Elite Equestrian magazine Jan/Feb 2022 issue

Page 1

ELITE

EQUESTRIAN

®

Celebrating The Equestrian Lifestyle

Cindy Crucio�

Serenity Farm Show Stables

Builds A Solid FOUNDATION

FOAL First Life Lessons TRAILER SAFETY

COLD WEATHER Fashion SETTING GOALS with Kat Fuqua

Volume 22 Issue 1 Complimentary

www.EliteEquestrianMagazine.com












12

www.EliteEquestrianMagazine.com


www.EliteEquestrianMagazine.com

13


FULL SERVICE FOR ALL MAKES & MODELS

2023 4 Star: The Ultimate In A 2 + 1 Straight Load • • • • •

Clear Coat Changes to 2 Box Stalls Hydralic Jack xxxx Fully insulated roof Escape door with drop window and drop bars • Rear and side ramps

• Extra tall • Large Dressing Room • WERM Floor • Fans in all corners • Aluminum wheels • LED lights inside and out • Plus lots more

Drop by or call and let us tell you the 4 Star Difference! www.coas�ocoas�railer.com 14

www.EliteEquestrianMagazine.com


www.EliteEquestrianMagazine.com

15


16

www.EliteEquestrianMagazine.com


www.EliteEquestrianMagazine.com

17


Standing at stud

THATSACOOLDUDE

4 time world champion halter horse now riding in ranch horse events. This horse is really athletic, as well as handsome. Double Registered: AQHA and APHA

2022 Stud Fee: $1000 IA Only Live Foal Guarantee Dude is a 2014 16.2 hh 2020 Breeder’s Trust, APHA, PtHA, AQHA (HE’S A COOL DUDE) 4 times World Champion and Reserve World Champion plus World and Reserve World Champion Sire. This proven world champion stallion has all the qualities you could want in a sire for your next foal; size, looks, performance, and personality! PERSONALITY: That’s A Cool Dude is an incredible and kind stallion. He loves his job no matter if he’s in the show ring showing off his many talents or training at the ranch. He is very willing to do whatever is asked of him. OFFSPRING: Dude’s offspring have become World Champions and Reserve World Champions in the Show Ring. His very first son, a stunning paint horse named ‘Coolest Dude’ was the 2018 World Champion Overo Color Horse & 2018 Res World Champion Amateur Yearling Stallion! And this was only his first son, he is a champion producer!! MR. WORLD CHAMPION: Time after time That’s A Cool Dude has proven himself in the show ring. 4 times PtHA World Champion as well as ApHA Reserve World Champion. 18

www.EliteEquestrianMagazine.com

Dream Maker Farm

Cindy Sellers-Bayer 352-463-7364 dreammakerfarm@aol.com Standing At Bocoy Stables, Ocala, FL

dreammakerfarm.com


www.EliteEquestrianMagazine.com

19


CONTENTS

40

January/February 2022

COVER STORY

Kelli Crucio�-Vanderveen and Shamonix SF.

Fashion • Home • Art 26 MUST HAVES For you, your horse and farm 28 Cold Weather Fashion 30 Training Breeches 32 HIS & HERS Denny Emerson 34 EQUINE ART Marie Ackers 36 Art & An�ques with Dr. Lori Art Ligh�ng

Training, Tack & Showing 38 SIDE SADDLE Why Join ISSO 52 FIRST LIFE LESSONS of a horse 58 SIMILARITIES “Regular” and Western Dressage

38 46

60 KAT’S KORNER Se�ng Goals 64 CAPITAL CHALLENGE 70 WORLD EQUESTRIAN CENTER Dressage IV

Equine Health 42 CURO Wireless, Portable Diagnos�c Tech

42

52

46 Animal Care in Egypt 50 HORSE HERO Mini Therapy Horses

More 62 WARRANTIES In Horse Sales

28

68 TRAILERS Safety in Design 75 TACK BOX Your source for services & great retail finds! 20

www.EliteEquestrianMagazine.com


www.EliteEquestrianMagazine.com

21


ELITE

Ranked 7 out of 15 WORLDWIDE Equine Magazines To Watch

EQUESTRIAN

®

Celebrating The Equestrian Lifestyle

Published since 2008 Riding a horse is not a gentle hobby, to be picked up and laid down like a game of solitaire. It is a grand passion. Ralph Waldo Emerson

According To Feedspot blog

For Media Kit including Print & Social Media Packages email: info@EliteEquestrian.us View current and all previous issues on our web site: www.EliteEquestrianMagazine.com

www.EliteEquestrianMagazine.com info@EliteEquestrian.us Main Office, Ocala, Florida: 352-304-8938 PUBLISHER Bill Vander Brink Bill@EliteEquestrian.us EDITORIAL STAFF Editor-in-Chief: Noelle Vander Brink Creative Editor: RSD Media Group, Raymond S. Di Maria Art & Antiques Editor: Dr. Lori Verderame Equine Art Editor: Jeanne Chisholm Fashion Editor: LA Sokolowski Legal Editor: Avery S. Chapman,Esquire CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Sabrina Brashares Alessandra Deerinck Kat Fuqua Lynn Palm

Tom Scheve Kathy Staly Pie Truono Philippa Walker

GRAPHICS Fran Sherman

ADVERTISING Advertising Sales, N.E.Region: Kathy Dress 610-420-9964 kdress@ptd.net Advertising Sales, S.E. Region Karen Eagle 352-812-1142 Advertising Sales, National: Diane Holt 713-408-8114 diane@eliteequestrian.us CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS Liz Callar Anne Gittins Sara Hellner Jacquelynn Holly Stefan Ohlsson, Paws and Rewind

On the cover...

Joss Ridley Andrew Ryback Jennifer Stevenson, Paws and Rewind Linda L. Volrath

ELITE

EQUESTRIAN

®

Celebrating The Equestrian Lifestyle

Kelli Crucio�-Vanderveen and Shamonix SF. GGT FOOTING has been providing consulta�on and installa�on as well as full service arena foo�ng products including Ma�ng systems, arena condi�oners,underwater flow systems and Water Free FOOTING.

Cindy Crucio�

Serenity Farm Show Stables

Builds A Solid FOUNDATION

FOAL First Life Lessons TRAILER SAFETY

COLD WEATHER Fashion SETTING GOALS with Kat Fuqua

Volume 22 Issue 1 Complimentary

www.EliteEquestrianMagazine.com

Disobedience is the true foundation of liberty. The obedient must be slaves. Henry David Thoreau

Copyright © 2022 Elite Equestrian is a registered trademark owned by Elite Equestrian LLC. No article, photo, or part of this publication may be reproduced wholly or in part without written permission of the publisher. Management reserves the right to approve or refuse any advertiser or contribution for any reason. EE does not endorse any product or advertiser and is not responsible for accuracy of info/opinions provided by advertisers or article content. Photographs are submitted by writers of each article who assume responsibility for usage approval.

22

www.EliteEquestrianMagazine.com


www.EliteEquestrianMagazine.com

23


24

www.EliteEquestrianMagazine.com


www.EliteEquestrianMagazine.com

25


MUST

Haves

PASTURE VACUUMS See our ad page 53 www.pasturevacuums.com

EZ SIGNS Free shipping! 1-800-640-8180 See our ad on page 53 www.EZSignsOnline.com

LAY-FLAT HOSE QUICKREEL See our ad page 49 BigSprinkler.com

SOURCE WEIGHT And other terrific supplements for your horse. See our ad page 33 800-232-2365 www.4source.com

Pyranha® Equine Spray & Wipe® See our ad on page 7 www.pyranhainc.com

PROTECTING SENSITIVE SKIN See our ad on page 45 www.soxforhorses.com

SADDLER’S TLC See our ad page 61 www.jmsaddler.com

BEST ON-THE-GO Hay Feeding System! See our ad page 45 www.NibbleNet.com

GUMBITS 100% FEI legal. See our ad page 77 www.GumBits.com

FOR YOUR HORSE

BITLESS BRIDLE Original Dr. Cook® Raised browband and noseband in Havana www.bitlessbridle.com See our ad page 61 26

PREMIUM 100% POLYESTER MESH SHEETS Made to order in the USA, six body colors, choose any binding, piping, or styling combo. Order online at tackshackocala.com or in store! Star�ng at $119.95. See our ad on page 12 www.EliteEquestrianMagazine.com

WARMER DAYS FOR YOUR CRITTERS Superior weather protec�on. See our ad page 45 www.theEquiVest.com 610-247-0829


Alexis Kletjian’s Lucky Star & Equestrian Collec�ons

Contact us to customize yours. See our ad on page 29 www.alexiskletjian.com “Lady Slim” eggplant skinny jeans. They are Made in USA. See our ad on page 27 BulletBluesCa.com

BASKET OF FAVORITES from $74. Customiza�on available. www.gi�horsebaskets.com See our ad page 76

Jack Russell Series Sculpted raised relief, Tempi’s signature work, as pendants. www.tempidesignstudio.com See our ad on page 75

Equine Consignments! Great selec�on ofsaddles, tack, boots, home items and more.Free trial on saddles.See our ad on page 76 www.GoodAppleEquine

EE

www.EliteEquestrianMagazine.com

27


COLD WEATHER

Fashion

Colder days are here. Don’t let the dipping temperatures keep you from what you love! Look great while keeping warm and enjoying your passion!

Ashendon Waterproof Jacket Stylish waterproof casual jacket for training, as well as dog walking and all equestrian ac�vi�es . A two-layer storm flap offers simplicity and durability. Featuring our exclusive wild animal polka dot quilted lining, adjustable detachable hood with detachable luxe faux fur trim, draw cord waist, front zip pockets, magne�c closure deep hand warmer pockets with thermal lining, Equetech designer horse bit zip pullers in rose gold and cuffs with inner storm cuffs. A �meless, heritage addi�on to your wardrobe, and an essen�al to anyone spending long periods of �me outside! XS - XXL Colour: Navy RRP: £139.95

CABLE KNIT SNOOD

MENS DENIM BREECHES

Deep, cosy cable knit fi�ed snood with plush ultra so� lining. Features metal Equetech pelham badge to front. Ideal for all yard du�es and training. Stretch fit. One size fits all! Matching headband also available. Colour: Navy RRP: £14.50

Designed to feel like your favourite jeans but with all the detail you would expect from a hard wearing pair of breeches. RRP: £78.95 Sizes: 28 - 36

STORM WATERPROOF RIDING GLOVES The ul�mate waterproof winter glove, which is thin enough to keep good contact when riding, and incorporates all the latest weatherproof features! This mul�-layer glove features a waterproof and windproof outer shell, a mid layer waterproof membrane, cosy inner micro fleece lining and complete grip palm with reinforced areas for the reins. Sizes XS - L, RRP: £39.50 Also available in children’s sizes: RRP: £24.50

www.equetech.com 28

www.EliteEquestrianMagazine.com

EE


www.EliteEquestrianMagazine.com

29


New Polo

Collaboration Is The Toughest Yet!

