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CA L E NDAR OF EVENTS

Arts and Culture at Wellesley

Spring 2017


ARTS AND CULTURE AT WELLESLEY | SPRING 2017

01 1/30 (Mon), p.18

Reading and Conversation with Jhumpa Lahiri 7 PM Suzy Newhouse Center, Green Hall

02 2/2–2/5, p.32

Guards at the Taj Diana Chapman Walsh Alumnae Hall Auditorium

2/9 (Thu), p.9

Panel Discussion Sacred Music and Dance: Tradition and Ethics, Exploration and Appropriation 6–9 PM Houghton Chapel/ Multifaith Center

2/9 (Thu), p.23

2/9 (Thu), p.36

Cinéphile Sundays: La Ciénaga (The Swamp) 3 PM Collins Cinema

Davis Museum Spring Opening Celebration 6:30 PM the Davis.

2/4 (Sat), p.12

2/8 (Wed), p.8

On Distant Shores: Landscapes by Constable and Kensett the Davis.

Yuval Ron Ensemble Midday Muse: A Place for Peace 12:30 PM Houghton Chapel

2/10–7/9, p.27

2/10–7/9, p.23

The Medici’s Painter: Carlo Dolci and 17thCentury Florience the Davis.

2/8 (Wed), p.8

Roundtable with Yuval Ron Music and Healing: Brain, Body, Spirit 7–9 PM Faroll Focus, Science Center

Reframing the Past: Piranesi’s Vedute di Roma the Davis.

2/9 (Thu), p.35

Daphne Wright: Prayer Project the Davis.

Calderwood Lecture in Economics: Bridget Terry Long 4:15 PM Knapp Atrium in Pendleton East

2/12 (Sun), p.9

Yuval Ron Ensemble: Public Workshops 12–3 PM Pendleton West Grand Music Hall

Why Did the Soviet Union Collapse? 8 PM Margaret Clapp Library Lecture Room

Music Department Honors Concert 7:30 PM Jewett Auditorium

2/11 (Sat), p.9

Yuval Ron Ensemble Concert: Seeker of Truth 7:30 PM Houghton Chapel

2/10–7/9, p.27

2/10–7/9, p.27

2/10–7/9, p.29

The Fine Print: Selections from the Collection Bequest of Ann Kirk Warren ’50 the Davis.

2/12 (Sun), p.20

2/15 (Wed), p. 38

The Freedom Project: Identity Is Not Politics 7 PM Alumnae Hall Ballroom

2/22 (Wed), p.9 (Rescheduled)

Midday Muse: Katherine Matasy and Arneis Quartet 12:30 PM Jewett Auditorium

2/23–2/26, p.34

Machinal Ruth Nagel Jones Theatre, Alumnae Hall

2/26 (Sun), p.22

Cinéphile Sundays: Die Abenteuer des Prinzen Achmed (The Adventures of Prince Achmed) 3 PM Collins Cinema

2/28 (Tue), p.27

Curatorial Gallery Talk: Piranesi’s Vedute de Roma 4 PM the Davis.

Please note that student performances are not included in our pullout section. Please see page 12 for student music ensembles and page 32 for student theatre productions.

www.wellesley.edu/events | 781.283.2373

03 3/2 (Thu), p.26

A Grand Tour Film Series: Death in Venice 6:30 PM Collins Cinema

3/3 (Fri), p.25

Performance: The Sound World of Carlo Dolci 6:30 PM the Davis.

3/4 (Sat), p.10

Jazz/World Music Faculty Concert: Songs of Celebration 7:30 PM Jewett Auditorium

3/6 (Mon), p.38

The Freedom Project: Jodie Ginsberg and Tom Cushman 4:30 PM Margaret Clapp Library Lecture Room

3/7 (Tue), p.39

The Freedom Project: Catherine Ross 4:30 PM Margaret Clapp Library Lecture Room

3/8 (Wed), p.39

The Freedom Project: Laura Kipnis 4:30 PM Margaret Clapp Library Lecture Room

3/8 (Wed), p.10

Midday Muse: Maria Schneider 12:30 PM Jewett Auditorium

3/10 (Fri), p.10

Business and Arts Conversation with Maria Schneider 12:30 PM Sorenson Black Box Theater, Babson College


ARTS AND CULTURE AT WELLESLEY | SPRING 2017

3/10 (Fri), p.10

Maria Schneider Orchestra Concert 7:30 PM Sorenson Center, Babson College

3/12 (Sun), p.11

Classical Faculty Concert: Contrasting Styles in the Early 20th Century 7:30 PM Jewett Auditorium

3/14–4/21, p.15

Exhibition: Sarah Tortora: Fickle Ground

3/14 (Tue)

Opening Reception 6 PM Jewett Arts Center Gallery

3/14 (Tue), p.18

Reading and Conversation with Saikat Majumdar 6 PM Suzy Newhouse Center, Green Hall

3/16 (Thu), p.26

A Grand Tour Film Series: Roman Holiday 6:30 PM Collins Cinema

3/19 (Sun), p.22

Cinéphile Sundays: Orlando 5 PM Collins Cinema

3/28 (Tue), p.25

Educator Workshop: Engaging with the Davis 4 PM the Davis.

04 4/4 (Tue), p.25

Curatorial Gallery Talk: Carlo Dolci and 17thCentury Florence 4 PM the Davis.

4/4 (Tue), p.35

The Wilson Lecture: William Julius Wilson: Reflections on Race, Class, and Cumulative Adversity 5 PM Diana Chapman Walsh Alumnae Hall Auditorium

4/5–4/9, p.31

Terra Nova Ruth Nagel Jones Theatre, Alumnae Hall

4/6 (Thu), p.26

A Grand Tour Film Series: A Room with a View 6:30 PM Collins Cinema

4/6 (Thu), p.11

Aeolus: A New Opera by Ken Ueno 7:30 PM Jewett Auditorium

4/7 (Fri), p.29

Symposium: Davis Discoveries: The D’mba on Display 2 PM Collins Cinema

4/9 (Sun), p.22

Cinéphile Sundays: Et maintenant on va où? (Where Do We Go Now?) 5 PM Collins Cinema

4/10 (Mon), p.15

Rebecca Parker Brienen ’89: Art and Travel: The Life of a Professional Art Historian 4:30 PM Jewett Arts Center 450

4/11 (Tue), p.36

Concert: Russian Folk Music with Zolotoj Plyos 7 PM Jewett Auditorium

4/13 (Thu), p.31

Kabuki Dance Live with Samisen and Taiko 7:30 PM Diana Chapman Walsh Alumnae Hall Auditorium

4/14–6/25, p.17

Alice C. Cole ’42 Exhibition: Alida Cervantes Mills Gallery, Boston Center for the Arts

4/19 (Wed), p.36

Distinguished Faculty Lecture: Marianne Moore: Casting a Net into the Clear, Cold Soul of Siberia—Lake Baikal 12:30 PM Collins Cinema

4/20 (Thu), p.30

Lecture: Laurie Wilson ’62: Louise Nevelson: Light and Shadow 6:30 PM the Davis.

4/20 (Thu), p.12

Midday Muse: Russell Hoffmann Jazz Ensemble 12:30 PM Jewett Auditorium

4/23 (Sun), p. 22

Cinéphile Sundays: Dream Girls 5 PM Collins Cinema www.wellesley.edu/events | 781.283.2373

4/24 (Mon), p.12

Skylark Choral Ensemble: Clear Voices in the Dark 7:30 PM Houghton Chapel

4/27 (Thu), p.29

In Conversation: Collecting and Connoisseurship 6:30 PM Collins Cinema

4/27–4/30, p.34

The White Snake Diana Chapman Walsh Alumnae Hall Auditorium

4/29 (Sat), p.25

Family Day: A Grand Tour of Italy 11 AM the Davis.

05 5/5 (Fri), p.17

Senior Thesis Exhibition 2017 4 PM Jewett Arts Center Gallery

5/6 (Sat), p.30

Lecture: Timothy Barringer: Transatlantic Landscapes 2 PM the Davis.

5/11 (Thu), p.26

A Grand Tour Film Series: The Talented Mr. Ripley 6:30 PM Collins Cinema

06 6/1–6/25, p.6

Wellesley Repertory Theatre presents Sonia Flew Ruth Nagel Jones Theatre, Alumnae Hall


Keohane r Sports Cente

West Campus

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College Buildings

Public Buildings

Lake Waban

Alumnae Valley

Diana Chapman Walsh Alumnae Hall & Ruth Nagel Jones Theatre

Tishman Commons

Visitor Parking

WEST ENTRY

Clap

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AudJewett itor ium

Davis Museum Collins Cinema

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Multifaith Center (Chapel)

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Academic Quad

Pendleton

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DOWNTOWN WELLESLEY

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Newhouse Center

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Admission Office

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CENTRAL STREET – ROUTE 135

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WELLESLEY CAMPUS MAP

For directions to Wellesley College, please visit: www.wellesley.edu/about/visit.


