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Annual Report

2012

A S S O C I A T E S

WEIDLINGER

I N C


Franklin D. Roosevelt Four Freedoms Park New York, New York Louis I. Kahn; Mitchell/Giurgola Architects


Writing: Helen Goddard Editing: Charles K. Palmer Design: Lorenzo Sanjuan

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Letter from the CEO Creating Momentum

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High-Rise Sculpture Fortune Tower

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Designed to Disappear Brooklyn Botanic Garden Visitor Center

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Site Improvements Conserve Freshwater Brooklyn Botanic Garden Site/Civil

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Shanghai Tabletop Shanghai Winter Garden

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Best in Show Algonquin Power Plant

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Sea Change U.S. Navy Innovative Research

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PZFlexCloud TM Software as a Service (SaaS)

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Suspenders Finely Tuned Manhattan Bridge Suspenders

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Local Heroes Resident Engineering and Inspection

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Awards

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Publications

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People/Promotions

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Charitable Donations

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LETTER FROM THE CEO CREATING MOMENTUM

In 2012, despite continued economic uncertainty, Weidlinger’s clients were surprisingly open to new ideas. From our perspective, creative engineering is a standard feature, not a luxury, and advancing technology the best way to meet the challenges of unique sites, aesthetics, and programs, and protect against multiple hazards. Judging from the last two staff surveys, our employees have internalized this approach: They chose as their top sources of satisfaction “feeling that [their] job is important” and that they “have the opportunity to do [their] best work every day.” Innovative projects dominate this report, from the hybrid Fortune Tower in China to the organically shaped Brooklyn Botanic Garden Visitor Center. Significant details, like the cost-saving foundation and aluminum-tube sunshade of the strikingly transparent MIT Media Lab Extension, are part of every story, as are unprecedented construction scenarios, such as the one required to install La Plata Stadium’s twin-peaked fabric dome. Even on relatively modest projects, for example the Algonquin power plant cogeneration upgrade, our engineers had ample opportunity to “do their best work.” Voted Best in Show by Connecticut’s Associated Builders and Contractors, the project proved that assembling a huge boiler on-site and pulling it into an existing facility on rails is a brilliant solution.

Two discernible trends were the importance of constructability in the process of design and the streamlining of construction practices. For instance, in replacing the Manhattan Bridge suspender system, Weidlinger utilized vibration analysis to attack the problem of jacking a single suspender multiple times to control its final tension. And as engineers for the Shanghai Winter Garden, with Alsop Architects, Weidlinger redefined the often-limited role of U.S. firms on Chinese projects, proposing the construction sequence and cable tensioning method and working closely with the steel fabricator. Having nurtured productive relationships with contractors over decades, Weidlinger welcomed New York State’s extension of design-build to transportation projects on an interim basis. Weidlinger often provides resident engineering and inspection (REI) services, overseeing contractors’ activities. While being a consummate bridge designer isn’t required, it is very helpful for responding to emergencies and unforeseen conditions and protecting public safety and convenience. In addition to vibration testing and REI, Weidlinger’s special services include structuralperformance monitoring, site/civil engineering, shoring design, and management and production of BIM shop drawings and detailing.

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The need for increased efficiency was another trend, accounting for the U.S. Navy’s upsurge of interest in alternative materials, such as aluminum; new science, such as cloaking metamaterials; and sustainable substitutes for explosives testing, such as air guns. Weidlinger’s Applied Science & Investigations group responded enthusiastically to the navy’s call for cutting-edge research. At the same time, our PZFlex® staff developed PZFlexCloudTM, a pay-as-you-go version of its highly regarded virtual prototyping software and the first finite-element-analysis product to be offered by CliQr Technologies’ CloudCenterTM.

Superstorm Sandy was a defining event in 2012, and our experience with FDR Four Freedoms Park an object lesson. The park, which opened in October to major acclaim, escaped damage from the storm despite its location at the tip of Roosevelt Island. As structural engineer for Louis Kahn’s posthumous work, Weidlinger was instrumental in elevating the park about 15 inches to account for sea-level rise since 1970 and a potential storm surge of 25 feet. The project is emblematic of a future we cannot entirely predict, but one that we can anticipate and plan for. Whether or not we are equally successful in every endeavor, there will be satisfaction in our attempts to advance the profession one incrementally adaptive step at a time.

Raymond P. Daddazio, President and CEO

Weidlinger also focused on efficiency in its business practices. By the end of 2012, all of Weidlinger’s Building Design Group projects were being documented with Building Information Modeling (BIM) software and the Transportation Group was using BIM in proposals, anticipating their clients’ adoption of this proven cooperative tool. Weidlinger also began work on reinventing its intranet to provide optimal information sharing among employees. Our Manhattan headquarters was relocated to 40 Wall Street and our Massachusetts office from Cambridge to South Boston’s recently designated Innovation District. Staff members are enjoying their new state-of-the-art premises, proud to be surrounded by structures that they designed, rehabilitated, or made safe over many decades.

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HIGH-RISE SCULPTURE QINGDAO’S TALLEST BUILDING IS A HYBRID

The 242-meter-high Fortune Tower, under construction in Qingdao, China, was conceived by C. C. Pei of Pei Partnership Architects as “a single slender tower in the shape of an arc that opens to embrace the Yellow Sea.” Weidlinger Associates Principal Tian-Fang Jing describes the building as a “high-rise sculpture” because of the irregular form that was produced by inserting a gracefully curved glass-clad wing into a rectangular, stone-clad pedestal. The building, soon to be the city’s tallest, is visually simple and elegant, but the functional difference between its upper and lower forms posed structural design challenges, which Weidlinger overcame with a unique hybrid structure. The 64-story, 85,000-square-meter mixed-use tower combines two distinct structural systems. The building’s orthogonal base—consisting of a double-height lobby with adjoining retail, 19 office floors, and four stories of amenities, including a clubhouse, pool, and rooftop terrace with ocean views—is supported by a cast-inplace concrete, tube-in-tube structure typical of high-rises. Its inner-tube concrete sheer walls, enclosing elevator shafts and stairwells, are connected by the floor system to the outer-tube perimeter frames that support the floor slabs and stone façade. A modified shear-wall-and-endcore structure supports the 19 double-height floors (and mechanical floor) of the asymmetrical residential wing. Extending into the base-

ment on two sides, the wing is sectioned into cross-ventilated, 130-square-meter duplex hotel apartments (corner units are even bigger), which offer spectacular views to the north and south and are models of micro-living design. Shear walls separate the apartments and support the floors and glass façade. The tower’s key structural element, a box transfer floor at the 25th level, supports the shear-wall upper structure, transmitting its loads to the tube-in-tube system below it. The transfer floor’s wing-shaped top girder, aligned with the upper-floor column grid, sits directly atop its rectangular-shaped bottom girder, aligned with the lower-floor column grid. The girders are sandwiched between two 200-millimeter-thick concrete slabs to form a super-strong 3.4-meterhigh box, which, in addition to transferring loads, prevents lateral deformation of the entire tower. A secondary transfer floor, at the 13th level, accommodates a partial setback of the office pedestal for balconies. Challenges to the Code Transfer floors are usually located close to the ground because of their heavy members. In this instance, however, the primary transfer floor is 96 meters above ground level, or 18 levels above the Chinese-code-specified maximum height limit for the tower’s seismic design requirements. The building is also 52 meters over the 190-meter

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recommended limit for a hybrid structure, and conforms only in its lower portion to the prescribed 7.0 height/width ratio. In general, the tower’s irregular plan and upper-portion layout place it outside the country’s prescribed practice.

COURTESY OF PEI PARTNERSHIP ARCHITECTS

To gain approval, Weidlinger increased seismic and wind safety levels and presented detailed analyses, along with wind tunnel test results, to the local building authorities. Although located in Seismic Zone 6, the building was designed for Zone 7, effectively increasing its lateral design loads by 100 percent. The capacity of the lowerportion elements, critical to seismic resistance, was increased by a factor of 2.8. The structural framing layout was also modified to ensure that story drift, overall deformation, torsional deformation, and lateral stiffness met the more stringent seismic code requirements. Because of the building’s uneven geometry, some columns had to carry greater loads than others. To minimize the size of these columns and the shear walls, highstrength concrete was used below the primary transfer floor. Several heavily loaded columns were designed as steel-and-concrete composites to improve their ductility and minimize their cross sections. As the narrow glass armature was not sufficiently stiff to resist heavier wind forces at its back and vulnerable corners, the latter were additionally reinforced against torsion and swaying. The building is scheduled to be completed in June 2013, and will open in 2014.

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DESIGNED TO DISAPPEAR LEAF-SHAPED ROOF COVERS VISITOR CENTER

In May 2012, the 102-year-old Brooklyn Botanic Garden unveiled its new, organically shaped Visitor Center, designed by Weiss/Manfredi Architects, New York. It is difficult to imagine a structure more suited to its function and site, more subtly evocative of the garden’s greenhouse structures, or more carefully fused with the historic landscape, its sinuous form having been generated by the garden pathways it replaced. Weidlinger Associates was structural and civil engineer for the project. The 20,000-square-foot steel, glass, and concrete building, with a generous entry plaza facing Washington Avenue, replaced a modest turnstile entrance from the Brooklyn Museum parking lot. Rather than remove most of the planted berm that separates the garden from the lot as initially planned, Weiss/Manfredi cut into the berm only slightly and designed the building to rest snugly against it, preserving the 25-foot-high Allée of mature gingko trees at its crest (a few of them provided wood paneling for a special-events room). The berm, which insulates the building, is separated from it by an exposed concrete retaining wall. An aerial view reveals the center’s processional unfolding and how its positioning, geometry, and green roof contribute to the architects’ long-term goal that, “as the gardens mature, the building will disappear completely.” An overhead view

is also best for comprehending the key structural element, a 385-foot-long integrated roof that covers two glass-enclosed pavilions and shades the pedestrian pathways between and alongside them. Less discernible (by design) are the seamless connections between the roof and the building’s envelope of exposed steel, fritted glass, and pale concrete. Project Manager Cheng Gu describes the roof as a “3D warped leaf composite,” explaining that its shape and geometry evolved even while its aesthetics remained unchanged. At the entrance, its copper portion over the retail store is barely visible, except as a flattened M section, but reveals itself from certain vantage points to be doublepitched north to south and downward sloping east to west. This part of the roof connects with a custom-made transitional canopy consisting of 26 ceramic-fritted, high-performance laminated glass units, which, along with the glass panels of the building envelope, are designed to reduce solar gain and bird collisions. At its far end, the canopy attaches to a single-pitched, 10,000-square-foot green roof that covers the rear exhibition and events pavilion. This dominant section rises in the middle and trails down at the back and sides, supporting an experimental landscape of 40,000 new plants (a mixture of wild grasses, perennial wildflowers, and spring bulbs).

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PHOTOS COURTESY OF WEISS/MANFREDI ARCHITECTS

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A curved C12x25 architecturally exposed steel channel defines the roof’s cantilevered edge, connecting smoothly with the building façade and folding with the latter to form an ornamental staircase. The channel is prominent when seen from above, as is the entrance pathway between the pavilions that leads to the eventsroom terrace and into the garden on the left. An alternate route takes visitors back up the staircase, across a pedestrian bridge to the other side of the building, and then upward through the Ginkgo Allée to an Overlook of the 52-acre garden. As structural engineer, Weidlinger was determined to keep construction costs in line, despite the building’s two-city-block span and nonrepetitive design. Weidlinger’s task was complicated by significant variations in the building’s height, width, slope, and soil loads (up to 55 psf). Specifically, the structure is 60 feet wide and one story high at the retail end, but double height and narrowed to a point over the rear-facing events room. The green roof has to support six inches of composite soil and its plantings through seasonal cycles of hot and cold, wet and dry, as well as extreme rain and snowstorms. It is expected to capture 190,000 gallons of stormwater per year as part of the larger water-management system. Warped and Highly Visible The Architect’s Newspaper singled out the building’s steel-frame design as its “most impressive feature…also its most vital,” validating decisions by the design team to express the structure and favor steel over concrete for the superstructure. Steel is versatile in producing irregular curves, but, for economy, Weidlinger used straight elements wherever possible. The building’s supportive spine consists of

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29 mostly exposed, hollow structural section (HSS) rigid frames, set approximately 12 feet on center in an undulating grid. The frames and the beams that connect them, hidden under an acoustic ceiling, are straight, but where curves were unavoidable, in the channel and canopy framing, bendable HSS elements were used to create smooth transitions. HSS frames were also beneficial in producing longer spans, thinner profiles, and smooth merging with the cantilever’s exposed details (full-penetration welded moment connections). Plus, the frames’ hollow cores were handy for hiding electrical feeds, lighting, and fire alarm systems. Supporting the warped roof, straight rafters, ranging in length from 12 to 36 feet, fold at the roof ridge and connect to the HSS columns at their ends. Each rafter has a unique slope, which reflects the warped shape of the 16-gauge, 1.5-inch-deep steel roof deck directly above. Indented every eight inches to form narrow ridges, the ribbed roof deck is flexible enough to conform to the various roof slopes, but heavy enough to function efficiently as part of the superstructure. An accurate 3D structural model of the roof was central to the building’s design and construction and, in fact, crucial for calculating the roof’s deflections and limiting them to an unnoticeable quarter of an inch. To produce a smoother channel curve, the roof’s cantilever was reduced to an average of 10 feet, but tolerances were still tight at its connections to the roof structure, especially in regions where its dimensions and loads varied greatly. The most exacting construction was where the curved channel abutted the curved canopy. Weidlinger designed puddle field welds to replace the countersunk bolts that would have been visible where the channel and canopy

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merged. These hidden welds had less strict tolerances and enough strength to support saturated soils and plants. Some expressed elements—specifically, the beams where ceiling height was unrestricted— were more lightweight and, hence, less costly than others. But because the structure was expressed, quality control was more of an issue overall. For example, the joints had to be care-

fully finished, and exposed welds ground down to create a flat surface. In fact, many of Weidlinger’s solutions related directly to improving the structure’s visual impression. To smooth transitions between segments, their number was reduced from 100 to 50; each was connected to three of the HSS outriggers that penetrate the glazed curtain wall. For the canopy, two types of trellis grids were used to support the shorter and longer sections.

SITE IMPROVEMENTS CONSERVE FRESHWATER “In the most significant…renewal effort since [its] founding,” the Brooklyn Botanic Garden is undertaking “environmentally inspired initiatives [that] will conserve 21 million gallons of freshwater per year and involve 60 percent of the Garden’s 52 acres.” Landscape architect Michael Van Valkenburgh Associates (MVVA) and Architecture Research Office have designed additions to the underutilized South Garden and several other sites to support the water conservation project. These include a restored Flatbush Avenue gate with an Early Spring Garden, a combined ticket booth and comfort station, an expanded Children’s Discovery Garden, and a new Water Garden that recirculates water in existing ponds and receives overflows from nearby catch basins. As site/civil engineer for the phased development, Weidlinger Associates prepared a New York City Department of Environmental Protection stormwater management master plan, which factored in recent additions and planned improvements, the effects of a typical storm event, and

allowable discharges to the city sewers. Weidlinger’s analysis optimized the functionality of the hydrologic system so that future changes will serve the sustainability best practice of reusing stormwater, rather than city-supplied potable water, to replenish most of the Garden’s ponds. In the final scheme, runoff will be channeled from the Visitor Center to the Japanese Hilland-Pond Garden and then to a southbound, 1,800-foot-long brook that terminates at the Water Garden. Water in the stream, forebay, and Water Garden will be cleansed and eventually pumped back up to the Japanese Garden, significantly reducing the quantity of stormwater released into the New York City sewer system. A Geosyntec pumping system, installed in the enlarged south pond of the Water Garden, will be programmed to control the pond’s water level in anticipation of a major storm. Water will be released into the sewers before the storm, and subsequent accumulations stored on-site.

