This is Y Magazine Digital Edition - July 2020

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Graeme Bandeira We meet the Cartoon King who has captured the mood of the country. yorkshire.com

Life through the lens Zooming in with Joe Cornish on the art of proper photography.

Changing man Ahead of his live dates Paul Weller talks to us about his latest music.

Amanda Owen Shepherdess chats flock, family and a new TV series.

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W E LCO M E B AC K It’s great to see the hospitality industry starting to come to life again and Yorkshire’s amazing attractions announcing reopening dates. Many are back in action offering excellent experiences, following Government guidelines, as others are still preparing for their big day. As part of Welcome to Yorkshire’s tourism recovery plan, working with the county’s business and tourism representatives, to reopen, recover and rebuild our much-missed attractions and locations after lockdown, we very much encourage all Yorkshire businesses to be part of an exciting new initiative - the Yorkshire Gift Card, which will be available to purchase across the globe, but to be used exclusively in Yorkshire. Just one of many fantastic ways to support and enjoy the county’s countless world-class offerings. July’s online Welcome to Yorkshire This Is Y magazine, shares a snippet of the vast variety of options available across the UK’s largest county...from vibrant cities, to breathtaking countryside and an impressive coastline that’s going to be part of the longest coastal path in the world (watch this space). From astounding art to top touring music artists, plus delicious dining, as well as TV’s famous farming family and fabulous photography in the most beautiful of locations, there’s inspiration in abundance and don’t-miss dates for your diary in this month’s magazine. So whether enjoying a pint at your local after lockdown or showing support by popping into one of the county’s many independent stores, make sure you take some time out to catch up on all things Yorkshire in This Is Y magazine. #YorkshireTogether

JAMES MASON Chief Executive, Welcome to Yorkshire

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As many Yorkshire businesses start to reopen and the glorious green outdoors beckon, we’re encouraged to capture the county’s breathtaking beauty with inspiration from celebrated photographer Joe Cornish (Cornish in Yorkshire), don’t forget to share your pics on social media #YorkshireTogether … and if that works up an appetite, check in and check out some of Yorkshire’s excellent eateries (Best Assured), delicious dining we all deserve. If you’ve struggled with homeschooling during lockdown, spare a thought for shepherdess Amanda Owen and her very own class of nine, as she chats about the latest series of Our Yorkshire Farm, back each week on our TV screens every Tuesday. The Modfather Paul Weller releases a brand new album and will be rocking up in Yorkshire on tour in 2021, he talks being productive during the coronavirus crisis. They say a picture paints a thousand words, this is certainly true of creative cartoonist and this month’s cover star Graeme Bandeira’s amazing art, find out more about his poignant pandemic masterpieces. There’s a Yorkshire quiz and brilliant business advice too.

CONTENTS 6 BUSINESS AS UNUSUAL Inspirational ideas and dates for your diary. 10 AMANDA OWEN Family fun behind the scenes of TV’s Our Yorkshire Farm. 16 WHAT’S ON THE MENU Tempting tasty tips and mouth-watering recipes from chef Bobby Geetha. 18 CHANGING MAN Paul Weller talks new album, touring and being productive in a pandemic. 22 LET’S GET QUIZZICAL Test your Yorkshire knowledge. 24 BECOME A MEMBER Join Welcome to Yorkshire. 26

BUSINESS TIPS Getting up and running.

28 LIFE THROUGH THE LENS Award-winning photographer Joe Cornish in Yorkshire. 32 BEST ASSURED WTY World Cup of Yorkshire serves up the best of the county’s restaurants. 40 CARTOON KING Graeme Bandeira and his amazing artistic achievements.

Enjoy This is Y (and all things Yorkshire).

44 PLAN YOUR JOURNEY (when the time’s right)

C A R O LY N N I C O L L Editor, This is Y magazine

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ON THE COVER Graeme Bandeira has exclusively created this month’s This Is Y cover. Graeme is a Middlesbrough-born freelance illustrator and current resident artist at The Yorkshire Post in Leeds.

GET IN TOUCH Editor Carolyn Nicoll cnicoll@yorkshire.com

WANT TO KNOW MORE? If you want to find out more about something in our features click on this symbol.

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W E LCO M E TOYO R K S H I R E @ W E LCO M E 2 YO R K S # T H I S I SY W E LCO M E TOYO R K S H I R E

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YO R K S H I R E H I G H L I G H T S

BUSINESS AS

UNUSUAL With some businesses already open postCOVID-19, many about to reopen and others waiting for the green light after lockdown, the county’s creativity is showcased in truly inspiring ways, as to how places have adapted to the current coronavirus climate … and there’s lots to look forward to too. SOUL II SOUL Many musical acts and event venues across the country have had to rearrange concerts because of the coronavirus crisis. Soul II Soul are one of many bands who have shifted this year’s tour dates to next. With huge hits including ‘Keep On Movin’ (sold over a million copies in the US alone) and the UK number one single ‘Back To Life (However Do You Want Me)’, Soul II Soul progressed from being one of the leaders of the ’80s warehouse scene to pioneering British black music around the world. Securing commercial success for themselves and the huge amount of artists they have influenced, they’ve sold over 10 million albums worldwide and main man Jazzie B was awarded an OBE for services to music in 2008, as well as winning an Ivor Novello Award for Inspiration, as “the man who gave British black music a soul of its own”. The double Grammy award-winning and five-time Brit award-nominated Soul II Soul will be in Yorkshire at Hull Bonus Arena (2nd April) and York Barbican (3rd April).

TREE-MENDOUS EXHIBITION To mark 100 years of the Forestry Commission a new online exhibition has been launched - Forest 100: a year in the life, reflecting exactly that, a year in the life of North Yorkshire’s Dalby Forest and the forests that surround. Featuring images from Scarborough-based editorial photographer Tony Bartholomew, the pictures portray activities ranging from bird ringing and harvesting to rallying, alongside portraits of forest workers and scenic views.

M I N T C H O C O L AT E For the first time in its 1,100 year history, The Royal Mint has combined gold with chocolate to develop a new Bullion Chocolate Bar Gift Set. In partnership with Sheffield’s Bullion Chocolate, an award-winning bean-to-bar chocolate maker, each bar has been exquisitely crafted and is presented in a gold foiled luxury gift box, which means chocolate lovers can indulge in style. Each bar is ethically sourced direct from farmers and contains real edible gold leaf flecks for an indulgent treat.

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Clockwise from top: Soul II Soul. Forest 100 exhibition. Beautiful Barnsley. Sand In Your Eye.

H O O R AY F O R H O L LY W O O D Kiplin Hall and Gardens celebrated its reopening with a Hollywood inspired movie trailer, Indiana Jones style, to attract attention as the historic house opened to the public again from 4th July. In line with Government guidance, staff decided to explore new marketing methods to help promote the venue which relies on income from ticket sales. The heritage attraction since lockdown has restructured its ticket prices and its reopening is part of a phased plan, currently open for three days per week (Fri/Sat/Sun), which may increase in the coming months.

J U ST I M AG I N E In or out? Gin’s in! As York Gin opened its doors again on 4th July, you can now pop over and enjoy a tipple or two. BUT you can also experience such pleasures at home if you’re not yet venturing out. LoGIN to find out more online about the York Gin Discovery Box which includes five award-winning gins, each with a paired Fever-Tree mixer and dried garnish for a ‘perfect serve’ - and a YouTube tasting session with gin experts. The kit provides a night’s entertainment and education for gin lovers who want to expand their knowledge – and drink a range of different gins includGIN London Dry, Roman Fruit (a full-strength dry gin with no added sugar), Outlaw (Navy Strength), Old Tom and Grey Lady. And includes free next day UK delivery.

BEAUTIFUL BARNSLEY Make a date in your diary to see the winning images of the ‘Beautiful Barnsley’ photography competition, hosted by Cannon Hall Museum, Park and Gardens in partnership with the International Garden Photographer of the Year (IGPOTY) organisation. First Place winner is Kyle Parr with his photograph Evening Fields. A stunning image taken in the early evening, overlooking farmland in the village of Dodworth near the Trans Pennine Trail. All seventeen winning entries are planned to be on display at the stunning Cannon Hall Museum from 25th September to 28 February 2021, showcasing the beauty and spectacular landscapes of the borough. Plus the prestigious International Garden Photographer of the Year exhibition will also be displayed from Friday 28 August until Thursday 22 October in the Hall’s impressive outside spaces.

S A N D - S AT I O N A L From a sprinkle of sand to a touch of ice, Hebden Bridge based Sand In Your Eye create inspirational and fun artwork, from working with multi-award-winning director Danny Boyle to creating massive pieces of land art and sculpture making a huge impact. As a result of the COVID-19 situation, Sand In Your Eye have risk assessed and adapted all events and art pieces to ensure confidence in running and operating safely, creating a short video to visually explain new working practices in line with Government guidelines of social distancing and hygiene.

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THRILLING NEWS

The magical mayhem has started on the Studfold Adventure Trail, with visits from new rainbow fairies. This exciting fairy and pixie adventure has introduced a very special rainbow fairy castle, with lots of fairy houses magically appearing in the woods as all the fairies from far and wide come to play. There’s also a sprinkling of special summertime rainbow magic turning the woods into a glorious multicolour world of enchantment. From rainbow towers to the fairy waterfall, children can see if they can spot the bright yellow primrose fairy, the beautiful blue kingfisher pixie or the shy violet heather fairy! Kids can dress up in their favourite costume and have fun in the woods. Due to COVID-19 restrictions booking is now essential.

