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David Atherton Book it with the Bake Off champ

DRAMA IN T H E DA L E S A L L C R E AT U R E S G R E AT A N D S M A L L I S B A C K . W E C H AT TO T H E C AST A B O U T T H E B R A N D N E W A D A P TAT I O N .

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Rugby League Welcoming the World after 125 years Captain Fantastic Honoring Keighley’s Captain Sir Tom Moore En Vogue Yorkshire travels with Vogue China’s Editor-in-Chief 1


W E LCO M E As summer comes to an end and autumn begins, there’s still lots happening in Yorkshire, confirming the region as a destination to visit all year round. From countryside walks (#walkshire coming soon) to bracing coastal sea air and stylish city breaks, the county’s hospitality industry and amazing attractions are beckoning. As part of Welcome to Yorkshire’s tourism recovery plan, working with the county’s business and tourism representatives, to reopen, recover and rebuild, we have lots of exciting new initiatives to share. On Yorkshire Day (1st August) Welcome to Yorkshire launched its brand new personal membership My Y, with its first honorary and very special members, international multi-award-winning actor (Mirfield lad) Sir Patrick Stewart, living legend and centenarian Captain Sir Tom Moore (from Keighley), Yorkshire shepherdess and TV star Amanda Owen (Swaledale via Huddersfield), plus gardening guru Alan Titchmarsh (Ilkley born and bred). My Y

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membership has been launched to unite people across the globe who have a love of, or links to Yorkshire, and allows them to have their very own piece of the county with a tree planted, and can be appreciated wherever they are in the world. During recent months, in particular, the preservation and nurture of the outdoors and feeling united, is more important than ever. There’s so much inspiration in the just launched bimonthly online Welcome to Yorkshire This Is Y magazine to get you out and about, but when relaxing after exploring the county, why not settle down to watch the new All Creatures Great and Small filmed in Yorkshire (and find out about my personal connection to Herriot’s great tales) or create something delicious from Great British Bake Off winner David Atherton’s new cook book?

JAMES MASON Chief Executive, Welcome to Yorkshire

Image courtesy Yorkshire Sculpture Park. Photo © David Lindsay

In or out...there’s lots to shout about. #YorkshireTogether

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W E LCO M E TO SEPTEMBER - O C TO B E R 10

CONTENTS 6  BUSINESS AS UNUSUAL Inspirational ideas and dates for your diary. 10 CAPTAIN FANTASTIC Interview with Captain Sir Tom Moore. 14 WHAT’S ON THE MENU Cooking in the kitchen with GBBO winner David Atherton. 18 WHAT ARE YOU LOOKING AT? Stylish Yorkshire travels with editor-in-chief of Vogue China. 22 CITY BREAK Explore Yorkshire’s spectacular seven cities. 28

LET’S GET QUIZZICAL Test your Yorkshire knowledge.

30 LIGHTS CAMERA YORKSHIRE Catching up with the cast of the new Dales drama. 38 IT’S A (GREAT AND) SMALL WORLD Welcome to Yorkshire’s James Mason looks back at his time as a child actor. 44 HOME TEAM Brilliant breaks away post-pandemic.

Yorkshire is idyllic, whatever time of year. As spectacular summer, slips into amazing autumn, and the purple hue of the magnificent moors make way for a kaleidoscope of autumnal colours across the county’s countryside and coastline, it’s the perfect time to explore. City breaks are ideal for experiencing rich heritage, stylish shopping, delicious dining and award-winning arts and Yorkshire has seven spectacular cities to stay and sightsee. Check out the latest ideas of what to do and check-in as the region’s range of places to stay, from luxury hotels, to gorgeous glamping, and brilliant B&Bs await. Many attractions have also reopened their doors (post-pandemic), some may be requesting booking, so see the latest arrangements online.

48 A LEAGUE OF THEIR OWN Pitch perfect plans ahead as Rugby League celebrates 125 years in Yorkshire. 52 WELCOMING THE WORLD Rugby League World Cup 2021 - Yorkshire host locations. 54 BEST ASSURED Family fun for kids of all ages. 58

PLAN YOUR JOURNEY (when the time’s right).

Celebrating sport, Yorkshire is the birthplace of rugby league, find out more during its 125th anniversary year, plans for a dedicated museum and of course the Rugby League World Cup coming to a stadium near you in 2021. Sit back and settle down with a cup of Yorkshire tea and be inspired by some incredible interviewees, from living legend and Keighley lad Captain Sir Tom Moore; to Whitby’s winning Great British Bake Off champ David Atherton... AND the cast of the Dales’ drama All Creatures Great and Small (it looks fantastic!). We reminisce with Vogue China Editor-in-chief, Angelica Cheung, about her love of the county and her stylish travels. Enjoy This is Y (and all things Yorkshire).

ON THE COVER A brand new adaptation of All Creatures Great and Small is back with a new cast, 30 years after it went off air.

GET IN TOUCH Editor Carolyn Nicoll cnicoll@yorkshire.com

C A R O LY N N I C O L L Editor, This is Y magazine

WANT TO KNOW MORE? If you want to find out more about something in our features click on this symbol.

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W E LCO M E TOYO R K S H I R E

@ W E LCO M E 2 YO R K S #THISISY

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BECOME A MEMBER. SIGN UP WITH US T O D AY

G O O D F O R YO U A N D YO U R B U S I N E S S . G O O D F O R YO R K S H I R E . W H AT ’ S I N I T F O R YO U ? Welcome to Yorkshire membership provides businesses with a chance to showcase to the world what they have to offer. Alongside promotion on our award-winning website yorkshire.com. Members can tap into a wide variety of resources including access to free social and training events, PR support, potential editorial coverage, money-saving offers, the opportunity to be nominated at the White Rose Awards (the UK’s largest

tourism awards ceremony) and be part of Welcome to Yorkshire’s annual Y conference (the biggest onstage tourism show in the UK), plus so much more. Tourism in Yorkshire is worth £9billion to the Yorkshire economy and can be as strong again, after the coronavirus situation, if we continue to bring together businesses from all four corners of the county, to continue to achieve even more and be seen on the world stage as a top tourist destination, showcasing the county globally. During such unprecedented times it’s important for Yorkshire businesses to work together, share tourism and business advice, as well as supporting and promoting the county’s businesses and attractions. The aim is to be as strong as ever

0113 322 3500 Discuss your options

once lockdown is lifted, to continue offering fantastic staycations and to attract international visitors once again (when it’s safe to do so). Welcome to Yorkshire has a social reach of almost 20 million and together we are stronger #YorkshireTogether

Sign up at yorkshire.com/membership

W H AT D O O U R M E M B E R S S AY ? Becky Whitaker Owner, People Buy People As a member I have worked with the team at Welcome To Yorkshire for many years, both as a venue and a supplier. They have always been extremely professional, friendly & helpful. I like the the opportunity to get involved with different events as a delegate & as an exhibitor and have always made valuable connections, gathered leads & generated business. I think the key to this good relationship with WTY is to communicate regularly. I see the hard work the team have all put in throughout difficult times and how it has paid off with the massive success of the likes of the Tour de Yorkshire. Becky Leach Marketing & Communications Manager, The Deep Welcome to Yorkshire have been a great support to The Deep for many years across our business, including social media, web, print, PR and events. Working closely with the them has helped to increase awareness of our product across the region and has resulted in a big increase in web traffic to our site. The team are always on hand for advice or assistance and go the extra mile to help.

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YO R K S H I R E H I G H L I G H T S

BUSINESS AS

UNUSUAL Unprecedented times for all, but businesses are adapting and their inspirational creativity is showcased in truly wonderful ways … there’s lots to see and experience in Yorkshire.

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Below: Abel Selaocoe composer of new soundwalk for Leeds. © Mlungisi Mlungwana. Right: Surfing in Scarborough, ‘Sense’ational Exhibition Barnsley Image: Caroline Achaintre, Todo Custo, 2015, Arts Council Collection, Southbank Centre, London © Caroline Achaintre. Bottom right: City Sightseeing York at Clifford’s Tower.

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busiest year. Kiplin Hall may have come through the coronavirus crisis, but it’s also been witness to 400 years of the world’s ups and downs, including a civil war, the whole reign of Queen Victoria, the Industrial Revolution, two world wars and more than one pandemic. Check out this heritage hall set in gorgeous gardens and enjoy a bite to eat from Proper Pizzas, serving freshly baked pizzas to eat outdoors, made in an authentic wood-fired oven. Hot drinks and sweet treats from the Kiplin Kitchen are available too.

SURF’S UP The Yorkshire coast has great surf beaches; ideal in the autumn when the waves are consistent, the sea is not too cold and the beaches are less crowded than in summer. More adventurous and experienced surfers might prefer the winter months when the waves are likely to be at their most magnificent.

SW I TC H O N TO OPERA NORTH Exciting outdoor events and digital projects will be taking place across the North of England this Autumn following the postponement of Opera North’s season (arranged pre-pandemic). So Switch ON to Opera North’s new planned programme, including As You Are, a new soundwalk for Leeds composed by cellist Abel Selaocoe; Will Todd’s community opera, Song of Our Heartland, released as a film; also a digital project bringing Act III of La bohème to cities across the North; and a Whistle Stop Opera: Hansel and Gretel will be performed live at outdoor, socially distanced performances including Stage@ TheDock, Hull (2nd September), Pontefract Castle (4th September) and at the National Centre for Early Music, York (5th September).

TRAIN TIME Travel on the North Yorkshire Moors Railway’s The Optimist, a pre-booked, steam-hauled journey. Services will depart from Pickering and will travel directly to the picturesque seaside town of Whitby. See the sights en route via Levisham, Goathland & Grosmont, although during current times the train will not be stopping at these stations. The Optimist is

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available for travel up to Sunday 13th September.

S E N S E - AT I O N A L Catch Allegories of the Senses a creative collaborative exhibition of artwork from the Arts Council Collection at Cooper Gallery, Barnsley. Replicating or stimulating the five senses of sight, smell, touch, taste and hearing, pieces have been chosen from Cooper Gallery and Cannon Hall Museums collections. Accessibility and inclusion is an important focus for the exhibition, carefully curated by Action for Autism and Asperger’s Barnsley (AfAAB). On display until 21st November.

VENICE PREMIERE

Filmed in Leeds, Bradford and London The Duke will have its world premiere at the 2020 Venice Film Festival in September, the first major film event to take place since the pandemic.Starring Academy Award winners Dame Helen Mirren and Jim Broadbent the feature film was backed by Screen Yorkshire. During her time filming in the county, Dame Helen Mirren shared images on social media enjoying nights out eating curry and having a great time at Bradford’s Alhambra Theatre watching Billy Pearce and cast at the panto … oh yes she did.

B U S STO P York City Sightseeing open-top bus tours are now running every 15 Minutes to meet visitor demand, doubling its timetable to four journeys an hour. Tickets are valid for a full 24 hours, meaning those arriving in York in the afternoon can complete a tour and then take another the next morning. Hop on and hop off at some of the city’s most celebrated sights including York Railway Station for the National Railway Museum, Museum Gardens for the Yorkshire Museum, St Mary’s Abbey, Mansion House, Yorkboat River Cruises and the Visit York Information Centre, Exhibition Square for York Minster and the City Art Gallery, Monk Bar for the Richard III Museum, The Stonebow for The Shambles, York’s Chocolate Story and Merchant Adventurers’ Hall, plus Clifford’s Tower for the Castle Museum, York Dungeon and the JORVIK Viking Centre.

RECORD BREAKING KIPLIN Opening post-pandemic is a precarious practice but for North Yorkshire Jacobean historic house Kiplin Hall, July was their best visitor month on record. With 2,833 people passing through their grand gates in just 14 days, visitor numbers were up 23% on the property’s previous

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Left: Ribblehead Viaduct.

YO R K S H I R E T R AV E L S

Right and above: Animal magic at Sheffield’s Butterfly House, Wildlife and Falconry Centre. Below: Fun at Gulliver’s Valley resort.

Launched just after lockdown, Gulliver’s Valley Resort is a new magical, family adventure experience in South Yorkshire’s Rother Valley. Designed for children aged 2-13 and home to indoor attractions and exciting theme park rides. From Western World to Smugglers Wharf, and the Lost World of the Living Dinosaurs, it’s going to be a roaring success. Stay over in a princess or unicorn suite at the Castle Hotel or Lost World Lodges and Western Cabins.

O T T E R LY A M A Z I N G Book an online ticket to visit Sheffield’s Tropical Butterfly House Wildlife and Falconry Centre and you may be given an exclusive otter feeding pot (only 20 available each day). Celebrating 25 years of spectacular creatures from birds of prey to parrots, lemurs to crocodiles, butterflies and bats ... it’s animal magic all the way.

S TAYC AT I O N E X P R E S S The picturesque and iconic Settle-Carlisle Railway has a new private charter train operating daily between Skipton, Settle and Appleby, offering a socially distanced, first-class journey, but without the firstclass fees. Experience one of the UK’s most historic and scenic railway lines, with views of the stunning Yorkshire Dales and reach the dizzy heights to see the breathtaking sights from the top of the Ribblehead Viaduct. Until 12th September.

