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Tanner 2011 Tanner Conference Sustainability Initiatives: • Local food is being featured at lunch, snacks, and breaks. • Please dispose of trash and recycle appropriate materials in the designated bins. • This program was printed on 100% recyclable paper with soy-based ink. • Please recycle your conference book when you’ve finished enjoying it! A sustainable community event brought to you by the Sustainability Advisory and Tanner Conference Committees

TABLE O F CONTENTS 1

Conference Overview

1 Committee 2

Thematic Overview

5

Conference Schedule

19

Abstracts and Web-Based Conference Scheduler

19

Wellesley in the World

20

Map

22

International Study Programs

24

Internship and Grant Programs

30

Fellowship Programs

34

Wellesley College Supported Internship Recipients 2011

41

Wellesley College Graduate Fellowship Recipients 2010–2011

42

National Fellowship Competition Recipients and Nominees 2010–2011

43

Index

46

Notes

Wellesley College gratefully acknowledges the generous alumnae and friends who support experiential learning. Their support enables students to engage in offcampus learning opportunities that have become an integral part of the Wellesley College educational experience. The Tanner Conference Committee gratefully acknowledges staff in the following departments and facilities for their commitment to the Tanner Conference: AVI Fresh, Campus Police, Communications and Public Affairs, Custodial Services, Diana Chapman Walsh Alumnae Hall, Physical Plant Administration, Grounds, Library and Technology Services, Mail Services, Motor Pool, Special Events, and the Science Center.

THE TANNER CONFERENCE Encompassing the diversity of student experiences and interests, the Tanner Conference takes as its subject internships and service learning, international study, experiential learning in courses, research conducted away from Wellesley, and fellowships. The conference provides a venue for faculty, staff, and students to discuss the challenges to teaching and learning presented by new definitions of what constitutes the classroom. It also invites alumnae to return to campus to discuss how their decisions to participate in these experiences as Wellesley students later proved to be ones of consequence.

We wish to thank all those presenting in the Tanner Conference for their roles in helping us to better understand Wellesley’s place in the world. We invite you to join the conversation that they are seeking to foster.

Emily A. Buchholtz Department of Biological Sciences

Elaine Mehalakes Davis Museum and Cultural Center

Jill A. Syverson-Stork Department of Spanish

Lee Cuba Department of Sociology

Salwa Muhammad ’06 Center for Work and Service

Sally Theran Department of Psychology

David J. Ellerby Department of Biological Sciences

S. Joanne Murray ’81 Center for Work and Service

Jennifer Thomas-Starck Office of International Study

Ted Hufstader Center for Work and Service

Kimberly O’Donnell Department of Biological Sciences

Franklyn A. Turbak Department of Computer Science

Michelle S. Lam Class of 2014

Karen Z. Pabon Slater International Center

Winifred Wood The Writing Program

Martha J. McNamara Department of Art

Natalie O. Rojas Class of 2014

It is our privilege to invite your participation in the 2011 Tanner Conference. Established through the generosity of trustee emerita Estelle “Nicki” Newman Tanner ’57, the Tanner Conference explores the relationship between the liberal arts classroom and student participation in an increasingly diverse and interdependent world. The conference is premised on the belief that a greater understanding of the learning that takes place off campus—combined with critical inquiry into the purpose, value, and effect of such learning—has the potential to move liberal education in new directions.

The 2011 Tanner Conference Committee

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THEMATIC OVERVIEW

Culture and Arts Digging the Past

individual presentations

9:15 am

SCI 264

The Business of Art: Art of Business

individual presentations

9:15 am

SCI 392

Cultural Core of Performing Arts

individual presentations

10:45 am

SCI 256

From Skateboarding to Wushu: Exploring Cultures Through Performance

individual presentations

10:45 am

SCI 104

Preserving the Past, Sustaining the Future

individual presentations

10:45 am

SCI E211

Art of the Moment: Situating Contemporary Practice

individual presentations

1:30 pm

SCI E211

Tikum Olam: Repairing the World Across Culture

panel

3:00 pm

SCI 274

individual presentations

9:15 am

SCI 256

Empowering Women to Travel the Globe: Four Women, Four panel Continents, and Countless Stories

10:45 am

SCI E111

Fostering Healthy Communities in Boston

panel

10:45 am

SCI 264

Human Rights and Human Wrongs

individual presentations

10:45 am

SCI 396

Alleviating Poverty

individual presentations

1:30 pm

SCI 268

Safe Spaces: Mitigating the Effects of Violence

individual presentations

1:30 pm

SCI 364

The World As a Classroom: Reflections on Education and Learning

individual presentations

3:00 pm

SCI 268

Challenges of Contemporary Mental Healthcare

panels

9:15 am

SCI 270

No Guts, No Glory

individual presentations

9:15 am

SCI 364

From Head to Hoof: Medicine Improving Outcomes

individual presentations

10:45 am

SCI 364

Taking Care of Business, or the Business of Taking Care

individual presentations

10:45 am

SCI 392

Mobile Medicine

individual presentations

1:30 pm

SCI 278

The Cutting Edge of Cancer Research

individual presentations

1:30 pm

SCI E111

Unequal Access: Healthcare in the Twenty-First Century

individual presentations

1:30 pm

SCI 256

Passion and the Scientific Enterprise

individual presentations

3:00 pm

SCI 264

Empowerment of Youth, Women, and Families A Family Matter: From Babies to Parents

Health and Medicine Beyond Borders

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THEMATIC OVERVIEW

Identity, Community, and Global Citizenship Conflicts and Interests: Navigating International Relations

individual presentations

9:15 am

SCI 274

From the Ground Up: Innovative Approaches For Closing the Achievement Gap

individual presentations

10:45 am

SCI 270

Fellowship Travels

panel

1:30 pm

SCI 396

Religious Diversity and Citizenship: Examining President Obama's Interfaith and Community Service Campus Challenge

roundtable

1:30 pm

SCI 274

The Unknown: Communities and Individuals at the Fringe

individual presentations

1:30 pm

SCI 380

Carpe Annum: Things Found and Things Learned During a Year Abroad

panel

3:00 pm

SCI 396

Fitting In and Falling Out: Working in a Foreign Culture

individual presentations

9:15 am

SCI 278

Post-Earthquake Japan: Shaking Up Our Perspectives

individual presentations

10:45 am

SCI 278

The Power in the Story: History as a Public Good

individual presentations

1:30 pm

SCI 264

The Stories of Their Lives: Creating Biographical Narratives

individual presentations

1:30 pm

SCI 104

Lived Economies

individual presentations

3:00 pm

SCI 392

Revolts and Revolution: Student Perspectives on the Arab Spring

individual presentations

3:00 pm

SCI 278

Chortling through Snorkels and Frolicking in the Rainforest: Experiences in Tropical Ecology

panel

9:15 am

SCI 396

It's Not Easy Being Green

individual presentations

9:15 am

SCI 380

Remote Access

individual presentations

10:45 am

SCI 380

You Are What You Eat: Stories from the Sustainable Agriculture Movement

individual presentations

10:45 am

SCI 261

Diverse Approaches to Biodiversity

individual presentations

1:30 pm

SCI 270

Narratives of Consequence

Planet Earth

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THEMATIC OVERVIEW

Environmental Adventures

individual presentations

3:00 pm

SCI 256

Lake Baikal: Science and Culture in Post-Soviet Siberia

panel

3:00 pm

SCI E211

3:00 pm

SCI 270

Sustainable Communities: Housing, Urban Planning, and the individual presentations Environment Political Economy of Development The Practice and Politics of Journalism

individual presentations

9:15 am

SCI E211

Transnational Politics: Women, Public Policy, and Advocacy

individual presentations

9:15 am

SCI 104

Examining the Efficacy of Microfinance

individual presentations

10:45 am

SCI 268

Making a Name: Branding Marketing and Product Development

individual presentations

1:30 pm

SCI 392

From Policy to Practice

individual presentations

3:00 pm

SCI 380

Evolving As a Scientist

individual presentations

9:15 am

SCI 268

Out of the Bubble, Then Back Again: How Off-Campus Experiences Shape Students’ Views of Diversity

roundtable

9:15 am

SCI E111

Teaching Abroad

individual presentations

10:45 am

SCI 274

Three-College Collaboration Wintersession Program: Pedagogy and Learning

panel

1:30 pm

SCI 261

Navigating in 2-D and 3-D

individual presentations

3:00 pm

SCI E111

New Tools of the Trade

individual presentations

3:00 pm

SCI 364

Supporting Innovation in Synthetic Biology Through Human-Computer Interaction

panel

3:00 pm

SCI 261

Technology, Innovation, and Education

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CONFERENCE SCHEDULE

8:30–9:15am Breakfast The Leonie Faroll Focus, Science Center

Session 1: 9:15–10:25am Culture and the Arts Digging the Past (individual presentations)

SCI 264 Bone or Stone?: The Search for Early Humans in Dmanisi, Georgia

A New Frontier for the Vast Wasteland: How TV Went DIY Kathleen T. Leonard ’12, Cinema and Media Studies Advisor: Winifred Wood, Writing Program

Business or Pleasure?: The Importance of Business in the Arts World

Health and Medicine Beyond Borders Challenges of Contemporary Mental Healthcare (panels)

SCI 270 How Do We Measure Success?: The Dilemma of Residential Care

Camden K. Louie ’12, American Studies and Music Advisor: Martin Brody, Music

Conisha T. Cooper ’12, Psychology and Victoria M. Nguyen ‘13, Spanish Advisor: Paul Wink, Psychology

Empowerment of Youth, Women, and Families

Strengths of Community: A Summer at the Riverside Day Treatment Center

Amanda M. Papakyrikos ’14, Undeclared; Julie B. Bass ’12, Anthropology; and Cobren A. Greer ’13, Anthropology Advisor: Adam Van Arsdale, Anthropology

A Family Matter: From Babies to Parents SCI 256

Michelle Lee ’12, Psychology and Neuroscience and Elizabeth H. Byerly ‘12, Psychology Advisor: Paul Wink, Psychology

Triassic Park: Paleontology of Ghost Ranch, New Mexico

Do You Have A House In Virginia?

No Guts, No Glory

Cabrina Kang ’13, English Advisor: Catia Confortini, Peace Studies

(individual presentations)

Making Women’s International Reproductive Health and Family Planning a Priority

Generating hES-derived β-cells as a Therapy for Type 1 Diabetics

Kaisa L. Wayrynen ’14, Undeclared Advisor: Emily Buchholtz, Biological Sciences

The Business of Art: Art of Business (individual presentations)

SCI 392 Got a View?: The Women (and Men) Behind ABC’s The View Grace O. Cheng ’12, Economics and Philosophy Advisor: Maria San Filippo, Cinema and Media Studies

(individual presentations)

SCI 364

Merene Botsio ’12, Africana Studies and International Relations-Political Science Advisor: Pashington Obeng, Africana Studies

Creating Healthy Families: An Insight into Teen Pregnancy and Parenting Jannet G. Sanchez ’14, Undeclared Advisor: Phillip Levine, Economics

Creating Safer Schools for Transgender and Gender Non-Conforming Youth Emma F. Townsend-Merino ’12, Psychology and Women’s and Gender Studies Advisor: Tom Burke, Political Science t h e

Rachel L. Parker ’13, Chemistry Advisor: Jeffrey Hughes, Biological Sciences

Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Research and Awareness Diana H. Schron ’14, Undeclared Advisor: Joy Renjilian-Burgy, Spanish

Bacteria in the Human Body: Making Connections Between Scientific Research and Health Jennifer E. Fishbein ’13, Biological Chemistry Advisor: Janet McDonough, Biological Sciences

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Identity, Community, and Global Citizenship

Bones: Learning the Ropes of Austrian Anthropological Research Emma E. Strick ’12, Anthropology Advisor: Philip Kohl, Anthropology

Conflicts and Interests: Navigating International Relations (individual presentations)

Stone Cold: Women’s Decision-Making in Small Businesses in a Strained Economy

SCI 274 How Do Cultural Diplomacy and Understanding Materialize? Julia N. Wu ’12, International Relations-History Advisor: Lidwien Kapteijns, History

Joining a Liberally Oriented Turkish NGO

Meredith W. Stoner ’13, Women’s and Gender Studies and Dana Y. Lee ’13, Economics Advisor: Victor Kazanjian, Office of Intercultural Education & Religious and Spiritual Life

Economic Ties Between India and China

Madeleine S. Nelson ’12, Economics Advisor: Joseph Swingle, Sociology

Yuting Guo ’13, International Relations-Political Science Advisor: Akila Weerapana, Economics

The United States: A Leader in Nuclear Weapons Treaties?

Planet Earth

Erin E. Corcoran ’13, International RelationsPolitical Science and Spanish Advisor: Stacie Goddard, Political Science

Chortling through Snorkels and Frolicking in the Rainforest: Experiences in Tropical Ecology (panel)

Middle East Nuclear Weapons Free Zone

SCI 396

Dana F. Al-Jawamis ’14, Undeclared Advisor: Stacie Goddard, Political Science

Ariel M. Robinson ’13, Cognitive and Linguistic Sciences Advisor: Lawrence Rosenwald, English

Mia M. Howard ’12, Biological Sciences; CeCe Cheng ’12, Biological Sciences; Katherine A. Connolly ’12, Biological Sciences; Lucie E. Drozd ’12, Biological Sciences; Genea C. Foster ’12, Environmental Studies; and Natalia Ospina ’12, Environmental Studies Advisor: Martina Königer, Biological Sciences

Narratives of Consequence

It’s Not Easy Being Green

Fitting In and Falling Out: Working in a Foreign Culture (individual presentations) SCI 278

SCI 380

Iceberg Dead Ahead: The Israeli-Palestinian Conflict

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(individual presentations)

The Future of the Renewable Fuel Standard Naomi T. Takaki ’12, Mathematics Advisor: Joseph Joyce, Economics

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Financing Renewable Energy Ventures: Myth and Reality in Central and Eastern Europe Surina Diddi ’12, Economics Advisor: David Lindauer, Economics

Private Funds for Public Goods: Battling Climate Change in the New Age Anjalee E. Martin ’12, Political Science Advisor: Judith Kenney, Center for Work and Service

Political Economy of Development The Practice and Politics of Journalism (individual presentations)

SCI E211 On the Ground in Peru: Documenting National identity During Presidential Transition Terra L. Stanley ’12, Latin American Studies and Political Science Advisor: Alejandra Osorio, History

Reporting from Hong Kong: My Summer at the South China Morning Post Natalie B. Ornell ’12, East Asian Studies and English Advisor: William Joseph, Political Science

Telling China’s Story: Academia vs. the Foreign News Bureau Elizabeth T. Grether ’12, Psychology Advisor: Kristy Liu ’DS, Center for Work and Service

Breaking Blagojevich News: Media Ethics, Law, and Privacy from a Chicago Newsroom Mary E. Kenefake ’13, History Advisor: Marion Just, Political Science

Transnational Politics: Women, Public Policy, and Advocacy (individual presentations)

SCI 104 Using Truth to Make Change Stephanie E. Graham ’12, Women’s and Gender Studies Advisor: Susan Reverby, Women’s and Gender Studies

“Smarter When We Share”: Women’s Networks in Africa and the Muslim World Rebecca C. Turkington ’12, International Relations-History Advisor: Rangita de Silva de Alwis, Wellesley Centers for Women

Gender Advocacy in North Borneo, Malaysia Eileen Yee Lin Cham ’14, Undeclared Advisor: Karen Shih, Office of Intercultural Education

Navigating Family Court in New York City: Need a LIFT?

Session 2: 10:45–11:55am

Standard Error: Reflections on the Humanity of Science and Medicine

Culture and the Arts

Anna Maria F. Coronata ’12, Neuroscience Advisor: Marc Tetel, Neuroscience

Cultural Core of Performing Arts

Getting There: My Experience with a Clinician, Researcher, and Teacher

(individual presentations)

Meredith F. Roy ’12, Neuroscience Advisor: Simone Helluy, Biological Sciences

Rethinking Communication: Conversations Between People, Chimpanzees, and Capuchins

Learning When to Follow: Gender and Dance in Argentina and Spain Cailey D. Stevens ’12, Economics and Amanda L. Crescitelli ’12, Spanish Advisor: Irene Mata, Women’s and Gender Studies

Emilie C. Menzel ’14, Undeclared Advisor: Sally Theran, Psychology

Out of the Bubble, Then Back Again: How Off-Campus Experiences Shape Students’ Views of Diversity (roundtable)

SCI E111 Lee Cuba, Sociology; Joseph Swingle, Sociology; Nancy Jennings, Bowdoin College; Suzanne Lovett, Bowdoin College; and Angela I. Hui ’12, Sociology Organizer: Lee Cuba, Sociology

Break: 10:25-10:45pm Refreshments will be served in The Leonie Faroll Focus, Science Center.