The Da Vinci Code, Dan Brown’s blockbuster best-selling novel that captivated the world with over 100 million copies sold, is to become an epic stage thriller, making its World Premiere in 2021 with a UK tour, taking in Yorkshire venues. Dan Brown said: “I am thrilled that The Da Vinci Code is being adapted for the stage, and excited to see the unique potential of live theatre enhance this story. The team making the production has been faithful to the book, but will also bring something new for the audience, in what is certain to be a gripping, fast-paced stage thriller and a thoroughly entertaining show.” The Da Vinci Code is produced by Simon Friend (The Girl On The Train, Life Of Pi) and can be seen next year at Hull New Theatre (12 – 17 April), Leeds Grand Theatre (14 – 19 June), Sheffield Lyceum Theatre (12 – 17 July).

PICTURE THIS Multi Story Picture House in Leeds is the first and only independent drive-up cinema, a socially distanced outdoor experience based at Bowcliffe Hall in Bramham, offering the ultimate outdoor cinema experience, whilst fully maintaining social distancing rules and government guidelines. Tickets will be scanned through closed car windows, and food and drink can be pre-ordered through an app. From 17-19 July catch Back to the Future, Moulin Rouge, Moana, The Goonies Hidden Figures, Shaun of the Dead, Chicken Run, Black Panther and Mamma Mia.

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A- M A Z E - I N The Great Yorkshire Maze opens on 22nd July to 6th September and is a brand-new attraction for all the family nestled in beautiful countryside at the foot of the Yorkshire Wolds, between Malton and Scarborough. A field full of fun with nine acres of maize plants and never-ending paths to explore, and for younger adventurers there’s a two-acre Scarecrow Mini-Maze. Visit the vintage funfair with a 1930s speedway, dodgems, a chair-o-plane, hush hush train ride, swing boats and lots, lots more. Have fun in the field.

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Clockwise from left: Studfold Adventure Trail. The Da Vinci Code. The Great Yorkshire Maze. Hull New Theatre.

(RE)OPEN AIR Open again post-COVID-19, the South Yorkshire Aircraft Museum showcases an impressive collection of aeroplanes and helicopters from the first years of flight to the modern day. See biplanes flown at the 1909 Doncaster Airshow (the first air show held in the UK) and military fast jets like the Harrier and Meteor. Based on the former RAF Doncaster site, this collection includes interactive exhibits and the site is fully accessible for wheelchairs and pushchairs.

VIRTUAL REALITY Now is the time to get planning for that perfect Yorkshire day out or overnight stay. Step inside amazing attractions and look around lovely locations on a virtual tour, visually bringing visitor destinations to life for all to view. From brilliant B&Bs to luxury hotels, crags to caverns, tipis to tigers, cooking to climbing, museums to meerkats, wildlife to weddings (perhaps combine the two), plus there’s so much more to check out right across the county. Follow in the footsteps of Kylie and Springsteen at First Direct Arena Leeds, check out the fabulous facilities at the Yorkshire Wolds Cookery School, step inside Cannon Hall Museum, take a walk on the wild side at the Yorkshire Wildlife Park, book a break at Saltmarshe Hall or plan a party under canvas with Serentipi. Some places are already up and running postpandemic, whilst others can be added to those must see wish lists. Apollo 3D, a member business of Welcome to Yorkshire, create premium 3D Virtual Tours which are ideal for showing off and promoting all types of properties, businesses and attractions, as well as being a great opportunity for prospective visitors and clients to find out more about what to expect and what’s on offer. Welcome to Yorkshire have a selection of Apollo 3D virtual tours to view.

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A M A N DA OW E N 2,000 acres, over 1,000 breeding ewes, 50 cattle, nine children (yes, nine), numerous dogs, hens...oh, and one husband. Carolyn Nicoll caught up with the super stylish shepherdess Amanda Owen (even in wellies, how does she do it?), to find out more about her flock and family, filming the latest series of Our Yorkshire Farm and life in lockdown. Growing up in Huddersfield, I had a typical suburban childhood, but I was always interested in the countryside. When friends were heading into town I’d go the other way and get on my bike for a cycle out to the open landscape above Holmfirth, then on to Saddleworth Moor and Castle Hill with its ancient monument. That’s the beauty of so many towns and cities in Yorkshire, they’re surrounded by stunning fields, moorland and woods, with amazing views to enjoy. When I left school I knew I wanted to become a shepherdess but it wasn’t the sort of thing offered for study at college. So off I went to work on local farms to get some hands-on experience, milking cows, driving tractors picking up as much practical knowledge as I could. I knew I didn’t want to be a general farm worker but it was all stuff to put on my CV, as well as picking up shifts in a newsagents, a fancy pottery shop in a Huddersfield arcade and working in a factory at night, to earn some money. All done to get me heading in the right career direction to be a hill shepherd. I was a free spirit trying to get to where I wanted to be. There’s certainly no hard and fast way to becoming a shepherdess. I had to learn on the job. Luckily I got my big break when I replied to an ad for a shepherd vacancy. It was down in Wiltshire, so off I headed with a Border collie and a lot of enthusiasm for the opportunity ahead. A stint at a farm in Cumbria followed and is how I met Clive (Amanda’s husband and father to their nine children).

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It wasn’t the most romantic of starts, I went to borrow a tup (male sheep). I’d travelled from the place I was working at over in the Lake District, to Ravenseat, Clive’s Yorkshire farm (now my home), all very businesslike. That was back in 1995 when I was 21, we were just friends to start with, but things developed, as they do, and we got married in 2000. Ravenseat in Swaledale became my home and it’s a very different part of Yorkshire to where I started off in life. But in a way I think that’s put me in good stead, because I wasn’t born and bred in the countryside, I think I appreciate it even more. It’s such a different way of life. And what’s not to love about it! It sounds cheesy, I know, and I’ve said this a million times but imagine the one thing I grew up absolutely loving and being obsessed with... James Herriot books. I adored them, I read every single one and watched All Creatures Great and Small, the TV series based on the books about the life of a Yorkshire vet. And what great news that they’re making a new series this year. For me it was all so magical, the fantastic tales that were all true stories about real experiences in the Yorkshire Dales with the stunning dales as a backdrop. My now home of Swaledale was used as the setting for so many of those farms, in a time that has almost stood still and continues to, to some degree. I say that in a positive way, as the farming techniques have almost come back into fashion, with its hay meadows, heritage roots and a more traditional way of farming. Forget

intensive farming, fertiliser and flattening everything, this is nature and farming at its best. So even though the original All Creatures Great and Small was filmed back in the ‘80s, you can watch it now and see it hasn’t changed. It’s got magnificent moorland, big skies, it’s extreme and it’s exhilarating and that’s where I live. Amazing! I desperately wanted to go on a school trip with the fantastic Yorkshire artist Ashley Jackson when I was at school to paint the moors with him. I’ve always been drawn to the hills and the open land and I distinctly remember the kids in my class who excelled at art would regularly get chosen to accompany this amazing artist with his swishy hair, as a treat, to create fantastic countryside scenes. I was never top of the class, so didn’t get picked once, but boy did I want to go. The good thing is I now get to live in a place that could be an Ashley Jackson painting, amid rolling dales farms, drystone walls, beautiful recognisable Yorkshire countryside. I’ve never told him that story. I’d hate for him to think I was some sort of mad stalker. (laughs) The brand new series of Our Yorkshire Farm is just more of the same (laughs)...what’s going to change?! We’re still battling with the elements and all sorts of weather. It’s very simple really in its format and I think the normality of it all is what viewers like. It isn’t rushed or polished, the fact that we don’t always win and things don’t always go right seems to really appeal to people, because that’s real life isn’t it. You watch some popular programmes about life in the country and it’s all very

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I WA S A F R E E S P I R I T T R Y I N G T O G E T T O W H E R E I WA N T E D T O B E . T H E R E ’ S C E R TA I N LY N O H A R D A N D FA S T WAY T O BECOMING A SHEPHERDESS. I H A D TO L E A R N O N T H E J O B .

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INTERVIEW

nice, but ours is more gritty. You get the mud, you get the floods, you get to see everything. If you’re invited into our home you’re not going to get perfection, you’re not going to get a page out of Country Living magazine, you’re going to get odd wellies and felt-tip on the walls. For a lot of people it’s a trip down memory lane, a bit of nostalgia. Homeliness, it’s basically normal TV that may teach people something, and I don’t mean that in a highfalutin kind of way, more of a what you see out of the window makes us all understand what’s going on … with the sheep at tupping time and fields that are ready for that push to make the hay.

Left: Amanda and her family make the most of the beautiful location of her farm in Ravenseat during filming for the new series of Our Yorkshire Farm.

Lockdown started towards the end of filming the six episodes of the new series of Our Yorkshire Farm and filming at that point proved to be quite difficult. We couldn’t have a crew so had to self-shoot everything. There were all sorts of different cameras and sound equipment to learn how to use. It was a great opportunity though, positioning cameras high up to get shots of birds in their nests. The production company have since put it all together in the edit and I’m really proud of what we all managed to achieve, giving viewers a real insight into what was going on at Ravenseat and the upside of lockdown. I feel quite humbled by how much the past TV series have touched viewers. People saying I feel like I know you. They don’t but they feel like they do, which is good. We’ve got nine children, all that open space, a huge amount to do throughout the year...and so there’s always going to be some chaos and nothing can ever be choreographed. The crew just film whatever happens, believe me, we never know what that might be, best-laid plans and all that (laughs). Things live, things die, so it’s not all dreamy, skipping through flower-filled meadows and everything comes out alright. I don’t want to sound depressing but it’s all about actual reality on the farm and real experiences, good and bad. The coronavirus crisis has impacted so many in different ways. When it all started it was almost like a ‘novelty experience’ kicking off and no one was sure how it would affect them personally. It was the beginning of lambing for us and what we have to fully concentrate on, being at the back end of a sheep for over a month. We’re really busy and not always fully aware of what’s going on elsewhere. But after lambing time the enormity of it hit home and the news was just horrible. For us, the end of lambing is when the weather starts to pick up and we see tourists and welcome visitors, but not this year. I mean we are

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remote, cut off and isolated at the best of times, but there was such a strange feeling in the air, you just knew that things weren’t right. The kids were at home because it was Easter, but now they’ve all been at home for such a long period of time. Thankfully they’re all happy to muck in and help out on the farm. Lockdown logistics of trying to feed 11 mouths has been a tricky one. Supermarkets were limiting the amount of food that could be bought which was a real problem. People would think I was bulk buying and hoarding things. You could only buy two milks and I was going shopping once a week, for not only my family, but also for neighbours who were shielding. Luckily we’re in a farm situation so can rely on self-sufficiency to a certain extent but it’s been a giant learning curve. We’ve had eggs from the chickens, we’ve made bread, used the dairy, picked rhubarb, looked at what we’ve got on the farm and tried to make the most of the situation. There are jobs that the children have that I don’t even think about. Morning and night, Edith sorts out the pet lambs, Violet is on with the calves and she knows what she has to do, Miles is sorting out the chickens, Sidney’s on with the dogs. It wouldn’t work if everybody didn’t chip in and pull their weight.