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IMAGES COURTESY OF MICHAEL VAN VALKENBURGH ASSOCIATES

At the Visitor Center, stormwater overflows have been routed to downstream bioinfiltration basins rather than directly into the city system. The building itself has three attractive bioinfiltration basins (“rain gardens” in Brooklyn Botanic parlance) that replenish groundwater and, along with the living roof and pervious pavement, reduce runoff and enhance water quality. Also contributing to reduction of the Garden’s water footprint will be thousands of new trees, shrubs, bulbs, ferns, and other plants chosen with conservation in mind. The MVVA website

elaborates: “Large drifts of wet-loving flowering perennials and shrubs will delineate the stream course...[and] billowing, large-leaved perennials and shrubs will surround the Water Garden.” Their soils will be composed and layered to be absorbent and to actively filter pollutants in the channels created for stormwater runoff. A recently completed one-acre expansion of the Native Flora Garden was designed by SiteWorks and engineered by Weidlinger. It features 15,000 new plants, representing over 150 species (many rare or threatened), and a newly created artificial pond.

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SHANGHAI TABLETOP SUSPENDED PODS ANIMATE RIVERFRONT ATRIUM

The Winter Garden is a dramatic addition to the burgeoning land-and-sea-scape along the northern bank of Shanghai’s Huangpu River. Engineering News-Record (ENR) described the iconic structure as “a giant Parsons table with several-story pods hanging like giant holiday ornaments from a tree,” pointing out that it was even more challenging to build than the nearby observatory, which resembles a “bubble, spaceship or a giant bug.” The dramatic glass-enclosed observatory calls attention to the extensive Shanghai Port International Cruise Terminal buried beneath it. The Winter Garden also serves a larger purpose, providing a burst of colorful energy among a dozen mid-rise office buildings interconnected with three underground levels of retail and parking. Weidlinger Associates engineered the terminal and observatory with architect Frank Repas, New York, and the Winter Garden with Alsop Architects, London. The Winter Garden performs its magic as the office park’s recreational haven on a mere 50-meter-wide sliver of the 880 x 220 meter site. It is further constricted by a double-tube traffic tunnel under the third basement level, which its foundation circumvents. Making optimal use of the “leftover” site, open front and back, Alsop designed an atrium dominated by three irregularly shaped, functional pods, suspending them from an eight-story, table-shaped, steel-and-glass structure. Several of Alsop’s previous buildings had incorporated hanging pods, including the

Peckham Library and the Institute of Cell and Molecular Science, both in London. Weidlinger designed the superstructure to carry the loads of both the pods and a rooftop restaurant. The 40-meter-high steel roof structure, 32 x 50 meters in plan, was formed into a rigid box by extending its one-story-high trusses in both directions. It is supported on three huge legs. The two “wall legs” at either end provide elevators at the front and back corners in glazed enclosures. Connecting these corner elements at each level are stairways that are open to the elements, as are the interlocking trusses at the eighth level. The less-extensive middle leg also has an elevator, and a unique shape that balances the surrounding pods aesthetically. It tilts slightly to the rear as it rises, and offers stunning river views. Access to the pods is provided by steel-framed footbridges that connect to all three legs on the second to sixth levels. The pods are suspended from the roof with structural strand cables and stabilized by tie-down cables that link them to the main frame and to the horizontal pipe struts of the bridges. Building the Pods Piece by Piece Each pod has its own form and personality. Pod 1 (100 tons, one story) is kidney-shaped and contains a small restaurant. Pod 2 (140 tons, two stories) is iris-shaped and houses a bar. Pod 3 (290 tons, four stories) is lung-shaped

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and symmetrical on one axis, housing a café on two floors and conference spaces above it. The two smallest pods are glass-clad; the largest is covered in molded fiberglass. All are constructed of built-up, expressed steel and glass pieces that vary in size and shape, have high-quality finishes and low tolerances, and were expertly field-welded. To communicate their complicated geometry to the local steel contractor, Weidlinger created extremely detailed computer models of their floor and façade framing, carving the structures into smaller sections where necessary. Direct inputs from Weidlinger’s models were used to produce 3D shop drawings in XSteel, which expedited manufacture of the custom pieces. A tower crane was used to erect the main table framing, including the three legs, followed by the main and secondary trusses and the pod floors, which were lifted into position and connected by the pod façade

framing. The cables, walkway bridges, and bracing between the pods and legs came next. Once the shoring towers were removed, the tie-down cables were tensioned by turning their adjustable sockets. For safety, Weidlinger recommended that the cable tensioning be monitored both during and after installation to confirm that the design-predicted tensions were achieved. Nonlinear analysis verified that the pods and main frame were stabilized and wouldn’t bounce or move laterally from the combined effects of gravity, earthquakes, high winds, and extreme temperatures. Wind-tunnel testing confirmed that the pods will not sway uncomfortably in high winds, although minor adjustments were made to their façades to account for local effects. Very few modifications to the design were required during installation, due to the attention paid to structural detailing, the careful monitoring of pod erection, and the collaborative team effort using BIM software.

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BEST IN SHOW CONTRACTORS HONOR COGENERATION UPGRADE

Huge cogeneration boilers are best erected and installed prior to the structures that enclose them, or brought in through the roofs of existing facilities. At the Algonquin Power Plant in Windsor Locks, Connecticut, however, access issues precluded removal of the 70-f00t-tall roof, which was supported by a massive truss. Cianbro Corporation, Vanderweil Engineers, and Weidlinger Associates devised an alternate strategy that took months of planning, but required closing the plant for only three days. Cianbro described the $7.6-million project as “one of the most challenging…that [it] had been asked to perform in recent years.” The Associated Builders and Contractors Connecticut Chapter concurred, selecting it for a 2012 Excellence in Construction Award and as their top project (Best in Show).

and Project Manager Wayne Siladi, “because the eccentric loading patterns of these heavy machines can cause excessive vibrations and compromise nearby structures.” Micropiles were used to isolate the turbine and avoid damaging the 24-inch-diameter cooling pipe underneath it. Additionally, state funding supported installation of a Solar Titan 130 Series natural-gas-fired combustion turbine generator (with IST oncethrough steam generator for heat recovery) because it made the plant more energy- and costefficient, reducing emissions below Department of Environmental Protection requirements. Any unused power could be sold back to the state by Algonquin Power, which exclusively serves Ahlstrom, a manufacturer of high-quality papers. PHOTOS COURTESY OF CIANBRO CORPORATION

The new boiler’s four modules were stacked and welded on a temporary platform by a 600-ton crane that occupied the narrow space between the building and the Connecticut River. Then, using a strand-jacking process, it was pulled on heavy-lift rails into the building, from which a side had been removed. Weidlinger’s analyses and designs were crucial to (1) raising a utilities bridge six feet for a crane to pass under it, (2) removing a bracing bay from the existing building, and (3) securing foundations and access platforms during equipment erection and installation. “The turbine foundations were the most difficult to design,” said Associate Principal

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Aiding Power Plant Contractors Due to public support of energy conservation, Weidlinger’s structural and geotechnical engineers in Boston have a thriving practice in assisting contractors who build and upgrade power-plant facilities. It is a natural fit because of the firm’s emphasis on constructability and its expertise in the advanced analysis of soil mechanics, extreme loads, and other special conditions. Much of Weidlinger’s work involves the design of utilidors, which are special structures that protect piping for electricity, water, sewerage, communications, and hazardous processing liquids. They are the ideal solution for sites with high water tables, or soil or weather conditions that prohibit the direct burial of pipelines. Space permitting, they also allow for the segregation of pipes that carry hazardous materials. And while they can be as large as tunnels that accommodate people and vehicles, utilidors are normally standalone structures just big enough to enclose the utilities they protect. Innovation is required, as there are no standard details, and sites may be tight, inaccessible, or subject to extreme seismic and wind conditions. Contractors demand structures that are simple to

build and install, and insist on easy access at or near grade for reconfiguration during and after construction. Elevated steel pipe racks that Weidlinger custom-designed for a California mining project met all of these criteria in supporting, among other conduits, those that convey hazardous processing liquids from central facilities to points of final use. Weidlinger’s design accounted for the pipes’ and liquids’ material properties and the effects of the liquids’ erratic movements. Usually for these designs, Weidlinger engineers consider all conditions, from the structure’s global seismic response to the fine details that control the support-and-thrust resistance of individual piping runs. They model and assess how much the pipes will lengthen due to internal and external temperature fluctuations as well as the effects of thrust-load pressures from changes in fluid-flow direction, detailing joints to allow for these changes. They also collaborate with pipe-stress analysts to anchor the pipes properly and resolve their thrust loads into the ground, shaping foundations in such a way that they can be enlisted, along with the surrounding soil, to provide passive pressure for resistance to lateral loads.

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SEA CHANGE NAVY INNOVATIVE RESEARCH ENTERS FERTILE PERIOD

The U.S. Navy, a steadfast supporter of Weidlinger Associates’ innovative research since the 1950s, has become increasingly alert to the potential of cutting-edge science, materials, and technologies. A major impetus is the geographically diffuse and unpredictable post-9/11 threat environment that is creating the need for more varied assets. But budgets are tight, and whereas time-tested, customized solutions worked in the past, now it makes more sense for the navy to mine the commercial marketplace for new ideas and adapt them to its purposes as quickly as possible. The navy’s heightened interest in R&D has been good news for Weidlinger’s young generation of PhDs in advanced and emerging fields. These talented engineers, who are energizing the Applied Science & Investigations group, have been encouraged to both delve deep into its traditional investigative areas and extend meaningfully into adjacent ones, synthesizing across disciplines. According to Weidlinger Principal Dr. Najib Abboud, “These are dynamic, intellectually curious people, with innovation on their minds, who are nimble in their response to the issues and the opportunities they represent. At the navy, they are finding knowledgeable and sophisticated peers, who are also being rewarded for their initiative, accelerated pace, and courage to sail uncharted waters.”

Air Guns Pass All the Tests A major success this year for Weidlinger was the navy’s adoption of the firm’s patented air-gun technology as a testing-element energy source for the Full Ship Shock Trial Alternative Process. Using live explosives to conduct mandatory tests of new ships is expensive, disruptive, and damaging to sea life and the environment. In contrast, Weidlinger’s air-gun method—the rapid release of highly pressurized air close to a vessel to produce an analogous impulsive load—can be confined to a small dockside area cleared of sea mammals. Now the navy has finished its five-year evaluation of Weidlinger’s technology and endorsed its use. Testing was performed with explosives as a reference, and again with air guns, on a floating-shock-platform ship surrogate. Modeling and simulation are important components of the Alternative Process. The effects of the tests on the ships and their onboard equipment were analyzed using the navy’s and Weidlinger’s computational models. QUIPS Quantifies Uncertainty Over many decades, Weidlinger research engineers have produced major software programs to model naval vessels, their interactions with fluid environments, and their responses to extreme loads. In 2012, Weidlinger launched development of QUIPS (Quantification of Uncertainty by Informed Probabilistic Simulation), raising the bar for computational science. Models can

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predict performance only up to a point, because engineers discount input and output data gaps and uncertainties, such as variations in explosive yield and equipment position. Exploiting uncertainty quantification science, QUIPS assesses the probability of outcomes for a particular model and statistically evaluates the confidence level of the results. Paradoxically, by acknowledging the existence and impact of uncertainties, confidence is increased, especially for pivotal details like the frequencies that damage equipment. As the primary developer of QUIPS, Research Engineer Dr. Kirubel Teferra emphasizes Weidlinger’s unique approach of borrowing from, while adding to, the next generation of algorithms that have overcome classical method limitations. “QUIPS is not simply another black-box program,” he explains, “but a comprehensive resource and toolkit reflecting state-of-the-art academic theory at any given moment, as well as any improvements in efficiency we obtain in its application. We are already using it on real-world problems that were once considered intractable because of the time and effort involved. Assimilating what we learn on each new project is part of the development process. The end result is an evolving library that continues to improve the predictive capability of our models.” Aluminum Requires Rigorous Study The navy’s interest in new materials is spurring Weidlinger to expand its modeling repertoire to encompass the properties and behavior of aluminum and hybrids as they pertain to navy applications. While these materials have been used extensively in commercial ships and aircraft, their performance must be evaluated specifically for naval ships, which are subject to corrosion, vibration-intensive fluid environments, and

extreme loads from warfare. Aluminum is an attractive option because it is 65 percent lighter than steel, promising lighter-weight aluminum vessels that travel faster and cover more distance than steel ones. But fracture, fatigue, and fire present challenges. On aluminum vessels, cracks usually initiate at weld seams, which are much weaker than the aluminum on either side of them (with steel, the weld is stronger). Weidlinger researchers, led by Senior Associate Dr. Pawel Woelke, are exploring the rigorous science required to quantify how and at what rate a crack initiates and propagates, and to what extent it compromises safety and life-cycle sustainability. They have teamed with Dr. John W. Hutchinson, Abbott and James Lawrence Research Professor of Engineering at Harvard University and expert in solid mechanics and fracture. Their joint task is to simulate fracture behavior with phenomenological models that incorporate up-to-date knowledge of ductile fracture mechanics, welds, and heat-affected zone properties. Another major concern is performance during and after fires. Aluminum loses half its strength at 200 degrees C, not 500 degrees C as with steel, and is more susceptible to high-strain-rate deformation and creep at higher temperatures. While these are not fatal flaws, sophisticated modeling and analysis are required to ascertain losses in component strength and stiffness due to fire, and their effect on survivability. Weidlinger has been investigating the effects of fires on structures since its award-winning study of the World Trade Center collapses, and continues to push the profession to explore these effects more comprehensively.

