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2020

SPICE UP YO U R L I F E MEL B HAS LEFT THE BRIGHT L I G H TS O F L A TO CO M E H O M E TO H E R B E L O V E D YO R K S H I R E

P L U S B L I N D A D V E N T U R E S E E K E R A M A R L AT I F, Z O O M I N G I N W I T H J O E C O R N I S H A N D I D E A S F O R 1 2 W E E K E N D S AWAY I N YO R K S H I R E


MEET THE CONTRIBUTORS

THE EDITOR

JULIE HENRY

ELAINE LEMM

J E R E M Y DY S O N

C A R O LY N N I C O L L

Life through the lens

York on a fork

Grimm up North

Welcome to This is Y 2020.

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Born and raised in Bradford. Early career in journalism working on regional newspapers, before joining the Times Educational Supplement, in London. This award-winning journalist spent more than 10 years on the Sunday Telegraph before moving into freelance writing, contributing regularly to national titles.

Following a successful career as a chef, restaurateur and teacher, Yorkshire born Elaine is a highly respected national food, drink and travel writer and contributes to many leading food titles. She loves pulling on walking boots, heading to the Dales or coast and a pub with decent Yorkshire ales and a plate of fish and chips involved somewhere.

Born, raised and educated in Leeds. Jeremy is a writer, director and occasional musician, best known as co-creator of The League of Gentlemen. His perfect Yorkshire day would be a run out to the Dales, taking in Settle, Clapham and Ingleborough. He’s looking forward to the Great Yorkshire Show and seeing some alpacas.

Ask anyone what they love about Yorkshire and they’re more than likely to not only mention the stunning countryside, breathtaking coastline and vibrant cities, but the people too...witty, warm and welcoming. So what a treat to get the latest from some of the county’s true stars, and those who are influenced and inspired by this magnificent part of the world. Global success as a member of one of the most successful girl bands of all time, Spice Girl and TV personality Mel B, talks about her return from LA to her much loved Yorkshire.

JEZ LAZELL

SAMIRA AHMED

D AV I D PA R K I N

Hall right now

Anne other Brontë

Steeling the show

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Grew up in America, the Caribbean, Australia, Kenya and Japan. After 10 years working as a trek leader in Central Asia and the Himalayas he moved to Scotland, where he now works as a writer and editor from his loch-side home, with three children, one dog and an abiding love for the bens and glens outside his office window.

London born and raised. Studied English at Oxford University. Was a BBC reporter on Newsnight, the Today programme, and LA correspondent, covering the OJ Simpson case, then a Channel 4 News presenter winning the Stonewall Broadcaster of the year award. Now presents Radio 4’s Front Row and BBC1’s Newswatch.  

Business editor of the Yorkshire Post before setting up TheBusinessDesk. com, the UK’s first business news website. His perfect Yorkshire day starts with a workout on the Stray in Harrogate, off to Saltaire for a bit of culture and lunch followed by Filey for a dog walk, then dinner and a nice bottle of wine in Leeds.

Ten years of The Great British Bake Off has showcased a selection of Yorkshire star bakers, from the first to the latest series the county’s culinary creators have triumphed. We caught up with Nancy Birtwhistle, Nadiya Hussain, Kim-Joy and the most recent winner David Atherton. Yorkshire continues to be a chosen location for TV and film makers, with The Secret Garden being just one of the many productions set to be a cinematic sensation this year. Its young star, producer and director talk about their love of filming in this glorious and great county. Enjoy all things Yorkshire.

A M A R L AT I F

ANDREW VINE

N I C K H OW E S

Sense-sational

Shore thing

Going for gold

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Born in Rochdale, grew up in Glasgow, lives in Leeds! Founder of Traveleyes, a world-unique company that takes blind and fully-sighted travellers on adventures all around the globe. His perfect Yorkshire day would involve visiting the beautiful villages, each one is unique and all of them are good for a brew and a scone after a leisurely walk.

Journalist and author, born and lives in Leeds. Formerly assistant editor of The Yorkshire Post and learned his trade on newspapers at the coast. He’s looking forward to the annual return of nesting seabirds to the cliffs around Bempton and Flamborough in the spring and summer. It’s one of Britain’s greatest wildlife spectaculars.

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W E LCO M E TOYO R K S H I R E

@ W E LCO M E 2 YO R K S #THISISY

TO M AS H U R ST

Tour guide PA G E 9 6

W E LCO M E TOYO R K S H I R E

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W E LCO M E As a proud Yorkshireman it’s an honour to be penning a few notes for the 2020 edition of This is Y magazine in my role as Chief Executive of Welcome to Yorkshire. I’d like to thank all our hardworking staff for their creativity and dedication in putting together this publication which showcases the very best of our county’s landscapes, landmarks, visitor attractions, hotels, theatres, restaurants, businesses, people and places. As someone who lives and works in the region I never take for granted the variety and diversity of things to do, whether that’s during the week or at the weekend with the family. Having travelled extensively, I can only imagine what it must be like as a visiting tourist, overwhelmed and excited with the amount of things to see and do. Our food economy is booming and now a huge exporter of regional delicacies. Due to the countless castles, stately homes and architecture on our doorstep, TV and film executives repeatedly return to film the latest dramas and cinema screen productions. Our theatres, live music venues and arts festivals are going from strength to strength whilst Yorkshire’s pedigree for staging world-class sporting events speaks for itself. All this choice of course means that a day trip, short stay or week-long vacation is no longer enough time to see and do it all! Yorkshire in our opinion really is the number one place to visit, live, work and stay. To everyone who works so hard in our tourism industry every day, I’d like to take this opportunity to say thank you for the huge contribution you make to our county. And, if you’re a visitor to Yorkshire - first-timer or returner - enjoy your time with us, please support our local producers and communities and be ready for the friendliest welcome in the world.

JAMES MASON Chief Executive, Welcome to Yorkshire

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D E S T I N AT I O N S 28 YORK Experience vibrant city living in this historical gem. Front cover image: Ben Riggott www.benriggott.com Photographer Ben took the front cover image of Melanie Brown in Nidderdale Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. Page 5 images clockwise from top left: Dramatic chalk beaches at Flamborough Head ©VHEY. Ribblehead Viaduct. Indian Dancing at the Bradford Festival. The Grand, York. Brimham Rocks. The Project Polar reserve at the Yorkshire Wildlife Park. Cycling in the North York Moors National Park. The Yorkshire Dales. The Winter Gardens in Sheffield. Building sandcastles in Bridlington © VHEY. Keighley & Worth Valley Railway. Published by: Welcome to Yorkshire Dry Sand Foundry Foundry Square Holbeck Leeds LS11 5DL

38 THE YORKSHIRE DALES & HERRIOT COUNTRY Soak up the epic views, glorious countryside and rural heritage. 50 HULL & EAST YORKSHIRE Where cutting edge city life meets rolling green hills.

ON THE COVER Mel B and her doting dog Cookie, living the country life surrounded by fields of sheep and rolling hills in Nidderdale. Read Yorkshire Spice on page 14.

60 HARROGATE Relax in this stylish spa town and discover idyllic country living. 62 SELBY DISTRICT Experience bustling market towns and notable medieval history.

© Welcome to Yorkshire 2020

70 THE NORTH YORK MOORS Vast skies, stunning landscapes and enchanting coastline.

Designed and produced by: Will Hodgson and Emma Wray at Welcome to Yorkshire Printed by: YM Chantry Ltd, Wakefield, West Yorkshire www.ymgroup.co.uk

82 THE COAST Golden beaches, dramatic cliffs and picturesque fishing villages.

Whilst every care has been taken to ensure the accuracy of the information contained in this publication, Welcome to Yorkshire can accept no responsibility for any errors or omissions. Information throughout this magazine is compiled from details supplied by organisations or establishments concerned. No recommendation by Welcome to Yorkshire is implied by the inclusion of any information and Welcome to Yorkshire accepts no responsibility in the matter. Prices, dates, hours of opening etc. were correct at the time of going to press. Readers are reminded that these details are subject to change and they are advised to check when finalising any arrangements. Please note, the destination guides have been placed by our partners and the content approved by them. It is not intended to be a comprehensive guide to all destinations and does not necessarily represent the views of Welcome to Yorkshire. The paper in this magazine originates from timber that is sourced from sustainable forests, managed to strict environmental, social and economic standards. The manufacturing mill has both PEFC and FSC chain of custody certifications and also ISO9001 and ISO14001 accreditation. Once you have finished with this magazine, please pass it on to someone else who may be interested to read it or recycle it.

Keeping Yorkshire special: From its lively cities to pretty villages, rolling countryside and amazing coastline, Yorkshire has so much to offer. By doing just a few simple things we can all help keep Yorkshire special, so that it’s ready for your next visit. Here are a few hints on how you can play a part and have a brilliant break at the same time! Here in Yorkshire we have some of the best food and drink around plus fantastic local arts and craft producers. You’ll be sure of a tasty Yorkshire experience. Don’t forget to take something home to treat your friends and family. Follow the Countryside Code. Help us look after the landscape and wildlife by avoiding damage and disturbance; use footpaths and cycleways responsibly and take your litter away. Try and recycle any waste you have. Most importantly have a great time when you’re here!

NEED TO GET IN TOUCH? Editor Carolyn Nicoll cnicoll@yorkshire.com Production and advertising Emma Wray ewray@yorkshire.com

84 SHEFFIELD An outdoor city full of surprise and contrast. 92 LEEDS A world of culture, art and shopping in this perfect city getaway.

128 YO R K S H I R E HIGHLIGHTS 9 YORKSHIRE HIGHLIGHTS The latest Yorkshire news. 30 RECORD BREAKERS Yorkshire’s record-breaking claims to fame. 126 BEST OF THE BEST Celebrating Yorkshire’s finest at the White Rose Awards.

98 REDCAR AND CLEVELAND Breathtaking landscapes and endless coastline. 101 BRADFORD World-class culture, delicious cuisine and impressive architecture. 106 WEST YORKSHIRE An artistic and cultural hub in rolling hills and rugged moors. 118 SOUTH YORKSHIRE Jam-packed with award-winning attractions and amazing heritage.

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128  WHAT’S ON 2020 Some of the best festivals and events across the county. 132 GETTING HERE Plan your next brilliant break. 134  OUR Y30 PARTNERS The Yorkshire based businesses with a real passion for the county.

INTERVIEW 14 YORKSHIRE SPICE Mel B talks Yorkshire Dales life, Spice Girls and what she really, really wants.

Become a member of Welcome to Yorkshire Kayleigh Catford kcatford@yorkshire.com

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CONTENTS 64

32 F E AT U R E S 16  SHORE THING Sandy beaches, fishing villages, towering cliffs and wonderful wildlife, walking the Yorkshire coast.

86 STEELING THE SHOW Everybody’s Talking About Jamie returns to Sheffield from the West End and there’s a film too.

22 YORK ON A FORK  Fabulous food and amazing awardwinning restaurants in historic York.

90 RAISING THE BARRE Northern Ballet celebrates 50 years with three world premieres in Yorkshire.

32 SENSE-SATIONAL  Blind, inspirational globetrotter Amar Latif and his love of Yorkshire adventure. 42 12 WEEKEND BREAKS  City to coast to countryside, stargazing to sculpture, 12 brilliant breaks in Yorkshire. 54 HALL RIGHT NOW  Check in and check out - it’s pure luxury, world-class wellbeing and fine dining at Grantley Hall. 64 DIG IT  Take a stroll through Yorkshire’s glorious gardens. 66 DO YOU WANT TO KNOW A SECRET?  Yorkshire scenes. Cast and crew are all set for the release of The Secret Garden film. 72 LIFE THROUGH THE LENS Picture-perfect Yorkshire captured by celebrated photographer Joe Cornish.

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94 GOING FOR GOLD Tokyo bound as Yorkshire’s athletes aim for Olympic glory. 96 TOUR GUIDE Top cyclists compete in the sixth Tour de Yorkshire. 102 ANNE OTHER BRONTË Celebrating the literary legacy of the youngest Brontë. 108 BAKER’S DOZEN The Yorkshire bakers you knead to know. 110 THE GREAT YORKSHIRE BAKE OFF The rise of Yorkshire star bakers on The Great British Bake Off. 112 GRAND DESIGNS From classic to contemporary, draw your attention to Yorkshire’s finest designs.

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120 GRIMM UP NORTH Magical experiences to inspire inquisitive imaginations.

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YO R K S H I R E H I G H L I G H T S

GARDENS

QUICK PICKS

Back in bloom

Around the county

Having stood derelict for more than 35 years, this spring sees the historic Grade II listed Kirkleatham Walled Garden, near Redcar, reopening following a multi-million pound project to restore the garden to its former glory with beautiful designs and displays inspired by the significant heritage of the Kirkleatham Estate. The gardens will provide catering, hospitality and horticultural training with opportunities for local residents of all ages to improve their skills, qualifications and experience.

1 W I L D L I F E WAT C H An artistic response to conservation at Nunnington Hall, Change In Attitudes displays 5,000 small porcelain black rhinoceros horns, each representing one of the remaining black rhinos left in the world. Local artist, Layla Khoo, was invited to respond to the big game hunting trophies in the house. Each visitor is invited to take one of the 5,000 ceramic rhino horns home as a souvenir, but with the moral dilemma that each one taken cannot be replaced and will leave fewer and fewer for others to experience. Until November.

2 OLD MASTERS Over 50 works from one of the UK’s most significant collections of Old Master Drawings are set to go on display at Sheffield’s Millennium Gallery in 2020 as part of a new exhibition. Lines of Beauty: Master Drawings from Chatsworth comprises around 1,800 works by some of the most important artists of the 15th, 16th and 17th centuries. 14 February to 25 May.

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SCULPTURE

Art where it belongs Yorkshire Sculpture International was a huge hit in the summer of 2019 and its eye-catching and world-class creations from Leeds lad Damien Hirst are staying in the county. Four major sculptures by Hirst can still be seen at the Yorkshire Sculpture Park until April 2022 - Charity (20022003), Myth (2010), The Hat Makes the

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Man (2004-2007) and the striking tenmetre high The Virgin Mother (20052006). Damien Hirst says of his works at the iconic country park location ‘The giant bronze sculptures at YSP are where they belong – they’re just made for that setting.’ The artist’s Black Sheep with Golden Horns will be at Leeds Art Gallery until June 2020.

ARTIST O N TO U R Harrogate’s Claire Baxter is this year’s Tour de Yorkshire Official Artist. Working predominantly in oil, Claire paints places she knows and loves. The beautiful town of Pateley Bridge, is home to The Claire Baxter Fine Art Gallery.

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YO R K S H I R E H I G H L I G H T S

TOP TUNES

MUSIC MAESTROS From arenas (the county counts three in Hull, Leeds and Sheffield) to historic buildings and seaside resorts to country house estates, Yorkshire has some impressive music venues and many world-class performances to look forward to. PERFECT PROMS

SHEFFIELD STYLES

Set in magnificent gardens, Castle Howard Proms is a spectacular concert experience and a night to remember for the whole family. Including popular classics, songs from musicals and a feast of fabulous flag waving favourites and fireworks from the Proms. 22 August.

There’s only one direction for Harry Styles as he ‘lights up’ the county, making his first solo performance in Sheffield at the FlyDSA Arena, with support from King Princess. The singer’s only Yorkshire date on his international tour. 17 April.

PERFORMANCE

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CO O L COA ST

PIECE OF MUSIC

No stranger to some of the biggest acts on the planet, look out for Scarborough Open Air Theatre’s top bookings for 2020. With indie rock giants Snow Patrol and Little Mix just some of the acts performing in the seaside resort in 2020.

Following on from last year’s hit concerts, including Mercury prize winners Elbow, at the truly spectacular and historic The Piece Hall in Halifax, this year looks to be even more amazing with Kaiser Chiefs, Richard Hawley and The Specials set to play.

Unique creations Cirque du Soleil’s Corteo is coming to the UK for the very first time and the only place to see this spectacular show outside of London is at Leeds First Direct Arena from 18th to 21st June. Corteo, which means “cortege” in Italian, is a joyous procession, a festive parade imagined by a clown. The show brings together the passion of the actor with the grace and power of the acrobat to plunge the audience into a theatrical world of fun, comedy and spontaneity situated in a mysterious space between heaven and earth. A most enchanting production and a welcome addition to Cirque du Soleil’s 30th anniversary in the UK, this unique creation has amazed audiences of over 9 million people, in 20 countries, on 4 continents.

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ON SCREEN

Lights, Camera, Yorkshire

SHIBDEN SUCCESS Brace yourselves for more big and bold storylines as series two of Sally Wainwright’s hugely successful Gentleman Jack commences filming in Calderdale this year. The hit BBC series portrays the lives of Anne Lister (Suranne Jones) and Ann Walker (Sophie Rundle). Filmed at the stunning Shibden Hall in Halifax, the real home of the drama’s heroine, international visitor figures have boomed following the popularity of the first series.

SMASH HIT Another Sally Wainwright smash hit, the BBC BAFTA-winning Last Tango in Halifax returns to TV screens in 2020. Starring Anne Reid, Derek Jacobi, Nicola Walker, Sarah Lancashire and reunited with Bradford born Timothy West, this is an uplifting, heart-warming, touching and funny tale exploring Celia and Alan’s relationship. Look out for lots of Yorkshire locations.

H O O R AY F O R H E R R I OT Celebrating 50 years since the first publication of Alf Wight’s books, known to the world as James Herriot, and all about the adventures of this much-loved country vet in the Yorkshire Dales, there’s a new series of All Creatures Great and Small to hit TV screens this year on Channel 5.

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YO R K S H I R E H I G H L I G H T S

DON’T MISS

Going wild © Stefan Christmann / Wildlife Photographer of the Year

Get down to Sewerby Hall and Gardens to see the 55th Wildlife Photographer of the Year Exhibition, on loan from the Natural History Museum. Featuring 100 breathtaking images from fascinating animal behaviour to some remarkable wild landscapes, this is the most prestigious photography event of its kind and will provide a global platform to showcase the natural world. Wildlife Photographer of the Year is developed and produced by the Natural History Museum, London. 25 April to 5 July.

ON STAGE

Premiere league World-class shows, returning favourites and brand new productions take to the Yorkshire stage in 2020. Here are a few not to miss.

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Roaring return

The Alhambra Theatre Bradford takes great pride in Disney’s musical The Lion King returning to its ‘mane’ stage for seven weeks in spring 2020, the only Yorkshire theatre on its tour. Over 81,000 people experienced the production in a record-breaking season when it visited the multiaward-winning Alhambra in 2014, the year the theatre celebrated its 100th anniversary. The Lion King, 30 April to 20 June.

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The county’s Phoenix Dance Theatre presents Black Waters, an original contemporary dance work. Inspired by the blending of cultures and the birth of fragmented identities. With multiculturalism at its heart, this evocative production shows how from despair, people find hope. World premiere: 12 to 15 February, Leeds. Playhouse

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Sweet treat

Pre-Peter Pan, J.M. Barrie’s delicious farce Quality Street was so well known in its day that it gave its name to the UK’s popular choice of chocolate, made in Halifax since 1936. Enjoy this Northern Broadsides’ production as it debuts in the town on perhaps the most popular day of the year for a chocolate treat. From 14 February, Viaduct Theatre.

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Operatic offering

Everybody dance

Take two

A landlord and landlady who’ve lived their lives in the pub, where all of humankind passes through. Join the regulars for humour and heartbreak. Two, a mesmerising comedy set in a Northern local is written by award-winning playwright Jim Cartwright. Hull Truck Theatre and Stephen Joseph Theatre, Scarborough. March to April.

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Street Scene blends European operatic tradition with golden-age Broadway. Think arias, duets, jazz and the jitterbug, plus Puccini shakes hands with Gershwin. With a diverse musical magic it’s no wonder Street Scene was awarded Best Original Score at the very first Tony Awards in 1947. Saturday 18 January to 28 February, Opera North.

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INTERVIEW

YO R K S H I R E S P I C E Leeds lass Mel B recently returned from the bright lights of LA to her beloved county of Yorkshire. Carolyn Nicoll found out more from the not so Scary Spice about country life, behind the scenes with the Spice Girls and what she really, really wants. Interview Carolyn Nicoll Picture Ben Riggott

It’s wonderful to be living back in Yorkshire. I returned to the UK from America to rehearse for the Spice Girls tour last year and of course popped up to Leeds to stay with Mum. I realised then that this is where I want to be with my daughters. It’s a place I know and feel at ease, my sister has had a baby and my extended family are all here and I’d missed HP Sauce. My schedule is a busy one and shows no signs of slowing down, but living in the Yorkshire countryside, with the Dales on my doorstep, is a real joy and allows me to relax and take time for myself. Being surrounded by fields of sheep, rolling hills and just watching the bees buzzing around is a real contrast to the madness and hectic pace of my professional life. Chickens may be on the imminent agenda too, my mum’s keen for me to get some. I have Cookie, a Yorkipoo... what else! I’ve never had a tiny dog before and a friend surprised me by getting a puppy for Madison, my youngest daughter. I’ve fallen madly in love with her. Cookie goes everywhere with me, she was part of my Brutally Honest theatre show (based on my book), that of course kicked off in Leeds. I even took her on the Spice Girls tour with me. Victoria wasn’t there this time and so Cookie became the fifth Spice Girl, she was easier to look after than Victoria and cheaper too (laughs).

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The Spice Girls are like a family and are all incredibly special to me. Melanie C is wonderful and the most organised and Emma is sweet, with a cheeky side. Not too long ago I spent the weekend at Geri’s gorgeous country pad and we went to the Grand Prix and had a fantastic time. Geri’s husband, Christian Horner, is Team Principal of the Red Bull Racing Formula One team and Geri’s been trying to get me to go for ages. It was a blast! I’m really hoping that all the Spice Girls will get together again and it would be a dream come true to perform at Glastonbury in 2020 for the festival’s 50th anniversary. My parents both instilled into me a great work ethic, setting an excellent example themselves to get out of bed whatever the weather and to get out there and provide for your family. It’s what I have always done and will continue to do. Mum and Dad’s hard work and dedication allowed my sister Danielle and I to take dance, singing and drama lessons at local classes in Leeds and to follow our dreams. It wasn’t always easy, growing up on a Yorkshire council estate as mixed-race children but having encouraging parents helped me to succeed. Although when I was growing up, Dad could be quite strict at times. I distinctly remember that nobody was allowed to talk, especially when Emmerdale was on the TV.

I’m incredibly proud and love my three beautiful daughters. My eldest, Phoenix, was born in London, but my two youngest, Angel and Madison, were both born in California. When we came to the UK for the Spice Girls Tour last year and visited Leeds, Angel looked at me and in her American accent said “Our family’s here. Let’s stay!” So I got straight on to looking at Yorkshire schools, her dad (Eddie Murphy) gave the move his thumbs up and here we are. Phoenix is doing great work with a Yorkshire charity. It’s just wonderful to be back home, surrounded by beautiful Yorkshire countryside and a loving family. Being the new team captain on Celebrity Juice is so much fun and I love working with Keith Lemon. There’s just a couple of years between us (he’s older of course) and we both grew up in Leeds. Leeds will always be me. I won’t lose my accent. I’ll say things as it is. I’m 44 years old and I’m back with my family, just where I want to be...I’m in a good place. What I really want is to stay on track, have good mental health, a happy family life in Yorkshire and to carry on working and doing what I love, making music, to get back in the studio and to do my own stuff too. Perhaps Stormzy would be up for a collaboration? For the Spice Girls to play at Glastonbury would be amazing...and perhaps I’ll get those chickens too!

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LIVING WITH THE DA L E S O N M Y D O O R S T E P I S A R E A L J OY A N D A L LOWS M E TO R E L AX A N D F E E L AT E A S E .

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SHORE THING Andrew Vine steps out to walk the Yorkshire coast and discovers a landscape of breathtaking beauty.

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t’s the most magnificent stretch of coastline in Britain, with majestic cliffs, glorious beaches and enchanting coves, and putting your best foot forward is the perfect way to savour it at a leisurely pace. Walking Yorkshire’s coast is to feel embraced by the beauty all around you, a constantly changing panorama of scenery. The path meanders through historic seaside towns including Whitby and Scarborough, the fishing villages of Staithes and Robin Hood’s Bay and takes in seemingly endless, awardwinning beaches including Filey and Bridlington. At a steady couple of miles an hour along the clifftops or sands, the coastline reveals its grandeur and loveliness. Vistas of headlands and bays open up, stretching away as far as the eye can see, timelessly beautiful and as exhilarating now as when the first people to settle at the coast saw them centuries ago. The sense of space and scale, the vast sky, the sparkling blues and greens of the summer sea stretching away to infinity, moorland of purple heather and yellow gorse overlooking the path, all combine to make this an inspiring walk that truly brings the senses alive. Dots on the clifftop gradually grow into

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Scarborough Castle, Whitby Abbey or Flamborough Head lighthouse, as the coast beckons you to discover the next treasure waiting along the path. History and heritage feel vividly alive as you walk, of fishing communities which still put to sea in traditional cobles directly descended from the Viking longships that once landed, of smugglers who hid contraband in the caves that honeycomb secluded bays, of pioneers who made Yorkshire the birthplace of the great British seaside holiday. And walking brings you thrillingly close to the rich array of wildlife for which Yorkshire’s coast is a haven – huge seabird colonies that nest on the sheer chalk cliffs, seals that bob their heads above the surf or bask on the rocks at low tide, porpoises that break the waves and even, if you’re lucky, whales. Yorkshire’s coastline is on an epic scale, stretching about 120 miles from Redcar in the north to the unique natural wonder of Spurn in the south, where land and sea are locked in an endless battle for supremacy. It’s possible to walk the entire length, and dedicated long-distance walkers will find it as satisfying to complete as any route in the country.

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COAST

CHALK CLIFFS GLEAM WHITE & S E E M TO G LOW WHEN THE SUN IS ON THEM.

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COAST

Previous page: High Stacks at sunrise. This page clockwise from bottom left: One of the most famous landmarks in Whitby are the 199 Steps that lead up to St Mary’s Churchyard - some historians believe that St Hilda would use the steps to test the faith of her followers. Beautiful walks on the East Yorkshire coast. Scarborough harbour with the castle above. Robin Hood’s Bay from Ravenscar © Mike Kipling/NYMNPA.

But one of the great things about the coast path is that it naturally divides into shorter, easily manageable sections which are family-friendly and suitable for walkers of any age or ability, whether you’re looking for half a day’s ramble, or just an unhurried stroll of a mile or two. It’s well signposted, easy to follow and you’re never far from somewhere to take a break and find something to eat or drink, which means that there’s no need to set out with a rucksack weighed down with supplies for a full day. The path takes in every highlight of Yorkshire’s coast, all its landmarks and the extraordinarily rich and diverse heritage. For 50 miles, it follows the Cleveland Way from Saltburn to Filey, then joins the Headland Way around Flamborough and into Bridlington. From there, it’s along the beach to Hornsea and Withernsea, and finally to Spurn. Beginning on the seafront promenade at Redcar, the path climbs to the cliffs at Saltburn, leading on to Staithes, the fishing village that became an artists’ colony at the turn of the 20th century, where time seems hardly to have moved on since then. Charming Runswick Bay is next and then Sandsend, with its two miles of beach leading into Whitby, where the sense of its heritage as a fishing and whaling port is so powerfully felt at every step. The path is a stroll through the town’s history, passing alongside the harbour, across the swing bridge and up cobbled Church Street, then climbing the 199 steps to St Mary’s Church and the iconic ruined 13th century Abbey that make Whitby’s skyline so unforgettable. Beyond lies Robin Hood’s Bay, nestled in the cliffs and coyly staying out of sight from the path until you round a headland and it reveals itself, pretty as any picture.

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The trail climbs again, to the mighty 600ft peak at Ravenscar and then, visible from nearly 10 miles away, is Scarborough, Queen of Resorts, crowned by her castle, and coming closer with every step. The path becomes a promenade through the heart of Britain’s original seaside resort and one of its bestloved, from the North Bay, round the Marine Drive and into the bustling South Bay. It passes the Spa, the site where the first tourists came to take the waters of a mineral spring believed to benefit health 400 years ago, beginning the enduring love affair between Scarborough and its visitors. Cayton Bay, surfing capital of the Yorkshire coast, is next and the trail leads to a grandstand view of elegant Filey and its Brigg, the finger of rock pointing out to sea, a magnet for families exploring its pools teeming with tiny creatures at low tide. And then comes one of the Yorkshire coast’s most imposing features – the towering chalk cliffs of Bempton, North Landing and Flamborough Head, gleaming white and seeming to glow when the sun is on them. From there, it’s an easy downhill stroll into Bridlington, with its busy harbour which is Britain’s leading port for lobster and crab fishing, and miles of golden beaches which stretch away to the horizon. Those sands are the route onwards to Hornsea and Withernsea, and then to the magical finale of the coast – Spurn, the fragile sliver of land that is a living entity, forever on the move as the tides erode it and then bring in sand and shingle to reinforce it.

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COAST

T H E PAT H TA K E S IN EVERY LANDMARK AND THE RICH AND D I V E R S E H E R I TA G E .

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Opposite: The incredible caves dotting the East Yorkshire Coast. This page clockwise from top left: Puffin at Bempton Cliffs. Cayton Bay, surfing capital of the Yorkshire Coast. Whitby Abbey. Rockpooling near Flamborough.

THE ROUTE MAKES THE S P I R I TS S OA R H I G H E R T H A N A N Y C L I F F TO P A L O N G T H E WAY.

A circuit of this utterly captivating place poised between the sea and the River Humber, where the beach shape-shifts constantly like a restless sleeper trying to get comfortable, is just one of the shorter walks that the path breaks down into. Others explore the coast’s wildlife and heritage. Walking from Bempton to Flamborough Head in spring or early summer is to be in the midst of one of Britain’s greatest natural spectaculars – half a million seabirds nesting on the cliffs and soaring on the air currents at your eye level as they head out of their nests in search of food. There are gannets, guillemots, razorbills and fulmars, but the stars of the show are puffins, with their colourful bills, clockwork-toy flight and guttural call. All are easily visible, especially from the viewpoints at the RSPB’s Bempton Cliffs reserve. Walking from Staithes to Runswick Bay or from Whitby to Robin Hood’s Bay is to step back 300 years to an age when smugglers sailed darkened ships into lonely coves to land contraband. Robin Hood’s Bay was their prime destination because it knew how to keep a secret. The closely packed cottages that make it so enthralling and picturesque were once riddled with interlinked secret passages, enabling smugglers to pass their wares from the seashore to the top of the village without them ever seeing the light of day. Or simply wander from Scarborough to Cayton Bay for the breathtaking views back across the town from the clifftop. But whether out for a stroll, or exploring everything Yorkshire’s coast has to offer, walking it makes the spirits soar higher than any clifftop along the way. Yorkshire Coast Path by Andrew Vine (above), is published by Safe Haven Books. Go to yorkshire.com/yorkshirecoastpath

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FOOD & DRINK

Left: Andrew Pern opened The Star Inn the City in 2013 and took 5,000 bookings from October to Christmas. Right: Skosh on Micklegate is in the talented hands of renowned Chef Neil Bentinck. The word Skosh comes from the Japanese sukoshi for “a little” or “small amount” which neatly sums up the premise of this hugely popular restaurant. Exquisite food comes on small to medium plates with a range of influences. Images © Karen Turner.