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The benefits have been taking the time to slow down and to really take note of nature and what’s going on under our noses. Usually there’s not enough time with so much rushing about, trying to get to here, got to do this and get back for that! We’ve watched curlew eggs hatch and I’ve been able to ride my horse anywhere I want to because there’s been no traffic. Wonderful! Of course, we know we’re fortunate to have a big space and yes, I’ve got nine children which probably sounds like a nightmare in lockdown, but we’re not stuck inside without a garden, the weather has been great most of the time, so I’ve opened the door and off they’d go. I’d often only see them when they were injured or hungry. A typical day? There isn’t one. It’s always very much about the weather, from sheep shearing to making hay to clipping hogs (young sheep), at the moment I’ve got another 800 to do, which will keep me out of mischief for a bit. It’s like a keep-fit regime and it can actually be quite back-breaking. There’s always something happening on a farm and if you’re not working, then you’re ignoring something. There are gaps in the walls to rebuild, cattle need moving, it’s a constant ongoing thing. There’s never a quiet time and the washing machine is ALWAYS going.

Lots of projects away from the farm have had to be put on hold and are all stacking up. Usually throughout the summer months I’m out and about talking at events about what happens on the farm, what it’s like to be a shepherdess, the sheep, the countryside, nature and the environment. There’s a real appetite for it. I spend months travelling here there and everywhere, including going to literary festivals, not somewhere I’d usually hang out. Can you imagine? Me, a lass from Huddersfield who got an E in my GCSE English. I wouldn’t be going to a literary festival. However, the point is, it’s about what inspires you, what inspires me … which was always to be a shepherdess and in a roundabout way I’ve managed to do what I set out to achieve. Hopefully inspiring other people to follow their dreams too. It’s a year of two halves at Ravenseat. Usually throughout the cooler, wintry months I’m out with the sheep and it’s quite an isolating experience. Then there are six months, when the weather picks up and I’m meeting and chatting with people who visit the farm and those I see at events. That’s what I’m really looking forward to when things start to get back to normal, the contact with lots of different people again.

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I’M A BIT OF AN O P P O R T U N I S T, I F SOMETHING COMES A LO N G I ’ L L G I V E I T A G O. Homeschooling has been interesting... in more ways than one. I can’t say the children have logged on to their homework as often as they perhaps should have done, but do you know what, they’ve learnt so much in many other ways. I spoke to the school staff last week about what the kids have done and what they haven’t done. They are good teachers who appreciate just what the children have learnt and experienced over the last few weeks, from finding out all sorts of things about the world outside, where food comes from, and lots of PE has been happening, including running, horse riding and swimming. We’ve been fascinated by the night skies with no aeroplanes flying over and have witnessed shooting stars and spotted constellations. The children have really benefitted in so many ways. Although I’m not saying they’ve got any better at their German or reached grade 6 in piano, but they have learnt a lot. It’s such a hard time for so many parents with home tutoring, that I think if you come out of lockdown sane, then you’ve done your job well. When it comes to filming Our Yorkshire Farm, I let the kids go with the flow. If they want to be part of it on the day, they film, if they don’t, then that’s fine too. You can’t force a child to perform, they’ve got to want to do it. The children often go off with the crew and it’s not until I watch the series on TV that I see what they’ve been up to. Some people say ‘I can’t believe your child picked up a wild rabbit’ and I think, I didn’t know they’d picked up a wild rabbit. It’s been a great opportunity for some of them to be part of other exciting projects too. Raven (eldest) has modelled for the designer

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fashion brand Burberry and Edith has been involved with Newsround. The whole TV experience has been completely accidental and something I’ve never chased. It’s certainly made me busier. I can’t sing, I can’t dance and I guess I’ve always been a bit of a slacker, but the whole experience is so enjoyable, if not a little hectic. I’m a bit of an opportunist, if something comes along I’ll give it a go. It started with regional TV and a report from broadcaster Luke Casey, then Adrian Edmondson visited Ravenseat Farm as part of ITV’s The Dales programme. I was then asked to write a book, that led to writing three bestselling books and I’m currently on with the fourth, although I’ve only written one chapter so far. The publisher thought lockdown would be a great time for me to crack on with it, but it’s not that easy to concentrate with nine kids at home and a zillion sheep! I’m the worst person to ask about a perfect Yorkshire day out, as I don’t really do days out. But I do love eating fish and chips by the beach, looking out to sea in Whitby. York is a beautiful city too with its magnificent minster. Raven is at university there, we lowered the tone last week when I dropped her off, we had a moped on the back of the truck with a giant stuffed toy strapped to it. There is one place on my wish list I’d like to visit though, which I can’t believe I’ve not been to yet … and that’s The World of James Herriot museum in Thirsk … back to James Herriot again!

Our Yorkshire Farm: Tuesdays 9pm on Channel 5.

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W H AT ’ S O N T H E M E N U ?

BOBBY GEETHA

Simple recipe Jerusalem artichoke chaat Prep 20 min Cook 20 min Serves 4-6 200g Jerusalem artichoke skin on and washed 10g lemon juice Oil to fry 2g chilli powder 2g chaat masala 10g sev 10g mint chutney

Leeds-based, Indian Chef Consultant Bobby Geetha, has launched a new self-published Indian cookbook during lockdown - Fine Dining Indian: Easy To Cook Restaurant Recipes At Home.

10g Tamarind chutney 20g fresh pomegranate seeds 50g thick yoghurt 10g onion finely chopped 3g coriander finely chopped 3g green chilli finely chopped

The MasterChef UK semi-finalist was the series’ top-rated chef contestant of BBC MasterChef The Professionals in season 8. Bobby recently moved to Yorkshire after completing a project in Dubai and is a corporate chef for a 21 outlet Indian Restaurant chain which has three restaurants in the UK. Chef Bobby Geetha cooked up the idea for the book during his 3 months at home, producing recipes and dishes for his YouTube channel. “I have to set an example for all chefs out there, each one of us are an artist in our own right. Don’t wait until someone offers a hand, just do amazing things with what is within your reach,” Bobby enthuses. This cookbook concept is to make fine cooking accessible to all households, as well as to Indian restaurants too. Fine Dining Indian is a vision in achieving positive eating and cooking habits from Indian kitchens, encouraging choosing the right fine ingredients and practicing excellent cooking techniques to produce the tastiest recipes. Some of the delicious dishes featured include Achari Octopus, Wildboar Sausage Vadapav, Tapioca Poppadom, Lamb Sweetbread Shami Kebab, Duck Egg Naan Roll and many more. “The Book brings out the importance of ‘we are what we eat’ and food can strongly affect our emotions,” says Bobby.

2g micro coriander cress

Slice Jerusalem artichoke into thin slices using a mandolin, keep in water mixed with lemon juice. Heat oil to fry and maintain temperature at 170°C. Drain and fry artichoke till it’s crispy. Drain to paper towel. Toss with chilli powder and salt, keep aside. Beat yoghurt add pinch of sugar if it’s sour. In a bowl toss Jerusalem artichoke, (keep a few pieces separate for garnish) with chopped onion, green chilli, coriander and chaat masala. Place the tossed mixture in two serving bowls, cover with yoghurt, line on top with mint and tamarind chutney, sprinkle pomegranate seeds. Place artichoke chips and sev crisp on top. Garnish with coriander cress, sprinkle chaat masala. Fine Dining Indian: Easy To Cook Restaurant Recipes At Home by Bobby Geetha is self-published, £19.00, available on amazon.co.uk Follow Bobby: Instagram - chefbobbygeetha Youtube - Bobbygeetha

H OT S P OTS I Yorkshire is home to some world-class restaurants serving amazing Asian cuisine. Check out some of the county’s culinary hotspots.

PRASHAD This vegetarian restaurant in Drighlington, West Yorkshire have a mantra of ‘cooking with love’.

ALL SIAM THAI Menus offering freshly prepared authentic Thai food full of choice and flavour, creating the true taste of Thailand in Sheffield.

B A R & R E S TA U R A N T EIGHTYEIGHT East meets West at gorgeous Grantley Hall’s Bar & Restaurant EightyEight. Serving a unique fusion of Yorkshire produce and far Eastern flavours.

S U K H OT H A I With restaurants in Leeds and Harrogate Sukhothai serves delicious authentic Thai food and provides five-star service, in super stylish surroundings.