When you cross a premium equestrian and country retailer with a top interna�onal superstar polo family, what do you get?

The new G&G Tradi�onal Training Breeches. These gorgeous unisex breeches have been designed to withstand the rigours of poloplaying and make the perfect training breeches for the busy rider who demands and expects more from their riding wardrobe. A high waist with a wide comfort waistband, pleated front, roomy side pockets and elasticated panels with a neat popper closure at the waist offer function and comfort. The slightly voluminous upper leg styling allows for total freedom of movement in and out of the saddle, tapering to a spandex lower leg (a style synonymous with jockey wear), which helps keep them securely in place under your boots.

Professional Polo player, Mark Tomlinson was involved at every stage.

Created through an exciting collaboration between equestrian and country retailer Glaze & Gordon and the UK’s leading superstar polo family, the Tomlinson’s, the new breeches share a story like no other. A chance meeting and discussion about the lack of comfortable yet durable breeches on the market with England Team regular Mark Tomlinson set Glaze & Gordon Founder Becs Glaze on a mission to create the ultimate breeches!

EQUINE Fashion

“We knew that PC Racewear (who are renowned for their traditional hard-wearing jockey breeches) had the knowledge and the ability to produce a pair of resilient and functional breeches. We just needed a polo expert to help with the design process.” Explains Becs, “Mark and the Tomlinsons were the ultimate collaborators for this project and were keen to get involved. Mark was committed to every step of the design process, from the breeches’ initial conception to the final design. The G&G Traditional Training Breeches are a collaborative effort between ourselves, PC Racewear, and showcase Mark’s knowledge and experience as an elite polo player.” After 12 months of design, creation, testing and tweaking, the final design is a hybrid unisex style that offers the durability of denim with flattering styling and a luxurious silky lining for comfort in and out of the saddle.

30

Rigorously tried, tested & loved by polo-playing pro’s including Mhairi Gould, Manager of the Beaufort Polo Club Polo School, Lisa Smith, a Beaufort Polo Club player and everyday busy equestrians, the breeches were put through their paces from initial design through to finished garment. The G&G Traditional Training Breeches are available in navy with a full black seat. Sizes: XS – XXXXL (24 – 38 inch waist) RRP: £95 15% of the G&G Limited Edition Training Breeches revenue will be donated to the Great Western and Wiltshire Air Ambulance Services, Beaufort Polo Club’s charity of choice.

glazeandgordon.com �������������������� ����������������������������������������������������������������������� ������������������������������������������������������������������������������ ����������������������������������������������������������������������������������� ���������������������������������������������������������������������������� ������������������������������������������������������������������������������� ���������������������������������������������������������������������������� � �������������������� ������������������������������������������������������������������������������ ����������������������������������������������������������������������������� ���������������������������������������������������������������������������� ��������������������������������������������������������������������������� ������ � ��������������������������������������������������

www.EliteEquestrianMagazine.com

EE


www.EliteEquestrianMagazine.com

31


HIS

& HERS

Denny Emerson: One of a Kind with L.A. Sokolowski, equinista He is the only, only rider to have earned both a World Gold medal in Three-Day Even�ng and Tevis Cup buckle in Endurance Riding, and in 1972, the U.S. Even�ng Associa�on named him Rider of the Year. But Denny Emerson was just ge�ng warmed up. His even�ng career has spanned 50 years (29 at the advanced level) and at age 58, he completed his final advanced three-day (Groton House in Massachuse�s) having -- at a precocious 51 -- won the Bromont CCI**. In 2004, he earned his Tevis Buckle, comple�ng the 50th anniversary of the 100-mile endurance race known as the Western States Trail Ride. In 2011, during his 50th consecu�ve season compe�ng at Preliminary or CCI* level, he broke his C1 vertebrae in a fall on the same Stoneleigh-Burnham fields where, as his father served as school headmaster, a nine year-old Denny learned to ride. Fully recovered and now in a rela�vely resilient eighth decade, he remains an author (How Good Riders Get Good), a writer of forewards for -- among others -- Sally Swi�’s Centered Riding, a clinician, and s�ll ac�ve horseman, with a substan�al Facebook following for Tamarack Hill Farms’ daily pearls of wisdom on training and riding, or true stories from the halcyon days of American even�ng. He remains as humble as he is capable, like the no-nonsense Yankee stock from which he came (he is a descendant of General Israel “Old Put” Putnam, who fought with dis�nc�on at the Ba�le of Bunker Hill during the American Revolu�on). This much is certain: this former high school English teacher and 2006 USEA Hall of Fame inductee is among the “50 most influen�al horsemen of the 20th century” and if Facebook fans are any indicator, of our digital age, too.

EQUINE Lifestyle

HERS: What do you remember about your first horse or pony? HIS: I was only 11 so I can’t really remember his size, maybe 14 or 14.1 hands, but he was a little Paint pony that the local (Sunderland, MA) horse dealer, Louis Goodyear, probably found out West. I realized much later how tolerant he was of all the mistakes that little kids (like me) make. I could do anything on him. He just went along and did his job.

HERS: If you had to work outside the horse world what would you be doing? HIS: Something related to land management, or publishing and editing. HERS: What is your favorite quote and why? HIS: Aristotle’s, “For the things we have to learn before we can do them, we learn by doing them.” The first time I read it, I went, huh? Then it started to make sense. It permits trial and error, and being brave enough to start. Don’t be afraid to make mistakes.

HERS: What do you like best in a horse? HIS: Basically, one that doesn’t get frazzled. That’s straight forward, but not a dead head. No drama and a generosity of spirit. HERS: Among the people you’ve worked with, whom do you admire and why? HERS: What do you like best in a person? HIS: Sally Swift was super positive and upbeat. She had HIS: I don’t care for a lot of pomposity or self-importance. an amazing ability to make people feel good about their I’ve known great horse people who are very quiet about selves. And I rode with Walter Christensen, coach of the their achievements. Being kind, not rough, with horses or 1984 Bronze-winning Swedish Olympic dressage team. He people. was a consummate horseman and ‘no drama’ trainer. HERS: How old were you when you got your first paying job and what was it? HIS: It was 1951, I was nine years old and getting paid probably no more than 10 cents an hour to drive a truck, in low low gear, between hay bales on the fields at StoneleighBurnham. 32

HERS: What makes you happy? HIS: Lots of things. When my family is well. Mornings sitting with a coffee watching the mist rise off the pond. Having a horse go well and feeling like a good rider.

www.EliteEquestrianMagazine.com


Epic at Rolex 1990

Epic at SPHT

HERS: Share an instance where you faced and solved a difficult problem. HIS: Three years ago, I rescued a Morgan, Catch A Cloud, and her dam, Tiger Lily, from a situation where their aging owner just couldn’t keep up with the work. The horses had not left their 10 x 12 stalls in a long time. Someone else adopted Tiger Lily. Catch A Cloud, after coming to my place after basically sitting in jail for a year, was pretty scared of being handled. It’s been a long, slow process but I think I’ve gotten through to her. It’s a nice feeling to help an animal that can’t help herself. (More of their story here: https://www.facebook.com/permalink.php?story_fbid =10157799755085947&id=109161715946) HERS: What has changed about our relationship with horses since you began riding? HIS: There have been huge changes! When I first had horses, I was a child of the 1950s. Which meant that the generation who taught me grew up in a time when horses were seen as utilitarian. There was little emphasis on ‘partnership.’ The attitude was, ‘Show that pony who’s really the boss,’ and ‘Make them mind you.’ Which was a wrong path and it took a long time to change, but I have learned, force has nowhere to go but into more force. That’s where there has been a paradigm shift in understanding, and more people have become sensitive to that. HERS: What has improved about our sport? Where might we still do better? HIS: A million things have improved! We have better veterinary and dental care, better deworming, better saddle and bridle fit, better trucking and transportation options. What we have lost is proximity, for a rider to their horse. Today, kids live in a house while their horse lives 10 miles away. Follow Denny Emerson We’ve lost ready access to and Tamarack Hill Farms actual, living horses. Competion Facebook, and share tively, we could all do better; your suggestions for future you can take any sport to an His & Her guests with our extreme. But overall, horse award-winning equinista, L.A. Sokolowski, at care and management have latheequinista@gmail.com. improved exponentially.

Photos provided by Denny Emerson

EE

www.EliteEquestrianMagazine.com

33


Marie Ackers , French Contemporary

The Three Riders Bronze - 87cm tall x 70 cm

Initially inspired Silver Cat:

Le Chat Noir- Version In Silver

Black Cat: Le Chat Noir

by the old master and “French Animalier”, French artist Marie Ackers has gone beyond realism and tradition to capture a contemporary interpretation of animals. In her work, Marie deconstruct the movements, trip down to pure lines, simplify the shapes and identify the dynamic and the rhythms of the lines to produce contemporary and distinctively elegant sculpture inextricably associated with but yet completely independent of reality.

EQUINE Art

Marie’s work can be found in various galleries in the UK and Europe and recently the Gold chrome walking cheetah and the bronze polished sitting cheetah have been accepted in the “Salon des Artistes Francais 2021” in Paris.

34

Silver chromed resine Approx 37 cm high. A version in black chromed resine

www.EliteEquestrianMagazine.com

Wellington Place, 13532 Fountain View Boulevard Wellington FL 33414, USA 845-505-1147 www.ChisholmGallery.com


Trojan

Iron resine and verdegris 48 cm x 40 cm A smaller vers�on of The Three Riders

Le taureau

Large Bronze Bull, Bronze Approx 42 cm x 32 cm

Running Horse

Extended Trot. Bronze Approx 40cm x 35cm

EE www.EliteEquestrianMagazine.com

35


& ANTIQUES By Dr. Lori

ART

The Fine Art of

Lighting

By Dr. Lori Verderame

Don’t hang that portrait

Rembrandt van Rijn’s paintings are famous for their luminosity. When considering works by the Dutch master in major international museums, you might agree with most people who think that a Rembrandt painting looks pretty good in any light! I agree with that statement.

of great grandpa in direct light and don’t attach a portrait light to the frame either. Hang works of art on interior walls of your home out of the way of direct sunlight or artificial light sources.

For art lovers, it is important to remember that there are certain methods to properly light your art masterpiece. While Rembrandt’s paintings seemingly glow of their own accord, various light sources are employed when masterpieces are installed in museums. The methods used by museum professionals and exhibition design experts regarding how to light works of art may help you to properly and safely light a work of art in your home. In short, lighting a work of fine art is both critical and complex. Lighting is critical to the overall preservation of the work of art and it is complex when you try to get it right. With fine art, even the slightest difference in the direction of the light source and the type of light selected (e.g., fluorescent, incandescent, halogen, led, natural, etc.) can make all the difference in the world. Like anything else, art lighting is all about compromise. The basics for lighting artwork in your home include: use low watt bulbs, don’t display art in direct sunlight, and don’t keep fragile works on display in highly lit areas for long periods of time.