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Novel Hybrid Materials Weidlinger is also studying the performance life cycle of hybrid and composite materials, such as the fiber-metal laminates used in aircraft, because they promise to be more resilient to cracks than aluminum. But the full spectrum of physics involved in aircraft fatigue is required to prove their suitability to naval applications. In addition to his work on monolithic aluminum, Woelke, an expert in plasticity and multiscale modeling, is developing the analytics for understanding and qualifying the use of hybrid materials and the bonded patches used to repair aging aircraft and, increasingly, ships. Multiscale modeling supplies the science and analytics for understanding the interactions of the repair kits, which depend on small fibers to bridge cracks in the structures being repaired. With this type of modeling, Woelke can assess the effect of smallscale structures, like fibers, on overall behavior. Enhanced Performance of Towed Arrays Weidlinger has been involved in the analytic study of navy sonar systems for decades. Recently, a Weidlinger team, led by Principal Investigator Dr. Jeffrey Cipolla, was chosen to participate in two challenging Future Naval Capabilities (FNC) programs for the Office of Naval Research. The first entails the modeling of acoustic vector sensors, devices that measure both acoustic pressure (how our ears perceive sound) and fluid particle velocity (the direction of sound wave propagation). This new sensitivity to acoustic fields has significant implications for sonar systems. For example, the navy hopes to deploy vector sensors in the long, thin hoses, called towed arrays, that are reeled out from surface ships and submarines. The firm has developed high-resolution structural-acoustic models of these arrays, which should expedite the engineering of sonar systems using vector sensors by identifying critical dynamic complexities and remedying their negative effects. The second FNC

project explores the structural durability of these towed arrays, which in submarine service tend to lead short and dangerous lives—dangled in the wake of propellers, whipped about by sudden turns, and pummeled by turbulence and rough handling as they are reeled in and out. In collaboration with industrial and academic partners, Weidlinger is investigating the forces and stresses on these structures, and the consequences for the intricate electronic sensors and devices they contain. Weidlinger’s task is to extend the systems’ life cycles by pinpointing their key vulnerabilities and the critical environmental effects. Metamaterials for Invisibility Perhaps the most intriguing of Weidlinger’s investigations, with potential widespread applicability, concerns metamaterials that can be used to camouflage ships and underwater objects by rendering them undetectable by sonar. Weidlinger has been conducting this research with Professor Andrew Norris, of Rutgers University, since 2008. The concept of acoustic “invisibility,” which is not science fiction for the navy, depends on metamaterial structures that guide waves around a cloaked object without disturbing wave fields in the surrounding fluid. Beyond navy applications, it is a promising strategy for protecting structures from the vibrations that cause damage in earthquakes and other disasters. Cipolla described the technology in Aviation Week & Space Technology (September 14, 2012) as carving up and altering metal to give it the critical elastic properties of water. He believes that previous attempts at creating cloaks, based on extensions of electromagnetics, are not physically realizable. Weidlinger has developed analytical tools to understand the science―of suppressing acoustic reflection through redirection of waves―and apply it to the creation of low-cost, scalable acoustic cloaks. These investigations could lead to fabrication of engineered cloaking metamaterials for a range of purposes in the very near future.

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Š WWW.NAVY.MIL

New Frontiers in Innovative Research

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Tr a nsitioning f r om Scie nce to Pr a ctice

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PZFlexCloud

TM

PZFLEX® OFFERS SOFTWARE-AS-A-SERVICE OPTION

Engineering teams across multiple disciplines and continents have invested in PZFlex because it is the fastest, most accurate 3D simulation software for piezoelectric and wave-propagation analysis. PZFlex has been shown to decrease the number of physical models a designer must produce by as much as 90 percent per development cycle and is valuable in pinpointing the problems that compromise a product’s manufacture and deployment. Sales have grown steadily over the past five years, bolstered in part by a robust international market. But until now, the software’s potential audience has been limited to companies and institutions that can finance the purchase of a license. Weidlinger Associates’ PZFlex team spent much of 2012 leveraging flexible cloud-computing architecture to remove this substantial barrier-to-entry cost. The debut of PZFlexCloud (in spring 2013) will represent a radical change in the way users access and pay for PZFlex—and potentially all high-fidelity finite element analysis (FEA) programs. Just as Weidlinger was quick to adapt PZFlex for desktop use in the 1990s, the firm is again a pioneer—this time in developing a pay-asyou-go business model unique to the FEA arena. PZFlexCloud should have immediate appeal to blue-sky inventors with little capital, or to any new user who wants to reduce capital expense and mitigate the risks inherent to assimilating a new technology. At the same time, PZFlexCloud

will serve current clients, who can expand the number of people working on a problem or schedule more intense work periods, as well as clients with lapsed licenses, who will have instant access to the latest release. Compute time will be paid for much like cellphone use is, which means that novices and experienced users alike will be able to run simulations and obtain rapid results without having to invest in frequent hardware upgrades or additional licenses during periods of peak demand. Everything Gained, Nothing Lost PZFlexCloud users will initiate the service, or supplement a current site-locked license, with the purchase of a monthly subscription and/or bundles of compute time. The PZFlex they access will be just as powerful as PZFlex in its licensed form and will deliver the same accuracy and quality performance. Documentation and training manuals for new users will be made available for offline viewing free of charge. A “thinner” tutorial version of the software that will support creation and installation of a model, but not its testing or improvement, is under development. A significant decision of the PZFlex team was to form a strategic alliance with CliQr Technologies™, ensuring a secure and flexible “cloud-agnostic” experience and, in the process, becoming the first FEA product supported by CliQr’s CloudCenter™. The CliQr platform allows

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users to move fluidly among various clouds and cloud configurations to obtain the best balance of state-of-the-art hardware, speed, and cost for any given project. Because the cloud supports multiple computers running in parallel, problemsolving time can be drastically reduced with a sweep of tests that run one variable many times over or many variables simultaneously. In a 2012 case study using this method, the time to prototype a fingerprint sensor that uses ultrasound to detect friction-ridge patterns was reduced from 30 workdays to just 14 hours. PZFlex has been a success story not only for Weidlinger but also for its original sponsor, the U.S. Small Business Administration’s Small

Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program, which gave the firm a 2011 Tibbetts Award in recognition of PZFlex’s originality and highly effective commercialization. PZFlex is unique among its rivals for being developed by acoustics engineers with advanced degrees, who use the software in their own research. It has also contributed to many hallmarks of technological progress. These real-world objects and processes include prenatal ultrasonic probes, sonar mine detectors, cancer drug delivery methods, and microchip flaw-detection systems. Recently, PZFlex was used to design fuel injectors that increase the efficiency of any vehicle with a diesel engine, resulting in the filing of six U.S. patents, three of which have been awarded.

21


SUSPENDERS FINELY TUNED VIBRATION TESTING SIMPLIFIES INSTALLATION

The completion, in 1964, of the VerrazanoNarrows Bridge, still the longest suspension bridge in the United States, marked the end of an era. In the period that followed, Weidlinger Associates and other suspension bridge experts, having provided crossings for virtually all of the country’s overwide rivers, shifted their attention to maintaining these relatively rare structures. Because each bridge was uniquely designed, and aged in its own way, the technology advanced piecemeal. In 1978, Weidlinger engineers determined that severe floor-beam cracking on the Manhattan Bridge resulted from a flaw in the bridge’s original design, which caused the deck to deflect under asymmetrical trainloads. Their cure—to stiffen the bridge by transforming the outer decks into torque tubes—was implemented over two decades, successfully reducing torsion by two-thirds. Subsequently, Weidlinger designed replacements for the bridge’s upper and lower roadway decks and subway framing and rehabilitated its anchorage eyebars. In an unprecedented, award-winning procedure, the cable strands in the anchorage were cut and resocketed on-site. In 2010, Weidlinger began replacement of the Manhattan Bridge’s suspender ropes, which, at 65 to 80 years old, were significantly corroded and nearing the end of their service lives. Suspenders are crucial structural elements,

carrying the deck load to the cables, but in this instance, the old and new ropes supported their loads with capacity to spare and could be exchanged, a few at a time at disparate locations, without interrupting traffic. Far from routine, the project capitalized on recent advances in suspender design to ensure that tensioning was accurate and efficient and the ropes would age well. To minimize abrasion between the suspender system and the very active truss, Weidlinger reduced the number of attachments from four to two on each panels. “Truss movement is normal,” explains Project Manager Chris Mauch. “A suspension bridge is a living, breathing thing. Its parts deflect as cars and trains cross it, and rather than dampen this movement, good engineers allow for it in their designs.” The old “full-rope” suspenders made complete circuits around the cable band, attaching at both ends to nearby points on the bottom chord of the deck truss. The new ropes made much shorter trips around the cable band, attaching to compact midlevel crossbeams, called “equalizer bars,” before descending as wire strands (wrapped bundles of wires) to single points on the truss’s top chord. A bonus feature of the new design is the jack-ready threaded socket, supplanting the more conventional dead-end truss attachment. Within an acceptable range, all of the suspenders on one cable are expected to carry the same load.

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But quality control of their tensioning is critical, because ropes that are too taut or slack impede the smooth and consistent support of moving loads. It is also important because, despite there being some leeway, the accuracy of pressure gauge readings during the jacking process, which are considered a direct measurement of the load, can be adversely affected by a number of factors, including uncontrollable field conditions, fallible equipment, and human error. Moreover, as each new rope is jacked into position, it influences the tensions in the ones on either side of it. Installers normally jack a rope to a specified tension, jack the neighboring ropes, and then rejack the first rope, repeating this procedure for each new rope. A jack-ready socket is helpful, because the external jacking equipment has to be moved for each measurement, but it does not solve the problem of having to jack each rope multiple times. Like Tuning a Piano To reduce the amount of jacking on the Manhattan Bridge, Weidlinger instituted vibration testing, which was begun after all of the ropes on one cable had been installed. (Testing was completed in 2012 on two of the four cables.)

The field engineers attached a triaxial accelerometer to the top flat surface of the equalizer bar, and then, much like piano tuners, struck the attached rope with a rubber mallet to make it vibrate. (Many ropes were already swaying sufficiently from the wind and traffic, or just needed a tap of the hand.) The “listening” part of the “tuning” procedure was performed by a data-acquisition laptop, which recorded one-minute acceleration time histories of the ropes swaying. The accelerometer and laptop were moved down the line, from rope to rope. But here the analogy to piano tuning ends, because the huge ropes are not like the idealized strings of a musical instrument. The positions of the equalizer bars, for instance, vary, as do the transverse inclined angles of the ropes’ upper sections. Due to these random differences, Weidlinger engineers used finite element analysis to average the four dominant modes of the recorded frequencies. They created models of each suspender and then calculated the tensions based on the ropes’ average frequencies and lengths (from 30 to 140 feet). Only those suspenders that were found to be more than 25 percent out of range were rejacked.

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LOCAL HEROES REI TEAM TAKES RESPONSIBILITY FOR CONSTRUCTION

“Once you design a structure, you have to build it right,” says Weidlinger Associates Transportation Principal George Pappas, a bridge and highway designer and resident engineering and inspection (REI) expert. “But nothing is built exactly to plan,” he warns, adding, “The real challenge is in dealing with unforeseen conditions and emergencies.” While the contractor is responsible for a project’s outcome, the REI team (sometimes as many as 20 engineers and inspectors) monitors construction to ensure that all of the owner’s needs and goals are met or exceeded. This means overseeing the contractor’s activities, coordinating with city agencies and utilities, and tracking site conditions. Typically, 10 percent or more of the total construction cost of infrastructure projects is set aside for construction oversight, compared to 2 percent for buildings, which are subject to different protocols. Along with quality assurance, the REI consultant’s highest priorities are public safety, traffic management, and keeping to (or besting) the agreed-upon schedule and budget. As project guardians, the REI team members are conversant with the deliverables and relevant specifications and codes, including EEO and minority regulations. They confirm that records are accurate, payments justified, materials acceptable, and tolerances within agency guidelines. They approve concrete pours and prefabricated components and affirm compliance with environmental regulations, including protection of land,

waterways, and wildlife. They monitor demolition, temporary conditions, painting and other specialty contractor work, traffic control devices and signs, accident reporting, worker safety, and the condition of contiguous structures. While decisiveness, team building, and communications skills are essential, going the extra mile is also advantageous. On a recent project, Weidlinger anticipated community concerns by providing rodent control prior to excavation (now part of the owner’s special provisions for new projects). Keeping the community informed and satisfied can include limiting demolition noise and dust, improving local traffic schemes, or, as on another recent project, providing safer passage for local schoolchildren. Planning Ahead Given that a wall is never exactly vertical, materials warp or go missing, pile installers hit obstructions, equipment breaks, and storms and accidents happen, the resident engineer works closely with the contractor, designer, owner, and various public agencies to address problems as they arise. They may occur less often if the resident engineer performs a constructability review of the design for its biddability and buildability, ensuring that bids are reasonable and construction problems and contract changes are minimized. The review usually includes an independent cost estimate and confirmation that staging operations are safe,

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workable, complete as shown, and can be performed within the stipulated right-of-way. In addition, the reviewer may suggest safer, more efficient, or more cost-effective alternatives. Judicious preplanning can take other forms. For instance, motivated by an incentive clause, the contractor proposed revising a staging plan for demolition and replacement of the severely deteriorated Belt Parkway Bridge over Fresh Creek Basin (part of the largest roadway-and-bridge reconstruction project in the five boroughs). Weidlinger assisted the New York City Department of Transportation in reviewing and approving the new plan and renegotiating the schedule and deliverables. Introducing a temporary bridge reduced the original four construction stages to two, created more room to work, and decreased bottlenecks on a major corridor to JFK Airport and the Verrazano Narrows Bridge. According to Resident Engineer James Dineen, the net shared savings was $2.1 million and 13 months on the original five-year, $120-million contract. Value of Design Experience: Priceless Unexpected conditions require immediate resolution to minimize change orders and protect public safety. Pappas points out that the REI consultant who, like Weidlinger, is also an experienced bridge designer can apply an intuitive sense of structure and material behavior to solve problems expeditiously. “You want to avoid emergencies, because they create time and safety constraints that limit your options,” he explains. “Resident engineers who can predict how the overall structure will behave in both permanent and temporary conditions are invaluable.” As experienced designers, Weidlinger resident engineers also know the dimensional tolerances and flatness requirements for proper fit-up of modular deck panels, the cor-

rect treatment of deck joints, various temporary shoring techniques, and how to stage concrete pours to offset vibrations from bridge traffic. An exemplary project was an emergency redecking of the suspended spans of the Brooklyn Bridge in 2000. The contractor was given a year to complete the work, with severe penalties for closing lanes during peak hours. First, Weidlinger engineers made sure that the new deck was not significantly heavier than the old one. Second, they tailored the structure for efficient nighttime installation. Third, they devised step-by-step procedures for replacing the old deck with a prefabricated lightweight precast and cured concrete grid deck, which was delivered with its stringers already attached. Weidlinger’s ongoing discussions with the contractor were instrumental in meeting stringent morning rush-hour deadlines and keeping the bridge open throughout construction. Overseeing a bridge for decades is an ideal setup. Principal Frank Fierro has been on-site at the Tappan Zee Bridge since 1992, providing design, construction support, and resident engineering services on more than 14 projects. “By having a thorough knowledge of the structure, we are able to provide recommendations and redesigns for unforeseen conditions without substantially altering the schedule or increasing costs.” His experience extends to awareness of traffic patterns for designing effective daily schedules and familiarity with the concerns of the owner, the New York State Thruway Authority, as well as traffic personnel, New York State Police, and the U.S. Coast Guard. Fierro reports that “for all these reasons, and despite unanticipated field conditions, the current redecking project is on budget, and the previous one was only slightly over, discounting owner-requested changes and acceleration.”