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CHANGING MAN Often referred to as music’s The Modfather, Paul Weller’s colossal creative career is now entering its sixth decade, with a jam-packed schedule ahead, as his 15th solo album is just released, plus a tour set to hit the county in 2021. Dates performing at Hull Bonus Arena, York Barbican and Bradford St. George’s Hall, originally scheduled for November, have had to be rearranged for next year because of the coronavirus crisis. That’s Entertainment! WORDS: NEILL BARSTON

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idely regarded as one of the UK’s most successful songwriters, Paul Weller explains that in spite of all else happening out there in the world, which has created many uncertainties, he feels fortunate and content. Having turned 62 in May, it seems he is very much at ease with himself these days, some distance from the widely perceived image of the ‘angry young man’ of his early career fronting The Jam. “I don’t really celebrate birthdays, but my daughter shares mine, so it’s very much about her,” he gestures breezily, explaining that if anything, he’s enjoying songwriting more than ever, and is in a rich vein of creativity. The ‘Modfather’ belongs in that most rare of categories in being an artist who has successfully reinvented himself over the course of more than 40 years. He’s managed to walk the line between classic rock, punk and new wave, through to 60s soul that inspired the Style Council, and later balladry that has equally attracted critical acclaim and resonated with long-term fans. His last recording two years ago, True Meanings, narrowly missed becoming Weller’s fifth number one solo album, but having consciously built it around the lilting lullaby of Gravity, he says that it placed him in a strong position considering his latest recordings. While the unwelcome arrival of the coronavirus pandemic may have scratched out his latest round of UK gigs, he has instead been squirrelling himself away in his beloved Surrey studio, Black Barn, to lay down new material. “I’ve actually been very focused being at home, doing a lot of writing, as well as some more recording in the studio. To be honest, these days when I am not working, I am actually home quite a lot with my wife and kids as we’ve been homeschooling. I haven’t really been bothered by the lockdown, other than having to queue for food or medicine,” he offers of the present situation that has placed the music industry, as much as the wider economy, largely on pause.

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I WA N T E D T O D O A N A L B U M T H AT WA S S O U L F U L A N D ALSO HAD AN ELECTRONIC E D G E T O I T.

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Beyond music, family is clearly a major priority, and he seems pleased at least two of his eight children, including daughter Leah, have shown real musical ability. He quips that ‘they sometimes patronise me’, in a fashion only children can achieve with their parents. For his own part, he’s recently completed final production work on his latest album, On Sunset, which notably stands as his 15th solo recording. Lead single Earth Beat offers a lush slice of soul pop, which is swiftly followed by Village, which neatly sums up its optimistic spirit that seems refreshingly relaxed amid these complex, challenging times. It’s a consistent theme across a record that places centre stage some of the soul motifs belying his earliest musical influences. There are also touches of electronica and orchestral arrangements that reveal he’s keen to experiment musically when the mood takes him. “I wouldn’t say making music has got any harder. I think I’m actually enjoying the process and the writing a lot more now than I ever did before in terms of recording. I have a great respect and appreciation for it and seeing how the finished songs are,” says Weller, who co-produced the new album with long-term collaborator Jan ‘Stan’ Kybert, whose long list of credits include working with the likes of Oasis, The Verve and Massive Attack. “I wanted to do an album that was soulful and also had an electronic edge to it. Most of the songs on it are quite uplifting, and to me it’s a sunshine record. With Village, like a lot of my songs, there’s a lot of me in there, so there’s a key idea, but then you make it broader to be about other people, you extemporise. So am I contented? Yes, I am – I’m fortunate and couldn’t wish for anything,” he acknowledges. His previous recordings have been noted for a careful sprinkling of notable guests down the years, and his latest follows in this pattern. There are appearances from his old friend Mick Talbot from Style Council days, Slade’s Jim Lea playing violin on the very 60s-influenced Equanimity, and several backing vocal tracks from indie outfit The Staves. As for the album’s title track, he says On Sunset was inspired by catching up with his eldest son in Los Angeles, which holds particularly strong memories for him as a teenager on his first tour of America. “I was out near the Whisky a Go Go Club in LA and hadn’t really walked that area of the city since I was 19. A huge amount of time has elapsed since then, so it’s a reflective song about that.” He says of the album’s core theme that offers a nostalgic glance over his shoulder. “It also

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INTERVIEW

became something else about being in a place in time looking for old friends and lovers and how everyone has moved on.” Connecting with pieces of the past clearly informed his choice of record label, Polydor, for which he had gained an initial flush of success alongside Bruce Foxton and Rick Buckler as fresh faces recording with The Jam. “We approached Polydor as we really liked what they have been doing lately and they have some great acts. It’s a very different world there now though. It was a little weird this time as everyone was at least 20 years younger than me, whereas when I was there before, it was the other way around and it felt that there were a lot of old men running around telling me what to do!” Discussing yesteryear brings us on to the subject of another key anniversary in 2020. It’s now been 25 years since Weller released Stanley Road, perhaps his most autobiographical recording to date, in being named after the street he grew up in Woking, Surrey. The seminal album contains some of his most cherished solo material including tracks such as The Changingman, Broken Stones and You Do Something To Me. “I can’t believe it’s 25 years old, but I still think it’s a great record that stands up now. It showed the progress made since that first solo album. It was just a really creative time for me and I’ve some really fond memories of that period.” As well as his strong attention to sartorial detail as befitting anyone from the mod revival scene, Weller has been noted for his passion for seeking out new music and offering assistance to like-minded acts.

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He’s still passionate about touring, and says his regular touring band, including Ocean Colour Scene’s Steve Cradock, are ‘chomping at the bit’ to get back out on the road. As he notes, the present musical landscape is a very different one from his youth, but what has changed the most? “Where do I start. Well, streaming for one, that has changed everything. Someone told me the other day that a band had a number one with 7,000 sales. But streaming is where it’s at, it’s not something that you can ignore. I could have a mini moan about things like that, but I don’t want to sound like a grumpy old git. I think the main reason I haven’t liked it is that people are not getting paid out of it, particularly up-and-coming bands, meaning it’s getting hard for them to make a living now,” Weller explains. “I’ve never believed that music should just be free as some people do. So it’s good to see that vinyl is still out there even if it’s not in great numbers, and I’m going to be releasing my album on cassette as well,” he adds, then signals it’s time to get back to business in the recording studio, highlighting that he’s lost none of the drive to keep pushing himself after many memorable decades in the industry.

Left: St George’s Hall in Bradford. Above: Cover artwork for Weller’s latest releases. Below: York Barbican. The Bonus Arena in Hull.

Paul Weller’s new album On Sunset – release date: 3rd July on Polydor Records. Yorkshire 2021 dates scheduled for: 28 June – Bonus Arena, Hull 29 June – York Barbican 13 July – St George’s Hall, Bradford

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YO R K S H I R E Q U I Z

LET’S GET QUIZZICAL Testing times...so time to test your Yorkshire knowledge with another 20 in 2020. Find out how much you know about the county famous for Fat Rascals, fish and chips on Filey front and follies at Fountains Abbey...

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1 Sheffield is home to Yorkshire’s largest shopping centre, opened in 1990. What is it called? 2 TV presenter Anita Rani has been sharing her favourite food recipes online during lockdown. In which Yorkshire city was she born and raised? 3 Formed in 2010, pop band One Direction had two Yorkshire members. Who are they? 4 Looking forward to July 2021 when the Great Yorkshire Show will once again open its gates to thousands of visitors and animals. In which year was it first held? 5 The UK’s first funicular railway was completed in 1875 and links the South

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Cliff Esplanade to the Spa in which Yorkshire coastal resort? 6 Standing at 36m tall, ROKTFACE is the UK’s tallest outdoor man-made climbing wall. Located in which Yorkshire town? 7 How many racecourses are there in Yorkshire? (Extra points if you can name them all) 8 Which black gemstone was a favourite of Queen Victoria and is linked to a Yorkshire seaside town? 9 This year is the 75th anniversary of Evelyn Waugh’s novel Brideshead Revisited. At which stunning stately home in Yorkshire was the TV series filmed?

10 Everybody’s Talking About Jamie is a hit West End musical. In which Yorkshire city is the story set?

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11 In 1978 Kate Bush topped the charts with her debut single, inspired by a famous Yorkshire tale. What is the name of the book and its author? 12 The Majestic Hotel in Harrogate opened 120 years ago. It’s home to some impressive venetian creations valued at £60,000. each. What are these majestic marvels? 13 Addicted to Love and Simply Irresistible are two of many hits for the late Robert Palmer. In which Yorkshire market town was the singer born?

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MEADOWHALL • BRADFORD • ZAYN MALIK AND LOUIS TOMLINSON 1838 • SCARBOROUGH • BRIGHOUSE • 9 (BEVERLEY, CATTERICK, DONCASTER, PONTEFRACT, REDCAR, RIPON, THIRSK, WETHERBY AND YORK) • WHITBY JET • CASTLE HOWARD • SHEFFIELD EMILY BRONTË – WUTHERING HEIGHTS • CHANDELIERS • BATLEY FILEY • BERYL BURTON • WHITE • SHAMBLES • GULLIVER DAME HELEN MIRREN • PATELEY BRIDGE

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14 In 2018 The Sunday Times revealed the winning result, following votes for the Beach of the Year. Which Yorkshire resort came out on top? 15 Born in 1937, this Leeds lass went on to be an English racing cyclist who won more than 90 domestic championships and seven world titles. What is her name? 16 What colour is the ’Yorkshire Rose’?

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17 Mentioned in the Domesday Book back in 1086, this famous York location is often regarded as the oldest shopping street in Europe. What is it called?

18 A novel name for one of Jonathan Swift’s characters, shared with Yorkshire’s newest theme park. What is that name? 19 A multi-awardwinning film actress tweeted about enjoying curry in Bradford and loving the pantomime at the city’s Alhambra Theatre earlier this year. Who is she? (Well, there is nothing like a pantomime dame) 20 Established in 1827 and in 2014 officially recognised by Guinness World Records as the oldest sweet shop in the world. In which Yorkshire market town can it be found? Answers at the top of this page (no cheating!)