ARTS AND CULTURE AT WELLESLEY

President Paula A. Johnson has said, “More than any other fields of study, the arts and the humanities fortify us to do the work that we are called to do. If the sciences tell us how, the humanities and arts remind us why.” Indeed, the arts are an essential part of Wellesley’s rich cultural and academic mission. This idea lies at the heart of Wellesley’s commitment to bringing leading artists, performers, writers, scholars, and thinkers to campus. As a college deeply invested in the tradition of the liberal arts, we have a long and distinguished history of integrating art, music, theatre, literature, film, and the media arts—in both theory and practice—into the intellectual and emotional life of the entire community. President Johnson also speaks of the “great transformational change [that] occurs at intersections”—not only the intersections of academic disciplines, but intersections of the liberal arts college with the larger world. This could easily serve as a description for arts events this semester. For example, our featured events include offerings that connect art, scholarship, and expression with international politics, history, philosophy, and religion and much more. From a drama about 20th-century Cuba, to art from the Medici’s Italy, to music from the Middle East and North Africa, the intersections they explore will transform how audiences see the role of art in the world. Finally, we believe it is of paramount importance to share artistic pursuits not only with the campus community but equally with the greater community. This creates opportunities for interactions and connections that widen and deepen the perspectives of everyone involved. We hope you will join us as the arts at Wellesley transport us around the world as well as remind us of the riches we have close to home. All of the arts and cultural events listed in this calendar are free of charge (unless otherwise noted) and open to the public, and ample parking is available at no cost. Please visit wellesley.edu/events for event updates. We look forward to seeing you soon.

TABLE OF CONTENTS The Medici’s Painter: Carlo Dolci and 17th-Century Florence ............................................................................. 2–3 Yuval Ron Ensemble: Seeker of Truth .................................... 4–5 Sonia Flew ................................................................................. 6–7 The Concert Series ...................................................................8–14 The Art Department .................................................................15–17 The Suzy Newhouse Center for the Humanities ....................18–19 Cinema and Media Studies ....................................................20–22 The Davis. ...............................................................................23–30 Theatre ....................................................................................31–34 The Arts, Academics, and Intersections .................................35–37 The Freedom Project ..............................................................38–39 For disability services, contact Jim Wice at 781.283.2434. www.wellesley.edu/events | 781.283.2373

John Frederick Kensett, Mount Washington from the Valley of Conway, 1851, oil on canvas; Davis Museum 1977.37


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THE DAVIS MUSEUM AT WELLESLEY COLLEGE PRESENTS

THE MEDICI’S PAINTER: CARLO DOLCI AND 17TH-CENTURY FLORENCE

The Medici’s Painter: Carlo Dolci and 17th-Century Florence February 10–July 9 Camilla Chandler and Dorothy Buffum Chandler Gallery/Marjorie and Gerald Bronfman Gallery

The Medici’s Painter: Carlo Dolci and 17thCentury Florence is the first exhibition in America devoted to the luminous and meticulously rendered paintings and drawings of Italian artist Carlo Dolci (1616–1687). It provides an unprecedented opportunity to study the life and oeuvre of 17th-century Florence’s most important painter, whose reverence for detail, brilliant palette, and seemingly enameled surfaces earned the favor of patronage by the powerful Medici family. The Davis Museum’s most ambitious Old Masters project to date, The Medici’s Painter includes over 50 autograph works—pictures of the highest pictorial, technical, and spiritual qualities—through exceptional loans from the world’s major museums and rarely seen works from private collections in the United States and abroad, including the Uffizi Gallery and Palazzo Pitti in Florence, the Louvre Museum in Paris, the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, the J. Paul Getty Museum in Los Angeles, and the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, among others.

The Medici’s Painter is curated by Eve Straussman-Pflanzer, head of the European Art Department and Elizabeth and Allan Shelden Curator of European Paintings at the Detroit Institute of Arts, with Francesca Baldassari, consulting curator. A fully illustrated catalogue, distributed by Yale University Press, accompanies the exhibition. Edited by Straussman-Pflanzer, the volume features essays by leading scholars: Francesca Baldassari, Edward Goldberg, Lisa Goldenberg Stoppato, Scott Nethersole, and Straussman-Pflanzer. Generously supported by the Wellesley College Friends of Art at the Davis Museum, Davis World Cultures Fund, E. Franklin Robbins Art Museum Fund, the National Endowment for the Arts, the National Endowment for the Arts Museum Program Fund, Anonymous ’70 Endowed Davis Museum Program Fund, The Judith Blough Wentz ’57 Museum Programs Fund, the Samuel H. Kress Foundation, the Robert Lehman Foundation, Inc., and the Office of the Provost and Dean of Wellesley College. Please note: Tickets are required for entry to this exhibition. General admission $20, Wellesley College alumnae $12. Free entry for all students, Wellesley College faculty and staff, Friends of Art members, and Durant Society members. For more information and to purchase tickets, please visit www.theDavis.org.

Carlo Dolci, The Penitent Magdalene, ca. 1670, oil on canvas; Davis Museum 1958.19

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Photo by Kansas State University Comm. and Marketing


THE WELLESLEY COLLEGE CONCERT SERIES PRESENTS

YUVAL RON ENSEMBLE:

SEEKER OF TRUTH Yuval Ron Ensemble: Seeker of Truth February 11 (Sat) | 7:30 PM Houghton Chapel

Formed in 1999, the Yuval Ron Ensemble endeavors to alleviate national, racial, religious, and cultural divides by uniting the music and dance of the people of the Middle East into a unique, mystical, spiritual, and inspiring musical celebration. The ensemble includes Jewish, Christian, and Muslim artists who have been actively involved in creating musical bridges between people of various faiths and ethnic groups worldwide. Led by award-winning composer Yuval Ron (who composed the music for the Oscar-winning film West Bank Story), the ensemble has enjoyed overwhelming community support. It was chosen to be featured in PBS’s “Holiday Celebration” TV specials and was honored with the Los Angeles Treasures Award and the Lincoln/Standing Bear Gold Medal from the city of Lincoln, Neb., in appreciation of its efforts for peace and justice worldwide.

The ensemble’s week-long residency will include a Midday Muse, a roundtable conversation on music and healing, a panel discussion exploring cultural ethics of performing sacred music and dance, public workshops, and a full evening performance of the ensemble’s acclaimed concert Seeker of Truth. We hope you will join us! Reservations required. Please email concerts@wellesley.edu for more information and a reservation link. This residency is presented in collaboration with the Office of Religious and Spiritual Life and its Art & Soul Series. It is generously supported by the Marjorie Copland Baum Memorial Fund, and The Florence Jeup Ford ’22, Mary M. Crawford ’22, and Virginia Ford ’48 Artists-InResidence Endowment Fund, and funded in part by the Expeditions program of the New England Foundation for the Arts, made possible with funding from the National Endowment for the Arts, with additional support from the six New England state arts agencies.

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WELLESLEY REPERTORY THEATRE PRESENTS

SONIA FLEW BY MELINDA LOPEZ Sonia Flew Directed by Lois Roach June 1–25 (Thursdays–Saturdays*) | 7 PM June 1–25 (Saturdays & Sundays) | 2 PM *No evening performance Saturday, June 3 Ruth Nagel Jones Theatre, Alumnae Hall

Wellesley Repertory Theatre is proud to present Sonia Flew, by acclaimed playwright, actress, and Lecturer in Theatre Studies Melinda Lopez. It is directed by Senior Lecturer in Theatre Studies Lois Roach. Sonia’s parents, fearful of the new government, sent their only daughter from Cuba to the United States in 1961. Set in Minneapolis and Havana, a story of family unfolds across the generations as Sonia—now raising two children with her Jewish husband—struggles to come to terms with her past, her lost parents, her own children, and her adopted country. Past performances of Sonia Flew have received critical acclaim: “Sonia Flew soars with a passion.” – Terry Byrne, Boston Herald “[An] engaging new play about family, flight, and forgiveness. What makes Sonia Flew so moving is…its feisty portrayal of family life, whether bathed in the sunlight and fear of early-Castro Cuba or tucked into a bicultural jumble of tchotchkes and adamancy in the post-September 11 Midwest.” – Carolyn Clay, Boston Phoenix To make a reservation call the Box Office at 781-283-2000 or go to wellesleyrepertorytheatre.org General admission $20, $10 for seniors and students.