Laura E. Bruno ’14, Undeclared Advisor: Ann Trenk, Mathematics

SCI 256

Of Flowing Sleeves and Colored Fans: Discovering Japan Through Dance Jennifer M. Yoo ’12, East Asian Studies; Stephanie T. Chu ’12, East Asian Studies; and Ila C. Duncan ’12, Japanese Language and Literature Advisor: Carolyn Morley, Theatre Studies

Enlightenment in the Land of Mozart: A Glimpse into the Core of Austria’s Music Tradition Lucy A. Bergin ’12, German Language and Literature Advisor: Anjeana Hans, German

From Skateboarding to Wushu: Exploring Cultures Through Performance (individual presentations)

SCI 104

Technology, Innovation, and Education

Shaolin Girl: Our Experiences in Shaolin Tagou Shaina Lu ’12, Classical Civilization and Debra A. Hasse ’13, Economics Advisor: Karen Shih, Office of Intercultural Education

Evolving As a Scientist (individual presentations)

SCI 268

Skateboarders and Rastafarians: Exploring

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Barcelona’s Underground Culture Through the Eyes of the “Young and Angry” Samantha M. Guergenenov ’12, Philosophy Advisor: Carlos Ramos, Spanish

Preserving the Past, Sustaining the Future (individual presentations)

SCI E211 Reviving the Past: Promoting Conservation and Archaeological Initiatives in Rome

SCI 264 Stephanie D. Quon ’12, Political Science and Spanish; Cassandra Duarte ’12, Biological Chemistry; Claire A. Fogarty ’12, Women’s and Gender Studies and Spanish; Meagan M. Moody ’12, Political Science; and Esther H. Nam ’13, Economics Advisor: Verónica Darer, Spanish

Human Rights and Human Wrongs

Marguerite A. Sulmont ’13, Architecture Advisor: Alice Friedman, Art

(individual presentations)

Balancing the Old and the New in Delhi

Arms Around Sierra Leone

Nancy H. Welsh ’12, English Advisor: Lara Tohme, Art

Charlotte J. Hulme ’14, Undeclared Advisor: Winifred Wood, Writing Program

Summer in Vieques: From Inland to Island

Muslim Women’s Empowerment: A Discovery of The Status of Women in Islamic Cultures and Societies

SCI 396

Ada P. Smith ’13, Anthropology and Environmental Studies Advisor: Adam Van Arsdale, Anthropology

Zahrah Z. Devji ’14, Undeclared Advisor: Louise Marlow, Religion

Empowerment of Youth, Women, and Families

KA.DER: A Model NGO for Increasing Women’s Political Participation in Turkey

Empowering Women to Travel the Globe: Four Women, Four Continents, and Countless Stories

Maliha Rahman ’12, Political Science Advisor: Rangita de Silva de Alwis, Wellesley Centers for Women

(panel)

SCI E111 Miryam S. Saad ’13, Undeclared; Julia K. Gruhot ’12, Astrophysics and History; Melanie L. Kaplan ’12, Latin American Studies; and Amy E. Wolkin ’12, Biological Sciences Advisor: Jennifer Thomas-Starck, International Studies

Fostering Healthy Communities in Boston (panel)

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From India to the United Nations: Exploring State-Based Gender Equality Initiatives at the National and International Level Zahra M. Ghadyali ’12, Middle Eastern Studies and Chemistry Advisor: Rangita de Silva de Alwis, Wellesley Centers for Women

Health and Medicine Beyond Borders

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From Head to Hoof: Medicine Improving Outcomes (individual presentations)

SCI 364 Mapping Language Activation in Bilingual Tumor Patients: A Bold fMRI Study at Brigham and Women’s Hospital Eugenia C. White ’13, Chemistry Advisor: Nancy Kolodny, Chemistry

To Save a Brain: Exploring Pediatric Head Trauma Caroline P. Dodge ’13, Biological Sciences Advisor: Jennifer Hood-DeGrenier, Biological Sciences

Dying to Play: The Athlete Heart Phenomenon in Collegiate Football Players Olivia L. Hulme ’12, Chemistry Advisor: Dora Carrico-Moniz, Chemistry

Medicating Pro-Athletes: An Insider’s Look at the Horse Racing Industry Whitney Reid ’12, Biological Sciences Advisor: Kimberly O’Donnell, Biological Sciences

Taking Care of Business, or the Business of Taking Care (individual presentations)

SCI 392 Connecting the Dots: Understanding and Addressing Social Determinants of Health in Kenya Sophia J. Ghaus ’12, Neuroscience Advisor: Donna Patterson, Africana Studies

More than Medicine: The Israeli Holistic Approach to Pediatric Cerebral Palsy Margaret Zwiebach ’12, Comparative Literature

Advisor: Erin Sullivan ’01, Center for Work and Service

Two Countries, One Organization: The Business of Global Health Zara Ibrahim ’12, Biological Sciences and Spanish and Ashley N. Abarr ’12, Neuroscience Advisor: Susan Reverby, Women’s and Gender Studies

Global Strategy Consulting and Healthcare: Critical Intersections Amisha Ahuja ’12, English and Biological Sciences Advisor: Joseph Joyce, Economics

Identity, Community, and Global Citizenship From the Ground Up: Innovative Approaches For Closing the Achievement Gap (individual presentations)

SCI 270 Still Not Equal: A Conversation about Race, Poverty, and Rural Education Kalina Yingnan Deng ’14, Undeclared Advisor: Melissa Hawkins, Center for Work and Service

From South Africa to Roxbury with Love: Translating Ubuntu into Action Kamilah A. Welch ’12, Peace and Justice Studies Advisor: Victor Kazanjian, Office of Intercultural Education & Religious and Spiritual Life

“I’m Going to College!”: Addressing the Opportunity Gap Through College Access Education Brenda S. Meza ’13, American Studies and Jessica Camacho ’13, American Studies Advisor: Soo Hong, Education

Advisor: Joseph Swingle, Sociology

SCI 380

Narratives of Consequence

Rainforest Sustainability in Guyana: Not Just About the Research

Post-Earthquake Japan: Shaking Up Our Perspectives (individual presentations)

SCI 278 Connecting Women’s Rights, Weapons, and Nuclear Power Molly R. Cyr ’13, French and Peace and Justice Studies Advisor: Catia Confortini, Peace Studies

Facing the Energy Crisis: Ecolife in Preand Post-Earthquake Japan Xinyi Yan ’14, Undeclared Advisor: Kazuko Ozawa, East Asian Languages and Literatures

Japanese Buddhist Values: Daily Lifestyle and a Japan Post-Earthquake Daniele Evangelista Leite da Silva ’14, Undeclared Advisor: Kazuko Ozawa, East Asian Languages and Literatures

From Russia with Love: Cultural Exchange and Basic Volcanology in Kamchatka Caroline R. Duncan ’13, Geosciences Advisor: James Besancon, Geosciences

Spreading Like Wildflowers: Invasive Plants and Biodiversity in the Wilderness Carolyn N. Daussin ’14, Biological Sciences Advisor: Marcia Thomas, Biological Sciences

Re-Envisioning Maharashtra Nature Park: Saving a Green Space in Mumbai, India Tiffany S. Chan ’12, Psychology Advisor: David Lindauer, Economics

You Are What You Eat: Stories from the Sustainable Agriculture Movement (individual presentations)

SCI 261 How Dirt Transcends Differences: Agriculture, Sustainability, and Building a Global Community

3/11/11: The Strength of the Japanese People During a Time of Crisis Mijeong Takahashi ’12, Neuroscience Advisor: Lauri Wardell, Physics

Rachel E. Smith ’12, Political Science Advisor: Beth DeSombre, Environmental Studies

From the Trading Floor: Understanding International Affairs Ikuno Naka ’12, International Relations-History Advisor: Lidwien Kapteijns, History

Planet Earth

Charlotte E. Dunn ’14, Undeclared Advisor: Jeffrey Hughes, Biological Sciences

Ideas Taking Root: A Season of (Botanical) Growth at Wellesley Lauren A. Cahillane ’12, Cognitive and Linguistic Sciences Advisor: Kristina Jones, Biological Sciences

My Joy of Food: A Delicious Taste of Sustainable Agriculture

Remote Access (individual presentations)

Julia H. Di Cicco ’12, Geosciences Advisor: Kristina Jones, Biological Sciences

This Dirt is So Rich!: My Year of Gardening and Playing Tag Rebecca A. Leung ’12, Economics t h e

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Political Economy of Development

Connie A. Rojas ’14, Undeclared Advisor: Manolo Núñez-Negrón, Spanish

Teaching Is a Two Way Street: Learning by Doing at a Girl’s School in India

Examining the Efficacy of Microfinance

Kristen J. Ferguson ’12, Women’s and Gender Studies Advisor: Winifred Wood, Writing Program

(individual presentations)

SCI 268 Microlending: A Poverty Reduction Strategy?

Tanner Conferene Luncheon: 12:00-1:30pm

Jessica L. Anthony ’12, Economics Advisor: Ted Hufstader, Center for Work and Service

All members of the Wellesley College community are invited to lunch, which will be served in The Leonie Faroll Focus, the Science Library, and the Sage Lounge at the Science Center. Please visit any one of the levels for food and beverages.

Microsavings: Microfinance’s Mysterious Other Half Anne C. Tuan ’12, Economics Advisor: Akila Weerapana, Economics

Session 3: 1:30-2:40pm

How Effective is Microfinance Really?: Perspectives from a Student Researcher Hilary A. White ’12, History Advisor: Salwa Muhammad ’06, Center for Work and Service

SCI E211 Gondolas, the Guggenheim, and Gloria: Contemporary Art Takes over Venice During the Venice Biennale

Teaching Abroad (individual presentations)

SCI 274 Challenges of English Education in Latin America: An Example of Ecuador Karen Kemirembe ’12, Biological Sciences and Spanish Advisor: Koichi Hagimoto, Spanish

Global Learning: What Teaching in Public Schools in Costa Rica Taught Us about Ourselves Sarah S. Roundy ’14, Undeclared; Nicole A. Lobodzinski ’14, Undeclared; and

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Art of the Moment: Situating Contemporary Practice (individual presentations)

Technology, Innovation, and Education

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Culture and the Arts

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Empowerment of Youth, Women, and Families Alleviating Poverty (individual presentations)

SCI 268 Mobilizing the Private Sector for Poverty Alleviation Mika B. Edgerly ’12, Spanish and Economics Advisor: Akila Weerapana, Economics

Who Is Empowering Whom?: Wendy Wellesley Learns from India’s Youth Ivy W. Wang ’13, Art History Advisor: Rebecca Bedell, Art

Innovative Development: Lessons From Ghana’s Newest Entrepreneurs Samantha N. Malambo ’12, Economics and Africana Studies Advisor: William Joseph, Political Science

Searching for Empowerment Esra E. Yarar ’12, International Relations-Political Science Advisor: Christopher Candland, Political Science

Safe Spaces: Mitigating the Effects of Violence

Mina Juhn ’13, Art History Advisor: Patricia Berman, Art

(individual presentations)

The Wild East: Cash Cows, Outlaws, Investors, and Art

Through the Lens of Maiti Nepal

Sarina M. Taylor ’12, East Asian Studies and Art History Advisor: Heping Liu, Art

Is Art Timeless?: At the Crossing of Renaissance and Biennale in Venice, Italy Shuyu Gao ’14, Undeclared Advisor: Lisa Fischman, Davis Museum and Cultural Center

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SCI 364 Aabha Sharma ’12, Biological Chemistry Advisor: Yuichiro Suzuki, Biological Sciences

Activism Through the Immigration Legal System Lourdes Mendoza ’12, Women’s and Gender Studies Advisor: Irene Mata, Women’s and Gender Studies

Abused and Misused: A Glimpse into the Realities of Domestic Violence Cases Rukmani D. Bhatia ’12, International RelationsHistory and French Cultural Studies Advisor: Michèle Respaut, French

Modern-Day Abolitionists: A First Hand Experience Combating Child Labor in Ghana Helen F. Driftmier ’14, Undeclared and Hyun-Ji Lee ’14, Undeclared Advisor: David Lindauer, Economics

Health and Medicine Beyond Borders Mobile Medicine (individual presentations) SCI 278 “Is That a Doctor in Your Pocket?”: The Evolving Media of Healthcare Allison A. Walker-Elders ’13, Neuroscience Advisor: Virginia Quinan, Neuroscience

Improving Eye Health with Mobile Phones Deborah J. Tien ’12, Astrophysics Advisor: Glenn Stark, Physics

Empowering Afghan Midwives Through the Use of Mobile Phones Hawa Ansary ’12, International Relations-Political Science Advisor: Erin Sullivan ’01, Center for Work and Service

Wheelchairs of Hope: Gift of Mobility to People in Asia Eriko Houlette ’DS, Psychology Advisor: Paul Wink, Psychology

The Cutting Edge of Cancer Research (individual presentations) SCI E111 ADAM and Cleave: Researching the Mechanisms of Neuroblastoma

Unite For Sight: Fighting Against Preventable Blindness Luyang Jin ’12, Chinese Language and Literature Advisor: Yuichiro Suzuki, Biological Sciences

Linnea E. Herzog ’12, Neuroscience Advisor: Michael Wiest, Neuroscience

Public Health in Bangalore: Public Schools, Health Volunteers, and Healthcare Access

Beneath the Ether Dome: Improving the Treatment of Neuromas

Elizabeth S. Lawler ’12, Chemistry Advisor: Ted Hufstader, Center for Work and Service

Asha Ayub ’14, Undeclared Advisor: Margaret Keane, Psychology

The Future of Skincare: Topical DNA Repair for Treatment of Photodamage Vivian W. Hu ’13, Biological Sciences Advisor: Andrew Webb, Biological Sciences

Eat Grapes and Fight Disease!: Investigating the Effects of Resveratrol on 4-hydroxynonenal Nirupama R. Sarathy ’14, Undeclared Advisor: Jennifer Hood-DeGrenier, Biological Sciences

Unequal Access: Healthcare in the Twenty-First Century (individual presentations)

SCI 256 Free Health Clinics: Economic and Health Impacts on Uninsured Residents of Rural Ohio Amanda M. Duritsch ’12, Economics and Biological Sciences Advisor: Connie Bauman, Physical Education, Recreation, and Athletics

Beating the Odds: Encountering the Challenges of Public Health Work in Boston Elizabeth F. Bair ’12, Health and Society Advisor: John Cameron, Biological Sciences

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A Means of Entry: Helping Boston’s Homeless Women Navigate the Healthcare System Shernaz S. Dossabhoy ’12, German Language and Literature Advisor: Anjeana Hans, German

Identity, Community, and Global Citizenship Fellowship Travels (panel)

SCI 396 Natalie Ross ’09, Fulbright English Assistantship to South Africa; Hannah Sholder ’09, Fulbright Full Grant to Bangladesh; and Kelima Yakupova ‘09, Carnegie Junior Fellow Moderator: Julie Levison ’98, Rhodes Scholarship Organizer: Ellie Perkins ’65, Center for Work and Service

Religious Diversity and Citizenship: Examining President Obama’s Interfaith and Community Service Campus Challenge (roundtable)

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Victor H. Kazanjian, Office of Intercultural Education & Religious and Spiritual Life , Stephen Marini, Religion; Najiba Akbar, Office of Religious and Spiritual Life; S. Joanne Murray ’81, Center for Work and Service; and Maggie E. Polachek ’11, Political Science Organizer: S. Joanne Murray ’81, Center for Work and Service

SCI 264

The Unknown: Communities and Individuals at the Fringe

Dominique R. Ledoux ’14, Undeclared Advisor: Martha McNamara, Art

(individual presentations)

SCI 380 The Romani People: A Journey Through the Past and Present Jugera Sulejmani ’13, International Relations-History Advisor: Lidwien Kapteijns, History

Wellesley Women Who Will Wander the World and Carly R. Abarbanel ‘12, Cinema and Media Studies Advisor: Melissa Hawkins, Center for Work and

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Melissa A. Evans ’12, German Studies and Political Science Advisor: Laura Grattan, Political Science

Walter Arlen: Assembling the Story of an Exiled Composer Clara M. Buchholtz ’12, Neuroscience Advisor: Thomas Nolden, German

Planet Earth Diverse Approaches to Biodiversity (individual presentations)

SCI 270 Coming Home: Creating a New Kenya Through Open Conversation Florence C. Wangui Kamonji ’13, Environmental Studies Advisor: Verónica Darer, Spanish

Climate Summer: Ten Weeks, Eight Towns, Eight Hundred Miles, and One Message

SCI 104

Samantha G. Burke ’14, Undeclared and April A. Bello ’14, Undeclared Advisor: Alden Griffith, Environmental Studies

Origins Through the Lenses: Finding Cultural Identity with Disposable Cameras

Saving Sea Turtles Through Research, Education, and Action

Charlene A. Lee ’14, Undeclared Advisor: T. James Kodera, Religion

Meghan J. Friedman ’12, Peace and Justice Studies

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Rachel E. Cherny ’13, History and Classical Civilization Advisor: Ryan Quintana, History

(individual presentations)

Christina M. Smith ’13, Peace and Justice Studies Advisor: Pashington Obeng, Africana Studies

(individual presentations)

Alternative Education: Developing Exhibits for the Field Museum of Natural History

The Stories of Their Lives: Creating Biographical Narratives

The African Diaspora in India: Siddis, Race, and Education

The Power in the Story: History as a Public Good

Keeping Track of Time: Watch Papers at the American Antiquarian Society

Rhiannon E. McCarthy ’12, English Advisor: Nina Tumarkin, History

Shannon M. Ward ’12, Anthropology Advisor: Deborah Matzner, Anthropology

Narratives of Consequence

Kerry M. Knerr ’12, American Studies Advisor: Ryan Quintana, History

Flour, Pudding, and Petticoats: Interpreting Daily Life in 1830s Rural New England Claire E. McRee ’12, History and

Narrative, Embodiment, and Choice: Identity and Abortion in a Community of Tibetan Refugees

Service

Nobody Pays for It and It Ain’t Pretty: Doing Social History

Working with Socialists: The Bruno Kreisky Foundation

The Bicycle Diaries: Travels with a Sikh Pilgrim in the 1930s Mannat Johal ’12, History and Classical Civilization Advisor: Nikhil Rao, History

Preserving Eleanor Roosevelt’s Legacy: My Internship at an Archival Research Project Rusi Li ’13, English Advisor: Nancy Hall, Spanish

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Randelle L. Boots ’13, Environmental Studies Advisor: Beth DeSombre, Environmental Studies

Resistance in Appalachia: The Fight to End Mountaintop Removal Guangxin Wang ’14, Undeclared Advisor: Victor Kazanjian, Office of Intercultural Education & Religious and Spiritual Life

Political Economy of Development

Making a Name: Branding Marketing and Product Development

Break: 2:40-3:00pm

(individual presentations)

Refreshments will be served in The Leonie Faroll Focus, Science Center.