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W E LCO M E TO YO R K S H I R E

BECOME A MEMBER. THREE MONTHS FREE

G O O D F O R YO U A N D YO U R B U S I N E S S . G O O D F O R YO R K S H I R E . W H AT ’ S I N I T F O R YO U ? Welcome to Yorkshire membership provides businesses with a chance to showcase to the world what they have to offer. Alongside promotion on our award-winning website yorkshire.com. Members can tap into a wide variety of resources including access to free social and training events, PR support, potential editorial coverage, money-saving offers, the opportunity to be nominated at the White Rose Awards (the UK’s largest

tourism awards ceremony) and be part of Welcome to Yorkshire’s annual Y conference (the biggest onstage tourism show in the UK), plus so much more. Tourism in Yorkshire is worth £9billion to the Yorkshire economy and can be as strong again, after the coronavirus situation, if we continue to bring together businesses from all four corners of the county, to continue to achieve even more and be seen on the world stage as a top tourist destination, showcasing the county globally. During such unprecedented times it’s important for Yorkshire businesses to work together, share tourism and business advice, as well as supporting and promoting the county’s businesses and attractions. The aim is to be as strong as ever, to continue offering fantastic staycations and to attract international visitors once again (when it’s safe to do so).

0113 322 3500 Discuss your options

Welcome to Yorkshire has a social reach of almost 20 million and together we are stronger #YorkshireTogether

B E A PA R T O F I T Welcome to Yorkshire are currently offering three months free membership, to current and new members. There’s also a new affiliate membership option too.

Sign up at yorkshire.com/membership

W H AT D O O U R M E M B E R S S AY ? Becky Whitaker Owner, People Buy People As a member I have worked with the team at Welcome To Yorkshire for many years, both as a venue and a supplier. They have always been extremely professional, friendly & helpful. I like the the opportunity to get involved with different events as a delegate & as an exhibitor and have always made valuable connections, gathered leads & generated business. I think the key to this good relationship with WTY is to communicate regularly. I see the hard work the team have all put in throughout difficult times and how it has paid off with the massive success of the likes of the Tour de Yorkshire. Becky Leach Marketing & Communications Manager, The Deep Welcome to Yorkshire have been a great support to The Deep for many years across our business, including social media, web, print, PR and events. Working closely with the them has helped to increase awareness of our product across the region and has resulted in a big increase in web traffic to our site. The team are always on hand for advice or assistance and go the extra mile to help.

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BUSINESS TIPS

GETTING UP AND RUNNING As lockdown restrictions loosen, Welcome to Yorkshire’s Emma Sanderson shares examples of best practice from Yorkshire tourism industry businesses, on how they are preparing to reopen, recover and rebuild. If you’re also making plans to get up and running again, use #YorkshireTogether when adding news to social media so others can keep up to date with what’s happening in the county.

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Fundraising

If you can’t open just yet, can you start a fundraising campaign to help your finances through this downtime? Both The Deep and Helmsley Walled Garden set up donation pages on their websites. Use the opportunity to tell people what different amounts of money can cover or consider offering them something in return.

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Number crunch

Manage potential influxes of visitors by asking people to book a timeslot prior to arrival. Bolton Abbey have an online ticketing system to ensure visitors can enjoy their visit knowing that numbers will be restricted.

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Welcome supporters

If you have a membership scheme, you could invite members first as Castle Howard did, or offer a priority slot for them to visit. Not just a great opportunity to welcome those who support your business, it can also give you a chance to ask for feedback on the measures you’ve put in place. If you don’t have a membership scheme, why not invite your newsletter database initially?

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Something new

It’s not always necessary to spend money to offer something new. The Coniston Hotel are promoting new walks and picnic areas around their grounds, giving guests something different to experience using features that already existed.

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Phased opening

If lockdown restrictions mean that you can’t open your doors fully can you partially reopen? The National Trust have opened many gardens, whilst keeping their houses closed.

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Communicate

Ensure you communicate with your customers regularly, keeping them up to date with changes to your business and with details of how you’re able to keep them safe during their visit. Whilst social media is an ideal way to get a message across, consider using a newsletter or even write a blog, just as The Private Hill has done.

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Good to go?

Visitors will be looking to see that you have PPE and thorough hygiene practices in place to keep them, your staff or yourselves safe. Introduce screens and masks, and have sanitiser placed throughout for everyone to use.

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Consultation

When putting plans in place, why not consult your customers and ask what they want to see you doing to feel reassured? Go Ape have a short survey on their homepage asking for ideas and thoughts on their plans to reopen.

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Staying apart

Label the floor to mark twometre distancing, as Leeds Cookery School will be doing, and help your customers stay safe by staying apart.

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Contactless stays

Many accommodation providers are opting for contactless stays, limiting the interaction required by guests and staff. Increased options for in room and alfresco dining, along with private hot tubs, are some features at Middleton Lodge.

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Alternative dates

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Appointment only

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Reassure customers

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Local measures

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Webinars

Introduce appointment only visits for customers, just as car dealer JCT600 have done. Not only does this one on one service keep your offering exclusive, it makes social distancing and other measures simpler to monitor.

To reassure customers and give them the confidence to return and be clear about the facilities that are available. Ripley Castle have details of areas that will be accessible for visitors including toilets, car parking and cafes.

Be aware of your local area and measures introduced to help with social distancing measures. Leeds City Council are widening pavements and increasing cleaning throughout the centre. Over the coming weeks and months Welcome to Yorkshire will be running a series of webinars on a variety of topics to keep Yorkshire connected and up to date on all the key movements within the tourism sector. Keep checking https://industry. yorkshire.com/resources/webinars for future webinar information and we will of course share details beforehand through our industry social media channels on Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn Join in the conversation on social media using #YorkshireTogether or email us at info@yorkshire.com.

When responding to cancellation requests, offer alternative dates, just as Meadow Falls have done.

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LIFE THROUGH

T HE L E N S

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ARTISTIC

R   In an age of selfies and instant phone images, it seems that everyone wants to get behind and in front of the lens. Not necessarily a negative thing... but when it comes to the art of proper photography, there’s an expertise required in capturing that perfect pic. Julie Henry stayed focussed and zoomed in to find out more.

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enowned photographer Joe Cornish has captured the natural beauty of some of the most spectacular landscapes in the world but there is one place that holds an enduring fascination. Roseberry Topping, in North Yorkshire, has been dubbed the “miniMatterhorn” because of its distinctive halfcone shape and jagged cliff edge. Cornish has been photographing the landmark for 25 years; in all seasons, all weathers and from all angles. It even played a small part in the decision to move with his young family to Great Ayton, the village right underneath it. “We were in the North York Moors and in the distance was this funny little conical hill called Roseberry Topping. You could see it from almost everywhere although it wasn’t the highest prominence in the area,” he said. “It has magnetism to it. I felt that it would give me a kind of inspiration to get out with my camera and that is exactly how it’s proved.”

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T H E YO R K S H I R E D A L E S A N D N O R T H YO R K M O O R S ARE JEWELS IN THE L A N DS C A P E C R OW N .

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ARTISTIC

In many ways, it is not the hill itself but the context, the surrounding Yorkshire landscape that are the focus. Cornish uses his camera to capture the lie of the land, the habitat, its trees and plants, with Roseberry providing “a wonderful punctuation mark”. The beautiful images have proved popular, particularly with local residents. However, as Cornish points out, popularity isn’t the point. Throughout a career which has involved more than 30 travel books, high-profile commissions, a thriving workshop business, gallery and cafe housed in a beautiful Georgian building in Northallerton, it has always been about the work. Born in Exeter, Cornish studied fine art at Reading University in the 1970s but the abstract culture of the time left him uninspired. The camera was his salvation. As a photographer’s assistant, first in Washington DC, then in London, he was part of a boom time in the industry, with celebrity photographers such as Terence Donovan, Brian Duffy and David Bailey, earning more than First Division footballers.

Left: Roseberry Topping is distinctive at any time of year but especially appealing in summer. Below: Staithes winter twilight: with water seeping down the cliffs visibly frozen, this was a bitterly cold evening. Fading daylight behind me is still glowing on the cliff faces, while the (out-of-frame) moon shines on the surface of the sea. Street lamps add a third light source, and all are close to balanced, creating a remarkable, short-lived ambience.

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The assignments – portraits of young musicians and actors and below the line advertising and design - offered the prospect of success and financial reward but Cornish began to feel conflicted. “Where you have to make big sacrifices in the commercial world is that you are not doing work based on your own ethos or artistic instinct but rather on the needs of the market place,” he explains. “I still had this part of me that was very conflicted and I think the reason for that is that I’ve always wanted to be free of commercial pressures and I also loved being outside- that was a strong motivation for me.” The opportunity to work as a travel photographer took him in the creative direction he wanted. From 1986 to 1995, Cornish worked on more than 30 travel books for three or four different publishers, spending much of that time abroad. Photographing far-flung wildernesses, from Alaska to South Africa, as well as spending three decades capturing stunning images from around the British Isles, has convinced him of the vital role photography can play in environmental advocacy. Cornish believes that the human condition yearns for and is bolstered by a connection to nature and beauty. His job is about capturing and hopefully sharing that sense of joy and therapeutic benefit with some kind of audience.