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H A R E WO O D D I N I N G Tempted to a nine course tasting menu at Harewood House? In September, Executive Chef Josh Whitehead, recently crowned Chef of the Year at this year’s prestigious Yorkshire Evening Post’s Oliver Awards, will be cooking up a treat with a mouthwatering menu featuring produce from Harewood throughout each course, with 80% of the delicious delicacies sourced from the estate. Featuring beef and venison from Harewood’s livestock, fruits, vegetables, herbs, spices and edible flowers from its historic walled garden and a range of wild foods foraged around vast grounds. Taking place in the “Hovels”, an old stable block built in the late 1700s around the same time as Harewood House, designed by Robert Carr, the architect behind the Grade I listed stately home.

DOUBLE DELIGHT Make it a priority to visit two impressive priories. Gisborough Priory in the Tees Valley is dominated by the dramatic skeleton of the 14th century church’s east end, an outstanding example of early Gothic architecture. One of the first Augustinian priories to be built in England, Gisborough was founded by the Bruce family, ancestors of Robert the Bruce, King of Scotland. The canons rebuilt their church no fewer than three times, and what survives gives a glimpse of the priory’s former riches. Half an hour’s drive away tucked away at the foot of the Cleveland Hills in North Yorkshire is Mount Grace Priory, House and Gardens. Discover the best preserved Carthusian priory in England. Roam the ruins of this unusual medieval monastery and find out what makes the property so unique in the reconstructed monk’s cell. The glorious gardens have been recently renovated. Keep a look out for the famous priory stoats.

Top to bottom: Harewood House dining, afternoon tea at Carlton Towers, Gisborough Priory.

TA K E T E A Visit Carlton Towers and enjoy afternoon tea hampers in the beautiful vineyard of this stunning period property, available throughout September and October. Described as ‘mixing the grace of Downton Abbey with the magic of Hogwarts’ the impressive property and gorgeous gardens have been locations for various TV and film adaptations, including as Hetton Abbey in the 1988 film A Handful Of Dust by Evelyn Waugh, it was the stunning backdrop for the television dramatisation of Charles Dickens’ Micawber, starring David Jason, and also in TV’s Masterchef, Kay Mellor’s series Love, Lies & Records and the amazing costume drama Victoria.

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INTERVIEW

C A P TA I N FA N TA S T I C It’s fair to say that the last few months have been memorable for most in many ways, but for an incredibly inspirational chap from Keighley they’ve been quite phenomenal. Carolyn Nicoll caught up with the quick-witted and charming centenarian Captain Sir Tom Moore in the stunning (socially distanced) setting of the Coniston Hotel. It’s absolutely amazing to be given the first Welcome to Yorkshire Personal Honorary Membership and to have a tree planted in my name. Never did I anticipate, earlier this year, that anything like this would ever happen. I’m delighted. I’ve spent most of my life enjoying the outdoors and I do like trees but I’m not really a gardener. I’m too impatient. Things don’t grow quick enough. I hope you plant me a fast growing tree so that I can visit it with my family. If it’s a slow grower I won’t live long enough to see it will I? I’m not intending to go just yet. I haven’t time. I’ve too many things that need doing, but perhaps a nice fast growing pine would do. I’ve never not been proud of being a Yorkshireman. Wherever I go I tell people that I come from Keighley in the West Riding of Yorkshire and there’s nowhere better, nowhere like it. My grandfathers were Yorkshiremen on both sides and I’m a true ‘dyed-in-the-wool’ Yorkshireman. My memories of my childhood in Keighley, going back a long time, when I must have been 3 or 4, are of my mother teaching me to ride a Fairy Cycle (a popular child’s bike in the twenties) on the pavement. Since then I’ve ridden pretty much anything

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with two wheels. I found my first motorcycle in a barn when I was twelve years old and bought it for half a crown. I managed to get it running. I’d been brought up with bikes and my Uncle Billy was a great motorcyclist, riding impressively at places like Park Rash outside Kettlewell. He meant a lot to me and I called my dog Billy after him. I’ve particularly enjoyed roaming the moors with my dogs and on a motorbike over the years. As a 21 year old I rode motorbikes during the war in Burma, through the dense jungle and taught other soldiers how to ride too. I’ve had a lifelong passion for motorbikes and recently got to travel in a sidecar alongside the fantastic Yorkshire trials rider Dougie Lampkin, who a few years after me (smiles) was born just down the road from my hometown of Keighley in Silsden. I love cycling even though I’m a bit old for it now. I enjoy watching the Tour de Yorkshire and I must say I give them full marks for taking on all those hills across the county. They really have to put their best foot forward haven’t they? The cyclists think they’ve got to the top of a hill and then there’s another one. That’s the beauty of Yorkshire, there’s always another one.

My grandfather built the impressive war memorial in the centre of Keighley and the wonderful walls around Cliffe Castle in the town. It’s a pretty old wall and is still there with its lovely big iron gates inviting people in. What a delightful building. I was proud to visit recently and be given the Freeman of Keighley, and they even stopped the traffic for me to get across the road. Raising £38.9m (with gift aid) for NHS charities...it’s not bad is it? When you think that we started off trying to raise a thousand pounds and it went on and on and on and on. People were so generous, not just in Yorkshire, or in England, but throughout the world, donating to National Health Service charities. I didn’t believe it possible and never dreamed that through my walk for charity we’d (my family and I) get famous! That wasn’t the reason why we raised all that money, it was for the benefit of the sick and the ill. It grew and it grew and it grew … just like Topsy (she was a fictional girl who grew and grew and grew!) Everything grows like Topsy! The Captain Tom Foundation is something that is very special and will go a long way. There are so many people in need of help, older people, lonely people, people who have various things to

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PEOPLE WERE SO G E N E R O U S , N OT J U S T I N YO R K S H I R E , O R I N E N G L A N D, BUT THROUGHOUT T H E WO R L D.

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INTERVIEW

Previous page: Captain Sir Tom Moore This page clockwise from bottom left: Autobiography out 17th September. Captain Sir Tom Moore with his grandson, daughter, son-in-law and granddaughter. One Hundred Steps published October 1st. Captain Sir Tom Moore proudly wearing his honorary Welcome to Yorkshire MY Y personal membership Y.

deal with and really are in need. Throughout England and throughout the world. When my late wife, Pamela, was in a home for 5 years with a degenerative brain disease, I’d visit her every day. One day she said “if you didn’t come to see me I would be very lonely” and that struck a hole in my heart, because so many in the same home were lonely and never had anyone visit them, year in and year out. That’s what the foundation is hopefully going to try to get rid of … loneliness. I’m proud to have two books coming out, my autobiography Tomorrow Will Be A Good Day and a children’s book, One Hundred Steps, with illustrations telling my story of adventure, helping people and never giving up. I love spending time with children, especially my grandchildren. My personal highlight over the last few months has been meeting the Queen. That was a magic day. I’ve never been so close to Her Majesty. She came to me all smiles, and tapped me with the sword very gently. Really it was a delight for me to speak with her and she chatted to the rest of the family too which is unusual, so we were doubly honoured on that day. The Queen is absolutely marvellous.

I’d like to live as long as Vera Lynn. I saw her when I was in Burma, she went around giving lots of help to people, far away from home and an absolute star in her own right. So yes, I’d like to live as long as Vera Lynn, so that means I’ve got to last another four years. (smiles) To receive the Pride of Yorkshire Award on Yorkshire Day was very lovely. I really am very pleased with it, such a special award and although I don’t think I’m particularly special … I am special … because I got the award from Welcome to Yorkshire and it is outstanding. Thank you ever so much to the whole of Yorkshire.

Captain Sir Tom Moore’s autobiography Tomorrow Will Be A Good Day is published September 17th (Michael Joseph). Captain Sir Tom Moore’s children’s picture book One Hundred Steps is published October 1st (Puffin). To watch the interview with Captain Sir Tom Moore click here.

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COAST

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W H AT ’ S O N T H E M E N U ?

D AV I D AT H E R T O N

Yorkshire’s Great British Bake Off champ David Atherton has had a hectic year, winning the country’s much-loved, primetime baking show, experiencing life in lockdown and launching My First Cook Book: Bake, Make and Learn to Cook. Find out more about his love of the countryside, curries and cakey caterpillars.

Growing up in picturesque Ruswarp, just outside Whitby, I loved how rural it was, living the outdoor life and growing food. For a family of seven we had a very small house, but with a massive garden, an apple orchard and vegetables. It’s a very beautiful part of the world and we’d walk a lot and spend time at the beach. My mum used to take us foraging when we were kids and at the time it was fun but I didn’t realise how useful it actually was, picking tonnes of bilberries and blackberries off the moors. We had a big chest freezer so we could use the fruits all year round and make crumbles. I live in London now but love coming back to visit, leaving the city and just feeling like you’re at one with the countryside again. Driving across the North York Moors I feel like I’m properly away and that I get a proper break from my London life. There’s nothing like walking on the beach with your family and smelling the sea. Being part of and winning GBBO in 2019 was amazing. It’s very different to a lot of TV shows and probably why it’s loved so much. It’s so friendly. When you go on TV people may be

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worried about how they come across. I never felt like that because the Bake Off puts people in a good light. It’s still A TV show that they’re producing and editing but you feel like it’s a real genuine thing. I also loved the fact that you’re not in a TV studio, you really are in a tent in the grounds of the most beautiful house. So when there’s a lot of waiting around, which there is in TV, you’re in spectacular surroundings. BUT overall, for me I just love baking and being in a kitchen. It’s not a hard task or a stressful task, it’s just something I love doing. You don’t really see the judges very often, but I was surprised that Sandy and Noel were in the tent the whole time, giving hugs, even when the cameras weren’t running. Winning the GBBO changed my life quite profoundly I guess. The obvious is that you get recognised in the street. I quite enjoyed my anonymity before because I’m not someone who likes to get dressed properly in the morning and it can be very embarrassing sometimes. But the opportunities are just great. It’s not just a show that everyone watches, it’s a show that everyone loves. I’ve had

the opportunity to write a book, I’ve got two more book deals and I write for The Guardian. So it’s a really good springboard I guess. All the bakers have stayed great friends and keep in touch too. Lockdown meant spending more time at home but for all the negative things during the last few months, I’ve been trying to look at the positives. Sleeping more, reading books, cooking and baking. I’m just obsessed with food so I’ve been doing a lot of things from scratch again and also my partner has so I’m not allowed anywhere near my sourdough starter and I love sourdough! I’ve been pickling and fermenting instead. I’m quite a crafty person and my partner and I made a quilt together. It’s been very busy since Bake Off, so it’s actually been quite nice to be forced to spend some time relaxing. I split my time between baking and working as a health adviser for Voluntary Service Overseas on classic health programmes like mass vaccination programmes in African countries, plus malaria and maternal health, which I still do three days a week. Based in the HQ in London

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GBBO 2019 winner David Atherton

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Illustrator Rachel Stubbs with friend David Atherton

dealing with 21 different countries. I travel frequently (not so much at the moment) to Ethiopia, Nigeria, Malawi, multiple times a year. I’ve always been obsessed with health and food from a young age and lots of things I’ve done connected to health has been about nutrition. Over the last few months there have been a lot of Zoom meetings. My partner and I are both working from our small flat in London, but we love exercise so every day we will go off on a bike ride together or do a keep fit workout. In the afternoon and evening it’s writing recipes and testing recipes, then reading a book before going to bed. My First Book Book: Bake, Make and Learn to Cook has just been published, it’s for kids and is inspired by my childhood. My mum was such an inspiration and we spent lots of time in the kitchen together, making me the food person I am today. Mum never said ‘don’t touch that or that’s sharp’, she made sure we had freedom

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and that it was safe, fun and that we learnt about food. Another important part of the book is the health side. It’s really important for kids to know about food and how things are made. I love spending time with kids. Leading kids clubs and teaching them about food and nutrition. My First Cook Book is a really great way for parents or guardians to spend time with their children and produce something that’s good for them too. Cakey Caterpillar is a favourite recipe in the book. A fun celebration cake but with healthy ingredients. People wouldn’t necessarily know from tasting it, because it’s sweet, that it actually has spinach in. Kids can be very picky about what they eat but if they’ve made something and know which ingredients they’ve put in, then they’ll try it. I worked closely with illustrator Rachel Stubbs on the book. It’s been another dream for me, like the Great British Bake Off. I lived with Rachel and her husband when I first moved to

London. I’d been in rural Malawi and moved back to England, they are two of my best friends. Rachel was doing her masters in children’s illustration at the time and later as Bake Off was going on we decided together to pitch to Walker Books, who she’d worked with, the idea of a kids’ cook book. It’s been important for me, as a gay man with a male partner, to have representation in the book. A lot of the illustrations aren’t just about food but they’re about families too. We’ve included lots of different situations, such as a childminder with different children, also showing that it’s not always just mummy and daddy, there are two dads as one of the families in the book too. Which was really important for me for kids to not always see the same family unit which isn’t necessarily their family. The illustrations in the book are really important. We live in an era where food photography is so stunningly beautiful now, especially on

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Instagram, so perfect and a food stylist has spent hours on every photo. For kids especially, it can be difficult to look at photos and then find their baking hasn’t turned out quite as perfect as the picture, even if they try their hardest it’s not going to look like that because the professionals have so much equipment and time to style it. To me the illustrations are brilliant because the kids don’t actually know exactly what it should look like, so they produce their recipe, that’s good and tasty. My mum makes a really good Yorkshire parkin that’s delicious and a version of it is going in my next book. And we’ve got to be proud of the Yorkshire pudding haven’t we? When there’s a roast dinner the Yorkshire pudding is all that anyone is looking at on the table. Always a fight for those. The Yorkshire pudding is the best. In the USA they have popovers, an American distortion of the Yorkshire Pudding and it’s basically a sweet as they put maple syrup on them.