SCI 392 The Science of a Good Party: Alcohol Marketing and Product Development Adeline L. Tan ’12, Economics and French Advisor: Kristine Niendorf, Residential Life

A Business and Visual Media Experience in the Luxury Activewear Industry Simran K. Virk ’14, Undeclared Advisor: Winifred Wood, Writing Program

Brand Image Matters: When The Devil Wears Prada Meets a Wellesley Woman Irene Pang ’13, Economics Advisor: Joseph Joyce, Economics

New Ventures: Microbes, Technology, and the Startup Arena Lisa J. Butler ’DS, Biological Sciences Advisor: Jeffrey Hughes, Biological Sciences

Technology, Innovation, and Education

Session 4: 3:00-4:10pm

Over the Mountains, Under the Sea Lin Davina Huang ’13, History and Alyssa G. Wibisono ’13, Biological Sciences Advisor: C. Pat Giersch, History

Culture and the Arts

¡Sonido! ¡Silencio en el set! ¡Acción!: Empowering Youth Through Film

Tikum Olam: Repairing the World Across Culture

Charleen Johnson Stoever ’12, French Cultural Studies and Women’s and Gender Studies Advisor: Irene Mata, Women’s and Gender Studies

(panel)

SCI 274 Alexandra F. Nagourney ’13, Physics; Julia Martinez ’13, Psychology; Margarita B. Rabinovich ’13, Psychology; Mayya B. Rabinovich ’13, Economics; Hannah J. Webber ’14, Undeclared; and Emily S. Wood ’13, Peace and Justice Studies Advisor: Mared Alicea-Westort, Office of Intercultural Education

Empowerment of Youth, Women, and Families

Health and Medicine Beyond Borders Passion and the Scientific Enterprise (individual presentations)

SCI 264 Catalysts of Explosion: Stromatolites and Their Ignition of Complex Life on Earth Rachel L. Harris ’14, Undeclared Advisor: Tucker Crum, Biological Sciences

The World As a Classroom: Reflections on Education and Learning

Climate Change Impacts on Leatherback Turtle Habitat in the Eastern Pacific

SCI 268

Ellen M. Willis-Norton ’12, Environmental Studies and Biological Sciences Advisor: Alden Griffith, Environmental Studies

SCI 261

Thinking Outside the Lunchbox: The Schooling Girls and Boys Project

Kirstin M. Dorozynski ’12, Peace and Justice Studies; Hayley E. Malkin ’13, Biological Chemistry; Sarah A. McAra ’12, Religion and Sociology; Juliana Nazare, Olin ’14, Electrical and Computer Engineering; Colin Winter, Babson ’13, Entrepreneurship; and Colin B. Zwiebel, Olin ’12, Electrical and Computer Engineering Advisor: Adele Wolfson, Chemistry

Tessa R. Johnson ’12, Psychology and Economics and Julia Martin ’12, Psychology and Classical Civilization Advisor: Nancy Genero, Psychology

Not Just Another Day at the Beach: Research in Coastal Environments

Three-College Collaboration Wintersession Program: Pedagogy and Learning (panel)

(individual presentations)

One Book, Three Years, Hundred and One Contributing Authors, and Thousands of Schools Yong Wei Chong ’14, Undeclared Advisor: Ted Hufstader, Center for Work and Service t h e

Mary Kate Schneeweis ’12, Geosciences and English and Caroline K. Templeton ’14, Undeclared Advisor: David Hawkins, Geosciences

Identity, Community, and Global Citizenship Carpe Annum: Things Found and Things Learned During a Year Abroad (panel)

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Suzanne M. Trainor ’12, Political Science Advisor: Louise Marlow, Religion

Rebecca L. Richardson ’12, Psychology; Christine M. Choudri ’12, Political Science; Corianne N. Holmes ’12, French and East Asian Studies; and Hayley M. Lenahan ’12, English Advisor: Jennifer Thomas-Starck, International Studies

“Don’t worry, Mom and Dad. I’m fine.”: Experiencing Morocco’s Riots First-Hand Elizabeth M. Freeman ’12, Political Science Advisor: Marion Just, Political Science

Yubelka A. Hernandez ’13, Biological Sciences; Katja J. Bego ’14, Undeclared; Alexandra A. Fuiks ’14, Undeclared; Kira M. Jordan ’14, Chemistry; Elena S. Mironciuc ’13, Russian and Art Studio; and Rebecca K. Ruhl ’13, Russian Area Studies and History Advisor: Thomas Hodge, Russian

Narratives of Consequence

Planet Earth

Sustainable Communities: Housing, Urban Planning, and the Environment

Lived Economies

Environmental Adventures

(individual presentations)

(individual presentations)

(individual presentations)

SCI 270

SCI 392

SCI 256

History: A Valuable Vantage Point on Wall Street

Environmental Adventures in Cameroon

Katherine A. Crispi ’12, International RelationsPolitical Science Advisor: C. Pat Giersch, History

“You’ve Never Touched a Flounder Before?”: A Summer Educating on The Sound

Corporate Consulting: Selling Out Without Giving In

Kelly A. Mercer ’13, Environmental Studies and Dominique T. Hazzard ’12, Environmental Studies Advisor: Beth DeSombre, Environmental Studies

Gauri S. Subramani ’12, Economics and English Advisor: Courtney Coile, Economics

Small but Mighty: Hong Kong as a Global Financial Hub

From Classrooms to Gardens: Environmental Education and Empowerment in Uganda and India

Anisha Vachani ’12, Economics Advisor: Akila Weerapana, Economics

Whitney I. Smith ’12, Environmental Studies Advisor: Joy Renjilian-Burgy, Spanish

Revolts and Revolution: Student Perspectives on the Arab Spring

Red Summer: How an Environmental Chemistry Laboratory Changed My View of Pollution

(individual presentations)

SCI 278 Revolution 2.0: Exploring the Use of Social Media During the Arab Spring Michelle M. Al-Ferzly ’14, Undeclared Advisor: Nadya Hajj, Political Science

My Time in the Arab Spring: Morocco’s Revolution

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Lake Baikal: Science and Culture in Post-Soviet Siberia (panel)

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Affordable by Design Alexandria M. Barnes ’12, Urban Studies Advisor: Martha McNamara, Art

There is a Difference Between a Cause and a Movement Asha R. Carter ’13, Peace and Justice Studies Advisor: Victor Kazanjian, Office of Intercultural Education & Religious and Spiritual Life

Building a Community: Affordable Housing in Jamaica Plain Sonrisa Cooper ’11, Environmental Studies Advisor: Martha McNamara, Art

Political Economy of Development From Policy to Practice (individual presentations)

SCI 380 Wellesley in the White House Brianna G. Fitch ’12, Political Science and Religion and Elizabeth H. Pan ’12, American Studies Advisor: Tom Burke, Political Science

Witnessing Government in an Era of Maximum Discord

Kinetic Installations in Architecture

Rebecca S. Freeman-Slade ’14, Undeclared Advisor: Michael Jeffries, American Studies

Laura Salazar ’12, Economics and Architecture Advisor: Lara Tohme, Art

American Health Policy: Recognizing Gaps from the Home to the House Floor

Searching for Errors in the Human Genome Reference Sequence

Kayla A. Scire ’12, Political Science and Women’s and Gender Studies Advisor: Tom Burke, Political Science

Anne V. West ’15, Undeclared Advisor: Andrea Sequeira, Biological Sciences

Global Perspectives of an American in British Parliament Caroline C. Dougherty ’12, Neuroscience Advisor: Joseph Joyce, Economics The Justice System and the Psychology of Egregious Criminals Julia L. Denardo Roney ’12, Psychology Advisor: Linda Carli, Psychology

Technology, Innovation, and Education Navigating in 2-D and 3-D (individual presentations)

SCI E111

Observatory Optimization to Observe an Exoplanet Lynn M. Geiger ’13, Geosciences and Astronomy and Helen G. Ressler ’14, Undeclared Advisor: Kim McLeod, Astronomy

Supporting Innovation in Synthetic Biology Through Human-Computer Interaction (panel)

SCI 261 Heidi J. Wang ’12, Computer Science; Taili Feng ’13, Computer Science; Michelle N. Ferreirae ’13, Computer Science; and Casey E. Grote ’14, Undeclared Advisor: Orit Shaer, Computer Science

Closing the Loop: Helping Robots Navigate the World With a Kinect Lucy E. Archer ’12, Physics Advisor: Glenn Stark, Physics

Improving Sharing, Searching, and Accessibility in the Web-Based Scheduler for Tanner Olivia V. Kotsopoulos ’14, Undeclared and Nora K. McKinnell ’14, Undeclared Advisor: Scott Anderson, Computer Science

New Tools of the Trade (individual presentations)

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AB STRACTS AND WEB -BASED CONFERENCE SCHEDULER

Complete Tanner Conference abstracts are available online through a Web-based conference scheduler at www.wellesley.edu/tanner Please visit the Web site to create, print, and share a personalized schedule for the day. Computer stations will be available in the Science Center on the day of the Conference. WELLESLEY IN THE WORLD

The Tanner Conference provides students the opportunity to learn about Wellesley’s international study, internship and grant, and fellowship programs through presentation, panels, and roundtables. International Study Every year, about 45 percent of Wellesley College juniors participate in semester or full-year international study programs in more than 38 countries. Roughly a third of those who study internationally are enrolled in Wellesley Collegesponsored programs, with the remainder selecting programs sponsored by other colleges, universities, or international study providers. Internship and Grant Programs Wellesley College supports a large and diverse number of summer internships and community service projects in the United States and around the world. This summer, more than 300 students participated in internship programs across 41 countries. Fellowship Programs Wellesley College offers fellowships for graduate study or research that are open to graduating seniors and Wellesley alumnae. Each year, the College supports approximately 50 women in both national and international programs of study or research. In addition, faculty committees assist candidates in applying for national fellowships, such as the Rhodes, Marshall, Fulbright, Truman, and Goldwater.

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M AP International Study Argentina Australia Austria Brazil Chile China Costa Rica Denmark Ecuador Egypt France Germany Ghana Greece Hungary India Ireland Israel Italy

Japan Jordan Kenya Korea Mexico Morocco Nepal Netherlands New Zealand Nicaragua Norway Oman Poland Portugal South Africa Spain Switzerland Turkey United Kingdom

Internship and Grant Programs Albania Argentina Austria Bangladesh Bosnia-Herzegovina Brazil Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde China Costa Rica Timor-Leste Ecuador Ethiopia France Germany Ghana Guatemala Hong Kong SAR India

Ireland Israel Italy Japan Kenya Korea Mexico Morocco Nepal New Zealand Nicaragua Peru Spain Sweden Switzerland Thailand Turkey Uganda United Kingdom United States

International Study Internship and Grant Programs Fellowship Programs Patterns indicate multiple categories

Fellowship Programs Argentina Bolivia China Denmark France Germany Italy Mexico

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Netherlands Norway Peru Spain Sweden Taiwan United Kingdom

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International Study Programs Department of Classical Studies College Year in Athens This program is designed for students interested in the study of ancient, medieval, or modern Greece and its environs. Courses are offered in archaeology, art history, classical languages and literature, ethnography, history, international relations, modern Greek language and literature, philosophy, political science, and religion. This semester or yearlong program in Athens emphasizes ancient Greece, with some attention paid to modern Greece and the Greek language. Intercollegiate Center for Classical Studies in Rome This program focuses on the archaeology and topography of ancient Rome, and is taught by American faculty. Approximately 35 students are enrolled in the program each semester. Each student takes four units: a required two unit course on “The Ancient City”; one unit of Greek or Latin; and one other unit, such as art history or the Italian language. Department of East Asian Languages and Literatures CET Beijing Chinese Language Program Based in one of China’s most dynamic cities (and the home of “standard” Chinese), the CET Beijing program immerses students in local Chinese life. Students have the opportunity to live with Chinese roommates from local universities and to enroll in innovative language courses that challenge their skills inside and outside the classroom. The program’s unique activities further capitalize on Beijing’s rich learning environment and show students a side of China not seen by tourists. This program is available in the spring, summer, or fall terms.

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Associated Kyoto Program, Japan Wellesley College is a member of a consortium of 16 liberal arts colleges that sponsors the Associated Kyoto Program at Doshisha University in Kyoto, Japan’s ancient capital. This two-semester program is an enriching, rigorous experience that provides an opportunity for students to study the Japanese language and take related courses in the humanities and the social sciences while living with a homestay family in the Kyoto area. Courses are taught by professors from the participating colleges and by Japanese-language teachers. Students take courses in English and Japanese, and are encouraged to participate in travel and cultural activities. Ewha Womans University, Seoul, South Korea Wellesley College offers a student-for-student exchange program with Ewha Womans University in Seoul. Wellesley students attend classes in Ewha’s international coeducational programs. All classes, with the exception of Korean, are taught in English. Students who have mastered the Korean language also may take courses at the university outside of the international program. Japan Women’s University, Tokyo, Japan This is a challenging, total-immersion, yearlong, student-for-student exchange program for one or two students per year between Wellesley College and Japan Women’s University, which is located in the heart of Tokyo. Students take courses at the university in addition to intensive Japanese-language courses for a total of 30 to 32 credits, and receive full credit for the year. One academicyear course may be taken in English at the coeducational Waseda University’s International Division at no additional expense. Students have the choice of living in a dormitory or with a homestay family. In addition to a versatile liberal arts curriculum with a strong emphasis on Japanese studies,

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the university offers a wide range of club and extracurricular activities. Department of French Wellesley-in-Aix The Wellesley-in-Aix program offers an exciting and challenging course of study, as well as an authentic experience of French life and culture. The program is open to women and men and its modest size (30 to 35 participants) allows close attention to be paid to individual interests and academic needs. Students begin with a pre-session of preparatory coursework and cultural excursions in Paris. In Aix, students are fully matriculated at the University of Provence (Aix-Marseille) and take the same courses as French students. Majors in political science, international relations, and economics are also registered at Sciences Po-Aix. Participants share studio apartments in Aix’s centre ville (downtown); homestays with selected families also are available. Department of German Wellesley-in-Berlin Wellesley College’s Department of German sponsors a junior-year-abroad program at the Freie University in Berlin, Germany, hosted by Middlebury College. The program offers academic-year and spring-semester options that allow students in almost all majors to pursue their academic interests. A resident director and tutors assist students with integration into university life. The opportunity to participate in internships at various political, cultural, and social institutions is a feature of the program. The Susan Rappaport Knafel ’52 International Internship Fund provides internship grants with an application through the Center for Work and Service.