YO R K ON A FORK Let’s celebrate fabulous food, pop a cork and talk York! Elaine Lemm serves up a few suggestions of what’s cooking in the city.

TO P N OS H The Estrella Damm National Restaurant Awards are the definitive guide to the best restaurants in the UK. Launched in 2007, the awards celebrate the brilliance and vibrancy of the UK’s eating out scene. In 2019 Yorkshire had eight entries in the UK Top 100: 29

The Black Swan at Oldstead

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Skosh, York

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Roots, York

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The Burlington, Devonshire Arms

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The Angel at Hetton

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The Man Behind the Curtain, Leeds

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Jöro, Sheffield

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Le Cochon Aveugle, York

GETTING THERE York is one of the most easily accessible cities in the UK and is ideally positioned in the heart of the country with direct rail links bringing you from London, Edinburgh, and Manchester in around two hours. You can get to York on half hourly high-speed trains from London with LNER. LNER runs more trains between York and London than any other operator, as well as regular trains to Newcastle, Glasgow and Edinburgh and regional connections across Yorkshire. www.lner.co.uk

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s recently as six years ago, someone asking for an amazing restaurant recommendation in York could have proved a difficult question to answer. Aside from the pubs and cafes, just a few good independents were keeping the city’s culinary credentials and reputation alive. Thankfully, most of those are still operating, but they often had a bumpy ride alongside the bigger businesses, restaurant chains and fast food outlets that once dominated the city centre. York is steeped in over a millennia of history and heritage, so it is no wonder the beautiful city is a significant tourist attraction for a staggering number of visitors worldwide. Around seven million people flock to York each year to enjoy all it has to offer. One wonders, for the most part, what impression of Yorkshire food they took away with them in the past though? Today numbers are still growing and York is now considered one of the major food destinations in the UK. So, what is different now?  Perhaps the game-changing moment for York was when, in 2013 Andrew Pern, chef-owner of the renowned The Star Inn, Harome opened his second eatery in York with business partner Justin Brosenitz. The Star Inn the City, a 130-seat restaurant at the old Engine House close to Lendal Bridge was the opening of the year with 5,000 bookings from when the doors opened in October through to Christmas. A testament that the city was hungry for a change.  “When we started The Star Inn the City everyone said we were at the wrong end of town and no one went out for lunch never mind breakfast,” Pern said of his high quality, relaxed all-day eating concept. “As with the Star Inn at Harome, we have always thought more national and international with our outlook, while using our famous Yorkshire hospitality and its finest ingredients to do the rest.”

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FOOD & DRINK

Left: Do not be fooled by the simplicity of the tiny Le Cochon Aveugle serving a blind tasting menu of contemporary European foods deeply rooted in classical French techniques. Josh Overington delivers big. Images © Karen Turner and Bacon on the Beech. Right: Roots is the next chapter, for the team behind The Black Swan at Oldstead. The team work around three seasons; The Preservation Season, The Hunger Gap and The Time of Abundance. Images © Andrew Hayes Watkins.

YO R K I S N O W T H E   C I T Y TO V I S I T O U TS I D E LO N D O N . Six years on The Star Inn the City is still busy and a destination in York for delicious food, a great bar and lashings of that excellent Yorkshire hospitality.  From then on, the diversity and quality of the food scene in York have continued to change and grow. The list of great places to eat keeps increasing, with an abundance of talented chefs, small businesses, new concepts and tons of innovation hitting the city.  The spotlight certainly shone when in September 2019, three independent York restaurants, Skosh, Le Cochon Aveugle and Roots made it into the top 100 UK restaurants in the Estrella Damm National Restaurant Awards. Outside of London, Yorkshire is the area with the most listed in the awards with eight of those hundred.  After opening his inaugural restaurant Skosh on Micklegate in 2016, Neil Bentinck and his team garnered national acclaim at an unprecedented pace. AA rosettes, Michelin Bib Gourmands, column-inches in both national and local magazines and newspapers with a “One to Watch” chef award from Olive magazine and Restaurant of the Year at the White Rose Awards 2018.  Neil modestly explains why he chose to open Skosh in York. “York is home and was the only place where I wanted to open a restaurant. Plus, I always wanted a city centre venue too, to provide that buzzing, inner-city vibe,” says Neil. “York is a small place and I love it, I really do, and I’m very proud to be putting York on the culinary map these days, and we are now known nationally as a top restaurant - something I never imagined in the early days.” Plans are to keep doing what he does so well and the only thing he would consider is a larger space. “More space would be great, but there’s nothing in the pipeline yet, somewhere bigger would be fantastic of course, as I’d be able to create a better experience for my customers and staff... so hopefully soon!”  Josh Overington from the acclaimed Le Cochon Aveugle, is one of the smallest restaurants in the city but vast on stunning food, tells of his York journey. “The York food scene has become a different beast over the last five years since we first opened. It is now an established food destination city in its own right, led by independent restaurants and a network of young, talented chefs driving the food scene forward. I chose York for my restaurants as I always thought there would be a market for an ambitious restaurant doing things their own way and we’ve had phenomenal support from both local diners and guests from further afield. York is now the city to visit outside London, and it is awesome to be a part of the movement.” 

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YO R K H A S B E C O M E A D I F F E R E N T B E AST OV E R T H E L AST F I V E Y E A R S , I T ’ S N O W A N E S TA B L I S H E D F O O D D E S T I N AT I O N C I T Y I N I T S O W N R I G H T, L E D B Y YO U N G , TA L E N T E D C H E F S . J O S H OV E R I N GTO N L E C O C H O N AV E U G L E

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FOOD & DRINK

Clockwise from top left: The Cookery School at The Grand. The innovative team of chefs at Grays Court Hotel guarantee a dining experience like no other. Arras makes thought-provoking, modern food. York has two Bettys Café Tea Rooms. Experience relaxed yet sophisticated all-day dining at The Ivy restaurant. Adam Jackson has designed a wonderful Tasting Menu at The Park Restaurant, Marmadukes Hotel.

NEW ON THE MENU From Michelin star restaurants to cafes serving scrumptious afternoon teas, Yorkshire has over 7,000 places to eat and drink. Offering established favourites to brand new and recently refurbished, here’s a taster of a handful of recent openings and new looks.

The latest opening of these three talents is Roots in late 2018. Roots is the second restaurant of the Michelin-starred Black Swan at Oldstead. Chef Tommy Banks takes care of the food, his big brother James, the drinks. Following their huge success, we asked James why York? “We had been thinking about creating a second restaurant that could showcase our Oldstead produce. There seems to be a really exciting vibrant food scene in York right now with more genuinely interesting restaurants than ever. It is a pleasure for Roots to be a part of it!” York’s Star was further on the ascendancy when the city scooped two Golds in Yorkshire’s acclaimed 2019 White Rose Awards both, incidentally, for hotels. Hotels have always been a part of the food scene in the city and Grays Court Hotel in its stunning location near York Minster is no exception. They received the Best Small Hotel award with the 2 AA rosette restaurant receiving rave views from the judges for its food. The Large Hotel Award went to The Grand Hotel, impressive for its hospitality and also playing a significant part in promoting great food in York with two destination restaurants and home to The Cookery School, which focuses on a selection of International cuisines and speciality classes. But it is not just these award-winning eateries making York what it is today; they are only part of the story. For variety and impressive standards, York now takes some beating. From the vibrant and eclectic mix of the street food; the tiniest of cafés, to the renowned Bettys Tea Rooms; the illustrious The Ivy choosing York to make its first move outside of London and even the famous York Food Festival showcasing all that the city has to offer in food and drink in an exciting 10day event. There’s ‘small plates’ dining through to impressive tasting menus stacked with innovation and creativity from across the globe. And with rafts of pubs from the quirky and haunted to the trendiest of bars serving good food, it is now safe to say, York has it all, and for that, we have to thank the independent operators who took a risk with York; one which thankfully seems to have paid off.

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Delicious Devour

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It’s Buzzing

An industrial dyehouse in picturesque Holmfirth has been transformed into a stunning restaurant with rustic chic, detailed design décor and impressive Italian cuisine. Inspired by heritage and tradition, Devour’s seasonal menu consists of simple fresh ingredients, served in a fantastic setting nestled between ancient woodland and the gently flowing River Holme. There’s also a deli filled with delicious handmade breads, pastas and pastries devour.co.uk

Serving unconventional British food The Beehive X Thorner, North Leeds is a vibrant village gastropub. With a string of successful and multi-award-winning restaurants under his belt, the city’s Matt Healy was a runner-up in Masterchef: The Professionals and has since been the recipient of many culinary accolades and achievements. Foodies are making a beeline to dine in the stylish venue and waxing lyrical about the food. mhbeehive.co.uk

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Open Arms

Executive Chef Tom Garland-Jones brings international expertise and experience at Michelinstar establishments to The Tennants Arms, in the picturesque Yorkshire Dales. This Wharfedale premier gastro pub and luxury boutique hotel is praised for serving locally sourced seasonal game and delectable Dales produce, including fresh trout from the neighbouring Kilnsey Park Estate. thetennantsarms.co.uk

Cygnet-ure Dishes

Set sail from the Rendezvous Hotel, Skipton, on the brand new, 60-foot long electrically propelled Graceful Swan luxury dining boat. Take in the sights along this stretch of beautiful Yorkshire Dales canal and dine in style. From afternoon tea to a three hour floodlit VIP dinner cruise, this is a peaceful way to relax and dine. With room for up to 54 people it’s a unique opportunity to celebrate with friends. rendezvous-skipton. co.uk/gracefulswan

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D E S T I N AT I O N

W E LCO M E TO

YO R K

Main picture: The breathtaking York Minster. Below: The York Dungeon. Opposite page clockwise from top left: The eye-catching Clifford’s Tower. Castle Howard. Step back in time 1000 years at JORVIK Viking Centre.

The ancient city of York has a remarkable history which is ever present, from the cobbled medieval streets of the Shambles and Stonegate to its imposing City Walls. There is an abundance of attractions to inspire young and old minds alike, as well as a tantalizing selection of cafes and restaurants and a pub for every day of the year!

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visit to York isn’t complete without taking in York Minster. This breathtaking architectural masterpiece is the largest Gothic-style cathedral in Northern Europe. Prepare to be impressed by the myriad of colour and design of the Great East window, the largest single expanse of medieval glass in England. If you have a head for heights, the central tower is well worth the climb, from here you can marvel at the gothic grotesques that shroud the exterior and take in the wonderful views. The York Pass and York and Beyond Explorer Pass are a great way to see the sights whilst saving money. They offer free admittance to over 45 attractions across the city and surrounding area including The York Dungeon, Yorkshire Air Museum, Castle Howard and many of the attractions listed in this feature. The River Ouse brought Romans and Vikings to the city and offers a great vantage point of important buildings and landmarks. City Cruises York provide a range of tours where you can admire the scenery and even book afternoon tea! If you fancy being captain, there are self-hire options available too. Get set to party with global icon Lionel Richie, pop superstars Westlife and British music legends Madness

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as they headline the first ever York Festival, held at York Sports Club between 19th – 21st June 2020. Thought to be the most haunted city in Europe, there is no shortage of ghostly tales to spark your imagination. If you are feeling brave, join a night-time, spine-tingling ghost tour of the ancient streets to explore some of the most haunted spots and hear the chilling stories of the spooky residents! Take a walking tour with The Original Ghost Walk of York or ride The Ghost Bus Tour’s Necrobus for a comedy-horror theatre show on wheels. The annual York Ice Trail (Feb) has over 50 intricate ice sculptures to discover within the city walls as well as fun family activities. Following on from this frosty theme, York is perhaps Britain’s most Christmassy destination. From mid-November the York Christmas Festival transforms the city into a winter wonderland, with jolly fairy lights and the aroma of mulled wine, hot chocolate and roasting chestnuts around every corner. York’s streets are lined with fantastic shops, from unique independents to designer and high street brands, there is something to suit all tastes. Call in at Cleggs, Goodramgate to pick up an eclectic gift, find your quintessentially British style at Wild & Westbrooke and discover a gourmet feast at Henshelwoods Delicatessen. At the Shambles Market you’re welcomed by a vibrant display of flower bouquets. You can also find local arts and crafts, fresh foods and fashion across its 70 stalls. Just a short drive out of the city centre is York Designer Outlet, a mecca for shopaholics and fashion lovers with over 125 shops to peruse and a contemporary food court to keep you nicely refreshed! York Castle Museum occupies two grand buildings on the site of York Castle and is home to several fascinating exhibitions. Wander down the iconic Kirkgate Victorian Street and rekindle memories of childhood at Toy Stories, a compilation of some of the most popular toys of the last 150 years. 1914 – When the World Changed Forever commemorates the First World War through its extensive military and social history collections. Proudly perched atop its high mound, the eye-catching Clifford’s

Tower provides stunning views across the historic skyline and out towards the North York Moors. The tower is all that remains of the original motteand-bailey castle built by William the Conqueror in 1068, and once served as a prison with the notorious highwayman Dick Turpin one of its most infamous inmates. Step back in time 1000 years at JORVIK Viking Centre as you stand on the site of one of the most astounding discoveries of modern archaeology. Aboard the time capsule ride the sights, sounds and even the smells of the Viking Age, which are brought vividly back to life! After you’ve explored the Viking city, see the rare artefacts that were discovered here, from delicate earrings to frying pans and even fossilised Viking poo! Look out for the annual JORVIK Viking Festival in February, a nine day raucous celebration of all things Norse. The National Railway Museum is the world’s largest railway collection and is free to enter. You’ll find groundbreaking steam locomotives including Stephenson’s Rocket, the record-breaking Mallard and the modern and superfast Japanese bullet train. For a taste of decadence, board the beautifully restored railway carriage Countess of York for a luxury afternoon tea. Join a gold award-winning guided tour at York’s Chocolate Story to unwrap the history of chocolate in this city. From its exotic origins in the rainforests of Central America to sweet success on the cobbled streets of Yorkshire, you will find out how three families; Terry’s, Rowntree’s and Craven made York the UK’s home of chocolate.

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RECORD BREAKERS 1

Flying High

Breathtaking Yorkshire scenery surrounds Tan Hill Inn, Britain’s highest pub, at 1,732 ft (528m) above sea level. This 17th century watering hole is located on the Pennine Way. Its altitude can make it pretty wild at times and things are set to get even wilder, as in July 2020 singer Kim Wilde is booked to play at the intimate venue. tanhillinn.com

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First of its kind

Britain boasts 15 stunning National Parks and three of them are in Yorkshire, the North York Moors and Yorkshire Dales, and back in 1951 the Peak District became the very first. Abundant with vast moorland, rolling hills, babbling brooks, scented meadows and leafy forests, the Peak District is a haven for exciting outdoor activity. peakdistrict.gov.uk

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Ultimate Accolade

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Cliff Hanger

Yorkshire may be the largest county in the UK but that’s not its only record-breaking claim to fame.

Six minutes of pure adrenaline rush, The Ultimate at Lightwater Valley is the longest roller coaster in Europe. At 1.5 miles long the ride speeds through deep, dark forest and over hill lifts measuring a staggering 102ft and 107ft. Keep your eyes open as the views are spectacular. lightwatervalley.co.uk

It seems only fitting that Scarborough, Britain’s first seaside resort, is also home to the UK’s first funicular railway, linking the South Cliff Esplanade to the Scarborough Spa. Completed in 1875, the Scarborough South Cliff Tramway Company opened on 6th July with 1400 passengers paying one old penny to be amongst the first to take a ride. discoveryorkshirecoast.com

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Shine a Light

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Got Some Front

Sheffield United has so much to celebrate. Its Bramall Lane stadium is lauded as one of the oldest major football league grounds anywhere in the world. As a sporting venue it dates back to 1855. The sport was changed forever when the historic venue hosted the world’s first ever floodlit football match in 1878. sufc.co.uk

The stunning Wentworth Woodhouse has the longest façade of any country house in England at 606ft. This magnificent Georgian property has hosted royalty and is a popular film and TV location - recently seen in the hugely successful Downton Abbey film, as well as in television’s hit ITV series Victoria and BBC’s Gentleman Jack. wentworthwoodhouse.org.uk

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I N S P I R AT I O N

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Fairy Nice

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Showing Off

A sprinkling of fairy dust in a picturesque 100 acre wood, Northwood Trail is the first woodland fairy sanctuary in England. Eco-aware and uniquely designed to appeal to adults and children, the 1.5km trail winds through picturesque paths, passing enchanting fairy houses, a willow walled maze and elven thrones. northwoodtrail.co.uk Nestled in the Yorkshire Dales National Park, White Scar Cave is the longest show cave in Britain. Stretching 6 kilometres (3.7 miles) long, 80 minute guided tours take visitors on a magical one mile journey to witness cascading waterfalls, the Devil’s Tongue, the Battlefield Cavern and many more natural wonders. whitescarcave.co.uk

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Clockwise from left: The Peak District was the first National Park in Britain. York Minster’s incredible Great East Window has been lovingly restored. The Minerva is ideal for a unique drinking experience. Find all the fairy houses on the Northwood Trail. The Humber Bridge spans the Humber Estuary between Hessle in East Yorkshire and Barton upon Humber in North Lincolnshire.

Span-tastic

The Humber Bridge is the longest bridge in the world that can be crossed on foot or by cycle. Construction started in 1972 and when completed it consisted of enough wire to wrap around the moon more than six times (nobody’s tried this yet!). Officially opened for business in 1981 it was declared the world’s longest single-span suspension bridge and held the record for 16 years. Measuring 2,200 metres (1.4 miles) long, it’s an impressive feat of engineering. humberbridge.co.uk

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Touch of Glass

Measuring in at the size of a tennis court, York Minster’s Great East Window is the largest expanse of medieval stained glass in the country. The 600-year-old window has recently been lovingly restored. Over a decade of meticulous work behind 16 miles of scaffolding, saw experts go to great ‘panes’ to dedicate 180,000 hours to remove and return 311 glass panels. yorkminster.org

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Standing Tall

Let’s ‘rock’ face it, if you want to reach dizzy heights, ROKT is where it’s at. Standing at 36m tall, ROKTFACE in Brighouse is higher than the Tower of London and is the UK’s tallest outdoor man-made climbing wall. Get roped in for some sheer excitement! rokt.co.uk

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Snug as a Bug

Bijou, cosy and steeped in maritime history, the smallest pub room in Britain nestles in the 1829 established The Minerva. This 3-seater snug, located in an iconic building overlooking Hull Marina is an ideal place for a unique drinking experience. Of course, there are larger rooms available too if more than a trio of you are fancying a tipple. Cheers! minerva-hull.co.uk

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EXPERIENCE

SENSES AT I O N A L When it comes to embracing new experiences, there’s very little off-limits for the Yorkshire-based adventure seeker Amar Latif and even more astounding is, that at the age of 18, Amar lost his sight. P I C T U R E S DA N P R I N C E

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Left: The excitement and anticipation of driving off-road. Above: Amar at The Coniston Hotel and Spa.

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s a youngster in Glasgow, I was diagnosed with retinitis pigmentosa, a genetic disorder of the eyes that causes loss of vision. At school I would crash into things, I’d hit the hurdles or miss the rugby ball in sport. I struggled in lessons and my desk had to be moved to the front of the classroom. In my late teens, as the doctors had predicted, I lost 95 per cent of my sight. Waking up and not being able to see the Madonna poster at the end of my bed or the faces of my parents and siblings, I realised that the day had come. I was blind! Losing my sight seemed like it was the end of my world. A downward spiral of feeling depressed ensued as I was surrounded by friends enjoying their teenage years, learning to drive and gaining independence. After several months it dawned on me that I had to switch my mindset and look at things in a positive way. I graduated with a mathematics, statistics and finance degree, spending my third year studying in Canada and sparking my love of travel. Everyone around me was completely shocked at what I’d achieved. Many had said that a blind person couldn’t study to be an accountant, but I went on to be Head of Commercial Finance for British Telecom. Not bad for a bloke who can’t see! Blindness gave me my love for adventure and travel. Lack of sight has heightened my curiosity. Some travel companies rejected me when they realised I was a blind person travelling independently, so I set up Traveleyes, my own company taking groups of sighted and blind people on holiday, offering trips to over 70 destinations across the world. The BBC were looking for people with disabilities to take part in Beyond Boundaries, a TV documentary throwing together strangers with different physical challenges and sending them on a big adventure.

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BEING HANDED A DOUBLE-BARRELLED S H OTG U N FO R T H E F I R ST T I M E E V E R WA S S U R R E A L .

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EXPERIENCE

EVEN SOMEONE WHO IS BLIND CAN SEE A N D F E E L YO R K S H I R E ’ S B R E AT H TA K I N G B E A U T Y. I got onboard, trekking 220 miles across Nicaragua from the Atlantic to the Pacific coast was a gruelling experience. Scaling a 5000 foot volcano (stepping two centimetres to the left or to the right would result in a 2000 foot drop), tramping through dense tropical jungle in temperatures of 40°C, was certainly a challenge, with crocodiles and snakes deciding amongst themselves whether they should eat you now or later. Pushing another traveller who was in a wheelchair and sleeping in hammocks was exhausting. Each morning I thought I can’t do it, I worried that physically I wasn’t capable of tackling the arduous journey ahead. I then realised it had to be power of the mind that would get me through and it then turned into the most wonderful experience. Work initially brought me to this great county I now call home. I love the breathtaking beauty and even someone who is blind can see and feel it. I’ve walked the Yorkshire Three Peaks (Pen-y-ghent, Ingleborough and Whernside), 26 amazing miles in 10 hours. I can’t physically see it but I can feel the wind on my face and I have incredible images of rolling green hills in different shades. Sometimes I think I have a better picture than a sighted person. It’s like reading a book that’s then turned into a film. The picture conjured up in the mind is often far more vivid than when you actually see the cinema interpretation. Returning from another far-flung destination, I recently headed to The Coniston Hotel Country Estate and Spa

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in the Dales to embrace quiet relaxation, delicious cuisine and to have a lot of fun. Being handed a double-barrelled shotgun for the first time ever was surreal. As a blind person it’s crucial to listen to instructions. A helpful instructor explained the importance of taking the correct stance. If you pull the trigger and you’re not in the right position, flying back and toppling over is highly likely. The gun was loaded, I carefully rested it on my shoulder and I was about to fire. Luckily my positioning was bang on and although I was scared, I also had an overwhelming feeling of exhilaration. For my second go I relaxed into it more, but the jolt is powerful every time and the intense smell of gunpowder made me think of how life must have been in the past, hunting and gathering to survive. It may seem like a reckless activity, a blind man clay target shooting but with a sighted professional instructor to verbally guide and ensure I was aiming in the right direction, all went to plan. I didn’t know what an archery bow looked like or how it felt. It reminded me of a violin bow and I was convinced I was going to play music. Surprisingly, the skill of firing an arrow requires a lot of strength and I was relieved that my time at the gym had prepared me well. The bow has to be pulled back gently. My sighted instructor gave me accurate guidance, encouraged me to relax and the sound of the arrow whooshing through the air at top speed and hitting the target with such force is something I will never forget.

Opposite: Amar gets to grips with a shotgun and collects his arrows. Above: Professional instructors guide Amar through the experience. Below: Amar stayed on the beautiful 1,400 acre Dales estate.

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EXPERIENCE

T H E S PA WA S A F U L L- O N S E N S O RY EXPERIENCE.

Top: The Coniston Spa. Top right: Amar relaxes in the outdoor infinity pool. Above: The sensational Land Rover off-road experience.

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The spa was certainly a full-on sensory experience with the intense scent of the beautiful oils and potions. Relaxing in a luxurious room with dimmed lights, the only challenge was to stay awake! Archery is very onerous and firing guns is a strenuous sport. A good back and head massage is ideal to feel rejuvenated. Just when I thought it couldn’t get any better, I then took a dip into an outdoor infinity Jacuzzi, overlooking The Coniston lake against a backdrop of rolling Yorkshire Dales hills. Bubbling water and the sun on my face was magical and the perfect way to unwind. Taste is important to me. I think sighted people get distracted if someone puts lovely leaves on a plate, if it looks good you automatically think it will taste good. When you’re blind you can feel and taste and it has to be right, as you have no preconceived idea what it looks like. I had delicious fishcakes with haddock and prawn inside, then the trout on a bed of potatoes was incredibly satisfying. Dessert was ginger rhubarb and custard, a mixture of sensations and tastes, blended together perfectly. Custard is just THE most underrated treat ever! Being driven off-road is something else when you have no idea what lies ahead. Riding along in a Land Rover tilted 32°

to one side plays with your mind. I was convinced it was going to go over, but what a sensational experience. Accelerating up steep steps then plummeting with an enormous splash into a lagoon, I could feel the spray of the water. The description of each twist and turn from the experienced driver, added to the excitement and anticipation. Getting the chance to actually drive a John Deere Gator was incredible. An offroad buggy (often used by farmers) and being guided by the brilliant expert James was so much fun. We had a great rapport and got a descriptive guiding system going ‘9 o’clock...10 o’clock, right back to 12’. This was all done in a private field and is similar to a business team building activity offered to companies who have awaydays at the hotel. Sighted staff take part in a blindfolded driving experience. Whatever your disability, if you feel hesitant to get involved in any adventurous activity or trying something new, I know that as soon as I started saying yes and getting involved (after an initial panic), my life changed for the better. Push yourself out of your comfort zone and your world will become bigger and more enjoyable. It doesn’t have to be a massive daredevil activity, it may just be something a little different that gives you a buzz.

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SENSE CHECK

E X P LO R E Cottage in the Dales has the award-winning The Dairy, a luxurious and relaxing 5* holiday let, with accessibility support for guests with mobility, hearing and visual requirements. In the heart of the stunning Yorkshire Dales National Park, it’s an ideal location for exploring the amazing countryside or for simply relaxing in style. cottageinthedales.co.uk

TO U R S

ACC E S S A L L

AREAS Check in and check out some of Yorkshire’s many venues and locations with top disability and accessibility options. A wide range of facilities are open to visitors with visual, hearing, mobility requirements and other additional needs.

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SEE

Enjoy luxury driver-guided excursions to some of Yorkshire’s many picturesque locations. YorTours can provide a fabulous experience, accommodating specific accessibility requirements and designing trips to cater for individual needs. With a unique triple sunroof providing all round visibility, you will be able to enjoy the splendour of Yorkshire in true style and comfort. yortours.co.uk

V I S I T With access, hearing and visual aids available, experience a journey back in time at the JORVIK Viking Centre (top) and witness life as it would have been in 10th century York. The awardwinning attraction is located on the actual site of an astounding archaeological discovery. jorvikvikingcentre.co.uk

C U R TA I N C A L L

Between March and October around half a million seabirds gather on the towering chalk cliffs at RSPB Bempton Cliffs (left). Three viewpoints are fully accessible and there are wheelchair bays with higher handrails that don’t restrict the amazing view. A free wheelchair, mobility scooter and all-terrain mobility scooter are available to book in advance and assistance dogs are welcome. rspb.org.uk

D O Enter one of the world’s most spectacular aquariums, get amongst thousands of sea creatures and learn more about marine conservation at The Deep in Hull (above). There’s a range of services and equipment for visitors with access or additional needs. thedeep.co.uk

Offering audio-described, captioned, relaxed, BSL (British Sign Language) plus other specialist productions, are Leeds Playhouse, Sheffield Theatres, Hull Truck Theatre and many more performance venues throughout Yorkshire. Sheffield Theatres and Leeds Playhouse are also part of the Ramps on the Moon group, who are committed to equal employment and artistic opportunities for disabled performers and creative teams. leedsplayhouse.org.uk sheffieldtheatres.co.uk hulltruck.co.uk

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YO R K S H I R E DA L E S & H E R R I OT COUNTRY Experience the Yorkshire Dales & Herriot Country and discover vast skies, epic views and glorious countryside with bustling market towns and idyllic villages.

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xploring the spectacular limestone valleys of the Yorkshire Dales National Park is a true delight and with miles of footpaths, trails and cycle tracks, very accessible too. The Dales Bike Centre situated in the beautiful Swaledale valley is perfectly located to access both mountain biking and road cycling. Cyclists will love the Swale Trail, a 12 mile mountain bike route from Reeth to Keld while the challenging 130 mile Yorkshire Dales Cycleway encompasses most of the major dales. Walkers will relish the Yorkshire Three Peaks of Pen-yghent, Whernside and Ingleborough, part of the Pennine range, that make for a magnificent walking break. The scenic village of Ingleton has a skyline dominated by the formidable Ingleborough but underground you’ll find two of Yorkshire’s three show caves. White Scar Cave is Britain’s longest

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show cave, while in Ingleborough Cave a tooth from the long extinct woolly rhinoceros was found. In the subterranean darkness you’ll find curious rock formations, stalactites and stalagmites. Back in the open air venture along the Ingleton Waterfalls Trail through dramatic gorges and woodland to see cascading falls. The scale of Ribblehead Viaduct on the Settle to Carlisle railway line is staggering. It is surrounded by mile after mile of rugged moorland dales, this is an isolated but incredibly beautiful place. Trains still journey over this historic track, providing a thrilling opportunity to experience perhaps one of the most stunning rail journeys in England. The remarkable Malham Cove was formed at the end of the last Ice Age by a waterfall carrying meltwater from glaciers. There are several walk routes that take you to the mysterious rock formations at the top of the cove,

Above: The Settle Loop in Upper Ribblesdale - a beautiful 10 mile circular route of quiet winding lanes in the Yorkshire Dales. Explore on foot, by bike or on horse.

which stands at a jaw-dropping 270ft and offers breathtaking views. Walk on to the magical Janet’s Foss waterfall in the ancient woodland below. Step back in time as you wander past the delightful stone cottages in the small hillside village of Grassington. The traditional pubs, tearooms, shops and art galleries make it a delightful place to explore, while music and art bring the town alive in a myriad of colours at the annual Grassington Festival. Caving adventures can be had at Stump Cross Caverns where the remains of wolverines were discovered, a giant member of the weasel family that have been extinct for centuries in the UK. A short distance away is the historic town of Skipton. With its award-winning high street, weekly markets and winding canal, there is lots to discover. Commanding a prime position in the town centre is the grand Skipton Castle, one of the best

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D E S T I N AT I O N

Left: Walking at Janet’s Foss in Malham. Gunnerside Bottoms in Swaledale. Below: Wensleydale Railway. Below left: Keelham Farm Shop.

preserved medieval fortresses in the country. If you begin to feel peckish, a feast of local produce can be found at Keelham Farm Shop. Nearby, The Coniston Hotel Country Estate and Spa not only offer a wonderful rural escape; thrill seekers will enjoy their off-road driving experiences too. Alongside the banks of the River Wharfe, at Bolton Abbey, are the crumbling ruins of its Priory. This landscape is full of legend, soak up the blissful surroundings with a walk along the riverside, through leafy woodland or take a ride on the Embsay & Bolton Abbey Steam Railway. Enjoy a scenic drive along meandering roads to the pretty town of Hawes. Here you’ll find the fascinating Dales Countryside Museum with galleries and exhibits which tell the story of the people and landscape of the Dales past and present. Cheese lovers should pay a visit to Wensleydale Creamery for a tour of the visitor centre. Not far from here is Aysgarth Falls, a spectacular triple series of waterfalls carved into the River Ure and Hardraw Force, the highest single drop waterfall in England. While delightful heritage railway adventures can be found at Wensleydale Railway, with services

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running between Northallerton West and Redmire. The picturesque town of Richmond, next to the River Swale, has hillside streets lined with Georgian architecture and is crowned with the imposing Richmond Castle. A short distance away, surround yourself with sweeping vistas of Swaledale from the beautiful village green at Reeth and find yourself in the heart of local arts and crafts. Handsome Kiplin Hall has a treasure trove of finery within its 17th century walls, while the glorious woodland at Thorp Perrow Arboretum and Bird of Prey & Mammal Centre, Bedale, is home to one of the largest collections of trees in the country, with species from around the world. Everyone will love meeting the adorable meerkats, wallabies and

the magnificent birds of prey too. More amazing family adventures can be found nearby at The Camp Hill Estate with its high ropes, quad biking and Woodland Kingdom. The rolling hills of Hambleton are peppered with charming market towns; Northallerton, Bedale, Easingwold, Stokesley and Thirsk and all still have bustling weekly markets. Thirsk is also home to the world’s most well-known vet, James Herriot, who was made famous by his books and the TV classic All Creatures Great and Small. At the World of James Herriot, in his fully restored 1940s home and surgery, you can see where he lived and worked as a young North Yorkshire vet. Follow The Herriot Trail and visit Wensleydale, Swaledale and Wharfedale to discover the charming villages, historic landmarks and dramatic landscapes that inspired his stories and feature in the old and new 2020 version of the TV series.

