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Quick and easy pressure cooking with Jamie Oliver


Summary Tomato pasta soup with rosemary 5 Moules a la mariniere 6 Lamb Tagine with preserved lemons, almonds and apricots 9 Pot roast Chinese pork shoulder with five-spice, plums, chilli and ginger 11 Sausage stew 13 Spicy chicken Rogan Josh14 Pot roast chicken with bacon, cider and mushrooms 17 Perfect steamed rice 19 The best fluffy couscous 20 Quick smashed celeriac 22 Quick cooked butternut squash or pumpkin 24 Quick steamed beetroot 26 Steamed potatoes 29 Steamed and marinated peppers and aubergine 30 Pound pudding 33

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his pressure cooker will change your life! Not only does it cook food better, but it does it so quickly. With people being so short on time these days, the pressure cooker seems to be the answer. It opens up a whole world of cooking you’d never have dreamt that you’d have time for. Pressure cookers are different from saucepans. They’re a totally different cooking concept. They work by trapping steam inside them which raises the temperature and pressure to higher than normal levels, cooking and tenderising food much more quickly. The high pressure really forces the flavour of herbs and spices into food and because no steam escapes, no flavour escapes either. Cuts of meat that would usually take ages to cook are done to perfection in this pressure cooker. The meat gets broken down so that it’s ridiculously tender and it will melt in your mouth. And you’ll end up with wonderfully tasty sauces in less than half the time. Let me tell you about some of the other great things you can use your pressure cooker for: You can start making the best mash in the world because, instead of • having to peel and halve your potatoes before they go in the water, in a pressure cooker you can keep them whole and effectively steam them. Then all you have to do is peel off their skins, and with some salt, pepper, milk and butter you’ll end up with the best ever, lovely fluffy mash.

Rice and couscous cook reliably and easily. I’ve got 2 foolproof recipes here, which I’m sure you’ll end up using all the time. Steaming veg is great in these cookers. You really get the taste of • whatever herbs and spices you use to flavour them, and all the veggies that usually take a while to cook will be ready in minutes. Stews and casseroles are great too, because they’re done so quickly and • they end up being so flavoursome. Mussels or clams done in the pressure cooker will all open at the same • rate, so you won’t end up with some cooking quicker than others. And, best of all, unlike the old style pressure cookers, Tefal has revolutionised the design so that your pressure cooker is dead easy to use and very easy to clean. They look pretty cool too! Happy pressure cooking! Love Jamie O 3


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Tomato pasta soup with rosemary This is based on an old Italian favourite called Pasta Fagioli. It’s a hearty dish half way between a soup and a stew. Don’t forget to finish it with a good glug of the best olive oil you can find.

Serves 4 redonion, onion,peeled peeled • 1 carrot, peeled sticks of celery, trimmed cans of good • 3•x2400g/14oz ••1 1red quality plum tomatoes • 2 cloves of garlic, peeled • olive oil • 80g/2_oz any dried pasta • 1 carrot, peeled x 400g/14oz cans of good •quality plum tomatoes 2 x 400g/14oz cans of borlotti of 3celery, trimmed • 2 sticks • ororcannellini beans • 2 x 400g/14oz cans of borlotti cannellini beans • 2 cloves of garlic, peeled salt and freshly ground • sea salt and freshly ground pepper • seablack • olive oil black picked pepper • a sprig of rosemary, leaves • 80g/23/4oz any dried pasta • a sprig of rosemary, leaves picked

Chop the red onion, carrot, celery and garlic as finely as you can and sweat them gently in a little olive oil in the bottom of the pressure cooker until soft. Place the pasta in a polythene bag, squeeze all the air out of it and bash it with a rolling pin, smashing the pasta into little pieces. Add the tomatoes, beans, broken pasta and 11/2 cans of water to the pot, and season with a little salt and pepper. Clamp the lid on the pressure cooker, set the steam to the ‘vegetable’ setting and when the cooker has come up to pressure, cook on a medium heat for 20 minutes. Release the steam, remove the lid and stir. If the soup is a little thin, place back on the heat and reduce for 5 minutes or so. Smash up the rosemary in a pestle and mortar with a pinch of salt, pour a glug of oil into the mortar and then pour into the soup. Taste and season with salt and pepper if necessary, and serve with a nice glass of Chianti.