Office of International Study The Wellesley College Office of International Study provides advice and support for Wellesley students who elect to study in a foreign country for a semester or an academic year. Each year, almost 50 percent of the junior class pursues academic course work internationally for at least one semester. Of those, about a third enroll in one of Wellesley’s international study or exchange programs in Austria, Egypt, France, Hong Kong SAR, Italy, Japan, Mexico, South Korea, Spain, or the United Kingdom. The remainder enrolls in one of more than 150 approved programs or direct-enrollment options. All students considering spending a semester or year in a foreign country during their junior year should begin the process early in their sophomore year. Department of Italian Studies Eastern College Consortium (ECCO), Bologna, Italy The ECCO in Lecce is an intensive threeweek summer program offered in the month of August. It is a rigorous linguistic and valuable cultural full-immersion experience recommended before the semester or yearlong program in Bologna. The language course consists of a fast-paced and thorough grammar review presented in the context of contemporary Italian issues, with a particular focus on southern Italian art, history, customs, and traditions. Learning of the language and understanding of the culture are also fostered through a rich program of social and artistic events, extracurricular activities, and guided tours in the region of Puglia. Department of Spanish Program for Mexican Culture and Society in Puebla, Mexico Wellesley College, Oberlin College, Smith College, and Wheaton College jointly offer an international study program in conjunction with the Benemérita Universidad Autónoma

de Puebla (BUAP). Students in this program enroll directly in regular Mexican university courses across nearly all divisions of the BUAP, a large public research university. Students build an individually tailored curriculum in collaboration with an on-site resident director who is a faculty member of one of the sponsoring institutions. Supplemental language and subject-matter tutoring is provided. As bona fide students of the BUAP, participants enjoy full access to university facilities and services. They live with host Mexican families. An extensive cultural activities program, as well as excursions to Mexico City, Oaxaca, Tlaxcala, and Chiapas complement the curricular offerings. The program has two terms: from early August through midDecember and from early January through late May. Each term offers a considerably longer international study experience than the usual semester—which may be of particular benefit to students who cannot spend an entire year outside the United States.

the Universidad de Córdoba. Course offerings are extensive, both in terms of PRESHCO courses and general university offerings, ranging from the fine arts to environmental sciences and engineering, from comparative law and politics to seminars in literature and film. Depending on individual preferences, students are housed in privately run dormitories or with host Spanish families. A variety of planned excursions complements and enhances the program of study.

Programa de Estudios Hispánicos en Córdoba (PRESHCO), Spain A consortium of Oberlin College, Smith College, The College of Wooster, Trinity College, Wellesley College, and Wheaton College created the Programa de Estudios Hispánicos en Córdoba in 1981 to encourage the intellectual and personal growth that comes from cultural immersion. The program offers students an opportunity to strengthen their acquisition of the Spanish language while fostering an appreciation of Spanish history and culture through studies in a variety of disciplines. The PRESHCO program is designed not only for Spanish majors, but for anyone wishing to develop fluency in Spanish for future professional endeavors. Academic study centers on courses taught by regular faculty from the Universidad de Córdoba, but developed to address the requirements of American universities and colleges; the program also offers direct matriculation at t h e

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Internship and Grant Programs

and backgrounds. By living independently, students gain an understanding of city living from a multidisciplinary perspective.

The Madeleine Korbel Albright Institute for Global Affairs

Anchor Point Internships in Global Leadership These internships were established through the generosity of Amy Batchelor ’88 and Brad Feld. Wellesley College students undertake ten-week summer internships in programs that foster their connections to the global community and encourage their global leadership skills and activities. Anchor Point internships have included placements for students from a variety of academic backgrounds in Cameroon, Cape Verde, Egypt, Morocco, and other countries. Sites have included a foundation dedicated to young women’s scientific and technological education and, a local women’s NGO working to improve economic and social conditions, among others. These community development-based projects will enable students to encounter the diversity, creative dynamism, and humanity existing throughout the world.

The Madeleine Korbel Albright Institute for Global Affairs completed its second successful year in 2011. Forty students were chosen as Albright Fellows and participated in an intensive Wintersession program in January. As a component of the Institute’s program, Albright Fellows each pursued summer internships in global affairs. The following donors have made endowed gifts to support the internships of Albright Fellows: Dorothy Chao Jenkins ’68 Lia Gelin Poorvu ’56 Mary Sidell James ’65 Class of 1959 Arthur Vining Davis Foundation Beth Langerman Friedman ’82 Sandra Brown Eakins ’59

Center for Work and Service Global Engagement Internship Programs American Cities Internship Program What is it like to have a job in a major American city? The American Cities Internship Program translates Wellesley College’s liberal arts education into action by providing interns with an intensive, careerrelated experience and the opportunity to live in such cities as Atlanta, Bethesda, Boston, Chicago, Los Angeles, New York City, and San Francisco, and Stamford. Students are placed in for-profit and nonprofit organizations, with alumnae mentors when possible. Through their internships, students become familiar with professional responsibilities, create networks for future employment, and learn the importance of cultivating relationships with co-workers of diverse ages

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Children’s Hospital Boston, Division of Hematology/Oncology This internship provides an opportunity for students to learn skills related to basic, translational, and clinical research in pediatric blood diseases, cancer, and stem cell biology. The intern will work with a mentor to conduct basic research in a laboratory, or to contribute to the development of a clinical research effort. The intern is expected to become familiar with the research approaches used by her mentor. At the mentor’s discretion, she may develop a specific project with a current member of the research team. Clinton Health Access Initiative Internship Program The Clinton Foundation was established to address poverty and health inequalities across the globe by expanding access to lifesaving

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medicines and by helping developing countries systematize their approaches to health care. The Clinton Foundation established CHAI in 2002. Interns at the organization conduct ten-week summer internships in areas of the world where CHAI has a presence. Students have worked in CHAI offices in China, South Africa, and Ethiopia. Internships in International Human Rights Organizations This program places students in international and domestic organizations working on human rights problems. During their internship, students address the issues of civil rights, equality, and justice throughout the world. Placements vary from year to year and have included The Henry Jackson Society in London, United Kingdom and Iran Human Rights Documentation Center in New Haven, CT. Lumpkin Summer Institute for Service Learning Designed for students with a commitment to service, the ten-week Lumpkin Summer Institute for Service Learning challenges students to explore and participate in social change in the greater Boston area. During the program, students live together in Boston while undertaking full-time internships with local nonprofit organizations. Led by Wellesley College faculty, staff, and nonprofit practitioners, weekly seminars integrating experiential and traditional classroom learning benefit not only the Wellesley interns but also the communities in which they serve. The Elisabeth Luce Moore ’24 Summer Internships in Asia The Elisabeth Luce Moore ’24 Summer Internships in Asia aim to prepare students for lives and careers in a global economy. Through internships in East Asian business, government, and nonprofit organizations, students gain a knowledge of local business and cultural norms that informs their liberal arts

education and prepares them for professions in an interconnected world. The program, which currently sponsors internships in China, Hong Kong SAR, Japan, and South Korea, was established in 1999 with a grant from the Henry Luce Foundation, and builds on ties between Wellesley College and Asia that date to the late nineteenth century. SoundWaters Summer Internship Program This program funds a student to work as a head educator, deckhand, and mate aboard SoundWaters, an 80-foot, three-masted schooner docked in Stamford, CT. This “floating classroom” program offers a multidisciplinary environmental curriculum for children and adults in Westchester, Nassau, and Suffolk counties in NY, and in Fairfield County, CT. Educators live and teach aboard SoundWaters. Summer Internships in Psychology at the Walker School and Riverside Community Care The Summer Internships in Psychology Program was developed in order to give students the opportunity to gain highly valuable clinical experience that helps them make informed career choices. Working in a community-based agency sensitizes the students to issues of cultural diversity and poverty and increases their understanding of the biopsycho-social model of mental disorders. Thus the interns develop a deeper appreciation of the complex interface between genetic makeup, psychological coping strategies, and the larger socio-cultural forces determining how individuals negotiate the vicissitudes of life. Vieques Conservation & Historical Trust (VCHT) Internship Program During this Wellesley College Wintersession and summer internship, students at the Vieques Conservation and Historical Trust (VCHT) help advance the organization’s mission of promoting environmental stewardship and community activism. Vieques Island, 21 miles long and five miles wide, is located ten

miles off the eastern shore of Puerto Rico’s main island. The VCHT works to protect and preserve local natural resources, including the most abundant bioluminescent bay in the world. Interns contribute to the implementation of several educational and research programs. Wellesley Internships in Africa Through Wellesley Internships in Africa, students undertake ten-week summer internships in Morocco, Uganda, and Ethiopia. Placements are available to students from a variety of academic backgrounds in organizations ranging from an international educational program to a local NGO working to create stronger cross-cultural relationships. These education and community development-based projects enable students to encounter the diversity, creative dynamism, and humanity of the continent. Wellesley Internships in Europe Established in 2009, the Wellesley Internships in Europe program provides an intensive, career-related internship in a student’s field of interest. In 2011, students pursued placements in Italy, Ireland, and Spain. Among them is a long-standing opportunity at the Peggy Guggenheim Collection in Venice, Italy, where students become familiar with museum management in one of the great art cities of Europe and work on the Biennale depending on the year. Wellesley Internships in India Established in 2007, the Wellesley Internships in India program provides students in all majors the opportunity to undertake tenweek summer internships in New Delhi and Mumbai. Placements are available in grassroots educational, organizing, and advocacy organizations. Responsibilities and projects include research, teaching, mentoring, communications, and office projects. Participation will enable students to develop flexibility, knowledge of the complexities and cultures t h e

of India, and the ability to work in varying cultural contexts. Students are exposed to the culturally rich regions and diverse populations of the Indian subcontinent. Wellesley Internships in Latin America The Wellesley Internships in Latin America program provides placements in varied fields such as political and environmental sciences, economics, Latin American politics, history, biology, and sociology. Students learn about the challenges facing this region. Students in all fields and majors are encouraged to apply for internships in Argentina, Guatemala, and Costa Rica. Through the program, interns gain an insider’s perspective on some of the most dynamic areas of the world.

Center for Work and Service Grant Programs The Paul B. Beal and Mona Phillips Beal Internship Fund The Paul B. Beal and Mona Phillips Beal Internship Fund has been established to encourage and facilitate practical learning experiences that will help Wellesley College students better define their career choices and develop a more informed understanding of the challenges and rewards of such choices. It is hoped that as a result of internship participation, students will make more effective course selections at both the undergraduate and graduate levels, learn more from those courses because of the perspective and experience they have acquired in their internship work, and become more competitive candidates for future opportunities in their chosen career paths. Carolyn Shaw Bell Internship Fund The Carolyn Shaw Bell Internship encourages and supports students seeking internship experience in business or economics. This program provides stipends for internships in nonprofit or for-profit organizations.

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Blessing Way Summer Public Service Internship This grant supports a Wellesley College student committed to making a difference in her community. It is designed for a student who is interested in working with a nonprofit or public service organization and in building a long-term commitment to service. In addition, it will support students who show leadership potential in this area or in their past service work. The intern’s project can focus on any important issue affecting a community, including youth, the environment, education, healthcare, and the arts. Barbara Bush Award for Volunteerism This grant funds a student pursuing a volunteer experience in disability services for the elderly or for young children. The placement must be with a nonprofit organization. The Wei Fong Chu Chao Endowed Fund This fund supports Wellesley College students pursuing summer internship opportunities outside the United States in for-profit and nonprofit organizations. Preference is given to internships in Asia. Class of 1962 Student Internship Fund This grant provides a stipend for a student pursuing a summer internship with a woman in a governmental position in the United States at the local, state, or national level. Class of 1969 Community Service Internship Fund This fund provides a summer stipend that supports student involvement in community service and encourages community service as a lifelong activity for Wellesley College women. Placement must be with a nonprofit community organization. Margaret C. Gordon Law and Education Public Service Award This fund supports a Wellesley College student committed to serving disadvantaged communities through an unpaid summer 26

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internship in public-interest law and/or in an urban public-school reform or support program. The grant enables a student to take an unpaid internship to learn more about the legal and educational issues surrounding disadvantaged urban communities. Susan Todd Horton 1910 Internship Fund This fund supports Wellesley College students interested in seeking summer internships in nonprofit and for-profit organizations. The Jeniam Foundation Internship Grant This grant supports students wishing to work in a nonprofit dedicated to preserving and protecting the environment. Susan Rappaport Knafel ’52 International Internship Fund This fund supports Wellesley College students pursuing summer internships outside the United States in for-profit and nonprofit organizations. Sherley Heidenberg Koteen ‘40 Endowed Internship Fund for Jewish Studies This fund will provide support for either international or domestic internships that encourage students to examine the many facets of Jewish civilization through interdisciplinary study of Jewish religion, history, philosophy, art, literature, social and political institutions, and cultural patterns. Rosemary Lonergan ’44 and John Todd President’s Discretionary Fund for Special Projects, Faculty and Student Travel, and Financial Aid The income from this endowed fund is to be used at the discretion of the President of Wellesley College to support special projects that the President deems worthy of support, and also travel-related activities for students and faculty of Wellesley College, including student internships, travel to conduct thesis research, faculty research and development, travel related to the Madeleine Korbel

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Albright Institute for Global Affairs, and faculty and student travel to conferences. The Mollie Green Lumpkin ’25 Fund for Experiential Learning in Latin America This fund supports Wellesley College students seeking summer internships in Spanishspeaking countries. Preference will be given to students interested in working in the area of environmental protection and preservation. The Lumpkin Family Internships for the Environment This fund encourages and supports Wellesley College students seeking summer internships in nonprofit organizations dedicated to preserving and protecting the environment. The Emily Cohen MacFarquhar ’59 Internship for International Journalism This fund was established to encourage and support Wellesley College students who have demonstrated an interest in journalism or photojournalism. The stipend provides the recipients with the opportunity to learn about journalism through an internship at an international news organization or to travel in order to document a foreign culture outside the United States. MasterCard Microfinance Internships This fund supports Wellesley students working in nonprofit microfinance organizations all over the world. Interns are exposed to the process of connecting low-income individuals with capital and new business opportunities. O’Meara Student Internship Fund This fund supports a Wellesley College student committed to making a difference in her state and/or local community by working directly with a woman involved in any aspect of state or local government in the United States. The stipend enables the student to take an unpaid internship and learn more about state or local government and the important role that women play in the governmental process.

Parents’ Internship Program This program provides unpaid summer careerdevelopment internships in nonprofit or forprofit sectors, with a focus on the applicants’ career development and exploration. Emphasis is placed on first-time experiences within an industry and/or organization. The Barbara Scott Preiskel ’45 Endowed Fund for Internships This fund supports a student seeking an internship to develop her career goals. It provides a stipend for any internship that is unpaid, full-time, and consistent with the applicant’s career interests. The internship may be with a nonprofit, for-profit, or public service organization in the United States. Public Service Internship Fund This fund encourages and enables Wellesley College students to use their talents and skills in public service. Each summer, it supports students working full-time in nonprofit organizations that otherwise could not employ them. Priority is given to applicants whose work relates to young children and their families, particularly those who are economically or otherwise disadvantaged. Responding to World Crises This fund supports students seeking to make a difference in the world by tackling contemporary crises worldwide. Students work at both rights-based advocacy and service NGOs. Students have addressed HIV/AIDS, human rights in North Korea and Iran, Darfur-related initiatives in the United States and abroad, and justice for women in India. Responding to World Crises is funded through the Office of the President. Service Opportunity Stipend This stipend funds summer placements that offer direct student involvement in frontline community service and that foster the spirit of volunteerism. The applicant must intend to

pursue an experience in a nonprofit organization that involves a particular community, population, or issue related to a personal interest or concern. Priority is given to applicants pursuing a full-time community service experience for the first time. This fund also supports one stipend with the Low Vision Center in Bethesda, MD. Beth K. Smith Award This award provides students the opportunity to experience work in the nonprofit sector, with the hope that they will continue in this field. In addition, it supports two placements with Social Accountability International in New York City, NY. Tanner Technology Initiative The Department of Computer Science and Center for Work and Service collaborated on improving accessibility, sharing, and scheduling features of a Web-based conference scheduler that was initiated in the tenth anniversary of the Tanner Conference. Conference abstracts are now made available online through this application leading to engagement with a wider audience. The Helen Wallace Health Sciences Internship Fund This fund supports an unpaid summer career development internship in a health profession, with preference given to those interested in the field of maternal and child health. Wellesley Serves! The Wellesley College motto, Non Ministrari sed Ministrare, underscores Wellesley’s commitment to community service. The Center for Work and Service translates the college motto into action by providing opportunities for direct service to others, and enables our students and alumnae to foster community and embrace diversity through lifelong learning, community involvement, civic engagement, and global citizenship.