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ADVERTORIAL

EXPERIENCE

DONCASTER IN 2020 Doncaster has so much exciting history waiting to be discovered by you. The historical market town dates back to 71AD and traces of its rich history can still be seen in and around the town today. Doncaster is home to one of three original Georgian Mansion Houses in the country. You must pay the Grade I listed building a visit on one of the open days to truly appreciate the splendour of decadent Georgian architecture. Doncaster is also home to the St Leger, the world’s oldest classic horse race which runs annually in September at the Doncaster Racecourse. Located approximately five miles out of the town centre you will find Brodsworth Hall, a beautiful ‘conserved as found’ country house with stunning gardens covering around 15 acres. Explore the many rooms of the house, roam the gardens and stop for some tea in the tea rooms. Watch out for Brodsworth Hall’s 25th anniversary events on our website following Princess Margaret’s opening of the building to the public in 1995. A visit to the Doncaster Minster is also a must. It is one of Doncaster’s most recognisable and architecturally impressive buildings and welcomes everyone. 2020 will see Doncaster commemorate the 400th anniversary of the sailing of the Mayflower due to its strong connections. Keep your eyes peeled for the exciting celebration events that Doncaster has in store for you!

© Ben Harrison Photography

E X P E R I E N C E H E R I TA G E

E X P E R I E N C E A R T A N D C U LT U R E Art and Culture has become a key part of daily life in Doncaster. Whether you are an avid theatregoer, a visual arts lover or you just love exploring and experiencing new cultures, Doncaster has it all. Doncaster hosts a quarterly Art Fair in the heart of Doncaster Market where you can browse and buy art from a range of emerging and established regional, national and international artists. The Ted Hughes Poetry Festival in Mexborough is the liveliest poetry festival in the UK. It arises from and embraces the community, and takes them to other worlds.

EXPERIENCE DONCASTER TOW N C E N T R E Head to Doncaster town centre for a spot of shopping at the Frenchgate Centre where you will find all your favourite high street stores. Do have a good look around our numerous independent boutiques and of course Doncaster Market, one of the finest markets in the north. Also just a few miles out of the town centre you will find the Lakeside Village Outlet and Wheatley Hall Retail Park – both of which have free parking too.

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After a long day of shopping head over to one of Doncaster’s many eateries or live music venues if you fancy a bit more of a lively atmosphere. If you fancy some tasty international street food, The Wool Market is a great choice and if you are after more of a pub/bar environment, then venues like The Queen Crafthouse, The Salutation, Doncaster Brewery and Tap, Hallgate, O’Donegans and The Leopard are all great choices. For an alternative night out at the theatre, look no further than Cast and Doncaster Little Theatre where you can watch some of the best performances around. The possibilities really are endless in Doncaster.

EXPERIENCE QUALITY FA M I LY T I M E Doncaster is home to some fantastic, award-winning attractions including Bawtry Paintball Fields, an outdoor activity centre offering paintballing, laser combat, archery, tomahawk throwing and in 2020 they will be opening a brand new Tree Trek and Zip Park too! Multiple award-winning Sunnybank Gardens is a great day out, particularly for those of you with younger children. Walk around the beautiful gardens, enjoy a game of crazy golf and then cool down with delicious locally made farm ice cream. Boston Park Farm is a firm favourite with children and parents alike. The outdoor activity centre is open all year round and is home to a number of animals big and small, an outdoor play area and more. During the summer months take the kids along to Maize Maze where they will have hours of fun trying to find their way out. One of Doncaster’s favourite family attractions is the Doncaster Dome, one of the region’s premier sports, leisure & entertainment destinations, with over 50 activities, including swimming, ice skating and a brand new cycle track. Doncaster has a number of award-winning and family friendly green spaces, such as Sandall Park and is home to a number of beautiful nature reserves such as Potteric Carr that are well worth visiting. Of course, no visit to Doncaster would be complete without a trip to the UK’s No.1 walk-through wildlife adventure, Yorkshire Wildlife Park. The park is currently undergoing a £50m expansion which will further improve your visitor experience in 2020 and beyond. Clockwise from top left: St Leger, the world’s oldest classic horse race at Doncaster Racecourse. Doncaster Dome. Doncaster Market. Yorkshire Wildlife Park. The beautiful Doncaster Minster.

NEW FOR 2020 2020 is a big year for Doncaster with lots of exciting projects such as the new Doncaster Central Library and Museum and the new Civic and Cultural Quarter cinema and restaurant complex (to name a few) due for completion. Doncaster is easily accessible by road, rail and air so why not start planning your visit to Doncaster today! For information about more things to do in Doncaster go to www.visitdoncaster.com

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12 WEEKEND

BREAKS Yorkshire has something special for every season, month, week and day of the year. Here are just 12 amazing ideas which will help you plan a brilliant break in this magnificent county.

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I N S P I R AT I O N

Images clockwise: Hull Old Town. Skidby Windmill in the Yorkshire Wolds. Shining Stars above Malham. York Racecourse.

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W H AT ’ S U P D O C K ?

Visit Hull UK City Of Culture. Be entertained at the Bonus Arena with its colourful collection of worldclass acts and top theatre productions with packed programmes at the city’s multi-award-winning venues Hull New Theatre and Hull Truck Theatre, presenting inspiring productions that reflect the diversity of modern Britain. Maritime history is abundant in Hull and a wander on the Fish Trail is a fun way to discover a unique piece of public art and to trawl the city centre catching sight of 41 fish, taking in the picturesque Old Town and thriving Fruit Market en route. Grab a map at the Hull City Hall ticket office trail start. You can’t miss The Deep, an incredible piece of aquarium architecture on the water’s edge. Dine at 1884 Wine and Tapas for a taste of the Mediterranean on the Humber and stay at Hideout Apartment Hotel, beautiful boutique accommodation located in the heart of the historic Old Town and only a five minute mooch to Hull’s hot spots. Escape the city and discover the rolling landscapes of the Yorkshire Wolds. A short drive from Hull, David Hockney fans will recognise the chalk downs, rich farmland, beautiful trees and leafy country lanes. Escape the crowds and enjoy a ramble in picturesque valleys and through beautiful woods.

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S TA R G A Z I N G

The National Parks Dark Skies Festival may be an ideal star-studded break that’s simply out of this world. It’s all about discovering, learning and enjoying the darkness under an impressive display of spectacular shining stars. Take part in cycling, walking, running or caving long after the sun has set, attend a stargazing party or get involved in a daytime event, discovering the facts behind star constellations or even make a rocket.

M A R V E L AT A T R U LY S P E C TA C U L A R D I S P L AY O F S H I N I N G S TA R S . Families, first-time stargazers and anyone wishing to enhance their astrophotography skills can get in on the astronomy action or maybe you just want to marvel at a truly remarkable natural phenomenon. National Parks remain some of the darkest places in Great Britain and an ideal setting to appreciate starry skies and over 100 events - the sky’s the limit. North York Moors and Yorkshire Dales (14 February - 1 March 2020).

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R AC I N G T I M E S

Be part of the oldest, richest, fastest and most famous horse racing event at The Welcome to Yorkshire Ebor Festival. Dating back to 1843, witness sporting excellence combined with fashion and fun over four fabulous days in York. Stay at the neighbouring and multi-award-winning Middlethorpe Hall & Spa, a magnificent William lll country house in 20 acres of gardens and parkland, only two miles, five minutes by car, from York’s historic city centre, packed full of fantastic restaurants and bars and fascinating heritage locations. Stop for a shop at York Designer Outlet, home to over 120 leading UK and international designer and high street brands. The Welcome to Yorkshire Ebor Festival (19th to 22nd August 2020).

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Left to right: Yorkshire Sculpture Park © Jonty Wilde. Get close to nature at Yurtshire Fountains. Yorkshire Wildlife Park’s Grévy’s Zebra - the most threatened species of Zebra in the world. Boggle Hole © Tony Bartholomew/NYMNPA.

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SHAPE SHIFTERS

Impressed with the success of last summer’s Yorkshire Sculpture International? Then take a city break and discover 200 of the world’s greatest artists at four world-class leading Yorkshire arts venues - The Hepworth Wakefield, Yorkshire Sculpture Park, Leeds Art Gallery and The Henry Moore Institute. The Yorkshire Sculpture Triangle’s beautiful vistas are dotted with some of the country’s finest sculptures, set in remarkable and alluring indoor and outdoor spaces. All located within a 30 minute drive, bus or train ride from each other. Stay in the city at the luxurious historic Principal Met Hotel Leeds or for amazing apartment Leeds living, The Bells are a real treat. Enjoy a spot of designer retail therapy and top-notch dining at Harvey Nichols and film, fashion and food fans can head to Trinity Leeds.

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D I S COV E R The Dales offer a great opportunity to get back to nature. They also hold some unique geological spectacles. Discover the huge, curved limestone cliff at Malham Cove and enjoy the natural playground of weird and wonderful rock formations at Brimham Rocks. And what a refreshing sight to see Britain’s highest unbroken waterfall, Hardraw Force.

E V E R Y B O DY Y U R T S

Get close to nature and enjoy the great outdoors. Yurtshire Glamping offers quality, simplicity and style in an outstanding location. There are double beds, fabulous futons, private kitchens, lanterns, wood burning stoves, full flushing loos, plus hot gas powered showers AND there are wood burning hot tubs to relax beneath the stars. On the edge of the Nidderdale Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty and the Yorkshire Dales National Park, Yurtshire Fountains is just a mile from Fountains Abbey and Studley Royal Water Garden UNESCO World Heritage site. A short drive away is the fun-packed Lightwater Valley theme park or take a tour of the Black Sheep Brewery in Masham. Carry on glamping!

GLAMP IT UP WITH STYLE IN A N O U T S TA N D I N G L O C AT I O N .

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A N I M A L M AG I C

Obsessed with Sir David Attenborough wildlife documentaries or fixed on farming and all things countryside? Kids and adults alike can head south and indulge in a double-dose of animal antics. At Doncaster’s Yorkshire Wildlife Park find out all about its roaring success with amazing animal conservation projects and then check out what’s happening, just a short drive away, in the barns in Barnsley at Cannon Hall Farm with a moo neigh, oink, baa, quack and a cock-a-doodle do! Want to check out Yorkshire’s native wildlife? Then Bunker Campers are a great way to take your accommodation on the road and see nature in its full glory across the county’s countryside!

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D O G D AY S

Take a beach break with a four-legged friend and walk the walk! Robin Hood’s Bay to Boggle Hole is just two miles return but is a feast for the eyes from start to finish. There are few things more exhilarating and enjoyable than a saunter along a stunning sandy beach (exploring rockpools and hunting for fossils enroute), combined with a clifftop stroll offering breathtaking coastal views and a meander along winding countryside paths. Throw in cosy cafes, step into inns steeped in maritime and smuggling history, as well as browsing through independent shops and art galleries all nestled in a quaint historic fishing village AND dogs are welcome on the beach all year too. What’s not to like! Camp at Hooks House Farm or book into Farsyde Farm Cottages in Robin Hood’s Bay.

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W I L D L I F E WAT C H

Relax at Church Farm Cottages, lovely holiday lets in the heart of the Yorkshire Nature Triangle and a great base to explore East Yorkshire’s 30 nature hot spots and designated havens for wildlife. A short drive away is a coast of discovery for all animal lovers, from wonderful whales to delightful dolphins and super cute seals. Watch puffins on the cliffs and spot swirling gannets riding the air above the waves at RSPB Bempton Cliffs. Flamborough’s Living Seas Centre is packed with information about the North Sea’s amazing marine wildlife. Head down the slipway to South Landing, where low tide reveals a spectacular array of rock pools. Check out the Discovery Centre at Yorkshire Wildlife Trust’s Spurn National Nature Reserve, one of the country’s top bird migration destinations, located in the Humber Estuary it attracts thousands of wading birds and birds of prey. The newly renovated black and white-striped Spurn Lighthouse is open to the public and offers several floors of exciting interactive displays with spectacular views from the 128ft high rooftop. Roam the spectacular beaches and dunes on foot or bicycle, or take a Spurn Safari aboard a giant 4x4.

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H E R I TA G E H A L I FA X

As seen on TV and film screens Halifax is packed with historic architectural gems, nestled in the picturesque Calder Valley. The Piece Hall (Brassed Off location), could be mistaken for an idyllic Italian piazza, but is a Grade I listed, architectural and cultural phenomenon. Imagine an historic Tuscan square has been dismantled, shipped across from Italy and painstakingly rebuilt brick by brick in Halifax. Established in 1779 it is the sole survivor of the great eighteenth century northern cloth halls and is now a world-class venue for entertainment, restaurants, bars and a superb selection of independent stores. Explore Shibden Hall the home of Anne Lister and location for the hit drama Gentleman Jack, the story of the inspirational and groundbreaking businesswoman. The hall dates back to 1420 and is surrounded by beautiful

gardens and parkland. Stay and dine at the stunning Holdsworth House an historic Jacobean manor, as seen in Last Tango in Halifax, its famous visitors have included Rudolph Nureyev, Jayne Mansfield and The Beatles. A former corn and spinning mill, the 17th century Shibden Mill Inn is nestled in the picturesque Shibden Valley and was converted to a country pub in 1890, with a delicious menu on offer and luxury rooms to stay over. Alibi Bar & Restaurant is located in the Grade II listed Georgian Somerset House, grab a cocktail or enjoy afternoon tea.

I M AG I N E A N H I STO R I C T U S C A N S Q UA R E H AS B E E N D I S M A N T L E D, S H I P P E D A C R O S S F R O M I TA LY A N D R E B U I LT I N H A L I FA X . 46

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GET SOME SKILLS

Fancy a luxury break in stunning surroundings, amidst breathtaking countryside and the chance to pick up an impressive skill? Middleton Lodge is a gorgeous Georgian country house set in 200 acres at the gateway to the Yorkshire Dales. From rose pruning to bread making, floristry to photography there’s a packed schedule of activities for all seasons. Delicious dining, cycling on the estate and relaxing treatment rooms plus Pilates are on offer too. Just a short drive away you can enjoy the picturesque market town of Richmond, the cultural capital of the Dales and a welcome blend of history and beautiful scenery. Visit Richmond Castle, the oldest Norman stone fortress in Britain and Kiplin Hall and Gardens, a fascinating Jacobean family home with fabulous grounds, walks and changing exhibitions. Make a date for Swaledale Festival (23rd May to 6th June 2020) celebrating music, arts and walking in the Yorkshire Dales.

Clockwise from top left: Thousands of birds cling to a rocky outcrop. Puffins visit from March to July. Richmond Castle. Middleton Lodge. Shibden Hall. Entrance to The Piece Hall piazza Š Paul White Photography. Spurn Point Lighthouse.

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MICHELIN MOMENTS

For a fabulous food indulgent getaway, take a long weekend to visit one or all five fantastic Yorkshire Michelin restaurants. Work up an appetite exploring Yorkshire’s stunning landscapes and then tuck into some incredible food. Dine and stay at The Angel at Hetton, near Skipton, which has for many years held the reputation of being the dining destination establishment in one of the most exquisite corners of the North Yorkshire Dales. Famous for its food as well as its warm, welcoming atmosphere, it has maintained a strong following among locals as well as international customers. The Pipe and Glass, South Dalton, has been Michelin starred for many years and voted one of the top 40 restaurants outside of London. The Black Swan at Oldstead, is a Michelin Star, and 4 AA Rosette, pub and restaurant with rooms, 20 miles north of York. Michelin says of chef/ owner, Tommy Banks, ‘cooking is modern and highly skilled but satisfyingly unpretentious’. The Star Inn  at Harome, a picturesque village on the edge of the North York Moors National Park and a couple of miles outside the market town of Helmsley, has origins believed to date back to the 14th Century. This restaurant is owned by multi-award-winning chef Andrew Pern. For city dining The Man Behind The Curtain, Leeds is a restaurant serving contemporary cuisine with its own identity, inspired by the arts, music and modern culture. Why not hire a vintage car and visit these exceptional eateries in style from Classic Car Hire Yorkshire or Classic Car Hire North?

Above: The Pipe and Glass in South Dalton has been voted one of the top 40 restaurants outside of London © VHEY.

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WO R K U P A N A P P E T I T E E X P LO R I N G YO R K S H I R E ’ S S T U N N I N G LANDSCAPES AND T H E N T U C K I N TO S O M E I N C R E D I B L E F O O D.

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A L E AG U E A H E A D

Sheffield United Football Club is back in the Premier League! Have an action-packed break, watch The Blades, stay at the Copthorne Hotel Bramall Lane close to the heart of the city and enjoy a drink and bite to eat at Riverside Kelham, just outside Sheffield’s city centre. Open seven days a week and passionate about catering to your every need, from a pint or a gin and tonic in the beer garden on a sunny evening to a Sunday roast by the fire on a winter’s day. Walking around Sheffield, you’ll soon find what makes the city special. A proud industrial past and an array of independent eateries and microbreweries, plus live music, street art, exhibitions and a vibrant events scene, there’s lots to keep you entertained. Sheffield is the UK’s leading destination for outdoor adventure, city culture and rural escapes. For a full-on activity weekend, add parasailing, boat hire, running, walking, climbing, horse riding and paragliding in the nearby countryside, part of the Peak District National Park.

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W E LCO M E TO

HULL & EAST YO R K S H I R E The waterfront city of Hull is fast becoming a top visitor destination. With its medieval streets, striking architecture, cuttingedge culture, revamped city centre and a chic marina. It’s no wonder it’s attracting visitors from across the globe.

Main picture: Amazing views across the Yorkshire Wolds. Above: Hull Marina. Opposite from top left: The Streetlife Museum in Hull’s Museums Quarter. The colourful Fruit Market, Hull’s modern, vibrant and unique cultural quarter © Nick Nicklin. The chalk cliffs at Flamborough on the stunning heritage coast © Martin Wilson.

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T

he beautiful buildings of the Old Town are testament to the city’s seafaring heyday and the old cobbled streets have witnessed some of the country’s most significant historical moments; from plots against the royal family to the World War II Blitz when Hull was heavily bombed. Thankfully the Old Town survived and is now home to the free to enter Museums Quarter which includes Wilberforce House, the birthplace of the famous antislavery trade campaigner William Wilberforce. Nearby the magnificent Ferens Art Gallery is home to a fabulous art collection spanning the 14th century to the present day and includes prized works by European Old Masters like Canaletto. The attractive Hull Marina, with its sleek yachts is also the centre of Hull’s cultural scene. A stone’s throw from the water’s edge is the Fruit Market which used to be home to a flourishing fruit trade. It’s now the place to find some of Yorkshire’s finest eateries, traditional pubs, microbreweries and even a gin distillery, all alongside art galleries and live music. A short walk away you’ll find the incredible Trinity Market bursting with street food vendors cooking up a storm of flavours and taste sensations from across the globe. The beautifully refurbished Victorian Paragon Arcade is the perfect place to while away time as you browse the swathe of fashionable independent shops and cafes. From the comfort of dry land experience an awe-inspiring underwater world at The Deep. This is one of the most spectacular aquariums in the world with a staggering range of marine

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life from across the globe to admire, from small and colourful tropical fish to huge sharks, rays and adorable penguins. It’s guaranteed to delight young and old alike. For a leisurely day out, the nearby market town of Beverley is a great place to visit. Enjoy a stroll around the historic market place (Saturday is market day) and explore the quaint arcades, high-end shops and antique merchants. A trip here isn’t complete without taking in the imposing and ornate Beverley Minster, widely regarded as a gothic masterpiece and the inspiration for London’s Westminster Abbey. Just outside the town is the beautiful greenery of Beverley Westwood home to Beverley Racecourse, which hosts a variety of exciting fixtures including the family focused Bygone Beverley Raceday and the Beverley Bullet Sprint Stakes. A recent addition to the town is the Flemingate shopping area where families can enjoy the cinema, high street shops, a gym and even an inflatable theme park. Younger visitors will love a visit to William’s Den in neighbouring North Cave. This unique indoormeets-outdoor adventure playscape, centred on good old-fashioned fun is inspired by kids and loved by grown-ups. Whilst here enjoy the refreshments in the fabulous café, including the home-made ice cream, a firm favourite with all who visit. While you’re in the area, pop over to Drewton’s farm shop offering the very best in locally sourced produce in its café, delicatessen and butchers. The picturesque Yorkshire Wolds are not to be missed. Gently undulating hills and picture postcard

villages make this a peaceful haven to lose yourself in. Explore the stunning scenery on foot as you follow all or part of the 79 mile Wolds Way, or pedal through wildflower and hedgerow lined country lanes on the Yorkshire Wolds Cycle Route. Make sure you stop at the charming country houses of Burton Agnes Hall and Gardens and Burton Constable Hall and Grounds both filled with treasures amassed over the centuries or the majestic Sledmere House and Gardens near Driffield. The stunning heritage coast highlights of RSPB Bempton Cliffs Nature Reserve, Flamborough Head and Spurn offer magnificent views and a wealth of flora and fauna. The domineering chalk cliffs at Flamborough stand at 400 feet and whilst high tides see them battered by the waves, low tide reveals caves that can be accessed from North Landing via the cliff footpaths and steps near the lighthouse at Flamborough Head. The Yorkshire Wildlife Trust’s Living Seas Centre is a great place for families to learn more about sea life above and below the waves. The traditional seaside town of Bridlington has a lot to offer; a 900 year old working harbour, beautiful beaches, long promenades, excellent fish and chip restaurants and John Bull World of Rock where you’ll find colourful sticks of rock galore! Here, with a dramatic clifftop location and stunning views of the bay and harbour below, you’ll find Bridlington Spa. One of the Yorkshire coast’s most iconic live music, dance hall and theatre venues. Close by, set in 50 acres of parkland, the charming Sewerby Hall and Gardens offers something for everyone. Relax in the award-winning gardens or explore the deep-rooted heritage of the house.

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INDULGENCE

H A LL RIGHT NOW Heritage hotel, luxury location, gorgeous gardens, delicious dining, spectacular spa‌Jez Lazell experienced it ALL, following the lavish launch of the county’s recently restored and already multi-award-winning, stunning Grantley Hall.

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INDULGENCE

I 

have slept at 9,000 ft above-sea-level before, but never – until now – in Yorkshire. Welcome to Grantley Hall, a remarkable new country house hotel near Ripon, where ‘altitude-adjustable’ bedrooms are merely the hors d’oeuvre in an eye-poppingly impressive buffet of sports and wellness facilities that make your average LA Fitness look like a nursery playground. Throw in a tranquil spa, 60ft pool and cryotherapy chamber and it’s little wonder the hotel has triumphed as Best Newcomer in the Conde Nast Johansens Awards for Excellence. In October, it also scooped Best Wellness Retreat title in The Sunday Times 100 Best Hotels. It is an astonishing story, made all the more astonishing because four years ago the Palladian mansion was almost in ruins. Built by Thomas Norton in the 17th century, Grantley Hall had been a family residence, WWII convalescent home and adult education centre in its time, finally languishing as a largely vacant holiday home in desperate need of repair. All that changed when Barnsley-born Valeria Sykes, stumbled across it on a drive around the eastern Dales in 2015. “Many years ago I’d enjoyed a decoupage course at Grantley Hall, and fell in love with the building. I thought it would be the perfect place to have afternoon tea,” Valeria reminisces. “Continuing on my Dales drive, my mind and heart began to race. I had a vivid vision of an incredible first-class hotel and at that very point, before even returning home, I decided to buy it.” More than three years of meticulous refurbishment later, the grade II*-listed mansion reopened last year after a £70 million facelift that

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doesn’t so much beggar belief, as make you rethink what a country house hotel can be. Now in her 70s, the notoriously high-energy new owner has been heavily involved in the redesign, and her pride in all things Yorkshire is writ large: the beds are made in Leeds, Raisthorpe Manor damson gin fills decanters in every room, and portraits by Ruth Fitton, an artist from Harrogate, hang in the drawing room. A self-confessed perfectionist, the proud new proprietor has created a stunning luxury get away showcasing decadent decor which strikes a just right balance between cosy and contemporary. Crushed velvet russet sofas beckon from the oak-panelled bar and electric-blue banquettes add a fun urban-chic touch to the art deco pan-Asian EightyEight restaurant, one of three dinner options at the hotel. The others are the low-lit, dark-wood-panelled Fletchers and Shaun Rankin’s 38-cover, 10-course finedining restaurant. Lunch in the spa cafe is a health nut’s fantasy of mindfully delicious dishes such as kale pesto linguine and poached salmon; afternoon tea by the fire in the lounge is perfect after a two-mile stroll along the river to the 12th-century Fountains Abbey and Studley Royal Water Garden, a magnificent UNESCO World Heritage Site. There are 21 elegant rooms in the main house at Grantley Hall, each with a bath. The decor is resolutely classical, with beige carpets, earthy throws, velvet armchairs and (slightly) more modern versions of those little lampshades spotted in cosy alcoves on trips to relatives as a child. Room 21 is a favourite, with window seats overlooking the river and gardens.

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Clockwise from top left: Create a state of equilibrium unique to you in the spa. Discover Shaun Rankin’s 38-cover, 10-course fine-dining restaurant. Exquisite rooms and suites ensure the ultimate experience in relaxation. The proud new proprietor has created impeccable interiors. Images © Jack Hardy.

GRANTLEY HALL IS A STUNNING L U X U R Y G E T AWAY S H O W C A S I N G DECADENT DECOR WHICH STRIKES A JUST RIGHT BALANCE BETWEEN C O S Y A N D C O N T E M P O R A R Y. As a nod to its new owner, Valeria’s is a chic champagne and cocktail bar, oozing art deco glitz, grace and Roaring Twenties glamour, with an atmosphere reminiscent of the gregarious Great Gatsby days. Valeria’s and Restaurant EightyEight are set apart from the hotel for an intimate and exclusive experience, the bar spills out onto the beautifully restored Japanese gardens, allowing revellers to party long into the night without having to worry about disturbing guests in the main house. So far, so impressive country house hotel. But to take it to yet another level, it’s the new wing that really sets Grantley Hall apart. Topped by a vast atrium, it has 26 much more contemporary, muted-grey bedrooms, the spa, a sauna, a steam room, a snow room (yes, that is what you think) and a 60ft indoor pool with an outdoor heated vitality pool looking across the manicured gardens. Then there’s the state of the art gym. Opened by Lord Coe, it wouldn’t look out of place at a Premier League football club. In fact there are two gyms: the first is packed with the latest Life Fitness cross trainers and IC7 exercise bikes (the Ferrari of the exercise bike world), the other rocks an industrial Strength & Conditioning studio that will appeal to hardcore circuit lovers and free-weight fans. More unusually, there is also a 3D body scanner and an underwater treadmill, already booked by Leeds Rhinos for rehabbing injured players. On top of that guests can have sessions with a nutritionist, a life coach, a hydration expert or a gait analyst, and supercharge your production of red blood cells in the altitude training studio, where

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© Adrian Ray Photography

you can do spin classes up to a simulated 18,500ft above-sea-level, that’s higher than Everest base camp. Most eye-catching of all, however, is the cryotherapy chamber. Looking essentially like a small sauna with a glass door, it is set to a marrow-chilling but utterly invigorating -85C, said to reduce inflammation, accelerate recovery – and burn up to 800 calories in a single three-minute session. As if that’s not space age enough, guests can also try out EMS (Electric Muscle Stimulation), which is like a TENS machine on steroids, and Cristiano Ronaldo’s ab-crunch cheat-tool of choice. So what to do when not being pampered in the spa or being pummelled in the gym? Well, if that leafy two-mile walk along the river to Fountains Abbey sounds like more exercise than you’re after, the 38 acres of elegantly landscaped parkland surrounding the hotel are criss-crossed by footpaths; you can also go punting on the small stretch of river by the main house. Then there is yoga with the infectiously friendly Helen Gilbertson, who when not performing horse acrobatics at shows across Yorkshire teaches Hatha Vinyasa to yogis of all experience and ability at Grantley Hall. There is even talk of future pre-breakfast yoga classes at Fountains Abbey itself – think Downward Dog and Sun Salutations below the 12th century walls of the best preserved Cistercian monastery in Britain, long before any other visitors are let in. Of course, most people checking in to Grantley Hall are here for R&R, not ab crunches and Downward Dogs. They will not be disappointed. Just want to kick back by the fire with a winter-warming tipple? Head to the dark-panelled lounge, and order yourself a house gin cocktail. The hotel is full of snug nooks and firewarmed crannies, with huge armchairs and squishy sofas that cry out for afternoon tea with the Sunday papers. First and foremost this is an elegant, big-hearted, relaxing country house hotel, it just happens to have industry-leading wellness facilities out back should you wish to use them. None of this would mean a thing were it not for the hotel’s excellent staff. Superefficient, but still wonderfully engaging, the mostly Yorkshire-born team is led by general manager, Andrew McPherson, who brings infectious down-to-earth energy and a wealth of experience having managed some of Britain’s top hotels. The hotel even has its own staff training academy in the East Lodge. That tells a tale. “I love opening the doors and greeting people from all over the world” Valeria Sykes says. “I love Yorkshire. It deserves the very best.” Mission accomplished.