Natural Beauty

EQUINE Lifestyle

Most people think that natural light is the best light in which to display a work of art. Since most artists are trained in art schools flooded with natural light and many artists prefer to paint works directly from nature in the outdoors or en plein aire where sunlight is abundant, it is true that sunlight is not the best lighting option for your collection.

Sunlight or natural light is difficult to control. Exposing your work of art to sunlight may cause deterioration problems for artwork, particularly, paintings, photographs, prints, watercolors, pastels, and other works on paper. The ultraviolet (UV) rays from natural sunlight can damage works of art over time. For instance, UV rays are so harmful that it can fade works on paper. Fading of artwork from light exposure including both direct and indirect sunlight may occur in as short a time span as three (3) months. Also, with many home design schemes looking to mixed media works of art for display such as textiles serving as

36

dramatic wall decorations, remember that these items will fade in sunlight too. That means your notion to redecorate your home in the popular “cozy, country chic style” and hang your great Grandma’s colorful quilt or vintage craft pieces like embroidery or needlepoint pictures on the prominent wall of your sunny family room that faces a big picture window is definitely not a good idea. Any source of light may cause fading and damage to works from oils paintings to historic maps. Sorry, natural light is not the easy answer to your art lighting problems.

Light Bright

While advanced technology and a litany of new products are continuously coming to market, the big three in art lighting remain incandescent, fluorescent, and halogen. What happens to the look of a work of art when selecting a particular lighting type. Incandescent light brings out the warmer colors of the color spectrum such as reds, oranges, and yellows. An incandescent light will enhance the warm colors within a work of art when compared to other colors. If you have a seascape composed of predominantly blues and greens then an incandescent light won’t highlight all of those cool colors. In fact, the blues, greens, and violets of your artwork may appear flat under incandescent lights. These lights are better than direct natural light or fluorescent lights that may not emit light across the entire color spectrum, but incandescent don’t provide the easy answer to the general art lighting problem.

Protect Grandpa

You should know that the old-fashioned portrait light that you may have attached to the top of a framed painting of your great-grandpa is very harmful. That little light source, depending on the bulb, may be emitting intense light and heat onto your oil portrait which will damage the work of art quickly. Since intense light exposure may damage art and antiques, too much light could deteriorate and devalue your pieces. Light your artwork properly and your collection will repay you with years of enjoyment. ���������������������������������������������������������������������������� ��������������������������������������������������������������������� ������������������������������������������������

www.EliteEquestrianMagazine.com

EE


www.EliteEquestrianMagazine.com

37


Why you should

JOIN

Interna�onal Side Saddle Organiza�on the

By Pie Truono ISSO President

Why should you join the International Side Saddle Organization? Well...that is a pretty easy question to answer! The International Side Saddle Organization(ISSO) started in 1974 and is a nonprofit organization with knowledgeable experts and novices all over the globe that are willing to mentor and help others that have an interest in the beautiful art of riding Side Saddle.

TRAINING & Showing

Many of our members have gotten their starts or helped others in the quest to ride in the most femine style of riding an equine. You could be part of an exceptional group of people that are passionate about preserving the history of the unique style of women (and some men), riding in this way. Who knew there would be this much to learn about this small niche in the equestrian world? It really doesn’t matter whether you like the physical aspect of riding and disciplines within such as western, english, charra, fox hunting, jousting, or your interests lie in learning about the boundless history of everything side saddle from the fashion, to the social graces that are steeped in this riding world. Maybe you are intrigued by the side saddles themselves, which are incredible pieces of history that have so many untold stories within a history that is so rich, it may take you back in time when life was simpler.

Chelsea Rae Devries, Hayden Rogers, Tammie Conway, Sarah McKay and Sophie Kretschmann ride down past the finish line aside at the Montpelier Hunt Races. Photo courtesy of Liz Callar.

The International Side Saddle Organization is dedicated to supporting and educating people all over the world about this very riding style. Our board of volunteers work tirelessly behind the scenes to plan and provide as much information and resources to each individual member. The board plans and holds clinics, shows, meetings, fundraisers and provides sponsorships, and contests all while cherishing this special historical way of equestrian riding. Members have exclusive access to our electronic magazine, Aside World, created each quarter by our dedicated secretary. Aside World includes articles and classifieds that circulate to all of our global members. Joining ISSO is a catalyst to connecting with members and experts so you may explore any facet of the sport regardless of how small or large of a detail. 38

Laureen Bartfield is picture perfect in her gorgeous vintage Victorian riding habit while posing with her beautiful Mustang Miles. Photo by Jen Stevenson for Paws and Rewind

www.EliteEquestrianMagazine.com


Sarah McKay and Terry Clore’s Clifford demonstrate side saddle at the Montpelier Hunt Races Photo by Linda L. Volrath

CJ Giacomini shared her amazing OTTB Melo with fellow ISSO member Sara Brown at Camp Leaping Horn 2021. Photo by Jennifer Stevenson for Paws and Rewind

Continued... Continued on page 66 www.EliteEquestrianMagazine.com

39


BUILDING A FOUNDATION for the FUTURE with GGT FOOTING

EQUINE Lifestyle

Building a successful program begins with a solid foundation. In 2004, Cindy Cruciotti founded Serenity Farm Show Stables in Elizabeth Colorado. Her mission statement exemplified her basic fundamental vision to develop a faith-based program built on quality, integrity and stability. To provide each individual the opportunity to accomplish all of their riding goals

= STABILITY.

To provide a fun, safe environment with knowledgeable professionals who are dedicated to the development of both horse and rider

= QUALITY.

And finally, above all else, to honor our faith and commitment to Christ, and through that faith, show respect and compassion to our horses, to ourselves and to all of those around us 40

www.EliteEquestrianMagazine.com

= Integrity.


A�er 20 years of unprecedented success, Cindy and her Serenity Farm team, comprised of top young professional and grand prix rider Kelli Crucio� VanderVeen and seasoned professional Kelli Clevenger, made the unanimous decision to relocate to Wellington, FL. “Building our new loca�on in Wellington/Loxahatchee was a dream that was finally came to frui�on,” Cindy explained. “We have been traveling to WEF for the winter circuit for the past 12 years and now, with God’s help we have decided to make it our permanent home.

“The sport is coming to a point where the compe��ons are so technical that professionals need to prac�ce at home the same way that they would at the show. The limi�ng factor with so many professionals is the surface in which they train on. With GGT-Foo�ng they can now bridge the gap between compe��on venues and at home training.”

Cindy’s training philosophy focuses on the development of both horse and rider through in-depth flat work and gymnas�c training combined with elements of courses suitable to each individual’s level of experience. It is impera�ve that a rider and a horse be educated in a quality training environment so that When we were in the planning stages of our new facility, it was they understand the ques�ons that a compe��on will ask. crucial that our new stable be built on the same founda�on One of Cindy’s favorite explana�ons is that our work at home that had carried us to this point. The arena was to be the grand is our “homework”, and the compe��on is the “test.” “Just like center piece of Serenity Farm Show Stables Florida and we all when we are in school, studying the material prepares us for adamantly agreed that GGT-Foo�ng was the only company taking the test. If our homework is correct, and we study the capable of providing all of the necessary components to meet right material then the test is a success. The tests are designed our needs. Quality, stability and integrity were the fundamen- to show us in what areas we need to study more. When we tal ingredients to the GGT foo�ng and that is essen�al to our have mastered one grade, then we move on to the next. Skipprogram and to the future of our success.” ping a grade, will at some point show up as a weakness. This goes for the horses as well as the riders.” The completed GGT-Foo�ng arena is one of the largest private arenas in Wellington, measuring 150’ x 220’ with three layers of With this in mind, a solid pla�orm in which to study is cri�cal foo�ng, felt and drainage rock respec�vely. Na�onal sales man- to the safety and development of the horses and of the riders. ager Cynthia Kea�ng shared with us for this ar�cle how excited A perfect partnership between GGT-Foo�ng and Serenity Farm she and GGT-Foo�ng are to have been able to assist Serenity Show Stables provides this irreplaceable environment that creFarm with this project. ates a wonderful founda�on for our future stars.

For More Informa�on About GGT Foo�ng, ContactCynthia Brewster-Kea�ng at 864-804-0011 www.EliteEquestrianMagazine.com

EE 41


42

www.EliteEquestrianMagazine.com


www.EliteEquestrianMagazine.com

43


44

www.EliteEquestrianMagazine.com


A new design for

COLD WEATHER PROTECTION

Give them the Best For horses, dogs and Livestock.

500d and 1000D outer, 70D Ripstop Liner and 3M thinsuate for warmth

Manufactured in Pennsylvania, USA International Patent Pending Dealer Inquiries Welcome

www.theEquiVest.com 610-247-0829 www.EliteEquestrianMagazine.com

45


Memories From my Time Volunteering at

Animal Care in Egypt Story and Photos By Kathy Staly

In 2008 my husband and I traveled to Luxor, Egypt to see the archaeological sites including the tomb of Tutankhamun. Our taxi driver, Radwan, was friendly and enjoyed chatting with us as he drove us around the sites and he soon learned of my concern for the animals that we were seeing in the streets. Many of them were seriously underweight and some had wounds but were still pulling carriages for tourists or carts of vegetables and other goods. That was when Radwan told me about Animal Care in Egypt, ACE (a British charity), and suggested I visit.

This visit was one of strong and mixed emotions.

EQUINE Health

On the one hand I was heartsick at the sight of such dreadful wounds on the horses and donkeys but at the same time I was amazed at the care they were receiving. One gray mare was recovering from cellulitis and had a section on her shoulder covered with skin grafts. I had never seen skin grafts on horses and I was in awe over the level of care the mare was receiving. I was crying as I saw the wounds and injuries the animals had whilst the volunteer was showing me around and explaining the various procedures that are performed. She told me that I shouldn’t be crying because those were the fortunate ones; their owners had brought them to the hospital as they knew the animals would receive thorough free care. At that moment I knew in my heart that I would become a forever sponsor to this amazing organization. That such a facility could exist there on the outskirts of Luxor is extraordinary; it is an oasis of good care and kindness not far from the barren desert. The admiration I feel toward the founders and all of the employees and volunteers who carry out this work is infinite.

46

When I returned home from our first trip in 2008, I immediately adopted a local emaciated sickly old horse. With care his health was restored and we had seven fantastic years together. During our most recent visit to ACE in January 2020, I bought a wounded horse with very poor body condition called Farola (Arabic for strawberry) who was in long-term care. I was fortunate to meet an English woman who has a small horse stable on the West Bank of Luxor and she now takes excellent care of her.