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I find food very meditative. I love doing a dish where I spend ages chopping up all the vegetables into perfect little pieces, like a vegetable curry. Just listening to the radio while I’m doing it, no rush … which is quite ironic really after Bake off! Making any kind of bread is number one for me, any kind of bread. Although Chinese steamed buns and a really good sourdough are particular favourites. I love working with a batch of scones, they are so quick and easy, perfect with jam, Greek yoghurt and a strawberry on top. When life is back to normal… Is life going to get back to normal? I’m looking forward to spending time with friends and family, and going to food markets and different restaurants. I think as part of my travelling I’m obsessed with food culture and seeing how other people do things with produce in other countries. I’ll be visiting Whitby for a family reunion. We’d arranged a get together just as lockdown came in.

For a perfect Yorkshire day out, how about Runswick Bay, close to where I’m from and voted Beach of the Year. Staithes is great too, an old smugglers cove. Some people like those long stretches of beach but I like smaller beaches in coves and I love the steep road down to the beach, with all the houses higgledy-piggledy. There’s a great coffee shop to stop at too. Leeds is a fantastic city. I was at uni there and I’m going back soon to stay with Helena Garcia from Bake Off. We’re really close and talk every day. She keeps inviting me to Leeds. So as soon as I can I’ll be up there. The architecture in the city is so impressive. When you’re walking down the shopping streets if you just lift your eyes above the bottom floor to the first floor, the design of the buildings is all different and I think that speaks for the city, as Leeds is full of so many different kinds of people too.

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C U LT U R A L

What are you

looking at?

Living in one of the world’s most populated cities, travelling as editor-in-chief of Vogue China to the most fabulous fashion destinations across the globe...just where does Angelica Cheung head to when taking a break from catwalks and cutting edge couture? Carolyn Nicoll found out. ngelica Cheung, the founding editor-inchief of Vogue China, is described by Forbes magazine as “the high priestess of China’s fashion scene” and presided over the prestigious magazine’s launch sixteen years ago. It has become the most influential fashion publication in the country, featuring the work of international A-list photographers, models, designers and stylists. Vogue China’s phenomenal influence and industry clout has gained Cheung respect and admiration throughout the global luxury industry. She has more than six million followers on the popular Chinese social media feed Weibo. What are your first memories of Yorkshire? I have been visiting Yorkshire for more than twenty years. One of my earliest memories is of watching The Full Monty, when it first came out, at a cinema in Sheffield, close to where the opening canal scenes were filmed. The audience were rolling in the aisles even as the opening credits came on and carried on

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laughing loudly throughout the film. It was a great atmosphere and of course, a very funny film, even though I couldn’t follow all the Yorkshire vernacular at the time. My daughter Hayley, who is very proud of her Yorkshire roots, can do a spot on South Yorkshire accent, with all the right inflections and slang. “Y’all right luv,” is her favourite. What’s the main difference between Beijing, where you live and Yorkshire? Where to start? Beijing is a crowded city of more than 21 million people, which I think is

People were surprised on social media to find a Vogue editor downing a pint in a Yorkshire pub.

Clockwise from top left: Angelica and Hayley at a waterfall close to Malham Cove. Hayley running in Wickersley in South Yorkshire. A family trip to Aysgarth Falls. Bolton Castle. Yorkshire Dales. The Tan Hill Inn in Arkengarthdale. Jumping for joy in the heart of the Dales. The amazing waterfalls at Aysgarth.

around four times the entire population of Yorkshire. Part of the attraction of visiting Yorkshire, particularly the Dales, is the open space, ruggedness and lack of people. You can go for a ten kilometre hike along trails in the Dales and not see a single person, only sheep. I love the big skies and rugged hills and each Dale is a little different. Last time we stayed in Arkengarthdale and it was a great experience, especially visiting the Tan Hill Inn, the highest pub in Britain. That got a lot of amused reaction on my social media feeds, people were surprised to find a Vogue editor downing a pint of Theakston’s in yorkshire.com


an isolated Yorkshire pub. Part of the appeal is that it is so different from my usual life. My schedule regularly takes me to fashion shows in Paris, Milan, London, New York, Los Angeles, Sydney, Shanghai and Hong Kong. My husband Mark Graham is a Yorkshireman and a journalist, so pubs feature a lot on our visits. I love the really old and quaint coaching inns: we once stayed in the tiny village of Askrigg where I think there are three pubs. I was intrigued to see that the fish and chip van came round every week and people waited patiently for their turn, including me. Last time I was in Hawes, a shopkeeper recognised me. She had seen a feature on me in The Times, where I had mentioned in passing that I liked visiting the Yorkshire Dales. As I was paying, she looked at me carefully and then asked me if I was editor of Vogue China. One year we rented a charming 17th century stone cottage in a small village called Thoralby, which is really handy for West Burton, a beautiful village and Aysgarth Falls, which is also a favourite. We were there after torrential rains and did a long walk, past stretches where the river was really raging. It always amazes me that there are so many different kinds of stiles: stone ones that you climb over, or squeeze through, wooden ones and metal ones. Another hike in that part of the world took us past Bolton Castle, which dates back to medieval times and has been in the family for hundreds of years. It is still pretty much intact. We had afternoon tea there and the waitress told us that the man at the next table was the current Lord Bolton! Any particular favourite hotels? Staying at Yorebridge House in Wensleydale was a real treat. The owners have done a really good job of incorporating modern and even Asian styles into a traditional Dales stone building. The food was of a very high standard, using the best local produce. Another favourite was Swinton Park Hotel, which is a real picture book castle, complete with ivy on the walls and swans gliding on the lake. We watched a display yorkshire.com

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I KNOW YORKSHIRE BETTER THAN ANY VOGUE EDITOR EVER HAS!

of birds of prey in the grounds and my daughter – who was then about six – was thrilled to take part, holding out a gloved hand as an owl swooped down. The handler, a young woman, did an excellent job of explaining all about birds of prey and how they hunt. Hayley also enjoyed The Forbidden Corner, one of those really quirky English follies with all kinds of nooks and crannies and mazes. She bought a traditional wimple there, which she wore for ages and ages. I often drive in the Dales and have had a few close-up encounters with tractors on the bends of single track roads and a number of stand offs with the sheep, who sit down nonchalantly in the middle of the road. Are there any Yorkshire fashion connections? Well, two people I know very well in the business are from Yorkshire. Christopher Bailey was in charge at Burberry for many years and we used to swap notes on places we had been in Yorkshire. He came to Beijing often and was a great ambassador for Yorkshire. Another very talented Yorkshireman is Stuart Vevers, who grew up in Doncaster and is now designer for the American brand Coach. He was formerly with Loewe and has become a friend over the years. They are both plain-speaking northerners, like me.

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Images top to bottom: Nishiki, the Oriental room at Yorebridge House, is furnished with stunning oriental wallpaper in black, silver and cream and with a large mango wood four-poster bed. Stanage Edge is a popular place for walkers and for rock climbing with stunning views of the Peak District moorlands. The gritstone edge stretches for approximately 4 miles and was featured in the classic film ‘Pride & Prejudice’ starring Keira Knightley.

MUST SEE From pretty moorland, rolling hills and dales to scented meadows and leafy forests, the Peak District is home to some of the country’s finest scenery and was designated as Britain’s first National Park. As well as natural wonders, the area is steeped with culture and award-winning attractions.

You often visit Yorkshire with your husband and daughter? Yes, my husband is from South Yorkshire. We met 26 years ago in Hong Kong and now live in Beijing. Our daughter, Hayley, who is now 13, just loves to visit, in fact she has probably seen more of the county than most Yorkshire-born kids. We took Hayley to the Yorkshire Sculpture Park at a very early age and she has been to York, where she climbed the city walls, although she was not quite as impressed with the National Railway Museum’s fabulous steam engines as her dad had hoped. She has ridden donkeys on the magnificent Filey Beach and been to the Dales many times. She loved jumping across the limestone rocks at Malham Cove which featured in Harry Potter and of course, she is a big fan of fish and chips and would eat them for five nights running if we let her. I like fish and chips too, but I have resisted my husband’s urging to sample mushy peas and pickled onions. Likewise with black pudding. What about shopping? I don’t do much myself, just the odd piece for the home, but my daughter always insists on a trip to Meadowhall Shopping Centre, Sheffield, which has a great range of brands for kids her age. In fact, if she had a choice she would probably spend all the holiday in Meadowhall! She also likes walking in Wickersley Wood, close to where her dad grew up, hiking the trails around Roche Abbey. She has done a couple of fun run races in Sheffield and also completed a two-week acting summer school at the Crucible. On her last day, she walked across the courtyard when Ian McKellen was coming the other way, on the way to a Pinter play rehearsal. She is learning guitar right now and has developed a fondness for Def Leppard, who are from Sheffield. yorkshire.com


We regularly go to Chatsworth House, only half an hour from the centre of Sheffield. Hayley loved playing in the cascade, a tiered water feature, when she was younger. I took my mum to visit – and she also accompanied us to the Dales and really enjoyed her visit to Bettys Café Tea Rooms in Harrogate, an experience that is really quintessentially English, something that you just can’t find in China. Last year we did a hike around Stanage Edge and recreated the famous Keira Knightley scene from Pride and Prejudice, where she is filmed standing on a distinctive rock that juts out.

Yorebridge House have done a really good job incorporating modern, and even asian, styles into a traditional stone building.

Yorkshire gets a large amount of visitors from China. What do you think it is that appeals to Chinese holidaymakers, which makes them want to see the county? I think mainstream tourists love places such as York, with its centuries of history and the glorious York Minster. Also the Brontë village in Haworth, where I have been several times. Chinese are familiar with the Brontë sisters and find it fascinating to visit the parsonage where they grew up. China has more and more affluent individual travellers, they are the ones who appreciate boutique hotels, fine dining and really special experiences, such as hiking in the Yorkshire Dales. I think those kind of travellers would really enjoy the adventurous side of things. Can you describe a perfect visit to Yorkshire? It is difficult to nominate one place, as part of the appeal of Yorkshire is its variety, it has wild places, countryside, cultural attractions, seaside resorts and cities. One place that holds very fond memories is Whitby, for its fabulous light. I remember sitting by the harbour there once and, in the space of an hour, it went from sunshine, to cloud, to rain and back again. That is the reason the artist J.M.W. Turner found it so captivating. Whitby Abbey is special too. Another spot is Salts Mill, in Saltaire, where there is a fantastic collection of David Hockney paintings. I have never had a proper tour of Castle Howard, which they say is one of the most magnificent stately homes, or visited Fountains Abbey. There are many Yorkshire Dales hikes that we would like to do now that Hayley is older. But I think it is fair to say that I know Yorkshire pretty well, possibly better than any Vogue editor ever has!

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CITY BREAK Coast, countryside...AND cities...Yorkshire has it all in abundance. Heaps of heritage, stylish shopping, brilliant bars, cafÊ culture, meandering through museums and admiring the arts...step out in the county’s cities for a day trip or an overnight stay.

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Visit Hull the UK City Of Culture (before the title’s sent to Coventry in 2021). Look out for updates from its top entertainment and events venues, including the Bonus Arena with its colourful collection of world-class acts from the rescheduled Blossoms to Simply Red and although temporarily closed due to COVID-19, top theatre productions have also been rescheduled at the city’s multiaward-winning venues Hull New Theatre (following an extensive and impressive £16 million refurbishment) and Hull Truck Theatre, that will continue to present inspiring productions which reflect the diversity of modern Britain. Maritime history is abundant in Hull and a wander on the Fish Trail is a fun way to discover a unique piece of public art and to trawl the city centre catching sight of 41 fish, taking in the picturesque Old Town (left) and thriving Fruit Market (above) en route. You can’t miss The Deep (below), an incredible piece of aquarium architecture on the water’s edge and home to 5,000 animals, where conservation is ‘quay’. Stay at Hideout Apartment Hotel, beautiful boutique accommodation located in the heart of the historic Old Town and only a five minute mooch to Hull’s hot spots. Marvel at the magnificent Hull Minster steeped in heritage, combined with contemporary art installations. For overseas visitors there are frequent ferries to the Port of Hull.