25


AWARDS PROJECT CITATIONS

American Council of Engineering Companies of Massachusetts, Engineering Excellence Award MIT Media Lab Extension, Cambridge, Massachusetts (Silver) Maki & Associates; Leers Weinzapfel Associates Museum of Fine Arts, Art of the Americas Wing, Boston, Massachusetts (Gold) Foster + Partners; Childs Bertman Tseckares American Council of Engineering Companies of New York, Engineering Excellence Award La Plata Stadium, La Plata, Argentina (Platinum) Roberto Ferreira y Arquitectos Asociados University of Virginia South Lawn Project, Charlottesville, Virginia (Gold) Moore Ruble Yudell American Institute of Architects, San Fernando Valley, Honor Award Third Street City View Retail Center, Los Angeles, California Abramson Teiger Architects Architect Magazine, Design Review Award Brooklyn Botanic Garden Visitor Center, Brooklyn, New York Weiss/Manfredi Architects Associated Builders and Contractors ABC/Green, Greener Tomorrow Award Bachelor Enlisted Quarters and Dining Facility, Pkg. 9, MCAGCC, Twentynine Palms, California Straub Construction Connecticut Chapter, Excellence in Construction Awards, First Place (Industrial) and Best in Show Algonquin Power Cogeneration Plant Reconfiguration, Windsor Locks, Connecticut Cianbro Corporation; R.G. Vanderweil Engineers, PC National, Mega-Project Eagle Award Bachelor Enlisted Quarters and Dining Facility, Pkg. 9, MCAGCC, Twentynine Palms, California Straub Construction San Diego Chapter, Top Project by a General Contractor Bachelor Enlisted Quarters and Dining Facility, Pkg. 9, MCAGCC, Twentynine Palms, California Straub Construction Boston Society of Architects Whittier Street Health Center, Roxbury, Massachusetts, Community Health Center Citation DHK Architects MIT Media Lab Extension, Cambridge, Massachusetts, Harleston Parker Medal Maki & Associates; Leers Weinzapfel Associates

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EXTENDING JEFFERSON’S VISION

LA PLATA STADIUM

“ESTADIO ÚNICO”

Boston Society of Architects (continued) Advanced Multimodality Image Guided Operating Suite, Boston, Massachusetts, Integration of Advanced Medical Technology Citation Payette

Concrete Reinforcing Steel Institute, Merit Award Third Street City View Retail Center, Los Angeles, California Abramson Teiger Architects Design-Build Institute of America, National Design-Build Award—Commercial John W. Finn Hall, Naval Base Coronado P742 BEQ, Coronado, California RJC Architects

UNIVERSIT Y OF VIRGINIA

Engineering News-Record New York Best Government/Public Building New U.S. Federal Courthouse, Bu�falo, New York Kohn Pedersen Fox

S O U T H L AW N P R O J E C T

LI N K S T H E PA S T T O T H E

Best Cultural/Worship Project Brooklyn Botanic Garden Visitor Center, Brooklyn, New York Weiss/Manfredi Architects

FUTURE

International Association for Bridge and Structural Engineering, Outstanding Structure Award La Plata Stadium, La Plata, Argentina Roberto Ferreira y Arquitectos Asociados

The South Lawn Project is a 116,000-square-foot ensemble of buildings, gardens, and courtyards

Municipal Art Society, Brendan Gill Prize Franklin D. Roosevelt Four Freedoms Park, New York, New York Louis I. Kahn; Mitchell Giurgola

that extends the University of Virginia’s renowned

“Academical Village,” designed by Thomas Jefferson.

Solar Energy Industries Association and Solar Electric Power Association, Photovoltaic Project of Distinction Award

A 95-foot-wide landscaped terrace (the crossing)

Bachelor Enlisted Quarters and Dining Facility, Pkg. 9, MCAGCC, Twentynine Palms, California Straub Construction

links the new construction to the original open area (the Lawn), which is lined with buildings and gar-

Staten Island Chamber of Commerce, Excellence Award for Exterior and Green Building Staten Island Children’s Museum Environmental Structures, Staten Island, New York Marpillero Pollak Architects

dens and frames Jefferson’s emblematic Rotunda.

27

New York

Engineering Excellence Gold Award WINNER

A MASSIVE UNDERTAKING

La Plata Stadium was designed with architect Roberto Ferreira in the late 1990s, but when Argentina’s economy faltered, it was only partially constructed. The 53,000-seat stadium opened in 2003, lacking its twin-peaked fabric dome. In 2009, when the site was chosen to host the opening game of the 2011 Copa América, construction was resumed.

From New Cabell Hall at the Lawn’s southernmost tip, the crossing spans a busy thoroughfare, continues 315 feet southward, and terminates at the Commons building, a circular structure that echoes the Rotunda and anchors the two classroom wings extending eastward.

A DELICATE BALANCE

The structural engineer had to overcome steep grades and poor soils to create a seamless transition between the Lawn and the complex, aiding designers in capturing the essence of Jeffersonian architecture while opening up modern design possibilities. The crossing had to match the differing elevations of the structures on either end while supporting heavy dead loads from extensive plantings.

BE YOND LEED®

With a strong environmental focus, the project is among the first at the university to earn LEED (Gold) certification. Because sensitivity to the community’s needs was paramount, disruptions to traffic and campus operations were avoided.

BUILDING CONSENSUS

One of the greatest project challenges was the unusually large number of experts and agencies involved in the decision-making process. Painstaking coordination enabled engineers to plan for contingencies, avoid pitfalls, and resolve conflicts inherent in undertaking the most ambitious construction on UVA grounds in more than a century.

33

Aerial Photos: Courtesy of Birdair, Inc.

Brooklyn Botanic Garden Visitor Center, Brooklyn, New York Weiss/Manfredi Architects

©Dan Addison

Courtesy of the University of Virginia

Chicago Athenaeum Museum of Architecture and Design and the European Centre for Architecture Art Design and Urban Studies, Green Good Design Award

International Association for Bridge and Structural Engineers

New York

Outstanding Structure Award Winner

Engineering Excellence Platinum Award Winner


P R E S E R V IN

Engineered for Discovery

G

AND RESTO Reestablishm R IN G A N IC ent of the ON museum’s o main entran riginal north ces and dem -south axis olition and of-excavatio required sig renovation o n sequence nificant rec f portions o was develop seismic code onstruction f th e d to protect e existing s s, the new s of the tructure. A the existing tructures are specific sup building duri separated fr portng construc om the origin B U ILT- IN R ti o a n l . m T E u o s S e m IL IE N C E um by seism eet local To permit m ic expansion ounting of h jo in ts . eavy artwork demands, w s, floors we ith thicker re concrete sla designed to were analyz bs to mitig accommoda ed to confi a te unusually te rm vibration an they would transportati large live lo d sound trans on and insta resist crack ading mission. Sto llation. ing under h igh load co ne floor pa ncentrations nels D E S IG N IN N a n d d u O ri n V g AT IO N S S U P object To support PORT TRAN the client’s S PA R E N C Y goal of inte maximizing grating the transparenc m y useum with , the design are controlle the surroun team develo d using fabri ding Back B ped new m c panels and and Carl J. ethods of s ay Fens Pa motorized lo Shapiro Cou h rk by ie ld ing artwork uvers in the rtyard conta the steel is s : Lighting le g in reinforced lazed roofs. compromise vels Steel box co -concrete c d. A state-o of oversized ores that w lumns in the f-the-art lo objects into il l temporarily Ruth ading area a the wing and support the nd innovativ throughout ro e of if “a the facility. rt hoist” fac ilitate move ment

MUSEUM O F FINE ART S E X PA N S I O N

Spacious, Versatile, Accessible The structure is among the first academic buildings to use extensive transparency to foster interdisciplinary collaboration by permitting researchers to view activities of others in the building. Its two large atriums are serviced by two glass elevators, three sets of brightly colored long-span flying stairs, and steel-framed bridges along the perimeter of each floor. Although the labs vary in size, their basic configuration can accommodate any type of research.

ART OF THE AMERICAS

HISTORY O N VIEW

Featuring a central glass building flan Museum of F ke d b y t w o ine Arts, Bos glass-and-gr ton, Art of th old and new anite pavilio e Americas W structures. T ns, the in g h e $345-millio creates a sea upwards of 5 mless joining n, 121,307-s ,000 works— quare-foot w of more than d ing accomm oubling the odates number prev iously on vie w.

All photos © Chuck Choi

A MERICAN

REDEFINES

The 163,000-square-foot Massachusetts Institute of Technology Media Lab Extension houses seven laboratories for the study of emerging technologies in a range of disciplines. Its translucent exterior incorporates several large geometric forms, creating a variegated silhouette against the backdrop of the campus’s masonry buildings. The extension abuts the original media lab facility, separated from it by seismic expansion joints.

Complexity and Cost Savings

MIT Media Lab Extension Uses Transparency to Promote Collaboration Attractive, Energy-Efficient Design

Massachusetts Engineering Excellence Gold Award Winner

Fritted glass and other low-energy materials allowed glazing of up to 80 percent of the facade, maximizing transparency while meeting stringent Massachusetts energy requirements. A distinctive exterior sunshade consisting of large panels of evenly spaced aluminum rods blocks 50 percent of solar heat gain.

Because the design incorporated so few standard details, the project resulted in the creation of 600 drawings and a greater-thanusual number of mockups. The engineer’s recommendation of a more economical basement foundation—and the elimination of a planned second basement (allowing the use of a conventional sheeting system instead of a slurry wall)—yielded significant cost savings.

Photos

Massachusetts Engineering Excellence Silver Award Winner

©Andy Ryan

31


P R E S E R V IN

Engineered for Discovery

G

AND RESTO Reestablishm R IN G A N IC ent of the ON museum’s o main entran riginal north ces and dem -south axis olition and of-excavatio required sig renovation o n sequence nificant rec f portions o was develop seismic code onstruction f th e d to protect e existing s s, the new s of the tructure. A the existing tructures are specific sup building duri separated fr portng construc om the origin B U ILT- IN R ti o a n l . m T E u o s S e m IL IE N C E um by seism eet local To permit m ic expansion ounting of h jo in ts . eavy artwork demands, w s, floors we ith thicker re concrete sla designed to were analyz bs to mitig accommoda ed to confi a te unusually te rm vibration an they would transportati large live lo d sound trans on and insta resist crack ading mission. Sto llation. ing under h igh load co ne floor pa ncentrations nels D E S IG N IN N a n d d u O ri n V g AT IO N S S U P object To support PORT TRAN the client’s S PA R E N C Y goal of inte maximizing grating the transparenc m y useum with , the design are controlle the surroun team develo d using fabri ding Back B ped new m c panels and and Carl J. ethods of s ay Fens Pa motorized lo Shapiro Cou h rk by ie ld ing artwork uvers in the rtyard conta the steel is s : Lighting le g in reinforced lazed roofs. compromise vels Steel box co -concrete c d. A state-o of oversized ores that w lumns in the f-the-art lo objects into il l temporarily Ruth ading area a the wing and support the nd innovativ throughout ro e of if “a the facility. rt hoist” fac ilitate move ment

MUSEUM O F FINE ART S E X PA N S I O N

Spacious, Versatile, Accessible The structure is among the first academic buildings to use extensive transparency to foster interdisciplinary collaboration by permitting researchers to view activities of others in the building. Its two large atriums are serviced by two glass elevators, three sets of brightly colored long-span flying stairs, and steel-framed bridges along the perimeter of each floor. Although the labs vary in size, their basic configuration can accommodate any type of research.

ART OF THE AMERICAS

HISTORY O N VIEW

Featuring a central glass building flan Museum of F ke d b y t w o ine Arts, Bos glass-and-gr ton, Art of th old and new anite pavilio e Americas W structures. T ns, the in g h e $345-millio creates a sea upwards of 5 mless joining n, 121,307-s ,000 works— quare-foot w of more than d ing accomm oubling the odates number prev iously on vie w.

All photos © Chuck Choi

A MERICAN

REDEFINES

The 163,000-square-foot Massachusetts Institute of Technology Media Lab Extension houses seven laboratories for the study of emerging technologies in a range of disciplines. Its translucent exterior incorporates several large geometric forms, creating a variegated silhouette against the backdrop of the campus’s masonry buildings. The extension abuts the original media lab facility, separated from it by seismic expansion joints.

Complexity and Cost Savings

MIT Media Lab Extension Uses Transparency to Promote Collaboration Attractive, Energy-Efficient Design

Massachusetts Engineering Excellence Gold Award Winner

Fritted glass and other low-energy materials allowed glazing of up to 80 percent of the facade, maximizing transparency while meeting stringent Massachusetts energy requirements. A distinctive exterior sunshade consisting of large panels of evenly spaced aluminum rods blocks 50 percent of solar heat gain.

Because the design incorporated so few standard details, the project resulted in the creation of 600 drawings and a greater-thanusual number of mockups. The engineer’s recommendation of a more economical basement foundation—and the elimination of a planned second basement (allowing the use of a conventional sheeting system instead of a slurry wall)—yielded significant cost savings.

Photos

Massachusetts Engineering Excellence Silver Award Winner

©Andy Ryan

31


P R E S E R V IN

Engineered for Discovery

G

AND RESTO Reestablishm R IN G A N IC ent of the ON museum’s o main entran riginal north ces and dem -south axis olition and of-excavatio required sig renovation o n sequence nificant rec f portions o was develop seismic code onstruction f th e d to protect e existing s s, the new s of the tructure. A the existing tructures are specific sup building duri separated fr portng construc om the origin B U ILT- IN R ti o a n l . m T E u o s S e m IL IE N C E um by seism eet local To permit m ic expansion ounting of h jo in ts . eavy artwork demands, w s, floors we ith thicker re concrete sla designed to were analyz bs to mitig accommoda ed to confi a te unusually te rm vibration an they would transportati large live lo d sound trans on and insta resist crack ading mission. Sto llation. ing under h igh load co ne floor pa ncentrations nels D E S IG N IN N a n d d u O ri n V g AT IO N S S U P object To support PORT TRAN the client’s S PA R E N C Y goal of inte maximizing grating the transparenc m y useum with , the design are controlle the surroun team develo d using fabri ding Back B ped new m c panels and and Carl J. ethods of s ay Fens Pa motorized lo Shapiro Cou h rk by ie ld ing artwork uvers in the rtyard conta the steel is s : Lighting le g in reinforced lazed roofs. compromise vels Steel box co -concrete c d. A state-o of oversized ores that w lumns in the f-the-art lo objects into il l temporarily Ruth ading area a the wing and support the nd innovativ throughout ro e of if “a the facility. rt hoist” fac ilitate move ment

MUSEUM O F FINE ART S E X PA N S I O N

Spacious, Versatile, Accessible The structure is among the first academic buildings to use extensive transparency to foster interdisciplinary collaboration by permitting researchers to view activities of others in the building. Its two large atriums are serviced by two glass elevators, three sets of brightly colored long-span flying stairs, and steel-framed bridges along the perimeter of each floor. Although the labs vary in size, their basic configuration can accommodate any type of research.