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Moules a la mariniere This is a real French classic and many would say the very best way to eat mussels. Serve with lots of chilled white wine and crusty bread to mop up all the lovely juice.

Serves 2 • 1kg/2lb 3oz of the freshest•mussels youozcan of the freshest 200ml/7fl of find white wine • 1kg/2lb 3oz • 1 tablespoon butter mussels you can find a small bunch of fresh flat leaf • • 1butter small white onion, peeled parsley, and finely chopped leaves picked and • 1 tablespoon chopped 200ml/7fl oz of white wine • 1 small white onion, •peeled • a small bunch of fresh flat leaf parsley, leaves picked and chopped and finely chopped

Give the mussels a good wash in plenty of clean cold water and scrub any dirty ones lightly with a scrubbing brush, pulling off any beardy bits you might find on them. Throw away any mussels that aren’t tightly closed. Heat the base of the pressure cooker until nice and hot. Add the butter and the chopped onion, turn down the heat and cook gently until soft. Add the white wine and bring to the boil before adding the mussels. Clamp the lid on the pressure cooker and turn the steam setting to “vegetables”. When the cooker is up to pressure, cook at a medium heat for 5 minutes shaking the pan now and then, release the steam and remove the lid. Taste and season with salt and pepper if necessary, and sprinkle with chopped parsley just before serving. Remember not to eat any mussels that haven’t opened fully.

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Lamb Tagine with preserved lemons, almonds and apricots North African food is packed full of fantastic flavours and textures - I love it! Tagines normally take a while to cook if using a normal pan, but with a pressure cooker things are much easier. If you don’t fancy using carrots then a couple of potatoes or sweet potatoes will work really well too.

Serves 4 • 1kg/2lb 3 oz lamb neck fillet • 2 teaspoons cumin seeds • 4 teaspoons coriander seeds • 1 teaspoon black peppercorns • sea salt • 2 teaspoons • smoked paprika • 1 teaspoon ground ginger • 1 pinch of saffron (optional) • 3 cloves of garlic, finely chopped • juice of 1 lemon • olive oil • 2 small red onions, finely sliced

• 3 red chillies, deseeded and chopped • 2 big carrots, peeled and cut into 1 inch/2cm lengths • 1 x 400g/14oz can of goodquality plum tomatoes 400ml/14fl oz water • 3 • 50g/1 /4oz blanched almonds • 12 dried apricots • 1 small bunch of fresh mint, leaves picked • 1 small bunch of fresh parsley, leaves picked • 2 preserved lemons • 1 cinnamon stick

Trim the excess fat off the lamb and cut into 2 inch/4cm pieces. Place them in a bowl. In a pestle and mortar, grind the cumin, coriander and pepper with a good pinch of salt. Sprinkle over the lamb with the paprika, ginger, saffron, chopped garlic, lemon juice and a splash of olive oil. Heat the base of the pressure cooker and add another splash of olive oil. Add the sliced onion and chilli and sweat gently for 5 minutes. Put the lamb in the pot and add the carrots, tomatoes and the water. Push the almonds inside the apricots and add them to the pot. Pick half the leaves off the bunches of mint and parsley, tie the stalks together and throw them in the pot too. Cut the preserved lemons in half, scoop out the pulp inside and this to the pot with the cinnamon stick. Discard the lemon skins. Clamp the lid on the pressure cooker and turn the steam setting to ‘meat’. When the cooker is up to pressure, turn the heat down to medium and cook for 25 minutes. Release the steam and remove the lid. Taste, add a little salt and pepper if necessary, scatter with chopped mint and parsley and serve with lots of fluffy steamed couscous. 9


Pot roast Chinese pork shoulder with five-spice, plums, chilli and ginger This dish transforms a lowly piece of pork shoulder into something rich, decadent, meltingly soft and full of amazing flavours. It works brilliantly well with pork belly too.