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© Carl Milner

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HULL

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LEEDS

A cosmopolitan city, packed with cultural creativity, outstanding architecture, amazing arts, stylish shopping, excellent eateries and so much more. Look out for its world-class theatre productions planned post-pandemic from Opera North, Northern Ballet, West Yorkshire Playhouse, Phoenix Dance and many more. The city’s shopping is second to none and was described by The Lonely Planet Guide to Britain as the ‘Knightsbridge of the North’, consistently being ranked as one of the UK’s top five retail destinations. In 1996 the Harvey Nichols Leeds store was the first to open outside of London and is part of the incredibly impressive Victoria Quarter. For contemporary surroundings Trinity Leeds is a hub of excellent eateries and spectacular shopping under a giant glass roof. Leeds Corn Exchange (above) is full of quirky independent shops. While the majestic Grade I listed Kirkgate Market, built in 1857, on opening was the largest indoor market in Europe. It’s also the birthplace of one of Britain’s biggest global brands, Marks and Spencer. The city has a vibrant visual art scene with Leeds Art Gallery home to diverse collections and its neighbouring Henry Moore Institute is dedicated to celebrating historical and contemporary sculpture from across the world. With such an incredible range of museums the awardwinning Leeds City Museum has six galleries to visit, including; Life on Earth, Ancient Worlds and The Leeds Story. The Royal Armouries Museum, Britain’s national museum of arms and armour is home to many treasured objects including Henry VIII’s original suit of armour. There’s a wealth of wonderful hotels to stay at across the city, from the luxury boutique Dakota Hotel Leeds to The Queens Hotel located just outside Leeds Train station.

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WA K E F I E L D

From art to adventure, plus heaps of history and creativity to catch kids’ imaginations … wake up to Wakefield. Its picturesque landscapes have inspired great artists for centuries, so it’s no surprise that renowned sculptors Dame Barbara Hepworth and Henry Moore were both born here. Celebrate amazing art and impressive contemporary architecture with visits to The Hepworth Wakefield (right) and check out the worldclass work of local lad (grew up in Leeds) Damien Hirst at the sprawling and spectacular Yorkshire Sculpture Park (below), both multi-award-winning venues, showcasing top international artwork. Dig deep (140m underground) at the National Coal Mining Museum, head to National Trust Nostell and experience the grandeur of an impressive 18th century mansion set in gorgeous grounds with a tempting tearoom, or experience the fascinating conservation work of the medieval Pontefract Castle. Escape to Xscape for full-on adventure under one roof. Ski, snowboard, shop or sample the cinema, when you’ve worked up an appetite, grab a bite to eat. Step back in time and mosey around the museums for an educational trip down memory lane at Castleford

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Museum (Bronze Age to the present day), Pontefract Museum (archaeology, archives, decorative and applied art, fine art, photographs,social history) and Wakefield Museum (local history from prehistoric times onwards). Stay at the wonderful Waterton Park Hotel & Spa, a Georgian mansion, surrounded by its own lake, a backdrop of ancient woodland and a championship golf course.

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RIPON

London’s Daniel Defoe described Ripon Market Square as ‘the finest and most beautiful square that is to be seen of its kind in England’ and to this day the square remains the heart and soul of the city, with the hornblower still ‘setting the watch’ every evening around 9pm, a tradition said to have originally started back in 886. The spectacular 7th Century Ripon Cathedral (below) dominates the skyline and if it’s history you’re after, then a visit to the city’s marvellous museums is a must. For a feel of life in Ripon in times past, head to the Workhouse Museum and Garden (for the grimmest of Victorian life),

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SHEFFIELD

© Grantley Hall/Jack Hardy

the Prison and Police Museum (a history of Yorkshire policing from Anglo-Saxon times to the formation of professional policing, plus crime and punishment with hands-on activities imagining the horror of the Victorian prison regime) and the Courthouse Museum (an elegant Georgian property which remains virtually unchanged since built in 1830). Stay at The Royal Oak, a renovated 18th century coaching inn right in the centre of the historic city. A short drive away is the world-class Grantley Hall (right), an idyllic indulgent experience with its spectacular spa and wellness facilities, luxury gym, fine restaurants and sumptuous suites set in gorgeous grounds.

Steal some time to visit ‘Steel City’. Sheffield gained its international reputation for steel production in the 19th century and its population boomed during the Industrial Revolution. Although many may still think of Sheffield as an industrial hub, it’s actually one of the greenest cities in the UK. Staggering statistics show that Sheffield has the highest ratio of trees to people in Europe, with over two million across the city. Sport and the outdoors score high here, with Sheffield United Football Club back in the premier league. Have an action packed break in the home of The Blades, stay at the Copthorne Hotel Bramall Lane close to the heart of the city and enjoy a drink and bite to eat at Riverside Kelham, just outside Sheffield’s centre. Open seven days a week and passionate about catering to your every need, from a pint or a gin and tonic (right) in the beer garden on a sunny evening to a Sunday roast by the fire on a winter’s day. Brocco on the park is brilliant for a boutique hotel break and you can take a stroll through the picturesque Sheffield Botanical Gardens. City stays can be combined with more of the outdoors in a full-on activity weekend, add parasailing, boat hire, running, walking, climbing, horse riding and paragliding in the nearby countryside, part of the Peak District National Park (right).

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YO R K

Centuries of fascinating folklore, impressive history, amazing architecture and now named the greenest city in the UK. Researchers looked at the nation’s eco-friendly habits and discovered York was the best! With many of its most iconic attractions reopen post-pandemic, surely now is the perfect time to plan a visit. Marvel at York Minster (left), one of the most impressive and largest of its kind in Northern Europe, with its Great East Window being the biggest medieval stained glass window in Britain. Indulge in York’s Chocolate Story, take a trip on the river with City Cruises York, explore the Museum Gardens or take a city sightseeing tour on an open top bus. The JORVIK Viking Centre can take you back to discover a time past on the streets of York. World-renowned artist Van Gogh’s work can be seen in the spectacular Van Gogh: The Immersive Experience at York St Mary’s. Pop into the historic Mansion House and then step across the street to sample delicious delicacies at Bettys Café Tearoom. Wander around the York City Walls for spectacular views across the city and amble down the Shambles for shopping in one of the country’s most spectacular streets, amongst overhanging timber-framed buildings dating back to the fourteenth century. The National Railway Museum is home to some of the world’s most impressive locomotives and excellent examples of engineering. For the more adventurous, take a trip through Europe’s most haunted city on The Original Ghost Walk or head down into the York Dungeon...if you DARE! Ideal for Halloween. Top nosh is available at a whole host of impressive eateries across the city. Overlooking the river is The Star Inn the City, serving fantastic food. In 2019 three independent York restaurants, Skosh, Le Cochon Aveugle and Roots (top right) made it into the top 100 UK restaurants in the Estelle Damm National Restaurant Awards. Approaching November 5th, Bonfire Night, and remembering York’s notoriously famous plotter Guido Fawkes, stay or dine at The Guy Fawkes Inn a medieval marvel in the shadow of York Minster, also in the shadow of the magnificent Minster is Grays Court, a spectacular setting for a break away. Or step outside York Railway Station and step into the very grand The Grand Hotel (left).

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BRADFORD

It’s no surprise that the cosmopolitan city of Bradford is bidding to be the 2025 City of Culture. With a wealth of world-renowned arts venues, museums, award-winning parks, world-class food and so much more to offer. From the Brontës to Hockney, the UNESCO World Heritage Site of Saltaire (right) and being the world’s first UNESCO City of Film, plus it boasts stunning historic buildings and theatres which have hosted such greats as Bowie and Dickens, its culture and creative legacy is outstanding. There are art galleries, concert halls and where else has been awarded Britain’s Curry Capital six years in a row? Top TV and fabulous films have been shot here amongst its amazing architecture, from Gentleman

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B R A D F O R D H A S A W E A LT H O F WO R L D - R E N OW N E D ARTS VENUES, MUSEUMS & AWA R D - W I N N I N G PA R K S .

Jack, Peaky Blinders and Victoria to The King’s Speech, Official Secrets and Downton Abbey, plus so much more. Take a short train ride from the city centre to Saltaire, a village with cobbled streets, canal barges, independent shops and restaurants serving delicious delicacies, plus the magnificent Salts Mill (left), home to Hockney galleries, stylish stores and excellent eateries. Bradford’s Industrial Museum has a motorbike ridden by man of the moment and This Is Y star Captain Sir Tom Moore on display. The international hero and local lad rode it competitively in his younger years. You can visit the city centre’s National Science and Media Museum to see a whole host of excellent exhibitions from days gone by to the present day, in a venue with spectacular views across Bradford. Haworth on the outskirts of this great city was home to the world-renowned literary legends The Brontë sisters (Charlotte, Emily and Anne) and their home the Brontë Parsonage Museum now reopened to the public, has a special exhibition dedicated to youngest sibling Anne in her bicentenary year (200 years since her birth). Hike, as the Brontes would have done up to Top Withens, said to be the inspiration for Emily Brontë’s Wuthering Heights or wander down the steep, cobbled main street lined with tempting tearooms, sweet shops and cute cottage stores to the heritage Keighley and Worth Valley Railway, celebrating the 50th anniversary of the film The Railway Children, the location for the 1970’s classic film and offering ‘Back in Steam’ special rides. The spa town of Ilkley is on the doorstep with the colossal Cow and Calf Rocks (above) nestled on the surrounding moorland of this stunning town offering stylish shopping, brilliant bars and restaurants, a Bettys Café Tea Room and spectacular walks along the riverside or across the majestic moors. Ilkley Manor House has an ‘Inside Out’ series of podcasts and self-guided walks.

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YO R K S H I R E Q U I Z

LET’S GET QUIZZICAL Time to test your Yorkshire knowledge with another 20 in 2020. Find out how much you know about the county that gave us Captain Tom Moore, Captain Cook and caps ‘n’ whippets...captivating!

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1 Sir Michael Parkinson interviewed thousands of the world’s most famous, from Mohammad Ali to Dame Edna Everage. In which Yorkshire town did he grow up?

5 St. Mary’s Church in Beverley has a carving which is reported to be the inspiration for a character in Lewis Carroll’s Alice in Wonderland. Which character?

2 In 2019 a famous North Yorkshire historic building celebrated its 950th anniversary. Which building was it?

6 A famous steam locomotive was built in Doncaster in 1922-3. What is its name?

3 Pontefract is famous for its Pontefract cakes. What is its main ingredient? 4 Nicola Adams is officially GB’s most successful female boxer. In which Yorkshire city was she born?

7 The Times Beach of the Year is in Yorkshire. Which stunning bay is it in? 8 Yorkshire is home to England’s largest single drop waterfall. What is its name? 9 A picturesque coastal town is celebrated as Britain’s first ever ‘seaside resort’? Where is it?

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10 Yorkshire boasts two UNESCO World Heritage Sites. Can you name them?

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11 Born in Sheffield, the first British astronaut and first woman to visit the Mir Space Station in 1991. What is her name? 12 Daniel Defoe’s fictional castaway Robinson Crusoe set sail from a Yorkshire dock on 1st September 1651. Where is it? 13 Ed Sheeran spent his early years in the pretty Yorkshire town of Hebden Bridge. Which Yorkshire town was he born? 14 Yorkshire is home to the Captain Cook Memorial Museum. Where is it?

© National Trust images

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ANSWERS: BARNSLEY • SELBY ABBEY • LIQUORICE • LEEDS WHITE RABBIT • FLYING SCOTSMAN • RUNSWICK BAY HARDRAW FORCE • SCARBOROUGH • SALTAIRE, FOUNTAINS ABBEY & STUDLEY ROYAL WATER GARDEN • HELEN SHARMAN • HULL HALIFAX • WHITBY • AMY JOHNSON • THE MAN BEHIND THE CURTAIN 1982 • AYSGARTH FALLS • RHUBARB • SIR BEN KINGSLEY

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15 A pioneering female flying legend was born in Hull on 1st July 1903. What is her name? 16 Leeds city centre is home to a Michelin starred restaurant. Do you know its name? 17 Harrogate hosted the Eurovision Song Contest? Which year was it? 18 Robin Hood Prince of Thieves was the second highest-grossing film of 1991. Name the stunning natural Yorkshire landmark where scenes were shot featuring actor Kevin Costner?

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19 A celebrated ‘triangle’ in West Yorkshire is famous for harvesting a particular vegetable. What’s it called? 20 A Yorkshire born (Snainton) actor won the Best Actor Oscar for playing the lead role in the multi-award-winning 1982 film Gandhi. Who is he?

Answers at the top of this page (no cheating!)

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TELEVISION

LIGHTS CAMERA YO R K S H I R E Fifty years ago Alf Wight (aka James Herriot) released his first book, If Only they Could Talk, based on his life as a vet in the Yorkshire Dales. Herriot’s tales from the Dales have sold 80 million copies worldwide and a hit TV series started in the 70s. Fast-forward and settle down... as All Creatures Great and Small, a brand new Channel 5 TV adaptation of heart-warming stories, breathtaking views, animal antics, Dales drama and farmyard fun is coming your way. Carolyn Nicoll caught up with its stellar cast to find out more.