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Photo by T. Charles Erickson, Huntington Theatre Company

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Maria Schneider

THE CONCERT SERIES The Wellesley College Concert Series brings world-class performers to campus, complementing the music department’s academic and performance instruction offerings and augmenting the cultural life of the College and surrounding community. With concerts ranging from classical to jazz, early music to electronic, and world music from every continent, the series features concerts and residencies with visiting artists, as well as the performing faculty.

YUVAL RON ENSEMBLE RESIDENCY Please see page 5 for details.

Roundtable Conversation: Music and Healing: Brain, Body, Spirit February 8 (Wed) | 7–9 PM

Midday Muse: A Place for Peace

Faroll Focus, Science Center

February 8 (Wed) | 12:30 PM

Tiffany Steinwert, dean of the Office of Religious and Spiritual Life, will facilitate this roundtable discussion featuring guest artist Yuval Ron, guest scholar Dr. Ani Patel, and faculty members from the neuroscience and music departments. The evening will explore recent research and experiences relating music and healing. A Q&A session and conversation, light refreshments, and participatory activities led by Ron and members of his ensemble will be included.

Houghton Chapel

Yuval Ron and his ensemble will join us in our weekly community reflection through sacred music from diverse world traditions, and will lead us in a discussion of the role of music in building bridges across faith and culture.

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Events above are free and open to the public with general seating | wellesley.edu/concertseries


Yuval Ron Ensemble. yuvalronmusic.com

Houghton Chapel

Panel Discussion: Sacred Music and Dance: Tradition and Ethics, Exploration and Appropriation

Public Workshops

February 9 (Thu) | 6–9 PM

12–12:45 PM | Rhythms of the Middle East:

Multifaith Center, Houghton Chapel

A family-friendly demonstration of the various rhythms and the unique drums used in Middle Eastern music. Learn trance rhythms from Iran and how to count and play beats such as 7/8, 10/8, and 9/8.

Join a discussion about the phenomenon of learning cultural spiritual traditions: Where do the lines of appropriation lie? How are traditions changing, both in context and out of context—or in “new” contexts? How can “outsiders” learn and honor dance and music techniques and traditions, with respect? Are there elements of sacred traditions that are embedded in their practice, engendering particular experiences regardless of one’s relation to the culture’s spirituality? Reservations required. Email concerts@wellesley.edu for reservation link

Concert: Seeker of Truth February 11 (Sat) | 7:30 PM Houghton Chapel

The internationally renowned Yuval Ron Ensemble performs the ecstatic music of the mystical Sufi, Hebrew, and Christian traditions of the Middle East and North Africa. The concert features hypnotic whirling dervishes; sacred songs of the Sufi Turkish tradition; Jewish sacred music from Morocco, Yemen, and Andalucia; and early Christian Armenian chants. A feast for the senses! Reception with the artists will follow in the Multi Faith Center. Funded in part by the Expeditions program of the New England Foundation for the Arts.

February 12 (Sun) Pendleton West Grand Music Hall

1–2 PM | Healing and Transforming Consciousness through Sacred Sound, Music, and Dance This unique experiential

seminar will journey into sacred music chanting, movement, and spiritual mindfulness practices from four ancient cultures. Walking meditation, sacred movement from Zen, Hebrew, and Sufi source, storytelling, poetry, and live Oud music by Yuval Ron.

2–3 PM | Music as a Bridge: Bringing People Together with Music A closing talk with

live music, exploring ways to teach unity and tolerance, using music as a platform for meeting your opponent, your neighbor, and the other.

Midday Muse: Katherine Matasy, clarinet, and Arneis Quartet February 22 (Wed) | 12:30 PM | (Rescheduled) Jewett Auditorium

One of the Boston area’s most versatile musicians, Katherine Matasy has been described by the Boston Globe as “a musician of depth and refinement” with “technique to burn,” and her playing has been praised as “riveting,” “ravishing,” “brilliant,” and “a rare feat.” A member of the Wellesley College clarinet faculty, Matasy will

For updates, text CONCERTS to 42828. For reservations, when recommended: concerts@wellesley.edu or 781.283.2028.

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Arneis Quartet

be joined by the acclaimed Arneis Quartet to present one of the greatest chamber music compositions of all time for any combination of instruments, the Quintet in B Minor for Clarinet and String Quartet, op. 115 by Johannes Brahms, dating from 1891. Generously supported by the Marjorie Copland Baum Memorial Fund.

Jazz/World Music Faculty Concert: Songs of Celebration

Midday Muse: Maria Schneider March 8 (Wed) | 12:30 PM Jewett Auditorium

Lecture-demonstration, discussion, and questions and answers. Free and open to the public.

March 4 (Sat) | 7:30 PM

Business and Arts Conversation with Maria Schneider

Jewett Auditorium

March 10 (Fri) | 12:30 PM

This year’s annual Jazz/World Music Faculty Concert showcases new works composed by our vibrant jazz and world music performance faculty. The concert features their innovative original music, and celebrates their creativity and unique compositional “voices.” Performers include: Kris Adams, Tom Duprey, David Harris, Mark Henry, Russell Hoffmann, Steve Kirby, Steve Langone, Lance Martin, Cercie Miller, Paula Zeitlin, and Kera Washington. Generously supported by the Marjorie Copland Baum Memorial Fund.

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MARIA SCHNEIDER JAZZ RESIDENCY

Sorenson Black Box Theater, Babson College

Interview with Schneider on her ArtistsShare project, musical advocacy, and being an entrepreneur. Free and open to the public.

Maria Schneider Orchestra Concert March 10 (Fri) | 7:30 PM Sorenson Center, Babson College

Maria Schneider’s music has been hailed by critics as “evocative, majestic, magical, heart-stoppingly gorgeous, and beyond categorization.” She and her orchestra became widely known starting in 1994 when they released their first recording, Evanescence. There, Schneider began to develop her personal way of writing for what would become her

Events above are free and open to the public (unless noted) with general seating. | wellesley.edu/concertseries


Maria Schneider

18-member collective, made up of many of the finest musicians in jazz today, tailoring her compositions to distinctly highlight the uniquely creative voices of the group. The Maria Schneider Orchestra has performed at festivals and concert halls worldwide.

BlueJazz

Aeolus: A New Opera by Ken Ueno April 6 (Thursday) | 7:30 PM Jewett Auditorium

Reservations required. Free to students, $10 for Babson,Olin, and Wellesley faculty/staff, $20 for general public. Babson.edu/student-life/arts/music. Residency presented by the Wellesley College Concert Series, Babson College, and Olin College in collaboration. Generously supported in part by a Babson/Olin/Wellesley Presidential Innovation Grant; BabsonArts; and the following Wellesley College sources: the Marjorie Copland Baum Memorial Fund, and The Florence Jeup Ford ’22, Mary M. Crawford ’22, and Virginia Ford ’48 Artists-In-Residence Endowment Fund.

Classical Faculty Concert: Contrasting Styles in the Early 20th Century March 12 (Sun) | 7:30 PM Jewett Auditorium

Featuring Schoenberg’s revolutionary 1912 masterwork Pierrot Lunaire, this concert celebrates the diversified musical styles from that era, with Saint-Saens’ Sonata for oboe and piano and Gershwin’s Lullaby for string quartet. Performers include Kathy Boyd, piccolo/flute; Gabriela Diaz, violin/viola; Andrew Eng, violin; Jane Harrison, oboe; Randy Hodgkinson, piano; Katherine Matasy, clarinet/bass clarinet; David Russell, cello; Jane Starkman, viola; Olga Talroze, piano; and guest artist Jennifer Ashe, soprano/speaker.

Ken Ueno

Aeolus, commissioned by Opera Cabal, is written by composer-performer Ken Ueno in collaboration with poet Robert Hass, architect Thomas Tsang, and vocalist Majel Connery. It is inspired by Homer’s The Odyssey and the epic meeting between Odysseus and Aeolus, the keeper of the winds. Reimagining these mythic personalities in a series of performance diptychs, the opera pits Ken Ueno’s extended vocal techniques (as Aeolus) against Majel Connery’s fluid vocals (as Odysseus). Generously supported by the Marjorie Copland Baum Memorial Fund and the Mellon Artist in Residence Program of the Suzy Newhouse Center for the Humanities.

Events above are free and open to the public with general seating. | wellesley.edu/concertseries

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Skylark Choral Ensemble

Midday Muse: Russell Hoffmann Jazz Ensemble April 20 (Thu) | 12:30 PM Jewett Auditorium

Russell Hoffmann, a pianist, recording artist, composer, and arranger, will share some of his discoveries of the rich musical and cultural heritage of Cuba and also perform selections with his group, from pre-revolutionary Old Havana, along with more contemporary works. Generously supported by the Marjorie Copland Baum Memorial Fund.