Serves 4 • 1.5kg/31/2lb pork shoulder, skin removed 2 • tablespoons five-spice powder • vegetable oil • zest of 1 orange • juice of 2 oranges • 2 red chillies, halved and deseeded • 5 cloves garlic, peeled • 2 inch/4cm piece of ginger, peeled and sliced thickly

• 2 tablespoons hoi sin sauce • 1 tablespoon tomato ketchup • 2 tablespoons dark soy sauce • 2 tablespoons honey • 100ml/3.5fl oz sherry • 4 plums, stoned and halved • 4 spring onions, roughly chopped • sea salt and freshly groun black pepper

Pat the pork dry with a piece of kitchen paper and rub it all over with the five-spice powder. Heat the base of the pressure cooker and add a splash of vegetable oil. Carefully brown the pork on all sides and then add the rest of the ingredients. Clamp the lid on the pressure cooker, turn the setting to ‘meat’ and when the cooker has come up to pressure, turn the heat down to medium and cook for 35 minutes. Release the steam and remove the lid. The pork should be very soft and break apart when pressed with a fork. If the sauce is a bit thin, lift the pork out carefully, keep it warm and boil the sauce down gently to thicken it, skimming any fat off the lid. Taste, add a little salt and pepper if necessary and serve with lots of plain boiled rice.

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Sausage stew This is real comfort food and very easy to do with a pressure cooker. Make sure the sausages you use are good quality and you won’t go wrong.

Serves 4 • olive oil • two big handfuls of stale bread torn into pieces • a small bunch of fresh thyme, leaves picked 8 • sausages • 8 rashers of smoked streaky bacon cut into lardons 2 • red onions, peeled finely chopped • half a celery heart, trimmed and finely chopped

• 2 bay leaves • a sprig of fresh rosemary • 2 x 400g/14 oz cans of tomatoes • 2 x 400g/14 oz cans of cannellini or borlotti beans a • glass of red wine • 1 carrot, peeled and cut into chunks sea salt and freshly ground • black pepper

Pre-heat your oven to 180˚C/350˚F/Gas 4. Mix the breadcrumbs together with the leaves from a couple of sprigs of thyme, spread out in a roasting tray and drizzle generously with olive oil. Place in the pre-heated oven for 15 to 20 minutes, shaking every now and then, until they’re golden brown and crispy. Place to one side. Heat the base of your pressure cooker and add a splash of oil. Add the sausages and brown them on all sides. Take them out of the pan and add the bacon, onion, celery, bay leaves, rosemary and the remaining thyme. Turn the heat down and fry gently for 5 minutes or so. Add the rest of the ingredients and season lightly with salt and pepper. Clamp the lid on the pressure cooker and set the steam setting to meat. Cook on a medium heat for 25 minutes before releasing the steam and removing the lid. Check the seasoning, add more salt and pepper if necessary and stir in the crispy breadcrumbs you made earlier.

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Spicy chicken Rogan Josh Rogan Josh is a curry with lots of peppers and paprika in it. I love the heat but you can remove some of the chillies if want to make it a little milder. The yoghurt stirred in at the end helps cool it down a little. You can make this with boneless chicken if you want, but try to use leg meat as it stays juicier during the cooking.

Serves 4 • 1kg/1.5kg/31/2lb skinned chicken thighs and drumsticks 4 • tablespoons yoghurt, plus extra for serving • 1 tablespoon chopped garlic • 1 tablespoon chopped ginger • zest and juice of 1 lemon • 1 teaspoon turmeric • 12 green cardamom pods • 6 cloves • 1 teaspoon black peppercorns • 2 teaspoons cumin seeds

• 1 teaspoon coriander seeds • 1 teaspoon dried chillies • 2 teaspoons smoked paprika • 2 red peppers • 2 small red onions • 2 fresh red chillies, deseeded and finely chopped 1 • bunch of fresh coriander • 1 tablespoon of butter • 1 cinnamon stick • 2 bay leaves • 250ml/9 oz water

Mix the chicken pieces with the yoghurt, garlic, ginger, lemon zest and juice, and turmeric. Leave in a bowl to marinate for an hour or so. In a pestle and mortar, grind the cardamom, cloves, peppercorns, cumin, coriander and dried chillies with a pinch of salt and the smoked paprika. Roughly chop the peppers, onions, chillies and the stalks from the coriander and whizz in a food processor until almost pureed. Melt the butter in the base of your pressure cooker and when it starts to bubble, add the ground spices, the cinnamon and bay leaves. Stir and fry for 30 seconds or so before adding the whizzed up vegetables. Fry gently for 5 minutes, turning down the heat a little if things start to brown. Add the marinated chicken and water and clamp the lid on the pressure cooker. Turn the setting to ‘meat’ and when the cooker has come up to pressure, turn the heat down to medium and cook for 25 minutes. Release the steam and remove the lid. If the curry is still quite liquid, place back on the heat and boil it down for a few minutes until it thickens. Fold in a few tablespoons of yoghurt, scatter with the coriander leaves and serve with steamed basmati rice and lots of cold beer. 14


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Pot roast chicken with bacon, cider and mushrooms This is a quick and easy way to cook a whole chicken. Not only that, but you’ll end up with a lovely restaurant-style sauce at the end. If you can’t get a chicken that’s the right size for the pot, buy separate legs and breasts and use them instead.