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This page: Nicholas Ralph as James Herriot.

NICHOLAS RALPH (JA M E S H E R R I OT ) Talking from a film set in Bulgaria, Nicholas Ralph chats about his first screen role playing Yorkshire’s favourite and most famous vet. I’d never come across James Herriot or All Creatures Great and Small before. When the script came through I thought the writing was incredible and felt an instant connection with the character. My parents knew of the 1970s show, but my uncle is a massive fan of the books and as a boy had read them all. He lived near Alf Wight’s veterinary practice and when I told him about the audition he hit the roof (in a good way) ...and that was just the audition. He was beside himself when I got the role.

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James’ character is funny, lovable, charming and slightly awkward. His compassion for the animals and his passion for his field and his intelligence are all traits you can’t not like. There are similarities, in that I studied like James in Glasgow, and we both travelled to Yorkshire for our first ‘Herriot’ jobs, so it was like art imitating life. My first day on set was with Sam (West) who was lovely and helpful from the first second. I’d ask him questions all of the time, he is such a well renowned actor, he keeps you on your toes. Callum (Tristan) and I hit it off straight away. James and Tristan are best pals in the show and he was so much fun to be around on set. Cal is a comic genius, his timing and the choices he makes are amazing, but also his physical comedy is absolutely brilliant. The casting in this show is so on point. We’d film 50/60 hours each week and then go out for dinner together because we all got on so well. Luckily we managed to get everything shot just before lockdown. This has been a pretty huge opportunity for me playing such an iconic role. The world of James Herriot is absolutely massive and is still thriving today. Big shoes to fill and of course the nerves that go with it, but the overriding emotion is excitement. I have huge respect for the production vet Andy Barrett and the animal handlers who worked on the show. They are the pros. I would ask them everything, even down to the most minute details. There was no holding back, Callum (Tristan), Rachel (Helen) and myself were taken to meet cows, horses, sheep and we were straight in there in wellies and vet coats getting up close and personal with the animals. We were taking the cow’s heartbeat and there is a triangle that you go through from stomach to lungs to heart, you check those three points … and we did. The weather for the first weeks of filming was amazing but then then the Yorkshire winter came and being outside was sometimes tricky. One morning in particular when it was raining and I was measuring ponies with this big stick slipping around, taking me forever, I was shivering from the cold until they shouted ‘action’ and then I had to pretend to be cool. As soon as they said cut I was shivering again and wrapping up in my big, warm coat.

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TELEVISION

Before the show I thought the animals would be the challenge but because the handlers and the people who looked after them and trained them were so incredible that, for the vast majority of the time, it went off without a hitch which was pleasantly surprising. Look out for gorgeous George, as we all called him, the Golden Retriever in the show (plays Jess) who was my buddy and just delightful. Driving vintage cars took a bit of getting used to, but they were fantastic and you couldn’t get me out of them. In the Vauxhall the gear stick was like the ones on a school bus, jangling about, it was like I was never really quite sure if I’d hit a gear or not. It is a guessing game at the start, you throw it in a direction and hope something sticks. I’m from the Highlands of Scotland which is picturesque, but when I got on the train and I was travelling through The Dales for the first time, much like James did, my eyes were glued to the window because it is like a beautiful painting. You could literally film 360 degrees. Every time we went to a new location, whether it be Broughton Hall or Ripon Racecourse or The Dales, we would look around and think how incredible.

Above: Rachel Shenton as Helen Anderson.

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IT IS LIKE A B E A U T I F U L PA I N T I N G , YO U C O U L D L I T E R A L LY FILM 360 DEGREES.

R AC H E L S H E N TO N (HELEN ANDERSON) Oscar-winning Rachel Shenton talks Helen, Herriot, vintage style and a bit of ‘bull’! I had read in the script that Helen heroically wrangles Clive...he’s a bull...and I thought ‘oh my goodness, how am I ever going to be able to do this?’ I had never been up close and personal with a bull, so I asked to meet Clive before I shot the scene. He has a better CV than mine, he’s been in everything. I went to visit him in the field and called my mum afterwards to tell her that his head was the size of my car bonnet. He is huge, but has a real gentleness about him. Clive has been hand reared which is why he is so good around people and completely unfazed by the cameras. What I love about Helen is what I learned from meeting the real-life Helen’s (Joan Danbury Wight) children, Rosie and Jim; that she is mischievous and fun loving in spite of having been through some really tough times. They shared

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SAMUEL WEST ( S I E G R I E D FA R N O N ) From a family of acting royalty (mum Prunella Scales and dad Timothy West), Samuel plays Siegfried Farnon, the unpredictable veterinary surgeon and proprietor of Skeldale House who reluctantly hires the recently qualified Herriot to join his rural practice.

with us some stories that you couldn’t glean from books or from visiting a museum. Stories about their parents and what they were like together which was very insightful. Helen has the best wardrobe, bar none. Ros (Little) and the wonderful costume department did an amazing job. She was the first woman in her village to ever wear trousers and in 1937 that was pretty bold. Helen loves her dungarees and corduroys and two pieces. She has serious style for a farmer’s daughter, practical chic. She is on the back of tractors and wrangling bulls and moving cattle around and you can’t be doing that in a dress. The first encounter with James, Helen is bemused and intrigued. Having grown up in Darrowby she is aware of the village and its people, and James is very new and fresh. You would never know it was Nick’s first TV job. There is a real easiness to him and he brings that to his character. It sounds corny but we couldn’t have wished for a better team on this show. It has been a dream job for me. I had tractor lessons and in one scene I’m driving the tractor across the fields but I had no idea when to stop, so kept going, and going, I almost ended up out of Yorkshire. I also got to drive vintage cars, met all sorts of amazing animals and I did it all with the backdrop of the Yorkshire Dales, which is such an epic scene, it is like a character in itself. Oh, and I got to go to the amazing Keelham Farm Shop in Skipton.

I read several of Herriot’s books when I was young and loved them, they are beautifully written and very funny. An extraordinary ubication of a time, of a place and community. The role of Siegfried really appealed to me. We have a great tradition of eccentrics in this country which other countries tend to look on as sort of mad, but when I worked with Andy Barrett, the vet on set, who had worked for Donald Sinclair (the real Siegfried), and in fact lent me his hoof knife for our very first scene, I said to him ‘was he eccentric?’ and he said ‘no, he was mad.’ Speaking to Rosie and Jim, Alf Wight’s children, made me think there is a real person in there. They told me he got bored during a dinner party once and picked up a double barrelled shotgun and blasted it into the wall to make people go home. So I thought, ‘yeah, I like this man.’ There are also emotional blockages there, he has lost his wife and he is not over that, he has a war record which made him like animals more than people, a lot of people came back from the war not wanting to talk about it. He doesn’t have any children, but James quite quickly becomes the son he never had and his brother Tristan is much younger and he has a paternal relationship to him as well. I really liked the fact that Siegfried talks to the mother cow in the very first episode in a way that we wouldn’t have expected of him. We think he might have trouble saying something like that to a child or lover but to talk in that generous, loving, comforting way to a cow, I thought was a real window into his character.

Images: James Herriot (Nicholas Ralph) and Helen Anderson (Rachel Shenton), Helen in the kitchen, Siegfried Farnon (Samuel West).

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As part of our research we went to see some horses because Siegfried is a very good horse vet and I listened to a horse’s heartbeat which only beats between 30-40 times a minute which seems so slow. It was an incredible moment. We met a man who breeds race horses (super models of the equine world) and I was absolutely dazzled by them all. I was shown how to check horses teeth, you open the horse’s mouth, grab the tongue which is pretty messy, and moved it out of the way to look at the teeth. I had to hold the tongue! I was really taken with all the horses on set. I ride very little and never kept the practice up. They are so much more civilised and beautiful than humans are. But the animal I asked for who we didn’t film with is a rat. I am a big fan of rats and they have promised there will be one next series if we go again.

Left: Samuel West as Siegfried Farnon. Right: James Herriot (Nicholas Ralph) and Helen Anderson (Rachel Shenton).

The animals and the Dales are the real stars. This is about a very hard, quite remote community which is a collective and which has to work like one. It is suspicious about outsiders but when they prove themselves it welcomes them. And it is about a time in British history where there wasn’t a lot of money around, and people were more community based and I think we need that. There are many reasons why it shines with something deeper than just a lovely hour of TV which people can laugh at and enjoy, although of course it is that as well. My first 24 hours with Nicholas Ralph (James) as he learned the ropes because it was his first screen job, I absolutely lauded it over him and pointed out everything I could about the filming process that he didn’t understand. And by the end of the 24 hours he was as happy as a clam and everything was second nature to him. I think it is a wonderful performance of a really true and likeable actor… he has great charisma and is a real star who I love working with. I lived in Yorkshire when I was Artistic Director of The Crucible in Sheffield and my aunt still lives there. My dad (Timothy West) was born in Bradford and my mum’s (Prunella Scales) mum was too so I have quite strong family connections with Yorkshire. The Dales I knew less well than the moors for trainspotting and bird watching reasons but what an extraordinarily beautiful part of the country. I do feel that putting yourself in it and realising that some of these outposts have been here for centuries, well you start to develop roots not just feet.

C A L LU M WO O D H O U S E ( T R I S TA N FA R N O N ) No stranger to working with animals (The Durrells), actor Callum Woodhouse is at it again! I absolutely love animals and I don’t think it is a coincidence that the two big TV jobs I have been on have both been animal centred. The Durrells was exotic, crazy animals, lemurs and pelicans, this time it’s cows and goats. Any scene you see me in with George, our Golden Retriever (who plays Jess), that is me asking to have him in the scene with me because I love him so much.

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Images: Callum Woodhouse as Tristan Farnon, Nicholas Ralph as James Herriot.

YO U W I L L WAT C H T H E F I R S T E P I S O D E A N D WA N T T O V I S I T T H E DA L E S .

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There were about five dogs I wanted to take home with me. George was one of them, of course. Ruby was a Labrador who you’d walk over to and straight away she’d be on her back wanting you to rub her belly, which was the sweetest thing in the world. Then there was also a sausage dog called Frankums who Siegfried and Tristan operate on and who was absolutely gorgeous. Finally, there was Sheila this Alsatian. The final shot in one of the episodes was probably my favourite scene I have ever shot in my life – it is literally a close up on my face being licked to pieces by this beautiful dog. It was heaven. Tristan is a bit of a wild card. He fits nicely with the other characters because James is very straight-laced and Siegfried is very eccentric and serious about his work, whereas Tristan is all about having a good time. He would much rather quickly get through a veterinary case so he can get to the pub, have a few pints and chat up a barmaid. After the first day on set Nick (James) and I went for a drink and we were both buzzing to be on the job. As it was his first TV role, I recalled my first day of The Durrells, small things like not knowing that all the catering was free. We really got on well on and off screen. Everyone on set kept saying they couldn’t believe this was his first role, he took to it like a duck to water. As for the characters of Tristan and James, they take a little longer to warm to each other. At the start of episode two when Tristan returns to Skeldale House from Edinburgh he is a little put out by James because he is sleeping in his bed and Tristan has been relegated to what is essentially the broom closet. All of the moments though where Tristan is laughing at something James has done are completely real, that’s literally me just laughing at Nick. Luckily Tristan is allowed to laugh at people because I really couldn’t help it. Some of the shots of Yorkshire are so beautiful and you have never seen England look more picturesque and since we have all been locked inside people will really love seeing that on screen. You will watch the first episode and want to visit The Dales. It is stunning. Every morning on the drive to work I was meant to be going over my lines but I could never take my eyes from the window.

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Clockwise from left: Anna Madeley as housekeeper Mrs Hall, Dales scenery, filming in Grassington. James Herriot (Nicholas Ralph) chats to Helen (Rachel Shenton).

ANNA MADELEY (MRS HALL) Anna plays housekeeper extraordinaire Mrs Hall, teasingly described by Siegfried as the ‘patron saint of lost causes’. I’ve filmed up in Yorkshire before along the coast, in Scarborough, but I didn’t know The Dales, so I was blown away when I saw the landscape. We were in shooting distance of Grassington and dotted about in little nooks, with lovely tea shops. It took a while to find what costume we wanted for Mrs Hall because she wears many hats. She’s not just doing the cooking and cleaning, she’s also opening the door, she’s answering the phone, she’s giving people cups of tea in the waiting room. However, she’s also a woman who cares about being presentable and cares about everything being clean. It was important to have that balance between the fact that she’s quite practical, but also having something that is quite easy to pop on every day. The clothes of that era don’t have any elasticity and so they do affect how you move. Astonishing really thinking about what it would have been like in the 30s without waterproofs. Although I had it quite easy as Mrs Hall works in the house most of the time, so I was pretty cosy back at Skeldale house!