ART OF THE AMERICAS

HISTORY O N VIEW

Featuring a central glass building flan Museum of F ke d b y t w o ine Arts, Bos glass-and-gr ton, Art of th old and new anite pavilio e Americas W structures. T ns, the in g h e $345-millio creates a sea upwards of 5 mless joining n, 121,307-s ,000 works— quare-foot w of more than d ing accomm oubling the odates number prev iously on vie w.

All photos © Chuck Choi

A MERICAN

REDEFINES

The 163,000-square-foot Massachusetts Institute of Technology Media Lab Extension houses seven laboratories for the study of emerging technologies in a range of disciplines. Its translucent exterior incorporates several large geometric forms, creating a variegated silhouette against the backdrop of the campus’s masonry buildings. The extension abuts the original media lab facility, separated from it by seismic expansion joints.

Complexity and Cost Savings

MIT Media Lab Extension Uses Transparency to Promote Collaboration Attractive, Energy-Efficient Design

Massachusetts Engineering Excellence Gold Award Winner

Fritted glass and other low-energy materials allowed glazing of up to 80 percent of the facade, maximizing transparency while meeting stringent Massachusetts energy requirements. A distinctive exterior sunshade consisting of large panels of evenly spaced aluminum rods blocks 50 percent of solar heat gain.

Because the design incorporated so few standard details, the project resulted in the creation of 600 drawings and a greater-thanusual number of mockups. The engineer’s recommendation of a more economical basement foundation—and the elimination of a planned second basement (allowing the use of a conventional sheeting system instead of a slurry wall)—yielded significant cost savings.

Photos

Massachusetts Engineering Excellence Silver Award Winner

©Andy Ryan

31


P R E S E R V IN

Engineered for Discovery

G

AND RESTO Reestablishm R IN G A N IC ent of the ON museum’s o main entran riginal north ces and dem -south axis olition and of-excavatio required sig renovation o n sequence nificant rec f portions o was develop seismic code onstruction f th e d to protect e existing s s, the new s of the tructure. A the existing tructures are specific sup building duri separated fr portng construc om the origin B U ILT- IN R ti o a n l . m T E u o s S e m IL IE N C E um by seism eet local To permit m ic expansion ounting of h jo in ts . eavy artwork demands, w s, floors we ith thicker re concrete sla designed to were analyz bs to mitig accommoda ed to confi a te unusually te rm vibration an they would transportati large live lo d sound trans on and insta resist crack ading mission. Sto llation. ing under h igh load co ne floor pa ncentrations nels D E S IG N IN N a n d d u O ri n V g AT IO N S S U P object To support PORT TRAN the client’s S PA R E N C Y goal of inte maximizing grating the transparenc m y useum with , the design are controlle the surroun team develo d using fabri ding Back B ped new m c panels and and Carl J. ethods of s ay Fens Pa motorized lo Shapiro Cou h rk by ie ld ing artwork uvers in the rtyard conta the steel is s : Lighting le g in reinforced lazed roofs. compromise vels Steel box co -concrete c d. A state-o of oversized ores that w lumns in the f-the-art lo objects into il l temporarily Ruth ading area a the wing and support the nd innovativ throughout ro e of if “a the facility. rt hoist” fac ilitate move ment

MUSEUM O F FINE ART S E X PA N S I O N

Spacious, Versatile, Accessible The structure is among the first academic buildings to use extensive transparency to foster interdisciplinary collaboration by permitting researchers to view activities of others in the building. Its two large atriums are serviced by two glass elevators, three sets of brightly colored long-span flying stairs, and steel-framed bridges along the perimeter of each floor. Although the labs vary in size, their basic configuration can accommodate any type of research.

ART OF THE AMERICAS

HISTORY O N VIEW

Featuring a central glass building flan Museum of F ke d b y t w o ine Arts, Bos glass-and-gr ton, Art of th old and new anite pavilio e Americas W structures. T ns, the in g h e $345-millio creates a sea upwards of 5 mless joining n, 121,307-s ,000 works— quare-foot w of more than d ing accomm oubling the odates number prev iously on vie w.

All photos © Chuck Choi

A MERICAN

REDEFINES

The 163,000-square-foot Massachusetts Institute of Technology Media Lab Extension houses seven laboratories for the study of emerging technologies in a range of disciplines. Its translucent exterior incorporates several large geometric forms, creating a variegated silhouette against the backdrop of the campus’s masonry buildings. The extension abuts the original media lab facility, separated from it by seismic expansion joints.

Complexity and Cost Savings

MIT Media Lab Extension Uses Transparency to Promote Collaboration Attractive, Energy-Efficient Design

Massachusetts Engineering Excellence Gold Award Winner

Fritted glass and other low-energy materials allowed glazing of up to 80 percent of the facade, maximizing transparency while meeting stringent Massachusetts energy requirements. A distinctive exterior sunshade consisting of large panels of evenly spaced aluminum rods blocks 50 percent of solar heat gain.

Because the design incorporated so few standard details, the project resulted in the creation of 600 drawings and a greater-thanusual number of mockups. The engineer’s recommendation of a more economical basement foundation—and the elimination of a planned second basement (allowing the use of a conventional sheeting system instead of a slurry wall)—yielded significant cost savings.

Photos

Massachusetts Engineering Excellence Silver Award Winner

©Andy Ryan

31


EXTENDING JEFFERSON’S VISION

LA PLATA STADIUM

“ESTADIO ÚNICO”

Boston Society of Architects (continued) Advanced Multimodality Image Guided Operating Suite, Boston, Massachusetts, Integration of Advanced Medical Technology Citation Payette

Concrete Reinforcing Steel Institute, Merit Award Third Street City View Retail Center, Los Angeles, California Abramson Teiger Architects Design-Build Institute of America, National Design-Build Award—Commercial John W. Finn Hall, Naval Base Coronado P742 BEQ, Coronado, California RJC Architects

UNIVERSIT Y OF VIRGINIA

Engineering News-Record New York Best Government/Public Building New U.S. Federal Courthouse, Bu�falo, New York Kohn Pedersen Fox

S O U T H L AW N P R O J E C T

LI N K S T H E PA S T T O T H E

Best Cultural/Worship Project Brooklyn Botanic Garden Visitor Center, Brooklyn, New York Weiss/Manfredi Architects

FUTURE

International Association for Bridge and Structural Engineering, Outstanding Structure Award La Plata Stadium, La Plata, Argentina Roberto Ferreira y Arquitectos Asociados

The South Lawn Project is a 116,000-square-foot ensemble of buildings, gardens, and courtyards

Municipal Art Society, Brendan Gill Prize Franklin D. Roosevelt Four Freedoms Park, New York, New York Louis I. Kahn; Mitchell Giurgola

that extends the University of Virginia’s renowned

“Academical Village,” designed by Thomas Jefferson.

Solar Energy Industries Association and Solar Electric Power Association, Photovoltaic Project of Distinction Award

A 95-foot-wide landscaped terrace (the crossing)

Bachelor Enlisted Quarters and Dining Facility, Pkg. 9, MCAGCC, Twentynine Palms, California Straub Construction

links the new construction to the original open area (the Lawn), which is lined with buildings and gar-

Staten Island Chamber of Commerce, Excellence Award for Exterior and Green Building Staten Island Children’s Museum Environmental Structures, Staten Island, New York Marpillero Pollak Architects

dens and frames Jefferson’s emblematic Rotunda.

27

New York

Engineering Excellence Gold Award WINNER

A MASSIVE UNDERTAKING

La Plata Stadium was designed with architect Roberto Ferreira in the late 1990s, but when Argentina’s economy faltered, it was only partially constructed. The 53,000-seat stadium opened in 2003, lacking its twin-peaked fabric dome. In 2009, when the site was chosen to host the opening game of the 2011 Copa América, construction was resumed.

From New Cabell Hall at the Lawn’s southernmost tip, the crossing spans a busy thoroughfare, continues 315 feet southward, and terminates at the Commons building, a circular structure that echoes the Rotunda and anchors the two classroom wings extending eastward.

A DELICATE BALANCE

The structural engineer had to overcome steep grades and poor soils to create a seamless transition between the Lawn and the complex, aiding designers in capturing the essence of Jeffersonian architecture while opening up modern design possibilities. The crossing had to match the differing elevations of the structures on either end while supporting heavy dead loads from extensive plantings.

BE YOND LEED®

With a strong environmental focus, the project is among the first at the university to earn LEED (Gold) certification. Because sensitivity to the community’s needs was paramount, disruptions to traffic and campus operations were avoided.

BUILDING CONSENSUS

One of the greatest project challenges was the unusually large number of experts and agencies involved in the decision-making process. Painstaking coordination enabled engineers to plan for contingencies, avoid pitfalls, and resolve conflicts inherent in undertaking the most ambitious construction on UVA grounds in more than a century.

33

Aerial Photos: Courtesy of Birdair, Inc.

Brooklyn Botanic Garden Visitor Center, Brooklyn, New York Weiss/Manfredi Architects

©Dan Addison

Courtesy of the University of Virginia

Chicago Athenaeum Museum of Architecture and Design and the European Centre for Architecture Art Design and Urban Studies, Green Good Design Award

International Association for Bridge and Structural Engineers

New York

Outstanding Structure Award Winner

Engineering Excellence Platinum Award Winner


EXTENDING JEFFERSON’S VISION

LA PLATA STADIUM

“ESTADIO ÚNICO”

Boston Society of Architects (continued) Advanced Multimodality Image Guided Operating Suite, Boston, Massachusetts, Integration of Advanced Medical Technology Citation Payette

Concrete Reinforcing Steel Institute, Merit Award Third Street City View Retail Center, Los Angeles, California Abramson Teiger Architects Design-Build Institute of America, National Design-Build Award—Commercial John W. Finn Hall, Naval Base Coronado P742 BEQ, Coronado, California RJC Architects

UNIVERSIT Y OF VIRGINIA

Engineering News-Record New York Best Government/Public Building New U.S. Federal Courthouse, Bu�falo, New York Kohn Pedersen Fox

S O U T H L AW N P R O J E C T

LI N K S T H E PA S T T O T H E

Best Cultural/Worship Project Brooklyn Botanic Garden Visitor Center, Brooklyn, New York Weiss/Manfredi Architects

FUTURE

International Association for Bridge and Structural Engineering, Outstanding Structure Award La Plata Stadium, La Plata, Argentina Roberto Ferreira y Arquitectos Asociados

The South Lawn Project is a 116,000-square-foot ensemble of buildings, gardens, and courtyards

Municipal Art Society, Brendan Gill Prize Franklin D. Roosevelt Four Freedoms Park, New York, New York Louis I. Kahn; Mitchell Giurgola

that extends the University of Virginia’s renowned

“Academical Village,” designed by Thomas Jefferson.

Solar Energy Industries Association and Solar Electric Power Association, Photovoltaic Project of Distinction Award

A 95-foot-wide landscaped terrace (the crossing)

Bachelor Enlisted Quarters and Dining Facility, Pkg. 9, MCAGCC, Twentynine Palms, California Straub Construction

links the new construction to the original open area (the Lawn), which is lined with buildings and gar-

Staten Island Chamber of Commerce, Excellence Award for Exterior and Green Building Staten Island Children’s Museum Environmental Structures, Staten Island, New York Marpillero Pollak Architects

dens and frames Jefferson’s emblematic Rotunda.

27

New York

Engineering Excellence Gold Award WINNER

A MASSIVE UNDERTAKING

La Plata Stadium was designed with architect Roberto Ferreira in the late 1990s, but when Argentina’s economy faltered, it was only partially constructed. The 53,000-seat stadium opened in 2003, lacking its twin-peaked fabric dome. In 2009, when the site was chosen to host the opening game of the 2011 Copa América, construction was resumed.

From New Cabell Hall at the Lawn’s southernmost tip, the crossing spans a busy thoroughfare, continues 315 feet southward, and terminates at the Commons building, a circular structure that echoes the Rotunda and anchors the two classroom wings extending eastward.

A DELICATE BALANCE

The structural engineer had to overcome steep grades and poor soils to create a seamless transition between the Lawn and the complex, aiding designers in capturing the essence of Jeffersonian architecture while opening up modern design possibilities. The crossing had to match the differing elevations of the structures on either end while supporting heavy dead loads from extensive plantings.

BE YOND LEED®

With a strong environmental focus, the project is among the first at the university to earn LEED (Gold) certification. Because sensitivity to the community’s needs was paramount, disruptions to traffic and campus operations were avoided.

BUILDING CONSENSUS

One of the greatest project challenges was the unusually large number of experts and agencies involved in the decision-making process. Painstaking coordination enabled engineers to plan for contingencies, avoid pitfalls, and resolve conflicts inherent in undertaking the most ambitious construction on UVA grounds in more than a century.

33

Aerial Photos: Courtesy of Birdair, Inc.

Brooklyn Botanic Garden Visitor Center, Brooklyn, New York Weiss/Manfredi Architects

©Dan Addison

Courtesy of the University of Virginia

Chicago Athenaeum Museum of Architecture and Design and the European Centre for Architecture Art Design and Urban Studies, Green Good Design Award

International Association for Bridge and Structural Engineers

New York

Outstanding Structure Award Winner

Engineering Excellence Platinum Award Winner


EXTENDING JEFFERSON’S VISION

LA PLATA STADIUM

“ESTADIO ÚNICO”

Boston Society of Architects (continued) Advanced Multimodality Image Guided Operating Suite, Boston, Massachusetts, Integration of Advanced Medical Technology Citation Payette

Concrete Reinforcing Steel Institute, Merit Award Third Street City View Retail Center, Los Angeles, California Abramson Teiger Architects Design-Build Institute of America, National Design-Build Award—Commercial John W. Finn Hall, Naval Base Coronado P742 BEQ, Coronado, California RJC Architects

UNIVERSIT Y OF VIRGINIA

Engineering News-Record New York Best Government/Public Building New U.S. Federal Courthouse, Bu�falo, New York Kohn Pedersen Fox

S O U T H L AW N P R O J E C T

LI N K S T H E PA S T T O T H E

Best Cultural/Worship Project Brooklyn Botanic Garden Visitor Center, Brooklyn, New York Weiss/Manfredi Architects

FUTURE

International Association for Bridge and Structural Engineering, Outstanding Structure Award La Plata Stadium, La Plata, Argentina Roberto Ferreira y Arquitectos Asociados

The South Lawn Project is a 116,000-square-foot ensemble of buildings, gardens, and courtyards

Municipal Art Society, Brendan Gill Prize Franklin D. Roosevelt Four Freedoms Park, New York, New York Louis I. Kahn; Mitchell Giurgola

that extends the University of Virginia’s renowned

“Academical Village,” designed by Thomas Jefferson.

Solar Energy Industries Association and Solar Electric Power Association, Photovoltaic Project of Distinction Award

A 95-foot-wide landscaped terrace (the crossing)

Bachelor Enlisted Quarters and Dining Facility, Pkg. 9, MCAGCC, Twentynine Palms, California Straub Construction

links the new construction to the original open area (the Lawn), which is lined with buildings and gar-

Staten Island Chamber of Commerce, Excellence Award for Exterior and Green Building Staten Island Children’s Museum Environmental Structures, Staten Island, New York Marpillero Pollak Architects

dens and frames Jefferson’s emblematic Rotunda.