On a typical day our driver would pick us up at about 7:45am and drive us 15 minutes to the animal hospital. My husband would go right to work on his many projects, usually with an employee working with him. Tom would After my initial visit I began donating to this charity on a often need to make trips to the hardware store, just like his monthly basis. I saw first-hand that the money is spent on projects at home. So, he would be off and running with his supplies, medications, and salaries. There is no waste or work. I liked to go round the equine in-patients and give frivolous expenditure in this organization. I shared with my small pieces of carrots to each. This is a big treat as Egyphusband my desire to come and volunteer when I retired; tians don’t typically give treats to their horses or donkeys. we would be able to come in January/February when the The animals would come to recognize my voice and know weather was more suitable. Tom was all in because he likes that a bit of carrot was arriving. Some of the donkeys were Egypt and the Egyptian people. Whilst he would not work very shy of people and would stay in the back of their stalls, with animals he would do maintenance work which he likes but enjoy the carrot tossed their way. Twenty three animals very much. are housed in covered stalls and there are also five large outside tree lined shady paddocks for recovering patients Our experiences volunteering have deepened our admias well as a small isolation area. Then I would check out ration for the Egyptian people, their culture and history. the tortoises and sometimes chop up food for them - they We have visited many places along the southern parts of received plenty of food like carrots, cucumber, lettuce, the Nile and find the archaeological sites fascinating and oranges, apples, melon, tomato, and dandelions. It is fun beautiful. Each trip we make we know that we will return. to see these small adorable creatures hustling to get to the I have gained insights into poverty and people making do food plate as it is arriving. What a great way to start the with what they have and being happy, and that is an inspi- day! There are Egyptian and Greek tortoises and they are ration to me. I have become less of a consumer and more separated by a low partition. There are plenty of places for of a giver to those who are in need. them to hide in the shade or sunbathe. www.EliteEquestrianMagazine.com


SOURCE OR AMT AD

More... www.EliteEquestrianMagazine.com

47


There are many resident cats living their best life (all spayed or neutered) and most have their favourite areas. You always know where to find which cats, and they are known by name and personality by everyone. There are a few resident dogs which are kept in a large garden area. They are walked frequently by volunteers and send up loud greetings when visitors arrive. As with house pets, once they know you and you call them by name they settle right down and are full of wiggles and greetings. At night, when everyone has gone home, they are allowed to roam the fenced grounds. During the pandemic, in order to help the employees, we have given them monetary gifts at Christmas time and in June. This is money we would have spent on airline tickets and it feels good to give to hardworking people who will use the money to help their families.

EQUINE Health

If you are interested in helping this wonderful charity please visit their website ACE | Animal Care in Egypt | Luxor. EE They are always in need of supporters and volunteers.

48

www.EliteEquestrianMagazine.com


Equine Hospital 24/7 Emergency Care

Our large animal doctors are also available Mon-Fri for routine on-site or in hospital calls.

215-536-2726

2250 N. Old Bethlehem Pike, Quakertown, PA 18951

www.quakertownvetclinic.com PERFORMANCE HORSE SUPPLY Health Products & Services For Horse And Rider • PEMF • Frequencies • Red Light

Promoting Health / Recovery Toxicity & Detox Specialist Karen Eagle

352-812-1142 www.EliteEquestrianMagazine.com

49


HEALING Horse Hero

“Read this book slowly,” I said. I wanted to absorb it one chapter at a �me, relishing in the stories about Gentle Carousel Miniature Therapy Horses. Let me start this by saying I u�erly failed at that. Mini Horse, Mighty Hope made me so happy that I could not stop reading it. - Lifeisstory.com I didn’t get past page 14 before the tears came. You won’t be able to put this book down! If you need a heaping helping of hoofed hope, you’ve found the right book!! - Julie Lavender, Author - This book, these miniature horses, Gentle Carousel’s gi� of inspira�on IS EVERYTHING... OK, there are a zillion books on inspira�on, healing, and love out there...and then there’s this book; Mini Horse, Mighty Hope. When I finally read it cover to cover I just sat in silence - for a long �me. For me, it’s life changing, life affirming, and reawakened something in me that I hadn’t even no�ced was sleeping - belief in literal ‘miracles’. - B. King Amazon review

Some information about

Gentle Carousel Miniature Therapy Horses:

Gentle Carousel Miniature Therapy Horses is an award winning 501(c)(3) non-profit charity celebrating almost 25 years of service. The therapy horses were called in to comfort survivors and first responders of the tragedies at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, CT, the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston, SC and the Pulse nightclub in Orlando, FL. They helped the tornado survivors of Moore, OK, victims of the fires in Gatlinburg, TN, families in the aftermath of Hurricane Irma, families and first responders after the condo collapse in Surfside, FL and they visit thousands of patients inside children’s and veterans hospitals across the country each year. Gentle Carousel Miniature Therapy Horses have also been asked to visit Congress in Washington, D.C., Arlington National Cemetery and the 911 Memorial in NYC. They helped teach a class at Columbia Medical School, were invited to meet the twin baby pandas at Zoo Atlanta, have been on the concert stage in Nashville, Tennessee and performed with the Dance Alive National Ballet (for blind and deaf children).

EQUINE Health

Gentle Carousel’s literacy program, with teams of volunteer educators, inspires young readers and “brings books to life”. The horses of Gentle Carousel work inside schools, libraries, with mentoring programs, at literacy events and at education resource centers in high crime neighborhoods with a focus on at-risk readers.

50

Mercury and Sirius

Working indoors would be a challenge for any horse but Gentle Carousel Miniature Therapy Horses make it look easy, even in high rise hospital buildings. The therapy horses walk up and down steps, ride in elevators, walk on unusual floor surfaces, carefully move around hospital and television studio equipment, work in small patient rooms and stay calm around unexpected sounds like ambulances, alarms and hospital helicopters... and yes they are house trained.

www.gentlecarouseltherapyhorses.com www.EliteEquestrianMagazine.com

EE


www.EliteEquestrianMagazine.com

51


The FIRST LIFE Lesson for a horse.

Story and Photos By Alessandra Deerinck When we welcome a horse into our lives, we always prefer to know his personality, and experiences, and aside from the training a horse received, the first life experiences are always very important because they leave a strong influence on an individual. It often is difficult to be able to access this kind of information, but knowing the instinctual behavior of a horse and the behavioral traits that are characteristic of the equine species is definitely always possible and helpful.

O

ne day,

TRAINING & Showing

before beginning to train horses I took a moment to meditate, and did it while standing by the pasture where the new foals were housed. These horses always attract the attention of people that come by the ranch. On that day the last newborn was just attempting to stand up, the mare was very comfortable and was watching her foal, while the owners were standing by, with their dog on the leash. Foals start learning immediately to stand up, to suck milk from their mother’s udder, to use their senses to perceive and to be alert. Their behavior is a blend between instincts and newly learned behavior from the very first moment. The most important thing that happens is the bond that starts between the mare and the foal, which will have an influence on the rest of the foal’s life, and it is very important for us human beings not to interfere in its mechanics. When horses live naturally the bond is created easily, while in the domestic environment there can be many interferences. There are even training techniques that actually have the purpose to intrude in this bond and train the horse to think that we are his keen. To me it is trying to put the circuits of a small radio into a large appliance.

We can be present to the birth of a horse but we should make sure that the mare is comfortable with our presence and actions.

the presence of other objects and living beings. It is the result of the combination of instinctive elements, which may have constant characteristics in individuals of the same species, and other elements learned from the life experience that influenced the original natural behavior. Behavior also has emotional components, largely involuntary, which are characteristic of each specific individual.

PRACTICAL APPLICATION of the RESPONSE TO MOVEMENT

Observing what happens when we approach a horse that has freedom of movement and is looking at us, like when we approach to put the halter on, before we start working, can let us see that there is no problem in putting the halter on if we get close, and the horse sees us, and stays alert and still. On the other hand, if the horse turns the head away and looks around, or moves away, the more we insist One fact that is always easy to see is how a horse responds in the approach, the more he will tend to move away. to movement since the first moment, and how this behavior At the first sign of the horse moving away, we should stop stays with the horse for the rest of his life. Every foal instincimmediately, but then try again to get closer only if he is tually moves away from something that approaches him, standing still, while we look at him, and he looks at us. It is even his mother, because otherwise he could get stepped very important to stop if the horse moves away or hesitates, on. At the same time the foal learns to always follow his because stopping our approach tells the horse, in terms mother, which is the source of his nutrition and safety. Being of movement, that his message has been understood. The with the mother is a necessity. Being next to the mother is horse expresses himself very clearly through movement. instinctual, and probably related to the ability that horses His act of walking away means that he does not trust us to have to move in tune with their herd, or with another indiapproach him, so if we continue to chase him, we show vidual they trust and respect. that we have not understood his message or, even worse, that we do not care. The next step is to make him curious We can be present to the birth of a horse but we should and inspire him to allow us to shorten the distance that make sure that the mare is comfortable with our presence separates us, and eventually let himself be touched. It is and actions. Working with horses that have freedom of not necessary to use food to attract the horse, the simple movement, and developing a positive relationship socially act of stopping can intrigue him to the point that the horse significant from the equine point of view, makes it possible decides to approach us to perceive who we are and what to get the horse to interact with us as it would with another we want using his touch, smell and taste. From a distance, of its kind. in fact, he can only use sight and hearing, so our body language will be what inspires him to approach. Once we are Behavior is the most complete expression of each individu- close, we both will have other sensory resources to draw al, and it is influenced by the situation of space, time and upon to communicate.

52

www.EliteEquestrianMagazine.com


Working with horses that have freedom of movement, and developing a positive relationship socially significant from the equine point of view, makes it possible to get the horse to interact with us as it would with another of its kind.

PASTURE PASTURE VACUUMS VACUUMS Managing Manure The Easy Way!

Continued...

S GGS

How the horse responds to movement can tell a lot about his mental status. If a horse moves with the same intensity as the object that approaches him, it can be said that he is attentive, comfortable and respectful. If, on the other hand, his speed is higher, it may be that he is afraid or that he has been surprised. Knowing how to interpret the response to the horse’s movement can not only be useful on the ground in building a relationship with the horse, it can also be useful when riding. Everything around us can move and influence the horse, even when he is under saddle, knowing how to predict what the horse will do in every situation we are in together can help us make the best choices and not be surprised by its reactions.

• Reduce time spent cleaning Next Shipment Arrives At The End Of January. pastures or paddocks Order Now To • Reduce risk of parasites Reserve Yours! • Easily towed behind a golf cart, ER SAVIN T lawn tractor or utility vehicle N • Vacuum your bulk shavingsTwo Sizes: Paddock Vac and dump them into $2,990 the stalls Shipping Deal $199 • Save money, shavings (Continental U.S.) and labor! $3,990 • 101 uses for your Maxi Vac Shipping Deal $249 Pasture Vac!