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Am I an animal person? Personally the most exciting animal I ever got was a pet gerbil and I think the school guinea pig visited for the weekend at one point. Being on set with so many animals was quite funny at times with geese being too noisy and chickens that wouldn’t stop laying eggs in the background. I’d never driven into The Dales before. The journey from London up to Yorkshire is pretty epic, you find yourself in this vast landscape that’s just absolutely stunning. It really took my breath away; so beautiful in all weathers. You can sit on a stone wall and gaze at the views and never get bored. With drone technology we could capture the expansive landscape, its beauty and what that air might be like to breathe. When James is yelling in his car (in joy) at the end of episode one, you really can yell into that huge landscape and it can take you. It was strange going back to London after filming and into this crazy busy hubbub where I look out of my windows and there’s someone else’s window. I miss Yorkshire, that scale and the landscape.

Add: All Creatures Great and Small Tuesdays at 9pm on Channel 5 from 1st September.

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IT’S A

( G R E AT A N D )

SMALL WO R L D

It’s 2020, Bradford’s James Mason became chief executive of Welcome to Yorkshire, in the year that the county (and the world) celebrate the 50th anniversary of the legendary Yorkshire vet, Alf Wight aka James Herriot’s, bestselling books, including All Creatures Great and Small. So what’s the connection. Helen Leavey in’vet’stigates.

I Left: Rose Dawson (podcast episode 2) Voices from Herriot Country.

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hadn’t been out for a drink for months but had barely touched my glass of wine. It was resting on a table in a Dales pub garden, where I was coaxing a handful of people I’d just met into ‘singing’ the wellknown theme tune to the BBC’s classic TV series, All Creatures Great and Small.   James Mason, the boss of Welcome to Yorkshire, led the way. “Ready, guys?” he said, before everyone joined together and hummed that famous tune, which just about everyone in Britain over a certain age will have etched into their brain. I grinned as the song and laughter rang out. It was a lovely moment. I began to relax, and managed to take a gulp of my wine.   There was a reason I was singing with the regulars at The Old Horn Inn in the village of Spennithorne, near Leyburn. There was also a point to James being there. My colleague Simon Collins and I have been making a podcast, Voices from Herriot Country, that tries to recapture some of the spirit of the James Herriot books. We were interviewing James – Mason, not Herriot – for one of our episodes because he has a personal link to All Creatures Great and Small. The humming would add a little extra spice to the audio.

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James Mason reminiscing about his role in the original All Creatures Great and Small with local George Tunstall and below James in his current role as CEO at Welcome to Yorkshire

I’m a former BBC journalist and became interested in James Herriot and his Yorkshire a couple of years ago when I ghost wrote the life story of Peter Wright, one of the stars of the Channel 5 series, The Yorkshire Vet. For years, Peter worked with a certain Alf Wight in Thirsk. Alf, of course, is the real name of James Herriot. Peter would watch with bemusement when scores of fans queued up outside the veterinary practice hoping to meet their literary hero.   The Herriot books and TV series were, and are, world famous. My late father, a quiet, dog-loving suburban southerner who rarely read anything but a newspaper, would sit in his armchair laughing at Herriot’s beautifullytold based-on-reality books about life as a rural vet. The books were also enjoyed by me and millions of others, including the Queen. Herriot’s stories were turned into two films and the aforementioned BBC TV series; a new Channel 5 version is being shown now. 25 years after his death, Herriot is still a giant magnet, pulling in visitors to the Thirsk area – his home and workplace for decades – and the Dales, where the TV series was set.   Filmmaker Simon and I (both in York) regularly work together and we’d been thinking about making a podcast. When we realised that in 2020 it would be 50 years since the first Herriot book was published, we decided to mark the anniversary with Voices from Herriot Country, bringing what we hoped would be heart-warming tales from 21st

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Alfiya Stephenson (podcast episode 4) Voices from Herriot Country

century Yorkshire characters to what we hoped would be a fascinated public. Our first interview was with Chris Greensit, an 85-year-old farmer, taking place on a rainy autumn day last year. Over the following months Simon and I visited magical spots, talked to endearing people who could have walked straight from the pages of a Herriot book, drank lots of tea and ate many scones. Then came a virus, and lockdown. We released five episodes, asking listeners to consider a donation to the NHS. As the weeks went by we clocked thousands of listens, across the UK and around the world, from Sweden and Italy to Australia and America. Even China.    Several interviewees, including The Owl Lady and The Carpet Man, knew Alf Wight personally. But not all of them. Alfiya Stephenson, episode four’s Lady With a Tale of a Donkey, is from the mountains of the former Soviet Union and never met the vet-turned-author. She knows Herriot well though, through his stories and Thirsk’s World of James Herriot visitor attraction, where she’s been a tour guide for Russian visitors.    Like Alfiya, James (Mason) has no direct connection to the writer. He grew up in Bradford, born in 1978, eight years after the first book hit the shelves. But he does have a connection to the original TV series All Creatures Great and Small. That was why we were with him at the pub and also why we initially met him that July evening at the cricket ground down the lane. He’d last been there in 1989. 

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“Just being here is quite emotional,” said James, when our socially-distanced introductions on the gorgeously green but empty pitch were over. “I remember I was crying my eyes out. I remember that tree. I remember the tiny little narrow road there. We could be in the 40s, 50s or 60s, couldn’t we? It hasn’t changed. It’s timeless.” I’d first contacted James in April, asking if he’d listen to Voices from Herriot Country. His quick reply explained he had a keen interest because in 1989 he’d been in All Creatures Great and Small, in an episode called Big Fish Little Fish. “I spent two months of a glorious summer in Robert Hardy’s company. A great man and great company,” James said of the Shakespearean actor who played vet Siegfried Farnon, based on Alf Wight’s colleague Donald Sinclair. James agreed to be interviewed. Then we just had to decide where, and when, to meet; his schedule in a role he’d only begun in January (“the greatest job on the planet”) was hectic, evolving from promoting Yorkshire to also trying to save its tourism industry from the side effects of Covid-19.     In the meantime, I found a DVD of the All Creatures episode and watched a fresh-faced James playing farmer’s son Colin Appleby. One of his goldfish had died so he’d asked Siegfried for advice. Soon Colin was accompanying him on his rounds, learning about farm animals’ ailments then watching the vet deal with an amiable ferret and

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Farmer Chris Greensit (podcast episode 1) Voices from Herriot Country

its irritable owner back in the surgery. There Colin was introduced to the TV version of James Herriot, played by Christopher Timothy. James spent many happy days filming in the Dales with Robert Hardy and staying in the Grade II listed Golden Lion in Leyburn. He also filmed in TV studios in Birmingham.   Back at the cricket ground, next to a tractor and a field of sheep, James’ childhood memories were flooding back. He’d been crying, he explained, because it was the last day of filming, then described how he’d fallen into acting. He was reading a comic, waiting for his sisters to finish their dance class, when a casting director spotted him and asked him to try for a role in a beef burger advert. His reluctance was overcome by the £100 on offer. “I had my eye on a snooker table that cost £80,” laughed James. He got the part, and others followed; soon he had an agent.   He said All Creatures Great and Small was his biggest experience as a child actor. He recalled putting on an “exaggerated” Yorkshire accent and having a “basin” haircut. He also saw men wearing make-up; Robert Hardy had “little red cheeks”. Robert and James often talked in the car when they were being filmed from a distance. “The director said to chat amongst ourselves so I got to know Robert,” said James. In 1989 the older actor, who died in 2017, was in his 60s. He was “very kind” and interested in his young co-star so James asked him questions too. “He was an archer, longbow archery, I was fascinated by that; there was this other side to him. He was a lovely man, very open with everyone.”   The All Creatures episode and James’ role as Colin ended at the cricket pitch because there was also a cricket storyline. George Tunstall, who grew up in the 1940s a few miles from Spennithorne, is a long-time supporter of the club. As he’d also taken part in the BBC’s filming, playing an umpire and marking out the ground, I’d invited him to meet us. He and James were soon reminiscing.     George remembered huge amounts of food provided by the crew in a village hall and James and actor/comedian

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Duggie Brown, who played Colin Appleby’s father, carving their names on the cricket pavilion. George also said Robert Hardy delayed filming for hours one day. “He was too hot, so sat under a tree.”   There was no singing or humming in this instance. Instead, I pulled out two copies of a script I’d typed out from the All Creatures episode and invited James and George to re-enact a scene. Then, on a golden summer’s evening, on a picture-postcard cricket pitch, James once again played young Colin Appleby, saying goodbye to vet Siegfried Farnon - played by George - at the end of a cricket match. “We’re off ‘ome now, Mr Farnon,” said James. “Are you Colin?” said George. “Thank you for all your help. I’d never have got through all my rounds without you.” “It were smashing,” said James. “I can’t remember last time I ‘ad such a great day.”

D I S COV E R Follow The Herriot Trail and visit Wensleydale, Swaledale and Wharfedale to discover the charming villages, historic landmarks and dramatic landscapes that inspired the James Herriot stories. Listen to James Mason in episode six - The Child Actor - and other episodes of Voices from Herriot Country, on iTunes, Soundcloud, Spotify or Google. Podcast produced by Mek It Media. https://podcasts.apple.com/gb/podcast/voices-fromherriot-country/id1506064954 https://soundcloud.com/user-127319777

The World of James Herriot The fabulous fully restored 1940s home and surgery, where Alf Wight (James Herriot) lived and worked as a young North Yorkshire vet.

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HOME TEAM One thing’s for sure, after weeks of lockdown there’s no better feeling for hoteliers than to be throwing open their doors again and welcoming visitors back. For guests, it’s looking forward to a well-earned break from the confinements of those familiar four walls of home. So from a first time seaside opening to a well-established country house reopening its estate, here’s a taste of time away. 44

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WHITBY WEEKEND BY HELEN STURGEON I thought I’d had my share of lifechanging experiences, and then Covid-19 arrived, and it felt like the world was at its mercy. Life as we knew it changed with words like “furlough” and “pandemic” becoming part of everyday life. Working from home, washing your hands at every opportunity and social distancing was the new norm. So, when lockdown lifted and I had the chance to escape, I needed one thing; the sea and all its sensory qualities. After feeling so trapped and cooped up I needed the sound of the tide to fill my ears, the smell of the salt, the sea air in my lungs and even just the sight of the vast waves, reassuring me that I was no longer sitting on my laptop at my kitchen table. I live about 75 miles inland, so the seaside for me is still novel. Whitby has long been one of my favourite places on the Yorkshire Coast and I’ve stayed there many times. I went

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searching for something new, and boy did I find it; welcome to the Jet Black Jewel on Skinner Street, Whitby’s newest boutique hotel. I hurriedly booked 2 nights last minute for my husband and I, not realising we would be their first paying guests on opening weekend. My initial thought was “who opens a new hotel during a global pandemic, in one of the most popular holiday destinations in the UK?!” I was intrigued, excited, and a teeny bit apprehensive. But to be honest I was just happy to be getting in the car and actually going somewhere. Even the petrol station felt new! Coming over the moors and seeing Whitby nestled in its romantic, isolated peninsula, I already start to feel better. As the clouds cleared, my mood brightened as the sun twinkled on the sea. We came in on West Cliff, stopped at the Whale Bones for the obligatory selfie, then headed to Skinner Street. The Jet Black Jewel occupies what used to

be Scarborough Council offices, an underrated double-fronted, 3-storey building on Whitby’s West side. The creative signage draws you in and the ground floor has been sympathetically restored into a beautiful space for a café bar. The bare brick and original stained glass windows add to its appeal and we were keen to get inside and have a nose around. Currently the café remains closed, but I’m excited to see what the future holds for this creative, social space. The contactless check-in is easy to use, and a genius idea especially during the current climate while we’re all trying to be safe. We entered the bright clean hallway and headed upstairs. There are 9 bespoke bedrooms, all lovingly designed and finished with an individual theme in mind. When designing around a theme, there is a fine line between quirky and tacky. But the Jet Black Jewel have nailed it. Inspirational, imaginative, and boutique all the way.

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I N S P I R AT I O N

Top to bottom: Newly opened Jet Black Jewel Hotel Whitby.