SPECIAL EVENT The Skylark Choral Ensemble: Clear Voices in the Dark April 24 (Mon) | 7:30 PM Houghton Chapel

Hosted by the Wellesley College Choral Program, the Skylark Choral Ensemble presents a celebration of the power of the human spirit to endure in times of turmoil, featuring Francis Poulenc’s Figure Humaine. The ensemble is a chamber choir of professional soloists and music educators from across the United States. Tickets: General public $30; students and music educators $10; free for Wellesley ID holders. Ticket link: brownpapertickets.com/event/2570683. info@skylarkensemble.org

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STUDENT PERFORMANCES Music Department Honors Concert February 4 (Sat) | 7:30 PM Jewett Auditorium

The Music Department at Wellesley College fosters an environment in which students can combine serious musical study with the depth and richness of a traditional liberal arts curriculum. The performance program is an important component of the department, giving students the opportunity to take instrumental and vocal private lessons with faculty and prepare for professional careers in music. The concert will showcase students who have exhibited exceptional promise as performing musicians.

Collegium Musicum Spring Concert Andrew Arceci, Director April 18 (Tue) | 7:30 PM | Houghton Chapel

Wellesley College Choral Program: The Baum Memorial Concert Lisa Graham, Conductor April 22 (Sat) | 8 PM | Houghton Chapel

Chamber Music Marathon April 23 (Sun) | 12 PM Lulu Chow Wang Campus Center, Anderson Forum

Events above are free and open to the public with general seating. | wellesley.edu/music/concertseries


Yuare Muniz, a member of the Russell Hoffmann Jazz Ensemble

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Chamber Music Society Spring Concerts David Russell, Director Jenny Tang, Assistant Director April 27 (Thu) | 7 PM The Cynthia Mead Sargent ’60 Concert Salon, Pendleton West April 30 (Sun) | 2 PM | Jewett Auditorium

BlueJazz Strings and Combos Spring Concert: No Walls, No Borders Paula Zeitlin, Director April 21 (Fri) | 7:30 PM | Jewett Auditorium

May 1 (Mon) | 7 PM The Cynthia Mead Sargent ’60 Concert Salon, Pendleton West

Wellesley BlueJazz Big Band Spring Concert: Rockin’ in Rhythm

May 3 (Wed) | 12:30 PM | Jewett Auditorium

Cercie Miller, Director

Brandeis-Wellesley Orchestra Spring Concert: Catch a Rising Star Neal Hampton, Conductor April 29 (Sat) | 8 PM | Houghton Memorial Chapel

Yanvalou Drum and Dance Ensemble Spring Concert: Ransanble Kera Washington, Director April 30 (Sun) | 7 PM | Jewett Auditorium

Look for the live stream of each concert at wellesley.edu/live. Email concerts@wellesley. edu to join the email list and for more information about all our concerts.

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WELLESLEY BLUEJAZZ

April 28 (Fri) | 7:30 PM | Jewett Auditorium

GUILD OF CARILLONNEURS The guild carries on the tradition of bell-ringing in Galen Stone Tower, where all programs are hosted. It is directed by Margaret Angelini.

Spring Carillon Concerts Cari-Radio Open Tower February 18 (Sat) | 2 PM Spring Carillon Concert March 18 (Sat) | 2 PM Carillon Spring Invitational Recital April 8 (Sat) | 2 PM Community Time Open Tower April 19 (Wed) | 12:30 PM Change Ringing Open Tower April 29 (Sat) | 2 PM

Events above are free and open to the public with general seating. | wellesley.edu/music/concertseries


THE ART DEPARTMENT When Wellesley introduced art history in 1885, it distinguished itself as one of the only American collges to offer this area of study, and the College has been dedicated to leadership in arts education ever since. The Art Department is home to majors in art history, studio art, and architecture, and intersects with programs in cinema and media studies as well as media arts and science. The department believes that the rigorous study of art and visual culture is critical to a liberal arts education and to the power of women to interpret, shape, and master their environments. To enrich the art experience at the College, the department hosts special exhibitions and welcomes guest lecturers and visiting artists to engage with the community.

Sarah Tortora: Fickle Ground Exhibition: March 14–April 21 Reception: March 14 (Tue) | 6–8 PM Jewett Arts Center Gallery (JAC 200)

Fickle Ground will feature sculptural works exploring the authority of longevity present in classical forms of friezes, columns, and steles, and relegating their imposing militarism to the surface, like a Potemkin village. These works accept the premise that every equestrian monument has inevitably become a Trojan horse, and by passively consuming sculptural archetypes

we passively place precedence on postured narratives of history. Generously supported by the Alice C. Cole ’42 Art Fund.

Rebecca Parker Brienen ’89: Art and Travel: The Life of a Professional Art Historian April 10 (Mon) | 4:30 PM Jewett Arts Center 450

Rebecca Parker Brienen ’89 is Vennerberg Professor of Art and head of the Department

Events above are free and open to the public. | wellesley.edu/events | 781.283.2042

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Sarah Tortora. Foe, 2016. Wood composites, acrylic, latex paint. 96”h x 30”w x 18”d


Alida Cervantes

Photo by Stefan Falke

of Art, Graphic Design, and Art History at Oklahoma State University. A specialist in 17th century Dutch art, internationalism, and the history of museums and collecting, Brienen will speak about her career path as an art historian. This talk, the second in a series, brings an alumna of the Art Department to campus to meet with Art History Club students and speak about her professional and personal trajectory after Wellesley.

ALICE C. COLE ’42 EXHIBITION Alida Cervantes Reception: April 14 (Fri) | 6–8 PM Exhibition: April 14–June 25 Mills Gallery, Boston Center for the Arts, 539 Tremont St., Boston, Mass.

Alida Cervantes is a Mexican artist who lives and works in the Tijuana/San Diego border region. Born in San Diego, California, she was raised in Tijuana, Mexico, and grew up on both

sides of the border. Her paintings, drawings, and performance work draw inspiration from class, race, and gender relations in colonial and present-day Mexico. Cervantes earned a BA from the University of California, San Diego, then studied at Scuola di Arte Lorenzo di Medici in Florence, Italy, for two years. She earned her MFA from the University of California, San Diego. Generously supported by the Alice C. Cole ’42 Art Fund and in partnership with the Boston Center for the Arts.

Senior Thesis Exhibition 2017 May 5 (Fri) | 4–8 PM Jewett Arts Center Gallery

Graduating students invite all to join them for the opening of their Thesis Exhibition, the first to make use of spaces in both the Jewett Arts Center and our new Pendleton West building. Generously supported by the Alice C. Cole ’42 Art Fund and in partnership with the Boston Center for the Arts.

Events above are free and open to the public. | wellesley.edu/events | 781.283.2042

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The Suzy Newhouse Center for the Humanities at Wellesley College

The mission of the Suzy Newhouse Center for the Humanities at Wellesley is to create a dynamic and cosmopolitan intellectual community that extends from Wellesley to the wider Boston area and beyond. Founded in 2004 by a generous gift from Susan Marley Newhouse ’55 and Donald Newhouse, the Suzy generates and supports innovative, world-class programming in the humanities and the arts.

Reading and Conversation with Jhumpa Lahiri

Reading and Conversation with Saikat Majumdar

January 30 (Mon) | 7 PM

March 14 (Tue) | 6 PM

Suzy Newhouse Center, Green Hall

Suzy Newhouse Center, Green Hall

Born in London, Jhumpa Lahiri moved to Rhode Island as a young child with her Bengali parents. Lahiri’s abilities to convey old cultural conflicts in the most immediate fashion and to achieve the voices of many different characters are among the unique qualities of her work that have captured the attention of a wide audience. In 2015, Lahiri was awarded the prestigious National Humanities Medal by the NEH at the White House. She won the Pulitzer Prize in 2000 for the collection of stories Interpreter of Maladies. Lahiri is the author of Namesake (2003), which was also made into a film, and two recent nonfiction books, The Clothing of Books and In Other Words (both 2016). Among her numerous other awards are the PEN/Hemingway Award, an O. Henry Prize, and the Addison Metcalf Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters. In September 2015, Lahiri joined the faculty of the Lewis Center for the Arts Program in Creative Writing at Princeton University as professor of creative writing. Sponsored in part by the Robert E. Garis and Arthur Gold Endowed Humanities Colloquium Fund.