W W II

The foal learns to always follow his mother, which is the source of his nutrition and safety.

(Continental U.S.)

Learn more here: www.pasturevacuums.com Tel: (813) 390 - 6730 Email: Juliana95@yahoo.com

www.EliteEquestrianMagazine.com

53


Training horses to face any situation

We experimented with the communication through movement and senses to train horses to participate in all different equestrian disciplines, and even parades. This activity requires a very tolerant and solid behavior on the part of the horse, and the ability to stay in environments that are not normally suited for horses. For this reason, we trained our horses by going to public parks, and on busy city streets. On one of these occasions, we were able to observe that when horses are able to perceive and understand what is happening, they immediately decide to change their behavior in a radical way without the need of external intervention. One morning, when I took Allegria de Los Cielos to the park, we were surprised by the presence of a group of athletes training for a marathon. Unlike the other people we meet on the streets, the athletes did not interrupt their running when we approached because they were working hard on their training. Allegria initially froze, as she always does when something makes her attentive, then, as I let her stand and observe for a few seconds, she was able to run alongside the athletes, in complete harmony of movement with them.

TRAINING & Showing

THE UNIVERSAL LANGUAGE OF MOVEMENT THROUGH THE SENSES

When we approach a horse that has freedom of movement and is looking at us we should only continue the approach if the horse stays still and is comfortable

The senses are the window of every individual, man or horse, on what surrounds him, be it the environment or other individuals. Different kinds of information reach us through the various sensory receptors that are specific for a stimulus. Based on what reaches us and with the contribution of our personality, we will express ourselves, we will relate to other individuals and we will be perceived by them. Focusing on the sense that the other individual will use to perceive our message, and by using behavior as a means of communication, we can bypass the difficulties that human language poses in connecting with animals. We should always have a greater awareness for what transpires from our actions, and a consideration for the horse’s behavior, that goes beyond training and include in the relationship the feedback that the horse offers us about what we are doing. This way of relating to the horse builds a constructive relationship and the possibility of being able to apply it to all equestrian disciplines. Some information that each individual perceives is more immediate in influencing the behavior of the individual that perceived it. For example, stimuli that provoke instinctive reactions, such as the response to movement in the horse, use nerve pathways that exist from birth to generate a behavioral response, while stimuli that elicit a conditioned response, such as those used in training, employ more complex nerve pathways. Knowing how to use instinctive responses in communicating with the horse is what facilitates our interaction and the training process. The spontaneous communication phase, if done in freedom of movement, and behavior choice, causes the horse, through the memorization of positive experiences, to develop a willingness to give us his attention. Another important element in the interactions through the senses with the horse in freedom of movement is knowing how to receive his answers, which are always expressed must realize that the horse is not responding but reacting, by movement, and see if they are in accordance with and that therefore we must present our request in a differwhat we have asked for. For example, if we have approached the horse with the intention of making him move ent way, because it was not understood or perceived. away, and instead he stops maintaining his position, we Continued... 54

www.EliteEquestrianMagazine.com


www.EliteEquestrianMagazine.com

55


Foals are still relatively free of memories, and they tend to live in the present

Horses that have a very tolerant and solid behavior develop the ability to stay in environments that are not normally suited for horses

Horses have the ability to move in tune with their herd, or with another individual that they trust and respect.

Man, horse and emotions

One of the most difficult things in the relationship between human and horse is dealing with the emotional element. This is a factor that it is absolutely necessary to take into consideration from the beginning, and especially when we work in freedom of movement, since the horse without tack and constraints expresses itself freely manifesting emotions, and (more importantly!) perceives ours, whether we want it or not. For example, if we are tense and insecure, the horse perceives it and often tends to not want to approach us. The emotional element is part of the social sphere, is often overlooked and can become dangerous when we ride. At Human Horse Sensing we firmly believe that it needs to be addressed appropriately, taking into account both the human and equine point of view. Working on the emotional sphere of the horse, however, involves making some considerations, including the difference in species between human and horse, and our tendency to humanize the behavior of other individuals. The way in which we suggest to enter this delicate aspect of the relationship between man and horse is to implement interactions that are not just the ones based on conditioning, but come from some actions we actually observed between horses, tested and standardized them finding a common code between the two species, human and equine. In terms of the emotions, the starting point is the awareness of our emotional state and of the fact that the horse always reads our emotions and will always and invariably respond to it. Likewise, by interacting with the horse who is free to express himself, we will learn to better understand his emotions and respect them instead of ignoring them or using them as an excuse for our lack of leadership. An example we have already mentioned is when we approach a horse and, even if he backs away in fear, we continue to approach, clearly demonstrating to the horse that we intend to approach and that we do not care if he walks away, and does not trust us. This attitude is perceived by the horse from our behavior and we are often so set on wanting to capture the horse that we do not notice the problem we are creating between us. Of course, for us this problem disappears when we finally manage to put the 56

halter on, while for the horse it subsists and often gets bigger. At the basis of the distancing that the horse performs there are voluntary and instinctive elements, since the approach of an object evokes the well-known flight response and our ignoring it puts us further and further away from the coveted leadership position. Our emotions, if expressed inappropriately, can certainly be counterproductive in the relationship with the horse. In the absence of other resources, at least, let us become aware of our emotional state, and try to behave in a way that is consistent with our intentions to have a good relationship with the horse. Foals are still relatively free of memories, and they tend to live in the present, staying relevant to what happens to them. Keeping this in mind can allow us to always have our “life manual” open. We don’t have to go to the library to find it, it’s written in the DNA, developed and tested across time and space, the energy of movement and social relationships between living beings. Each individual builds his own future with the actions he performs. Actions that an individual is aware of doing, build more useful memories to draw upon in the future.

���������������� ����������������������������������������������������������������������� ��������������������������������������������������������������������������� ������������������������������ ������������������������������������������������������������������������� �������������������������������������������������������������������������� �������������������������������������������������������������������������� ��������������������������������������������������������������������������� ������������������������������������������������������������������������� ������������������������������������������������������������������������� ����������������������������������������������������������������������������� ������������������������������ ��������������������������������������������������������������������� ������������������������������������������������������������������������ ����������������������������������������������������������������������� ������������������������������� �������������������������������������������������������������������������� ������������������������������������������������������������������������ ���������������������������������������������������

www.EliteEquestrianMagazine.com

EE


STALL HEATERS

Electric radiant infrared heaters warm horses and owners without heating the entire barn. No ultra-violet tanning rays! Ideal for wash stalls, foaling stalls and grooming areas! Made in the USA

610.837.0700

KALGLO.COM/HORSEHTR

EQUESTRIAN SURFACES Specializing In All Your Equestrian Surface Needs

• Design • Construction • Maintenance • Renovation • Irrigation • Drags & Groomers Field Specialties provides personalized solutions for each individual surface. Family owned company for 30 years Utilizing laser grading systems for precision Contact David Frey 440.339.6049 davidfieldspecialties@gmail.com www.EliteEquestrianMagazine.com

57


Western Dressage:

Similarities Between

Western and “Regular” DRESSAGE Story and Photos By Lynn Palm Palm Partnership Training™ Building a Partnership with your Horse You’ve probably already figured out that you can do the same dressage maneuvers in a Western saddle that you can do in a “regular” dressage saddle. This reminds me of our Western Dressage motto, “Why Not?!” I’ve been saying that since I learned of the vast interests in Western Dressage at the 2010 FEI World Equestrian Games.

TRAINING & Showing

For the first 30 years of riding, I rode consistently in the dressage saddle. I still find myself training the exact same way whether I am in a Western saddle or a dressage saddle. Dressage principles are the basis of my show ring success. By using these principles with the training of the horses, I find I ride the same when riding in a hunt seat or Western saddle. I would guarantee you if you put a western saddle—correctly fitted, of course—on a Gran Prix horse and started to do Piaffe, Tempi changes, Passage, Half Pass, etc., you would find that a horse can do just as well in a Western saddle! It does not matter to a horse what saddle is on his back, unless it does not fit the horse or rider correctly. Actually, I find the dressage and Western saddles are the most similar. You ride in a sitting position at the walk, trot, and canter in a dressage saddle. If you are riding correctly in a Western saddle, you mirror the same basic principles at the walk, jog and lope. You can post to the trot in the Western or English saddle too. Have you ever compared dressage and Western riders? I encourage you to do this using my latest book, “A Riders Guide To Real Collection.” If you use another book, just make sure it features good quality training and correct horsemanship. Now, compare photos of riders. You are going to find the English riders and the Western riders are in similar positions. You should be able to define a vertical straight line from their ear, shoulder, middle of the hip, back of the heel to the ground. This vertical alignment that we must maintain while riding the horse in his three gaits is so similar, no matter what saddle you are using. For example, the Western rider can ride with two hands just like the English rider. This is a similar balanced position. Remember, the horse does not care about the saddle as long as it fits properly. Whether you are riding in a dressage or Western saddle, the universal aids of seat, legs and hands used to communicate with the horse are all the same. It should not matter what saddle you are in, as long as you are consistently using your aids correctly. If you had a big, bulky, thick leathered Western saddle, you may not be able to

58

use your aids as “close contact” as a dressage saddle. My Western dressage saddle gives just as close contact with my horse as my dressage saddle. I just love it! The training of the horse and the levels you follow to improve the horse’s knowledge and performance, as well as your own skills, does not depend on the saddle you ride. The saddle is just a tool to keep you in balance with your horse, feel the horse underneath you, and to give your horse comfort as he carries your weight. A horse should have no problems unless the saddle does not fit. I find that most riders love the Western saddle because it has a bigger seat and a horn for confidence. A Western saddle does not challenge your balance as much as an English dressage saddle does. All English saddles require more balance from the rider and a skill level, so they don’t rely on the horn if they should need it for balance. We require all our Western riders to ride English simply because I believe that riding English (dressage or hunt seat) will improve your Western riding. Over the years, this has proven very true. I would like to end this training article with a challenge for you. If you have a friend or student who rides only Western, try to get them in an English saddle. They will find it helps their Western riding by enhancing balance and confidence. If you know an English rider, try to get them to ride in the Western saddle. They will have a blast, as it is so much more comfortable if the saddle is of top quality. Most riders retire riding in a Western saddle! Don’t ever forget that! We love to share our dressage backgrounds and knowledge with you and would love to have you come ride with us www.lynnpalm.com. You can join us at our farm in Ocala, Florida, or at one of our Ride Well Clinics on our USA Tour at a location near you. Until then, follow your dreams, Lynn �������������������������������������������������������������������� ����������������������������������������������������������

www.EliteEquestrianMagazine.com

EE


www.EliteEquestrianMagazine.com

59


KATS

KORNER Set that Goal by Kat Fuqua

2021 FEI North American Youth Championship JR Dressage. My first time on a team taking home 3 Bronze medals with Dream Girl, later to be named USEF JR Dressage Champion. Photo by Andrew Ryback

Brandywine 2021, Low JR Jumper, My first 5 months to compete Jumpers. Photo by Anne Gittins

TRAINING & Showing

GOALS TAKE YEARS SET THEM TODAY Goals are the most important thing you can do for yourself, setting goals makes you hungry and ambitious. They make you strong and competitive. Lots of people set short term goals that they are sure they can make, which are great and keep you busy. But the best feeling is when you set a huge goal that when you set it, you know it was a big stretch and would be hard to make. But in the end you did it. Even if you think there’s no way you can ever do this; if it’s something you want to do, set that goal. People on the outside looking in believe you can do it, even if your doubtful. Feed off of that energy THAT YOU CAN AND WILL DO IT. Because then you are setting yourself up to succeed and to do well by telling yourself you can. Every time before I go in any competition my mom makes me say, “I can do it and I will do it”. This motivates me to be great and fight for what I want to do. In 2014 it was my absolute goal to win USEF Pony Finals. After four years of getting no ribbons, I kept coming back and telling myself that I could do it. On my fifth year I won Grand Champion Overall with Brighton. As my mom says “ you can do it if you put your mind to it!” So no matter how many years your goal will take, set it and work towards it every day until you get it done and believe in yourself.