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Not only does each room have its own story to tell, but there is the usual finishing touches you’d expect to find in boutique accommodation, really comfy beds, fluffy white towels, great soap and tea & coffee. My favourite part is a little black book illustrated by the artist responsible for the impressive wall art. Guests are expected to take the book home and I enthusiastically encourage everyone to do this. It’s a really thoughtful finishing touch to your experience. The book told me so much more about Whitby’s peculiar history and legends and it explains the inspiration behind the bedrooms. We stayed in the “Penny Hedge” room which is inspired by a local ceremony from centuries ago which Whitby still celebrates today. St Hilda’s Suite and the Maharaja Suite are the largest rooms and both on the third floor with those much-coveted sea views across Whitby and the Abbey. After reading the black book, I became quite obsessed with the Maharaja of Mulgrave…East meets West Cliff! You might be in Whitby, but once you imagine the Maharaja’s elephants promenading to Sands End, your imagination sweeps you back in time. Even the sound of the seagulls faded, as I fell asleep in my big comfy bed, imagining the elephants, the Far East and all its mystery. I took a moment to really appreciate being in a hotel by the sea. A little normality in the most surreal of times. It’s no secret that here at Welcome to Yorkshire, we’ve suffered in the wake of COVID-19 along with so many fellow businesses. The staff here truly love Yorkshire, we care about Yorkshire and its success. It’s our passion. We’ve seen businesses suffer tremendous loss. The redundancies, the closures, the lives lost. As we celebrate Yorkshire’s glory, in turn we feel it’s heartbreak. But we’ve also witnessed tourism survive. Not as it was, but it’s alive and clinging to the rocks. So, imagine if you will, my elation when I heard about a new hotel opening. What a time to open a hotel. The Jet Black Jewel is a credit to the owner’s tenacious determination. A perfect example of Yorkshire true grit. It’s clear to see the love poured in to the details, the finishing touches, the time spent restoring the building and the very bones of the hotel. Being by the sea, eating fish & chips and marvelling at the thought of elephants on the beach has lit the fuse in my imagination. My weekend at the Jet Black Jewel inspired me. It quashed my bleak mood and replaced it with one of hope. Hope for businesses, hope for people and hope for Yorkshire. Guess which room I’ll be staying in next time? Namaste Yorkshire.

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Top to bottom: Top to bottom: Amazing accommodation & delicious dining at Middleton Lodge in Richmondshire.

RURAL RETREAT BY CAROLYN NICOLL Middleton Lodge, an impressive Georgian countryside estate in Richmondshire, North Yorkshire, had been on my ‘rural retreat radar’ as a place to stay for some months, when I booked a night away there for my husband and I to celebrate our wedding anniversary in February. However, the planned weekend didn’t quite go to plan, as we packed our bags the heavens quite literally opened and the rain came, and came, not just a shower but torrential downpours (quite unprecedented and pretty biblical to be honest), floods were forecast and roads became rivers. So the wonderful weekend was put on hold and rearranged, the month of March was now to be the time for our rural relaxation, delicious dining and woodland walks. Fast-forward to the end of March and life as we knew it went into full lockdown as pandemic pandemonium prevailed and the coronavirus crisis created a catastrophe across the county, the country and the globe (quite

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unprecedented and pretty biblical to be honest). Jump forward to July and third time lucky we made it to Middleton Lodge, as lockdown was starting to lift. The experience couldn’t have been more enjoyable and anyone with any slight apprehension about venturing away can be reassured that the team had pretty much thought of everything, from a contactless check-in at the gatehouse, to staff being masked at all times, hand sanitisers positioned around the place, plus amazing accommodation with separate entrances for each property. We stayed in the delightful Dairy 3, a stunning suite with the biggest copper bath I’d ever seen. The Coach House restaurant offered a mouth-watering menu and distanced seating inside, plus a vast outdoor dining area amongst gorgeous grounds. There are bikes to ride around pretty paths, woodland walkways and a wonderful walled garden, a complete carpet of colour, brimming with beautiful blooms. A blissful break away.

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A L E AG U E OF THEIR OW N Exciting times past and ahead for Rugby League in the county, as the great game, founded in Yorkshire 125 years ago, looks forward to the opening of a dedicated museum and prepares for the 2021 Rugby League World Cup. Alice Bailey touches on the sport’s amazing achievements and groundbreaking goals going ‘prop’ forward.

A

round 57 million people travel around the country to see their favourite sport or watch their team play each year. With day trips and overnight stays, they put more than 2.8 billion into the English economy alone. A good chunk of that cash ends up in Yorkshire with world-class cricket, Premier League football and of course our home-grown sport: Rugby League. COVID-19 permitting the global spotlight will be on the county next year when it plays host to the 2021 Rugby League World Cup. 6 of the 18 host towns and cities are in Yorkshire, which is only fitting as the sport, which started in the county, has just celebrated its 125th anniversary. Debate still rages over the precise origins of the game of rugby. For many years William Webb Ellis was lauded as its inventor after claims he picked up a ball in a football game at Rugby public school and ran with it in the 1820s. To this day the trophy awarded to the winner of the men’s Rugby World Cup, the premier international

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rugby union competition, bears his name, despite most historians now agreeing it was probably an early example of spinning a PR story rather than a rugby ball. What is more certain, is the origin of Rugby League and its proud roots in Yorkshire in 1895, but how and why did it happen? The rules of what we now know as football were formulated back in the 1860s but there were many different versions and some people weren’t happy with following the regulations set out with the founding of the Football Association in 1863. So, in 1871 a number of clubs playing the version of football favoured at Rugby School, which involved the handling of the ball, met to form the Rugby Football Union. Despite its roots in the privileged world of private education, Rugby was hugely popular in the north of England especially in Yorkshire and Lancashire where it was a largely a working-class game. This is where the problems started with a classic north south divide.

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Huddersfield v Halifax 1892 pre-rugby league credit: Huddersfield Rugby League Heritage

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Huddersfield Rugby League Heritage - Team of All Talents (1914) credit Kirklees Museums and Galleries collection

The Rugby Football Union was founded on principles of amateur sport and didn’t allow players to benefit financially. The RFU simply refused, saying ‘if men couldn’t afford to play, then they shouldn’t play at all’. While this was all well and good if your parents could afford the fees at an exclusive school like Rugby, it was very different for the many working class and often Northern players. These young men needed to work to earn a living. Not only did this mean they were less able to train, it also meant that they had to be more cautious on the pitch to avoid injury, which would mean they were not only unable to work but also incur the risk of costly medical bills. This meant many players and teams in Yorkshire and Lancashire simply weren’t able to reach their full potential, and more and more clubs wanted to compensate their players for time away from work and for any injuries. Tensions increased as did the severity of the punishments dished out to clubs for so called “broken time” payments they made to working players and in 1892, charges of professionalism were laid against rugby clubs in Bradford and Leeds. The following year clubs in Yorkshire complained that an over-representation of Southern clubs on the RFU committee, plus the fact that meetings were held in London meant that their voices weren’t being heard, and they were proved right when an attempt to allow these payments was voted down. And like the prefect Yorkshire cuppa – change was brewing – with plans for the northern rugby clubs to break away from the RFU and form their own professional league.

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On 27 August 1895, a number of prominent Lancashire clubs including Oldham, Rochdale St. Helens, Warrington and Wigan declared that they would support their Yorkshire colleagues in their proposal to form a Northern Union and 2 days later representatives of twenty-two clubs met in the George Hotel, Huddersfield to form the Northern Rugby Football Union. There were a number of changes made to the game which made it much more spectator friendly. The sport continued to increase in popularity and began to grow into the one we know and love to this day. And to make sure we continue to celebrate the sport’s birthplace there are now ambitious plans to create the first-ever National Rugby League Museum at the very site where the deal was done. Closed since 2013 The George Hotel has now been bought by Kirklees Council and will become the focal point of a multi-million-pound redevelopment of Huddersfield town centre. The council is partnering with the sports charity Rugby League Cares to deliver the project. It’s chairman Tim Adams MBE, said: “I am sure everyone in the sport will welcome this decision to establish the National RL Museum at the George Hotel…… a museum that will be the envy of sports around the world in a location that means so much to so many people.” Councillor Shabir Pandor, Leader of Kirklees Council, said “This is absolutely fantastic news and

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COAST

we’re really excited to get started and bring Rugby League home. It is so much more than a building to local people and to Rugby League fans across the world. This is where it all began for Rugby League and there is no better place to create a museum that celebrates and remembers the history of the game.” The announcement has been welcomed by the Chairman of the Rugby Football League, Simon Johnson “It is high time that there is a National Rugby League Museum to celebrate our sport’s rich heritage. How fitting then, that, as we celebrate the birth of our sport 125 years ago, the location of that radical meeting, the George Hotel in Huddersfield, should be the chosen location.” Work is due to start, aiming for an opening date early in 2024. But before then we can get our RL fix when World Cup games are played in Yorkshire next year in Doncaster, Leeds, Hull, Kirklees, Sheffield and York. It’s another historic Rugby League moment for the county as the pinnacle of men’s, women’s and wheelchair games all come together for the very first time. Criss-crossing crisscross moors, mountains, historic towns and buzzing metropolitan cities, RLWC2021 will showcase not just the sport but the diverse, welcoming culture and all Yorkshire has to offer.

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Above and below: The George Hotel Huddersfield

I T ’ S FA N TA S T I C . W E ’ R E R E A L LY E XC I T E D T O G E T S TA R T E D A N D B R I N G R U G BY L E AG U E

HOME.

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SPORT

W E LCO M I N G T H E WO R L D The Rugby League World Cup 2021 will be a breakthrough moment for Rugby League when the men’s, women’s and wheelchair games come together for the first time on the sport’s biggest stage. RLWC2021 will cross county, taking in towns and cities, showcasing a diverse, welcoming culture and all that England has to offer. The 32 teams competing across the three blue riband events will showcase not only the Northern Powerhouse but shine a light on Yorkshire – as a third of the host locations (6) are situated in the county. YO R K S H I R E ’ S R U G B Y L E AG U E WO R L D C U P HOST VENUES

DONCASTERI The historic market town of Doncaster is renowned for its rich railway heritage and its amazing architecture, particularly on the Great North Road. It has an original Roman wall, a Saxon church, Norman castles at Conisbrough and Tickhill; and a wealth of Georgian and Regency architecture reflecting the glory days of Doncaster. The Keepmoat Stadium will host three men’s group games and Doncaster will be the team base for Samoa (Men’s).

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Samoa Marty Taupau © Photosport Ltd 2019 www.photosport.nz /SWpix.com

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HULLI Former City of Culture and a UK maritime location, Hull has a historic old town heart combined with buzzing marina and stunning cultural venues. The KCOM Stadium will host two men’s games, including a quarter-final. The city will also be the team base for Fiji (Men’s).

KIRKLEESI Against a backdrop of Pennine Moors and Peak District parkland, Kirklees is steeped in local history and legend; buildings and locations made famous by writers, film and television; and vibrant towns full of art, creativity and delicious local produce. The John Smith’s Stadium in Huddersfield will host a men’s quarter-final.

LEEDSI From stylish shopping to decadent dining, contemporary art and vibrant nightlife, Leeds is abundant with things to do (below). Hosting more games than any other city, Elland Road will host a men’s semi-final and the Emerald Headingley Stadium will host three men’s games and four women’s games. The city will also be the team base for Jamaica and Ireland (Men’s) and England, Papua New Guinea, Brazil and Canada (Women’s) teams.

SHEFFIELDI Sheffield (above) is a vibrant city bustling with character and creativity. Known the world over as “The Steel City”, Sheffield was famed for its industry in the heyday of the 1900s and remains a hub of innovation to this day. Today, Sheffield has a modern spectacular cityscape set against the beautiful backdrop of the Peak District National Park. Bramall Lane will host an England men’s group game. The EIS Sheffield will host a group and both semi-finals in the wheelchair tournament. The city will also be the team base for the Greece (Men’s) and France, Wales, Scotland and USA (Wheelchair) teams.

YORKI York boasts excellent theatres, a wealth of pubs and many museums, all built around well preserved medieval features such as the old city walls, York Minster (left), Clifford’s Tower and The Shambles. LNER Community Stadium will host a women’s group game and both women’s semi-finals. The city will also be the team base for New Zealand (Men’s) and Australia, New Zealand, France, Cook Islands (Women’s) teams.

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I N S P I R AT I O N

S I M P LY THE BEST

After months of home schooling and life in lockdown it’s time to get the kids out for some family fun. After all there’s nothing more educational than a hands on, see it for yourself, exciting experience … big ‘kids’ will love it too!

This page: Springtime On the Farm with Helen Skelton at Cannon Hall Farm.

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Clockwise from bottom left: Lovely lambs and llamas at Cannon Hall Farm. Interactive fun at Eureka!

During lockdown Welcome to Yorkshire’s online WTY World Cup of Yorkshire continued to entertain and inform by inviting votes to celebrate the county’s finest offerings in its popular polls. Starting with Iconic Buildings (The Piece Hall), followed by Yorkshire’s favourite Natural Landmarks (Malham Cove), then restaurants (Shibden Mill Inn) and now it’s time to shout about...chosen by you... yes, it’s the WTY World Cup of Yorkshire FAMILY FUN.

A N I M A L M AG I C Star of Channel 5’s This Week on the Farm, Cannon Hall Farm in Baa-rnsley moo-ved to the top slot as it was voted the overall winner in the WTY World Cup of Yorkshire Family Fun.

C R E AT U R E C O M F O R T S AND ADORABLE ANIMALS A R E I N A B U N DA N C E . Nestled in the rolling Pennine foothills the multi-awardwinning family run, farm attraction is home to hundreds of animals offering a wonderful world of animal magic, as well as a fabulous farm shop, delicious deli, amazing afternoon tea, plus one of the biggest and best-equipped playgrounds in the north of England, including a magnificent tube maze. From cute calves to lolloping llamas, playful piglets to spectacular Shire horses...creature comforts and adorable animals are in abundance. With a year-round breeding programme, there’s always a new arrival to visit at Cannon Hall Farm (and who can’t resist a newborn bundle of fur or feathers). So don’t ‘bleat’ about the bush...tell your ‘neigh’bours too...there’s something for everyone. We’re not kidding!