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Oprah Winfrey Award for Volunteerism This award provides a summer stipend for a student wishing to explore a volunteer position with a nonprofit social service organization. The award honors the important connection between Oprah Winfrey’s speech at the Commencement of the Class of 1997 and the Wellesley College motto “Not to be ministered unto, but to minister.” Each year, this award enables a student to follow Ms. Winfrey’s example of service.

Davis Museum and Cultural Center The Summer Fellowship Program at the Davis Museum and Cultural Center Each summer, a select group of Wellesley College students joins the Davis staff for ten weeks of hands-on professional experience. This residential, paid, and highly competitive opportunity ensures that students earn marketable skills, gain broad exposure to museum operations, and acquire an overview of best museum policies and practices. The internship engages students with the collections and programs of one of the most active academic museums in the United States. Through focused work in one or more of the Davis departments, interns may participate in research, collections care, curatorial planning, technology/social media support, and/ or educational content development. Activities also include field trips to museums and arts events, with opportunities to meet arts leaders throughout the region. Additional opportunities offered by the Davis include the Eleanor P. DeLorme Museum Internship, and the Liliane Pingoud Soriano Curatorial Fellowship at the Musée du Louvre, Paris, France, an exchange program between the Davis and the Musée du Louvre. Both are curatorial in focus, and are made available through an application process to recent Wellesley College graduates.

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Office of the Dean of the College

Department of German

Department of Psychology

Social Sciences Summer Research Program This program provides awards that allow Wellesley College students to work with faculty and researchers from the Wellesley Centers for Women on projects related to anthropology, cognitive and linguistic sciences, economics, education, political science, psychology, sociology, women’s and gender studies, and social policy.

Wellesley Internships in Berlin Wellesley College’s Department of German sponsors a junior-year-abroad program at the Freie University in Berlin, hosted by Middlebury College. The opportunity to participate in internships at various political, cultural, and social institutions is a feature of the program. Internship stipends are made available by the Susan Rappaport Knafel ’52 International Internship Fund with an application through the Center for Work and Service.

Psychology Practicum Program This program allows students to gain hands on experience in the field of psychology and to acquire course credit through their participation in unpaid internships. The program is run collaboratively through the Department of Psychology and the Center for Work and Service. All participants have an advisor in the psychology department who oversees their internship work through scheduled meetings. The Center for Work and Service consults with potential and currently participating organizations about possible internships, and assists students in determining the placement that best matches both their interests and the organization’s needs.

Department of Economics Audrey Freedman ’51 Endowed Fund for Students in Economics This fund encourages and supports students who are interested in the study of economics. The internship supports students seeking experience in the field of domestic or international economics.

Department of English and Writing Program Department of English and Writing Program Summer Internships This fund supports three summer internships with organizations involved in activities related to publishing, literary research, and journalism or other media involving writing. In 2011, one editorial summer internship was offered at Kneerim and Williams Literary Agency, one at AGNI magazine, and one at the online magazine Slate.

Department of French French House Fellows Program This program funds students pursuing internships in a francophone country, in the field of their choice. The program is open to junior year French majors who have completed a year or a semester of study in France through the Wellesley-in-Aix program. Priority is given to students who have spent the entire year in France.

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Department of Political Science Washington Summer Internship Program This program provides an opportunity for a funded summer internship in Washington, DC. Students can seek placements from the wide array of government offices, publicinterest groups, media and cultural institutions, scientific and medical institutes, and research groups in Washington, DC. Eighteen to 20 interns—who must be in their junior year—are selected without regard to academic major. Each intern is provided a stipend and housing. In addition to the internship placement, the ten-week program involves weekly seminars and a mentor program with the Wellesley Club of Washington. Wellesley College’s Department of Political Science has run this program since 1943. The program is supported through the following endowed funds: Bertha S. Adkins ’28 Washington Internship Fund, Washington Summer Internship Fund in Memory of Marguerite Stitt Church ’14, Alona Evans Scholarship Fund for the Washington Internship Program, Sherley Heidenberg Koteen ’40 Washington Internship Fund, Anne Livingstone Williamson Quackenbos ’41 Memorial Fund, Laurence S. Rockefeller Fund, Ruth Goldman Schapiro ’47 Washington Internship Fund, and the Washington Internship Anniversary Fund.

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Department of Religion Severinghaus Summer Internship Program in Ministry/Human Services in Memory of Emmavail Luce Severinghaus ’22 This program supports students who wish to pursue internships in ministry or undertake the study of religion and/or the role of religion in society. Students may engage in hands-on work or research through positions with humanitarian or social action agencies, charitable or religious organizations, or policy based institutes. Applications are reviewed by a Department of Religion committee.

Peace and Justice Studies Class of 1950 Emily Greene Balch Summer Internship This fund supports one or more students conducting a summer project that analyzes the ways injustice is linked to conflict, and that encourages the study of the relationships among peace, justice, and social change. The project must include both analytical and experiential components. The program is funded by the Wellesley Class of 1950.

Science Center Summer Research Awards Mary M. and Edward B. Allen Fellows Administered by the Office of the Dean of the College, these fellows receive stipends and supplies for required for summer research in biological chemistry, including microbiology. Beckman Hoffman Scholars Program Marilyn Brachman Hoffman ’52 has endowed this fund to encourage members of Wellesley College’s science faculty to be creative in their work. These awards are made to faculty members who may use their funding to support student summer research. Nellie Zuckerman Cohen and Ann Cohen Heller Professorship in the Health Sciences This fund is used to support a professorship in those sciences, which are related to health in the broadest sense of the word. The Sally Etherton Cummins ’58 Summer Science Research Fellowship Fund Named for Sally Etherton Cummins ’58, this award supports students doing research in the natural sciences under the supervision of a Wellesley faculty member. Henry Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Award The Henry Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Awards Program supports the research and teaching careers of talented young faculty in the chemical sciences. Based on institutional nominations, the program provides discretionary funding to faculty at an early stage in their careers. The Henry Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Awards Program is based on accomplishment in scholarly research with undergraduates, as well as a compelling commitment to teaching. Frost Endowed Environmental Science/ Studies Fund This program provides general support to the Environmental Science/Studies Program.

Susan Todd Horton Class of 1910 Trust The Susan Todd Horton Class of 1910 Trust supports the Science Center’s Summer Research Program and Wellesley students in their scientific research projects. Howard Hughes Medical Institute Summer Research Awards These awards are provided by the Howard Hughes Medical Institute to students doing research in fields related to the life sciences, including biological chemistry, biological sciences, chemistry, mathematics, neuroscience, and physics. Students in all classes are eligible, including graduating seniors. Recipients may work with a Wellesley College Science Center faculty member or at an off-campus location. Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) Exceptional Research Opportunities Program (EXROP) EXROP provides talented undergraduates from disadvantaged backgrounds with summer research experiences in the labs of HHMI investigators and HHMI professors. The students are selected to apply by HHMI professors and invited directors of HHMIfunded undergraduate programs at colleges and universities. EXROP students also attend meetings at HHMI headquarters where they present their research in a poster session, network with their peers and HHMI scientists, and hear from scientific researchers from various backgrounds and stages in their careers. Hubel Summer Research Fellowship The Hubel Summer Research Fellowship is a gift provided by Dr. David Hubel. Students work under the supervision of a Wellesley College Neuroscience faculty member. IBM Research Fund This fund supports faculty development and student-faculty collaborative research in all of the sciences. The fund also helps to procure equipment that may be required to perform the aforementioned research. t h e

Amabel Boyce James ’74 Fund for Summer Research in the Sciences Named for Amabel Boyce James ’74, these awards are given to sophomores and juniors to encourage and strengthen their early interest in science. Students work under the supervision of a Wellesley College faculty member. The Keck Foundation Endowment Fund This fund supports the purchase of scientific equipment, especially equipment used for student-faculty research. Janina A. Longtine ’76 Fund for Summer Research in the Natural Sciences Named for Janina A. Longtine ’76, these awards support students doing research in the natural sciences under the supervision of a Wellesley faculty member. National Science Foundation Individual faculty awards from the National Science Foundation engage undergraduate students in meaningful ways with on-going scientific research. National Science Foundation REU (Research Experience for Undergrads) This program supports active research participation by undergraduate students in any of the areas of research funded by the National Science Foundation. REU projects involve students in meaningful ways in ongoing research programs or in research projects specifically designed for the REU program. Massachusetts Space Grant Consortium (MASGC) The consortium, funded by NASA, consists of four year colleges and universities, community colleges and public outreach organizations. MASGC’s primary goal is to represent NASA in Massachusetts, to promote public understanding of and support for space exploration and research, and to encourage students to choose courses of study that will lead them to enter the technical work force. One of MASGC’s primary activities is providing

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fellowships to Massachusetts students to enable them to engage in study and research projects and to attend meetings that they would not be able to do without Space Grant support. Patterson Summer Research Fellowship The Patterson Summer Research Fellowship is awarded in recognition of a student’s academic excellence and their potential for success in research. Patterson Fellows display an excitement for original discovery and a desire to communicate knowledge to others, and embody the ethos of a Wellesley education. In addition to a summer research stipend, the Fellowship provides an additional award of $300. The fellowship is awarded to a student nominated by a faculty member in the Neuroscience Program or affiliated departments, including chemistry, biology, psychology, physics, and computer science, and is not normally given to students who have received other major research fellowships or prizes. Barbara Peterson Ruhlman ’54 Fund for Interdisciplinary Studies This fund supports students and faculty advisors who participate in the social sciences summer research program. Roberta Day Staley and Karl A. Staley Fund for Cancer-Related Research Awards This program provides awards in any discipline, including the social sciences and humanities, to undertake cancer-related research. The awards may be used to conduct research with a Wellesley College faculty member or at an off-campus site. SOMAS (Support of Mentors and Their Students in the Neurosciences) This program, under a main grant to Davidson College from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute’s Undergraduate Science Education Program, works to encourage underrepresented minorities to enter the field of neuroscience. 30

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The Eleanor R. Webster Prize in Chemistry This prize is offered in memory of Eleanor Webster (Wellesley College Professor Emerita of Chemistry). A recommendation to the department is made by a committee comprised of thesis mentors. Norma Wilentz Hess Faculty and Program Fund in Computer Science This fund is used to support visiting faculty who have expertise in computer science and related disciplines. The fund may also be used for salary and additional expenses such as travel, research, equipment, and other academic needs.

Wellesley Centers for Women Through dynamic internships and the Wellesley Centers for Women (WCW), Wellesley College students help drive social change through research and action programs that put women’s perspectives and experiences at the center of the inquiry. Work at WCW addresses three major areas: the social and economic status of women and girls and the advancement of their human rights in the United States and around the globe; the education, care, and development of children and youth; and the emotional well-being of families and individuals.

Department of Women’s and Gender Studies The Department of Women’s and Gender Studies offers a stipend to support one summer internship directly involving gender and social change. Applicants must secure their own internship which may be anywhere in the world.

Fellowship Programs For Wellesley College Graduating Seniors Only Jacqueline Krieger Klein ’53 Fellowship in Jewish Studies t h e

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This award encourages graduating seniors to pursue further education in the field of Jewish Studies. Susan Rappaport Knafel ’52 Scholarship for Foreign Study This scholarship is awarded to a member of the graduating class who displays a desire for learning and an ability to impart knowledge to others. The scholarship will fund a year of study at a foreign institution to pursue a specific subject that requires contact with foreign scholars, libraries, or other resources. Study will not be supported at an institution in the United States or in the candidate’s country of citizenship or residence. U.S. tax laws apply. Susan Rappaport Knafel ’52 Traveling Fellowship This fellowship is awarded to a member of the graduating class who displays an interest in and an acceptance of others, and who displays the ethos of a Wellesley College education. The fellowship will fund a year of purposeful international travel to explore a particular interest, with the requirement that the recipient not remain in the same area for more than two months. Travel will not be supported in the country of the candidate’s citizenship or residence. U.S. tax laws apply. Trustee Scholarship This scholarship is awarded on a competitive basis to graduating seniors who are applying to graduate school. To be considered a candidate, a senior must apply for a Trustee Scholarship or for any of the Wellesley College fellowships for graduate study. The title “Trustee Scholar” is honorary.

For Wellesley College Graduating Seniors and Alumnae Anne Louise Barrett Fellowship This fellowship supports graduate study or research, preferably in music, with an emphasis on study or research in musical theory,

composition, or the history of music internationally or in the United States. Margaret Freeman Bowers Fellowship This fellowship supports a first year of study in the fields of social work, law, public policy, or public administration, including M.B.A candidates planning a career in the field of social services. Preference is given to candidates demonstrating financial need. Eugene L. Cox Fellowship This fellowship supports graduate study in medieval or Renaissance history and culture, internationally or in the United States. Professor Elizabeth F. Fisher Fellowship This fellowship supports research or further study in geology or geography, including urban, environmental, or ecological studies. Preference is given to applicants in the fields of geology and geography. Ruth Ingersoll Goldmark Fellowship This fellowship supports graduate study in English literature or composition or in the classics. Horton-Hallowell Fellowship This fellowship supports graduate study in any field, preferably for the last two years of candidacy for the Ph.D. degree or its equivalent, or for private research of an equivalent standard. Peggy Howard Fellowship in Economics This fellowship provides financial aid for Wellesley College students or alumnae continuing their study of economics. The economics faculty administers this fellowship and may name one or two recipients, depending on the funding available. Edna V. Moffett Fellowship This fellowship is for a young alumna, preferably for a first year of graduate study in history. Alice Freeman Palmer Fellowship This fellowship supports study or research internationally or in the United States. The

holder must be no more than 26 years old at the time of her appointment, and remain unmarried throughout her tenure. Kathryn Conway Preyer Fellowship (formerly the Thomas Jefferson Fellowship) This fellowship supports advanced study in history. Vida Dutton Scudder Fellowship This fellowship supports study or research in the fields of literature, political science, or social science. Harriet A. Shaw Fellowship This fellowship supports study or research in music, art, or allied subjects in the United States or in a foreign country. Preference is given to music candidates; undergraduate work in the history of art is required of other candidates. Mary Elvira Stevens Traveling Fellowship This fellowship supports a student taking up to a year of travel or study outside the United States to benefit from the knowledge and understanding of a global education. Any scholarly, artistic, or cultural purpose may be considered. Except under unusual and compelling circumstances, the committee in recent years has not chosen to fund formal graduate study or Ph.D. dissertation research. Candidates must be at least 25 years old in the year they apply. Maria Opasnov Tyler ’52 Scholarship in Russian Studies This scholarship is for graduate study in Russian studies. Sarah Perry Wood Medical Fellowship This fellowship supports the study of medicine at an accredited medical school approved by the American Medical Association. Fanny Bullock Workman Fellowship This fellowship supports graduate study in any field.

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Elisabeth Luce Moore ’24 WellesleyYenching Fellowship Program The fellowships listed below are open to graduating seniors and alumnae in all majors. Chinese-language proficiency is required only for the fellowship at the National Palace Museum in Taipei, Taiwan. Chung Chi College, Hong Kong SAR The fellow’s time may be divided between helping to organize and promote English language activities at Chung Chi College as a whole and serving as a teaching or research assistant for an academic department. Ginling College, Nanjing, China The fellows teach English in the classroom for about 12 to 14 hours each week, with office hours as needed. National Palace Museum, Taipei, Taiwan Approximately one-half of the fellow’s work is with the National Palace Museum Secretariat, where she writes, translates, and revises English documents for various departments. The other half of the fellow’s work is with one of the museum’s other departments.

For Women Who Are Graduates of Any American Institution Mary McEwen Schimke Scholarship This scholarship provides a supplemental award to provide the candidate with relief from household and child care expenses while she pursues graduate study. The award is made on the basis of scholarly potential and identified need. The candidate must be at least 30 years old and currently engaged in graduate study in literature and/or history. Preference is given to those who major in American Studies. M.A. Cartland Shackford Medical Fellowship This fellowship is for a candidate studying medicine with a view to general practice, not psychiatry.