2021 Grand Champion USEF Jr Hunter Finals with Grand Remo. My first JR Hunter Finals win besting over 300 entries after 3 years of trying. Photo by Anne Gittins

WEF 6 2018, with RS Levitatioin AKA Jet, and 11 year old Kat. My first time in the international ring. Photo by Sara Hellner

EE

Photo provided by and usage permission obtained by Fuqua’s 60

www.EliteEquestrianMagazine.com


LOVE TO RIDE! Learn how Nancy can help you create more joy and success in your riding.

Go to carouselcoaching.com and arrange your introductory session today! Dressage Performance and Mindset Coaching

Nancy’s unique experience of competition through the Grand Prix level in the U.S. and Europe and her passion for relationships makes her a perfect choice to partner with.

The Original Dr Cook Bitless Bridle ®

US Patent No 6591589

Prices start at $69.95

English & Western Styles

In stock for FREE same day shipping

Nancy’s dedication to horsemanship and the health and wellbeing of our youth riders creates a positive environment for growth and success. Lessons and coaching are available at her facilities in New Hampshire (summer) and Florida (winter), or remotely via phone or internet.

Nancy Later Lavoie 561 714 7447

Greenville, NH / Loxahatchee, FL

To Order: www.bitlessbridle.com Or Call: 877.942.4277 www.EliteEquestrianMagazine.com

61


Warranties in Horse Sales – I promised what? © 2021 Avery S. Chapman, Esq.1 When you sell a horse, most sellers understand that a written Equine Bill of Sale is best practice. If the deal has complexities, such as payment over time, trial period or lease-to-own, then a written Equine Purchase and Sale Agreement is a further best practice. However, what many sellers do not realize is that the form of the Equine Bill of Sale and the form of the Equine Purchase and Sale Agreement are very important. In a separate article, we discussed certain disclosure and language requirements in the Bill of Sale required in certain jurisdictions. Notably, Florida contains some of the most expansive requirements in those areas.2 Here, I address another area of horse sales: the warranties a seller gives a buyer when selling a horse. Some of these warranties exist whether or not any warranty is stated in the Bill of Sale or Purchase and Sale Agreement. You now thing, “can I be accused of giving a warranty if I did not put one in the equine sale transaction documents?” Short Answer: yes. With that “yes” comes a host of legal responsibilities. Now, with that thought in mind, let’s unpack the various warranties that might exist when you sell a horse: Here, I address another area of horse sales: the warranties a seller gives a buyer when selling a horse. Some of these warranties exist whether or not any warranty is stated in the Bill of Sale or Purchase and Sale Agreement. You now thing, “can I be accused of giving a warranty if I did not put one in the equine sale transaction documents?” Short Answer: yes. With that “yes” comes a host of legal responsibilities. Now, with that thought in mind, let’s unpack the various warranties that might exist when you sell a horse:

1. Express Warranties.

EQUINE Training & Showing

These are the warranties you commonly see in horse sale contracts. Promises that the seller has the capacity to sell the horse, that the horse is currently sound, that the horse is not subject to any lien or claim by a third parson, that the horse is as identified, that the horse is identified correctly. You can make any express warranty you want in your documents, not just those listed. The previously listed warranties are warranties that are the easy ones to give as a seller, and are the warranties that many purchasers will want to see included in the transaction documents.

2. Implied Warranties.

a. Implied Warranty of Fitness for a Particular Purpose An implied warranty, as opposed to an express warranty, is a warranty that arises from the particular circumstances of an equine purchase and sale transaction. Under many state laws, including Florida, an implied warranty of fitness for a particular purpose arises where a seller has reason to know a particular purpose for which the horse is required and the purchaser relies on the seller’s skill or judgment to select or furnish a suitable horse To enforce that 62

While a recipient of information about a horse will not have to investigate every piece of information furnished, he or she is responsible for investigating information that a reasonable person in the position of the recipient would be expected to investigate. type of implied warranty, however, a person must be in privity with the seller and must have justifiably relied on the seller. Many states have codified into their Uniform Commercial Codes the requirements to for that understanding and right to enforce to exist. What that means is that while a purchaser who is inexperienced with horses likely can justifiably rely on a professional horse seller, the same is not true when an inexperienced purchaser employs a team of equine professionals and equine veterinarians to assist the purchaser in examining the horse. In that case, the purchaser is relying on the purchaser’s own team, not upon the statements of the seller. The same is true when you have an equine purchase and sale amongst equals, such as when one equine professional sells to another equine professional. There is often a defense to such an implied warranty, so do not confuse justifiable reliance on a representation by the seller, which is not the same thing as failure to exercise due diligence. One does not necessarily translate into the other. While a recipient of information about a horse will not have to investigate every piece of information furnished, he or she is responsible for investigating information that a reasonable person in the position of the recipient would be expected to investigate. So it follows, if a purchaser does not exercise due diligence when purchasing a horse, that may defeat any claim of the implied warranty of fitness. b. Implied Warranty of Merchantability. Under this type of implied warranty, each sale of a horse comes with it the implied promise that the horse was at least of of average quality as similar horses in that category of horse, and the horse was fit for its intended and ordinary purpose. This implied warranty

Continued on page 72 www.EliteEquestrianMagazine.com


is distinguished from the prior implied warranty as this is a warranty that the horse is at least an average horse for the discipline and class for which the horse is sold to compete. The jumper sold, for example, need not be the guaranteed winner at 1.40, just that it is at least an average horse at that level. Conversely, there is no warranty implied here that the horse will perform flawlessly or even always safely, given the inherent dangers of sport horse competition.

3. Disclaimer of Warranties – “As-Is” is not sufficient.

Warranties can only be be disclaimed by conspicuous and clear language A oneliner: “This horse is sold “as-is” would not be sufficient to disclaim a warranty stated, or otherwise implied, by the circumstances of the sale. Do you want to legally disclaim some or all warranties ? Call a knowledgeable equine lawyer and work out the proper language and scope of the disclaimer for your transaction documents. Do not be penny-wise, pound-foolish about committing some resources to having a proper set of an Equine Bill of Sale and and Equine Purchase and Sale Agreement. A lack of proper disclaimer in your documents is a sleeping land mine, waiting to blow up on a seller at a future time, should an issue arise with the horse after sale.

4. Who Can Enforce a Warranty?

The law of most states, including Florida, is that to recover for the breach of a warranty, either express or implied, the plaintiff must be in privity of contract with the defendant. “Privity” means that parties contracting together – the seller and purchaser. An agent of a purchaser, such as a trainer who is not a purchaser or part purchaser of the horse, is not in privity of contract, and thus not entitled to enforce any warranties by the seller in that contract, unless the seller’s trainer is a “third party beneficiary” to the contract. That does not mean that, because the trainer was going to earn fees from the boarding and training of the horse the trainer, the trainer is in privity with the seller and entitled to enforce the warranties. Those are incidental or consequential benefits, and a person who is not a party to a contract may not sue for breach of that contract where that person receives only an incidental or consequential benefit from the contract.

A trainer or other agent merely expecting benefits such as fees from the sale commission, training or boarding fees, or competition prize winnings, would not convert the trainer into a third party beneficiary with rights to enforce the warranties, if any, of the equine Bill of Sale or equine Purchase and Sale Agreement. Rather, a non-party to a contract, such as a trainer, may only qualify as a third-party beneficiary when the following elements are met: (1) existence of a contract; (2) the clear or manifest intent of the contracting parties that the contract primarily and directly benefit the third party; (3) breach of the contract by a contracting party; and (4) damages to the third party resulting from the breach. Therefore, unless equine Bill of Sale or equine Purchase and Sale Agreement specifically states that the seller and purchaser both agree that the purpose of the sale is to benefit the trainer, the trainer would not be able to enforce any warranties against the seller. A trainer or other agent merely expecting benefits such as fees from the sale commission, training or boarding fees, or competition prize winnings, would not convert the trainer into a third party beneficiary with rights to enforce the warranties, if any, of the equine Bill of Sale or equine Purchase and Sale Agreement. This is because the primary purpose of the horse sale transaction is to benefit the seller and purchaser. For the same reasons, a downstream purchaser, such as the next purchaser after the first purchaser, would not be able to enforce any warranty upon the original seller, because of a lack of direct connection, a lack of privity, with the seller.

5. Conclusion.

Be aware that when you sell a horse, if you want to disclaim some or all warranties, you must do it in written form, expressly and correctly. Find yourself a knowledgeable equine lawyer, in the jurisdiction where the equine purchase and sale is to occur, and develop the correct set of transaction documents for that equine purchase and sale. 1. Avery S. Chapman, Esq. is the Founding and Inaugural Chair of The Equine Law Committee of The Animal Law Section of The Florida Bar. The principal Founder of Equine Law Group, LLC, located in Wellington, Florida, Mr. Chapman provides legal counsel to members of the national and international equine industry and equestrian owners and athletes on a wide range of matters including litigation and business, as well as disciplinary matters. He is also a national speaker and writer on equine law issues, a member of the Palm Beach County Bar Association Professionalism Committee and the Professional Ethics Committee of the American Bar Association, as well as past legal counsel to and a Governor At Large of the United States Polo Association, a 501(c)(6) organization. Mr. Chapman may be reached through www.equinelawgroup.com. 2. See Fraud In Horse Sales, https://www.floridabar. org/the-florida-bar-journal/fraud-in-horse-sales-floridasrule-5h-and-unfair-and-deceptive-acts-by-equine-sellersagents-and-others/

www.EliteEquestrianMagazine.com

EE 63


Capital Challenge Returns Home for Elite Hunter, Jumper, and Equitation Competition By Sabrina Brashares/Jump Media After a change of venue in 2020 due to the coronavirus pandemic, the Capital Challenge Horse Show returned to its familiar venue, Prince George’s Equestrian Center in Upper Marlboro, Maryland, October 1 though October 10, 2021. The nation’s top hunter, jumper, and equitation riders competed for historic titles during the 28th edition of the show. The 10-day event offered more than $400,000 in prize money and had a record-high number of entries in its return home. Capital Challenge held five year-end equitation finals, five North American League (NAL) Finals, nine World Championship Hunter Rider (WCHR) Challenge classes, the $10,000 WCHR Professional Finals sponsored by the Rein Family, and the $25,000 KASK Green Hunter 3’ and 3’3” North American Championship sponsored by the Wheeler Family.