27

New York

Engineering Excellence Gold Award WINNER

A MASSIVE UNDERTAKING

La Plata Stadium was designed with architect Roberto Ferreira in the late 1990s, but when Argentina’s economy faltered, it was only partially constructed. The 53,000-seat stadium opened in 2003, lacking its twin-peaked fabric dome. In 2009, when the site was chosen to host the opening game of the 2011 Copa América, construction was resumed.

From New Cabell Hall at the Lawn’s southernmost tip, the crossing spans a busy thoroughfare, continues 315 feet southward, and terminates at the Commons building, a circular structure that echoes the Rotunda and anchors the two classroom wings extending eastward.

A DELICATE BALANCE

The structural engineer had to overcome steep grades and poor soils to create a seamless transition between the Lawn and the complex, aiding designers in capturing the essence of Jeffersonian architecture while opening up modern design possibilities. The crossing had to match the differing elevations of the structures on either end while supporting heavy dead loads from extensive plantings.

BE YOND LEED®

With a strong environmental focus, the project is among the first at the university to earn LEED (Gold) certification. Because sensitivity to the community’s needs was paramount, disruptions to traffic and campus operations were avoided.

BUILDING CONSENSUS

One of the greatest project challenges was the unusually large number of experts and agencies involved in the decision-making process. Painstaking coordination enabled engineers to plan for contingencies, avoid pitfalls, and resolve conflicts inherent in undertaking the most ambitious construction on UVA grounds in more than a century.

33

Aerial Photos: Courtesy of Birdair, Inc.

Brooklyn Botanic Garden Visitor Center, Brooklyn, New York Weiss/Manfredi Architects

©Dan Addison

Courtesy of the University of Virginia

Chicago Athenaeum Museum of Architecture and Design and the European Centre for Architecture Art Design and Urban Studies, Green Good Design Award

International Association for Bridge and Structural Engineers

New York

Outstanding Structure Award Winner

Engineering Excellence Platinum Award Winner


A series of firsts  La Plata is the first PTFE-covered stadium in South America, the first clad in translucent UltraLUX®, allowing sunlight to nourish a naturalgrass field, and the first anywhere to adapt the TenstarTM tensegrity concept to a twin-peak contour. Unlike other tensile roof systems, La Plata’s is stable without its cover.

Minimum waste, maximum economy Testing verified that materials purchased for the dome a decade earlier could be used without modification. The structure’s balance of cut and fill further reduced waste. The durability, low cost, and minimal maintenance requirements of fabric make it an extremely economical construction material.

An archetypal erection procedure  The dome’s unusual shape inspired the development of a new, complex construction method. To avoid damaging the existing structure, temporary towers enabled the roof rings to be lifted before being expanded to their full circumference. The arch was installed with its center higher than its intended final position and then pulled down into place.

Exceeding expectations  The construction and design teams went beyond the original concept of a football stadium, transforming the structure into a multipurpose entertainment complex that will boost the economy by hosting national and international events.

Fabric Dome Is a First for South America 29 35


PUBLICATIONS BOOKS Deepak Ahuja, Behnam Arya, James Cohen, Derrick Hancock, Joshua B. Kardon, Leonard J. Morse-Fortier, Robert T. Ratay, Clemens Rossell, and Lloyd Sonenthal, Guidelines for Forensic Engineering Practice (Second Edition), American Society of Civil Engineers, September 14, 2012. Richard Aynsley, Daryl Boggs, Arthur Chiu, Leighton Cochran, Roy Denoon, Elizabeth English, John Holmes, Noriaki Hosoya, Peter Irwin, Anurag Jain, Nick Jones, Kenny Kwok, Chris Letchford, Marc Levitan, Bill Melbourne, Joseph Minor, Jon Peterka, Doug Smith, Ted Stathopoulos, Arn Womble, and Jiming Xie, Wind Issues in the Design of Buildings, American Society of Civil Engineers, 2012.

International Journal for Numerical Methods in Engineering Luc Berger-Vergiat, Haim Waisman, Badri Hiriyur, Ray Tuminaro, and David Keyes, “Inexact Schwarz-AMG Preconditioners for Crack Problems Modeled by Extended Finite Element Methods,” April 20, 2012. Jacob Fish, Mahesh Bailakanavar, Lynn Powers, and Thomas Cook, “Multiscale Fatigue Life Prediction Model for Heterogeneous Materials,” May 31, 2012. Journal of Earthquake Engineering and Structural Dynamics Virginia Mosquera, Andrew W. Smyth, and Raimondo Betti. “Rapid Evaluation and Damage Assessment of Instrumented Highway Bridges,” April 2012. Journal of Engineering Mechanics

J. R. Ubejd Mujagic, J. Daniel Dolan, Chukwuma G. Ekwueme, David A. Fanella, and Roger A. LaBoube, Structural Design of Low-Rise Buildings in Cold-Formed Steel, Reinforced Masonry, and Structural Timber, McGraw Hill, 2012. Marcus Rutner, Load-Carrying Columns Subjected to Impulsive Loading – Protection Technology in High-Speed Dynamics, Vol. 4 of Reports from Structural Engineering (Berichte aus dem Konstruktiven Ingenieurbau), Technical University Munich, 2012.

PAPERS American Society of Civil Engineers Journal of Structural Engineering Wesley Keller and Stephen Pessiki, “Thermomechanical Simulation of Post-Earthquake Fire Exposure in a TenStory Steel Moment-Frame Building,” January/February 2012. Civil Engineering Timothy Beach and Peggy Van Eepoel, “Blast Protection and Historic Preservation,” October 2012. Computers & Structures Kirubel Teferra, Sanjay Arwade, and George Deodatis, “Stochastic Variability of Effective Properties for Indeterminate Structures via the Generalized Variability Response Function,” November 2012. Earthquake Spectra Hasan Aydin Pekoz and José Pincheira, “A Method for Estimating Spectral Displacements Using a Velocity Pulse,” May 2012. Engineering with Computers Mahesh Bailakanavar, Yang Liu, Jacob Fish, and Yuan Zheng, “Automated Modeling of Random Inclusion Composites,” December 2012.

Genda Chen, Wenjian Wang, Kazi R. Karim, and Xi Huang, “Dynamic Response Reduction of Cantilevered Columns by Anchored Constrained Viscoelastic Layer Treatments,” January 2012. Journal of Fire Protection Engineering Wesley Keller and Stephen Pessiki, “Thermomechanical Response of Steel Moment-Frame Beam-Column Connections during Post-Earthquake Fire Exposure,” December 19, 2012. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America Nachiket Gokhale, Jeffrey Cipolla, and Andrew Norris, “Special Transformations for Pentamode Acoustic Cloaking,” Special Issue on Acoustic Metamaterials, October 2012. Journal of the Mechanics and Physics of Solids Pawel Woelke and Najib Abboud, “Modeling Fracture in Large Scale Shell Structures,” December 2012. Journal of the Structural Design of Tall and Special Buildings Gary C. Hart, “Quality Sucks,” May 2012. Gary C. Hart, Gregg Brandow, Larry Brugger, Lauren D. Carpenter, Nick Delli Quadri, Sampson S. Huang, Ifa Kashefi, Colin Kumabe, and Marshall Lew, “An Alternative Procedure for Seismic Evaluation and Strengthening of Tall Buildings,” December 2012. Gary C. Hart, Joel P. Conte, Kidong Park, Daren Reyes, and Sampson S. Huang, “Structural Reliability for Structural Engineers Evaluating and Strengthening a Tall Building,” December 2012. Gary C. Hart, Anurag Jain, Alexis Dumortier, Can C. Simsir, and Michael Barnes, “Start of Structural Damage in Stucco Walls,” January 2012. Nick Delli Quadri, Colin Kumabe, Ifa Kashefi, Larry Brugger, Lauren D. Carpenter, Gregg Brandow, and Gary C. Hart, “Structural Evaluation and Strengthening of Tall Buildings: Expected Value and Coefficient of Variation of Limit State Capacity,” December 2012.

w eidl inger a s s oci at e s

2012

a nnua l r ep or t


PEOPLE Modern Steel Construction Cheng Gu and Tian-Fang Jing, “Rite of Spring,” August 2012. PCI Journal (Precast/Prestressed Concrete Institute) J. Paul Hobelmann and Macarena Schachter-Adaros, “Architectural Precast Concrete Panel Systems Used for Lateral-Force Resistance,” Winter 2012. Shock and Vibration Journal Pawel Woelke, Najib Abboud, Darren Tennant, Eric Hansen, and Chad McArthur, “Ship Impact Study— Analytical Approaches and Finite Element Modeling,” 2012. Pawel Woelke, Ka-Kin Chan, Raymond Daddazio, and Najib Abboud, “Stress-Resultant Based ElastoViscoplastic Thick Shell Model,” 2012. Pawel Woelke, Ka-Kin Chan, Raymond Daddazio, and George Voyiadjis, “Analysis of Shear Flexible Layered Isotropic and Composite Shells by EPSA,” 2012. Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics Journal on Scientific Computing Badri Hiriyur, Ray Tuminaro, Haim Waisman, Erik Boman, and David Keyes, “A Quasi-Algebraic Multigrid Approach to Fracture Problems Based on Extended Finite Element Methods,” March 2012.

CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS Acoustical Society of America, 164 Meeting, Kansas City, Missouri, October 22-26, 2012 th

Kirubel Teferra and Jeffrey Cipolla, “Investigating the Fidelity of a Pseudo-Analytical Solution of a Rib-Stiffened, Layered Plate Structure Subjected to High Frequency Acoustic Loading.” American Association for Wind Engineering, 3rd Workshop, Hyannis, Massachusetts, August 12-14, 2012 Anurag Jain, “Wind Borne Debris Impact Generated Damage to Cladding of High Rise Building.” American Society of Civil Engineers 6 Congress on Forensic Engineering, San Francisco, California, October 31-November 3, 2012 th

Behnam Arya and Anurag Jain, “Prefabricated Wood Truss Roof Failure under Wind Induced Loads.” Gary C. Hart and Kidong Park, “Application of Reliability Model Updating in the Forensic Engineering Field.” Anurag Jain and Can C. Simsir, “Investigation of Hurricane Damage to a Condominium Building in Florida.”

American Society of Civil Engineers Structural Engineering Institute, 2012 Structures Congress, Chicago, Illinois, March 29-31, 2012 Timothy Beach and Peggy Van Eepoel, “Don’t Forget the Existing Materials! Case Studies for Smart Use of Existing Façade Systems in Blast Design of Historic Buildings.” Phillip Georgakopoulos and Panagiotis Koklanos, “Design, Detailing, and Architectural Impacts of Fiber Reinforced Polymers (FRP) and Geotextile Fabrics in the Blast Mitigation of Unreinforced Masonry Walls in Historic Buildings.” Evan Lapointe, Qi Ye, and Erich Baumgartner, “Performance-Based Vibration Design Methodology for Pedestrian Bridges.” Macarena Schachter Adaros and Kaan Tanali, “Retrofit of Structures to Meet Progressive Collapse Guidelines.” American Society of Mechanical Engineers, International Mechanical Engineering Congress & Exposition, Houston, Texas, November 9-15, 2012 Najib Abboud and Pawel Woelke, “Parametric Study of Implosion of Stiffened Cylinders.” Kirubel Teferra, Michael Shields, Adam Hapij, and Raymond Daddazio, “A Combined Reduced Order and SubStructuring Approach for Uncertainty Quantification of Equipment Response Due to Shock Loading.” Pawel Woelke and Najib Abboud, “Advanced Fire Analysis of Aluminum Structures During and After Fire.” American Society of Mechanical Engineers Noise Control and Acoustics Division, 41st International Congress and Exposition on Noise Control Engineering (Internoise), New York, New York, August 19-22, 2012 Michael Shields, Pawel Woelke, and Najib Abboud, “Parameterization of the Pressure Wave Emitted From Implosion of Submerged Cylindrical Shell Structures.” Kirubel Teferra, Jeffrey Cipolla, Nachiket Gokhale, and Mohammed Ettouney, “Conditioning and Convergence in an Analytic Model of the Elastodynamics of Submerged, Coated, Ribbed Plates.” American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Pressure Vessels and Piping Conference, Toronto, Canada, July 15-19, 2012 David Vaughan, Howard Levine, Paul Hassig, and Robert Smilowitz, “Evaluation of Airblast Loads on Structures in Complex Configurations.” American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Verification and Validation Symposium, Las Vegas, Nevada, May 2-4, 2012 Michael Shields, Kirubel Teferra, Adam Hapij, Najib Abboud, and Raymond Daddazio, “Validating Computational Models in the Presence of Uncertainty for the Response of Large-Scale Structures to Impulsive Dynamic Loading with Limited Data.”

37

PZFlex® Champions

Career Recognition

DR. ROBERT BANKS, Weidlinger senior associate and director of PZFlex services, became a Senior Member of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) in 2012. Only 8 percent of the institute’s 400,000 members achieve this grade, IEEE’s second highest. Banks holds advanced degrees in ultrasonic design from the University of Strathclyde, Scotland. He also coaches, and PZFlex sponsors, the rugby team of Stanford University’s Graduate School of Business, which won the 2012 inaugural USA Sevens Las Vegas graduate school tournament in the last minute of play and finished second in the Austin, Texas, tournament.

JEROME RASGUS retired at the end of the year, but not before receiving a 2012 Excellence in Structural Engineering Individual Award from the Structural Engineers Association of Metropolitan Washington (SEA-MW). Rasgus was a Weidlinger principal and manager of the firm’s National Capital Region Washington, DC, office. For nearly 35 years, as both a Registered Architect and licensed Professional Engineer, he mentored SEA-MW members and others who are now industry leaders.

DR. GERALD HARVEY, PZFlex sales manager, Europe, received the 2012 A4A Better Way Forward award for his contributions to a multifaceted project on acoustic thermography at Rolls Royce, his former employer.

DR. RAYMOND DADDAZIO, Weidlinger’s president and CEO, received a 2012 Columbia University Alumni Medal for distinguished service to the university. Daddazio earned his BSCE, MSCE, and EngScD degrees from Columbia’s Fu Foundation School of Engineering and Applied Science (SEAS) and is current chairman of the SEAS Board of Visitors. He taught Columbia graduate students for many years and is a member of the university’s Civil Engineering and Engineering Mechanics Industrial Advisory Council. DR. MOHAMMED ETTOUNEY was an active presenter in 2012, after the publication of Infrastructure Health in Civil Engineering, which he coauthored with Dr. Sreenivas Alampalli of the New York State Department of Transportation. Ettouney was a keynote speaker at the 5th International Conference on Protection of Structures against Hazards and represented the U.S. delegation to the 6th International Workshop on Structural Control Monitoring at the University of Technology, Sydney, Australia.