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Saikat Majumdar

Saikat Majumdar teaches English and creative writing at India’s Ashoka University. He specializes in modern and contemporary world literature. His novels include Silverfish (2007) and Firebird (2015). He is the author of the scholarly Prose of the World, which was a finalist for the Modernist Studies Association’s annual Book Prize. He is currently working on a new novel, titled The Amateur. Majumdar’s articles have appeared in The Journal of Commonwealth and Postcolonial Studies, Modern Fiction Studies, and Cambridge History of the Indian English Novel.

Events above are free and open to the public. | wellesley.edu/newhouse


Jhumpa Lahiri; photo by Liana Miuccio

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Die Abenteuer des Prinzen Achmed (The Adventures of Prince Achmed), 1926

CINEMA AND MEDIA STUDIES The Cinema and Media Studies Program aims to offer film lovers a communal viewing experience, sharing the beauty of 35mm films on the big screen of Wellesley’s Collins Cinema. In a time when people too often watch film in the isolation of their homes in front of their computers, we offer the opportunity to come together, in the dark and in the light, to view film on the big screen, hear from major film theorists, and meet filmmakers.

CINÉPHILE SUNDAYS: WHERE DO WE GO NOW? Although films made by women have already figured in our Cinéphile Sundays series, the time has come to dedicate a five-film cycle to women directors. The series’ title, Where Do We Go Now?, is the English translation of the title of one the films, Nadine Labaki’s Et maintenant on va où? (2011). All films are screened on Sundays in Collins Cinema, and are free and open to the public. This program is generously supported by the Edwards Fund. 20

La Ciénaga (The Swamp) Dir. Lucrecia Martel, 2001 February 12 | 3 PM

Undoubtedly the most intriguing and promising auteur to emerge from the so-called New Argentine Cinema, Lucrecia Martel took the film festival circuit by storm with this stunning portrayal of an oblivious, decaying, and racist middle class in the northwest of her country. The screenplay for La Ciénaga won the NHK award at Sundance in 1999. The film has been compared to Faulkner’s novels. Indeed, La Ciénaga, as all of Martel’s films, is characterized by a somewhat disorienting narrative structure and an extreme

Events above are free and open to the public. | wellesley.edu/CAMS | 781.283.2042


Still from Orlando, 1992

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Still from La Ciénaga (The Swamp), 2001

attention paid to the soundscape and all the forms of haptic/tactile visuality enabled by filming on 35mm.

Et maintenant on va où? (Where Do We Go Now?)

Die Abenteuer des Prinzen Achmed (The Adventures of Prince Achmed)

April 9 | 5 PM

Dir. Lotte Reininger, 1926 February 26 | 3 PM

As the oldest surviving animated feature, Lotte Reininger’s film goes a long way to proving the relevance of women filmmakers in the history of animation. Die Abenteuer des Prinzen Achmed features a silhouette animation technique Reiniger invented, which involved manipulated cutouts made from cardboard and thin sheets of lead under a camera—a technique she would continue using during the rest of her long filmmaking career.

Dir. Nadine Labaki, 2011

Nadine Labaki’s first film, Caramel (2007), premiered at the Cannes film festival and went on to become the most internationally acclaimed and exposed Lebanese film to date. Et maintenant on va où?, the winner of the People’s Choice Award at the 2011 Toronto International Film Festival, is a bold step in political filmmaking, a fairy tale that attempts the impossible: at once the depiction of an intractably topical situation in Lebanon ( the conflict between Muslims and Christians) and the visualization of what could happen if women took some extreme, utopian— and humorous—measures.

Dream Girls Dirs. Kim Longinotto, Jano Williams, 1993

Orlando

April 23 | 5 PM

Dir. Sally Potter, 1992 March 19 | 5 PM

Sally Potter’s visually sumptuous Orlando (1992) is the cinematic adaptation of Virginia Woolf ’s gender- and history-bending novel of the same name. Beginning in the era of Queen Elizabeth I (played with gusto by writer and performer Quentin Crisp) and rolling down the centuries to end in contemporary London, Orlando is faithful to the spirit of a book that was regarded as impossible to adapt for the screen.

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Still from Et maintenant on va où? (Where Do We Go Now?), 2011

In the high-stakes world of the Takarazuka Revue, young women vie to perform as men or women in the troupe’s wildly popular musicals. A fascinating documentary about gender, sexuality, and performance, Dream Girls offers a unique perspective on the confines of modern women in a male-dominated world. Join film archivist May Haduong ’00 as she presents a rare 16mm print of Dream Girls, along with some outstanding short films from the Academy Film Archive’s collection.

Events above are free and open to the public. | wellesley.edu/CAMS | 781.283.2042


Ancient Mediterranean Gallery at the Davis Museum

THE DAVIS. The Davis Museum at Wellesley College is one of the oldest and most acclaimed academic art museums in the United States. Dynamic gallery presentations and richly varied temporary exhibitions create an environment that encourages visual literacy, inspires new ideas, and fosters involvement in the arts as a vital element of crossdisciplinary teaching and study.

Spring Opening Celebration February 9 (Thu) Keynote Lecture | 6:30 PM | Collins Cinema Reception and Gallery Viewing | 7:30 PM Davis Lobby and Galleries

Join the Davis to celebrate the opening of our spring 2017 special exhibitions, The Medici’s Painter: Carlo Dolci and 17th-Century Florence; Reframing the Past: Piranesi’s Vedute di Roma; Daphne Wright: Prayer Project; On Distant Shores: Landscapes by Constable and Kensett; and The Fine Print: Selections from the Collection Bequest of Ann Kirk Warren ’50. The evening kicks off

Free and open to the public, Tuesday–Sunday 11 AM–5 PM

with a keynote lecture by Francesca Baldassari, consulting curator to The Medici’s Painter, generously supported by the Samuel H. Kress Foundation. Reception immediately following.

THE MEDICI’S PAINTER: CARLO DOLCI AND 17TH-CENTURY FLORENCE Please see page 3 for more information about this exhibition, and join us for the related special events that follow.

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Wellesley student looks at the Portrait of Miss Cornelia Lyman Warren, Trustee of Wellesley College by Alexandre Cabanel, 1871, oil on canvas, Davis Museum at Wellesley College, 1929.2.


Curatorial Gallery Talk: Carlo Dolci and 17th-Century Florence April 4 (Tue) | 4–5 PM Camilla Chandler and Dorothy Buffum Chandler Gallery/Marjorie and Gerald Bronfman Gallery

Join Alicia LaTores, Friends of Art Curatorial Research Assistant, to explore the life and oeuvre of Carlo Dolci through his dramatic and intimate canvases. Requires ticketed admission to The Medici’s Painter: Carlo Dolci and 17th-Century Florence.

Educator Workshop: Engaging with the Davis March 28 (Tue) | 4–6 PM Davis Lobby and Galleries

Carlo Dolci, Saint Apollonia, late 1660s. Oil on canvas, 25 ½ x 21 ½ in (63.9 x 53.9 cm). Robilant+Voena London, Milan, St. Moritz Courtesy of Robilant + Voena

Performance: The Sound World of Carlo Dolci March 3 (Fri) | 6:30–8 PM Camilla Chandler and Dorothy Buffum Chandler Gallery

Set amidst the luminous devotional works of Florentine painter Carlo Dolci, this program of 17th-century Italian song brings a sonic dimension to the experience of looking. Featuring soprano Laurie Monahan, Laura Jeppesen on viola da gamba, and Catherine Liddell on theorbo and baroque guitar, the concert includes music by Barbara Strozzi, Vincenzo Calestani, Jacopo Peri, Girolamo Frescobaldi, and other early-modern composers. Requires ticketed admission to The Medici’s Painter: Carlo Dolci and 17th-Century Florence. Co-sponsored by Medieval-Renaissance Studies (Edna Virginia Moffet Fund), the Davis Museum, and the Wellesley College Music Department.

Free and open to the public, Tuesday–Sunday 11 AM–5 PM

The Davis welcomes local K-12 educators for a workshop organized around our recently reinstalled permanent collections galleries. Explore how to connect the themes and works of art on view in the Museum with your classroom curricula. Free program with registration required. Please email davisadmin@wellesley.edu or call 781.283.3569. Generously supported by The Palley Endowment Fund for Davis Museum Outreach Programs.

Family Day: A Grand Tour of Italy April 29 (Sat) | 11 AM–3 PM Davis Lobby, Plaza, and Galleries

The Davis welcomes visitors of all ages to participate in programming and activities inspired by Italian art and culture. Join us for a treasure hunt in the galleries, art making, and performances that will entertain the whole family. Free and open to the public. Generously supported by The Palley Endowment Fund for Davis Museum Outreach Programs.