Top to bottom: A warm welcome on arrival. Order yourself one of the amazing house gin cocktails. Nestled in the picturesque Yorkshire Dales between Ripon and Harrogate, Grantley Hall delivers the exceptional. Images © Jack Hardy.

FIRST AND FOREMOST T H I S I S A B I G - H E A R T E D, RELAXING, ELEGANT CO U N T RY H O U S E H OT E L .

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INDULGENCE

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T R E AT T I M E

GREEN BOOST The spa at Rudding Park, surrounded by greenery, recently came top in a survey of the country’s classiest hotel accommodation. Enjoy an indulgent afternoon in the new rooftop spa garden, a ‘Relax Head and Foot Heaven’ treatment, followed by use of the mind and sense experience zones after your treatment: Visual, Relax, Audio and Mind. ruddingpark.co.uk

S O U T H S PA Close to the city of Sheffield and in reach of the stunning Peak District National Park, Tankersley Manor is a mix of modern and original Grade II 17th century accommodation. The hotel’s spa has five treatment rooms and a dedicated team of therapists offering a full programme of massages and treatments. With a swimming pool, sauna, steam room and Jacuzzi it’s an ideal destination to relax and rejuvenate! tankersleymanorhotel.com

TA K E A

BREAK Luxury getaways, relaxing spa treatments and healthy activities to enhance wellness and well-being, take time out from that busy schedule and treat yourself!

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S TAY Set in picturesque parkland, Swinton Park Hotel is a Grade II luxury castle with a spa offering wellness facilities, pool, sauna and treatments. Outdoor activities include fishing, pony trekking, walking, cycling and shooting. From rooms with fabulous views across the rolling countryside to tree lodges and yurts, there are plenty of options to stay over. swintonestate.com I N D U LG E

The grand coastal Raithwaite Estate retreat comprises of two hotels, quaint cosy cottages, an ultra-exclusive Lake House and a tranquil spa, nestled within 100 acres of picturesque Yorkshire coastline and just a short distance from the North York Moors. Whitby’s firstclass Temple Spa has treatment rooms, a relaxation room, heated pool, Jacuzzi, steam room, sauna and gym. raithwaiteestate.com

SHIPSHAPE Amidst the majestic Pennine hills in a beautifully restored 20th century textile mill, Titanic Spa combines stunning architecture with contemporary state of the art spa facilities. Titanic Mill was redeveloped in 2005 setting new standards in Eco-builds. Not only pioneers of sustainability within the industry, the multi-awardwinning destination spa places equal emphasis on the well-being of both guests and the environment. Indulge in luxurious treatments, and experience escapism! titanicspa.com

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D E S T I N AT I O N

W E LCO M E TO

H A R R O G AT E From the charming towns to the glorious countryside, the past to the present, the diverse district of Harrogate has so much to offer.

Left: Knaresborough waterside © Charlotte Gale. Above: Beningbrough Hall, Gallery and Gardens. Newby Hall & Gardens. Below: Harrogate Turkish Baths.

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he spa town of Harrogate is the perfect place to relax. Wander the attractive streets lined with boutique shops and discover the stylish Montpellier Quarter full of fantastic independents. Take a stroll around the colourful Valley Gardens or experience horticulture at its best at RHS Garden Harlow Carr. You’ll be spoilt for choice with places to eat and drink as the town boasts a huge selection, including the Yorkshire institution Bettys. Here you can enjoy dainty cakes and perfect scones as you savour one of their delightful afternoon teas. The beautifully restored Turkish Baths are decorated with mosaic floors and Islamic arches and are a toasty sanctuary to relax and unwind. You can also indulge with a treatment in the contemporary spa. The historic market town of Knaresborough has one of the most dramatic riverside settings in the country. You’ll find gorgeous cottages and a Norman castle ruin perched spectacularly on a cliff overlooking a remarkable viaduct and the River Nidd. Take a leisurely riverside stroll or even hire a rowing boat. Visit the

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mysterious Mother Shipton’s Cave or venture into the Woodland Trust’s ancient Nidd Gorge. Nearby, the remarkable baroque mansion of Beningbrough Hall, Gallery and Gardens is surrounded by gorgeous gardens and woodland. Experience the changing exhibitions in the Saloon Galleries and uncover stories of those who played a role in its history, from owners and employees to builders and craftsmen. Children can let off steam in the wilderness play area. They’ll also love Stockeld Park, full of spectacular seasonal adventures, including an Enchanted Forest and a Magical Maze. The cathedral city of Ripon is a gem, with its thriving market place and rich heritage. Ripon Cathedral has the country’s oldest cathedral crypt as well as carvings said to have inspired Lewis Carroll. Explore the Ripon Workhouse Museum and experience the harsh realities of life for Victorian vagrants. The National Trust’s Fountains Abbey and Studley Royal Water Garden is a UNESCO World Heritage Site that will surprise and captivate.

The mesmerising Cistercian abbey ruins are spectacular while the elegant Georgian water garden is a joy to explore. A short distance from Ripon is Newby Hall & Gardens, crowned 2019 Historic Houses Garden of the Year. The double herbaceous border, at 172m in length, is one of the longest in the country. With its north-south axis, the border holds the fine William & Mary house at the top, and slopes down to the River Ure at the bottom. Families can enjoy a ride on the miniature railway and will love the adventure playground. The designated Nidderdale Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty is a rich landscape waiting to be discovered. It’s a haven for families, climbers, walkers and cyclists with trails and pathways galore. There are spectacular views to enjoy at Brimham Rocks, an amazing collection of weird and wonderful rock formations that children will love to explore. For an adrenaline kick visit How Stean Gorge near Pateley Bridge and get your hard hat on for canyoning, abseiling, caving and gorge walking.

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D E S T I N AT I O N

Above left to right: Tadcaster on the banks of the River Wharfe. Cooks School of Food at Carlton Towers. Summit Indoor Adventure. Below: Selby Abbey.

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SELBY DISTRICT Home to Selby, Tadcaster and Sherburn in Elmet, this delightful district is a fascinating mix of bustling market towns and beguiling villages, with medieval history, stunning architecture and beautiful countryside.

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ne of the highlights of a visit to Selby is the striking Selby Abbey which sits in the centre of the town’s historic marketplace. Overflowing with heritage and culture, visitors can discover the Washington Window, with its links to the modern day American flag, or follow the Benedict Trail to uncover lots of quirky facts. Enjoy a craft beer at The Doghouse before seeing a show at Selby Town Hall, an intimate performing arts centre that attracts high quality touring artists from across the world. The historic brewery town of Tadcaster is complete with lovely shops and cafes and is surrounded by beautiful countryside. Here you can enjoy a relaxing stroll along the River Wharfe taking in the town’s listed 18th century bridge before rewarding yourself with a pint of local ale. The nearby village of Towton wasn’t always such a tranquil spot.

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Here you can find the site of the Battle of Towton, that took place during the English War of the Roses and was described as the largest and bloodiest battle ever fought on English soil. Find out more at the Information Centre in the grounds of the Crooked Billet pub in Saxton. If you’ve ever wondered what it takes to keep the lights on and power the nation, join a fascinating tour of Drax Power Station and see how energy is generated firsthand at the UK’s biggest renewable power generator and the largest decarbonisation project in Europe. It’s also home to the Skylark Centre and Nature Reserve, this unique ecological setting is the habitat for 100 species of wildlife. Carlton Towers has a range of beautiful accommodation and the Stables Tea Room at the Carlton Vineyard serve delicious locally sourced dishes. You can even learn

to cook in the lovingly restored kitchens at the Cooks School of Food under the guidance of a leading chef. The quintessential English country gardens at Stillingfleet Lodge Gardens are a joy to explore. The series of cottage style gardens are bursting with colourful blooms and are a haven for nature. Bird lovers should head to the wonderful RSPB Fairburn Ings nature reserve. The landscape of this ex-industrial site has transformed to become an important place for breeding an wintering wildfowl. There are lots of exciting hands-on activities for families to get involved in. For something completely out of this world, children will love the York Solar System Cycleway for a bike ride to discover the planets. Plan your great escape at The Escapologist escape rooms, by solving a series of clues to secure your freedom! If you have a head for heights, take part in a range of flying experiences with Sherburn Aero Club or, if you prefer to keep your feet closer to the ground, alternative activities are on offer at Summit Indoor Adventure, including skateboarding, adventure climb, aerial trek, tenpin bowling and soft play.

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GARDENS

DIG IT From picturesque parkland to glorious gardens, Yorkshire is blooming marvellous! Make a path through some of its finest. NEWBY HALL & GARDENS

Top left: The magnificent stately house and stunning gardens of Burton Agnes Hall is a mustsee in the East Riding of Yorkshire. Left: RHS Harlow Carr is one of England’s most relaxing and innovative gardens. Opposite: The glorious Castle Howard. Outdoor sculpture and glorious gardens at Hepworth Wakefield. Brodsworth Hall and Gardens is a plant-lover’s paradise.

Crowned Historic Houses Garden of the Year Newby Hall & Gardens received nearly a third of all votes when it recently triumphed as the nation’s favourite country house garden. A fabulous 40 acres of glorious gardens and wonderful woodland are visited by around 140,000 people every year and its grand grounds frequently feature on film and TV (Victoria, Mansfield Park, Peaky Blinders). Discover rare and beautiful plants and scented shrubs in 14 stunning garden ‘rooms’. Boasting one of the longest double herbaceous borders in the UK, two heritage orchards, vast woodland, sculpture, plus a delightful children’s adventure playground and miniature railway. It’s a treat for garden lovers and a family fun day out! newbyhall.com

HEPWORTH WAKEFIELD

Sculpture and art combine at The Hepworth Wakefield, with a gorgeous garden designed by internationally acclaimed landscape architect Tom StuartSmith. Free for all to enjoy, this piece of glorious ground is positioned beside the award-winning art gallery on Wakefield’s historic waterfront, overlooking the River Calder. There is a rolling programme of outdoor sculptures, with works by Lynn Chadwick, Rebecca Warren, Michael CraigMartin and Barbara Hepworth being the first to be installed. hepworthwakefield.org

RHS GARDEN HARLOW CARR From woodland to wildflower meadows, RHS Garden Harlow Carr, Harrogate, is a growing landscape with much to see across its 68 acres. This breathtakingly beautiful, relaxing and innovative garden offers a hedgehog-friendly area, the longest streamside gardens in the country, a Kitchen Garden, a wonderful Winter Walk and an Alpine House with stunning views of the woodland. Dine in Bettys Café Tea Rooms, browse in the extensive shop and plant centre, and look out for an exciting schedule of events happening all year round. rhs.org.uk

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KIPLIN HALL AND GARDENS Built in 1619 Kiplin Hall and Gardens is an oasis of calm and tranquillity, with scenic walks by the lake, through stunning woodland and picturesque parkland. Take in the far-reaching views to the folly and enjoy the flora and fauna in the gorgeous grounds. The restored walled garden provides produce for the Tea Room, just as it would have served Kiplin’s family kitchen. There are cut flowers on display in the Hall and there’s a petite garden museum to the rear of the Walled Garden, helping to piece together the earth’s rich history. kiplinhall.co.uk

BRODSWORTH HALL AND GARDENS A plant-lover’s paradise, the grounds at Brodsworth Hall and Gardens are a collection of ‘grand gardens in miniature’, which have been restored to their full Victorian splendour, reflecting the desires and aspirations of the country gentry at the time. There’s a seasonal sensation of ever-changing colour palettes, from spring tulips and laburnum to the Rose Dell’s display of spectacular wild and native roses, in full flower and scent all summer, followed by an array of golden autumnal leaves, with snowdrops and winter evergreens. english-heritage.org.uk

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BURTON AGNES HALL AND GARDENS Described as ‘the perfect English house,’ Burton Agnes Hall and Gardens was listed as one of the twenty finest in ‘England’s Thousand Best Houses’, alongside Windsor Castle and Buckingham Palace. There’s a walled garden containing a staggering four thousand plant species, heavenly herbaceous borders, a jungle garden and a national collection of campanulas. Look out for wildlife sculptures on the woodland walk, lose yourself (or not) in the amazing maze and get engrossed in the giant games for children and adults alike. burtonagnes.com

HAREWOOD HOUSE Filled with art, culture and heritage Harewood is an historic Georgian country house set within 100 acres of stunning gardens and grounds. Surrounded by a vast variety of plants from all over the world, amidst an impressive landscape created by Lancelot ‘Capability’ Brown, explore the Terrace, the Lakeside Garden, the Himalayan Garden and the Walled Garden. There’s even a Bird Garden which is home to 40 species of birds from across the globe. Take a lake boat trip to admire the estate from the water. Astoundingly more than 30 tons of leaves are collected in the

grounds each autumn and between April and October over 5,000 hours are spent cutting the grass in the gardens and park. harewood.org

CASTLE HOWARD A glorious 120 acre garden of 6,000 trees from across the globe, The Yorkshire Arboretum spans a stunning landscape of parkland, lakes and ponds on the Castle Howard Estate and is run in conjunction with Royal Botanic Gardens Kew. Wander through peaceful hidden glades and wildflower meadows, admiring native plants and wildlife. yorkshirearboretum.org

SEWERBY HALL AND GARDENS Set within 50 acres of early 19th century parkland Sewerby Hall and Gardens has spectacular views over Bridlington from its dramatic clifftop setting. The award-winning gardens and woodland include a Pleasure Garden with some of the oldest monkey puzzle trees in England, a Walled Garden displaying an ever-changing kaleidoscope of box hedgerows, shrubs and flowers, a blaze of colour and patterns. Discover a variety of wildlife and tree species on the Woodland Walk or visit the zoo for even more exotic species. sewerbyhall.co.uk

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GARDENS ON FILM

D O YO U WA N T T O K N OW A S E C R E T ? Set to be a cinema sensation, The Secret Garden, based on the classic children’s novel, is a muchloved Yorkshire story. With a stellar lineup of acting royalty, including multiaward-winning actors Colin Firth and Dame Julie Walters, Carolyn Nicoll caught up with cast and crew.

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et’s set the scene, The Secret Garden is the story of Mary Lennox (Dixie Egerickx), a 10-year-old girl, born in India to wealthy British parents and then sent to England when her mother and father sadly pass away. Life changes forever at her uncle’s home, Misselthwaite Manor on a remote Yorkshire country estate, as Mary, together with her cousin Colin (Edan Hayhurst), uncover family secrets and discover a magical secret garden. No one can deny the breathtaking beauty of North Yorkshire’s sprawling moorland, historic properties and its heritage railway, so pick your popcorn (sweet, salted or both?), sit back and enjoy scenes caught on camera across this stunning part of the county. Look out for Duncombe Park, Helmsley Walled Garden, the North York Moors National Park, UNESCO World Heritage site Fountains Abbey and Studley Royal Water Garden, as well as the North Yorkshire Moors Railway, already a frequent favourite for film crews, as seen in Harry Potter, Dad’s Army and the recent Downton Abbey, amongst others. But what can audiences look forward to?

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PA R T O F T H E P L O T “The hero of the film is the natural beauty of the landscape.” M A R C M U N D E N , D I R E C TO R I love filming in Yorkshire and have filmed two television pieces there before: National Treasure with Julie Walters and Robbie Coltrane (Harrogate, Leeds, Scarborough) and Utopia (Leeds, Harrogate, Halifax). The locations are incredibly adaptable. I’ve always loved the North York Moors and that is an essential part of the landscape of the film as Mary Lennox is shipped from her homeland of India to live with her uncle in England. This poor orphaned girl finds herself surrounded by a vast alien country and she asks the housekeeper Mrs Medlock (Dame Julie Walters) “Is that the sea?” as she travels over the moor with its heavy mist and strange muted colours, perfectly conjuring up that sense of awe she feels frightening and beautiful. The hero of the film is the landscape in all its incredible diversity and uncanny natural beauty.

When we saw the garden’s hot borders we knew we had to have them in the film. Mary and Dickon (Amir Wilson) run through the garden as all the flowers around them shoot up and bloom. We were blessed with great weather for the sequence. What you see in the film is digitally enhanced but it was inspired by our first sighting of Helmsley Walled Garden. Dixie Egerickx is a legend in the making. She is remarkable, intelligent and serious about acting, but also a lot of fun. All the children were very dedicated and into the work so it made it easy, contributing to a great atmosphere. Colin Firth is a warm and incisive collaborator, a brave actor full of ideas and unafraid to play tortured and grieving, the character of Archibald Craven the widower in the film. Julie Walters is funny and brilliant, the best actor of her generation.

“We filmed during a summer of perpetual sunshine.” ROSIE ALISON, PRODUCER We were determined that Yorkshire must feature in the film, the book is set there and there is a sense in which a ‘Yorkshire of the imagination’ permeates our culture, in a clear line from the Brontës to The Secret Garden, there are many links between Jane Eyre and ’The Secret Garden. We filmed in the county during an amazing summer of perpetual sunshine.

over me and I return for walking holidays on the North York Moors, where we filmed on the North Yorkshire Moors Railway for Mary’s journey to Yorkshire, then on the Roman Road near Goathland for her car journey to the house and on her first morning at ‘Misselthwaite’, as she goes out to explore, she sees over the great park plain, evocative of a remote Yorkshire setting.

It was inspiring to meet the people who run the wonderful hidden jewel of Helmsley Walled Garden. It provides therapeutic solace for those who work there, that sense of the restorative and rejuvenating powers of nature, exemplified in the story The Secret Garden. Fountains Abbey was another location where we created a ‘ruined temple’ section of our secret garden. I grew up in Yorkshire and love it dearly. The stunning landscapes of North Yorkshire still have a great hold

Making a film with children can really enhance the spirit of the shoot. Their excitement at filming was palpable and this lifted everyone’s mood. Dixie Egerickx is a remarkable girl, wise beyond her years and her piercing intelligence shines through in her performance. She completely captured Mary’s complexity, the complicated journey and goes from prickly loner to openhearted friend of Colin and Dickon. When she smiles, she lights up the screen.

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Top to bottom: Dixie Egerickx as Mary in the new film. The beautifiully manicured Helmsley Walled Garden.

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GARDENS

Top: Rosie Alison and Colin Firth. Right: Dixie with Amir Wilson during filming. Below: Marc directs Dixie. The natural beauty of Helmsley Walled Garden.

“It was my mum’s favourite childhood book.” D I X I E E G E R I C K X , AC T R E S S Mary is probably the ultimate anti-heroine of children’s literature, it feels a great privilege to portray her in this new adaptation and a big responsibility too, as Mary is a loved character from many people’s childhoods, making the task of playing her quite daunting! I was aware of The Secret Garden from a young age, as it was my mum’s favourite childhood book and she introduced me to it when I was very small. It is one of the first books I read on my own and even though written in 1911, I think the themes of loss, grief and rejuvenation mean just as much to people today as always.   I had never visited Yorkshire before, but the countryside is beautiful and the people are lovely and friendly. It felt special that we were filming where so much of the original book was set. I stayed in the lovely market town of Helmsley, when the Tour de Yorkshire was racing through and I was able to stand at the edge of the road and cheer on all the cyclists. There was a real party atmosphere and it was so exciting.

© Colin Dilcock

When filming, the paparazzi showed up in the middle of the Yorkshire countryside, but I don’t think they got much because they stood out a mile with their long lenses in the middle of nowhere so everyone just hid.

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Colin and Julie were really fun. It is a real privilege to have worked so closely with them and I learned so much. They are kind, funny and supportive people, as well as being incredible actors.

The Secret Garden will be released in UK cinemas on 17th April 2020

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IN THE AREA

HIDDEN GEMS

SECRET

S TAY If you were asked to imagine the perfect English market town, then it’d probably look a lot like Helmsley! There’s the bustling market square, the dramatic castle ruins, the charming tea rooms, the inviting inns; all surrounded by mile after mile of the beautiful North York Moors. Enjoy a break in the picturesque market town and visit the, not so secret, walled garden.

C H E C K I N TO

© Kevin Gibson

A Mediterranean oasis in a charming countryside retreat, stay at the Feversham Arms Hotel & Verbena Spa. Relax in luxury lounges with open fires and a cosy snug to welcome guests all year round. The 33 bedrooms, including 20 stunning suites are tastefully designed with many boasting log burning stoves, balconies and terraces around the heated outdoor pool. Enjoy delicious dining and be pampered in the stylish spa. fevershamarmshotel.com

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Step inside and discover Helmsley Walled Garden, built in 1759. Explore the five acre grounds, its double herbaceous hot border running the length of the garden, as seen in The Secret Garden film. Experience the tranquillity of the Garden of Contemplation, the beauty of the Clematis Garden showcasing over 100 different clematis varieties, the vegetable patch and edible flowers in the Kitchen Garden. It’s good enough to eat! helmsleywalledgarden.org.uk

V I S I T From raptors to owls, plus 300 stunning acres of woodland and parkland to stroll around, the National Centre for Birds of Prey is situated in the magnificent Duncombe Park estate (Misselthwaite Manor in The Secret Garden film). Nestled in the North York Moors National Park, see spectacular flying demonstrations from the largest collection of birds of prey in the north of England. ncbp.co.uk

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TA K E T E A Charming, traditional and fabulously quintessential, the Black Swan Tearoom, overlooking the town square in Helmsley, serves a delectable English Afternoon Tea which changes seasonally, making best use of the fresh, local produce. Choose from over 20 types of tea, alongside a great selection of coffees. You can stay over too in the centuries old coaching inn, turned beautiful boutique hotel. blackswan-helmsley.co.uk

C A P T I VAT I N G CASTLE Soaring above this tranquil town are the dramatic ruins of Helmsley Castle. With a 100 foot high tower and substantial medieval, Tudor and Victorian remains, it’s a history lover’s delight. There’s a fantastic visitors centre and plenty of regular activities throughout school holidays - perfect if you want to learn more about the dramatic history of this region. english-heritage.org.uk

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W E LCO M E TO T H E

N O R T H YO R K MOORS

This outstandingly beautiful area has it all; vast skies, stunning landscapes, an enchanting coastline, a warm welcome and much more. You will find an adventure worth discovering in the North York Moors National Park.

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oak up the sweeping and dramatic scenery of the North York Moors. Here you will find one of the largest expanses of heather in England which, in late summer, blankets the moorland in gorgeous hues of purple. A nature lovers’ paradise, this habitat is also home to moorland birds including lapwing, golden plover, curlew and merlin. Levisham Moor and the Hole of Horcum, a huge natural amphitheatre 400 feet deep and more than half a mile across, are spectacular sites to soak up this wonderful natural environment. Whale spotting adventures can be booked from Staithes and Whitby, and Hidden Horizons offer rockpooling trips, fossil hunts and dinosaur walks. Experienced leaders will show you the amazing secrets hidden on this coast, from 180-million-year-old fossils and dinosaur footprints to the creatures that call it home today.

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When the sun sets and the night draws in, turn your head skywards to experience astonishing stargazing. There are Dark Sky Discovery Sites at Sutton Bank, Dalby Forest and The Moors National Park Centre near Danby, all fabulous places to glimpse the Milky Way with the naked eye. The Dark Skies Festival in February has a calendar of activities to celebrate the beauty of the night. The fascinating history and habitats of the North York Moors can also be explored at The Moors National Park Centre. Delve deep into the ironstone heritage and interactive displays in the brand new visitor experience. Enjoy the adventure play areas, woodland and riverside trails and Inspired by… a contemporary art gallery with regularly changing exhibitions. At Sutton Bank National Park Centre, soak up ‘England’s finest view’ from the panoramic viewpoint, let the kids go wild

Main picture: The North York Moors is a perfect cycling destination © Russell Burton. Opposite top to bottom: Walking on the Cleveland Way National Trail. Fossil Hunting on the Jurassic Coastline. Ana Cross above Rosedale © Ebor images/ NYMNPA. Picnic at Rievaulx Abbey © Chris J Parker/NYMNPA.

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in the natural adventure play area or investigate the exhibits and crafts. There are also spectacular bike trails that offer a mix of family cycling and more adventurous offroad thrills. Local history, heritage and culture come together at the Ryedale Folk Museum. This openair museum’s 20 reconstructed buildings shine a light on the way people once lived here. It’s located in Hutton-le-Hole, one of the most photogenic of all moorland villages, with its sheep-cropped greens and babbling river. Castle Howard near York is one of the great houses of Europe. Taking over 100 years to complete, this 18th century architectural masterpiece sits on 1000 acres of rolling parkland and is surrounded by breathtaking vistas of the Howardian Hills – an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. Uncover its fascinating history, impressive collection of antique treasures, statues, temples and follies in the magnificent grounds and gardens. The beautiful valleys have inspired monastic communities for centuries and nestled amongst lush woodland and hillsides you will find the spectacular and peaceful ruins of Rievaulx Abbey, Mount Grace Priory, House and Gardens, and Byland Abbey. A more turbulent history can be found at the medieval Helmsley Castle and Pickering Castle. Discover how they were used throughout the years and the tales of those who occupied them. Tackle all or part of the 109 mile Cleveland Way National Trail, this is a walkers’ delight! Free downloadable route guides can be found on the National Park’s website, taking you on step-by-step adventures to tumbling waterfalls, timeless stone villages, moorland crags and historic monuments. The North Yorkshire Moors Railway is the most popular heritage railway line in the world. Hop aboard a steam or diesel locomotive from Whitby or Pickering to enjoy an inspiring

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journey that whisks you through the heart of the wild and beautiful moorland landscape. You’ll head to Goathland where you can relive the magic of Harry Potter at this station made famous as Hogsmeade Station in the film Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone. Follow the Moor to Sea Cycle Network, a 150 mile route which connects Scarborough, Whitby, Dalby Forest, Pickering and Great Ayton in a stunning series of moorland, forest and coastal loops on quiet roads, woodland tracks and bridleways. The vast and verdant Dalby Forest near Pickering is one of the best places in the UK for mountain biking with extensive cycling trails. If you prefer a more leisurely day, enjoy walking through the forest and moorland tracks, stopping off at the picnic areas en route. Families will love the Shaun the Sheep Glow Trail, based on the beloved woolly character from the makers of Wallace and Gromit. For fun-filled adventure in the treetop canopies there is also Go Ape. The National Park has a 26 mile stretch of Jurassic coastline with a wonderful mix of secluded coves and soaring cliffs with breathtaking views of the sparkling blue sea. Picture-perfect Staithes, Runswick Bay and Robin Hood’s Bay with their old fishing village charms are a joy to explore. Get lost in the tiny passageways surrounded by cosy cottages and uncover their smuggling secrets. Peppering the countryside are a host of charming market towns and villages, full of historic interest, great places to eat and cosy country inns. Weekly markets in Helmsley and Pickering are always worth catching, as are the farmers’ and artisan food markets at Stokesley, Hovingham and Coxwold. Meanwhile Malton is carving out a fast-growing foodie reputation as Yorkshire’s Food Capital with artisan food producers like Roost Coffee & Roastery and Rare Bird Distillery in Talbot Yard Food Court and its annual food festival.

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LIFE THROUGH

T HE L E N S

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R   In an age of selfies and instant phone images, it seems that everyone wants to get behind and in front of the lens. Not necessarily a negative thing... but when it comes to the art of proper photography, there’s an expertise required in capturing that perfect pic. Julie Henry stayed focussed and zoomed in to find out more.

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enowned photographer Joe Cornish has captured the natural beauty of some of the most spectacular landscapes in the world but there is one place that holds an enduring fascination. Roseberry Topping, in North Yorkshire, has been dubbed the “miniMatterhorn” because of its distinctive halfcone shape and jagged cliff edge. Cornish has been photographing the landmark for 25 years; in all seasons, all weathers and from all angles. It even played a small part in the decision to move with his young family to Great Ayton, the village right underneath it. “We were in the North York Moors and in the distance was this funny little conical hill called Roseberry Topping. You could see it from almost everywhere although it wasn’t the highest prominence in the area,” he said. “It has magnetism to it. I felt that it would give me a kind of inspiration to get out with my camera and that is exactly how it’s proved.”

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T H E YO R K S H I R E D A L E S A N D N O R T H YO R K M O O R S ARE JEWELS IN THE L A N DS C A P E C R OW N .

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In many ways, it is not the hill itself but the context, the surrounding Yorkshire landscape that are the focus. Cornish uses his camera to capture the lie of the land, the habitat, its trees and plants, with Roseberry providing “a wonderful punctuation mark”. The beautiful images have proved popular, particularly with local residents. However, as Cornish points out, popularity isn’t the point. Throughout a career which has involved more than 30 travel books, high-profile commissions, a thriving workshop business, gallery and cafe housed in a beautiful Georgian building in Northallerton, it has always been about the work. Born in Exeter, Cornish studied fine art at Reading University in the 1970s but the abstract culture of the time left him uninspired. The camera was his salvation. As a photographer’s assistant, first in Washington DC, then in London, he was part of a boom time in the industry, with celebrity photographers such as Terence Donovan, Brian Duffy and David Bailey, earning more than First Division footballers.

Left: Roseberry Topping is distinctive at any time of year but especially appealing in summer. Below: Staithes winter twilight: with water seeping down the cliffs visibly frozen, this was a bitterly cold evening. Fading daylight behind me is still glowing on the cliff faces, while the (out-of-frame) moon shines on the surface of the sea. Street lamps add a third light source, and all are close to balanced, creating a remarkable, short-lived ambience.

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The assignments – portraits of young musicians and actors and below the line advertising and design - offered the prospect of success and financial reward but Cornish began to feel conflicted. “Where you have to make big sacrifices in the commercial world is that you are not doing work based on your own ethos or artistic instinct but rather on the needs of the market place,” he explains. “I still had this part of me that was very conflicted and I think the reason for that is that I’ve always wanted to be free of commercial pressures and I also loved being outside- that was a strong motivation for me.” The opportunity to work as a travel photographer took him in the creative direction he wanted. From 1986 to 1995, Cornish worked on more than 30 travel books for three or four different publishers, spending much of that time abroad. Photographing far-flung wildernesses, from Alaska to South Africa, as well as spending three decades capturing stunning images from around the British Isles, has convinced him of the vital role photography can play in environmental advocacy. Cornish believes that the human condition yearns for and is bolstered by a connection to nature and beauty. His job is about capturing and hopefully sharing that sense of joy and therapeutic benefit with some kind of audience.

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His outstanding work has been recognised by his peers. Cornish received the annual Power of Photography award in 2006 and in 2008 he was made an honorary Fellow of the Royal Photographic Society. Another highly respected photographer said recently that his work was “as close to artistic and technical perfection as you can get”. Cornish has lived in North Yorkshire since 1993, with his wife, Jenny Earle, and their two children. In 2004 he bought Register House, a Grade II Listed Building in Northallerton and established Joe Cornish Galleries. The gallery, over two floors, houses a programme of exhibitions, particularly young and local photographers and artists. Collaborating with David Ward and other photographers, Cornish runs popular workshops that draw visitors from abroad as well as closer to home. Assignments still take him overseas. Working with renowned wildlife photographer and TV presenter Mark Carwardine on Polar expedition cruise ships has enabled Cornish to photograph breathtaking landscapes in the Arctic and Antarctic. He has just returned from Greenland, which he described as “genuinely one of the most exciting experiences, partly because it is very remote, relatively unknown and unexplored.”