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WELLESLEY COLLEGE SUPPORTED INTERNSHIPS 2011

WELLESLEY COLLEGE GRADUATE FELLOWSHIP RECIPIENTS 2010–2011

NATIONAL FELLOWSHIP COMPETITION RECIPIENTS AND NOMINEES 2010–2011

WELLESLEY COLLEGE SUPPORTED INTERNSHIP RECIPIENTS 2011 The Madeleine Korbel Albright Institute for Global Affairs Internships Ashley N. Abarr ’12, Clinton Health Access Initiative, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia Amisha Ahuja ’12, Albright Stonebridge Group, Washington, DC Hawa Ansary ’11, World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland Jessica L. Anthony ’12, The Guatemalan Project, El Triunfo, Guatemala Merene Botsio ’12, UN Foundation, Washington, DC Toby Chaiken ’11* Siwen Chen ’11, European Union Chamber of Commerce, Shanghai, China** Jessica G. Chin ’11, Human Rights First, Washington, DC Samantha K. Chu ’11, World Policy Journal, New York, NY Surina Diddi ’12, Unicredit Bank, Vienna, Austria Caroline C. Dougherty ’12, The Henry Jackson Society, London, United Kingdom Mika B. Edgerly ’12, Oxfam America, Boston, MA Amanda J. Faulkner ’11, Cleantech Group, London, United Kingdom Yaffa Fredrick ’11* Zahra M. Ghadyali ’12, Office of the Solicitor General, Mumbai, India Zara Ibrahim ’12, Clinton Health Access Initiative, Harlem, NY Luyang Jin ’12, Unite for Sight, Accra, Ghana Katherine E. Judd ’11, Catalytic Communities, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil Weiye Kou ’12, Social Accountability International, New York, NY** Elizabeth S. Lawler ’12, Sewa International, Bangalore, India Anjalee E. Martin ’12, International Finance Corporation, Washington, DC 34

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Sang-Hee Min ’11, Democracy NOW, New York, NY Ikuno Naka ’12, Merrill Lynch Japan Securities Company, Tokyo, Japan Madeleine S. Nelson ’12, The ARI Movement, Istanbul, Turkey Lucia M. Nhamo ’11, Color of Film Collaborative, Boston, MA Leslye D. Penticoff ’11, World Bank Inspection Panel, Washington, DC Maliha Rahman ’12, Association for the Support and Training of Women Candidates (KA. DER), Istanbul, Turkey Serena B. Ryan ’11, Save Your Future Association, Nkambe, Cameroon Aabha Sharma ’12, Maiti Nepal, Kathmandu, Nepal Rebecca C. Turkington ’12, Ministry of the Interior, Rabat, Morocco Anisha Vachani ’12, Hong Kong Monetary Authority, Hong Kong SAR Anagha Vaidhyanathan ’11* Nancy H. Welsh ’12, Observer Research Foundation, New Delhi, India Michaela Wilkes Klein ’11, UNESCO, Paris, France Catherine Wu ’11, Ventures in Development, Shanghai, China** Julia N. Wu ’12, Institute for Cultural Diplomacy, Berlin, Germany Esra E. Yarar ’12, The Harpswell Foundation, Phnom Penh, Cambodia Deeba Zivari ’11, ** Sewa International, Ahmadabad, India Margaret Zwiebach ’12, Assaf-Harofe Medical Center, Tel Aviv, Israel *Exempt from internship requirement ** Completed internship in summer 2010.

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Center for Work and Service Global Engagement Internship Programs American Cities Internship Program Atlanta Aryanne D. de Silva ’13, Emory Center for Neurogenerative Medicine, Atlanta, GA

Bethesda Yrianna N. Germosen ’13, Low Vision Center, Bethesda, MD

Boston Joanna S. Concessao ’13, Children’s Hospital Boston, Boston, MA

Camille E. Hamilton ’13, Children’s Hospital Boston, Boston, MA

Linnea E. Herzog ’12, Children’s Hospital Boston, Boston, MA

Yoowon Lim ’12, Children’s Hospital Boston, Boston, MA

Elizabeth F. Bair ’12, Codman Square Health Center, Boston, MA

Molly Cyr ’13, Women’s International League of Peace and Freedom, Boston, MA

Chicago Rachel E. Cherny ’13, The Field Museum, Chicago, IL

Mary E. Kenefake ’13, WTTW, Network Chicago, Chicago, IL

Los Angeles Jean M. Kim ’12, Marc Platt Productions, Universal City, CA

New York Lianna Yi-An Lee ’12, Social Accountability International, New York, NY

Aileen Patimeteeporn ’12, Social Accountability International, New York, NY

Alizah F. Raza ’12, Social Accountability International, New York, NY

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Emma F. Wright ’11, Blackburn Printmaking Studio, New York, NY

San Francisco Hannah S. Allen ’12, Contemporary Jewish Museum, San Francisco, CA

Robyn L. Burleson ’12,Women’s Foundation, San Francisco, CA

Una M. Graonic ’13, Global Business Network, San Francisco, CA

Monica M. Wawrzyniak ’12, Alameda County Child Care, San Francisco, CA

Stamford Kelly A. Mercer ’13, SoundWaters, Stamford, CT Vieques Conservation & Historical Trust (VCHT) Internship Wintersession 2011 Eliana R. Blaine ’13, Vieques Conservation & Historical Trust (VCHT), Vieques, Puerto Rico Jane J. Park ’11, Vieques Conservation & Historical Trust (VCHT), Vieques, Puerto Rico

Summer 2011 Ada P. Smith ’13, Vieques Conservation & Historical Trust (VCHT), Vieques, Puerto Rico

Internships in International Human Rights Organizations Sarah A. McAra ’12, The Henry Jackson Society, London, United Kingdom Belgin S. Palaz ’12, The Henry Jackson Society, London, United Kingdom Jee-Hyun Song ’13, Citizen’s Alliance for North Korean Human Rights, Seoul, South Korea

Lumpkin Summer Institute for Service Learning Cassandra Duarte ’12, Medical Legal Partnership for Children, Boston, MA Claire A. Fogarty ’12, St. Francis House, Boston, MA Jean H. Lee ’13, Women’s Inc., Teen Voices, Boston, MA

Grace Liu ’13, Boston Chinatown Neighborhood Center, Boston, MA

Dominique T. Hazzard ’12, Aga Khan Education Services, Kampala, Uganda

Meagan M. Moody ’12, Office of Senator Harriette Chandler ’59, Boston, MA

Amy K. Wang ’13, Center for Cross-Cultural Learning, Rabat, Morocco

Esther H. Nam ’13, Boston Community Capital, Boston, MA

Stephanie D. Quon ’12 , The Crittenton Women’s

Anchor Point Internships in Global Leadership

Union, Boston, MA

The Elisabeth Luce Moore ’24 Summer Internships in Asia Beijing, China Yu Shan Dai ’12, The Economist Group, Beijing, China

Elizabeth T. Grether ’12, ABC News, Beijing, China

Xinyue Wu ’13, Global Law Office, Beijing, China

Shanghai, China Wing Yee Lee ’13, Ventures in Development, Shanghai, China

Zijun J. Pang ’13, China Market Research, Shanghai, China

Katherine R. Nolan ’12, Organização das Mulheres de Cabo Verde (OMCV), Cape Verde

Serena B. Ryan ’11, Save Your Future Association, Nkambe, Cameroon

Wendy W. West ’13, Organização das Mulheres de Cabo Verde (OMCV), Cape Verde

Rebecca C. Turkington ’12, Ministry of the Interior, Rabat, Morocco

Wellesley Internships in Latin America Jessica L. Anthony ’12, Guatemalan Project, El Triunfo, Guatemala

Veronica M. Correa ’11, Poder Ciudadano, Buenos Aires, Argentina

Erica Saldivar ’12, United Nations Development Program, San Jose, Costa Rica

Cailey D. Stevens ’12, Directorio Legislativo,

Hong Kong SAR Alison L. Pearson ’12, Hong Kong Civic

Buenos Aires, Argentina

Exchange, Hong Kong SAR

Anisha Vachani ’12, Hong Kong Monetary Authority, Hong Kong SAR

Shradha Basnyat ’13, Action India, New Delhi, India

South Korea Christine J. Lee ’12, Korean National

Tiffany Si-Ting Chan ’12, Observer Research

Commission for UNESCO, Seoul, South Korea Eun Young Park ’13, Korean National Commission for UNESCO, Seoul, South Korea Jee-Hyun Song ’13, Citizen’s Alliance for North Korean Human Rights, Seoul, South Korea

Foundation, Mumbai, India

Kristen J. Ferguson ’12, Aga Khan Education Services, Mumbai, India

Michelle Vogelzang ’13, Operation ASHA, New Delhi, India

Whitney I. Smith ’12, Navdanya, Dehradun, India

Wellesley Internships in Africa Rutendo G. Gambe ’13, Aga Khan Education Services, Kampala, Uganda Jda S. Gayle ’13, Modern Art Museum, Addis Ababa University, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia Nicole F. Gebriel ’12, Modern Art Museum, Addis Ababa University, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia t h e

Wellesley Internships in India

Wellesley in Europe Johanna M. Ascher ’13, ACPACYS, Cordoba, Spain

Mina Juhn ’13, Peggy Guggenheim Collection, Venice, Italy

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Sarah A. McAra ’12, The Henry Jackson Society,

Blessing Way Summer Public Service

London, United Kingdom

Mika Edgerly ’12, Oxfam America, Boston, MA

Jacqueline A. Moreno ’12, Cordoba Acoge, Cordoba, Spain Belgin Palaz ’12, The Henry Jackson Society, London, United Kingdom Zsofia Schweger ’12, Cow House Studios, County Wexford, Ireland Marguerite A. Sulmont ’13, American Institute for Roman Culture, Rome, Italy

Clinton Health Access Initiative Program Ashley N. Abarr ’12, Clinton Health Access Initiative, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

Summer Internships In Psychology Program Natalie E. Benjamin ’13, Walker School, Needham, MA

Conisha T. Cooper ’12, Walker School, Needham, MA

Barbara Bush Award for Volunteerism Melanie S. Bellini ’12, Global Learning, Liberia, Costa Rica

Jessica Camacho ’13, Steppingstone Foundation, Boston, MA

Simone R. Thibodeau ’13, Cambridge Community Center, Cambridge, MA Catherine C. Vatikiotis ’13, Turn Around Domestic Violence Center and Services, Baltimore, MD

Wei Fong Chu Chao Endowed Fund Adeline L. Tan ’12, Lion Nathan, Auckland, New Zealand Esra E. Yarar ’12, The Harpswell Foundation, Phnom Penh, Cambodia

Class of 1959 Student Internship Fund Amanda J. Faulkner ’11, Cleantech Group, London, United Kingdom

Leslye D. Penticoff ’11, World Bank Inspection Panel, Washington, DC

Rachel L. Doyle ’13, Walker School, Needham, MA

Meredith G. Healy ’13, Walker School, Needham, MA

Victoria M. Nguyen ’13, Walker School, Needham, MA

Elizabeth H. Byerly ’12, Riverside Community Care, Needham, MA Michelle Lee ’12, Riverside Community Care, Needham, MA

Center for Work and Service Global Engagement Grant and Wellesley Serves! Programs The Paul B. Beal and Mona Phillips Beal Internship Elizabeth L. Campbell ’13, Cognitive Development Lab, Barnard College, New York, NY

Class of 1962 Student Internship Fund Briana M. Calleros ’12, The County of Orange

NY

Margaret C. Gordon Law and Education Public Service Award Kimberlee A. Johnson-Rivera ’13, Las Americas Immigrant Advocacy Center, El Paso, TX

Lourdes Mendoza ’12, Community Legal Services and Counseling Center, Cambridge, MA

Susan Todd Horton 1910 Internship Fund Francesca R. Acocella ’13, National Women’s Law Center, Washington, DC

Jessica L. Anthony ’12, The Guatemalan Project, El Triunfo, Guatemala

Rhiannon E. McCarthy ’12, Old Sturbridge Village, Sturbridge, MA

Laura Salazar ’12, SJET, Cambridge, MA Mary Sidel James ’65 Internship Fund Lucia M. Nhamo ’11, The Color of Film Collaborative, Boston, MA

Class of 1969 Community Service Internship Fund Asha R. Carter ’13, Alternatives for Community

Florence Wangui Kamonji ’13, Eco-Ethics

& Environment, Roxbury, MA

Amanda L. Crescitelli ’12, Global Learning, San Jorge, Nicaragua

Berlin, Germany

The Jeniam Foundation Internship Grant Tiana E. Ramos ’13, Guam Environmental Alliance, Hagatna, Guam International Union, Mombasa, Kenya

Dorothy Chao Jenkins’68 Internship Fund Michaela Wilkes Klein ’11, UNESCO, Paris, France

Amanda M. Duritsch ’12, Health Partners Free Clinic, Tory, OH

Arthur Vining Davis Internship Fund Jessica G. Chin ’11, Human Rights First,

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Beth Langerman Friedman ’82 Internship Fund Sang-Hee Min ’11, Democracy NOW, New York,

Julia N. Wu ’12, Institute for Cultural Diplomacy,

Washington, DC

Susan Rappaport Knafel ’52 International Internship Fund Emily C. Bell ’13, Wellesley in Berlin, Berlin, Germany

Samira S. Daswani ’12, Chulabhorn Research Institute, Bangkok, Thailand

Corporation, Washington, DC w e l l e s l e y

Washington, DC

Executive Office, Santa Ana, CA Melissa L. Gracia ’12, Law Office of the Cook County Public Defender, Chicago, IL Maya A. Lochan ’12, Representative Sherry Jones, Nashville, TN

Carolyn Shaw Bell Internship Anjalee E. Martin ’12, International Finance 36

Eakins Fund for Internships Merene Botsio ’12, United Nations Foundation,

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Jda S. Gayle ’13, Modern Art Museum, Addis

Tiffany S. Chan ’12, Observer Research

Ababa University, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia Nicole F. Gebriel ’12, Modern Art Museum, Addis Ababa University, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia Luyang Jin ’12, Unite for Sight, Accra, Ghana Katherine E. Judd ’11, Catalytic Communities, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil Mina Juhn ’13, Peggy Guggenheim Collection, Venice, Italy Jennifer L. Marble ’13, Wellesley in Berlin, Berlin, Germany Madeleine S. Nelson ’12, The ARI Movement, Istanbul, Turkey Maliha Rahman ’12, Association for the Support and Training of Women Candidates (KA.DER), Istanbul, Turkey Denisse Ruiz ’13, Wellesley in Berlin, Berlin, Germany Zsofia Schweger ’12, Cow House Studios, County Wexford, Ireland Aabha Sharma ’12, Maiti Nepal, Kathmandu, Nepal Jugera Sulejmani ’13, Soros Ticono, Tirana, Albania Marguerite A. Sulmont ’13, American Institute for Roman Culture, Rome, Italy Yan An Tan ’13, Wellesley in Berlin, Berlin, Germany Amy K. Wang ’13, Center for Cross-Cultural Learning, Rabat, Morocco Lauren S. Woelfel ’13, Wellesley in Berlin, Berlin, Germany Margaret Zwiebach ’12, Assaf-Harofe Medical Center, Tel Aviv, Israel

Foundation, Mumbai, India Surina Diddi ’12, Unicredit Bank, Vienna, Austria Kristen J. Ferguson ’12, Aga Khan Educational Services, Mumbai, India Zahra M. Ghadyali ’12, Office of the Solicitor General, Mumbai, India Elizabeth S. Lawler ’12, Sewa International, Bangalore, India Michelle Vogelzang ’13, Operation ASHA, New Delhi, India Nancy H. Welsh ’12, Observer Research Foundation, New Delhi, India

Littleford Vieques Internship Fund Eliana R. Blaine ’13, Vieques Conservation & Historical Trust (VCHT), Vieques, Puerto Rico Jane J. Park ’11, Vieques Conservation & Historical Trust (VCHT), Vieques, Puerto Rico Ada P. Smith ’13, Vieques Conservation & Historical Trust (VCHT), Vieques, Puerto Rico

Rosemary Lonergan ’44 and John Todd President’s Discretionary Fund Shradha Basnyat ’13, Action India, New Delhi, India

Laura Michelle Goldstein ’13, Office of Karen

The Mollie Green Lumpkin ’25 Fund for Experiential Learning in Latin America Veronica Corea Moreno ’11, Poder Ciudadano, Buenos Aires, Argentina

Cailey D. Stevens ’12, Directorio Legislativo, Buenos Aires, Argentina

Spilka, Boston, MA

Marice Guzman ’13, United States Congress, Miami, FL

Parents’ Internship Program Aryanne D. de Silva ’13, Emory Center for Neurogenerative Medicine, Atlanta, GA

Victoria Doherty Munro ’11, Kneerim and Williams, Boston, MA

Jean M. Kim ’12, Marc Platt Productions, Universal City, CA

Kerry M. Knerr ’12, Texas Historical Commission, Austin, TX

Lia Gelin Poorvu ’56 Internship Fund Samantha Chu ’11, Business Council for International Understanding, New York, NY

Zara Ibrahim ’12, The Clinton Foundation, New York, NY

The Lumpkin Family Internship for the Environment

Barbara Scott Preiskel ’45 Endowed Fund for Internships Robyn L. Burleson ’12, Women’s Foundation, San

Whitney I. Smith ’12, Navdanya, Dehradun, India

Mary E. Kenefake ’13, WTTW Chicago Public

The Emily Cohen MacFarquhar ’59 Internship for International Journalism Natalie B. Ornell ’12, The South China Morning

Francisco, CA Media, Chicago, IL

Katie P. Simpson ’12, Focus Features, New York, NY

Post, Hong Kong-SAR Terra L. Stanley ’12, Independent Journalism Project, Lima, Peru