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His outstanding work has been recognised by his peers. Cornish received the annual Power of Photography award in 2006 and in 2008 he was made an honorary Fellow of the Royal Photographic Society. Another highly respected photographer said recently that his work was “as close to artistic and technical perfection as you can get”. Cornish has lived in North Yorkshire since 1993, with his wife, Jenny Earle, and their two children. In 2004 he bought Register House, a Grade II Listed Building in Northallerton and established Joe Cornish Galleries. The gallery, over two floors, houses a programme of exhibitions, particularly young and local photographers and artists. Collaborating with David Ward and other photographers, Cornish runs popular workshops that draw visitors from abroad as well as closer to home. Assignments still take him overseas. Working with renowned wildlife photographer and TV presenter Mark Carwardine on Polar expedition cruise ships has enabled Cornish to photograph breathtaking landscapes in the Arctic and Antarctic. He has just returned from Greenland, which he described as “genuinely one of the most exciting experiences, partly because it is very remote, relatively unknown and unexplored.”

Above: Malham Dale from Malham Cove: Dappled light and rain showers characterise the English landscape, and frequently contribute greatly to a sense of depth and articulation in the space before the camera. With its folded curves, field boundaries, trees and rugged outcrops this view epitomises the essence of Yorkshire’s unique beauty. Right: East of Whitby, Saltwick Bay reveals spectacular geological detail at low tide.

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J O E ’ S WO R K I S AS C LO S E TO A R T I ST I C A N D TECHNICAL PERFECTION A S YO U C A N G E T.

Back home, the varied landscape of Yorkshire – from Whitby and Robin Hood’s Bay to Higger Tor, in the Peak District, is still a constant inspiration. “It is the biggest county in England and obviously it’s the best. I don’t think anyone disputes that, Yorkshire person or otherwise,” said the 61-year-old. “It’s a very broad piece of geography - from Spurn Point to Settle and including the watershed on the western side of the Pennines.” He describes the Yorkshire Dales and North York Moors as ”jewels in the landscape crown” that, unlike many other picturesque UK tourist destinations, remain relatively crowd-free. With its subtlety and complexity, the county provides the perfect backdrop to his workshops, which generally attract intermediate photographers. “If you look hard at Yorkshire it has these hidden depths; it’s literally full of caves and it has, to me, emotional depths as well,” he said. “The complexity of the land, the geology, the overlay of flora, the natural vegetation, with more than 12,000 years of human occupation.” Its beauty is more than skin deep and photographers have to work that bit harder to capture it.

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ARTISTIC

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“The Yorkshire tops can be bleak and that presents quite a challenge for the photographer,” said Cornish. “It’s not all flashing mountain tops as is often the case in Scotland, which I love by the way. Because of that, it’s a great practise ground for any landscape photographer meaning you have to work harder at finding its beauty. It’s not an obvious, superficial beauty, but having explored and increasingly understood this landscape through the years I have fallen in love with it.” Despite the county’s industrial past and its impact on the land, nature’s burgeoning fertility is on display everywhere, fuelled by the benign climate. “Now, especially when there is such concern about the future, I always feel that Yorkshire gives me a lot of hope because each year you go around the countryside and nature still seems to have the upper hand a lot of the time,” said Cornish. The same entrepreneurial spirit which gave rise to Yorkshire’s bygone industrial success is alive and well and was vital when Cornish was setting up his enterprises in Northallerton. “The county has a ‘get on and do things’ kind of attitude,” he said “This was a place where you felt you could do things and people would react positively and be supportive, which they absolutely are. ” Left: Ribblehead Viaduct is a remarkable monument of the Victorian era. Batty Moss over which it passes is also decorated with some of the finest examples of limestone pavement in the Dales. Below left: The gritstone towers of Wainstones is a notable landmark on the western edge of the North York Moors. Below right: Rievaulx Abbey is one the finest ruined medieval buildings in Europe.

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YO R K S H I R E G I V E S M E H O P E B E C A U S E N AT U R E S T I L L S E E M S T O H AV E T H E U P P E R H A N D. The cafe at Register House is the engine room of the gallery and provides a focal point. Visitors from abroad insist they’ve found the best coffee in the UK. Cafe staff bake every day and serve up fresh, local produce, including “amazing cakes” from an artisan specialist baker in Richmond. Run by a local daughter and mother team, the cafe helps to fund the gallery, which in 2020 will see shows by Mark Littlejohn, Take a View’s Landscape Photographer of the Year 2014, and a talk by the great American landscape photographer Charles Cramer. Musical events featuring young talent are also held in the first floor “long gallery”, with its new wooden floor providing superb acoustics. There’s a lot going on but the work remains the point. He recalls sound advice given to him in the early days by a veteran photographer: “You look after the work and the money will look after itself. I was out last night with my camera photographing on the hills, with Roseberry there in the distance. There’s so much to celebrate and be proud of if you live in Yorkshire. I’m a bit zealous about it, maybe because I’m an incomer. I feel very grateful to live here.”

Go to www.joecornishgallery.co.uk for opening times.

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I N S P I R AT I O N

BEST ASSURED With the excitement of a whole host of Yorkshire’s much-loved hospitality venues flinging wide their doors and welcoming much-missed guests back again (others are about to open soon), it’s time for a taste of what’s cooking across the county.

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I N S P I R AT I O N

D

uring lockdown Welcome to Yorkshire’s online WTY World Cup of Yorkshire has continued to invite votes to celebrate the county’s finest offerings in its online popular polls. First it was Iconic Buildings (step forward The Piece Hall), then Yorkshire’s favourite Natural Landmarks (the mighty Malham Cove), but if all of that exploring world-class venues and lovely locations has worked up an appetite for a spot of delicious dining, then you’re in for a treat. Here’s a tempting teaser of what’s being served, with a roll call of mouth-watering menus on offer, from idyllic inns to Michelin-star city sites...voted for by you. Yes, it’s the WTY World Cup of Yorkshire RESTAURANTS. Steeped in Halifax history and nestled in the picturesque Calderdale countryside, Shibden Mill Inn was voted the overall winner in the WTY World Cup of Yorkshire restaurants. The multi-award-winning 17th century inn sits beside a babbling brook, the millstream that provided nourishment to the corn and spinning mill’s beginnings. This picture-postcard pub now has eleven beautiful bedrooms (designed and styled for complete relaxation), and serves fabulous food alongside an array of ales and wonderful wines. At the foot of the stunning Shibden Valley with its steep cobbled approach from one side and winding country lanes from the other, Shibden Mill Inn is just minutes away from the spectacular Shibden Hall, home of the historic heroine Anne Lister (Gentleman Jack) and a short drive away from the impressive Halifax heritage sites, arts and shopping venues The Piece Hall, Dean Clough and also Eureka! The National Children’s Museum. Shibden Mill Inn serves sensational seasonal dishes using the best fresh locally sourced ingredients that Yorkshire has to offer, combined with produce found ‘inn’ their very own kitchen garden. Throughout the seasons diners can enjoy the bar area or the Mill Room and in the summer months, chill out in the patio garden. The cosy bar with its ancient beams, thick stone walls and crackling fire, is a welcoming spot for a quick pint or a relaxing evening with a bottle of wine.

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I N S P I R AT I O N

THE SEMI-FINALISTS

From delicious dining to overnight stays, wonderful weddings to exciting events, Huddersfield’s Manor House Lindley does it all in style and was a worthy finalist in the WTY World Cup of Yorkshire restaurants. Delectable dishes are the order of the day at Manor House, with a head chef who crafts menus for each of the hotel’s restaurants with flair and finesse, from breakfast to an evening of fine dining. Offering several stunning settings, there’s an excellent choice of eateries all under (or on) one roof. The Lantern Room serves an ever-changing menu to reflect the evolving drama of this dining destination, with its edgy design, traditional elegance and quality ingredients presenting a gorgeous gastronomic joyous journey to enthral and delight Take time for the Clock Tower Lounge with its glittering chandeliers in a luxurious lounge setting, serving fabulous flutes of champagne and a highly recommended high tea. Get geared up for some glitz and glamour in the evening The Kitchen Bistro is a relaxed sunny space with a wholesome menu of the freshest seasonal ingredients. Open from breakfast until bedtime, brace yourself for a fabulous feast of super healthy and super naughty delights, from energy boosting smoothies, melt in the mouth pastries and yummy menus throughout the day. Pop down to Lindley Cellars an atmospheric den with large screens, luxurious booths, a delectable drinks menu and indulge in scrummy sharing boards. Pop up to the Rooftop Terrace Bar on summer evenings sharing super cool tunes and one or two tipples. Go global at Manor Lindley with tasting events including Thai, Italian, French, Indian and vegan, as well as an artisan market and a Manor House ‘Feastival’.

Above: Manor House Lindley. Opposite from top: Michael O’Hare. Amazing dishes at The Star Inn Harome.

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Situated between the Victoria Quarter and Victoria Gate in Leeds city centre, The Man Behind The Curtain’s awardwinning chef Michael O’Hare opened the restaurant in 2014. The excellent eatery has a reputable reputation for contemporary cuisine, often unusual, with modern and artistic presentation. A Michelin star was awarded in October 2015 and three AA Rosettes a year later. “The Man Behind The Curtain is more than a restaurant for me. It is where I am able to express myself with flavour and aesthetic. The cuisine is my couture, bold in flavour with inspiration from around the world. Brutalist in design, yet fun,” explains chef Michael O’Hare, who grew up in Redcar, North Yorkshire, gained a pilot’s licence, competed in the BBC’s The Great British Menu in 2015, Masterchef in 2016, and later returned to The Great British Menu as a judge. A tasting menu only is served at The Man Behind The Curtain, amid a minimalist interior akin to a stylish art gallery, with sculpture and original artwork on display. O’Hare describes the restaurant’s food and ambience as “Not particularly based on what I wanted, but on what I hated and didn’t want.”. Described as a rustic gourmet bolthole, dating back to the fourteenth century, The Star Inn at Harome is a thatched picture-postcard place, situated in a pretty village on the edge of the North York Moors. Current chef/patron, Andrew Pern, arrived in June 1996 and since then it’s been consistently rated as one of the UK’s top eateries, holding a Michelin star for a generous portion of that time. Essentially an inn with rooms serving modern Yorkshire food made primarily from locally-sourced seasonal ingredients, such as local game, North Sea fish and fresh herbs from its own kitchen garden, The Star Inn at Harome also serves up top wines and beers carefully selected to complement the dining menu. Service is knowledgeable and friendly and there’s a warm welcome. From a much-celebrated Michelin star to Top UK Gastropub, this dining destination is a firm favourite for hospitality professionals and diners alike. Tempted by its all year round choice of menus, from the table d’hôtestyle fixed locals’ menu to a full à la carte offering, with drink pairing suggestions available by the glass for each dish, there’s also a 10-course tasting menu with a matched package of premium wines.