Above: Malham Dale from Malham Cove: Dappled light and rain showers characterise the English landscape, and frequently contribute greatly to a sense of depth and articulation in the space before the camera. With its folded curves, field boundaries, trees and rugged outcrops this view epitomises the essence of Yorkshire’s unique beauty. Right: East of Whitby, Saltwick Bay reveals spectacular geological detail at low tide.

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J O E ’ S WO R K I S AS C LO S E TO A R T I ST I C A N D TECHNICAL PERFECTION A S YO U C A N G E T.

Back home, the varied landscape of Yorkshire – from Whitby and Robin Hood’s Bay to Higger Tor, in the Peak District, is still a constant inspiration. “It is the biggest county in England and obviously it’s the best. I don’t think anyone disputes that, Yorkshire person or otherwise,” said the 61-year-old. “It’s a very broad piece of geography - from Spurn Point to Settle and including the watershed on the western side of the Pennines.” He describes the Yorkshire Dales and North York Moors as ”jewels in the landscape crown” that, unlike many other picturesque UK tourist destinations, remain relatively crowd-free. With its subtlety and complexity, the county provides the perfect backdrop to his workshops, which generally attract intermediate photographers. “If you look hard at Yorkshire it has these hidden depths; it’s literally full of caves and it has, to me, emotional depths as well,” he said. “The complexity of the land, the geology, the overlay of flora, the natural vegetation, with more than 12,000 years of human occupation.” Its beauty is more than skin deep and photographers have to work that bit harder to capture it.

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“The Yorkshire tops can be bleak and that presents quite a challenge for the photographer,” said Cornish. “It’s not all flashing mountain tops as is often the case in Scotland, which I love by the way. Because of that, it’s a great practise ground for any landscape photographer meaning you have to work harder at finding its beauty. It’s not an obvious, superficial beauty, but having explored and increasingly understood this landscape through the years I have fallen in love with it.” Despite the county’s industrial past and its impact on the land, nature’s burgeoning fertility is on display everywhere, fuelled by the benign climate. “Now, especially when there is such concern about the future, I always feel that Yorkshire gives me a lot of hope because each year you go around the countryside and nature still seems to have the upper hand a lot of the time,” said Cornish. The same entrepreneurial spirit which gave rise to Yorkshire’s bygone industrial success is alive and well and was vital when Cornish was setting up his enterprises in Northallerton. “The county has a ‘get on and do things’ kind of attitude,” he said “This was a place where you felt you could do things and people would react positively and be supportive, which they absolutely are. ” Left: Ribblehead Viaduct is a remarkable monument of the Victorian era. Batty Moss over which it passes is also decorated with some of the finest examples of limestone pavement in the Dales. Below left: The gritstone towers of Wainstones is a notable landmark on the western edge of the North York Moors. Below right: Rievaulx Abbey is one the finest ruined medieval buildings in Europe.

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YO R K S H I R E G I V E S M E H O P E B E C A U S E N AT U R E S T I L L S E E M S T O H AV E T H E U P P E R H A N D.

The cafe at Register House is the engine room of the gallery and provides a focal point. Visitors from abroad insist they’ve found the best coffee in the UK. Cafe staff bake every day and serve up fresh, local produce, including “amazing cakes” from an artisan specialist baker in Richmond. Run by a local daughter and mother team, the cafe helps to fund the gallery, which in 2020 will see shows by Mark Littlejohn, Take a View’s Landscape Photographer of the Year 2014, and a talk by the great American landscape photographer Charles Cramer. Musical events featuring young talent are also held in the first floor “long gallery”, with its new wooden floor providing superb acoustics. There’s a lot going on but the work remains the point. He recalls sound advice given to him in the early days by a veteran photographer: “You look after the work and the money will look after itself”.   “I was out last night with my camera,” said Cornish, “photographing on the hills, with Roseberry there in the distance. There’s so much to celebrate and be proud of if you live in Yorkshire. I’m a bit zealous about it, maybe because I’m an incomer. I feel very grateful to live here.”

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5 OF JOE’S P H OTO O P P S

Feeling inspired and wanting some expert advice on how to create impressive images to add to your collection? Then snap to it and check out these Yorkshire photography workshops. G E T I N T O YO U R S T R I D E

FULL STEAM AHEAD

Enjoy exploring city, coast and countryside - view the world through a camera with award-winning walking photographer Rich Bunce. walkingphotographer.co.uk

Get your photography skills on the right track as North Yorkshire Moors Railway have a number of dates out and about with Yorkshire-based photographer John Potter. nymr.co.uk

© Paul D Hunter/NYMNPA

S H A R P S H O OT E R S S U T TO N B A N K Arguably one of the finest views in the country, from the top of Whitestone Cliff you can see Gormire Lake with the the Vale of York in the background.

YO R K M I N S T E R York’s City Walls offer a splendid elevated walk around the city with amazing views of York Minster.

WHITBY WEST PIER

THE SKY’S THE LIMIT

C O R N I S H I N YO R K S H I R E

Cober Hill, Scarborough, offer creative courses and holidays throughout the year including a Dark Skies photography workshop with astro and outdoor photographer Steve Bell. coberhill.co.uk

Joe will be delivering workshops from his gallery and Brimham Rocks in 2020. The National Trust property will also be exhibiting his work from 15 February - 1 November. joecornishgallery.co.uk

The iconic and instantly recognisable west pier with or without a rough sea is the perfect spot for beautiful and dramatic photographs.

F O U N TA I N S A B B E Y You will find it difficult not to find a perfect shot among the 800 acres. Climbing up to Surprise View is well worth it for the reward at the top.

S WA L E D A L E The elevated views of Swaledale from above Thwaite and a dramatic backdrop of hills and mountains makes it perfect for landscape photography.

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W E LCO M E TO T H E

COAST Everyone loves a trip to the seaside and with golden sandy beaches, dramatic cliffs, picturesque fishing villages and timeless resorts, the Yorkshire Coast has plenty to shout about.

Left: The view from Scarborough Castle. Above: Family fun on Filey Beach. Below: Whitby Abbey.

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ith two sweeping sandy bays, natural mineral waters and a host of charming attractions, such was the popularity of Scarborough in the 18th century, that it became England’s first seaside resort. Today, a ride on the miniature North Bay Railway is a delightful way to take in spectacular views of the North Bay as well as the magnificent ruins of Scarborough Castle, where you can discover its 3000 years of history. Taking you even further back in time, are the exhibitions at the Rotunda Museum, that dive into Yorkshire’s ancient seas to bring you prehistoric creatures from 360 million years ago. The Central Tramway Company still takes beachgoers from the town to the shores below and back on quaint Victorian trams. The entertainment on offer at this spa town certainly had an appeal for Victorian holidaymakers and is still in abundance today. You’ll find great drama at the iconic Stephen Joseph Theatre, home of notable playwright Sir Alan Ayckbourn CBE. It has a variety of productions all year round to keep everyone entertained. The atmospheric Scarborough Open Air Theatre is the largest of its kind in Europe. Its unique setting makes it a great venue for performers that have included Elton John, Britney Spears and Kylie Minogue – we can’t wait to see which superstars play there next. And with its uninterrupted sea views, Alpamare, is a spectacular themed water park and alpine wellness centre and spa. It’s the perfect day out for those seeking adventure or calm and relaxation. Further up the Yorkshire coast you’ll find the beautiful seaside town of Whitby. The picturesque harbour, the haunting gothic ruins of Whitby Abbey and St. Mary’s windswept churchyard were just a few of the locations that inspired Bram Stoker to write his horror masterpiece, Dracula. Whitby also has strong connections to legendary

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explorer Captain Cook. Head to the Captain Cook Memorial Museum to discover where he spent his most formative years and exhibitions covering his maritime training and oversea endeavours. Seas the day and follow in his nautical footsteps out at sea, Whitby Coastal Cruises offer a selection of fantastic sea trips including seal, seabird and whale watching. Back on dry land, the black beauty of the local Whitby jet gemstone can be appreciated at the Whitby Jet Heritage Centre where you can explore a Victorian jet workshop and buy your own piece of jewellery to treasure. Of course, a trip to the coast is not complete without fish and chips and there’s nowhere more iconic than The Magpie Café, housed in its distinctive black and white building overlooking the harbour, just look for the queue of people outside the door. The annual Fish and Ships Festival in May is also not to be missed. In 2019, family friendly Filey was named one of the 10 best beaches in the UK in the annual TripAdvisor Traveller’s Choice Awards and was voted Beach of the Year (The Sunday Times, 2018) for its magnificent five mile stretch of sandy beach. Park your car at Filey Country Park and take a walk along the clifftop admiring the sea views. It’s not uncommon to see the odd seal in early spring, and porpoises can be seen bobbing on the shoreline when the summer sun comes out. Families and nature lovers alike will love watching the exotic birds, feeding the friendly animals and relaxing in beautiful gardens at Filey Bird Garden and Animal Park.

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Main picture: Adrenaline fuelled rock climbing in the Outdoor City. Opposite from left ro right: Sheffield City Hall. Abbeydale Industrial Hamlet. Sheffield Cathedral during Tramlines Festival. Cycling at Lady Canning’s Plantation.

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SHEFFIELD Discover a city full of surprise and contrast. Sheffield’s enviable location and green backdrop lends itself to exploring outdoors as well as city life.

C U LT U R E There is never a dull moment in Sheffield, with a vibrant and exciting choice of live entertainment across the city. Home to the largest theatre complex outside of London, you will find the world famous Crucible Theatre, the elegant Lyceum with its proscenium arch design and the intimate Studio Theatre. Together they offer a diverse programme of plays and musicals as well as producing original shows, including the hugely successful Everybody’s Talking About Jamie, now destined for the big screen. Music in the Round, the leading national promoter of chamber music, brings people and music closer together through a unique, informal

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and informative style of ‘in the round’ performances across the city. This series of events celebrating the 250th birthday of Beethoven will culminate at the Sheffield Chamber of Music Festival in May 2020.

OUTDOOR CITY Sheffield is the only major city in the UK to have part of a national park within its boundaries, in fact a third of the city is inside the Peak District National Park. It also boasts 250 parks, woodland areas and gardens, so it’s no wonder that the self-named Outdoor City has earned a reputation for its plethora of outdoor activities. DC Outdoors offers a range of adventures and instructed sessions, from adrenaline fuelled rock climbing to tranquil stand-up paddleboarding.

Discovering the city on foot is a delight and each September there’s the perfect opportunity to lace up your hiking boots and take in the area during the annual Sheffield Walking Festival. With over 30 routes of varying lengths, difficulty and themes you can explore the city’s abundant heritage and fascinating suburbs on urban strolls, or venture out to Sheffield’s dramatic borders that overlap with the national park. The city is also home to the largest area of ancient woodland in South Yorkshire, Ecclesall Woods. A labyrinth of walking and cycling tracks, it is a great place to escape city life and reconnect with nature. While here, join a course at J G Graves Woodland Discovery Centre and weave your own basket or make a rustic stool.

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H E R I TA G E With such an exciting history, Sheffield offers many opportunities to travel back in time and learn about its fascinating heritage. The oldest building in the city, Sheffield Cathedral has been a site of worship for 1000 years, with its architecture and form experiencing many changes over the centuries. The cathedral has embarked on an impressive and ambitious three-year schedule of artistic events seeing the magnificent structure transformed in a way that has never been seen before. This will incorporate three major projects each year, during spring, summer and advent. The first of 2020 is the light and sound installation, Great Observatory, in March. Located in a Grade II listed building, Weston Park Museum tells the story of Sheffield from its prehistory to the present day. In 2020 it launches two new galleries; Ancient Egypt shares the museum’s enviable collection of Egyptian artefacts and Sheffield Stories will celebrate the diverse communities and people’s experiences of life in this city. Head to Kelham Island Museum just outside the city centre. This historic venue showcases Sheffield’s manufacturing heritage, from early industrialisation to modern times. Learn what it was like to live and work in the city during the Industrial Revolution, the Victorian era and through two world wars, and how

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steelmaking forged both the city of today and had a major impact across the globe! A visit to Abbeydale Industrial Hamlet - a group of Grade I and II listed buildings and a Scheduled Ancient Monument - will transport you back in time to the 18th century where you will experience industrial life in a rural scythe and steelworks. Discover the preserved worker’s cottage, waterwheels, a grinding hull, steam engine and the last complete surviving crucible steel furnace in the UK. The unique National Emergency Services Museum offers a fascinating insight into the history and role of the emergency services. With over 50 vehicles on display from horsepower to manual and steam to motor, there are three floors of impressive exhibits to discover.

CITY LIFE For those seeking quirky and independent places to shop, eat and drink, there are several vibrant areas to explore across Sheffield. Just outside of the city centre is Ecclesall Road and Sharrow Vale, a long-time hang-out of locals and visitors alike. It is teeming with a huge selection of pavement side coffee shops, bars and restaurants where you can find food from all corners of the world, sip sophisticated cocktails or sup a pint of Yorkshire’s finest. A short distance from the city centre is the Upper Don Valley an area which includes the exciting Kelham Island. This part of the city has seen significant rejuvenation over recent years – a shift from a

manufacturing mecca to hipster hub. Whet your appetite at one of the huge range of eateries from fine dining to street food. The thirsty won’t need to look far either, with three breweries and bars aplenty located here it is no wonder the area goes by the name of Valley of Beer. The Antiques Quarter, on the south-side of the city and a short walk from the centre, is a lively and up-and-coming area with eight antique centres as well as 50 shops, cafes and bars. Browse for authentic period antiques, affordable traditional furniture, retro collectables, vinyl, vintage clothing, as well as local artwork, handmade crafts, artisan produce and ‘Made in Yorkshire’ foods and beers. If you share the nation’s love of gin, at Sheffield’s Locksley Distilling, you can delve into the world of aromatic botanicals and learn how to distil your own unique bottle of the spirit, you’ll also sample their range and learn about the history and production of gin.

FO OT B A L L FO C U S This city is the home of football, the world’s oldest football club Sheffield FC was founded here in 1857. Ever popular today, football runs deep in this city’s veins with local teams Sheffield United and Sheffield Wednesday keeping local interest alive and kicking.

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ST E E L I N G T H E S H OW A sensational stage premiere, a West End hit and now it’s heading home to Yorkshire. Think theatre tour, think fabulous film. David Parkin finds out why Everybody’s Talking About…Sheffield!

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t is the latest Yorkshire underdog story to capture the hearts of audiences around the world. Everybody’s Talking About Jamie attracted sold-out audiences during a West End theatre run last year. But that was just the start, with the musical set to make an even bigger splash in 2020 - with a national tour bringing it back to its home city of Sheffield and the premiere of a starstudded Hollywood film. Inspired by a BBC documentary, Jamie: Drag Queen at 16, the show tells the true story of Jamie Campbell, a teenager living on a council estate who doesn’t quite fit in. Terrified about the future but bursting with talent, Jamie is supported by his loving mum and surrounded by his friends who help him overcome prejudice, beat the bullies and step out into the spotlight Following in the footsteps of The Full Monty and Calendar Girls, this quirky, warm-hearted Yorkshire tale about a teenage boy who dreams of becoming a drag queen, starring Layton Williams and EastEnders’ Shane Richie, has proved a smash hit. It boasts an original score of catchy pop tunes by lead singer-songwriter of The Feeling, Dan Gillespie Sells and Dr Who screenwriter Tom MacRae. But as Dan Bates, chief executive of Sheffield Theatres, recalls, a bit like Jamie himself, while the show had a lot going for it, it still faced an uphill battle to find success. “The director got in touch with us and said they had an idea for a show that would be great for Sheffield. I knew of the documentary. I liked the idea. I know Sheffield likes a true story and really likes an underdog story,” says Bates. “It is one of the few Cities of Sanctuary, taking people under their wing (in 2007 Sheffield became the first UK City of Sanctuary, for asylumseekers and refugees, welcoming those in need of safety).” Despite commissioning the show after recognising the excitement and “spark” it generated, Bates admits that there was still a high risk that it might not be successful.

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Left: Layton Williams in the lead role at the Apollo Theatre. Above: The famous Crucible and Lyceum Theatres in Sheffield. Right: Sejal Keshwala as Ray.

A G R E AT S T O R Y T O L D WITH ENERGY ABOUT AN UNDERDOG TRIUMPHING AG A I N ST T H E O D D S . “It was a big show, a risky show with an unknown title. Audiences like a hook - so a story they know, a recognised title or a famous person as the star - and we had none of those! But it had a top-notch cast and I was blown away by the energy of it.” Bates remembers that on the eve of its opening at the iconic Crucible Theatre in 2017 ticket sales had not been good. But that was the last time there was any question mark over the success of Everybody’s Talking About Jamie. “We hold a public dress rehearsal the day before every show opens and people can come and watch in return for a donation. You can tell the success of the show by the length of the queue in the morning and we had a big queue! As soon as the show finished the whole audience was on their feet. They told their friends, the reaction through social media and word of mouth was amazing.” Bates puts the success of the show down to its combination of being a great story told with energy about an underdog triumphing against the odds. “So many families came to see the show - it touched people’s hearts,” he says. The show’s West End success will transfer to the big screen later

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this year with the release of a film. Sheffield-based Warp Films has teamed up with Film4 and New Regency to reunite the original creative team behind the stage production. Filmed in Sheffield and Doncaster, it features stars including Oscarnominated Richard E Grant, Sarah Lancashire, who won a BAFTA for Yorkshire-based TV series Happy Valley, as Jamie’s mother Margaret and BAFTA nominee Sharon Horgan as teacher Miss Hedge. The movie, which will be released worldwide via 20th Century Fox, sees newcomer Max Harwood take the title role of Jamie New. The 21-year-old from Basingstoke who is still studying at acting school, was chosen ahead of 3,000 who applied for the open casting call. Following a year’s search for Jamie’s classmates via regional casting calls, 20 young people from Yorkshire and the surrounding regions were cast. The film’s director Jonathan Butterell, writer Tom MacRae and composer Dan Gillespie Sells said: “Who would have thought when Jamie Campbell first put on his prom dress, that eight years later we would have brought together the best of British and Irish acting talent to tell his story.

“As well as launching a brand new star in Max Harwood to play Jamie himself, we’re so thrilled to welcome Sarah, Richard and Sharon to the Jamie family. Now the party’s really getting started.” Producer Mark Herbert from Warp Films added: “Warp Films are absolutely delighted that Richard, Sharon and Sarah are joining the Jamie family, and we are so excited that after nearly a year of searching we have found our Jamie New - we can’t wait to start this journey with Max and to share this film with the world.” Dan Bates is excited to see the film, which he believes delivers on several levels. “It has been huge, huge. It is a £17m production, that’s £17m coming into Yorkshire to develop this. “And they have really included that Sheffield community. There is a street party scene in the film and 4,000 people were invited to turn up without an audition! It makes me really proud for Sheffield.” He says the success of Everybody’s Talking About Jamie was the start of a more ambitious approach by Sheffield Theatres that has literally put it on the world stage. “If we could do a show of that scale then we knew we could do more - we have been bolder.”

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Since then there have been world stage premieres of books turned films including Life of Pi and The Last King of Scotland as well as Flowers For Mrs Harris and Standing At The Sky’s Edge created by Sheffield musician Richard Hawley and set in the city’s now rejuvenated but once austere Park Hill estate. “No other theatre that I know of has that amount of new work,” says Bates proudly. “People want to work with us and invest in our work. There is an absolute sense of pride in helping put Sheffield on the map.” Bates says he thought that certain references to Sheffield might be removed when Everybody’s Talking

About Jamie transferred to the West End. “But they didn’t, they still included the snooker (the World Snooker Championship which has been held at the Crucible Theatre every year since 1977) and certain places in Sheffield, including Parson Cross, no one knows that unless you’re from Sheffield!” He is looking forward to welcoming back Everybody’s Talking About Jamie for a three-week run in February with some performances already sold out. “It’s amazing how it touches your heart, there is such a strong feelgood factor,” Bates beams with pride. And after the return of the stage show, there is the Hollywood movie to look forward to. “It will have its premiere in Los Angeles and then a week later in the UK,” says Bates. Could that be in Sheffield? “We are hoping!” Everybody’s Talking About Jamie, Lyceum Theatre, Sheffield 8 to 29 February The Grand Theatre, Leeds 13 to 18 July.

Top: Layton with the ensemble. Above: Layton Williams plays out the true story of Jamie Campbell who lives on a council estate in Sheffield. Left: Rita Simons as Miss Hedge with Layton. Images © Johan Perrson.

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RAISING THE BARRE Take a moment or tutu to contemplate Northern Ballet’s amazing achievements over the last 50 years as from the end of 2019 through 2020, the illustrious Leeds-based company celebrates its golden anniversary with a spectacular schedule of top-class productions and premieres.

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egarded as one of THE greatest ballet companies, the multi-award-winning, internationally renowned dance troupe continues its commitment to constantly create new and inspiring ballets, touring extensively and attracting the finest dancers from across the globe. Some of Northern Ballet’s cast share their highlights and ‘en pointes’ of view...

Clockwise from top left: Abigail Prudames. Andrew Tomlinson. Ayami Miyata. Javier Torres. Minju Kang.

A B I G A I L P R U DA M E S P R I N C I PA L S O L O I S T N O R T H YO R K S H I R E In Dracula I performed as Mina, a challenging yet hugely rewarding part. My first title role was Cinderella and I played her again quite recently. It was lovely to be able to revisit that experience a second time but with much more knowledge, technique and strength. I joined Northern Ballet straight out of school as an apprentice, not knowing much about the company but now I couldn’t imagine having my career anywhere else. 2020 productions? Hopefully I’ll get the chance to appear in all of them! (laughs)

MINJU KANG F I R ST S O LO I ST S O U T H KO R E A My first lead role was in The Little Mermaid and was really special for me. The repertoire that Northern Ballet performs and the storytelling is all very attractive. Having communication with the audience is really important too. I love the traditional ballets produced by other companies but they’re not my favourite to perform. Northern Ballet’s work allows the audience and the dancers to connect more. Everyone works so hard for our achievements, it really is teamwork and we’re connected like a family, especially working so closely on tour.

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NORTHERN BALLET CO N T I N U E S TO AT T R A C T T H E F I N E S T DA N C E R S F R O M AC R O S S T H E G LO B E . WO R L D FIRSTS Celebrate 50 years of Northern Ballet with a trio of Yorkshire world premieres.

AYA M I M I YATA L E A D I N G S O LO I ST J A PA N Northern Ballet is my second home and its cast and crew are like family to me. I loved appearing in The Three Musketeers. The story, dancing and music are so beautiful with a mixture of magnificent sword fights and many moments for laughter, love and excitement. It’s certainly a fun ballet to perform! The productions at Northern Ballet are a perfect mix of acting and dance. Ideal as I enjoy playing someone else and telling stories.

ANDREW TOMLINSON DA N C E R W E S T YO R K S H I R E Aged 10 years old I joined the Academy of Northern Ballet and it continues to be an incredible experience, receiving excellent and inspiring training alongside company dancers. Performing in The Great Gatsby was amazing, it has such a fun atmosphere on stage. I was born in Leeds and Leeds based Northern Ballet is a world-class company...so a perfect match! As a student I got to perform in The Nutcracker, A Christmas Carol as Tiny Tim and in A Simple Man, all fantastic experiences. I enjoy being part of such a hard-working and supportive team. Performing in Leeds is a joy and our home crowd are always fabulous.

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GEISHA Kenneth Tindall choreographs the haunting tale of two young women trapped in a world of duty and sacrifice. Based on a true story, Geisha will premiere in Leeds on 14 March 2020 followed by Sheffield and then on a UK tour until May 2020.

MERLIN A magical experience, choreographed by Drew McOnie. Inspired by the story of the legendary wizard, Merlin will premiere in Bradford on 16 October 2020 followed by a spell on a national tour and returning to Yorkshire in December 2020 for some Christmas sparkle in Leeds.

J AV I E R T O R R E S P R E M I E R DA N C E R CUBA The Great Gatsby has a special place for me because it took me right out of my comfort zone. I studied intensely for the role, to try and get all the layers of Gatsby’s character into my performance. Casanova was totally different, I was even more out of my comfort zone playing the lead but it gave me the realisation that I am more than just a classical dancer. I didn’t know anything about Northern Ballet at first! I was in the UK on holiday and I saw that the company was touring near me, so I asked if I could take a class with them to keep up my fitness. That was my first interaction and eventually led to me joining Northern Ballet. So, here I am 10 years later! My favourite thing is the people. There is a moment where, after 16 weeks of being on tour, you have a bond with absolutely everybody. The incredible teamwork and support is what makes the tour easier for the dancers, everyone helps everybody else and we can all relate to one another.

There’ll be a children’s ballet premiere coming to a stage near you in autumn 2020 too. Look out for details at northernballet.com

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LEEDS Vibrant and bursting with energy, Leeds is the perfect place for a cultural fix, shopping spree, city getaway or a great night out. This proud Yorkshire city certainly has plenty to offer.

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Below: Leeds City Centre with the glass roof of Trinity Leeds in the foreground. Right: Harewood House. Wildlife World at Lotherton. Bottom right: Founded over 800 years ago in 1152, Kirkstall Abbey is a feat of historic architecture set amid a haven of wildlife and greenery.

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eeds has a rich and varied heritage, especially when it comes to architecture. In fact, it has more listed buildings than any other city outside of London. You’ll find ornate Victorian arcades, industrial mills and ancient ruins sitting alongside contemporary new builds in this incredibly eclectic city. Take a stroll to marvel at iconic buildings like the grand Leeds Town Hall and Leeds Civic Hall. The spectacular dome roofed Leeds Corn Exchange is full of quirky independent shops. While the majestic Grade I listed Kirkgate Market, built in 1857, on opening was the largest indoor market in Europe. It’s also the birthplace of one of Britain’s biggest global brands, Marks and Spencer. Beautiful buildings are home to some of the city’s finest shopping destinations too, designer brands and Harvey Nichols fill the gorgeous Victoria Quarter and Victoria Gate arcades and the contemporary Trinity Leeds, housed under a giant glass roof, make Leeds a shopper’s paradise. Full of groundbreaking cultural institutions, Leeds certainly packs a punch. It’s the only English city other than London, to have its own resident opera and ballet companies, the internationally renowned and award-winning Opera North and Northern Ballet. Leeds is also home to some of the finest theatres in the UK including the recently refurbished Leeds Playhouse, City Varieties Music Hall, and the beautiful Leeds Grand Theatre, providing a wealth of entertainment from West End plays, musicals, classical music and comedy. As well as performance art, Leeds also has a vibrant visual art scene; Leeds Art Gallery has a diverse collection and next door, the Henry Moore Institute is dedicated to celebrating

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historical and contemporary sculpture from across the world. Housed in the art deco headquarters of the former brewery, The Tetley is a leading centre for contemporary art. With such an incredible range of museums there is plenty to keep inquisitive minds inspired. The awardwinning Leeds City Museum has six galleries to visit, including; Life on Earth, Ancient Worlds and The Leeds Story. You can spring into action at the Royal Armouries Museum, Britain’s national museum of arms and armour and home to many treasured objects including Henry VIII’s original suit of armour. Families and rail enthusiasts will love Middleton Railway, the oldest continuously working railway in the world. It now has a museum and offers nostalgic passenger trips aboard steam locomotives. The city’s industrial heritage can be explored at many locations around Leeds including Thwaite Mills; one of the last remaining examples of water-powered mills in Britain. A local favourite is the well preserved Kirkstall Abbey, whose ancient ruins and surroundings are a peaceful escape, while being just a short distance from the fast pace of the city centre. Taste buds will certainly be tantalised. With a national reputation for its exciting independent food and drink scene, Leeds serves up world cuisine, award-winning eateries, Michelin star dining and a flourishing street food scene with gusto. As a city with a proud brewing history, the love of craft beer and real ale is widespread with almost every bar in the city offering something more than a simple pint. The vibrant and eclectic nightlife takes some beating too, from classy cocktails and popular nightclubs to live music and theatre, there is a huge choice and something for everyone. It’s good to know that

the city has been awarded Purple Flag status to show that a night out here is not only entertaining and enjoyable but diverse and safe too. To escape the hustle and bustle of the city, the picturesque Roundhay Park is a wonderful place to relax. Not only is it the largest park in Leeds, but one of the largest urban parks in Europe and twice the size of Hyde Park, London! The rolling parkland is perfect for circular walks around lakes, woodlands and formal gardens. Children will love the fantastic playground and there are tempting cafés along the way too. With dramatic countryside on the doorstep, Leeds is a great base for exploring. A short ride out is the wonderful market town of Otley. Wander the quaint streets to discover lovely shops and cafés. If the weather is on your side, take a picnic to the riverside or hike to the top of the Otley Chevin Forest Park for a breathtaking view across the Wharfedale valley. Situated just outside of Leeds, at Harewood House you can step back in time and wander through this glorious treasure house of England to discover Renaissance masterpieces, Chippendale furniture, exquisite family portraits, as well as a fine collection of Sèvres china and much more. Outside, the extraordinary 100 acres of gardens created by Lancelot ‘Capability’ Brown are a delight to explore and include plant species from all over the world. Nearby are the historic houses of Lotherton and Temple Newsam with both boasting stunning gardens and a grand estate.

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SPORT

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GOLD

The eyes of the sporting world will turn to Tokyo this summer as Japan hosts the 2020 Olympic and Paralympic Games. Nick Howes looks at the Yorkshire-based athletes who will once again be looking to conquer.

K A D E E N A C OX M B E PA R A - AT H L E T I C S A N D PA R A - C YC L I N G Since winning golds in two different sports in Rio, Kadeena has enjoyed spells as a reality TV star after recurrent injuries hampered her athletic career. Those problems seem to be firmly behind her now though and some impressive results last year – including a victory at the Para-cycling Track World Championships - mean we’re predicting even more medals in Tokyo.

C H LO E B I R C H B A D M I N TO N With British Badminton having lost much of its funding in recent years, you have to hand it to stars like Chloe who have managed to work their way to the very pinnacle of the sport. A bronze medal at the 2018 Commonwealth Games was followed up by a silver in the 2019 European Games, and we’d love to see this rise continue on the biggest sporting stage of them all.

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Britain might not be known for its world-class basketball players, but in the wheelchair discipline, Carrigill is definitely amongst the best. She was part of the team that narrowly missed out on a medal in Rio and will be looking to put that right in Japan. She helped GB earn a silver at the 2018 World Championship and now wants to add an Olympic one to her impressive collection.

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SOPHIE CARRIGILL W H E E LC H A I R BASKETBALL

Clockwise from top: Kadeena Cox at the UCI Para-Cycling Track World Championships 2019. Nile Wilson tumbles his way to victory. Sheffield’s Bryony Page. Lizzie Deignan aims to go out with a bang.

ED CLANCY OBE C YC L I N G In the world of cycling where Victoria Pendleton, Sir Bradley Wiggins and Sir Chris Hoy are household names, Ed Clancy is sometimes surprisingly overlooked. He has achieved 11 World and European titles in a glittering career on the track, and in Tokyo will be gunning for a remarkable fourth gold medal. At 35, this may be his last chance to shine, but we wouldn’t put it past him achieving that feat if he makes Team GB’s revered Team Pursuit squad.