Public Service Internship Fund Johanna M. Ascher ’13, ACPACYS, Cordoba,

MasterCard Microfinance Internship Fund Chaitra M. Nerurkar ’13, Women Weave,

Raquet Family Foundation Internship Fund Tiffany Lam ’13, Acción Ecológica, Quito,

Mumbai, India

Cecilia L. Tai ’13, Asian Women in Business, New York, NY

Tijana Trkulja ’13, MCC Microfin Ltd., Banja Luka, Bosnia-Herzegovina Anne C. Tuan ’12, BRAC, Dhaka, Bangladesh Hilary A. White ’12, Centre for Microfinance, Chennai, India

O’Meara Student Internship Fund April M. Crehan ’13, Massachusetts House of Representatives, Boston, MA t h e

Spain

Ecuador

Responding to World Crises Fund Ashley N. Abarr ’12, Clinton Health Access Initiative, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

Olivia A. Bergman ’12, Red Cross, Stockholm, Sweden

Service Opportunity Stipend Elizabeth H. Byerly ’12, Riverside Community Cares, Newton, MA

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Rutendo G. Gambe ’13, Aga Khan Educational Services, Kampala, Uganda Yrianna N. Germosen ’13, Low Vision Center, Bethesda, MD Dominique T. Hazzard ’12, Aga Khan Educational Services, Kampala, Uganda Charleen Johnson Stoever ’12, La Poderosa Media Project, Bahia de Caraquez, Ecuador Michelle Lee ’12, Riverside Community Cares, Newton, MA Victoria M. Nguyen ’13, Walker School, Needham, MA Monica M. Wawrzyniak ’12, Child Care Program of Alameda County, San Francisco, CA

Beth K. Smith Award Hannah S. Allen ’12, Contemporary Jewish Museum, San Francisco, CA Elizabeth F. Bair ’12, Codman Square Health Center, Boston, MA Rachel E. Cherny ’13, Field Museum, Chicago, IL Jessica M. Choi ’13, Business Council for International Understanding, New York, NY Caroline C. Dougherty ’12, The Henry Jackson Society, London, United Kingdom Lianna Y. Lee ’12, Social Accountability International, New York, NY Samantha N. Malambo ’12, African Aurora Business Network, Accra, Ghana Sarah A. McAra ’12, The Henry Jackson Society, London, United Kingdom Jacqueline A. Moreno ’12, Cordoba Acoge, Cordoba, Spain Belgin S. Palaz ’12, The Henry Jackson Society, London, United Kingdom Alizah F. Raza ’12, Social Accountability International, New York, NY Erica Saldivar ’12, United Nations Development Program, San Jose, Costa Rica Emma F. Wright ’11, Robert Blackburn Printmaking Workshop, New York, NY

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Tanner Technology Initiative Nora K. McKinnell ’14, Department of Computer Science, Wellesley College, Wellesley, MA Olivia V. Kotsopoulos ’14, Department of Computer Science, Wellesley College, Wellesley, MA

The Helen Wallace Health Sciences Internship Fund Hawa Ansary ’11, World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland

The Oprah Winfrey Award for Volunteerism Jane E. Adkins ’13, Our House, Portland, OR Danielle L. Good ’11, Urban Harvest, Houston, TX

Davis Museum Summer Internship Program (Internships took place on the Wellesley College Campus unless noted otherwise.)

Allison S. Li ’13 Jaeun Ahn ’12 Katherine C. Foley ’12 Kristina A. Bracero ’14 Mollie S. Hutchings ’14 Miquel A. Geller ’10 Eleanor P. DeLorme Museum Internship Emma F. Wright ’11 Liliane Pingoud Soriano Curatorial Fellowship at the Musée du Louvre, Paris Hannah A. Keck ’11, Musée du Louvre, Paris, France

Office of the Dean of the College (Internships took place on the Wellesley College Campus unless noted otherwise.)

Social Sciences Summer Research Program Rachel E. Kery ’12 Lena S. Mironciuc ’13 Sohini S. Pillai ’12 Pasinee Panitnantanakul ’13

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Kate M. Kemmerer ’13 Anastasia Thayer ’12 Isabella M. Gambill ’12 Jennifer M Lee ’12 Devin L. Elliott ’13 Ran Wei ’13 Julia Martin ’12 Rachel W. Magid ’12 Soomi Kim ’14 Katherine W. Cali ’13 Priscilla D. Gutierrez ’13 Department of English and Writing Program Sarah E. Weinberg ‘12, AGNI, Boston, MA Christina Gossmann ’11, Slate, Washington, DC Victoria E. Doherty Munro ’11, Kneerim and Williams, Boston, MA

Department of German Wellesley Internships in Berlin Fall/Spring 2011-12 Emily C. Bell ’13, Wellesley Internships in Berlin, Berlin, Germany Jennifer L. Marble ’13, Wellesley Internships in Berlin, Berlin, Germany Denisse Ruiz, ’13, Wellesley Internships in Berlin, Berlin, Germany Yan An Tan ’13, Wellesley Internships in Berlin, Berlin, Germany Lauren S. Woelfel ’13, Wellesley Internships in Berlin, Berlin, Germany

Jewish Studies Sherley Heidenberg Koteen ’40 Internship Fund for Jewish Studies Hannah L. Park ’12, Diarna Project, Boston, MA Department of Political Science Wellesley in Washington Internship Program Amisha Ahuja ’12, The Albright Stonebridge Group, Washington, DC

Anna C. Coll ’12, Center for a New American Security, Washington, DC Samantha M. Crowell ’12, African Center for Strategic Studies, Washington, DC Lia E. Dawley ’12, The Phillips Collection, Washington, DC Alexandria L. Icenhower ’12, Massey Media, Washington, DC Ashley E. Engel ’12, Witness for Peace, Washington, DC Brianna G. Fitch ’12, White House, Washington, DC Brittany-Rae Gregory ’12, Department of Labor, Public Affairs, Washington, DC Gena M. Hong ’12, National Institute on Health (NIH), Washington, DC Esther S. Im ’12, Woodrow Wilson Center, North Korean International Documentation Project, Washington, DC Charity N. Jackson ’12, Congressman Pete Stark’s office, Washington, DC Weiye Kou ’12, Department of Labor, Office of Chief Economist, Washington, DC Kristin A. Liska ’12, District of Columbia Superior Court, Washington, DC Maggie E. Polachek ’12, White House, Washington, DC Maria T. Prebble ’12, Department of Labor, Job Corps, Washington, DC Halle C. Ritter ’12, National Institute on Health, Washington, DC Emma F. Townsend-Merino ’12, Parents, Families and Friends of Lesbians and Gays (PFLAG), Washington, DC Julie Vining ’12, Conservation International, Washington, DC Koua C. Xiong ’12, The Southeast Asian Resource Action Center, Washington, DC Irem Yoruk ’12, International Center for Research on Women (ICRW), Washington, DC

Department of Psychology Psychology Practicum Program Fall, 2010

Spring 2011

Ellyn M. Schmidt ’11, Children’s Hospital, Boston, MA

Sooyeon Kho ’11, Walker School, Needham, MA Elizabeth S. Park ’11, Walker School, Needham, MA

Department of Religion Emmavail Luce Severinghaus ’22 Summer Internship Program in Ministry/Human Services Laila Alawa ’12, Muslim American Society of Boston, Boston, MA

Pratibha Chauhan ’13, Art History Institute, University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria Melissa D. Gallant ’12, The Street Child Project, Entebbe, Uganda Eriko Houlette ’DS, Wheelchairs of Hope, Tokyo, Japan Elizabeth H. Kang ’13, Bairo-Pite Clinic, Dili, East Timor Lisa Y. Nam ’14, World Vision, Federal Way, WA Kelsey D. Rodriguez ’12, Inner Change, San Francisco, CA Christina M. Smith ’13, Research with Professor Pashington Obeng, Karnatka, India Margaret A. Tallmadge ’12, Watari Youth Family & Community Services, Vancouver, Canada

Peace and Justice Studies Emily Green Balch Peace and Justice Internship Sarah M. Gray, ’12 Urban Peace Movement in Oakland, CA

Science Center Summer Research Awards (Internships took place on the Wellesley College campus unless noted otherwise.)

Mary M. and Edward B. Allen Fellows Heidi S. Park ’12 Daniela Rios ’12

Sarah A. Siegel ’11, Walker School, Needham, MA t h e

Brachman Hoffman Fund Faculty Awards Amanda R. Curtis ’11 Evgenia S. Nizkorodov ’13 Jane C. Rieck ’11 Nellie Zuckerman Cohen and Ann Cohen Heller Professorship in the Health Sciences Celine L. Buehl ’13 Palig Mouradian ’13 The Sally Etherton Cummins ’58 Summer Science Research Fellowship Fund Jie Han ’12 Maki Kato ’DS Henry Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Award Lisa M. Jacob ’12 Frost Endowed Environmental Science/ Studies Fund Julia N. Adams ’14 Victoria E. Ellis ’12 Phoebe Handler ’12 Emily M. Lewis ’13 Hailey N. Scofield ’13 Susan Todd Horton Class of 1910 Trust Virginia Hung ’13 Amy Ko ’14 Kate L. Liebmann ’12 Julia M. Ross ’11 Nicole A. Spiegelman ’13 Devika A. Werth ’12 Alicia C. West ’11 Amelia S. Williams ’13 Louisa W. Ying ’14 Howard Hughes Medical Institute Summer Research Awards Judy P. DeWitt ’12 Jennifer E. Fishbein ’13, Tufts Medical Center, Boston, MA Casey E. Grote ’14 Olivia L. Hendricks ’12 Olivia L. Hulme ’12, Stanford University, Stanford, CA Allicia O. Imada ’13 Hye In Koo ’13

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Sirui Lui ’13 Kelsey L. Tempel ’13 Jingwei Zhang ’13 Consuelo Valdes ’11 Howard Hughes Medical Institute Exceptional Research Opportunities Program (EXROP) Taibat Salami ’13, Columbia University, New York, NY

Hubel Summer Research Fellowship Cleo M. Stoughton ’11 IBM Research Fund Nichole P. Burton ’13 Georgina G. Hoagland ’13 Nuha Khan ’13 Ana Smaranda Sandu ’14

Susan A. Laves ’12 Kyung Hwa Lee ’12 Erica K. Namigai ’11 Rachel A. Roston ’11 Heidi J. Wang ’12 National Science Foundation REU (The Research Experiences for Undergraduates) Shoshana Bachman ’12 Amelia B. Kreienkamp ’13 Jennifer W. Lu ’13 Ashton M. Vattelana ’13 Department of Neuroscience Rebecca K. Muwanse ’12 Massachusetts Space Grant Consortium Lynn M. Geiger ’13 Helen G. Ressler ’14

Amabel Boyce James ’74 Fund for Summer Research in the Sciences Mavis D. Boamah ’14 Sarah L. Myoung ’14 Allison B. Robbins ’13 Farrah C. Yhee ’14 Ying Yi Zhang ’13 The Keck Foundation Endowment Fund Jane Qu ’14 Lorraine S. Shim ’11 Elizabeth M. Regan ’12 Ashima Sarup ’12 Janina A. Longtine ’76 Fund for Summer Research in the Natural Sciences Jessica H. Lee ’12 Emma J. Nechamkin ’12 National Science Foundation Mei-Yee Chan ’14 CeCe Cheng ’12 Taili Feng ’13 Michelle N. Ferreirae ’13 Galina Gagin ’12

Patterson Summer Research Fellowship Michelle K. Corkrum ’12 Barbara Peterson Ruhlman ’54 Fund for Interdisciplinary Studies Samantha T. Finn ’12 Da In Kim ’13 Jenny C. Lu ’12 Reitumetse L. Pulumo ’13 Sonja N. Swanbeck ’12 Roberta Day Staley and Karl A. Staley Fund for Cancer-Related Research Awards Amanda J. Daigle ’12 Christa C. DeFries ’13 Alexandra L. Fischer ’14 Stephanie S. Huang ’12 Colleen G. Isabelle ’13 Yu Liu ’13 Kathryn E. Pavia ’12 Helena W. Qi ’14 Jasmine K. Rana ’12 Wing Y. Wan ’12 Allison M. Yee ’12 Eugenia C. White ’13, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA

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SOMAS (Support of Mentors and Their Students in the Neurosciences) Kia L. Salehi ’13 The Eleanor R. Webster Prize in Chemistry Kathleen Tam ’13 Norma Wilentz Hess Faculty and Program Fund in Computer Science Carolyn E. Whitlock ’12 Wellesley Centers for Women (Internships took place on the Wellesley College campus unless noted otherwise.)

Randelle L. Boots ’13, Anne Murray Ladd Student Research Intern

Alice J. Lee ’11, Morse Fellow Priscilla D. Gutierrez ’13, Class of 1967 Intern Vidya Dindiyal ’11, The Shirley R. Sherr Student Research Intern

Department of Women’s and Gender Studies Stephanie E. Graham ’12, National Congress of Black Women, Washington, DC

WELLESLEY COLLEGE GRADUATE FELLOWSHIP RECIPIENTS 2010–2011 Trustee Scholars Kara Lauren Feilich ’11, United States Xiaoyue Mona Guo ’11, United States Natasha Madeleine Anne Roule ’11, United States

Christina Heeyoung Sun ’11, United States Anne Louise Barrett Fellowship Natasha Madeleine Anne Roule ’11, United States

Margaret Freeman Bowers Fellowship Marisol Trowbridge ’05, United States Eugene L. Cox Fellowship Tiffany Peterson Rechsteiner ’08, United States Professor Elizabeth F. Fisher Fellowship Andreea Cojocaru ’07, Romania and Moldova Ruth Ingersoll Goldmark Fellowship Rae Xiao Yan ’11 Horton-Hallowell Fellowship Katherine Rebecca Broad ’06, United States Danya Laura Goodman ’04, United States Magdalena Naydekova ’08, United States Bracha Y. Schindler ’11, United States Peggy Howard Fellowship in Economics Tamary Jane McGavock ’08, United States Marison Trowbridge ’05, United States Kelima Yakupova ’09, United States

Jacqueline Krieger Klein ’53 Fellowship in Jewish Studies Michaela Wilkes-Klein ’11, Israel Susan Victoria Schwartz ’11, Israel Lisa Snider ’11, United States Edna V. Moffett Fellowship Emily Catherine Ammerman ’08, United States Kaylan Michelle Stevenson ’09, United States Alice Freeman Palmer Fellowship Monica Calderon Colunga ’10, France Kathryn Conway Preyer Fellowship Catherine Stilwell Arnold ’10, United States Mary McEwen Schimke Scholarship Emily Anne Hillhouse ’00, United States Vida Dutton Scudder Fellowship Meghan Loretta Sullivan ’08, United States M.A. Cartland Shackford Medical Fellowship Ashmita Banerjee ’08, United States Hoi See Tsao ’09, United States

Susan Rappaport Knafel ’52 Traveling Fellowship Christina Gossmann ’11, Brazil, Colombia, India, Kenya, Mexico, and Senegal

Mary Elvira Stevens ’52 Traveling Fellowship Ailin Naomi Conant ’04, India, Israel, Lebanon, Christine Miriam Grant ’06, Belgium, Denmark, France, Germany, Netherlands, Norway, Spain, and Sweden Megan Tucker Orringer ’04, Azores, England, France, Ireland, and Italy Avantika Jaidev Rao ’98, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Germany, Guatemala, Guyana, Hungary, India, Peru, Poland, Romania, South Africa, and Ukraine Stacie Raucci ’97, Italy

Elisabeth Luce Moore ’24 WellesleyYenching Fellowship Cynthia Chen ’10, Hong Kong SAR Candice Joy Snowden ’11, China Fan Anna Zhang ’11, China Elaine Lin Wong ’11, Taiwan

Harriett A. Shaw Fellowship Cindy Kang ’02, United States Maria Opasnov Tyler ‘52 Scholarship Malina Elisa Dumas ’10, United States Sarah Perry Wood Medical Fellowship Xiaoyue Mona Guo ’11, United States Fanny Bullock Workman Fellowship Kara Lauren Feilich ’11, United States Susan Rappaport Knafel ’52 Scholarship for Foreign Study Ruth Anne Cecelia Smith ’11, United Kingdom

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NATIONAL FELLOWSHIP COMPETITION RECIPIENTS AND NOMINEES 2010-2011 American Graduate Fellowship Natasha Madeleine Anne Roule ’11 American Institute of Indian Studies’ Urdu Language Fellowship Rebecca Temkin Winslow ’11, India Chinese Government Scholarships Ayoung Jeon ’11, China Kathryn Wasserman Davis 100 Projects for Peace Award Sara Minkara ’11, Lebanon Lana Leila Dweik ’11, Lebanon Maysa Mourad ’11, Lebanon Melda Salhab ’13, Lebanon