Serves 4 • 1 x 1.3kg/23/4lb organic chicken • 1 sprig of bay • sea salt and freshly ground black pepper 1 • lemon • olive oil • a few rashers of good quality smoked streaky bacon, chopped • a large handful of mushrooms – wild if you can find them, roughly torn up

• 1 tablespoon of butter • 1 clove of garlic, peeled and chopped • 300ml/11fl oz cider • 6 baby leeks • 2 tablespoons crème fraîche • a small bunch of fresh flat leaf parsley, chopped • a small bunch of fresh chives, chopped

Season the chicken well with sea salt and pepper and stuff with the bay and lemon. In a little olive oil, brown the chicken lightly on all sides in the base of the pressure cooker. Remove the chicken and add the bacon, mushrooms, butter and garlic. Fry for a minute or so, then place the chicken on lid and add the cider. Clamp the lid on the pressure cooker, set the steam to the “meat” setting and when the cooker has come up to pressure, turn the heat down a little and cook for 25 minutes. Release the steam and remove the lid. Lay the baby leeks in the basket and place in the pot over the chicken. Replace the lid and cook for another 5 minutes on the vegetable setting. Remove the leeks and check that the chicken is cooked. The leg should pull away easily from the body. Remove to a plate and keep warm. Place the pressure cooker base back on the heat and stir the crème fraîche into the sauce. Reduce until the sauce is a nice gravy consistency, then add the chopped herbs, taste, correct the seasoning and pour over the cooked chicken. Serve with the baby leeks, some mashed potatoes and the rest of the cider! 17


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Steam your starches! With normal kitchen equipment it can be tricky to get perfectly fluffy rice and couscous. With a pressure cooker it’s a piece of cake. Steamed potatoes mash really well and if you cut them open to release their steam they become nice and dry – ideal for making potato cakes or even potato gnocchi.

Perfect steamed rice This recipe works well for plain rice, basmati and jasmine rice too. If you want to add extra flavour to it, add a few bay leaves, or a cinnamon stick, or some cardamom cloves to the water. The rice will take on a fantastic perfume as it steams. Serves 4 • 300g/11oz rice

• 600ml/21fl oz cold water

Pour the rice into a separate saucepan and cover with the cold water. Fit the steaming basket inside the pressure cooker and have it standing by. Bring the rice to the boil and pour the contents of the pan into the basket inside the pressure cooker. The rice will be caught in the basket and the water will drain through to the bottom. Clamp the lid on the pressure cooker, set the steam to the ‘vegetable’ setting and when the cooker has come up to pressure, cook for 10 minutes. Release the steam and remove the lid. Lift the steaming basket, fork to fluff it up, season with salt and pepper and serve.

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The best fluffy couscous Plain steamed couscous is great but if you want to spice it up, you can try adding a pinch of cumin or coriander or even chilli to it as it’s soaking. The flavours will really come out in the pressure cooker.

Serves 4 • 250g/9oz couscous • 200ml/7fl oz cold water

• 1 tablespoon olive oil

Mix the couscous, cold water and olive oil together then leave for two minutes. Stir with a fork to break up any lumps of couscous. Tear or cut a circle of greaseproof paper 5 cm/2 inch bigger in diameter than the base of the pressure cooker. Line the steaming basket with it and spoon in the couscous. Pour an inch of water in the bottom of the pressure cooker and fit the steaming basket filled with the couscous in it. Clamp the lid on the pressure cooker, set the steam to the ‘vegetable’ setting and when the cooker has come up to pressure, cook for 10 minutes. Release the steam and remove the lid. Lift the steaming basket out, fork up the couscous and serve.