HANNAH COCKROFT MBE, DL PA R A - AT H L E T I C S With 11 World Championships and five Paralympic medals already in the bag, you could forgive Hannah for resting on her laurels, but incredibly, she remains as hungry as ever to add to that impressive tally. She proved that by triumphing in the 100m T34 event in Doha last November and is working hard to ensure she tops the standings again this summer.

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ack in 2016, the county’s sports stars won an incredible 14 medals in the Olympics alone – five gold, five silver and four bronze – and if Yorkshire had been a country it would have finished 17th on the overall medal table, higher than the likes of Canada, New Zealand and South Africa! Whether Yorkshire’s finest will be able to top those feats remains to be seen, but we have picked out 11 athletes who we think are worth keeping an eye on in the Land of the Rising Sun.

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LIZZIE DEIGNAN C YC L I N G Lizzie has announced she’ll be retiring after the Olympics so we’re expecting her to go out with a bang. A gold medal is about all that’s missing from the Otley star’s amazing list of achievements. Tokyo offers the perfect stage for her to bring the curtain down on a fantastic career.

JAC K L AU G H E R M B E DIVING Rio 2016 was a record-breaking Games for Laugher. Not only did he become the first British diver (alongside Chris Mears) to win a gold medal, he also became British diving’s first multiple medallist when he also took silver in the individual 3m springboard. Since then he’s claimed five more golds and will be among the favourites once again at the XXXII Olympiad.

JESS LEARMONTH T R I AT H L O N The Brownlee brothers have rightly dominated the headlines when it comes to triathlon heroics in recent years, but keep an eye out for Jess in Tokyo as she also aims to earn a few lines of her own. This Leeds lass came to the sport late but is more than making up for it now, earning two silver medals at the 2018 Commonwealth Games.

JESS LEYDEN R OW I N G Jess only took up rowing to try and fix a horse riding injury in her arm but rose through the ranks sharply and announced herself on the world stage by becoming the first-ever British winner at the 2013 Junior World Rowing Championships. An Under-23 title followed in 2016 and this will be her first Olympics.

B R YO N Y PA G E TRAMPOLINE In Rio, Bryony became the first British trampolinist to ever win an Olympic medal when she took home the silver, and she is back on the case to try and go one better in Tokyo. If everything goes well in the build-up, the Sheffield-based star looks set to be among the front runners this summer.

NILE WILSON GYMNASTICS Nile was just 20 when he claimed Britain’s first-ever Horizontal Bar bronze medal in Rio, and in the time since then he’s become as famous for his great YouTube videos as he has for his outstanding sports talent. Five medals (three gold and two silver) followed at the 2018 Commonwealth Games, and even though 2019 was hampered by injury, we’re confident he’ll be back to his best in the Japanese capital.

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TO U R GUIDE 2020 TOUR D E YO R K S H I R E 3 0 A P R I L - 3 M AY

1 Beverley to Redcar

Beverley will host the start of the Tour for the third time as the route heads north along the stunning Yorkshire coastline taking in sights such as Bempton Cliffs, Whitby and Robin Hood’s Bay before finishing on the Redcar seafront.

2 Skipton to Leyburn

A first TDY start in Skipton. The route heads out towards Settle before heading north past the Yorkshire Three Peaks. Iconic climbs at Buttertubs and Grinton Moor feature before the peloton twist back south for a sprint finish into Leyburn.

3 Barnsley to Huddersfield

Barnsley witnesses its third start. This brutal stage sees five classified climbs for the women and six for the men including the Côte de Shibden Wall, a brutal 15.5% gradient, 0.8km climb. The added complication? This climb is cobbled.

4 Halifax to Leeds

Same, same but different? Yes; Halifax to Leeds has featured before but this time the route takes in different climbs including Skyreholme, Lofthouse, Greenhow and the Cow and Calf. A vicious stage that should provide fireworks for the fans.

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As the county races towards its sixth Tour de Yorkshire, Tom Ashurst reflects on the annual worldclass cycling event ahead of this year’s international sporting extravaganza. “Of course, I’m excited to be back and racing the Tour de Yorkshire. It’s a place I used to spend a lot of time as a kid, and I’ve always had such an incredible welcome here. It’s a special race.” These were the words of the great Mark Cavendish on the eve of the 2019 edition. The fact that a 30-time stage winner of the Tour de France still gets excited about competing in Yorkshire is testament to how far the race has come in five years. Joining him on the start line in Doncaster was another of Britain’s greatest sportsmen, Chris Froome, who was racing in God’s Own County for the first time since his participation in the 2014 Grand Départ, and 2018 TDY champion Greg Van Avermaet. Stellar names for a stellar race. Whilst the line-up for the men’s race looked good, the names for the Asda Tour de Yorkshire Women’s Race were positively extraordinary. Three-time world champion Marianne Vos, reigning world road race and time trial champions Anna van der Breggen and Annemiek van Vleuten,

plus Yorkshire’s Lizzie Deignan all featured as the race included 15 of the top 16 teams on the planet. Cycling is going from strength to strength here, but it is perhaps the strides that are being made to create genuine gender parity within the sport that Yorkshire can be most proud of. Equal prize money coupled with full television coverage is what these heroes of the sport deserve, and it is exactly what they receive in the White Rose county. Looking at the women’s race first, Stage One from Barnsley to Bedale, and incorporating a lap of the Yorkshire 2019 Harrogate circuit, was fiercely competed but it was the new sprint sensation Lorena Wiebes who would win on the day, this victory would prove to be one of 14 in a breakout season for the Dutch speedster. Stage Two was always going to be the crucial day though as they faced 132km of sheer Yorkshire viciousness from Bridlington to Scarborough, including the small matter of five categorised climbs. Chuck in the most brutal weather

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SPORT

Clockwise from left: Nicholas Dlamini leads a rain-soaked peloton across Boothferry Bridge. Cav meets the fans. Marianne Vos wins the women’s title. Men’s champion Chris Lawless makes his way through the crowds at the finish. Chris Froome was racing in Yorkshire for the first time since the 2014 Grand Départ. All images © SWpix.com

I T WA S C L E A R I T WA S G O I N G T O TA K E S O M E O N E W I T H T R U E YO R K S H I R E G R I T T O W I N . conditions the race has ever faced and it was clear it was going to take someone with true Yorkshire grit to win. After attacks from van der Breggen, van Vleuten and Deignan, it was Mavi Garcia and Soraya Paladin who forced the decisive break. Unfortunately for them though, they took the legendary Vos with them and it was the Dutchwoman who would ultimately reign in the rain on the Scarborough seafront. In the men’s race lightening actually and metaphorically struck twice on Stage One as, in a repeat of 2018, a victory on what looked like a routine bunch sprint stage was won from the day’s breakaway. Unlike in 2018, when Yorkshire’s Harry Tanfield triumphed from the breakaway group, Jesper Asselman was the only escapee to hold off the baying peloton as his sprint into a soggy Selby was unparalleled. Stage Two into Bedale was more by the book, with the mighty German Rick Zabel outsprinting the field in a bunch kick to the line. Stage 3, Bridlington to Scarborough, saw the General Classification spark into life as a

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Team INEOS-led group forced a searing pace in crosswinds to blow the peloton to bits as an elite group made their way to Scarborough’s North Bay. It was the demonstrative Dane, Alexander Kamp, who would win on the day but Team INEOS rider Chris Lawless would move into the overall lead with one stage to go. So, onto the final stage that saw a repeat of the Halifax to Leeds route of 2018. Lawless, a sprinter who climbs a bit, was not expected to hold on with the likes of Olympic champion Van Avermaet breathing down his neck but he clung on over climbs like Park Rash and Greenhow Hill, ably supported by his teammates Owain Doull, Eddie Dunbar and Froome, and by the time they reached Leeds, he was with just Van Avermaet and teammate Dunbar. The 2018 champion Van Avermaet would win the sprint for the stage, but it was the man from Wigan who would seal the overall title by just two seconds. What the Tour de Yorkshire lacked in weather, it more than made up for it in atmosphere as the villages and towns along the route came out in

force to do Yorkshire proud yet again. Not only was it the vociferous support on the roadside but it was the creative efforts that communities went to when adorning their streets with bunting and flags and some of the incredible land art seen too. This included an amazing creation featuring a winking goose and turkey riding Chopper bikes in Goose Eye which was crowned the winner of the 2019 Land Art competition. The legacy of 2014 and the Grand Départ lives on, not only with the Tour de Yorkshire but also with the UCI Road World Championships, which for nine days in September 2019 saw the world of cycling yet again descend on Yorkshire. Cycling in God’s Own County has come of age and 2020 will yet again show off the county in all its glory.

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ADVERTORIAL

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REDCAR AND CLEVELAND A place of interest and beauty, Redcar and Cleveland has it all, as magnificent coastline and dramatic countryside combine with a rich and diverse history.

This picture: Saltburn Pier is the only remaining pleasure pier on the Yorkshire Coast. Opposite clockwise from top left: Learning to surf in Saltburn. Gisborough Priory. Watersports on Redcar beach. Take in spectacular views from Redcar Beacon. Saltburn Cliff Tramway.

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ith easy access to the sea and wide open spaces, it’s no wonder Redcar and Cleveland is described as the outdoor capital of the North East. Eight glorious miles of sandy beaches offer a traditional seaside experience, while inland you will discover beautiful moorland and scenery. The delightful coastal town of Saltburn-by-the-Sea bestows plenty of Victorian charm and thrills. Take a ride down to the sea on The Saltburn Cliff Tramway, the oldest water balanced funicular in operation in Great Britain. It connects the town with the only remaining pleasure pier on the North East and Yorkshire Coast. There’s a variety of exciting water sports on offer. Why not book in for a thrilling surf lesson at Saltburn Surf School and learn to ride those waves. At Saltburn Golf Club, with its stunning views, you can hit the perfect round of golf. Of course, a trip to the coast isn’t complete without sampling the local fishing crew’s catch. The Seaview Restaurant, perfectly placed on the seafront, serves fresh and elegant seafood dishes in the restaurant and the tastiest fish and chips from its takeaway. At the charming seaside resort and fishing town of Redcar, give your taste buds a treat and try the famous lemon top ice cream. Voyage into the nautical world with a visit to the Zetland Lifeboat Museum and Redcar Heritage Centre, home to the oldest surviving lifeboat in the world. Take in spectacular seaside views from the top of Redcar Beacon, an 80ft vertical

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pier that was built as part of the seafront regeneration scheme. For a memorable day out, horse lovers will be champing at the bit to visit Redcar Racecourse for some topquality horse racing action. The busy market town of Guisborough and its surrounds are well worth a visit with activities and attractions to keep everyone happy. A good place to start is Guisborough Museum, which tells the story of the ancient town. The Guisborough Forest and Walkway is a mosaic of thriving habitats, with woodland, wetland and grassland and is a gateway to the North York Moors National Park. The dramatic skeleton of Gisborough Priory dates to the 14th century and is a superb example of early Gothic architecture. It was founded by ancestors of Robert the Bruce, King of Scotland and is steeped in rich ecclesiastical history. Tired legs can enjoy a well earned and luxurious rest at Gisborough Hall, a striking hotel where you can dine in style, be pampered in the Revival Zone and relax in elegant surroundings. Perhaps one of the best ways to enjoy the area is to lace up your walking boots and explore the Cleveland Way. This 110 mile National Trail which starts in Helmsley and reaches its end at Filey Brigg will show you the best of coast and country with magnificent scenery of the North York Moors National Park, stunning heather moorland and spectacular views of the North Yorkshire coastline. Along the route, at Great Ayton you will find the beautiful Roseberry Topping, probably one of the most distinctive hills in Yorkshire with its half-cone summit and jagged cliff. Whatever the season, soak up the gorgeous setting as you walk through colourful bluebell

woods or blushing heather to reach the top and experience breathtaking panoramic views. Redcar and Cleveland has a rich industrial heritage which can be explored in its wealth of museums and historic sites. The Cleveland Ironstone Mining Museum in Skinningrove, provides the exciting opportunity to experience the underground world of a real ironstone mine and to understand the skills, customs and life of the Cleveland miner. The fascinating local industrial, maritime and social history can be uncovered at Kirkleatham Museum and Grounds. Within this magnificent 1709 Queen Anne building, that began life as a free school for boys, is a treasure trove of artefacts and exhibitions that tell the tales of the past, including Steel Stories a powerful celebration of the region’s steel and industrial heritage. Winkie’s Castle Folk Museum in Marske-by-the-Sea also has a wonderful collection of artefacts from local bygone days.

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BECOME A MEMBER. G O O D F O R YO U A N D YO U R B U S I N E S S . G O O D F O R YO R K S H I R E . W H AT ’ S I N I T F O R YO U ? Welcome to Yorkshire membership provides businesses with a chance to showcase to the world what they have to offer. Alongside promotion on our award-winning website, yorkshire.com, members can tap into a wide variety of resources including access to free social and training events, PR support, potential editorial coverage, money saving offers and more. Tourism in Yorkshire has never been stronger and by bringing together businesses from all four corners of the county we can achieve even more.

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BRADFORD In the world’s first UNESCO City of Film you will find beautiful architecture, world-class artists, literary greats, outstanding museums and cuisine, all next to the wild and wonderful moors. In fact, Bradford is bidding to be the UK City of Culture 2025.

Left: Bradford City Park and City Hall. Below left to right: Wonderlab at the National Science and Media Museum. The Cow and Calf rocks on Ilkley Moor. Salt’s Mill. Cartwright Hall Art Gallery.

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ne thing’s for sure, you won’t go hungry or thirsty! Bradford serves up fantastic curry dishes from across the subcontinent, it’s no wonder it held the title of Curry Capital of Britain for six consecutive years. Try the Gujarati cuisine at Prashad or Kashmiri delights from Aagrah. The elegant Restaurant 1914 at the Alhambra Theatre serves excellent food accompanied by unbeatable views of City Park. With the beautiful and rugged backdrop of Ilkley Moor, the nearby town of Ilkley has an enviable location and is bursting with fantastic shops and great places to eat. Try the delightful cakes on offer at Bettys Café Tea Rooms or if the spirit takes you, sip a signature cocktail at The Ticket Office bar. Bradford is home to many breweries and produces an excellent range of real ale. From Timothy Taylor’s and Naylor’s Brewery in Keighley to the artisan gin distillery, Haworth Steam Brewing Co. Cosy pubs in nearby countryside will pull you the perfect pint, The Dog and Gun in Oxenhope and The Fleece Inn in Addingham to name a few. Wander the streets to see the intricate design of City Hall and the welcoming Bradford Cathedral. Discover the neoclassical architecture of Little Germany, the legacy of 19th century European merchants who inhabited the city during the height of the textile industry. Nearby Saltaire, a Victorian industrial village built by the philanthropist Sir Titus Salt, is a UNESCO World Heritage Site - just like the Pyramids! At its heart is the imposing Salts Mill, a grand textile mill that is now home to art collections, shops and restaurants.

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For a taste of the local history and culture visit Ilkley Manor House which dates back to the 14th century. Today it’s a heritage, learning, creative and leisure quarter for the town. The Brontë Parsonage Museum in Haworth is the home of the famous literary sisters, today it shares fascinating exhibitions of their lives and works. Cliffe Castle Museum in Keighley is a local heritage museum where you can explore its Victorian neo-gothic treasures alongside natural history exhibits and Bradford’s haunted Bolling Hall has every nook and cranny packed with history. The Alhambra Theatre and the newly refurbished St George’s Hall presents a variety of the best musicals, dramas and touring music and comedy acts while Kala Sangam an intercultural arts hub have a diverse programme of shows and events. The annual Bradford Literature Festival is a real ‘novelty’ for book fans. Curious minds will enjoy Bradford’s galleries and museums. Located in the city centre, the inspirational National Science and Media Museum allows visitors to explore the impact of image and sound technologies on our lives through interactive and educational exhibitions. The internationally renowned Impressions Gallery is one of the UK’s leading photography galleries. Located in the picturesque Lister Park is Cartwright Hall Art Gallery home to permanent displays including David Hockney as well as visiting exhibitions. Unique and moving, The Peace Museum explores the history and stories of peace while The Bradford Police Museum, provides an insight into the history and heritage of criminal justice in Bradford.

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This page: The Black Bull at the top of Haworth Main Street. Anne Brontë portrait by Branwell Brontë. Opposite: The Brontë Parsonage Museum.

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am sitting in the Brontë Parsonage Museum archives with a small painting of Anne Brontë aged 16, drawn by her sister Charlotte. Anne is wearing a string of simple glowing amber beads, which had belonged to their mother; who had died when Anne was not even a year old. Thanks to the museum’s Lauren Livesey, I also have the real beads in front of me. She has dug out a selection of objects connected to “my favourite Brontë sister”. I am still trying to process the impact of this young motherless woman with her brown curls and her few cherished possessions, on my life and on the long campaign for women’s rights. I didn’t visit the Parsonage or the landscape that Anne Brontë roamed till long after she’d captured my imagination. Her two novels are the works of a whistle-blower confronting the truth of Victorian womanhood. Agnes Grey recounts in documentary detail the grim reality of her own experience as a poor governess to wild children in a dysfunctional family. Anne’s masterpiece The Tenant of Wildfell Hall is a revolutionary novel recounting the degradations of a woman trying to escape with her young son from a marriage to a violent alcoholic. “Things that formerly shocked and disgusted me, now seem only natural,” her heroine Helen writes in her diary mourning her entrapment. It may have drawn some of its detail from observing the wretched decline of her brother Branwell, but the novel was campaign literature for all women. It challenged the right of men to own their wives entirely. Anne’s writing astounded me. It seemed to speak across the centuries. For decades her reputation was damaged and overshadowed by Charlotte’s negative assessment of her work and character. But in the 20th century, Anne with her clear eyed passion for justice and equality was reclaimed by feminists and scholars. She seemed to be a modern woman in not modern times. Winning a place at Oxford in 1986, I chose to study the new Women’s Studies option as part of my English Literature degree. Alongside reading the exciting new African American prose emerging from the likes of Alice Walker and Toni Morrison, I wrote my undergraduate thesis on Property and Possession: The Politics of Marriage in The Tenant of Wildfell Hall, looking at connections with the eventual 1870 Married Women’s Property Act that finally granted women some rights – 22 years later. After graduating I finally visited Haworth for the first time with my sister, herself then a schoolteacher in York. And most recently I’ve brought my own daughter to this breathtaking landscape on the spectacular moors for her to experience the ancient wild beauty that inspired the sisters. In Haworth Parsonage (became the Brontë Parsonage Museum in 1928) I am mesmerised by the tiny dim parlour where the girls walked round the dining table sharing their stories of their elaborately imagined early fantasy worlds. In the archive I smile seeing Anne’s drawing of one of the strong Amazonian women of her imaginary island creation Gondal; standing tall and confident on the rocky seashore, looking out to the horizon and a world of adventure.

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A R T & C U LT U R E

A desired destination for international literary lovers, the West Yorkshire village of Haworth was home to one of the world’s most lauded writing families. On the 200th anniversary of sister Anne’s birth, Samira Ahmed visits a corner of the county that sparked much creativity and shares her thoughts on the inspirational and youngest BrontÍ.

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T H E R E I S A R E A L J OY I N K N OW I N G A N N E ’ S R E P U TAT I O N H A S N E V E R B E E N G R E AT E R .

Clockwise from top left: Top Withens. Inside the Brontë Parsonage Museum where Anne Brontë lived and worked. A blue plaque marks the site of Anne Brontë’s death at the Grand Hotel, Scarborough. Below: Anne practises the signature for her pen name of Acton Bell, both of her novels were first published under this name.

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I look at the sketch portrait of William Weightman, the handsome young curate, who looks rather like the actor Toby Stephens, about whom Anne clearly had strong feelings. Did he know? His death from typhoid inspired in the natural poet Anne some of her most grief-stricken verse. What moves me most about visiting Haworth, is the dramatic view from almost every room. In the Brontë home, so many overlook the church graveyard. In winter it is full of crows and the trees are towering and bare, but in summer the garden is in colourful bloom and the neighbouring moorland alive with a different wildness and magnificent open skies. When I first visited Scarborough in my early twenties, it was summer. After the long drive through the heather covered moors, looking down from the cliff top by the blue plaque to her name where Wood’s Lodgings once stood, I saw Anne’s love of this spa town, the romantic view from the cliffs, the castle ruins, the excitement of the social scene, and the gorgeous curve of the sandy bay. And it is that sunny optimism that haunts me most about Anne. She loved life. She fought her illness. When she returned here it was in hope of a sea cure, yet it became her final resting place. Back in the Parsonage archive Lauren hands me the black edged “cross” letter Anne wrote to her friend Ellen Nussey on mourning paper (it was just months after Branwell and Emily’s deaths), and just weeks before she herself was to die at just 29. The exquisite penmanship intersects as she turned the paper 90 degrees to maximise the number of lines, to save paper and postage. “I have no horror of death,” she wrote. “If I thought it inevitable I think I could quietly resign myself to the prospect ... But I wish it would please God to spare me not only for Papa’s and Charlotte’s sakes but because I long to do some good in the world before I leave it. I have many schemes in my head for future practise, humble and limited indeed, but still I should not like them all to come to nothing, and myself to have lived to so little purpose.” It is a letter Lauren, warns me, that usually provokes tears. She is right. But there is a real joy in knowing Anne Bronte’s reputation has never been greater and continues to grow as more and more readers discover her work and ideas. I like to imagine her as that proud Amazonian, on the distant shore of Gondal looking out at us, and seeing us waving back.

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A R T & C U LT U R E

THE BRONTË TRAIL

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ne of the most photographed and impressive streets in the country, the famous Haworth cobbles are world-renowned. Lined with a selection of shops, cosy tearooms, intimate inns and places to stay, steeped in history it’s surrounded by stunning countryside and vast picturesque moorland.

C H E C K I N TO W E AV E R S G U E S T H O U S E Built circa 1840 at the time the Brontë family lived just across the way at the Parsonage, Weavers Guesthouse offers stylish bed and breakfast accommodation and is a perfect base for enjoying the village of Haworth and exploring its beautiful countryside. weaversguesthouse.co.uk

G O TO T H E B R O N T Ë PA R S O N A G E MUSEUM In the bicentenary year of youngest sister Anne’s birth, explore the Brontë Parsonage Museum, home of the internationally famous literary family. This picturesque, historical setting was where the famous siblings Charlotte (Jane Eyre, Villette, Shirley), Emily (Wuthering Heights) and Anne (Agnes Grey, The Tenant of Wildfell Hall) wrote groundbreaking novels. The house contains a wealth of Brontë belongings, from clothes and rooms furnished as they were at the time the family resided there, to pieces of writing including a ‘little book’ written by Charlotte Brontë when she was 14, which the Brontë Society recently acquired at auction with the help of a high-profile public fundraising campaign.bronte.org.uk

H AV E A P I N T I N THE FLEECE Perfectly positioned on the famous Haworth cobbles midway between the Brontë Parsonage Museum and the Keighley & Worth Valley Railway is The Fleece. Serving delicious dishes and a wide range of drinks, including locally brewed prizewinning Timothy Taylor’s Yorkshire beers and ales (apparently a favourite tipple of Madonna), cosy rooms are available too if you want to spend a night or more in this beautiful village. fleeceinnhaworth.co.uk

TA K E A R I D E O N T H E K E I G H L E Y & WO R T H VA L L E Y R A I LWAY Post Brontës, the historic 5 mile line opened in 1867 and runs from Keighley to Oxenhope, with a busy annual schedule of exciting events aboard its classic locomotives. You may recognise many of the route’s locations in a wide range of film and TV productions. From Peaky Blinders and even Pink Floyd’s The Wall to Swallows and Amazons, the heritage train line has appeared on screen regularly over the years. 2020 will be the 50th anniversary of its starring role in The Railway Children, so make a date in your diary for August Bank Holiday when there’ll be a packed weekend of cinematic celebrations. kwvr.co.uk

WA L K O N T H E B R O N T Ë WAY The Brontë Way is a 69km (43 mile) long-distance footpath. The route winds its way past many places of interest to Brontë enthusiasts, including the Brontë Birthplace in Thornton. Scenic highlights are Penistone Hill country park, perched on the moors high above Haworth, the trail to the Brontë Waterfall and over the Brontë Bridge up to Top Withens.

Top left and right: Keighley & Worth Valley Railway. Left: The Brontë waterfall near Haworth. The Waterfalls and Top Withens walk explores the Pennine moors made famous by the Brontë sisters. You’ll reach the Brontë Waterfalls first, which were famously described by Charlotte Brontë as a ‘perfect torrent racing over the rocks, white and beautiful’.

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W E LCO M E TO

WEST YO R K S H I R E A visit to West Yorkshire is full of surprises. Nestled amidst its rolling hills and rugged moors are cultural and historic gems, as well as lively and diverse towns and cities.

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rt lovers will love Wakefield, home to the internationally renowned The Hepworth Wakefield and Yorkshire Sculpture Park. The former is one of the largest purpose-built art galleries in the UK, housing a rare collection of works by Wakefield born sculptor Barbara Hepworth, and a programme of regularly changing exhibitions. The inspiring Yorkshire Sculpture Park is one of the world’s leading open-air galleries, here you can explore world-class contemporary sculpture set amidst 500 acres of beautiful Yorkshire countryside. On the fringes of this cathedral city is the National Trust’s stunning architectural masterpiece, Nostell. This grandest of stately mansions, with extensive landscaped park and gardens, is a wonder to behold. The house was designed and furnished to embody the finest tastes, and this is still evident today, from the grand Palladium exterior to the treasure trove of priceless artefacts inside. Pontefract Castle is a place of family-friendly adventure, with wide open spaces to explore and fascinating ruins to investigate. Discover the stories of its turbulent past, from battles and sieges to starvation and destruction, you’ll be surprised at what these walls have seen! Coal mining was once a hugely prevalent industry in the area. At the National Coal Mining Museum for England, descend 140 metres underground to learn about the hidden world of mining with interactive tours that bring to life the turbulent history of the hard-working miners.

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This area is also famous for some very distinctive and well-loved flavours. Yorkshire Forced Rhubarb is grown locally and celebrated at the city’s Rhubarb Festival each February. While at Pontefract Liquorice Festival in July you can discover the roots of the humble Pontefract cake and sample the delights of liquorice food and drink! Scenic Calderdale is home to Halifax whose dramatic location accentuates the stunning architecture of The Piece Hall. This epic construction, resembling a Venetian piazza, is a beautifully restored legacy of the town’s Georgian cloth industry. Today, between the countless columns you will find a collection of boutique shops, a fascinating visitor centre and a year-round programme of events and festivals. Whilst here, inspire young minds with a visit to Eureka! the National Children’s Museum. The captivating and interactive exhibits make this a magical place to explore and learn. Animal adventures are aplenty at Ponderosa Zoo, Heckmondwike, from adorable lemurs to rare Scottish wildcats, families will adore meeting its furry residents.

Made famous in the recent BBC drama Gentleman Jack, Shibden Hall and Estate is the home of the noted 19th century diarist Anne Lister. The beautiful Grade II listed hall set within glorious parkland is truly charming. Enjoy the boating lake or ride the miniature railway as well as exploring the hall and the tales of those who lived there. Just down the road is the multiple award-winning Shibden Mill Inn. A charming 17th century inn offering sumptuous accommodation and exceptional food by roaring log fires. Soak up outstanding nature at Hardcastle Crags where rocky ravines, tumbling streams, woodland and upland meadow all combine. You can enjoy exploring this stunning environment on superb walking routes which also take in the atmospheric Gibson Mill. If you have a head for heights, then ROKT Climbing Gym in Brighouse is not to be missed. Taller than the Angel of the North, the ROKTFACE is the UK’s highest manmade outdoor climbing wall and is certain to get adrenaline pumping. The open landscape around Huddersfield is teeming with trails. Take a walk on the wild side and enjoy the dramatic moorland of the National Trust’s Marsden Moor Estate or amble the picturesque three mile section of the Huddersfield Narrow Canal between the beautiful Colne Valley villages of Marsden and Slaithwaite. Come October each year, Marsden is alive with the sound of music when the Marsden Jazz Festival arrives in town. Here you will also find Standedge Tunnel and Visitor Centre where, with a hard hat on, you can

sail through Britain’s longest, deepest and highest canal tunnel, hidden deep beneath the Pennine countryside. An alternative way to experience the local surrounds is to take a nostalgic ride aboard a small steam train at the award-winning Kirklees Light Railway. Dating back to the 1690s, a visit to Oakwell Hall and Country Park is a step back in time to a postEnglish Civil War household and its extensive park has new mountain bike tracks that snake through woodland plantations. The unique collections at the fascinating Tolson Museum paint a vivid and intriguing picture of the area from prehistory to present day and at Huddersfield Art Gallery you can enjoy incredible paintings and sculptures by internationally renowned artists like LS Lowry and Francis Bacon. With an idyllic backdrop of the Peak District National Park, the cobbled streets of quaint Holmfirth are a joy to explore. You can find delightful independent shops, a local vineyard and a thriving arts scene. In fact, Holmfirth Artweek is one of the UK’s largest open art exhibitions. Experience the best of farm produce at Coddy’s Farm participating in muddy boot farm tours, as well as cookery and butchery demonstrations. When it is time to relax, check in to Titanic Spa, the eco-spa that places equal emphasis on the well-being of both guests and the environment.

Main picture: Marsden Moor Estate © National Trust images. Opposite: Yorkshire Sculpture Park. The Hepworth Wakefield. Above: Eureka! The National Children’s Museum. Standedge Tunnel and Visitor Centre. Left: Gibson Mill. Right: The National Coal Mining Museum for England.

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FOOD & DRINK

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Going Cocoa

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Flour Power

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Beach Bake

Sit down at Cocoa Wonderland in Sheffield and experience a traditional afternoon tea with a chocolate ‘twist’ of sweet and savoury chocolate-infused delights. Indulge in handmade chocolate and other magical sweet sensations. cocoawonderland.co.uk Slow fermentation, low yeasted overnight sponges, natural sourdough levain or a combination of the two means York’s Haxby Bakehouse produces breads full of flavour WITHOUT any artificial bits and there’s a delicious deli too. haxbybakehouse.co.uk

Elizabeth Botham originally sold from a basket at the local market in the historic fishing port of Whitby. Botham’s of Whitby’s baking traditions are proudly continued by the fifth generation of family in the popular seaside shop and tearooms. botham.co.uk

BAKER’S D OZ E N With the popularity of baking on the rise, here are a few Yorkshire treats to sift through that you may become rather fondant of!

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Ooh Bettys

With over a century creating coveted confectionary, Bettys Café Tea Rooms are a must visit. Known across the globe, but located only in Yorkshire, Bettys Café Tea Rooms are located in Harrogate (centre and Harlow Carr), Ilkley, Northallerton and two in York, as well as Bettys Cookery School, if you fancy getting hands-on. bettys.co.uk

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Deli-cious

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Go YO

In the heart of Beverley, Vanessa Delicatessen and Café serves a wide range of gorgeous goodies, made from scratch daily or sourced from local Yorkshire producers, supporting over 30 regional farmers who are passionate about top quality, fabulous food. vanessadelicafe.co.uk

Malton’s multi-award-winning Yo Bakehouse artisan bakery and coffee house serves up Roost coffee and Easy Teasy loose tea alongside a superb selection of freshly baked delicacies. yobakehouse.com

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Family Favourites

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Feeling Fruity?