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FILM SERIES: A GRAND TOUR

Roman Holiday

The Davis spring film series considers the “Grand Tour”—a rite of passage for young aristocrats (men, and some women) coming of cultural age from the mid-17th through the mid-19th centuries. The Grand Tour itinerary linked passion for touristic adventure to the cultural legacies of classical antiquity and the Renaissance, informed tastes in art and collecting, and reinforced notions of class status and empire. These four films vary in source material, genre, and time period, from modern psychological horror to classic romantic comedy, yet have one thing in common: a life-changing visit to Italy, though perhaps not as “grand” as expected.

Dir. William Wyler, 1953

This series is generously supported by the Davis Museum Film Program Gift.

In this romantic comedy, a young Princess Ann escapes her dull political duties for a day of sightseeing in Rome with an American journalist who hides his real agenda. Transformed by the city and his company, she faces uncertainty about the confines of her royal role. Starring Audrey Hepburn and Gregory Peck.

Death in Venice Dir. Luchino Visconti, 1971 March 2 (Thu) | 6:30 PM | Collins Cinema

March 16 (Thu) | 6:30 PM | Collins Cinema

Still from Roman Holiday, 1953

A Room with a View Dir. James Ivory, 1985 April 6 (Thu) | 6:30 PM | Collins Cinema

Still from Death in Venice, 1971

Seeking respite and recovery from illness, Gustav von Aschenbach alights in Venice. Unexpectedly, he finds relief and hope in the beauty of a teenaged boy named Tadzio, with whom he becomes enamored. After an outbreak of cholera, Aschenbach’s condition quickly worsens—but he feels the most alive he ever has, even in the city that eventually kills him.

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Based on the novel by E.M. Forster, this sweeping romantic drama finds young Lucy Honeychurch, played by Helena Bonham Carter, and her chaperone, played by Maggie Smith, on holiday in Florence, ensconced at a small pension amidst free-thinking fellow travellers. Back at home, Lucy is wooed by an affluent and cultured suitor, and must decide whether to abide by the conventions of Edwardian England or follow her heart.

The Talented Mr. Ripley Dir. Anthony Minghella, 1999 May 11 (Thu) | 6:30 PM | Collins Cinema

An impulsive young “nobody” is enlisted to convince the scion of a wealthy family to return to America. Thus begins a chain of deception with dire consequences. Based on the novel by Patricia Highsmith, this psychological thriller matches Tom Ripley’s passions to the dramatic landscapes of Italy’s great tourist destinations.

thedavis.org | Information: 781.283.2051; Tours: 781.283.3045


Giovanni Battista Piranesi, Temple of Saturn, from the series Vedute di Roma, 1774, etching, Davis Museum 1999.0.409

Daphne Wright, Prayer Project. Courtesy the artist and Frith Street Gallery, London

SPECIAL EXHIBITIONS & RELATED EVENTS

Daphne Wright: Prayer Project

Reframing the Past: Piranesi’s Vedute di Roma

Joan Levine Freedman ’57 and Richard I. Freedman Gallery

February 10–July 9 Morelle Lasky Levine ’56 Works on Paper Gallery

Perhaps Giovanni Battista Piranesi’s best-known work, the Vedute di Roma print series was completed over the course of more than three decades, from 1747 until the artist’s death in 1778. This exhibition focuses on Piranesi’s views of Roman memorial monuments and on 18thcentury approaches to antiquity, along with his contributions to the scholarly advancement of Roman architecture in the nascent field of art history. It also orients Piranesi’s Roman Vedute within the context of print culture and in relation to the Grand Tour. Co-curated by Meredith Fluke, Kemper Curator of Academic Programs, and Kimberly Cassibry, assistant professor of art, Wellesley College. Generously supported by the Mary Tebbetts Wolfe ’54 Davis Museum Program Fund.

Curatorial Gallery Talk: Piranesi’s Vedute di Roma February 28 (Tue) | 4–5 PM Morelle Lasky Levine ’56 Works on Paper Gallery

Curators Meredith Fluke and Kimberly Cassibry discuss Giovanni Battista Piranesi’s Roman Vedute in the context of 18th-century travel and print culture, as well as within the prevalent approaches to antiquity found in the circles of philosophers, antiquarians, philologists, archaeologists, and architects that Piranesi inhabited. Free and open to the public, Tuesday–Sunday 11 AM–5 PM

February 10–July 9

Daphne Wright lives and works in Bristol and Dublin. Her work traverses media and materials—including plaster, tinfoil, video, printmaking, found objects, and performance— to consider “unspoken human preoccupations.” As part of her major solo exhibition, Emotional Archeology, organized by the Arnolfini in Bristol in 2016, Wright’s Prayer Project was installed to dramatic effect in the chapel at the National Trust’s Tyntesfield. Curator Josephine Lanyon writes, its “…portraits of the private moment of prayer and meditation. These tranquil, often silent, films place religions on an equal footing in their stripped down, human form, showing faith as a part of daily life. We are invited to explore the notion of communion, both in the sense of its religious connotations (a communion with god) but also in the old sense of the word as communication, community, or dialogue with the self or with an ‘other.’”

On Distant Shores: Landscapes by Constable and Kensett February 10–July 9 Friends of Art Gallery

On loan for the spring semester from the Currier Museum of Art, a depiction of the serene English countryside by pioneering landscapist John Constable hangs next to the Davis Museum’s Mount Washington from the Valley of Conway (1851) by Hudson River School painter John Frederick Kensett. This pairing creates the enviable opportunity for close side-by-side 27


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Wenceslaus Hollar, A Muff in Five Views, 1645-46, etching, Bequest of Ann Kirk Warren (Ann Haggarty, Class of 1950), Davis Museum E.2016.44.122


Baga, D’mba (Shoulder mask), first half of the 20th century, wood. 1959.36 Gift of John J. and Halina Klejman.

analysis of the multivalent influences and philosophical convictions that informed British and American landscape painting in the 19th century.

The Fine Print: Selections from the Collection Bequest of Ann Kirk Warren ’50 February 10–July 9 Robert and Claire Freedman Lober Viewing Alcove

Ann Kirk Warren ’50 was an avid collector of works on paper, with impeccable taste and capacious interests. Her entire collection—which encompasses works from European old masters to American prints and drawings—comes by generous bequest to the Davis Museum, where it adds immeasurably to our holdings. This first selection of many demonstrates the breadth and richness of the Warren Collection of more than 200 works on paper, in honor of her generous donation.

Symposium: Davis Discoveries: The D’mba on Display April 7 (Fri) | 2–4:30 PM Collins Cinema

In 1959, New York gallerists and Wellesley parents John J. and Halina Klejman donated a D’mba shoulder headdress to the Wellesley Art Museum. Since then, it has been displayed as sculpture: as a single, isolated artwork on a pedestal. Many museums now seek ways to portray more fully the masquerades for which the D’mba were created Free and open to the public, Tuesday–Sunday 11 AM–5 PM

and question how best to convey dance in a gallery context. Should our D’mba stand on its pedestal, or should it be dressed in a raffia dress and cotton shawl, as if ready to dance? This afternoon symposium features presentations by Frederick John Lamp, curator emeritus of African art at the Yale Art Gallery, Christopher Steiner, the Lucy C. McDannel ’22 Professor of Art History and Anthropology at Connecticut College, and Yaëlle Biro, associate curator for the arts of Africa at the Metropolitan Museum, in conversation with Amanda Gilvin, assistant curator at the Davis. Reception to follow in the Davis Lobby. Generously supported by Wellesley College Friends of Art at the Davis.

In Conversation: Collecting and Connoisseurship April 27 (Thu) | 6:30–8 PM Collins Cinema

Honoring the collection bequest from the estate of Ann Kirk Warren ’50, this program brings together George Abrams, internationally recognized collector of Old Master Dutch drawings, with Susan Schulman, specialist in museum quality old master European and American prints up to 1945, and Elizabeth Wyckoff, curator of prints, drawings, and photographs at the Saint Louis Art Museum, with Claire Whitner, assistant director of curatorial affairs and senior curator of collections at the Davis, in conversation about the pleasures, passions, and pitfalls of collecting Old Master prints and drawings. 29


Lecture: Laurie Wilson ’62: Louise Nevelson: Light and Shadow April 20 (Thu) | 6:30–8 PM Davis Museum Lobby

TOURS The Davis Museum at Wellesley College offers guided tours to public groups during open hours, Tuesday through Sunday from 11 AM to 5 PM. Our specially trained Student Guides engage visitors with the Davis’s distinctive permanent collections and its special temporary exhibitions through dialogue-based, interactive experiences. Admission is free; reservations must be made two weeks in advance. School groups are encouraged to apply for our School Bus Subsidy, generously supported by the Palley Endowment Fund for Davis Museum Outreach Programs. Tours are customized according to interest area. To schedule your visit or to request more information, please call 781.283.3569, or email davisadmin@wellesley.edu.