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Quick smashed vegetables This method of cooking tougher root vegetables works so well it’s actually better than doing it normally AND it’s much quicker. Smashed veg is a great accompaniment to meat and fish dishes, is great stirred into a risotto or pasta dish and without the salt and the spice, makes superb baby food too. The two recipes below are great, but feel free to experiment with other vegetables. Carrots work well with coriander and some ground chilli, swede is nice with lots of black pepper, garlic and thyme, and parsnips are great with rosemary, garlic and a pinch of ground cumin. As far as timings are concerned, 15 minutes seems to work with any kind of root vegetable as long as you remember to chop it up first.

Quick smashed celeriac Great with roast beef or a winter stew. Serves 4 • 1 head of celeriac, peeled • 1 tablespoon butter • 1 tablespoon of fresh thyme, leaves picked

• 2 cloves of garlic • 200ml/7 fl oz water

Chop the celeriac roughly into cubes and sauté lightly in the butter with the thyme and garlic. Season well and add 200ml/7 fl oz of water. Clamp the lid on the pressure cooker and set the steam to the ‘vegetable’ setting. Cook for 15 minutes before releasing the steam and removing the lid. Stir the cooked celeriac and reduce for a minute without the lid if it’s a little too watery. Season to taste if necessary and serve.

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Quick cooked butternut squash or pumpkin Wonderful served with grilled lamb or stirred into a risotto.

Serves 4 • 2 butternut squash, peeled, seeds removed 1 • tablespoon butter • 2 cloves of garlic • 1 tablespoon of fresh marjoram, leaves picked

• 1 stick of cinnamon • a good pinch of ground chilli • sea salt and freshly ground black pepper • 200 ml/7fl oz water

Chop the squash roughly into cubes and sauté lightly in the butter with the garlic. Add the marjoram, cinnamon and chilli, season well and add 200ml/7fl oz of water. Clamp the lid on the pressure cooker and set the steam to the ‘vegetable’ setting. Cook for 15 minutes before releasing the steam and removing the lid. Stir the cooked pumpkin and reduce for a minute without the lid if it’s a little too watery. Season to taste if necessary and serve.

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Steamed vegetables Steaming vegetables in a pressure cooker is a joy to do - much easier and quicker than using a conventional steamer. You can put wine or vinegar in the water to flavour whatever you’re steaming or you can add spices and herbs to the steaming basket to infuse your vegetables with wonderful flavours. Sweetcorn is great with a little chilli, cauliflower works really well with cumin and cinnamon, and broccoli is best mates with soy and ginger! As for timings, solid vegetables like beetroots will take around 20 to 25 minutes, sweetcorn about 15, carrots around 10, cauliflower and broccoli about 5 and delicate things like French beans, baby leeks and asparagus will only take around 2 to 3 minutes.

Quick steamed beetroot Beetroot are much sweeter than many people think and this way of cooking keeps all the sugar inside them so they are a joy to eat. They also take on fantastic flavour from the spices and herbs and vinegar in the water.

Serves 4 • 500ml/18fl oz water • 100ml/3.6 fl oz red wine vinegar • a few sprigs of fresh thyme • 1kg/2lb 3oz small beetroot, washed and trimmed • a few bay leaves • a stick of cinnamon

• rock salt • a couple of dried red chillies • 10 cloves • sea salt and freshly ground black pepper • extra virgin olive oil • sprig of majoram/leaves picked

Pour the water into the bottom of the pressure cooker and add the vinegar. Spread the thyme across the bottom of the basket and lay the beetroot on top. Tuck the bay leaves and cinnamon stick in and around the beetroot, sprinkle the rock salt, chillies and cloves over the top and hang the basket over the surface of the liquid. Clamp the lid on the pressure cooker and set the steam to the ‘vegetable’ setting. Cook for 20 minutes before releasing the steam and removing the lid. Lift the beetroot out of the basket and discard all the seasonings. Slice in half, and sprinkle with salt, pepper and majoram and drizzle with a little extra virgin olive oil before serving. 26


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Steamed potatoes The thyme and rosemary in the steaming basket will infuse the potatoes with herby flavours as they steam. Lovely!