Using pure ingredients, Bondgate Bakery has always been about real traditional bread making with locally sourced untreated flours. Producing delicious pizza, quiches and cakes from a precious selection of family recipes, the Otley based bakery also supplies to some luxury locations, including Harvey Nichols. bondgatebakery.com Lovely uncomplicated crafted creations, Tipple Tails mouth-watering moist fruit cakes are handmade with care in Sheffield. Full of flavour, good to eat and they can be delivered to your door. What’s not to like? reallygreatfruitcake.co.uk

F R O M L A R G E TO S M A L L & R U R A L T O U R B A N , YO R K S H I R E H A S A W I D E RANGE OF AMAZING BAKERIES.

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Clockwise from top left: Haxby Bakehouse - York’s artisan bakery. Tipple Tails fruit cake. Afternoon tea at the Devonshire Arms. Real traditional bread at Bondgate Bakery in Otley © Karen Turner. Bettys Fat Rascals © Olivia Brabbs. Perfect pies from Blacker Hall Farm Shop.

Ooh La La

Serving sweet and savoury, plus delicious homemade cakes, Malton’s The Patisserie offers relaxing dining with views across the market town or grab a tasty takeaway if you’re on the go. Discover delicious vegetarian and vegan choices, as well as gluten, wheat and dairy free options. thepatisseriemalton.co.uk

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Down On The Farm

Enjoy afternoon tea in the converted 400 year old barn at Wakefield’s Blacker Hall Farm, offering award-winning seasonal produce. Pick up handmade freshly baked bread, cakes and pastries in the farm shop. blackerhallfarmshop.co.uk

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Bake Away

Create your very own sourdough bread at Cawthorne House in picturesque Pickering. Combine a break away with a bake day in this fabulous family run guest house, and there are homemade cookies in every room. cawthornehouse.co.uk

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Garden View

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Up In Arms

Indulge in a little sophistication amidst elegant surroundings near Harrogate. Enjoy a delicious selection of delicacies, including freshly made scones and cakes created by Rudding Park’s pastry chef. ruddingpark.co.uk Relax in the decadent cocktail lounge and conservatory at The Devonshire Arms and indulge in sweet treats created by awardwinning pastry chefs, as well as enjoying dainty finger sandwiches, buttermilk scones with clotted cream and home-made strawberry preserve. thedevonshirearms.co.uk

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T H E G R E AT YO R K S H I R E

BAKE OFF

NADIYA HUSSAIN Lived in Leeds at the time of winning GBBO 2015 “Baking can mean many things, sometimes it’s just a way of using up a lonely ripe banana, other times it’s for a special occasion and sometimes baking is simply therapy. Winning GBBO was the most wonderful feeling and like many monumental moments in life it all still feels like a blur. Since winning, meeting Sir Lenny Henry was an absolute highlight! Yorkshire has given me a wonderful northern husband who loves nothing more than cake and a cup of tea. If he didn’t love cake so much, I probably would never have started baking. Carrot cake is a fave and Yorkshire parkin too.” Latest book: Nadiya Hussain Time to Eat

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DAVID ATHERTON

NANCY BIRTWHISTLE

Winner GBBO 2019, from Whitby

Winner GBBO 2014, from Hull

“Baking is meditation, I find it very relaxing. This isn’t always the case though when you’re on Bake Off, it can become a bit stressful against the clock, but I’m now back to baking without any time pressures. I was on top of the world going into the GBBO final and already felt like a winner, so when I actually won my feelings went through the roof.

“Baking, cooking, growing my own food and ‘working smart’ are part of my DNA. Every day I have a plan, usually it’s to create something new and adventurous. What I bake depends on my mood, fresh bread, cake…and who doesn’t love a good pie? The whole Bake Off experience, from auditions through to winning has been life changing and a marvellous journey.

Highlights since winning? Book signing in York, people queued in the rain, the books sold out and it was really special to meet so many who’d supported me each week on the show. When I’m back in Whitby I enjoy a scone at Marie Antoinette’s and I get my bike out to visit the café at the Yorkshire Cycle Hub. I love the spiciness of Yorkshire parkin and it’s a great snack when cycling up the hills.”

ANITA RANI Winner Great Sport Relief Bake Off 2012 from Bradford Let’s not forget the Yorkshire celebrities who triumphed in the tent! When it comes to culinary creations the city of Bradford has produced some brilliant bakers too! Winner of The Great Sport Relief Bake Off 2012, Anita Rani beat the opposition in the show’s final, cooking up baked biscuits, sausage rolls and a covered tier occasion cake. Fast forward to 2016 and Bradford born Adrian Edmondson was awarded star baker “I am very proud. I’ve always watched since the first series and it was a thrill to be in the tent...I’m chuffed.” Although Adrian was beaten in the series by Spice Girl Geri Horner. You should have added a little more ginger Ade!

Almost overnight I was being recognised, it felt strange but everyone was so friendly. My grandmother taught me to make classic Yorkshire pudding, always light and crispy around the edges, golden brown and soft inside. Never hard, heavy and stodgy! Yorkshire Teacakes and a Yorkshire Curd Tart take some beating.”

© Ellis Parrinder

© Chris Terry

Its appeal has grown quicker than a soaring soufflé as The Great British Bake Off has become an annual must watch. Yorkshire’s star bakers have certainly shone, from Bradford’s Ed Kimber, the first series winner to the latest triumphant top talent, Whitby’s David Atherton and the Yorkshire celebs too.

KIM-JOY HEWLETT Runner-up GBBO 2018, lives in Leeds “Baking means I can be creative and also make other people happy by gifting them my bakes! It was fantastic to be a runner-up on GBBO, I never thought I’d reach the final. Getting there was such an achievement. I actually feel more like a winner rather than a runnerup, even though I didn’t technically win!  There are so many highlights since the show, definitely getting to write my book and seeing it on the shelves, writing weekly recipes for The Guardian has been amazing too, as well as just being paid to do what I love.  I adore Bettys! Me and my partner Nabil had our sort-of first date there on my birthday.” Latest book: Baking with Kim-Joy  

Latest book: Sizzle and Drizzle

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From contemporary to heritage, Yorkshire is home to some of the finest architecture and grandest designs, with many venues and locations recently being treated to multimillion pound renovations. Prepare to be amazed! FIT FOR A QUEEN Rooted in rivalry, Wentworth Castle Gardens is South Yorkshire’s only Grade I listed landscape. Royal diplomat Thomas Wentworth was outraged when a cousin inherited his family home in 1695 and he was determined to outdo him, creating what was once known as ‘the finest garden in England’. Over the last 10 years £20m has been spent, with 20 historical buildings and monuments renovated, including the Victorian Conservatory with its array of exotic and unusual plants. This impressive structure was one of the first places in the country to have electric lights, even before Buckingham Palace. Surrounded by history from Queen Anne’s court to Yorkshire’s mining heritage, there’s lots to discover whilst wandering through 563 acres of picturesque parkland. Look out for a castle that is not what it seems! nationaltrust.org.uk/wentworth-castle-gardens

PLAYHOUSE OF DREAMS Founded in the city 50 years ago, then relocated in 1990 to its current site and with recent restoration work of over £15m completed, there’s plenty to celebrate at Leeds Playhouse. Its brand new multicoloured façade is a striking addition to the city’s Cultural Quarter, nestled alongside neighbouring media and arts venues including BBC Yorkshire, Leeds College of Music and Northern Ballet. With links to acting royalty over the years, including Yorkshire’s Dame Judi Dench and Dame Diana Rigg, as well as Sir Donald Sinden and Albert Finney, the Playhouse continues to excel with a packed programme of productions and performances in 2020. leedsplayhouse.org.uk

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© Natrional Trust Images / Chris Lacey

GRAND DESIGNS yorkshire.com


DESIGN

Clockwise from left: Incredible views of Yorkshire’s lush green countryside can be seen from across the parkland at Wentworth Castle Gardens. The colourful new Leeds Playhouse. Beautiful landscaped gardens surround The Majestic Hotel in Harrogate. St George’s Hall has retained its world-class auditorium.

‘THE FINEST GARDEN IN ENGLAND’ SET IN 5 6 3 AC R E S O F P I C T U R E S Q U E PA R K L A N D .

BY GEORGE! Opened in 1853 and one of the UK’s oldest concert halls, Bradford’s St George’s Hall has seen a wide range of the world’s entertainment icons take to its stage, from Charles Dickens to David Bowie. The recent £9.8m transformational refurbishment has included major structural work to its roof, windows, electrics and stone work, as well as increasing front-of-house area space and upgrading the venue’s seating arrangements, whilst retaining its renowned and world-class auditorium acoustics. An exhibition of tickets and posters from historic productions over the last century and a half are currently on display in the hall’s foyer and bar areas. bradford-theatres.co.uk/venues/st-georges-hall

TRULY MAJESTIC Celebrating 120 years and a magnificent £15m refurbishment The Majestic Hotel in the heart of Harrogate has hosted the world’s elite, from sports stars to royalty. Surrounded by beautiful landscaped gardens, there are 184 guest rooms. Enjoy a delicious afternoon tea or fabulous fine dining, with a delightful culinary experience at Carters Champagne Bar & Grill or Frederick’s Piano Lounge & Terrace. The hotel’s newly opened Harrogate Spa has six luxury treatment rooms, a heated indoor pool, a spa terrace and a gymnasium. Look out for the glittering Venetian chandeliers, valued at an eye-watering £60,000 each, hanging ‘majestically’ in the reading and drawing rooms. harrogatemajestic.doubletreebyhilton.com

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DESIGN

Left: Thackray Medical Museum’s £4 million makeover includes redevelopment of all the galleries allowing the museum to show even more of the fabulous collections.

LEARN ABOUT DISEASE-RIDDEN V I C TO R I A N ST R E E TS O F L E E DS A N D T H E A M A Z I N G WO R L D O F M E D I C I N E . WHAT THE DOCTOR ORDERED

Right and below: Designed to a high standard with simple quality furnishings and stunning views The Manor Rooms is the perfect place for your special event.

A year after its 1997 launch the Thackray Medical Museum won the prestigious Museum of the Year accolade. Located in a Grade II listed former Leeds Union Workhouse dating back to the 19th century, during the First World War the heritage building was a medical care haven for the armed forces. Currently undergoing a £4 million makeover, the museum will reopen in the summer, after structural renovations, redevelopment of all the galleries and a major rebrand are completed. Visitors will be able to step back in time and learn about disease-ridden Victorian streets, then travel right through history and medical advancements to the present day, as well as discovering what the future holds for medicine and health care. thackraymedicalmuseum.co.uk

WOLDS CLASS Say I do, with a view, at the brand new luxury The Manor Rooms in the rolling East Yorkshire countryside. Part of the Drewton Estate, whose multi-award-winning farm shop sources produce from 250 farmers and suppliers, this stunning setting now offers a rustic yet beautiful venue to get married. The recently constructed impressive barn offers a large function area, a mezzanine level, garden room and bar. Step outside to a terrace with breathtaking woodland and Yorkshire Wolds far-reaching rural views. Of course, there’s also a delicious menu to choose from, offering locally and ethically-produced delectable dishes. themanorrooms.co.uk

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ADVERTORIAL

LIFE CHANGING Bike Libraries are transforming lives across the county and giving hope to thousands. One volunteer describes how working with the project has changed his life. Driving through Cottingham, East Yorkshire this strikes you as a typical English village. A beautiful church, a bustling high street, quaint village pubs. But what is not such a typical site appears to be the amount of bicycles all around Cottingham. R-evolution is the answer to where you’ll find all these bikes. A charity local to the East Riding of Yorkshire since 2015, they opened their first Bike Library in the same year and to date, have opened 21 across East Yorkshire in partnership with East Riding Council. Each Library provides bicycles to children who don’t have access to their own. They also cater for adults, where bicycles enable them to be out and about in the community. The Cottingham HQ is also where the main training workshop is based. Their aim is to get as many unused bikes back into the community to increase safe cycling, social inclusion and exercise. Through public training courses, R-evolution also teach people how to fix their own bikes, whilst offering servicing for larger repairs. Each year, they refurbish over 1,500 bikes carried out by a fully qualified team of mechanics and volunteers. One such volunteer is Neil who has been with R-evolution for over a year. “I didn’t realise I had mental health problems until three years ago, when I had a major breakdown. Since then I was struggling, having a lack of concentration, motivation and taking antidepressants. Finding a scheme like the Bike Libraries is brilliant. It just gives you the impetus to get up and to get going. Finding the motivation with a charity like R-evolution has been fantastic.” John Marshall MBE, CEO of R-evolution started the charity to help people just like Neil. “Our initial aim was to help people from disadvantaged backgrounds to get into work, to learn about employment and help people build their self-esteem. I am very proud of what the staff, volunteers and trainees are achieving here in partnership with the Bike Libraries. We are helping to change people’s lives for the better in so many ways, from a small child in school learning to ride their bike safely, to providing purpose and better futures for our trainees in the workshops.” For Neil, finding the Bike Libraries stand at 2017’s Tour de Yorkshire has had a major impact on his life. “Absolutely fantastic! If I hadn’t found it, I would probably be sitting at home in a very dark place. This has given me my life back.”

AT A G L A N C E What? Simply a location with a fleet of bikes that are available for loan to children and families. There are 61 Bike Libraries across Yorkshire and over 6,000 bikes have been donated so far. Can anyone borrow one? Yes. Just find your local bike library (see the link below) and get in touch. The libraries often arrange activities such as guided bike rides, basic bike skills and maintenance courses. Or you can just have the freedom to ride on a safe route, where you want, with family and friends. Where can I donate a bike? Donation stations are popping up around Yorkshire all the time for full details of your local drop-off point see the website below. If you can’t see a local donation station near you, keep checking more are added all the time as the scheme develops. To donate a bike, borrow a bike, start a bike library or become a volunteer visit bikelibraries.co.uk

Top to bottom: Neil is now a fully trained volunteer bike mechanic. Lizzie Deignan supports the project. Launch of the new R-evolution site in Cottingham. Training at the new Cottingham HQ.

For more information on where you can find your local Bike Library go to www.bikelibraries.co.uk

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W E LCO M E TO

S O U T H YO R K S H I R E Clockwise from above: Discover Cannon Hall’s 70 acres of rolling parkland and beautiful gardens. Cannon Hall Farm. The Civic arts centre. Yorkshire Wildlife Park. The famous Union Jack garden at Wentworth Castle Gardens.

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D E S T I N AT I O N

Award-winning visitor attractions, green open spaces, exciting horse racing and an amazing heritage makes South Yorkshire a must for every generation.

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visit to Doncaster wouldn’t be the same without a trip to the number one walk-through wildlife park in the UK. Yorkshire Wildlife Park offers a unique view into the world of animals in areas including Lemur Woods, Wallaby Walkabout, Into Africa and Lion Country. See up close some of the most amazing animals on the planet, from the only Polar bears in England to majestic lions, tigers, black rhino and much more. Doncaster has one of the biggest and best traditional markets in the North, with its origins dating back to Roman times. It has always been the heart of the town and last year, following a major transformation, saw the opening of The Wool Market. Lively and diverse, this spot is now home to on-trend eateries, bars and retailers. The highlight of Doncaster’s social calendar is the St Leger Festival at Doncaster Racecourse. Every year 60,000 people from across the globe descend to enjoy the oldest classic horse race in the world. Not only does Doncaster Racecourse close the flat racing season in England each year but opens it up again in March with the Lincoln Festival. There are many race meetings in between, so your odds of catching a race are high. Ice skating is not just reserved for the winter months in Yorkshire. The Ice Caps at Doncaster Dome is the first and only split-level ice rink in the UK, it’s fully equipped for beginners with skating supports, so whether you can Bolero like Torvill and Dean or slip around like Bambi, there’s fun to be had for everyone. Further excitement

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can be found nearby at the worldclass Doncaster Cycle Track which has a high-quality circuit designed to provide recreational and competitive routes as well as the chance for the whole family to cycle together without being on the road. Take off to see the collection of aircraft at the South Yorkshire Aircraft Museum. Their unique collection has models from the first air show in Britain at Doncaster Racecourse in 1909, to modern fast jets and civil light aircraft. With an ongoing multi-million pound regeneration plan well underway, the market town of Barnsley is thriving and is rapidly becoming a shopping hot spot as well as being an interesting place to discover. At the award-winning Experience Barnsley Museum and Discovery Centre visitors can uncover the fascinating story of this proud Yorkshire borough. Interactive galleries and exhibitions will take people on a journey through the ages with centuries old artefacts, documents, films and recordings. While in the cultural quarter at the Cooper Gallery you’ll find masterpieces by Ruskin and Turner as well as prominent 20th century British artists. Take a short walk to The Civic, an inspiring multipurpose arts centre which showcases high quality performances from worldclass touring theatre and dance, as well as contemporary art exhibitions curated in conjunction with the V&A and Tate amongst others. The bustling undercover cobbled street of the Victorian Arcade is full of independent shops and delicious eateries.

The beautiful gardens and parkland at Wentworth Castle Gardens were once created for the privileged few but they are now preserved for everyone to enjoy all year round. The 18th century ‘Union Jack’ garden, restored Victorian conservatory and ‘ancient’ hilltop folly of Stainborough Castle are firm visitor favourites. At Cannon Hall Farm, family adventures are afoot. A home to hundreds of animals, you can meet them all, from favourite farmyard friends to more exotic llamas, reptiles and porcupines! It also has a fantastic playground and the largest tube maze in Europe – children won’t want to leave. The stunning Georgian Cannon Hall Museum, Park and Gardens is set in 70 acres of historic parkland. 2020 looks set to be a monumental year with the completion of its four year Parks for People project which brings interactive trails, a restored walled garden and an outdoor family area with a mud kitchen and exploration dens. An industrial model village built by Earls and famed for its iron and coal, Elsecar Heritage Centre is a remarkable and picturesque place to explore. In majestic Victorian workshops, visitors will find local history exhibitions, independent shops, artist studios, cafes and a vast antique centre all alongside a heritage railway. Visitors to Worsbrough Mill will be transported to a place of calm and serenity. Here they will discover centuries of milling and bread making and have the unique opportunity to see history come to life.

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Maecenas quis turpis libero.

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F A M I LY F U N

GRIMM UP

NO RT H Enter Grimm & Co in Rotherham and it’s like stepping onto a magical movie set, with lotions and potions perched above balancing broomsticks. There’s even a library lined with much loved literature tucked into a cosy corner. Jeremy Dyson discovers hidden doors and secret stairways.

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f all the various creative endeavours I’ve been involved with, from the comedy group The League of Gentlemen, to the play and film of Ghost Stories, and my own books of short stories, Grimm & Co holds a very special place in my heart. For those that don’t know, Grimm & Co is a Yorkshire charity which promotes literacy among children, particularly those who might not enjoy the advantages others do. I’ve been earning my living as a writer for more than two decades. My parents were nervous about me setting out on such a potentially precarious path but they never realised they were the ones responsible for laying out the stepping stones which had led me there. I, like many children, was blessed with a vivid imagination and Mum and Dad thought it was their job to feed it. I was regularly bought books and comics, but also taken on visits to museums, caves, ruined castles and abbeys, and less-obvious, but perhaps the most inspiring were joke and magic shops at seaside destinations. These became canvases onto which my imagination painted additional layers of fascination (ghosts in the windows of the ruins, mazes which became portals to another dimension etc) and also great slabs of slow release fuel for my own creative urges. I never forgot the feeling of excitement encountered on these trips. The joke and magic shops were particularly special to me. The experience of walking through the doors of these palaces of delight, packed with mischief and wonder, was like a bomb going off in my imagination. More than just a bomb, it was closer to nuclear fusion because the memories are still belting out creative energy, deep in the core of my being, forty-five years later. As an adult, and particularly when I became a parent, I grew increasingly aware of my own good fortune in having had access to these early experiences. I knew of,

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of course, that there were many children for whom such access was not easy to come by. For quite a while I mused upon whether it might be possible to set up some kind of charity that could address that problem. Synchronicity stepped in for me in the form of writer Matt Haig who I met at a publisher’s event. He started talking about a charity he was involved with called Grimm & Co, which seemed to have exactly the same aspiration. And so, I was introduced to the extraordinary Deborah Bullivant, the force of nature behind the enterprise. Her vision, drive and determination were going to become a source of ongoing inspiration for me.

WA L K I N G T H R O U G H T H E D O O R S WA S L I K E A BOMB GOING OFF I N M Y I M A G I N AT I O N . At this time, Grimm & Co had temporary premises above a shop in Rotherham town centre. Deborah was an academic, looking at ways of boosting literacy in communities that really needed help, and she’d come across a TED (Technology, Entertainment, Design) talk by the American writer Dave Eggers. He’d set up 826 Valencia in San Francisco, which had similar aims. It was fronted by a shop, which apparently sold supplies to pirates. The kids would go in and be led through this amazing place to the workshops hidden behind the store. The idea soon spread across the US and Deborah immediately saw that such a model could work in Yorkshire too, and thus Grimm & Co was born (though the shop would serve magical creatures rather than pirates).

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Left: Grimm & Co’s Apothecary to the Magical has surprises around every corner.

IT’S ABOUT ENABLING C H I L D R E N TO S E E T H E P OW E R O F T H E I R O W N C R E AT I V I T Y.

Images: Grimm & Co champion the writer and creativity in every child - building confidence and skills in workshops and out of school and holiday clubs.

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All this was in place by the time I became involved in 2013. But Grimm & Co had yet to find permanent premises. Mindful of my own childhood experiences I stressed how important I thought it was to ‘bake in’ the magical quality that I remembered from my juvenile day trips. This would involve great design, and deeper than that, Deborah recognised it needed a kind of mythical underpinning. To that end, her, myself and Steve Dearden a fellow trustee sat down and began talking about a character, Graham Grimm who might be behind the whole business. I took the idea and ran with it, writing a short story that explained Grimm & Co’s ancient origins.   The story flowed quite easily, it was a pleasure to create a magical realm that Graham Grimm might have been a part of. I was right back in my own childhood, the world of my favourite books: ‘Haunted Britain’, ‘The Encyclopedia of Witchcraft and Magic’ and ‘Mysterious Yorkshire’. Once the story was written, everyone involved in Grimm & Co could plug in to it. Most significantly, our incredible design team were able to derive a look and a feel from the tale they could extend to every corner of the premises, including the products the shop sold. There’s no question that this first phase of Grimm & Co has been more successful then we could have dared hope. There have been theatre performances of dramas, short films made and shown in our own mini movie festival and radio plays broadcast nationally on the BBC, all of them written by Grimm & Co children, each of these

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F A M I LY F U N

C R E AT I V E S PA R K S Talk to any successful writer, performer, illustrator, vet, barber, florist (the list is endless) and they’ll no doubt mention that what led them on the path to achieving their goals came from childhood inspiration. So if you want to enlighten your kids, here are some great ideas...

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Strange Ways

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Island Life

A labyrinth of tunnels, fantastic follies and do check out the chambers - this is a fabulous four acre garden in the heart of the stunning Yorkshire Dales. Ideal for young (and not so young) adventurers to discover the temple of the underworld, see the eye of the needle and a huge pyramid made of translucent glass. Stare at stately statues and be led down paths that lead to... nowhere. It’s a day out at the strangest place in the world! theforbiddencorner.co.uk

One of the greatest palaces of Europe, Castle Howard is home to the recently launched Skelf Island. Search for its fictional and interesting yet impish inhabitants, the ‘Skelves’, at this magical destination. Children can immerse themselves in nature and enjoy the adventure playground inspired by Henderskelf, a medieval settlement predating the stately home, and located just across its Great Lake. castlehoward.co.uk

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Hands On

Get involved at Eureka! The National Children’s Museum in Halifax. This funpacked and educational place is perfect for enquiring minds and aimed at kids from 0-11 years. There are six unique zones to explore from All About Me to Spark Gallery and Sound Space, plus hundreds of interactive exhibits, extensive grounds and it’s located right next to the train station. eureka.org.uk

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endeavours was enabled by another of our fantastic trustees, the wonderful Paul Clayton. Most significant has been the impact on children themselves. Time and again teachers have told us how kids who would never voluntarily pick up a pen before have become enthusiastic story makers, thrilled and excited by the possibilities of their own creativity. And that, to me is the true wonder of Grimm & Co. It’s not about seeking to turn every child into a professional writer. It’s something much more fundamental than that. It’s about enabling them to see the power of their own creativity and how it can be found through literacy, a universally applicable faculty that can serve them through the rest of their lives, no matter what they end up doing. In fact, our first three years in the original Grimm & Co shop have been so successful that we are now having to seek much larger premises so we can fulfil the increasing demand for access to what we have to offer.   To me, once again it’s a testament to fact that things which begin life in the imagination, as Grimm & Co did in Deborah Bullivant’s eight years ago, can go on to thrive in actuality, growing from those tiny first seeds of an idea into a tangible reality that impacts positively on the lives of others. Now that’s real magic.

Ewe’ll Love It

In the rolling Pennine foothills of Baa-rnsley, Cannon Hall Farm is a multiaward-winning attraction with a farm shop, adventure playground and it’s home to hundreds of animals. From everyone’s favourite farmyard friends to reptiles and South American llamas, plus with a year-round breeding programme there’s always a new animal addition to admire. cannonhallfarm.co.uk

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W H I T E R O S E AWA R D S

BEST O F T H E

BEST

Alice Bailey looks at some of the outstanding and impressive Yorkshire businesses who help attract millions of visitors from across the globe.

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ike Welcome to Yorkshire itself, its flagship event the White Rose Awards has experienced some progressive changes over the last year. Already the largest celebration of tourism in the UK, the 2019 edition was bigger and better than ever. A thousand people packed into the first direct arena in Leeds to honour the cream of the Yorkshire tourism crop and see more awards given out than ever before. Illustrious food critic and writer Elaine Lemm, who’s been involved for more than a decade took over as Chair of Judges this season and explains the recent improvements “The awards have

positive directions. One big winner on the night was William’s Den in North Cave which swept to Gold in the new Ethical, Responsible and Sustainable Tourism category. Judges said its outstanding green credentials ran through the entire business. This wasn’t the only gong for the innovative play attraction which scooped a second new award for New Tourism Business of the Year, for consistently surpassing all visitor expectations. A third new and important category is the award for Accessible and Inclusive Tourism. Inaugural winners The Deep in Hull were praised by the judges for welcoming everyone and enabling families from nought to 100 to have a wonderful full day out whatever their needs. The backbone of any tourism sector is its accommodation offer and judges thought the sheer breadth of what’s available in Yorkshire was striking, with fierce competition in every one of these categories. York was setting the standard when it came to hotels with The Grand praised for its beautiful make over, which has seen it fully modernised while treasuring and showcasing its history and heritage. Another highlight there was the staff team learning Cantonese and Mandarin to fully embrace the booming Asian market.  The growing international market was recognised with its own award for the first time for 2019, with Castle Howard taking home the top prize. Judges noted its outstanding customer services, facilities and innovation saying it was no surprise guests travelled from far and wide to this spectacular location. The vibrant arts scene in Yorkshire is another major pull for tourists from all over

WINNERS WILL GET A C H A N C E TO S H I N E O N T H E N AT I O N A L S TA G E . been updated with categories added, a new online scoring system and a tougher judging process with a distinguished panel of eight industry experts, I really believe these have been the best yet!” The refresh was prompted by a closer alignment with the Visit England Awards and means more Welcome to Yorkshire members get a chance to shine on the national stage, Elaine continued “The update has made the awards more robust but also means more of our winners go through to the national finals, which is great for them individually and Yorkshire as a whole.” The diversity of the finalists shows precisely why tourism is thriving in the county. Independent figures show the current value of tourism is worth a huge £9 billion a year to the Yorkshire economy. The winners in the new categories are shining examples of how tourism in Yorkshire is moving forward in so many

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WHITE ROSE AWA R D S WINNERS 2019 Accessible and Inclusive Tourism Award The Deep, Hull Arts & Culture Award Hull Truck Theatre B&B and Guest House of the Year The Barn, Monk Fryston Business Events Venue of the Year Broughton Hall Estate, Skipton Camping, Glamping and Holiday Park of the Year Wolds Edge Holiday Lodges, Bishop Wilton Ethical, Responsible and Sustainable Tourism Award William’s Den, North Cave Experience of the Year Hotham’s Gin School and Distillery, Hull Inns & Restaurants with Rooms Award Manor House Lindley International Tourism Award Castle Howard, York Large Hotel of the Year The Grand, York Large Visitor Attraction of the Year Yorkshire Sculpture Park, West Bretton New Tourism Business Award William’s Den, North Cave Producers and Makers Award York Emporium Pub of the Year The Durham Ox, Crayke Self Catering Accommodation of the Year Broadgate Farm Cottages, Walkington Small Hotel of the Year Grays Court Hotel and The Bow Room Restaurant, York Small Visitor Attraction of the Year Spirit of Yorkshire Distillery, Hunmanby Taste of England Award The Star Inn at Harome Tourism Event Award Yorkshire Dales Food & Drink Festival

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Left: The only one of its kind, Yorkshire Sculpture Park is an international centre for modern and contemporary art, experienced and enjoyed by thousands of visitors every year © Jonty Wilde. Below left: Spirit of Yorkshire Distillery makes the first-ever Yorkshire single malt whisky.

WO R L D - C L ASS , TO P Q UA L I T Y C U S T O M E R S E R V I C E W I T H PA S S I O N , C O M M I T M E N T A N D I N N O VAT I O N .

Right: William’s Den has outstanding green credentials running through the entire business. Below: Grays Court Hotel is an historic, boutique, luxury hotel and restaurant located in York which has played host to kings.

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the world and the incredibly worthy winner of the 2019 Arts & Culture Award was the groundbreaking and inclusive Hull Truck Theatre. The judges were bowled over by the passion and commitment shining through from this pioneering theatre with a unique Northern voice. The visitor economy is, of course, so much bigger than just the leisure market. The White Rose Awards recognise this with the Business Events Venue of the Year Award which was won by Broughton Hall Estate. This highly flexible venue in a fantastic location was hailed for its brilliant and holistic approach to events with excellent sustainability credentials and a focus on well-being. The classic visitor attraction categories perfectly showed off the broad spectrum of things to see, do and experience in Yorkshire, with arts, nature, heritage, food and drink as well as some high-octane physical activities among the nominees. The large winner was the stunning Yorkshire Sculpture Park described as simply world-class, with top quality service and customer care from top to bottom. The winner of the Small Visitor Attraction Award was The Spirit of Yorkshire Distillery which judges called a high-quality experience which is going from strength to strength as it matures along with the whisky! Just missing out in the attraction category,  Hotham’s Gin School and Distillery was recognised in the final new award for 2019 - Experience of the Year. Judges loved its commitment to quality and the whole customer experience, which gives visitors an insight not only into gin but to Hull and the surrounding area too. It was also lauded for promoting other independent local businesses along the way. Which really sums up the aims of these awards, and of Welcome to Yorkshire. A great example of how when we all work together and support each other, our voice is louder and prouder, and the real winner is Yorkshire itself.