Drop-in Public Tours Saturdays, February 11–May 6 (except March 25) Meet in Davis Lobby at 2 PM

Louise Nevelson. Thames and Hudson.

Laurie Wilson ’62 is an art historian, biographer, and practicing psychoanalyst. Her involvement with Louise Nevelson dates back to the 1970s, when she spent 15 hours interviewing the artist for her doctoral dissertation. Her new book, Louise Nevelson: Light and Shadow (Thames & Hudson), offers what Kirkus Reviews extols as an “intimate, revealing biography of the artist.” Reception to follow.

Focus on Accessibility The Davis is committed to making the museum and programs accessible to all audiences. We encourage you to contact us about the following guided tour options, available for free with two weeks advance notice: American Sign Language interpreted tours of the permanent collections and special exhibitions (subject to interpreter availability).

Lecture: Timothy Barringer: Transatlantic Landscapes

Tactile tours or verbal description tours of the permanent collections.

May 6 (Sat) | 2 PM Friends of Art Gallery

The histories of American and British art have often been told as isolated narratives of two national schools rooted in their own soil. This presentation, by Tim Barringer, Paul Mellon Professor of the History of Art at Yale University, focuses on stylistic, iconographic, and historical comparisons to suggest that transatlantic dialogue—by way of Constable and Kensett—is a key to understanding art in the Anglophone world. 30

Thematic tours of special exhibitions and permanent collections are free and open to the public on a first-come, first-served basis. For a full schedule of tours, please visit www.theDavis.org.

To book your customized tour, please email davisadmin@wellesley.edu or call 781.283.3569. Museum Hours Tuesday–Sunday, 11 AM–5 PM Closed Mondays, major holidays, and campus recesses.

MassCulturalCouncil.org

The Davis is supported in part by a grant from the Massachusetts Cultural Council.

thedavis.org | Information: 781.283.2051; Tours: 781.283.3045


Kabuki Dance

THEATRE The Department of Theatre Studies allows Wellesley students to explore the history and literature of the theatre, and then to bring their experience from the classroom and the audience to a hands-on application of the craft. From a professional American Equity Association company in residence at Wellesley to all-student troupes, multiple performance programs enhance this experiential learning and offer quality productions to share with the public.

THEATRE STUDIES Terra Nova Written by Ted Tally Directed by Nora Hussey April 5–8 | 7 PM April 8 (Sat) & 9 (Sun) | 2 PM Ruth Nagel Jones Theatre, Alumnae Hall

Terra Nova is the story of Captain Scott’s expedition to the South Pole in the winter of 1911–12. Five Englishmen and five Norwegians raced each other to the bottom of the Earth. Only the Norwegians returned. The discovery that Amundsen has preceded him, the bravery and suffering of his team, the self-sacrifice of Captain Oates, and the final tragedy, are recounted in a mixture of fantasy and realism that

underlines both the human and the epic qualities of the adventure. In this unique production, Wellesley College will explore this very male experience. General admission $15, $10 for seniors and students, free for Wellesley, Olin, and Babson students.

GUEST PERFORMERS Kabuki Dance Live with Samisen and Taiko April 13 (Thurs) | 7:30 PM – 9 PM Diana Chapman Walsh Alumnae Hall Auditorium

Master dancer Michiko Kurata (stage name: Hanayagi Sukekatsumi), Japanese koto and

For information: 781.283.2000 | wellesleyrepertorytheatre.org.

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Terra Nova

samisen musician Sumi Kaneko, and Japanese taiko drum and shakuhachi musician Kaoru Watanabe offer a rare glimpse into the hidden world of traditional Japanese dance. Kabuki dance (kabuki buyo) originated in Japan over 400 years ago among female street performers in Edo (modern-day Tokyo) and spread throughout all classes of society. Kurata has been performing traditional Japanese dance for 35 years in Japan and the United States. At the age of 15, she was awarded natori status and earned her professional name. Free and open to the public.

Sonia Flew Written by Melinda Lopez Directed by Lois Roach June 1–25 (Thursdays–Saturdays*) | 7 PM June 1–25 (Saturdays & Sundays) | 2 PM *No evening performance Saturday, June 3

STUDENT PRODUCTIONS: UPSTAGE THEATRE Guards at the Taj Written by Rajiv Joseph Directed by Kanika Vaish ’17 February 2–4 | 7 PM February 4 (Sat) & 5 (Sun) | 2 PM Diana Chapman Walsh Alumnae Hall Auditorium

Written by award-winning American playwright Rajiv Joseph, Guards at the Taj is set in Agra, India, in 1648. The Taj Mahal has just been unveiled, and guards Humayan and Babur are the first to see it in all its beauty. But the next day, they are given an imperial order that will change their lives forever. General admission $10, $5 for students with ID, free for Wellesley, Olin, Babson, MIT faculty and students.

Ruth Nagel Jones Theatre, Alumnae Hall

Please see page 6 for details.

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For reservations for Upstage Theatre productions only, please email upstage@wellesley.edu.


For information and reservations: 781.283.2000 | www.wellesleyrepertorytheatre.org

Melinda Lopez; Photo by PSWB Portraiture 33 3


Upstage Theatre

Machinal

The White Snake

Written by Sophie Treadwell Directed by Brigitte Demelo ’18

Written by Mary Zimmerman Directed by Kendra Cui ’18

February 23–25 | 7 PM February 25 (Sat) & 26 (Sun) | 2 PM

April 27–29 | 7 PM April 29 (Sat) & 30 (Sun) | 2 PM

Ruth Nagel Jones Theatre, Alumnae Hall

Diana Chapman Walsh Alumnae Hall Auditorium

Written by American playwright and journalist Sophie Treadwell, Machinal is a 1920s expressionist drama that chronicles the life of a young female stenographer. In the span of nine episodes that detail various stages of her life, she marries, has a child, and essentially does what is expected of a young woman. However, in a turn of events based on the true story of Ruth Snyder, her life ends in the electric chair when she is executed for the murder of her husband.

In this adaptation of a classical Chinese legend, an immortal white snake spirit journeys to the human realm and falls in love with a man. Although cosmic law forbids spirits from living in the mortal world, the white snake refuses to relinquish her love. Her defiance brings about tragic consequences, but from her story we are reminded of the timelessness of friendship and love, and the joys and pains that make human life so vibrant. Filled with dances, poetic designs, and intensely lyrical storytelling, The White Snake is sure to enchant audiences of all ages.

General admission $10, $5 for students with ID, free for Wellesley, Olin, Babson, MIT faculty and students.

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General admission $10, $5 for students with ID, free for Wellesley, Olin, Babson, MIT faculty and students.

For reservations for Upstage Theatre productions only, please email upstage@wellesley.edu.


William Julius Wilson

THE ARTS, ACADEMICS, AND INTERSECTIONS The arts and humanities are a vibrant part of the greater intellectual community at Wellesley College. Every year, various academic departments bring art, artists, and experts in diverse fields from all over the world to campus to both complement their own curriculum and enliven the cultural life of the greater Wellesley community.

THE WILSON LECTURE William Julius Wilson: Reflections on Race, Class, and Cumulative Adversity April 4 (Tue) | 5 PM Diana Chapman Walsh Alumnae Hall Auditorium

This lecture will revisit some of the major arguments advanced in William Julius Wilson’s seminal books, The Truly Disadvantaged (1987) and When Work Disappears (1996), to elucidate problems associated with the increased income segregation in communities of color since 1970, including low-income neighborhoods where growing income segregation is exacerbated by racial segregation. In the process, he will reflect on issues of race and class that are important to the nation, including social and public policy Events above are free and open to the public.

challenges, as we enter an era of uncertainty under a Trump administration. Generously funded by The Wilson Lectures Fund supported by Carolyn Ann Wilson, Class of 1910.

THE 2017 CALDERWOOD LECTURE IN ECONOMICS Bridget Terry Long: The Economics of Higher Education Access and Success February 9 (Thu) | 4:15 PM Knapp Atrium in Pendleton East

Bridget Terry Long is academic dean and the Saris Professor of Education and Economics at the Harvard Graduate School of Education and a research associate of the National Bureau of 35


Lake Baikal. Source: LifeFoc.com

Bridget Terry Long. Source: U.S. Senate Committee on Health, Education Labor & Pensions

Economic Research. Long is an economist who specializes in the study of education, in particular the transition from high school to higher education and beyond. Her work focuses on college student access and choice and the factors that influence students’ postsecondary and labor market outcomes. Generously supported by the Stanford Calderwood Fund for Economics.