EQUINE Training & Showing

Professionals Compete for Coveted Titles

64

The WCHR Professional Finals is one of the highlights of Capital Challenge every year. Six of the country’s best hunter riders qualified for the class and the top four continued to The Final Four Ride-Off. Scott Stewart, John French, Jimmy Torano, and Victoria Colvin all secured a spot in the final round where they returned to each jump four courses on horses generously donated by their owners. Stewart of Wellington, Florida, scored a 90 or above in all four of his rides to capture his seventh victory in the class. “I always get nervous for these types of classes,” admitted Stewart. “Excited, but a little nervous. So many things can go wrong for any of us. Whoever wins the class is always the luckiest. They are the luckiest draw, the luckiest for not hitting a jump or swapping. Obviously, everybody rides great, so it’s just who was the luckiest that night.” Stewart took home another top win in the $25,000 KASK Green Hunter 3’ and 3’3” North American Championship sponsored by the Wheeler Family riding Betsee Parker’s Ackergill Castle.

French of Wellington, Florida, earned his own headline after piloting Babylon, owned by Marnell Sport Horses, to the top prize in the $25,000 WCHR Professional Challenge, sponsored by the Gochman Family, which took place earlier in the week. This marked French’s fourth win in the class. “For him to come here at six years old and show against those horses and win is pretty special,” said French. “I never dreamed that he would win this. I just thought this would be a good class to go in for experience and see how he did, and he ended up winning the whole thing. Having started him from the beginning makes it more special.” French and Babylon made it a week to remember by also claiming the Grand Hunter, Grand Green Hunter, and Grand Green Hunter 3’6” Championship titles. “I’ve always had good luck at this horse show; it’s always been a good show for me,” commented French, who is originally from Maryland. “I think this is the best show there is for the hunters with all the special classes and awards they give that showcase the owners, the horses, and the riders.”

Equitation Stars Rise to the Challenge

Junior and amateur equitation riders kicked off the Capital Challenge with Equitation Weekend, sponsored by Bigeq.com. One of the largest and most competitive classes was the fifth-annual EMO Insurance/ United States Hunter Jumper Association (USHJA) 3’3” Jumping Seat Medal Final – East. The class consisted of three challenging phases and 153 horse-and-rider combinations fighting for the top prize. Riley Hogan www.EliteEquestrianMagazine.com


of Warrenton, Virginia, and Donald Stewart’s Wengen ultimately topped the leaderboard and led the victory gallop. Hogan climbed 16 places to return for the final round sitting in second. She did not let the pressure get to her and navigated Wengen around the final course with ease to earn a high score of 93. Hogan saw this victory as a huge confidence builder going into the remaining indoor finals. “I was ecstatic; I mean it was unreal,” said Hogan. “This class was a pretty big goal, and it definitely gives me a boost of confidence going into the [Dover Saddlery/USEF Hunt Seat] Medal Finals, ASPCA Maclay National Championship, and Washington International Horse Show Equitation Finals.” Other top equitation finishes included: THIS Children’s Medal Finals – Abigail Gordon Ariat Adult Medal Finals – Jaden Olson Palm Beach International Academy North American Junior Equitation Championships – Grace Debney North American Adult Amateur Equitation Championships – Claire Stevenson

Jumpers Fly in the Show Place Arena

Jumper riders took a turn in the spotlight with the $10,000 NAL Children’s Jumper Finals sponsored by EquiFit. Taylor Landstrom of Excelsior, Minnesota, piloted her own Colina SN to the win in the NAL Children’s Jumper Finals out of 31 horse-and-rider combinations. After 16 riders successfully cleared the first round and qualified for the jump-off, Landstrom knew she was going to have to go all out in order to win the competitive class. Last to return for the jump-off, Landstrom kept her cool and stuck to her plan to produce the winning time of 33.021 seconds. “Going into the jump-off I had to make sure that I kept my mind mentally calm,” explained Landstrom. “There were some

fast rounds so I just had to trust my horse. I also had to trust myself and mentally calm myself down through all of it.” The winner of the $10,000 NAL Adult Jumper Finals sponsored by Smartpak was Hope Batchelor DVM of Chester Springs, Pennsylvania, riding her own Byolga. In the $10,000 NAL Low Junior/Adult/Amateur Jumper Finals, Emma Blumenkrantz of Colts Neck, New Jersey, and her own Collin W were victorious.

Hunters Close Out a Successful Week

Amateur hunter competition did not disappoint at Capital Challenge. As a result of a stellar performance in the AmateurOwner 3’6” 18-35 division, Callie Seaman of New York, New York, and her own Silver Lining secured the division championship, which led them to the Grand Amateur-Owner Hunter 3’6” Champion title, presented by Finally Farm. Seaman was thrilled to earn her first grand championship at Capital Challenge with Silver Lining, her partner of three years. She originally purchased her mount right before badly breaking her leg. Seaman renamed the gelding because he became her silver lining in an unlucky situation. “I think everyone sees Capital Challenge as the hunter spotlight show,” remarked Seaman. “It’s the most exciting horse show for me for the hunters every year. It really is the culmination of all the hard work that you have done.” Other Grand Champions during the 2021 Capital Challenge Horse Show included: Grand Amateur-Owner 3’3” Champion – Airport 48, ridden by Martha Ingram and owned by John and Stephanie Ingram, LLC Grand Junior Hunter 3’6” Champion – Commentary, ridden by Augusta Iwasaki and owned by Bikoff Equestrian LLC Grand Junior Hunter 3’3” Champion – Arabesque, ridden by Clara Propp and owned by Aquitaine Equine Grand Children’s Hunter Champion – Catbird, ridden by Alexa Karet and owned by Glade Run Farm LLC Grand Adult Hunter Champion – Per Se, ridden by Laura Karet and owned by Glade Run Farm LLC Grand Pony Hunter Champion – So Enchanted, ridden by Lauren Padilla and owned by Highland Farm, LLC To learn more about the Capital Challenge Horse Show and to view a full list of winners from the hunter, jumper, and equitation competition offered, visit www.CapitalChallenge.org. See lots of great winning ride videos and winner interviews on the Capital Challenge YouTube page. For additional updates, visit the CCHS Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter pages. www.EliteEquestrianMagazine.com

EE 65


Continued from page 38

Krissy Greenleaf and Eddie strut their stuff during a side saddle session at Camp Leaping Horn 2021 held at USET. Photo by Stefan Ohlsson for Paws and Rewind

Tammie Conway and Porthos looking dapper while volunteering at the Montpelier Races this November in Virginia. Photo by Liz Callar

Lynn Daniel proudly poses with her beautiful antique western side saddle she lovingly restored herself. Photo by Jacquelynn Holly of Holly Saddlery

Our community consists of amazing people that come from all walks of life and different backgrounds with endless opportunities to discover curiosities of the side saddle world. Our members create clothing, hats, whips and crops, leather goods, costumes, restore historical artifacts and saddles. Some collect different side saddle items such as antique stirrups, sandwich cases, canes, and top hats among other collectibles. Our members are so generous that it is not uncommon to see them loan items to others, so that they may be successful in their endeavors of their choosing. ISSO members are involved with reenactments, parades, competing, jousting, archery, shooting, dressage, jumping, flatwork all in the name of preserving this style of riding. ISSO holds an annual meeting each spring complete with board member elections, rules, Year End Awards, Scholarship announcements, while usually having several scheduled events on specific side saddle topics led by experts in the field.

TRAINING & Showing

The International Side Saddle Organization strives to serve each individual member with the best and safest information, so that each equestrian and their equines can enjoy the years to come and maybe help someone else who may want to get started in this exciting field of riding. If you want to find out more, you can find us at

www.sidesaddle.com

EE 66

www.EliteEquestrianMagazine.com


www.EliteEquestrianMagazine.com

67


Safety in DESIGN Story and Diagrams By Tom Scheve All horse owners want their horses to be safe when be transported, however, sadly, there are horse trailer designs out there that are dangerous if not used correctly, and some that are just fundamentally dangerous no matter what.

HOW DOES THIS HAPPEN? Three horse bumper pull slant load

There are several possible reasons why a trailer that would be considered unsafe and possibly dangerous would make it to market: manufacturers and dealers experimenting with designs to possibly standout from competition without consideration for the safety of the horses, horse owners without the knowledge of design and how it can affect the horses safety (and their own), and the acceptance of designs that have been on the market for a awhile that are seemingly popular because they offer convenience over safety (i.e. more horses in a smaller trailer) Regarding convenience over safety the latter, one such trailer is the three-horse slant load bumper pull. One of the big design concerns with the slant load threehorse bumper pull is that more consideration must be given to tongue weight, especially when more owners want the ability to tow the trailer with an SUV or smaller pickups. Too little tongue weight and the trailer is prone to sway; too much tongue weight will exceed the rating of the framemounted hitch and the tow vehicle’s capacity. There is inherent danger in the design. To prevent over-loading the tongue weight, the designer and builders of a three-horse bumper pull move the axles forward from the rear so that one horse is behind the axles, one horse is over the axles, and one is in front. See above photo.

THE THREE-HORSE SLANT BUMPER PULL Adding a third horse to a trailer increases the loaded weight anywhere from eight hundred to fifteen hundred pounds (and can be more). Add the empty weight of a standard three-horse bumper pull (about 3,900 lbs.) to the weight of three one thousand pound horses along with some tack, and the loaded weight will be 7,000 lbs (typical GVWR for a bumper pull). Also, consider has to be given to the fact that that the three thousand pounds of horse weight is “live” weight, which can move and shift at will.