A C T I O N - PA C K E D F U N D AY O U T Step off the train in Halifax and you’ve arrived at Eureka! a fantastic finalist in the WTY World Cup of Yorkshire Family Fun. The National Children’s Museum is the only fully interactive museum in the UK which is totally dedicated to kids (aged 0-11 years old). It’s a hands-on, action-packed, fun day for all, with nothing behind a glass cabinet.

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I N S P I R AT I O N

Spanning two floors, there are six unique zones filled with more than 400 interactive exhibits with equipment to explore, activities to amaze and buttons to buzz … AND there’s an impressive interactive gaming wall too, all designed to inspire and expand young minds to find out about the wonderful world around them. The ‘All About Me’ zone offers families a chance to learn all about bodies, perhaps peer up a giant nose or step inside a giant mouth! ‘Living & Working’ allows exploration of a child-sized town whilst experiencing the wonders of working. The Spark Gallery offers a chance to experience a programme of exhibitions, workshops and pop-up activities, learning all about interactive technology and the latest in digital art from across the globe. The Creativity Space, Desert Discovery and Sound Garden zones are dedicated to under 5s, offering sensory play, arts and crafts. Eureka! Is a cry of joy when one finds or discovers something. This is your chance for that Eureka! moment when you visit...Eureka!

Above: Eureka! Opposite from top: Rasputin the Polar Bear at Yorkshire Wildlife Park. Lightwater Valley.

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S P E C TA C U L A R S E M I - F I N A L I S T S Have a grrr-eat day out at Doncaster’s Yorkshire Wildlife Park, spectacularly featured on Channel 5’s Big Week at the Zoo. With nearly 400 animals and 70 different species, including its latest additions Alice, Ariel and Aurora, the amazing red pandas (a special sister act), hanging out in the Himalayan Pass reserve, there’s so much to see. The Yorkshire Wildlife Park is the perfect place to experience a truly breathtaking walk-through wildlife adventure. The majority of the animals at the park are either endangered or threatened and Yorkshire Wildlife Park works closely with charities to help the conservation of endangered species in the wild and captivity.

T H E P E R F E C T P L AC E TO E X P E R I E N C E A T R U LY B R E AT H TA K I N G WA L K-T H R O U G H W I L D L I F E A DV E N T U R E . yorkshire.com


I N S P I R AT I O N

Family fun Final 32

WILLIAM’S DEN North Cave

DIGGERLAND Castleford

GRIMM & CO Rotherham

YO R K S H I R E SCULPTURE PA R K Wakefield

From groundbreaking Project Polar, a dynamic programme for the conservation and welfare of the precious Polar bears, to Land of the Tiger, you can also step Into Africa! AND reach Leopard Heights. Take a wonderful walk on the wild side. Over 30 rides and attractions to suit all ages, Lightwater Valley in Ripon offers thrills and excitement in abundance. From super-relaxing Swan Boats to dropping into Trauma Tower, the theme park is also home to The Ultimate experience, six minutes of pure adrenaline rush on the longest roller coaster in Europe. At 1.5 miles long the ride speeds through deep, dark forest and over hill lifts measuring a staggering 102ft and 107ft. Keep your eyes open as the views are spectacular. There are fantastic family fun rides and attractions; including the Lightwater Express train travel around the park, Eagle’s Creek Farm tractor trail, a selection of fairground and water rides, plus the Adventure Playground and Mini Sand Diggers. Due to the coronavirus crisis some specific rides may not be running in 2020. Please check all websites for more information and opening dates/times/current procedures and post-pandemic regulations.

A L PA M A R E Scarborough

STO C K E L D PA R K

XSCAPE Castleford

EUREKA! Halifax

Wetherby

M AG N A Rotherham

L I G H T WAT E R VA L L E Y Ripon

YO R K S H I R E C A M P H I L L WILDLIFE Bedale PA R K Doncaster

WO R L D O F JAMES H E R R I OT

M OT H E R S H I P TO N ’ S Harrogate

R OYA L LOT H E R TO N A R M O U R I E S Leeds Leeds

Thirsk

FORBIDDEN JORVIK CORNER VIKING CENTRE Leyburn

T H O R N TO N T R O P I C A L H A L L FA R M B U T T E R F LY HOUSE Skipton

York

FLAMINGO LAND Malton

KIRKLEES LIGHT R A I LWAY

Sheffield

CANNON SUMMIT H A L L FA R M I N D O O R A DV E N T U R E Barnsley

Huddersfield

GO APE Dalby Forest

N AT I O N A L R A I LWAY MUSEUM

Selby

THE DEEP Hull

S TA N D E D G E TUNNEL Huddersfield

Yorks

NORTH YO R K S H I R E MOORS R A I LWAY Pickering

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N AT I O N A L SCIENCE & MEDIA MUSEUM Bradford

N AT I O N A L COA L MINING MUSEUM Wakefield

N AT I O N A L EMERGENCY SERVICES MUSEUM Sheffield

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REDCAR SALTBURN

BOWES

KIRKBY STEPHEN

A685

TO THE M6 FOR BIRMINGHAM AND CUMBRIA

A67CATTERICK LEYBURN A66

A683

A685 DENT

KIRKBY A684 STEPHEN HAWES

BOWES

YORKSHIRE DALES REETH

TEBAY

KIRKBY LONSDALEYORKSHIRE SEDBERGH

NORTHALLERTON

A1

LOFTHOUSE HORTON-IN-RIBBLESDALE A684 A683 HAWES PATELEY BRIDGE MASHAM GRASSINGTON DENT

KIRKBY LONSDALE

SETTLE

INGLETON A65

MALHAM HORTON-IN-RIBBLESDALE

RIPON

A169

PICKERING MALTON

HELMSLEY

A64

YORK

FILEY

DRIFFIELD

BRIDLINGTON

A165

A166

MALTON

A614 DRIFFIELD

A1079

FLAMBOROUGH HEAD

A165 SEAMER

A64

PATELEY BRIDGE A658

FILEY SCARBOROUGH

A170

KNARESBOROUGH A19

BOLTON ABBEY A59 GRASSINGTONHARROGATE

SETTLE SKIPTON MALHAM

THIRSK BOROUGHBRIDGE

A61 RIPLEY

ROBIN HOOD’S BAY SEAMER

HELMSLEY

BANK A19 RIPONSUTTON

SCARBOROUGH

PICKERING

A170

NORTH YORK MOORS

THIRSK

WHITBY

DANBY

OSMOTHERLEY

NORTHALLERTON

ROBIN HOOD’S BAY

STAITHES

A172 SUTTON BANK

LEYBURN

DALES

INGLETON

MASHAM

SALTBURN GOATHLAND

NORTH YORK GUISBOROUGH MOORS A171

YARM

BEDALE A1 RICHMOND A6108

WHITBY

A171

REDCAR DANBY

A172 A19 RICHMOND MIDDLESBROUGH OSMOTHERLEY

REETH

SEDBERGH

GUISBOROUGH

YARM

A1 A66

BARNARD CASTLE

TEBAY

STAITHES

MIDDLESBROUGH

BARNARD CASTLE

FLAMBOROUGH HEAD

A165 BRIDLINGTON

WETHERBY A65 KNARESBOROUGH HORNSEA POCKLINGTON MARKET A629 ILKLEY A166 WEIGHTON OTLEY A59 A64 A1 A61 HARROGATE KEIGHLEY SKIPTON SALTAIRE ILKLEY BEVERLEY A19 WETHERBY A614 HAWORTH A658 A1079 A65 A629 OTLEY SELBY HORNSEA M1 A164 BEVERLEY KEIGHLEY A64 M606 M621 A19 A63 A63 SALTAIRE

BRADFORD

LEEDS

HAWORTH

HEBDEN HALIFAX TODMORDEN BRIDGE

BRADFORD

HEBDEN BRIDGE M62

YORK

LEEDS

MIRFIELD HUDDERSFIELD

WAKEFIELD

HALIFAX TODMORDEN

BARNSLEY MIRFIELD

M1

PEAK PENISTONE

DISTRICT

A1

BARNSLEY ROTHERHAM M18

HULL

A63

HUMBER BRIDGE

PONTEFRACT

M180

GOOLE

DONCASTER

WITHERNSEA

A164 BRIDGE HUMBER

GOOLE

A63 M18

WAKEFIELD

HUDDERSFIELD

HOLMFIRTH

M62

A1

HOLMFIRTH

PENISTONE

HULL

SELBY

PONTEFRACT

A15

WITHERNSEA

A180

SCUNTHORPE

GRIMSBY CLEETHORPES

DONCASTER

BRIGG

A18

ROTHERHAM PEAK A57 DISTRICT

A57

SHEFFIELD TO LONDON BY RAIL

TO LONDON BY RAIL

SHEFFIELD

N

KEY Motorways

P L A N YO U R

JOURNEY

Wherever you’re coming from, getting to Yorkshire by rail, road, sea or air couldn’t be easier – and the journey takes you through some of our most stunning scenery on the way.

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A Roads Rail Routes Airports Heritage Coasts Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty National Parks Ferryport

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GETTING HERE

YO R K S H I R E B Y R A I L You can get to Yorkshire by high-speed train from London or Edinburgh in less than two hours. The Midlands is even nearer to Yorkshire’s cities, and TransPennine services offer direct links from the North West and North East. For timetables and reservations contact: London North Eastern Railway (www.lner.co.uk) Grand Central (www.grandcentralrail.com) National Rail Enquiries (tel 08457 484950 www.nationalrail.co.uk) East Midlands Trains (www.eastmidlandstrains.co.uk) Hull Trains (www.hulltrains.co.uk) Northern Rail (www.northernrail.org) Supertram Sheffield (www.supertram.com) Transpennine Express (www.tpexpress.co.uk) Metro (www.wymetro.com)

YO R K S H I R E B Y AIR AND SEA

Don’t forget P&O Ferries operate direct overnight links into Yorkshire from Rotterdam, Holland and Zeebrugge, Belgium. For more information go to www.poferries.com.

The Yorkshire county is served by a number of airports, providing daily flights to and from many destinations. With excellent transport links, Yorkshire is also easily accessible from many other airports throughout the UK, through high speed train links and an extensive motorway network.

I N F O R M AT I O N CENTRES Tourist Information Centres can offer plenty of great ideas so you can make the most of your visit. For all the Tourist Information Centres in Yorkshire; www.yorkshire.com/tic.

Doncaster Sheffield Airport (tel 0871 2202210 www.flydsa.co.uk) Leeds Bradford Yorkshire’s Airport (tel 0871 2882288 www.leedsbradfordairport.co.uk) Humberside Airport (tel 0844 8877747 www.humbersideairport.com) Manchester Airport (tel 08712 710711 www.manchesterairport.co.uk)

Find a wide choice of guide books and maps with lots of dedicated walking and cycling routes at Tourist Information Centres across the county, or more ideas from Welcome to Yorkshire at www.yorkshire.com/outdoors.

And you can explore Yorkshire’s hills, moors and valleys on some of Britain’s best loved and most spectacular leisure trains, with lovingly preserved vintage rolling stock and historic steam locomotives. These include the North Yorkshire Moors Railway, Embsay & Bolton Abbey Steam Railway, Keighley & Worth Valley Railway, Middleton Railway, Wensleydale Railway, Fellsman (for the Settle-Carlisle Railway) and Kirklees Light Railway. To discover more about these super train trips go to www.yorkshire.com.

YO R K S H I R E B Y R O A D Britain’s biggest and fastest highways cross Yorkshire from north to south and east to west, making getting here with your own car or by coach very simple indeed.

Glasgow M8 Edinburgh A74

The A1 and M1 connect from the north and south, while the M6 and M62 link Yorkshire with the Midlands and the North West and the M18/M180 gives easy access to the coast and countryside of northern Lincolnshire. For details of the quickest (or the most scenic) driving routes see the AA or RAC websites www.theaa.com and www.rac.co.uk. Coach and bus companies with services to (and within) Yorkshire include: Arriva (www.arrivabus.co.uk/yorkshire) Transdev Blazefield (www.transdevplc.co.uk) East Yorkshire Motor Services (www.eyms.co.uk) First (www.firstgroup.com) Coastliner (www.yorkbus.co.uk) Dalesbus (www.dalesbus.org) Moorsbus (www.moorsbus.org) Brontë Bus (www.keighleybus.co.uk) Connexions Buses (www.connexionsbuses.com) Find further information on regional and local bus and train services from Traveline Yorkshire (www.yorkshiretravel.net).

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A1

Carlisle

Newcastle

M6 Leeds Bradford Yorkshire’s Airport

York

Leeds Liverpool

M62

Doncaster Sheffield Airport

Manchester

Hull

Ferryport

Humberside Airport

A1

M6 Birmingham M1 Car

M5 M4 Bristol

M5

M25

London

Exeter

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Profile for Welcome to Yorkshire

This is Y Magazine, September - October 2020