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W H AT ’ S O N 2 0 2 0 Across the county there are festivals and events for every interest. Here are a selection of dates for your diary. For a full listing go to yorkshire.com/events

N AT I O N A L A R M E D F O R C E S D AY SCARBOROUGH 27 JUNE This year Scarborough has the honour of hosting the National Armed Forces Day, providing an opportunity to thank the British Armed Forces for their selfless bravery and heroism. The day is usually attended by a senior royal and the Prime Minister. The event will feature an array of land, sea and air assets with highlights for this year including the legendary Red Arrows and the world famous Royal Marines Band. For more details visit discoveryorkshirecoast.com and armedforcesday.org.uk

G R E AT YO R K S H I R E S H O W H A R R O G AT E 1 4 T O 1 6 J U LY The rich pastures and fertile land of Yorkshire means that farming and country life is at the heart of this county. Testament to this is one of the biggest events in the English agricultural calendar, the Great Yorkshire Show. Welcoming over 130,000 visitors and 8,500 animals over three glorious days, this show is a celebration of the countryside featuring exhibitions of livestock and rare breeds, dog trials, farm machinery, show jumping as well as local food and drink, family activities, plus arts and crafts. There is something for everyone to enjoy.

YO R K S H I R E PRIDE VA R I O U S D AT E S A N D V E N U E S Celebrating Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender life and running since 2006, Leeds Pride is now THE largest free Pride in the UK. A completely free event with over 40,000 people attending this colourful carnival amidst a mass of rainbow flags. This year will mark the 11th year a Pride event has been held in Sheffield, as well as the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall Riots (a pivotal moment for LGBT+ communities and a worldwide catalyst for change). You can also take pride in Yorkshire at one (or more) of its many Pride festivals throughout the summer months in York (6 June), Hull (July), Rotherham (11 July), Barnsley (12 July), Sheffield (28 July), Leeds (2 August), Doncaster (8 August) plus others. Wave those rainbow flags with pride at one of the fantastic events in Yorkshire.

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W H AT ’ S O N

FREEDOM F E S T I VA L HULL 2 TO 6 S E P T E M B E R An international arts festival where the city of Hull is its stage. The aim is to delight, entertain and surprise audiences, with extraordinary performances and award-winning artists from across the world. Now approaching its 13th year, Freedom Festival is an established fixture on the national and international cultural calendar. Freedom is a festival born from the city of Hull and its association with the abolitionist movement, themes of empowerment, activism and the potential of community.

NO LIMITS DISABILITY F E S T I VA L

LEEDS WEST INDIAN C A R N I VA L

BARNSLEY 4 T O 1 2 J U LY

LEEDS 31 AUGUST

Set to be the biggest and best disability festival held in the UK. This forward thinking event aims to help change people’s attitudes and understanding, recognising that there should be No Limits put in the way of disabled people. The festival will involve a wide variety of events, activities and performances including theatre, music, dance, comedy, community activities, family fun days and circus performances.

Move over Notting Hill, Leeds is home to Europe’s oldest Caribbean carnival. Taking place every August Bank Holiday, the explosion of colour, addictive rhythms, delicious food and jawdropping costumes from across the UK create the perfect recipe of tastes, sights and sounds. The huge carnival parade attended by thousands of spectators and revellers takes over Potternewton Park with music, arts, crafts and funfair rides. It looks amazing, sounds great and tastes fabulous.

S WA L E D A L E F E S T I VA L YO R K S H I R E D A L E S 2 3 M AY T O 6 J U N E This year’s festival will make the beautiful Yorkshire Dales come alive with superb music from around the world, as well as performing arts, exhibitions, workshops, talks and guided walks. The eclectic programme of folk, classic and world music will include vocal stars The Young’uns and The Fretless (an exceptional Canadian folk quartet) and the extraordinary turntable artist Shiva Feshareki will be accompanied by a top orchestra.

B R I D L I N GTO N K I T E F E S T I VA L B R I D L I N GTO N 1 6 & 1 7 M AY Turn your eyes skyward as a wide variety of kites will be flying high on the Yorkshire coast. Look out for rare Oriental kites, Indian fighter kites and some of the world’s largest inflatables.

WHITBY FISH & SHIPS F E S T I VA L WHITBY 1 6 & 1 7 M AY Celebrate everything that is special about the Yorkshire coast’s maritime culture at this fantastic festival in atmospheric Whitby. A town where you can still experience the seafarer’s way of life as it has been for hundreds of years. Expect to find celebrity chef cookery demonstrations, fish markets, fishing boats, a seafood trail and of course, fish and chips.

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YO R K S H I R E DA L E S F O O D AND DRINK F E S T I VA L S K I P TO N 1 8 & 1 9 J U LY This festival will bring you a foodie fun-filled weekend with live cookery demonstrations from some famous faces including Ainsley Harriott and James Martin, plus fabulous workshops, masterclasses and some of the best street food in the UK. You can even dance the night away to tribute acts and top local artists.

Y U M ! F E S T I VA L OF FOOD AND DRINK HULL 3 1 J U LY TO 1 A U G U S T Experience fresh and tasty street food and lose yourself in the bustling market at this celebration of food at Hull Marina. There will be over 70 stalls serving delicious hot and cold dishes, a variety of alcoholic and soft drinks, as well as free children’s entertainment ranging from face painting to healthy cookery classes.

THE BRIDESHEAD F E S T I VA L C A S T L E H O WA R D 2 6 TO 2 8 J U N E Evelyn Waugh’s seminal novel Brideshead Revisited, an unforgettable exploration of youth, nostalgia, religion and class turns 75. The sumptuous and internationally acclaimed TV adaptation, filmed at Castle Howard, shaped the fashion of the 1980s. To celebrate this masterpiece of 20th century fiction and screen, this festival has a stellar line-up of writers and leading actors, with screenings, performances and exclusive tours.

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W H AT ’ S O N

BBC COUNTRYFILE LIVE C A S T L E H O WA R D 6 TO 9 AU G U S T The magnificent house and beautiful grounds of Castle Howard will once again provide a picture-perfect backdrop for the show where visitors can enjoy a whole host of entertainment from arena shows, animal displays, demonstrations and debates. Families can head to the lakeside for kayaking, paddleboarding and fishing and experience activities such as tree climbing. Local producers will also showcase a delicious array of local food and drink. BBC Countryfile Live is the perfect chance to meet your favourite stars of the show, with presenters hosting an array of talks and experiences throughout.

WO O D L I F E

M AY F LO W E R 4 0 0

N O R T H YO R K M O O R S N AT I O N A L PA R K 2 4 J U LY T O 1 SEPTEMBER

AUSTERFIELD NEAR DONCASTER ALL YEAR

Exploring the relationship between trees, woodland and humans at a time of climate crisis, this inspiring exhibition and events programme centres on the weekend Wood Life Festival at The Moors National Park Centre near Danby from 25 to 26 July. A brand new immersive theatre performance Told in Gold, from 24 to 27 July, is adapted from the multi-award-winning book The Lost Word by Robert Macfarlane and Jackie Morris. Discover spells wrapped around trees, words in the woodland and hear recordings of the spell poems. Also at The Moors National Park Centre, the Inspired by… gallery puts on a ‘Wood Life’ exhibition, celebrating the special importance of wood life (from 24 July to 1 September).

H A R R O G AT E S P R I N G F LOW E R S H OW G R E AT YO R K S H I R E S H OWG R O U N D 2 3 TO 2 6 A P R I L This year marks a century of Harrogate Flower Shows, starting with a roaring 1920s theme at the first big event in the gardening calendar. Welcome the new growing season with a spectacular celebration of the very best in horticulture. Rated Britain’s top gardening event by Which?, it features beautiful show gardens, great shopping, live entertainment and the biggest exhibition by florists and flower arrangers in the country. Take a stroll back in time to discover what it was like in the garden 100 years ago and don’t forget to call in at the cocktail bar before you leave!

H A R R O G AT E AU T U M N F LOW E R S H OW NEWBY HALL & GARDENS 1 8 TO 2 0 S E P T E M B E R This year’s new venue, Newby Hall, is one of the country’s finest 18th century stately homes. Its grand rooms will be full of blooms, with major flower and plant installations inspired by the breathtaking interiors. In addition to all the usual favourite show features, admission will also include access to Newby’s award-winning gardens, complete with some of Europe’s biggest herbaceous flower borders and family adventure garden!

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2020 is the 400th anniversary of the Mayflower’s voyage, one of the most influential journeys in global history and a defining moment in the shared history of Britain, the US and the Netherlands. Doncaster will be celebrating this momentous occasion with the 2020 Doncaster Heritage Festival, promising to be the biggest and best ever.

M A N & B OY : MALE DRESS 1730-1930 TENNANTS AUCTIONEERS, LEYBURN 1 6 JA N UA RY TO 16 FEBRUARY A fabulous fashion focus on garments from centuries past. See two exceptional private collections, telling the story of clothes worn by chaps at work, at war and at play over two hundred years.

I L L U M I N AT I O N GALLERY N AT I O N A L C O A L MINING MUSEUM, WA K E F I E L D SUMMER 2020 The brand new gallery will delve into the theme of History Makers - People Who Shaped Our World exploring the contribution made by Sir Humphry Davy, the widely celebrated scientist and inventor, to the invention of the flame safety lamp which saved countless lives and inspired generations.

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AJ BELL W O R L D T R I AT H L O N YO R K S H I R E G A M E S F E S T I VA L N AT I O N A L S C I E N C E AND MEDIA MUSEUM, BRADFORD 5 TO 9 F E B R UA RY A five-day extravaganza celebrating games culture, design and production, with special guests, workshops, masterclasses, and a fun-packed weekend for gamers of all ages. Explore unique and boundary pushing video games and take part in a special eSports tournament all under one roof!

LEEDS 6 TO 7 J U N E 2 0 2 0 Leeds will play host to the AJ Bell World Triathlon for the fifth time. Representing the pinnacle of triathlon competition in the UK and providing more than 5,000 recreational triathletes with the unique opportunity to compete on much of the same course as the world’s finest. If you want to get the best view of all of the race action head over to the purpose-built grandstand at Millennium Square. Big screens, live commentary and entertainment are also available to make it an unforgettable sporting event for everyone to enjoy.

TO U R D E YO R K S H I R E L O C AT I O N S A C R O S S THE COUNTY 3 0 A P R I L T O 3 M AY Welcome to Yorkshire and A.S.O. (the organisers of the Tour de France) are thrilled to be hosting the sixth edition of the Tour de Yorkshire - now considered one of professional cycling’s most dramatic and best supported events, and a firm fixture on Yorkshire’s cultural calendar.

W E LCO M E TO YO R K S H I R E E B O R F E S T I VA L YO R K 1 9 TO 2 2 AU G U S T One of the oldest, richest, fastest and most famous horse races. The celebrated racing action forms the centrepiece of a festival brimming with award-winning hospitality and show-stopping outfits on the Ebor Fashion Lawn. The jewel in the crown is the Juddmonte International, one of the high points of British Summer racing.

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REDCAR SALTBURN

BOWES

KIRKBY STEPHEN

A685

TO THE M6 FOR BIRMINGHAM AND CUMBRIA

A67CATTERICK LEYBURN A66

A683

A685 DENT

KIRKBY A684 STEPHEN HAWES

BOWES

YORKSHIRE DALES REETH

TEBAY

KIRKBY LONSDALEYORKSHIRE SEDBERGH

NORTHALLERTON

A1

LOFTHOUSE HORTON-IN-RIBBLESDALE A684 A683 HAWES PATELEY BRIDGE MASHAM GRASSINGTON DENT

KIRKBY LONSDALE

SETTLE

INGLETON A65

MALHAM HORTON-IN-RIBBLESDALE

RIPON

A169

PICKERING MALTON

HELMSLEY

A64

YORK

FILEY

DRIFFIELD

BRIDLINGTON

A165

A166

MALTON

A614 DRIFFIELD

A1079

FLAMBOROUGH HEAD

A165 SEAMER

A64

PATELEY BRIDGE A658

FILEY SCARBOROUGH

A170

KNARESBOROUGH A19

BOLTON ABBEY A59 GRASSINGTONHARROGATE

SETTLE SKIPTON MALHAM

THIRSK BOROUGHBRIDGE

A61 RIPLEY

ROBIN HOOD’S BAY SEAMER

HELMSLEY

BANK A19 RIPONSUTTON

SCARBOROUGH

PICKERING

A170

NORTH YORK MOORS

THIRSK

WHITBY

DANBY

OSMOTHERLEY

NORTHALLERTON

ROBIN HOOD’S BAY

STAITHES

A172 SUTTON BANK

LEYBURN

DALES

INGLETON

MASHAM

SALTBURN GOATHLAND

NORTH YORK GUISBOROUGH MOORS A171

YARM

BEDALE A1 RICHMOND A6108

WHITBY

A171

REDCAR DANBY

A172 A19 RICHMOND MIDDLESBROUGH OSMOTHERLEY

REETH

SEDBERGH

GUISBOROUGH

YARM

A1 A66

BARNARD CASTLE

TEBAY

STAITHES

MIDDLESBROUGH

BARNARD CASTLE

FLAMBOROUGH HEAD

A165 BRIDLINGTON

WETHERBY A65 KNARESBOROUGH HORNSEA POCKLINGTON MARKET A629 ILKLEY A166 WEIGHTON OTLEY A59 A64 A1 A61 HARROGATE KEIGHLEY SKIPTON SALTAIRE ILKLEY BEVERLEY A19 WETHERBY A614 HAWORTH A658 A1079 A65 A629 OTLEY SELBY HORNSEA M1 A164 BEVERLEY KEIGHLEY A64 M606 M621 A19 A63 A63 SALTAIRE

BRADFORD

LEEDS

HAWORTH

HEBDEN HALIFAX TODMORDEN BRIDGE

BRADFORD

HEBDEN BRIDGE M62

YORK

LEEDS

MIRFIELD HUDDERSFIELD

WAKEFIELD

HALIFAX TODMORDEN

BARNSLEY MIRFIELD

M1

PEAK PENISTONE

DISTRICT

A1

BARNSLEY ROTHERHAM M18

HULL

A63

HUMBER BRIDGE

PONTEFRACT

M180

GOOLE

DONCASTER

WITHERNSEA

A164 BRIDGE HUMBER

GOOLE

A63 M18

WAKEFIELD

HUDDERSFIELD

HOLMFIRTH

M62

A1

HOLMFIRTH

PENISTONE

HULL

SELBY

PONTEFRACT

A15

WITHERNSEA

A180

SCUNTHORPE

GRIMSBY CLEETHORPES

DONCASTER

BRIGG

A18

ROTHERHAM PEAK A57 DISTRICT

A57

SHEFFIELD TO LONDON BY RAIL

TO LONDON BY RAIL

SHEFFIELD

N

KEY Motorways

P L A N YO U R

JOURNEY

Wherever you’re coming from, getting to Yorkshire by rail, road, sea or air couldn’t be easier – and the journey takes you through some of our most stunning scenery on the way.

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A Roads Rail Routes Airports Heritage Coast Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty National Parks Ferryport

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GETTING HERE

YO R K S H I R E B Y R A I L You can get to Yorkshire by high-speed train from London or Edinburgh in less than two hours. The Midlands is even nearer to Yorkshire’s cities, and TransPennine services offer direct links from the North West and North East. For timetables and reservations contact: London North Eastern Railway (www.lner.co.uk) Grand Central (www.grandcentralrail.com) National Rail Enquiries (tel 08457 484950 www.nationalrail.co.uk) East Midlands Trains (www.eastmidlandstrains.co.uk) Hull Trains (www.hulltrains.co.uk) Northern Rail (www.northernrail.org) Supertram Sheffield (www.supertram.com) Transpennine Express (www.tpexpress.co.uk) Metro (www.wymetro.com)

YO R K S H I R E B Y AIR AND SEA

Don’t forget P&O Ferries operate direct overnight links into Yorkshire from Rotterdam, Holland and Zeebrugge, Belgium. For more information go to www.poferries.com.

The Yorkshire county is served by a number of airports, providing daily flights to and from many destinations. With excellent transport links, Yorkshire is also easily accessible from many other airports throughout the UK, through high speed train links and an extensive motorway network.

I N F O R M AT I O N CENTRES Tourist Information Centres can offer plenty of great ideas so you can make the most of your visit. For all the Tourist Information Centres in Yorkshire; www.yorkshire.com/tic.

Doncaster Sheffield Airport (tel 0871 2202210 www.flydsa.co.uk) Leeds Bradford Yorkshire’s Airport (tel 0871 2882288 www.leedsbradfordairport.co.uk) Humberside Airport (tel 0844 8877747 www.humbersideairport.com) Manchester Airport (tel 08712 710711 www.manchesterairport.co.uk)

Find a wide choice of guide books and maps with lots of dedicated walking and cycling routes at Tourist Information Centres across the county, or more ideas from Welcome to Yorkshire at www.yorkshire.com/outdoors.

And you can explore Yorkshire’s hills, moors and valleys on some of Britain’s best loved and most spectacular leisure trains, with lovingly preserved vintage rolling stock and historic steam locomotives. These include the North Yorkshire Moors Railway, Embsay & Bolton Abbey Steam Railway, Keighley & Worth Valley Railway, Middleton Railway, Wensleydale Railway, Fellsman (for the Settle-Carlisle Railway) and Kirklees Light Railway. To discover more about these super train trips go to www.yorkshire.com.

YO R K S H I R E B Y R O A D Britain’s biggest and fastest highways cross Yorkshire from north to south and east to west, making getting here with your own car or by coach very simple indeed.

Glasgow M8 Edinburgh A74

The A1 and M1 connect from the north and south, while the M6 and M62 link Yorkshire with the Midlands and the North West and the M18/M180 gives easy access to the coast and countryside of northern Lincolnshire. For details of the quickest (or the most scenic) driving routes see the AA or RAC websites www.theaa.com and www.rac.co.uk. Coach and bus companies with services to (and within) Yorkshire include: Arriva (www.arrivabus.co.uk/yorkshire) Transdev Blazefield (www.transdevplc.co.uk) East Yorkshire Motor Services (www.eyms.co.uk) First (www.firstgroup.com) Coastliner (www.yorkbus.co.uk) Dalesbus (www.dalesbus.org) Moorsbus (www.moorsbus.org) Brontë Bus (www.keighleybus.co.uk) Connexions Buses (www.connexionsbuses.com) Find further information on regional and local bus and train services from Traveline Yorkshire (www.yorkshiretravel.net).

yorkshire.com

A1

Carlisle

Newcastle

M6 Leeds Bradford Yorkshire’s Airport

York

Leeds Liverpool

M62

Doncaster Sheffield Airport

Manchester

Hull

Ferryport

Humberside Airport

A1

M6 Birmingham M1 Car

M5 M4 Bristol

M5

M25

London

Exeter

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O U R Y 3 0 PA R T N E R S A group of Yorkshire based businesses that are ambitious, innovative and passionate about Yorkshire. Addleshaw Goddard is a leading full service, international law firm, providing quality-focused and commercially-minded legal advice across a wide range of market sectors and industries. We aim to achieve real commercial value for each client by drawing together professionals from across our practices and building strong relationships with our clients. addleshawgoddard.com When you require legal advice, it is important to know you can rely on a team that understands your specialist needs, commercial pressures and personal requirements. Whatever legal services you are looking for to protect your business, we offer clear practical solutions that are tailored to your requirements. andrewjackson.co.uk A Yorkshire based social enterprise committed to changing lives for the better through learning and work. For over 25 years, we have successfully helped individuals, organisations and communities to achieve their ambitions by providing them with the high-quality tools, motivation and support they need, whenever and however they need it. aspire-igen.com With over 300 years banking experience, Barclays is delighted to be a key part of the local business community in Yorkshire, providing support and relationship banking for businesses of all sizes. Working in partnership we aim to help customers, clients and businesses realise their ambitions in the right way. barclays.co.uk Bettys & Taylors of Harrogate is an independent family business, passionate about some of the finer things in life – beautiful café tea rooms, handmade cakes, traditional breads, proper tea and top-quality coffee. We’re the business behind Yorkshire Tea, Taylors of Harrogate coffee and the famous Bettys Café Tea Rooms.bettysandtaylors.co.uk

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Biffa are the leading nationwide integrated waste management business providing collection, treatment, recycling and technologically-driven energy generation services. Through the expertise and investment in technology we promote and deliver sustainable waste management solutions. We are committed to providing 100% recycling and zero waste to landfill solutions. biffa.co.uk We provide a wide range of legal services to commercial and private clients. We believe in delivering a first-class service, whilst providing expert advice at realistic prices. This is achieved by taking the time to get to know and understand our clients, building long-term relationships to deliver the best results possible. lawblacks.com Established in 1762, Brewin Dolphin is one of the UK’s largest independently-owned private client wealth managers. With offices in Leeds and a further 37 branches throughout the UK and Channel Islands, we offer an extensive range of investment management and financial planning services. brewin.co.uk A defining moment in 1912 brought Frank Brook and Walter Taverner together. The two embarked on a relentless pursuit of the finest and most prestigious cloths, materials, and tailors worldwide to lovingly create their suits, jackets, trousers and outerwear. A brand synonymous with luxury and steeped in rich English heritage. brooktaverner.co.uk Specialists in office refurbishments, relocations, redesigns and fit-outs we are passionate about interiors and their impact on business performance. Focussing on understanding the culture, processes and people within a business. We seamlessly take care of every detail, bringing your tailor-made project to life, on budget and on time. chameleon-business-interiors.co.uk

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Y 3 0 PA R T N E R S

Christeyns was founded in 1946. Since then, it has grown into a major player on the global chemical market. Our family run company has headquarters in Belgium, the UK operation consists of three businesses, of which one is based in Bradford. Our principal focus is the supply of detergent, supporting chemicals and engineering expertise to the commercial laundry sector. christeyns.com From the beginning CNG’s purpose was to offer something different, a stand-out proposition in a crowded industry. The UK’s largest independent shipper of gas, we have set ourselves apart through giving power back to customers, encompassing our expertise and passion, providing a service that just works for everyone involved. cngltd.co.uk A multi-award-winning, full service integrated digital marketing and strategic marketing agency. The team comprises over 20 marketing specialists, a 37-year trading history and a £5m turnover. Creative Marketing Services was recently voted a top 40 regional agency, Center Parcs supplier of the year and best data driven agency. cmsadvertising.co.uk Established in 1997, Dovecote Park is proud to supply the very finest British beef, veal and venison to Waitrose supermarkets nationwide. We pride ourselves on maintaining the highest standards of animal welfare and husbandry. A privately owned family business with a reputation for exceptional product, innovation and industry leading animal welfare standards. The strong relationship with producers is paramount to creating the tastiest meat with optimum traceability. dovecotepark.com Eversheds Sutherland offers legal services of the highest quality. By building deep relationships. We fully understand your organisation and deliver advice that obtains the results you want. With a reputation for innovation, providing solutions that save time and money, reduce risks and create new opportunities. eversheds-sutherland.com

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Gateley Plc believes clients deserve a better service from their professional advisers. Providing cost-effective, straight-talking advisory services to our clients across all aspects of their business: people and resources, property, operations and supply chain, finance, risk management and regulatory governance delivering world-class products and services. gateleyplc.com Formed in 1997 as a vehicle maintenance centre, our goal has been to provide a high-quality professional service to all customers. Investment in employee development combined with continuous improvements in processes and operations, has enabled Global Autocare to gain a strong reputation for providing a quality, reliable service. With a wide range of inhouse services to help simplify the management of all fleet sizes. globalautocare.co.uk Pass through the gates and follow the meandering river through beautiful parkland, prepare to be surprised as you catch your first glimpse of Grantley Hall and its beautiful gardens. A perfect haven combining vibrancy and serenity, fun and relaxation, sophistication and country charm, the ideal setting to create unforgettable moments. grantleyhall.co.uk Drawing on over 400 years of bottled water history to produce one of the world’s finest spring waters. Synonymous with style and elegance, combining our awardwinning diamond bottle with a perfectly balanced mineral content and clean taste. We are a responsible manufacturer committed to sustainable production practices and minimising environmental impact. harrogatespring.com One of the largest law firms in the UK, priding ourselves on understanding people. Be it business or personal we understand that everybody’s situation is different. Whatever your legal needs or support with financial planning, we’ll listen, get to know you, your situation and give you the advice you need. Our goal is to exceed the expectations of every client. irwinmitchell.com

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Regarded as one of the UK’s most highly respected names in motor retailing. Our long-established family business was founded in 1946 and still has its headquarters in Bradford. We have grown to encompass 50 dealerships across Yorkshire and the North of England, representing 18 of the world’s best manufacturers. jct600.co.uk

Offering pragmatic, reliable advice to protect and grow your wealth, meeting the needs of individuals, families and businesses. Financial and legal advisory services are built on the philosophy that we work hard to understand your aspirations to give the quality and bespoke service you require, now and in the future. theprogenygroup.com

Whether you are a start-up or a large corporate business, Jelf is well placed to deliver exactly the right insurance and the right solution. A UK wide company, we are proud to have worked with and to have supported businesses throughout Yorkshire, ensuring that local businesses thrive and survive. jelf.com

Produced by Raisthorpe Manor Fine Foods in the Yorkshire Wolds, this range of fruit flavoured, and premium Yorkshire Tonics contains only natural ingredients and Vitamin C, blended to produce a refreshing drink when served over ice or adding a new dimension to floral and fruity gins and vodkas. raisthorpemanor.com

Helping millions of passengers reach a wide range of international destinations every year. A continually expanding route network provides as much choice as possible, with competitive airlines offering great routes and prices worth travelling for as well as excellent connectivity and positive customer experiences. leedsbradfordairport.co.uk

Providing all industries and sectors with full service, omnichannel, contact centre support. Our agents are the best in the business, trained to operate to the highest standards of any leading brand. With a full suite of services and market leading technology, we are perfectly placed to help clients, help their customers. resqcs.co.uk

Created by Karl and Cathy Mason who set out to produce a drink that stood out from the crowd. Since its launch in 2013, we have continued to use slow traditional distillation methods, pure Yorkshire water and just the right balance of botanicals, adding numerous editions to their award-winning range. masonsyorkshiregin.com

This will be the leading outlet shopping and leisure destination in the North of England, bringing an appealing mix of premium and high street brands to one of the UK’s most well-known locations. Including restaurants, cafes and leisure and entertainment facilities. scotchcornerdesignervillage.com

Explore over 200-years of history and discover how railways shaped our world by taking a trip to York to enjoy free entry at this award-winning museum. Home to iconic locomotives and an unrivalled collection of engineering firsts, our museum celebrates the past, present and future of innovation on the railways. railwaymuseum.org.uk

The world’s oldest professional football stadium is home to the first ever united, Sheffield United Football Club. Aside from football, our venue is home to the best conference, exhibition, banqueting and event facilities in the South Yorkshire region, complimented by the adjoining 4* Copthorne Hotel with restaurants and sports bars. sufc.co.uk

Responsible for delivering electricity safely and reliably to 3.8 million customers across the North eEast England, Yorkshire and northern Lincolnshire. We can help you with advising who your energy supplier is, plus moving cables and meters, to installation of a generator, right down to what to do in a power cut. northernpowergrid.com

A great place to study, our college really cares about every person that comes through the door. We pride ourselves on giving every student the individual support they deserve. Whether you are a school-leaver, mature student or employer, we will provide excellent opportunities to develop your skills and qualifications. shipley.ac.uk

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Y 3 0 PA R T N E R S

Europe’s leading direct-to-consumer media and entertainment company. We believe better business creates a better world. That’s why we push to achieve the highest standards of sustainability and responsibility. Using our voice to make a difference, campaigning for positive change on the big issues of our time. We believe in better. sky.com We’re a tech company born out of Sky, and we’re aiming to be the UK’s best digital business. 1000+ colleagues, developing some of the country’s biggest brands in online betting and gaming including SkyBet, SkyVegas, Soccer Saturday Super6 and Sky Sports Fantasy Football. skybet.com A proud Yorkshire business that does, thinks and has a different vision to others. We started producing award-winning gins and vodka in 2015 and now offer a range of four premium products around the globe. Discover the true ‘Spirit of Harrogate’ by visiting our flagship store and experience in Harrogate. spiritofharrogate.co.uk A FTSE 100 company, our success has grown through the ethos of offering quality, face-to-face wealth management advice and commitment to building trusted and enduring relationships with our clients. The proposition is further enhanced by our distinctive approach to investment management helping individuals, trustees and organisations to achieve their goals. sjp.co.uk Set in 17 acres of countryside, we are one of the biggest independentlyowned garden centres in Yorkshire. Browse the extensive outdoor plant department, an enviable range of gift and home accessories as well as garden furniture. Everything you need to keep your garden and home looking great all year round. tonggardencentre.co.uk

By joining Y30, you’ll be part of a prestigious group of business leaders committed to showcasing Yorkshire on the national and international stage. Please contact us to discuss the possibilities:

yorkshire.com

In a world that’s changing faster than ever, it’s comforting that some things endure the passage of time. With a brewing heritage that stretches back over 200 years, the Thwaites family continues to create beautifully balanced, delicious beers alongside a growing collection of pubs, inns, hotels and spas. thwaites.co.uk One of the largest higher education institutions in the UK and renowned globally for the quality of teaching and research. The strength of our academic expertise combined with the breadth of disciplines covered, provides a wealth of opportunities with real impact on the world in cultural, economic and societal ways. leeds.ac.uk Over the last 47 years, Wykeland has established an enviable reputation as a leading property development company, owning a substantial commercial property portfolio and working in close partnership with public and private sectors and the wider community to deliver buildings that meet today’s expectations, yet achieve tomorrow’s standards. wykeland.co.uk With roots back to its establishment in Halifax in 1859. Yorkshire Bank has a strong personal customer base and business banking capability through a UK-wide network. These strong foundations help support local communities and continue to help people when they need it with practical banking for the real world. ybonline.co.uk The Yorkshire Post is a daily broadsheet newspaper, published in Leeds in northern England. It covers the whole of Yorkshire as well as parts of North Derbyshire and Lincolnshire, but goes beyond just local news and its masthead carries the slogan “Yorkshire’s National Newspaper”. yorkshirepost.co.uk

C H R I S P OW E L L Head of Strategic Partnerships Welcome to Yorkshire T +44 (0)113 322 3572 M +44 (0)7875 297 101 E cpowell@yorkshire.com

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Profile for Welcome to Yorkshire

This is Y Magazine 2020  

Welcome to This is Y 2020. Ask anyone what they love about Yorkshire and they’re more than likely to not only mention the stunning countrys...

This is Y Magazine 2020  

Welcome to This is Y 2020. Ask anyone what they love about Yorkshire and they’re more than likely to not only mention the stunning countrys...