DISTINGUISHED FACULTY LECTURE Marianne Moore: Casting a Net into the Clear, Cold Soul of Siberia—Lake Baikal April 19 (Wed) | 12:30 PM Collins Cinema

Since 2001, students and faculty from the sciences and the humanities at Wellesley College have travelled to Lake Baikal, Siberia, where they have worked together to conduct original scientific research and exchange ideas across multiple cultures. In this lecture, some of the scientific and cultural discoveries that created meaningful change for both Russians and Americans will be presented, emphasizing the power and unexpected benefits that can come from uniting the sciences with the humanities. Moore, the Frost Professor in Environmental Science and professor of biological sciences, has conducted research focusing on biodiversity and environmental change in Lake Baikal for more than 15 years. Generously supported by the President’s Office.

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RUSSIAN AREA STUDIES/ RUSSIAN DEPARTMENT Why Did the Soviet Union Collapse? February 9 (Thu) | 8 PM Margaret Clapp Library Lecture Room

William Taubman, Bertrand Snell Professor of Political Science Emeritus at Amherst College, discusses the many causes of the Soviet Union’s collapse. Mikhail Gorbachev wanted to humanize and modernize his country, but ended up presiding over its demise. How did a poor peasant boy become the grave-digger of Soviet Communism? Taubman is the Pulitzer Prizewinning author of Khrushchev: The Man and His Era. Generously supported by the Kathryn W. Davis Fund.

Russian Folk Music with Zolotoj Plyos: Concert and Student Recital Concert: April 11 (Tue) | 7 PM | Jewett Auditorium Student Recital: April 14 (Fri) | 4 PM | Lulu Chow Wang Campus Center, Cow Chair Room

Russian folk music with musicians Alexander Solovov, Elena Sadina, and Sergei Grachev. All three members of the group graduated from the Saratov State Conservatory. The group’s repertoire includes folk songs and instrumental pieces from various parts of Russia, Ukraine, Belarus, Moldova, Georgia, and other areas, and also features Gypsy music, Russian popular music, and Jewish music. Generously supported by the Maria Opasnov Tyler ’52 Fund for the Russian Department.

Events above are free and open to the public. www.wellesley.edu/events | 781.283.2426


Photo by Nina Tumarkin, professor of history at Wellesley College

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tHE FReeDOM projECT The Freedom Project at Wellesley College is dedicated to the exploration of the idea of freedom in all of its manifestations, but especially in the tradition of Western classical liberalism. This tradition emphasizes the sanctity of individual rights, freedom of contract and economic rights, constitutional democracy, and the rule of law. The Freedom Project also promotes interdisciplinary understandings of the idea of freedom, and values expansive intellectual pluralism and debate, especially on contentious issues.

Mark Lilla

Jodie Ginsberg

Tom Cushman

Mark Lilla: Identity Is Not Politics February 15 (Wed) | 7 PM Alumnae Hall Ballroom

Mark Lilla is an American political scientist, historian of ideas, journalist, and professor of humanities at Columbia University. A frequent contributor to the New York Review of Books and the New York Times, he is the author of The Reckless Mind: Intellectuals in Politics, The Stillborn God: Religion, Politics, and the Modern West, and The Shipwrecked Mind: On Political Reaction.

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Catherine Ross

Laura Kipnis

THE FREEDOM PROJECT: CENSORSHIP AWARENESS WEEK Jodie Ginsberg and Tom Cushman March 6 (Mon) | 4:30–6:30 PM Margaret Clapp Library Lecture Room

Jodie Ginsberg is the chief executive of Index on Censorship, a UK-based organization that promotes freedom of expression and campaigns against censorship worldwide. Ginsberg joined Index from the think-tank Demos, where she was deputy director of Demos Finance,

Visit wellesley.edu/FreedomProject | Events above are free and open to the public.


a financial services research unit. A former London bureau chief for Reuters news agency, Ginsberg worked for more than a decade as a foreign correspondent and business journalist in southern Africa and Ireland. She was previously head of communications for Camfed, a nonprofit organization working in girls’ education.

Tom Cushman is Deffenbaugh de Hoyos Carlson Professor in the Social Sciences and professor of sociology at Wellesley College, founder of The Journal of Human Rights, and director of the Freedom Project at Wellesley.

Catherine Ross March 7 (Tue) | 4:30–6:30 PM Margaret Clapp Library Lecture Room

Catherine J. Ross, professor of law at the George Washington University Law School, is the author of Lessons in Censorship: How Schools and Courts Subvert Students’ First Amendment Rights (Harvard University Press 2015).

www.wellesley.edu/events | 781.283.2426

Laura Kipnis March 8 (Wed) | 4:30–6:30 PM Margaret Clapp Library Lecture Room

Laura Kipnis is a cultural critic and former video artist whose work focuses on sexual politics, aesthetics, emotion, acting out, bad behavior, and various other crevices of the American psyche. Her books include Men: Notes from an Ongoing Investigation; How to Become a Scandal; Against Love: A Polemic; The Female Thing: Dirt, Sex, Envy, Vulnerability; and Bound and Gagged: Pornography and the Politics of Fantasy in America. Her next book, Unwanted Advances: Sexual Paranoia Comes to Campus, will be out in April 2017 from HarperCollins. Kipnis is a professor in the Department of Radio/TV/Film at Northwestern University, where she teaches filmmaking.

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ABOUT WELLESLEY

Attending an event at Wellesley is as stress-free as it is affecting. Just 12 miles from Boston, Wellesley’s rich and diverse arts scene feels worlds away. Parking is free and readily accessible, our performance spaces are intimate and inviting, and the town of Wellesley offers a variety of fine restaurants nearby. The professional arts programming is of the highest quality available, yet the majority of our events are offered free to the public. Take in the celebrated landscape and architecture. The landscape has always been central to the identity of Wellesley College and to the experience of its students. Combine your visit to Wellesley with a stroll through the grounds and see if you don’t feel as inspired by our surroundings as our guest artists do. Designed in consultation with landscape architect Frederick Law Olmsted Jr., the campus

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Pictured: Lake Waban

is a historic landmark that showcases the work of distinguished architects including Ralph Adams Cram, Paul Rudolph, and Rafael Moneo. Wellesley’s 500 acres include a private lake, a golf club, groves of conifers and hardwoods, and the Botanical Gardens with its own butterfly garden. Stunning brick and stone buildings rise from wooded hills. The view across Lake Waban showcases elaborate topiary on the far shore. Paths wind down open meadows and sweeping lawns past century-old oaks with magnificent gnarled branches. Share Wellesley’s passion for cultural and intellectual pursuits. The world’s preeminent college for women, Wellesley College is known for its intellectual rigor, its belief in the enduring importance of service, and its cultivation of an inclusive, pragmatic approach to leadership.


ABOUT WELLESLEY

Attending an event at Wellesley is as stress-free as it is affecting. Just 12 miles from Boston, Wellesley’s rich and diverse arts scene feels worlds away. Parking is free and readily accessible, our performance spaces are intimate and inviting, and the town of Wellesley offers a variety of fine restaurants nearby. The professional arts programming is of the highest quality available, yet the majority of our events are offered free to the public. Take in the celebrated landscape and architecture. The landscape has always been central to the identity of Wellesley College and to the experience of its students. Combine your visit to Wellesley with a stroll through the grounds and see if you don’t feel as inspired by our surroundings as our guest artists do. Designed in consultation with landscape architect Frederick Law Olmsted Jr., the campus

40

Pictured: Lake Waban

is a historic landmark that showcases the work of distinguished architects including Ralph Adams Cram, Paul Rudolph, and Rafael Moneo. Wellesley’s 500 acres include a private lake, a golf club, groves of conifers and hardwoods, and the Botanical Gardens with its own butterfly garden. Stunning brick and stone buildings rise from wooded hills. The view across Lake Waban showcases elaborate topiary on the far shore. Paths wind down open meadows and sweeping lawns past century-old oaks with magnificent gnarled branches. Share Wellesley’s passion for cultural and intellectual pursuits. The world’s preeminent college for women, Wellesley College is known for its intellectual rigor, its belief in the enduring importance of service, and its cultivation of an inclusive, pragmatic approach to leadership.


Be part of the vibrant arts and culture scene at Wellesley this spring!

106 Central Street, Wellesley, MA 02481

WELLESLEY COLLEGE

Wellesley College Arts and Culture Calendar of Events, Spring 2017  
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