yu, Victoria 8, 27 Zander, Sydney B. 8, 26 Zhang, Nancy A. 12, 43 Zhang, QiaoLing 7, 25, 67, 69 Zhang, Xueyin 5, 14 Zhang, Yuhe 12, 41 Zhou, Amy 12, 42, 67 Zhu, April P. 9, 30 Zhu, Qiuyu 7, 23

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TABLE O F CONTENTS 1

Conference Overview

1

Tanner Conference Committee

2

Thematic Overview

5

Conference Schedule

14

Conference Abstracts and Web-Based Scheduler

50

Wellesley in the World

52

Map

54

International Study Programs

56

Internships and Grants Programs

63

Fellowship Programs

66

Wellesley College Supported Internship Recipients 2013

74

Wellesley College Graduate Fellowship Recipients 2012–2013

75

National Fellowship Competition Recipients and Nominees 2012–2013

77

Index

Wellesley College gratefully acknowledges the generous alumnae and friends who support experiential learning. Their support enables student to engage in offcampus learning opportunities that have become an integral part of the Wellesley College educational experience.

The Tanner Conference Committee gratefully acknowledges faculty and staff in the following departments and facilities for their commitment to the Tanner Conference: Campus Police, Communications and Public Affairs, Computer Science, Custodial Services, Physical Plant Administration, Grounds, Library and Technology Services, Mail Services, Motor Pool, Special Events, the Science Center, and The Wellesley College Club.


Tanner 2013

• Please dispose of trash and recycle appropriate materials in the designated bins. • This program was printed on recyclable • Please remember to recycle your paper with soy-based ink. conference booklet when you’ve • finished Please remember enjoying it!to recycle your conference booklet when you’ve finished enjoying it! A sustainable community

2013

event brought to you by the Sustainability Advisory and Tanner Conference Committees. A sustainable community event brought to you by the Sustainability Advisory and Tanner Conference Committees.

THE TANNER CONFERENCE

Tanner Conference Sustainability Initiatives:


Tanner 2013