W EIDL INGER A S S OCI AT E S

2012

A NNUA L R EP OR T


Asociación Ingenieros Estructurales, 22nd Jornadas de Ingeniería Estructural, Buenos Aires, Argentina, October 5, 2012 Gregory Freeman, “Estadio Ciudad de La Plata.” Cambridge University, Engineering Department Workshop, Cambridge, England, United Kingdom, September 12, 2012 Pawel Woelke and John Hutchinson, “Ductile Fracture Simulation Methodologies for Industrial Applications.” Commissariat à l’Énergie Atomique et aux Énergies Alternatives and ENSI Bourges, 22nd International Symposium on Military Aspects of Blast and Shock (MABS22), Bourges, France, November 4-9, 2012 Chok Kau Binky Lee, “A First-Order Method for Extrapolating Pressure-Time Histories.” John Mould, Howard Levine, David Vaughan, and Darren Tennant, “Simulating Explosive Detonations within Buildings with Frangible Walls.” Andrew Nicholson, Christopher Stirling, and Nicolas Misselbrook, “Fast Running CFD Code Using GPGPUS for High Fidelity Airblast Calculations.” Deep Foundations Institute, Annual Conference, Houston, Texas, October 16-19, 2012 Michael Oakland, John Mould, Gordon Chen, and William McElwee, “Analysis and Performance of Sheet Pile Cofferdam under Demolition Blast Loads.” El Centro de Investigación en Matemática Pura y Aplicada, XVIII Simposio Internacional de Métodos Matemáticos Aplicados a las Ciencias, San José, Costa Rica, February 21-24, 2012 Victor Pereyra, “Compressed Fast Solution of the Acoustic Wave Equation.” Engineering Mechanics Institute and American Society of Civil Engineers, 11th Joint Specialty Conference on Probabilistic Mechanics and Structural Reliability, University of Notre Dame, Indiana, June 17-20, 2012 Brett Benowitz, George Deodatis, and Michael Shields, “Simulation of Non-Stationary and Non-Gaussian Processes: Efficient Methodology for Determining Evolutionary Spectra from Autocorrelation Functions and Application to a Translation Model-Based Algorithm.” Badri Hiriyur, Ray Tuminaro, and Haim Waisman, “Multigrid Approaches to Solve Fracture Problems Modeled with XFEM.”

Michael Shields and George Deodatis, “Simple and Efficient Approximation of a General Non-Gaussian Stochastic Vector Process by a Translation Vector Process.”

International Electrical, Transport and Optical Properties of Inhomogeneous Media Association, ETOPIM 9, Marseille, France, September 2-7, 2012 Andrew Norris, Adam Nagy, Jeffrey Cipolla, Nachiket Gokhale, Anne-Christine Hladky-Henion, Charles Croënne, Jérôme Vasseur, and Bertrand Dubus, “Metallic Structures for Transformation Acoustics and Negative Index Phononic Crystals.”

Michael Shields, Kirubel Teferra, Adam Hapij, Najib Abboud, Raymond Daddazio, “A Methodology for Verifying and Validating Computational Models of the Response of Highly Uncertain, Large-Scale Structures Subject to Dynamic Impulsive Loading.”

Johns Hopkins University, International Workshop on Computational Mechanics of Materials (IWCMM XXII), Baltimore, Maryland, September 24-26, 2012

The French Acoustical Society and the Institute of Acoustics (UK), Acoustics 2012, Nantes, France, April 23-27, 2012

Badri Hiriyur, Pawel Woelke, and Robert Smilowitz, “Numerical Simulation of Blast Effects on Large-Scale Civil Engineering Structures: CMU Walls Retrofitted with Polymeric Coatings.”

Laura Cunningham, Anthony Mulholland, Gerald Harvey, and Colin Bird, “Ultrasonic Wave Propagation in Heterogeneous Media.” Front Range Scientific Computations, Inc., Copper Mountain Conference on Iterative Methods, Copper Mountain, Colorado, March 25-30, 2012

Los Angeles Tall Buildings Structural Design Council, Annual Meeting, Los Angeles, California, May 4, 2012 Gary C. Hart, Gregg Brandow, Larry Brugger, Lauren D. Carpenter, Nick Delli Quadri, Sampson S. Huang, Ifa Kashefi, Colin Kumabe, and Marshall Lew, “An Alternative Procedure for Seismic Evaluation and Strengthening of Tall Buildings.”

Badri Hiriyur, Ray Tuminaro, and Haim Waisman, “Algebraic Multigrid for 3D Nonlinear Extended Finite Elements.” Gobierno de España Ministerio de Economía y Competitividad, Centro de Acústica Aplicada y Evaluación no Destructiva, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, University of LEEDS, and Universitat Politècnica de València, International Symposium on Ultrasound in the Control of Industrial Processes, Madrid, Spain, April 18-20, 2012

Office of Naval Research, International Workshop on Acoustic Transduction Materials and Devices, State College, Pennsylvania, May 8-10, 2012 Robert Banks and Gerald Harvey, “3D Finite Element Simulation of a Fully-Coupled 9 Element Hexagonal-Head Tonpilz Array.”

Gerald Harvey, “PZFlex—Finite Element Analysis for Virtual Prototyping and Wave Propagation Simulation.”

Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 9th Workshop on Experimental and Computational Fracture Mechanics, Cambridge, Massachusetts, October 8, 2012

Gerdau AZA, Camara Chilena de la Construccion, Asociación Latinoamericana del Acero, European Convention for Constructional Steelwork, and Asociación Chilena de Sismología e Ingenieria Antisismica, 7th International Specialty Conference on Behaviour of Steel Structures in Seismic Areas, Santiago de Chile, Chile, January 9-11, 2012

Pawel Woelke, John Hutchinson, “Ductile Fracture Simulation Methodologies for Industrial Applications.” Mid-Atlantic Precast Association, Member Seminar, Davidsonville, Maryland, August 29, 2012

Andrei M. Reinhorn and Macarena Schachter Adaros, “Experimental and Analytical Modeling Seismic Behavior of Braced Framed Structures with ‘Zipper’ Mechanism.”

Huston Dawson, “Design of Precast Façades for Explosive Loads.”

International Association for Earthquake Engineering, 15th World Conference on Earthquake Engineering, Lisbon, Portugal, September 24-28, 2012

Shock and Vibration Exchange, Shock and Vibration Symposium, New Orleans, Louisiana, November 4-8, 2012 Najib Abboud, “The Evolution of Critical Infrastructure Security.”

Gary C. Hart, “Seismic Evaluation of Tall Buildings: Transparence Using a Building Specific Earthquake Demand and System Capacity Uncertainty Analysis.”

Jeffrey Cipolla, Michael Shields, Pawel Woelke, and Najib Abboud, “Parameterization of the Pressure Wave Emitted by Hydrostatic Implosion of Submerged Cylinders.”

Can C. Simsir, Chukwuma Ekwueme, Gary C. Hart, and Alexis Dumortier, “Earthquake Damage Assessment of Reinforced Concrete Hotel Buildings in Hawaii.”

Mohammed Ettouney, “Importance of Infrastructure Security to Modern Society.” Mohammed Ettouney, “State of Progressive Collapse Knowledge and Research.”

38

Simos Gerasimidis (Columbia University), Mohammed Ettouney, and George Deodatis (Columbia University), “New Findings on Progressive Collapse of Buildings and Global Structural Integrity of Damaged Structures.” Adam Hapij, Adam Dick, Margaret Tang, and Mohammed Ettouney, “Development of the Post Disaster Assessment Tool.” Colleen Kirk, Margaret Tang, Raymond Daddazio, and Mohammed Ettouney, “Integration of Sustainability and Building Security.” Michael Shields, Jeffrey Cipolla, Pawel Woelke, and Najib Abboud, “Use of a Neural Net for Response Surface Based Prediction of the Pressure Wave Emitted by Hydrostatic Implosion of Submerged Cylinders.” Michael Shields, Kirubel Teferra, Adam Hapij, Najib Abboud, and Raymond Daddazio, “Bootstrap Monte Carlo Using Adaptive Stratified Sampling for UQ/V&V of Large Structures Subject to Shock Loading.” Robert Smilowitz, Milagros Kennett (Department of Homeland Security), and David Vaughan, “Evaluating the Effects of Explosive Devices in Urban Streetscapes.” Margaret Tang, Ryan Anderson, and Mohammed Ettouney, “WIM Data, Risk Management, and Bridge Security.” Kirubel Teferra, Michael Shields, Adam Hapij, and Raymond Daddazio, “A Combined Reduced Order and Substructuring Approach for Uncertainty Quantification of Heavy Equipment Response.” United States Air Force, Aircraft Airworthiness & Sustainment Conference, Baltimore, Maryland, April 2-5, 2012 Pawel Woelke, Marcus Rutner, Najib Abboud, Calvin Rans, and René Alderliesten, “Finite Element Simulation of Fatigue Fracture in Fiber Metal Laminates.” Universidad Central de Venezuela, Simposio Científico y Tecnológico en Computacion, Caracas, Venezuela, May 7-9, 2012 Victor Pereyra, “Simulación de la Propagación de Ondas en 2D Usando un Modelo Reducido” (Simulation of Wave Propagation in 2D Using a Reduced Model). University of Southern California, Center for Applied Mathematical Sciences Seminar, Los Angeles, California, February 27, 2012 Victor Pereyra, “Compressed Fast Solution of the Acoustic Wave Equation.” Wind Science and Engineering Research Center, United StatesJapan Workshop on Structural Dynamics and Monitoring of Bridges and other Flexible Structures against Wind Hazards, Lubbock, Texas, March 11-13, 2012 Anurag Jain, “Wind-Induced Non-Linear Dynamic Response Analysis of a Tall Chimney.”

39


Asociación Ingenieros Estructurales, 22nd Jornadas de Ingeniería Estructural, Buenos Aires, Argentina, October 5, 2012 Gregory Freeman, “Estadio Ciudad de La Plata.” Cambridge University, Engineering Department Workshop, Cambridge, England, United Kingdom, September 12, 2012 Pawel Woelke and John Hutchinson, “Ductile Fracture Simulation Methodologies for Industrial Applications.” Commissariat à l’Énergie Atomique et aux Énergies Alternatives and ENSI Bourges, 22nd International Symposium on Military Aspects of Blast and Shock (MABS22), Bourges, France, November 4-9, 2012 Chok Kau Binky Lee, “A First-Order Method for Extrapolating Pressure-Time Histories.” John Mould, Howard Levine, David Vaughan, and Darren Tennant, “Simulating Explosive Detonations within Buildings with Frangible Walls.” Andrew Nicholson, Christopher Stirling, and Nicolas Misselbrook, “Fast Running CFD Code Using GPGPUS for High Fidelity Airblast Calculations.” Deep Foundations Institute, Annual Conference, Houston, Texas, October 16-19, 2012 Michael Oakland, John Mould, Gordon Chen, and William McElwee, “Analysis and Performance of Sheet Pile Cofferdam under Demolition Blast Loads.” El Centro de Investigación en Matemática Pura y Aplicada, XVIII Simposio Internacional de Métodos Matemáticos Aplicados a las Ciencias, San José, Costa Rica, February 21-24, 2012 Victor Pereyra, “Compressed Fast Solution of the Acoustic Wave Equation.” Engineering Mechanics Institute and American Society of Civil Engineers, 11th Joint Specialty Conference on Probabilistic Mechanics and Structural Reliability, University of Notre Dame, Indiana, June 17-20, 2012 Brett Benowitz, George Deodatis, and Michael Shields, “Simulation of Non-Stationary and Non-Gaussian Processes: Efficient Methodology for Determining Evolutionary Spectra from Autocorrelation Functions and Application to a Translation Model-Based Algorithm.” Badri Hiriyur, Ray Tuminaro, and Haim Waisman, “Multigrid Approaches to Solve Fracture Problems Modeled with XFEM.”

Michael Shields and George Deodatis, “Simple and Efficient Approximation of a General Non-Gaussian Stochastic Vector Process by a Translation Vector Process.”

International Electrical, Transport and Optical Properties of Inhomogeneous Media Association, ETOPIM 9, Marseille, France, September 2-7, 2012 Andrew Norris, Adam Nagy, Jeffrey Cipolla, Nachiket Gokhale, Anne-Christine Hladky-Henion, Charles Croënne, Jérôme Vasseur, and Bertrand Dubus, “Metallic Structures for Transformation Acoustics and Negative Index Phononic Crystals.”

Michael Shields, Kirubel Teferra, Adam Hapij, Najib Abboud, Raymond Daddazio, “A Methodology for Verifying and Validating Computational Models of the Response of Highly Uncertain, Large-Scale Structures Subject to Dynamic Impulsive Loading.”

Johns Hopkins University, International Workshop on Computational Mechanics of Materials (IWCMM XXII), Baltimore, Maryland, September 24-26, 2012

The French Acoustical Society and the Institute of Acoustics (UK), Acoustics 2012, Nantes, France, April 23-27, 2012

Badri Hiriyur, Pawel Woelke, and Robert Smilowitz, “Numerical Simulation of Blast Effects on Large-Scale Civil Engineering Structures: CMU Walls Retrofitted with Polymeric Coatings.”

Laura Cunningham, Anthony Mulholland, Gerald Harvey, and Colin Bird, “Ultrasonic Wave Propagation in Heterogeneous Media.” Front Range Scientific Computations, Inc., Copper Mountain Conference on Iterative Methods, Copper Mountain, Colorado, March 25-30, 2012

Los Angeles Tall Buildings Structural Design Council, Annual Meeting, Los Angeles, California, May 4, 2012 Gary C. Hart, Gregg Brandow, Larry Brugger, Lauren D. Carpenter, Nick Delli Quadri, Sampson S. Huang, Ifa Kashefi, Colin Kumabe, and Marshall Lew, “An Alternative Procedure for Seismic Evaluation and Strengthening of Tall Buildings.”

Badri Hiriyur, Ray Tuminaro, and Haim Waisman, “Algebraic Multigrid for 3D Nonlinear Extended Finite Elements.” Gobierno de España Ministerio de Economía y Competitividad, Centro de Acústica Aplicada y Evaluación no Destructiva, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, University of LEEDS, and Universitat Politècnica de València, International Symposium on Ultrasound in the Control of Industrial Processes, Madrid, Spain, April 18-20, 2012

Office of Naval Research, International Workshop on Acoustic Transduction Materials and Devices, State College, Pennsylvania, May 8-10, 2012 Robert Banks and Gerald Harvey, “3D Finite Element Simulation of a Fully-Coupled 9 Element Hexagonal-Head Tonpilz Array.”

Gerald Harvey, “PZFlex—Finite Element Analysis for Virtual Prototyping and Wave Propagation Simulation.”

Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 9th Workshop on Experimental and Computational Fracture Mechanics, Cambridge, Massachusetts, October 8, 2012

Gerdau AZA, Camara Chilena de la Construccion, Asociación Latinoamericana del Acero, European Convention for Constructional Steelwork, and Asociación Chilena de Sismología e Ingenieria Antisismica, 7th International Specialty Conference on Behaviour of Steel Structures in Seismic Areas, Santiago de Chile, Chile, January 9-11, 2012

Pawel Woelke, John Hutchinson, “Ductile Fracture Simulation Methodologies for Industrial Applications.” Mid-Atlantic Precast Association, Member Seminar, Davidsonville, Maryland, August 29, 2012

Andrei M. Reinhorn and Macarena Schachter Adaros, “Experimental and Analytical Modeling Seismic Behavior of Braced Framed Structures with ‘Zipper’ Mechanism.”