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I N S P I R AT I O N

Restaurants Final 32

JÖRO

Daily Specials allow the chefs to take advantage of catch of the day fresh fish, limited availability game and kitchen garden produce, as the seasons allow. The restaurant has been extended over the years to add the stylish, modern new dining room with its smart banquette seating and cocktail bar, and a view of the gorgeous gardens towards the kitchen garden. There’s also the original thatched inn area with the pub bar, home to a roaring fire on cooler days, as well as a low-ceilinged atmospheric old dining room, plus a coffee loft and a private dining room. The pub bar shows the craftsmanship of the famous Robert Thompson, the ‘Mouse Man’ of Kilburn and the creative cruck construction of the building can be really appreciated from the upstairs coffee loft. Take a foodie tour and visit Andrew Pern’s other Yorkshire ‘stars’ including in York, the Star Inn the City, and also Mr P’s Curious Tavern, then head to the coast to the historic seaside town of Whitby and enjoy seasonal seafood with sea views at the Star Inn The Harbour … but start your journey at the ‘star semi-finalist’ in the WTY World Cup of Restaurants, The Star at Harome.

Sheffield

HOST Ilkley

B L AC K S WA N Oldstead

THE ANGEL Hetton

RAFTERS Sheffield

ESTBEK HOUSE Sandsend

THE OLD V I C A R AG E Sheffield

THE PIPE & GLASS South Dalton

CLAM & CORK Doncaster

THE S TA R I N N Harome

BUTLER WHITES Hull

SHIBDEN MILL INN Shibden

THE HARE INN Scawton

THE SANDPIPER Leyburn

IRIS Wakefield

THE W E ST WO O D Beverley

Check restaurant websites for more information and opening dates/times.

CRAB & LO B ST E R Asenby

PRASHAD Bradford

HOME Leeds

M AT T H E A LY X THE FOUNDRY Leeds

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THE BLUE LION East Witton

MANOR HOUSE Lindley

THE M AG P I E Whitby

MAN BEHIND THE C U R TA I N

LANTERNA Scarborough

S KO S H York

ELDER Halifax

D E VO U R AT T H E DY E H O U S E

LE COCHON AV E U G L E York

T H E B OX TREE Ilkley

THE WHITE RABBIT Todmordon

T H E YO R K E ARMS Ramsgill

Holmfirth

Leeds

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ARTISTIC

C A R TO O N

KI NG

James Mason and Carolyn Nicoll met up with The Yorkshire Post’s acclaimed artist, Graeme Bandeira, to chat about his sometimes stark, but often colourful cartoons, that have captured the mood of the county, the country and beyond.

F

lorence Nightingale is just one of many famous faces to have inspired football fanatic and creative cartoonist Graeme Bandeira in recent weeks. Whilst the coronavirus crisis has proved to be a challenging time for many, for others, like Graeme, it’s been positively productive. Shining the spotlight on serious situations and then raising a smile with his satirical sketches, this Yorkshire artist has captured the attention of admirers across the globe with his impressive illustrations. Born in Middlesbrough, raised in Hemlington and now living in Harrogate, Graeme recently discovered that his family roots are perhaps ‘a bit rum’. “I found out on Father’s Day, when we were all looking through old photos, that my great-grandfather was from São Paulo in Brazil. He’d been part of the merchant navy, turns out he was a rum smuggler too and that’s how he actually ended up in Middlesbrough,” explained a bemused Graeme. Well, that creative ancestral ‘ambition’ on an international scale has perhaps rubbed off on his great grandson, but in a good way. “Ever since I could hold a pen I’d be drawing on curtains … on anything. It’s so therapeutic and enjoyable and it’s constantly been a great way to get a message out there,” says Graeme. “I’ve always drawn, through school, art college and university, followed by freelancing for agencies in London. However, when the digital era came, I made the decision to continue working with pen and ink. It’s the medium I love and that I still use to this day, but when the internet arrived, work started to dry up. Then it all turned around again when I started working at The Yorkshire Post, serving the ad department, creating cartoons and here I am still doing it.” They say a picture paints a thousand words and Graeme’s much-loved illustrations have featured everyone

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from celebrated sports stars, to recreating royal occasions and portraying politicians in a humorous way. “I met Boris Johnson and showed him the cartoon I’d done of him as a wrecking ball. He was actually really good fun and quite self-deprecating. When he saw the picture he laughed and said ‘I ABSOLUTELY LOVE IT!’.” Graeme’s brilliant illustrations have brought a lot of laughter and joy to many over the years, but in recent times his pandemic pictures have been more poignant and thought provoking. As an artist his aim has been to capture the human side of the catastrophic crisis, the real workers on the fragile ‘front line’, from the dedicated delivery drivers to the staff stepping into the unknown, cautiously cleaning corridors not knowing if the contagious coronavirus could be closing in. Of course the real heroes of the last few months have been the NHS staff, always appreciated, but certainly now, more than ever.

HIS BRILLIANT I L L U S T R AT I O N S H AV E B R O U G H T A LOT O F L A U G H T E R A N D J OY. Over the years Graeme has produced thousands of illustrations, but after 100 days of lockdown, putting his heart and soul into trying to capture the mood of a nation, he could quite easily choose a hundred cartoons to talk about, one for each day, but here are his thoughts on some of the most memorable.

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I T ’ S P U R P O S E LY I N B L AC K A N D W H I T E , T H E R E ’ S N O CO LO U R & I T ’ S H O W I F E LT A B O U T T H AT S A D S I T U AT I O N .

I D I D T H I S P I E C E TO S H O W H O W I M P O R TA N T THE NHS ARE AND THE STRAIN THEY WERE G O I N G TO B E U N D E R . NURSE Depicting the weight of the COVID-19 world on the shoulders of the NHS staff. A nurse holding a global pandemic that was bursting at the seams. “When coronavirus was first reported it initially didn’t seem to be being taken that seriously, although there were a lot of news reports, but then all of a sudden the terrible reality of people dying and the statistics started to rapidly rise. I did this piece to show how important the NHS are and the strain they were going to be under. I tried to think of how to do it in a simple way. Everyone appreciates nurses and what they do, so I came up with this model and a strange looking atom. The interest was massive on social media, it went viral in just a couple of days and the national media including Sky News covered it, so I knew it was doing its job and getting the message out there. Not bad for an afternoon’s work and from there it spiralled.”

and produced BE KIND. It’s purposely in black and white to reflect the mood, there’s no joy, there’s no colour and it’s how I felt about that sad situation. It reminded me of news reports I’d seen years ago of old Russia, no food on the shelves and lots of bare concrete. I felt I’d hit the nail on the head with this one. Broadcaster Jeremy Vine picked it up and shared it. The impact again was huge.”

Previous page: Captain 100. Boris Wrecking Ball. Above: Nurse. Be Kind. Below: Tragedy. Opposite: Florence Nightingale: Then and Now.

BE KIND “The supermarket lady was based on a very personal experience. I went shopping and I saw people panic buying and stripping supermarket shelves unnecessarily. It was complete pandemonium and a really sad indictment of some parts of society, it seemed so selfish. So when I got into work, we were still in the office then, I put pen to paper

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ARTISTIC

F LO R E N C E N I G H T I N G A L E : T H E N A N D N OW “Back in 1820 one of the most iconic figures in the world of medicine was born, Florence Nightingale. Fast-forward exactly 200 years and there’s a global pandemic. This image shows Florence Nightingale handing over the lamp to the modern day NHS medical staff, who like Florence did back in the nineteenth century, are working under immense strain. I wanted to shed a bit of hope, light and support to the situation.” The power of the pen when creating something so visually appealing can spread an important message far and wide and once that pen and ink creation is shared on Twitter, it can travel around the world in seconds. His recent TRAGEDY cartoon highlighting the plight of theatres has not only caught the attention of the arts world, but has attracted an emotional and passionate audience, all talking about an incredibly difficult ‘stage’ for the live entertainment industry. Graeme has quite literally become a star of lockdown across the globe and is proud that his pictures can raise awareness. With fans of his work in far-flung places from Venezuela and Costa Rica to Denmark and Norway, he’s aware of his very varied international network. “It’s vital that people like to open up to different perceptions and not necessarily get bogged down with organisations telling them stuff. I’m just an individual getting my message out there. I am led in certain directions by my employer but we generally come to the same conclusion. It’s very enjoyable and very rewarding when you create a cartoon that’s well-received.” From start to finish, from the initial idea to a completed piece of artwork, takes about 6 to 7 hours but some have to be quicker, if there’s an imminent deadline. “James Mitchinson, The Yorkshire Post editor, may say at 3pm that a cartoon is needed for 6pm, but you know I tend to work better under pressure as the ideas really flow. You just have to go with your gut instinct when time is tight. I’m lucky, I feel I’m on a roll right now and I really love what I’m doing.” Of course, such unprecedented times have produced some real positives including an outstanding achievement from Yorkshire’s very own Captain Tom.