BALANCED

TRAINING & Showing

NOTE: Light tongue weights increase the chance of sway. Heavier tongue weights reduce and even eliminate sway. However, if the tongue weight exceeds the maximum rating of a frame-mounted hitch and a tow vehicle’s capability, the vehicle and hitch are at risk, and safety is compromised. For the trailer to function correctly, each horse should weigh approximately the same (good luck with that). Horses with different weights will affect the tongue weight depending on their weight and the stall it occupies. Unless the horses have significant weight differences, the degree to which the tongue weight is affected is minimal. The real problems arise when putting fewer than three horses in a trailer specifically designed for three. Where do you put them? To carry two horses in the trailer, placing one in the rear behind the axles and one over the axles will significantly decrease the tongue weight and create sway. Placing one horse in the middle stall (over the axles) and one in the front stall, forward of the axles, puts the entire weight of the front horse on tongue, which is likely to overload the hitches and capacities of most SUVs and many trucks. See diagram. 68

www.EliteEquestrianMagazine.com

TOO LIGHT - SWAY

HEAVY TONGUE WEIGHT

Contiued...


So the best scenario for carrying two horses in a three-horse slant bumper pull is to load one in the rear stall and one in the front, preferably the heavier one in front. However, the common practice of many three-horse bumper pull owners when only carrying two horses is to remove one of the dividers to give both horses more room. However, this creates more area for the horses to move around, creating sway and tongue weight issues for most tow vehicles. See above.

When carrying just one horse, never place the horse in the rear stall behind the axles. All the weight behind the axles is sure to cause sway and loss of control. The best placement for one horse is directly over the axles. However, depending on the weight and strength of the tow vehicle, the tongue weight still may not be sufficient to prevent swaying. If the tow vehicle is heavy-duty and the hitch rating is high enough, placing the one horse in the front stall will ensure good tracking and eliminate sway. See above. In closing, keep in mind that slant load designs have other potential safety related problems: smaller stalls, no individual access to or exits for the horses, and horse balancing issues for the horses from standing at an angle. Combine these potential issues with an improperly loaded trailer, and you’re asking for trouble out on the road.

��������������������������������������������������������������������������������� ������������������������������������������������������������������������������ ��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� ������������������������������������������������������������������������������ ������������������������������������������������������������������������������� ���������������������������������������������������������������������������� ��������������������������������������������������������������������������������� ������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� �������������������������������������������������������������������������

See our ad on page 67 Elite Equestrian does not endorse or confirm content suggestions in any articles. See credit page for disclaimer.

EE

www.EliteEquestrianMagazine.com

69


WEC Dressage IV Grand Prix Freestyle Naima Moreira Laliberte on Statesman

Stacey Parvey Larsson on Benidetto

1st Place Ashley Holzer on Havanna 2nd Place Codi Harrison on Katholt’s Bossco

TRAINING & Showing

3rd Place Pablo Gomaz Molina on Ulises de Yas 4th Place Naima Moreria Laliberte on Statesman 5th Place Sahar Hirosh on Whitman 6th Place Ivo Juhrend on Cover Girl

Tyra Vernon on Ruben

UPCOMING DRESSAGE SHOWS AT THE WORLD EQUESTRIAN CENTER SOUTH, Ocala FL The World Equestrian Center – Ocala Dressage VI Jan 7th, 2022 - Jan 9th, 2022 The World Equestrian Center – Ocala Dressage VIII Jan 21st, 2022 - Jan 23rd, 2022 The World Equestrian Center – Ocala Dressage XIII Feb 25th, 2022 - Feb 27th, 2022

EE 70

www.EliteEquestrianMagazine.com


www.EliteEquestrianMagazine.com

71


Continued from page 62

is distinguished from the prior implied warranty as this is a warranty that the horse is at least an average horse for the discipline and class for which the horse is sold to compete. The jumper sold, for example, need not be the guaranteed winner at 1.40, just that it is at least an average horse at that level. Conversely, there is no warranty implied here that the horse will perform flawlessly or even always safely, given the inherent dangers of sport horse competition.

3. Disclaimer of Warranties – “As-Is” is not sufficient.

Warranties can only be be disclaimed by conspicuous and clear language A oneliner: “This horse is sold “as-is” would not be sufficient to disclaim a warranty stated, or otherwise implied, by the circumstances of the sale. Do you want to legally disclaim some or all warranties ? Call a knowledgeable equine lawyer and work out the proper language and scope of the disclaimer for your transaction documents. Do not be penny-wise, pound-foolish about committing some resources to having a proper set of an Equine Bill of Sale and and Equine Purchase and Sale Agreement. A lack of proper disclaimer in your documents is a sleeping land mine, waiting to blow up on a seller at a future time, should an issue arise with the horse after sale.

4. Who Can Enforce a Warranty?

The law of most states, including Florida, is that to recover for the breach of a warranty, either express or implied, the plaintiff must be in privity of contract with the defendant. “Privity” means that parties contracting together – the seller and purchaser. An agent of a purchaser, such as a trainer who is not a purchaser or part purchaser of the horse, is not in privity of contract, and thus not entitled to enforce any warranties by the seller in that contract, unless the seller’s trainer is a “third party beneficiary” to the contract. That does not mean that, because the trainer was going to earn fees from the boarding and training of the horse the trainer, the trainer is in privity with the seller and entitled to enforce the warranties. Those are incidental or consequential benefits, and a person who is not a party to a contract may not sue for breach of that contract where that person receives only an incidental or consequential benefit from the contract.

72

A trainer or other agent merely expecting benefits such as fees from the sale commission, training or boarding fees, or competition prize winnings, would not convert the trainer into a third party beneficiary with rights to enforce the warranties, if any, of the equine Bill of Sale or equine Purchase and Sale Agreement. Rather, a non-party to a contract, such as a trainer, may only qualify as a third-party beneficiary when the following elements are met: (1) existence of a contract; (2) the clear or manifest intent of the contracting parties that the contract primarily and directly benefit the third party; (3) breach of the contract by a contracting party; and (4) damages to the third party resulting from the breach. Therefore, unless equine Bill of Sale or equine Purchase and Sale Agreement specifically states that the seller and purchaser both agree that the purpose of the sale is to benefit the trainer, the trainer would not be able to enforce any warranties against the seller. A trainer or other agent merely expecting benefits such as fees from the sale commission, training or boarding fees, or competition prize winnings, would not convert the trainer into a third party beneficiary with rights to enforce the warranties, if any, of the equine Bill of Sale or equine Purchase and Sale Agreement. This is because the primary purpose of the horse sale transaction is to benefit the seller and purchaser. For the same reasons, a downstream purchaser, such as the next purchaser after the first purchaser, would not be able to enforce any warranty upon the original seller, because of a lack of direct connection, a lack of privity, with the seller.

5. Conclusion.

Be aware that when you sell a horse, if you want to disclaim some or all warranties, you must do it in written form, expressly and correctly. Find yourself a knowledgeable equine lawyer, in the jurisdiction where the equine purchase and sale is to occur, and develop the correct set of transaction documents for that equine purchase and sale. 1. Avery S. Chapman, Esq. is the Founding and Inaugural Chair of The Equine Law Committee of The Animal Law Section of The Florida Bar. The principal Founder of Equine Law Group, LLC, located in Wellington, Florida, Mr. Chapman provides legal counsel to members of the national and international equine industry and equestrian owners and athletes on a wide range of matters including litigation and business, as well as disciplinary matters. He is also a national speaker and writer on equine law issues, a member of the Palm Beach County Bar Association Professionalism Committee and the Professional Ethics Committee of the American Bar Association, as well as past legal counsel to and a Governor At Large of the United States Polo Association, a 501(c)(6) organization. Mr. Chapman may be reached through www.equinelawgroup.com. 2. See Fraud In Horse Sales, https://www.floridabar. org/the-florida-bar-journal/fraud-in-horse-sales-floridasrule-5h-and-unfair-and-deceptive-acts-by-equine-sellersagents-and-others/

www.EliteEquestrianMagazine.com

EE


www.EliteEquestrianMagazine.com

73


Tina Wilson

Realtor Broker Associate, ABR, SFR Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices Home Team Realty

Office: 352-622-9700 Direct Local: 352-897-0725

“Sell” phone/text: 215-239-7441

2161 E. Fort King Street Ocala, FL 34471

Honesty, Integrity, Always. tinawilsonhomes@gmail.com

74

www.EliteEquestrianMagazine.com


TACK BOX Business Card Showcase

WHY SHOULD YOU HAVE A PROFESSIONAL CERTIFIED EQUINE APPRAISAL?

• Pre-purchase or sale evaluation • Bankruptcy • Insurance Policies • Estate Planning • Divorce

• Settlements • I.R.S.- Tax Donations • Tax Audit • Lending Institution (collateral) • Litigation Expert Witness

The Leading Equine Appraisal Service Worldwide Since 1980

Christine Rolando,Certified Senior Equine Appraiser

Call 845-494-6257 For Free Consultation

www.equineappraiser.net or horses@warwick.net

7150 W HWY 40 OCALA, FL 34482

www.EliteEquestrianMagazine.com

75


Tack Box Business Showcase

TACK BOX Business Card Showcase

Visit our newly renovated store!

Mon - Fri: 9 to 5:30 Sat: 9 to 4

352-203-4803 1655 SW Hwy 484 Unit 102, Ocala FL

1.5 Miles From FL Horse Park- FREE DELIVERY!

thecountrylanetack@gmail.com

Find Horse Sense Radio recordings at:

www.EquineAppraiser.net www.HorseSenseRadio.com STREAMING WORLDWIDE

Amazing Interviews with EQUINE Thought Leaders and Influencers

Have a story that needs to be told? Horses@warwick.net

76

www.EliteEquestrianMagazine.com

www.countrylanetack.com


Just $130 per issue OR $594 for the year (6 issues), or...BEST VALUE... Prepay $500 for the/ year... like6getting one issue FREE! $140 / Issue, or $660 Year it’s (Our regular issues)

Founder?

855-44CINCH www.hoofcinch.com

ALWAYS BE PREPARED!

Horse ID Collars, Fetlock ID Bands for camping, trail riding or traveling and everyday use.

ID Collars now available for all your small farm animals too!

xx

�������� ���������� ������

• Stops the pain quickly • Painless application • Realigns the hoof wall to the coffin bone • Works with or without shoeing • Easy to apply

Be prepared NOW before the next evacuation happens!

www.EquestriSafe.com

(877) 600-1375

Internationally Known Animal Communicator

LYDIA HIBY

Published Author of:

“Conversations with Animals”

Featured on: • 48 Hours • Equitana USA • Equine Affair • David Letterman • Equestrian Nation, RFD-TV

(850)775-8331

www.EliteEquestrianMagazine.com

Ranch Calls in the New Year GIFT CERTIFICATES available for any occasion! I www.lydiahiby.com

77


78

www.EliteEquestrianMagazine.com


www.EliteEquestrianMagazine.com

79



80

www.EliteEquestrianMagazine.com