Serves 4 • 500 ml/18fl oz water • a few sprigs of thyme or rosemary • 1.5kg/31/2 lb potatoes, peeled (or unpeeled and washed)

• rock salt • sea salt and freshly ground black pepper • extra virgin olive oil

Pour the water into the pressure cooker. Spread the thyme or rosemary across the bottom of the basket and lay the potatoes on lid. Sprinkle the rock salt over and hang the basket over the surface of the liquid. Clamp the lid on the pressure cooker and, although potatoes are vegetables, set the steam setting to ‘meat’. Cook for 20 minutes before releasing the steam and removing the lid. Sprinkle with sea salt and freshly ground black pepper and drizzle with a little olive oil before serving. Alternatively, instead of finishing your potatoes like this, you can peel them and use them for potato gnocchi, for mashed potato or for potato cakes.

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Steamed and marinated peppers and aubergine Serve these as an antipasto with some cured meats, salamis and grilled bruschetta. They’re also great in a sandwich with some mozzarella!

Serves 4 to 6 • 500 ml/18fl oz water • a few sprigs of basil or thyme • 1 aubergine • 2 small red peppers • rock salt • sea salt and freshly ground black pepper

• white or red wine vinegar • extra virgin olive oil • 2 cloves of garlic, peeled and finely sliced 1 • red chilli, deseeded and finely sliced • a small bunch of fresh basil, leaves picked

Pour the water into the pressure cooker. Spread the thyme or basil across the bottom of the basket and lay the vegetables on lid. Sprinkle the rock salt over and hang the basket over the surface of the liquid. Clamp the lid on the pressure cooker and set the steam to vegetable ‘setting’. Cook for 10 minutes before releasing the steam and removing the lid. Remove the basket from the pressure cooker and leave the contents to cool. When the peppers are cool enough to handle, break them into pieces, remove the seedy cores and peel the skin off as best you can. Peel the skin off the aubergine and slice it into 6 or 8 pieces lengthways. Lay on a big serving plate, sprinkle well with salt and pepper, drizzle with good white or red wine vinegar and olive oil. Sprinkle over the sliced garlic and chilli. Tear up the basil leaves and scatter over the lid before serving.

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Pound pudding This is a traditional pudding that I think makes a wicked change from Christmas pud, which can sometimes a bit heavy. It’s one of the classic old English desserts and is great served with some brandy butter, crème fraîche, whipped cream or custard. Don’t just save it for Christmas time as it makes a lovely, treacly, fruity sponge pudding at any time! Once cooked, feel free to flame the pudding - safely! First, make sure your pudding is piping hot then place it on a plate with a wide rim, in the centre of the table. Gently heat a little rum and brandy in a small pan (ideally one with a lip) on the hob. When the alcohol is warm, carry the pan carefully to the pudding and pour the alcohol over it. Stand back and carefully hold a lit match next to the pudding - no need to touch it - and the fumes will ignite. A lovely bit of theatre! The flames will go out in a few seconds and then you can tuck in!

Serves 6 to 8 • 3 large tablespoons golden syrup • 500g/1 lb 1oz mixed dried fruit • 100g/31/2oz dried dates, chopped • 5cm/2 inch piece preserved ginger or 1 teaspoon dried ginger • 125g/41/2

• zest of 1 orange • 125g/41/2oz plain flour • 125g/41/2oz sugar • 150g/51/2oz fresh breadcrumbs • 2 tablespoons brandy • a pinch of salt • 1 medium egg, beaten • 150ml/5.5fl oz milk

Butter a 1.5 litre pudding bowl. Spoon the golden syrup into the bottom of the bowl. Mix all the other ingredients together, except for the egg and the milk. Once mixed, add the beaten egg and milk, mix again and put the mixture into the pudding bowl. Take a large piece of foil and grease it on one side. Wrap the bowl with the greased side of the foil facing in so that it’s a couple of layers thick. Scrunch up the ends underneath the bowl so that they make a trivet for the bowl to stand on in the bottom of the pressure cooker and so that the base is not in direct contact with the base of the pressure cooker. Fill the pressure cooker with enough water to come three quarters of the way up the sides of the pudding bowl. Clamp the lid on the pressure cooker and set the steam setting to ‘meat’. Cook on a medium heat for one hour before releasing the steam and removing the lid. Carefully lift out the cooked pudding and allow to cool for 5 minutes. Unwrap the foil, turn the pudding out on to a plate and serve with lots of whipped cream, crème fraîche or custard. 32


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Quick and easy pressure cooking with Jamie Oliver

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Quick and easy cooking with Jamie Oliver  
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