C A P TA I N 1 0 0 There have been those lighter moments of communities coming together and Captain Tom’s achievement raising money for the NHS was just phenomenal. What a

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wonderful man he is. The first cartoon I did of him was to commemorate him finishing his laps in the garden. He was a person I warmed to straight away...as did the whole nation. I wanted to show him crossing the finish line, with the nurses saluting him, highlighting his contribution to the NHS. By that point I think he’d raised £26m BUT he went on to top £30m. Jeremy Vine again loved it and shared it on social media and on his programme. I then took a call asking if I’d do a cartoon to present to Captain Tom on his 100th birthday. I wasn’t sure how it was going to happen during lockdown with social distancing but I had a word with the editor at The Yorkshire Post and we set it all up with Jeremy Vine. A plan to produce the artwork of Captain Tom with a cake for his 100th birthday, with nurses saluting him and showing their appreciation of what a fantastic guy he is. A Rolls Royce from JCT 600 was arranged to take the artwork to Captain Tom and it was presented to him live on TV. For me to personally see his reaction on the television when he received his cartoon gift, was a really special moment. He’s a Yorkshire hero, known around the world, and his birth town of Keighley now have the image of Captain Tom splashed across a special commemorative bus. Just another spin-off of doing a cartoon.” It’s certainly been a productive period, but post-pandemic what is Graeme looking forward to doing once things quieten down? “I’m going to take the dog to Malham Cove and then call for a beer!”

Front Cover: Welcome to Yorkshire would like to say a huge thank you to Graeme Bandeira for exclusively creating this month’s This Is Y cover. We think it says it all! Another masterpiece from Yorkshire’s Graeme Bandeira. #YorkshireTogether.

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REDCAR SALTBURN

BOWES

KIRKBY STEPHEN

A685

TO THE M6 FOR BIRMINGHAM AND CUMBRIA

A67CATTERICK LEYBURN A66

A683

A685 DENT

KIRKBY A684 STEPHEN HAWES

BOWES

YORKSHIRE DALES REETH

TEBAY

KIRKBY LONSDALEYORKSHIRE SEDBERGH

NORTHALLERTON

A1

LOFTHOUSE HORTON-IN-RIBBLESDALE A684 A683 HAWES PATELEY BRIDGE MASHAM GRASSINGTON DENT

KIRKBY LONSDALE

SETTLE

INGLETON A65

MALHAM HORTON-IN-RIBBLESDALE

RIPON

A169

PICKERING MALTON

HELMSLEY

A64

YORK

FILEY

DRIFFIELD

BRIDLINGTON

A165

A166

MALTON

A614 DRIFFIELD

A1079

FLAMBOROUGH HEAD

A165 SEAMER

A64

PATELEY BRIDGE A658

FILEY SCARBOROUGH

A170

KNARESBOROUGH A19

BOLTON ABBEY A59 GRASSINGTONHARROGATE

SETTLE SKIPTON MALHAM

THIRSK BOROUGHBRIDGE

A61 RIPLEY

ROBIN HOOD’S BAY SEAMER

HELMSLEY

BANK A19 RIPONSUTTON

SCARBOROUGH

PICKERING

A170

NORTH YORK MOORS

THIRSK

WHITBY

DANBY

OSMOTHERLEY

NORTHALLERTON

ROBIN HOOD’S BAY

STAITHES

A172 SUTTON BANK

LEYBURN

DALES

INGLETON

MASHAM

SALTBURN GOATHLAND

NORTH YORK GUISBOROUGH MOORS A171

YARM

BEDALE A1 RICHMOND A6108

WHITBY

A171

REDCAR DANBY

A172 A19 RICHMOND MIDDLESBROUGH OSMOTHERLEY

REETH

SEDBERGH

GUISBOROUGH

YARM

A1 A66

BARNARD CASTLE

TEBAY

STAITHES

MIDDLESBROUGH

BARNARD CASTLE

FLAMBOROUGH HEAD

A165 BRIDLINGTON

WETHERBY A65 KNARESBOROUGH HORNSEA POCKLINGTON MARKET A629 ILKLEY A166 WEIGHTON OTLEY A59 A64 A1 A61 HARROGATE KEIGHLEY SKIPTON SALTAIRE ILKLEY BEVERLEY A19 WETHERBY A614 HAWORTH A658 A1079 A65 A629 OTLEY SELBY HORNSEA M1 A164 BEVERLEY KEIGHLEY A64 M606 M621 A19 A63 A63 SALTAIRE

BRADFORD

LEEDS

HAWORTH

HEBDEN HALIFAX TODMORDEN BRIDGE

BRADFORD

HEBDEN BRIDGE M62

YORK

LEEDS

MIRFIELD HUDDERSFIELD

WAKEFIELD

HALIFAX TODMORDEN

BARNSLEY MIRFIELD

M1

PEAK PENISTONE

DISTRICT

A1

BARNSLEY ROTHERHAM M18

HULL

A63

HUMBER BRIDGE

PONTEFRACT

M180

GOOLE

DONCASTER

WITHERNSEA

A164 BRIDGE HUMBER

GOOLE

A63 M18

WAKEFIELD

HUDDERSFIELD

HOLMFIRTH

M62

A1

HOLMFIRTH

PENISTONE

HULL

SELBY

PONTEFRACT

A15

WITHERNSEA

A180

SCUNTHORPE

GRIMSBY CLEETHORPES

DONCASTER

BRIGG

A18

ROTHERHAM PEAK A57 DISTRICT

A57

SHEFFIELD TO LONDON BY RAIL

TO LONDON BY RAIL

SHEFFIELD

N

KEY Motorways

P L A N YO U R

JOURNEY

Wherever you’re coming from, getting to Yorkshire by rail, road, sea or air couldn’t be easier – and the journey takes you through some of our most stunning scenery on the way.

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A Roads Rail Routes Airports Heritage Coast Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty National Parks Ferryport

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GETTING HERE

YO R K S H I R E B Y R A I L You can get to Yorkshire by high-speed train from London or Edinburgh in less than two hours. The Midlands is even nearer to Yorkshire’s cities, and TransPennine services offer direct links from the North West and North East. For timetables and reservations contact: London North Eastern Railway (www.lner.co.uk) Grand Central (www.grandcentralrail.com) National Rail Enquiries (tel 08457 484950 www.nationalrail.co.uk) East Midlands Trains (www.eastmidlandstrains.co.uk) Hull Trains (www.hulltrains.co.uk) Northern Rail (www.northernrail.org) Supertram Sheffield (www.supertram.com) Transpennine Express (www.tpexpress.co.uk) Metro (www.wymetro.com)

YO R K S H I R E B Y AIR AND SEA

Don’t forget P&O Ferries operate direct overnight links into Yorkshire from Rotterdam, Holland and Zeebrugge, Belgium. For more information go to www.poferries.com.

The Yorkshire county is served by a number of airports, providing daily flights to and from many destinations. With excellent transport links, Yorkshire is also easily accessible from many other airports throughout the UK, through high speed train links and an extensive motorway network.

I N F O R M AT I O N CENTRES Tourist Information Centres can offer plenty of great ideas so you can make the most of your visit. For all the Tourist Information Centres in Yorkshire; www.yorkshire.com/tic.

Doncaster Sheffield Airport (tel 0871 2202210 www.flydsa.co.uk) Leeds Bradford Yorkshire’s Airport (tel 0871 2882288 www.leedsbradfordairport.co.uk) Humberside Airport (tel 0844 8877747 www.humbersideairport.com) Manchester Airport (tel 08712 710711 www.manchesterairport.co.uk)

Find a wide choice of guide books and maps with lots of dedicated walking and cycling routes at Tourist Information Centres across the county, or more ideas from Welcome to Yorkshire at www.yorkshire.com/outdoors.

And you can explore Yorkshire’s hills, moors and valleys on some of Britain’s best loved and most spectacular leisure trains, with lovingly preserved vintage rolling stock and historic steam locomotives. These include the North Yorkshire Moors Railway, Embsay & Bolton Abbey Steam Railway, Keighley & Worth Valley Railway, Middleton Railway, Wensleydale Railway, Fellsman (for the Settle-Carlisle Railway) and Kirklees Light Railway. To discover more about these super train trips go to www.yorkshire.com.

YO R K S H I R E B Y R O A D Britain’s biggest and fastest highways cross Yorkshire from north to south and east to west, making getting here with your own car or by coach very simple indeed.

Glasgow M8 Edinburgh A74

The A1 and M1 connect from the north and south, while the M6 and M62 link Yorkshire with the Midlands and the North West and the M18/M180 gives easy access to the coast and countryside of northern Lincolnshire. For details of the quickest (or the most scenic) driving routes see the AA or RAC websites www.theaa.com and www.rac.co.uk. Coach and bus companies with services to (and within) Yorkshire include: Arriva (www.arrivabus.co.uk/yorkshire) Transdev Blazefield (www.transdevplc.co.uk) East Yorkshire Motor Services (www.eyms.co.uk) First (www.firstgroup.com) Coastliner (www.yorkbus.co.uk) Dalesbus (www.dalesbus.org) Moorsbus (www.moorsbus.org) Brontë Bus (www.keighleybus.co.uk) Connexions Buses (www.connexionsbuses.com) Find further information on regional and local bus and train services from Traveline Yorkshire (www.yorkshiretravel.net).

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A1

Carlisle

Newcastle

M6 Leeds Bradford Yorkshire’s Airport

York

Leeds Liverpool

M62

Doncaster Sheffield Airport

Manchester

Hull

Ferryport

Humberside Airport

A1

M6 Birmingham M1 Car

M5 M4 Bristol

M5

M25

London

Exeter

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