Huston Dawson, “Design of Precast Façades for Explosive Loads.”

International Association for Earthquake Engineering, 15th World Conference on Earthquake Engineering, Lisbon, Portugal, September 24-28, 2012

Shock and Vibration Exchange, Shock and Vibration Symposium, New Orleans, Louisiana, November 4-8, 2012 Najib Abboud, “The Evolution of Critical Infrastructure Security.”

Gary C. Hart, “Seismic Evaluation of Tall Buildings: Transparence Using a Building Specific Earthquake Demand and System Capacity Uncertainty Analysis.”

Jeffrey Cipolla, Michael Shields, Pawel Woelke, and Najib Abboud, “Parameterization of the Pressure Wave Emitted by Hydrostatic Implosion of Submerged Cylinders.”

Can C. Simsir, Chukwuma Ekwueme, Gary C. Hart, and Alexis Dumortier, “Earthquake Damage Assessment of Reinforced Concrete Hotel Buildings in Hawaii.”

Mohammed Ettouney, “Importance of Infrastructure Security to Modern Society.” Mohammed Ettouney, “State of Progressive Collapse Knowledge and Research.”

38

Simos Gerasimidis (Columbia University), Mohammed Ettouney, and George Deodatis (Columbia University), “New Findings on Progressive Collapse of Buildings and Global Structural Integrity of Damaged Structures.” Adam Hapij, Adam Dick, Margaret Tang, and Mohammed Ettouney, “Development of the Post Disaster Assessment Tool.” Colleen Kirk, Margaret Tang, Raymond Daddazio, and Mohammed Ettouney, “Integration of Sustainability and Building Security.” Michael Shields, Jeffrey Cipolla, Pawel Woelke, and Najib Abboud, “Use of a Neural Net for Response Surface Based Prediction of the Pressure Wave Emitted by Hydrostatic Implosion of Submerged Cylinders.” Michael Shields, Kirubel Teferra, Adam Hapij, Najib Abboud, and Raymond Daddazio, “Bootstrap Monte Carlo Using Adaptive Stratified Sampling for UQ/V&V of Large Structures Subject to Shock Loading.” Robert Smilowitz, Milagros Kennett (Department of Homeland Security), and David Vaughan, “Evaluating the Effects of Explosive Devices in Urban Streetscapes.” Margaret Tang, Ryan Anderson, and Mohammed Ettouney, “WIM Data, Risk Management, and Bridge Security.” Kirubel Teferra, Michael Shields, Adam Hapij, and Raymond Daddazio, “A Combined Reduced Order and Substructuring Approach for Uncertainty Quantification of Heavy Equipment Response.” United States Air Force, Aircraft Airworthiness & Sustainment Conference, Baltimore, Maryland, April 2-5, 2012 Pawel Woelke, Marcus Rutner, Najib Abboud, Calvin Rans, and René Alderliesten, “Finite Element Simulation of Fatigue Fracture in Fiber Metal Laminates.” Universidad Central de Venezuela, Simposio Científico y Tecnológico en Computacion, Caracas, Venezuela, May 7-9, 2012 Victor Pereyra, “Simulación de la Propagación de Ondas en 2D Usando un Modelo Reducido” (Simulation of Wave Propagation in 2D Using a Reduced Model). University of Southern California, Center for Applied Mathematical Sciences Seminar, Los Angeles, California, February 27, 2012 Victor Pereyra, “Compressed Fast Solution of the Acoustic Wave Equation.” Wind Science and Engineering Research Center, United StatesJapan Workshop on Structural Dynamics and Monitoring of Bridges and other Flexible Structures against Wind Hazards, Lubbock, Texas, March 11-13, 2012 Anurag Jain, “Wind-Induced Non-Linear Dynamic Response Analysis of a Tall Chimney.”

39


PEOPLE Modern Steel Construction Cheng Gu and Tian-Fang Jing, “Rite of Spring,” August 2012. PCI Journal (Precast/Prestressed Concrete Institute) J. Paul Hobelmann and Macarena Schachter-Adaros, “Architectural Precast Concrete Panel Systems Used for Lateral-Force Resistance,” Winter 2012. Shock and Vibration Journal Pawel Woelke, Najib Abboud, Darren Tennant, Eric Hansen, and Chad McArthur, “Ship Impact Study— Analytical Approaches and Finite Element Modeling,” 2012. Pawel Woelke, Ka-Kin Chan, Raymond Daddazio, and Najib Abboud, “Stress-Resultant Based ElastoViscoplastic Thick Shell Model,” 2012. Pawel Woelke, Ka-Kin Chan, Raymond Daddazio, and George Voyiadjis, “Analysis of Shear Flexible Layered Isotropic and Composite Shells by EPSA,” 2012. Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics Journal on Scientific Computing Badri Hiriyur, Ray Tuminaro, Haim Waisman, Erik Boman, and David Keyes, “A Quasi-Algebraic Multigrid Approach to Fracture Problems Based on Extended Finite Element Methods,” March 2012.

CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS Acoustical Society of America, 164 Meeting, Kansas City, Missouri, October 22-26, 2012 th

Kirubel Teferra and Jeffrey Cipolla, “Investigating the Fidelity of a Pseudo-Analytical Solution of a Rib-Stiffened, Layered Plate Structure Subjected to High Frequency Acoustic Loading.” American Association for Wind Engineering, 3rd Workshop, Hyannis, Massachusetts, August 12-14, 2012 Anurag Jain, “Wind Borne Debris Impact Generated Damage to Cladding of High Rise Building.” American Society of Civil Engineers 6 Congress on Forensic Engineering, San Francisco, California, October 31-November 3, 2012 th

Behnam Arya and Anurag Jain, “Prefabricated Wood Truss Roof Failure under Wind Induced Loads.” Gary C. Hart and Kidong Park, “Application of Reliability Model Updating in the Forensic Engineering Field.” Anurag Jain and Can C. Simsir, “Investigation of Hurricane Damage to a Condominium Building in Florida.”

American Society of Civil Engineers Structural Engineering Institute, 2012 Structures Congress, Chicago, Illinois, March 29-31, 2012 Timothy Beach and Peggy Van Eepoel, “Don’t Forget the Existing Materials! Case Studies for Smart Use of Existing Façade Systems in Blast Design of Historic Buildings.” Phillip Georgakopoulos and Panagiotis Koklanos, “Design, Detailing, and Architectural Impacts of Fiber Reinforced Polymers (FRP) and Geotextile Fabrics in the Blast Mitigation of Unreinforced Masonry Walls in Historic Buildings.” Evan Lapointe, Qi Ye, and Erich Baumgartner, “Performance-Based Vibration Design Methodology for Pedestrian Bridges.” Macarena Schachter Adaros and Kaan Tanali, “Retrofit of Structures to Meet Progressive Collapse Guidelines.” American Society of Mechanical Engineers, International Mechanical Engineering Congress & Exposition, Houston, Texas, November 9-15, 2012 Najib Abboud and Pawel Woelke, “Parametric Study of Implosion of Stiffened Cylinders.” Kirubel Teferra, Michael Shields, Adam Hapij, and Raymond Daddazio, “A Combined Reduced Order and SubStructuring Approach for Uncertainty Quantification of Equipment Response Due to Shock Loading.” Pawel Woelke and Najib Abboud, “Advanced Fire Analysis of Aluminum Structures During and After Fire.” American Society of Mechanical Engineers Noise Control and Acoustics Division, 41st International Congress and Exposition on Noise Control Engineering (Internoise), New York, New York, August 19-22, 2012 Michael Shields, Pawel Woelke, and Najib Abboud, “Parameterization of the Pressure Wave Emitted From Implosion of Submerged Cylindrical Shell Structures.” Kirubel Teferra, Jeffrey Cipolla, Nachiket Gokhale, and Mohammed Ettouney, “Conditioning and Convergence in an Analytic Model of the Elastodynamics of Submerged, Coated, Ribbed Plates.” American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Pressure Vessels and Piping Conference, Toronto, Canada, July 15-19, 2012 David Vaughan, Howard Levine, Paul Hassig, and Robert Smilowitz, “Evaluation of Airblast Loads on Structures in Complex Configurations.” American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Verification and Validation Symposium, Las Vegas, Nevada, May 2-4, 2012 Michael Shields, Kirubel Teferra, Adam Hapij, Najib Abboud, and Raymond Daddazio, “Validating Computational Models in the Presence of Uncertainty for the Response of Large-Scale Structures to Impulsive Dynamic Loading with Limited Data.”

37

PZFlex® Champions

Career Recognition

DR. ROBERT BANKS, Weidlinger senior associate and director of PZFlex services, became a Senior Member of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) in 2012. Only 8 percent of the institute’s 400,000 members achieve this grade, IEEE’s second highest. Banks holds advanced degrees in ultrasonic design from the University of Strathclyde, Scotland. He also coaches, and PZFlex sponsors, the rugby team of Stanford University’s Graduate School of Business, which won the 2012 inaugural USA Sevens Las Vegas graduate school tournament in the last minute of play and finished second in the Austin, Texas, tournament.

JEROME RASGUS retired at the end of the year, but not before receiving a 2012 Excellence in Structural Engineering Individual Award from the Structural Engineers Association of Metropolitan Washington (SEA-MW). Rasgus was a Weidlinger principal and manager of the firm’s National Capital Region Washington, DC, office. For nearly 35 years, as both a Registered Architect and licensed Professional Engineer, he mentored SEA-MW members and others who are now industry leaders.

DR. GERALD HARVEY, PZFlex sales manager, Europe, received the 2012 A4A Better Way Forward award for his contributions to a multifaceted project on acoustic thermography at Rolls Royce, his former employer.

DR. RAYMOND DADDAZIO, Weidlinger’s president and CEO, received a 2012 Columbia University Alumni Medal for distinguished service to the university. Daddazio earned his BSCE, MSCE, and EngScD degrees from Columbia’s Fu Foundation School of Engineering and Applied Science (SEAS) and is current chairman of the SEAS Board of Visitors. He taught Columbia graduate students for many years and is a member of the university’s Civil Engineering and Engineering Mechanics Industrial Advisory Council. DR. MOHAMMED ETTOUNEY was an active presenter in 2012, after the publication of Infrastructure Health in Civil Engineering, which he coauthored with Dr. Sreenivas Alampalli of the New York State Department of Transportation. Ettouney was a keynote speaker at the 5th International Conference on Protection of Structures against Hazards and represented the U.S. delegation to the 6th International Workshop on Structural Control Monitoring at the University of Technology, Sydney, Australia.

W EIDL INGER A S S OCI AT E S

2012

A NNUA L R EP OR T


Associate Principal Jeffrey Cipolla, PhD – Washington, DC

Welcome Addition CAROLINE WEISS, PE and LEED Accredited Professional, joined Weidlinger as an associate principal of the Building Design Group in New York. Her 25 years of structural engineering experience include a wide range of projects, such as the Southwest Washington Medical Center and the SeaTac Airport South Terminal Expansion. Shortly after arrival, Weiss began managing a major project for Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center and CUNY Hunter College. Weiss holds an MS degree in structural engineering from the University of Pennsylvania and a BS degree in civil engineering from Tufts University.

Senior Associate Anthony Balseca, PE – New York, NY Robert Banks, PhD – Mountain View, CA Cheng Gu, PE – New York, NY Brent Vollenweider, PE, LEED AP – New York, NY Pawel Woelke, PhD, PE – New York, NY

Under New Management

Senior Engineer Richard Lau, PE, LEED AP – New York, NY Oleksandr Malyushytskyy – Mountain View, CA Melissa Manalo, PE – New York, NY Quan Nguyen, PE – New York, NY Kara Raymond, PE – New York, NY

CATHERINE BRAGG was hired as Weidlinger’s first in-house general counsel, responsible for providing legal guidance to Weidlinger’s board of directors and senior management. She was previously vice president, senior counsel, and contracts management director of TRC Companies, Inc. She received JD and MBA degrees from the University of Connecticut and is a member of the bar in New York and Connecticut. JAY HEADDEN became Weidlinger’s controller in 2012, bringing extensive finance and technical experience as former controller of Weeks Marine, Inc., a $500-million construction and engineering company, and Jaret International, Inc., a subsidiary of Cadbury Schweppes. Headden received an MBA degree from Monmouth University and a BS degree in finance from Fairleigh Dickinson University.

Associate James Dineen, PE – New York, NY Celalettin Simsir, PhD, PE – Marina del Rey, CA

Project Engineer Jonathan DiLauro, PE – Mountain Lakes, NJ Christopher Heckmann, PE – Washington, DC Pornchai Jiratatprasot, PE – New York, NY Kendell Johnson, PE, LEED AP – Washington, DC

Engineer III Gershon Larsen, EIT, LEED AP – Boston, MA

Associate Facility Security Officer Roxanne Timothy – New York, NY

Senior HR Administrator Elizabeth Modica – New York, NY

Billing Supervisor Ana Veronica Bast – New York, NY

Professional Staff Assistant Lindsay Sapp – Albuquerque, NM

Credit and Collections Clerk Milagros Sanchez – New York, NY

41


CHARITABLE DONATIONS American Council of Engineering Companies of New York, Scholarship Fund American Architectural Foundation, Accent on Architecture Gala American Institute of Architects (AIA), New York Chapter and Center for Architecture Foundation Architecture, Construction, and Engineering (ACE) Mentor Program of Greater New York Business Executives for National Security Bridge Family Center, Children’s Charity Ball American Society of Civil Engineers, Columbia University Chapter

New York Building Foundation New York Landmarks Preservation Foundation Nontraditional Employment for Women Operation Smile ORT America, Inc. (Organization for Rehabilitation through Training) Regional Plan Association/Governors Island Alliance Salvadori Center Salvation Army San Francisco Architectural Heritage

CulturalDC

Special Olympics New York

Doctors without Borders USA

St. Francis Food Pantries & Shelters

Festival Ballet Albuquerque

Stanford University Rugby Club

Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation Kiewit Children’s Fund Los Angeles Tall Buildings Structural Design Council Lower Manhattan Cultural Council March of Dimes

Structural Engineers Association of Metropolitan Washington TeaPotOne (Sports-Bike Marathon for Charity) Women’s Transportation Seminar, Boston Worcester Polytechnic Institute Youth for Tomorrow

Museum of the City of New York

Goya Foods, the largest Hispanic-owned food company in the United States, sponsored Weidlinger in the 2012 New York Canstruction competition, an annual charity event for which contestants design and build oversized structures entirely of canned food. After the structures were judged and exhibited in February 2013 (postponed because of Superstorm Sandy), they were dismantled and the cans donated to City Harvest for distribution to New York City soup kitchens and food pantries. Weidlinger’s entry, “Room for One More,” was a rectangular dinner table surrounded by four chairs. It was conceived by Senior Graphic Artist Lorenzo Sanjuan and Senior Business Analyst Dom Ponsades to highlight Canstruction’s Thanksgiving-themed message of feeding the hungry and to support Goya’s promotion of MiPlato/MyPlate, a national initiative to educate families about healthy eating.

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2012

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Weidlinger 2012 Annual Report