Assistantship, Cyprus

Elizabeth Kim ’09, South Korea Erin Kim ’09, English Teaching Assistantship, South Korea

Courtney Sato ’09, Bangladesh Sarah Katharine Turrin ’11, English Teaching Assistantship, Malaysia

Katherine Elizabeth Judd ’11, alternate, English

Teaching Assistantship, South Korea

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Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarships Taylor Lauren Miller ’DS, India Pin Pravalprukskul ’12, Costa Rica Sana Tajoddin Saiyed ’12, Egypt

Morris K. Udall Scholarship Kelly Ann Mercer ’13, Honorable Mention

Mellon Mays Undergraduate Fellowship Nichole Patrice Burton ’13 Priscilla Devon Gutierrez ’13 Shelby B. Robertson ’13 Kamilah Ain Welch ’12 Cassandra Lynn Eddington ’12

Fulbright U.S. Student Program Michele Helen Bornstein ’11, India (declined) Mimosa Burr ’08, Sweden Meghan Dombrink-Green ’05, English Teaching

Teaching Assistantship, Brazil

Rhodes Scholarship Sara Minkara ’11, finalist

Barry M. Goldwater Scholarship Kathryn Ellen Pavia ’12, Honorable Mention

French Government Teaching Assistantship in English Leah Elizabeth Hamilton ’11, France Glenna Reed Moran ’11, France Katherine Greer Pawlowski ’11, France Tiffany Higgen Pyen ’11, France Julia Kay Shew ’11, France Kiley Midgett Workman ’11, France Kexin Zhang ’11, France

Darah Dorothy Phillip’11, alternate, English

United Kingdom Fulbright Summer Institute Kelsey Nicole Heroux ’14, United Kingdom Katherine Youngmi Joh ’14, United Kingdom

National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship Katrina Browne ’09, United States Halina Jacqueline Dour ’08, United States Chloe Chen Fan ’09, United States Madeline Harms ’08, United States Cheryl Hojnowski ’05, United States Aigerim Kabdiyeva ’08, United States Madeleine Eileen Kieffe ’10, United States Colleen Rose Kirkhart ’09, United States Brandi Jo Newell ’08, United States Harriet Alexander Skoning ’10 Alessandra Maria Oddone Sullivan ’05 Christina Maria Tognoni ’09 Tracy Yuh Wang ’10, Honorable Mention Courtney Cruise Stepien ’08, Honorable Mention

Katherine Judith Lenoir ’06, Honorable Mention Emily R Estes ’10, Honorable Mention Morgan Kathryn Carr-Markell ’10, Honorable Mention

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Harry S. Truman Scholarship Dominique Tomika Hazzard ’12, United States

Thomas J. Watson Fellowship Michele Helen Bornstein ’11, Greece, Italy, Netherlands, Spain, and Turkey

Debbie Jean Chen ’11, Brazil, Canary Islands of Spain, Indonesia, Japan, South Korea, and Thailand

Woodrow Wilson-Rockefeller Brothers Fund Fellowship for Aspiring Teachers of Color Graciela Katarina Gonzales ’11, United States

INDEX Advisors and Organizers Alicea-Westort, Mared 13, 43 Anderson, Scott 15 Bauman, Connie 11 Bedell, Rebecca 10 Berman, Patricia 10 Besancon, James 9 Brody, Martin 5 Buchholtz, Emily 5 Burke, Tom 5, 14, 15 Cameron, John 11 Candland, Christopher 10 Carli, Linda 15 Carrico-Moniz, Dora 8 Coile, Courtney 14 Confortini, Catia 5, 9 Crum, Tucker 13 Cuba, Lee 1, 7 Darer, Verónica 8, 12 de Silva de Alwis, Rangita 7, 8 DeSombre, Beth 9, 12, 14 Fischman, Lisa 10 Friedman, Alice 8 Genero, Nancy 13 Giersch, C. Pat 13, 14 Goddard, Stacie 6 Grattan, Laura 12 Griffith, Alden 12, 13 Hagimoto, Koichi 10 Hajj, Nadya 14 Hall, Nancy 12 Hans, Anjeana 7, 11 Hawkins, Melissa 9, 12 Hawkins, David 13

Helluy, Simone 7 Hodge, Thomas 14 Hong, Soo 9 Hood-DeGrenier, Jennifer 8, 11 Hufstader, Ted 10, 11, 13 Hughes, Jeffrey 5, 9, 13 Hunter, Jessica 6 Jeffries, Michael 15 Jones, Kristina 9 Joseph, William 6, 10 Joyce, Joseph 6, 9, 13, 15 Just, Marion 7, 14 Kapteijns, Lidwien 6, 9, 12 Kazanjian, Victor 6, 9, 12, 14 Keane, Margaret 11 Kenney, Judith 6 Kodera, T. James 12 Kohl, Philip 6 Kolodny, Nancy 8 Königer, Martina 6 Levine, Phillip 5 Lindauer, David 6, 9, 11 Liu, Heping 10 Liu, Kristy 6 Loehlin, James 14 Marlow, Louise 8, 14 Mata, Irene 7, 10, 13 Matzner, Deborah 12 McDonough, Janet 5 McLeod, Kim 15 McNamara, Martha 12, 14 Morley, Carolyn 7 Muhammad, Salwa 10 Murray, S. Joanne 1, 12

Niendorf, Kristine 13 Nolden, Thomas 12 Núñez-Negrón, Manolo 10

Wardell, Lauri 9 Webb, Andrew 11 Weerapana, Akila 6, 10, 14 Wiest, Michael 11 Wink, Paul 5, 11 Wolfson, Adele 13 Wood, Winifred 1, 5, 8, 10, 13

Obeng, Pashington 5, 12, 39 O’Donnell, Kimberly 1, 8 Osorio, Alejandra 6 Ozawa, Kazuko 9 Patterson, Donna 8 Perkins, Ellie 11 Quinan, Virginia 11 Quintana, Ryan 12 Ramos, Carlos 8, 36 Rao, Nikhil 12 Renjilian-Burgy, Joy 5, 14 Respaut, Michèle 11 Reverby, Susan 7, 9 Rosenwald, Lawrence 6 San Filippo, Maria 5 Sequeira, Andrea 15 Shaer, Orit 15 Shih, Karen 7 Stark, Glenn 11, 15 Sullivan, Erin 9, 11 Suzuki, Yuichiro 10, 11 Swingle, Joseph 6, 7, 9 Tetel, Marc 7 Theran, Sally 7 Thomas, Marcia 9, 14 Thomas-Starck, Jennifer 1, 8, 14 Tohme, Lara 8, 15 Trenk, Ann 7 Tumarkin, Nina 12 Van Arsdale, Adam 5, 8

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Presenters Abarbanel, Carly R. 12 Abarr, Ashley N. Ahuja, Amisha 9, 34, 38 Akbar, Najiba 12 Al-Ferzly, Michelle M. 14 Al-Jawamis, Dana F. 6 Ansary, Hawa 11, 34, 38 Anthony, Jessica L. 10, 34, 35, 36 Archer, Lucy E. 15 Ayub, Asha 11 Bair, Elizabeth F. 11, 34, 38 Barnes, Alexandria M. 14 Bass, Julie B. 5 Bego, Katja J. 14 Bello, April A. 12 Bergin, Lucy A. 7 Bhatia, Rukmani D. 11 Boots, Randelle L. 12, 40 Botsio, Merene 5, 34, 36 Bruno, Laura E. 7 Buchholtz, Clara M. 12 Burke, Samantha G. 12 Butler, Lisa J. 13 Byerly, Elizabeth H. 5, 36, 37 Cahillane, Lauren A. 9 Camacho, Jessica 9, 36

Carter, Asha R. 14, 36 Cham, Eileen Yee Lin 7 Chan, Tiffany S. 9, 37 Cheng, Grace O. 5 Cheng, CeCe 6 Cherny, Rachel E. 12, 34, 38 Chong, Yong Wei 13 Choudri, Christine M. 14 Chu, Stephanie T. 7 Connolly, Katherine A. 6 Cooper, Conisha T. 5, 36 Cooper, Sonrisa 14 Corcoran, Erin E. 6 Coronata, Anna Maria F. 7 Crescitelli, Amanda L. 7, 36 Crispi, Katherine A. 14 Cuba, Lee 1, 7 Cyr, Molly R. 9 Daussin, Carolyn N. 9 Day, Stephanie K. 14 Denardo Roney, Julia L. 15 Deng, Kalina Yingnan 9 Devji, Zahrah Z. 8 Di Cicco, Julia H. Diddi, Surina 6, 34, 37 Dodge, Caroline P. 8 Dorozynski, Kirstin M. 13 Dossabhoy, Shernaz S. 11 Dougherty, Caroline C. 15, 34, 38 Driftmier, Helen F. 11 Drozd, Lucie E. 6

Duarte, Cassandra 8, 35 Duncan, Caroline R. 9 Duncan, Ila C. 7 Dunn, Charlotte E. 9 Duritsch, Amanda M. 11 Edgerly, Mika B. 10, 34 Evangelista Leite da Silva, Daniele 9 Evans, Melissa A. 12 Feng, Taili 15, 40 Ferguson, Kristen J. 10, 35, 37 Ferreirae, Michelle N. 15, 40 Fishbein, Jennifer E. 5, 39 Fitch, Brianna G. 14, 39 Fogarty, Claire A. 8, 35 Foster, Genea C. 6 Freeman, Elizabeth M. 14 Freeman-Slade, Rebecca S. 15 Friedman, Meghan J. 12 Fuiks, Alexandra A. 14 Gao, Shuyu 10 Geiger, Lynn M. 15, 40 Ghadyali, Zahra M. 8, 34, 37 Ghaus, Sophia J. 8 Graham, Stephanie E. 7, 40 Greer, Cobren A. 5 Grether, Elizabeth T. 6, 35 Grote, Casey E. 15, 39 Gruhot, Julia K. 8 Guergenenov, Samantha M. 8 Guo, Yuting 6 Harris, Rachel L. 13 Hasse, Debra A. 7 Hazzard, Dominique T. 14 Hernandez, Yubelka A. 14 Herzog, Linnea E. 11, 34 Holmes, Corianne N. 14

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Houlette, Eriko 11, 39 Howard, Mia M. 6 Hu, Vivian W. 11 Huang, Lin Davina 13 Hui, Angela I. 7 Hulme, Charlotte J. 8 Hulme, Olivia L. 8, 39 Ibrahim, Zara 9, 34, 37 Jennings, Nancy 7 Jin, Luyang 11, 34, 37 Johal, Mannat 12 Johnson, Tessa R. 13 Johnson Stoever, Charleen 13, 38 Jordan, Kira M. 14 Juhn, Mina 10, 35, 37 Kang, Cabrina 5 Kaplan, Melanie L. 8 Kazanjian, Victor H. 6, 9, 12, 14 Kemirembe, Karen 10 Kenefake, Mary E. 7, 34, 37 Knerr, Kerry M. 12, 37 Kotsopoulos, Olivia V. 15, 38 Lawler, Elizabeth S. 11, 34, 37 Ledoux, Dominique R. 12 Lee, Michelle 5, 36, 38 Lee, Charlene A. 12 Lee, Hyun-Ji 11 Lee, Dana Y. 6 Lenahan, Hayley M. 14 Leonard, Kathleen T. 5 Leung, Rebecca A. 9 Levison, Julie 11

Li, Rusi 12 Lobodzinski, Nicole A. 10 Louie, Camden K. 5 Lovett, Suzanne 7 Lu, Shaina 7 Malambo, Samantha N. 10, 38 Malkin, Hayley E. 13 Marini, Stephen A. 12 Martin, Anjalee E. 6, 34, 36 Martin, Julia 13, 38 Martinez, Julia 13 McAra, Sarah A. 13, 35, 36, 38 McCarthy, Rhiannon E. 12, 36 McKinnell, Nora K. 15, 38 McRee, Claire E. 12 Mendoza, Lourdes 10, 36 Menzel, Emilie C. 7 Mercer, Kelly A. 14, 35 Meza, Brenda S. 9 Mironciuc, Elena S. 14 Moody, Meagan M. 8, 35 Murray, S. Joanne 12 Nagourney, Alexandra F. 13 Naka, Ikuno 9, 34 Nam, Esther H. 8, 35 Nazare, Juliana 13 Nelson, Madeleine S. 6, 34, 37 Nguyen, Victoria M. 5, 36, 38 Ornell, Natalie B. 6 Ospina, Natalia 6 Pan, Elizabeth H. 14 Pang, Irene 13 Papakyrikos, Amanda M. 5 Parker, Rachel L. 5 Polachek, Maggie E. 12, 39

Quon, Stephanie D. 8, 35 Rabinovich, Mayya B. 13 Rabinovich, Margarita B. 13 Rahman, Maliha 8, 34, 37 Ressler, Helen G. 15, 40 Richardson, Rebecca L. 14 Robinson, Ariel M. 6 Rojas, Connie A. 10 Ross, Natalie 11 Roundy, Sarah S. 10 Roy, Meredith F. 7 Ruhl, Rebecca K. 14 Ryan, Serena 14 Saad, Miryam S. 8 Salazar, Laura 15, 36 Sanchez, Jannet G. 5 Sarathy, Nirupama R. 11 Schneeweis, Mary Kate 13 Schron, Diana H. 5 Scire, Kayla A. 15 Sharma, Aabha 10, 34, 37 Sholder, Hannah 11 Smith, Christina M. 12, 39 Smith, Rachel E. 9 Smith, Ada P. 8, 35, 37 Smith, Whitney I. 14, 35, 37 Stanley, Terra L. 15, 40 Stevens, Cailey D. 7, 35, 37 Stoner, Meredith W. 6 Strick, Emma E. 6

Subramani, Gauri S. 14 Sulejmani, Jugera 12, 37 Sulmont, Marguerite A. 8, 36, 37 Swingle, Joseph P. 6, 7, 9 Takahashi, Mijeong 9 Takaki, Naomi T. 6 Tan, Adeline L. 13, 36 Taylor, Sarina M. 10 Templeton, Caroline K. 13 Tien, Deborah J. 11 Townsend-Merino, Emma F. 5, 39 Trainor, Suzanne M. 14 Tuan, Anne C. 10, 37 Turkington, Rebecca C. 7, 34, 35

Wu, Julia N. 6, 34, 36 Yakupova, Kelima 11, 41 Yan, Xinyi 9 Yarar, Esra E. 10, 34, 36 Yoo, Jennifer M. 7 Zwiebach, Margaret 8, 34, 37 Zwiebel, Colin B. 13

Vachani, Anisha 14, 34, 35 Virk, Simran K. 13 Walker-Elders, Allison A. 11 Wang, Guangxin 12 Wang, Ivy W. 10 Wang, Heidi J. 15, 40 Wangui Kamonji, Florence C. 12 Ward, Shannon M. 12 Wayrynen, Kaisa L. 5 Webber, Hannah J. 13 Welch, Kamilah A. 9 Welsh, Nancy H. 8, 34, 37 West, Anne V. 15 White, Eugenia C. 8, 40 White, Hilary A. 10, 37 Wibisono, Alyssa G. 13 Willis-Norton, Ellen M. 13 Winter, Colin 13 Wolkin, Amy E. 8 Wood, Emily S. 13

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TABLE O F CONTENTS 1

Conference Overview

1 Committee 2

Thematic Overview

5

Conference Schedule

19

Abstracts and Web-Based Conference Scheduler

19

Wellesley in the World

20

Map

22

International Study Programs

24

Internship and Grant Programs

30

Fellowship Programs

34

Wellesley College Supported Internship Recipients 2011

41

Wellesley College Graduate Fellowship Recipients 2010–2011

42

National Fellowship Competition Recipients and Nominees 2010–2011

43

Index

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Notes

Wellesley College gratefully acknowledges the generous alumnae and friends who support experiential learning. Their support enables students to engage in offcampus learning opportunities that have become an integral part of the Wellesley College educational experience. The Tanner Conference Committee gratefully acknowledges staff in the following departments and facilities for their commitment to the Tanner Conference: AVI Fresh, Campus Police, Communications and Public Affairs, Custodial Services, Diana Chapman Walsh Alumnae Hall, Physical Plant Administration, Grounds, Library and Technology Services, Mail Services, Motor Pool, Special Events, and the Science Center.

Tanner 2011 Tanner Conference Sustainability Initiatives: • Local food is being featured at lunch, snacks, and breaks. • Please dispose of trash and recycle appropriate materials in the designated bins. • This program was printed on 100% recyclable paper with soy-based ink. • Please recycle your conference book when you’ve finished enjoying it! A sustainable community event brought to you by the Sustainability Advisory and Tanner Conference Committees


Tanner Conference 2011