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Emery County

Progress

Tuesday September 24, 2013

Home Grown News Since 1900 • Castle Dale, Utah

Volume 112 • Number 39• 75¢

War on coal: EPA regulations work to make coal fired power plants/inexpensive power a thing of the past By PATSY STODDARD, Editor

The Division of Oil, Gas and Mining held their collaborative meeting in Castle Dale on Sept. 12. One of the topics was the Environmental Protection Agency’s new rules for power plants and their emissions. William K. Lawson is the Director of Environmental Services for PacifiCorp Energy and he presented information on new regulations which the coal fired plants must adhere to in the near future. “There’s a lot going on right now. PacifiCorp is headquartered in Portland, Oregon. They employee 6,300 people and have 1.8 million customers and 11,224 net MW generation capacity. The area they serve is 136,000 square miles. The goal is reliable service at a reasonable cost. Lawson said coal has been a challenge lately. PacifiCorp’s power comes from: coal-55 Percent; natural gas 25 percent; hydro-10 percent; renewable-10 percent. Baseloaded power is available when you need it. The capacity with renewables is unreliable. The power generated in Utah is mostly from coal. Hydropower is more in the Pacific Northwest. Lawson went over each of the new rules and regulations and gave an idea of what it means for PacifiCorp. He said coal fired power plants at this time are really being scrutinized. “The reality is we can reduce emissions to zero but it may not have any impact on regional haze. Between 2005-12, emissions have been reduced by 50 percent. The installation of a scrubber at Huntington Plant made a significant reduction. PacifiCorp

Meet the teams Page 4-5A

BRIEFLY Emery County Republican Party

Patsy Stoddard/Emery County Progress

Even though Hunter Plant has installed emission control as regulated. The coal fired units are still under attack by the Environmental Protection Agency and Anti-Green House gases legislation by Pres. Barack Obama.

has made significant efforts to nox burners have been installed reduce emissions. In our exist- on all but Hunter I and that will be installed in 2014. ing coal plants cost is $10-19 emissions Loren Huntsman said, The million. All these have been re“The graph that showed costs are being duced. The States come zero pollutants by 2040 stacked on coal. up with regu- indicates that all the coal PacifiCorp’s main lations which fired plants will be shut goal is to provide reliable energy at are approved reasonable cost. by the EPA . down.” You would expect Currently, they as technology gets better that costs are not accepting any of the states regulations. Our worst days last would lower, but that’s not happenyear were caused by fires. Low ing. How do you encourage utilities

to get away from coal? Make it more expensive to produce.” All new gas units have been put in with all the catalytic specifications in place. Naughton 3 in Wyoming needs a bag house which isn’t cost effective so that plant will be converted to natural gas. Nox controls for Utah’s BART units are still under review. Hunter and Huntington plants are targets. EPA is pushing the state to acquire aggressive Nox controls. The state plan has required the installation

Melon Games

Patsy Stoddard/Emery County Progress

Continued on PAGE 9A.

The Green River will be a source of discussion at the trial beginning this week.

Trial for protest of water for Green River nuclear power plant ongoing this week By PATSY STODDARD, Editor

The case, “HEAL Utah et al v. Blue Castle Holdings et al,” will be tried in front of Judge George Harmond in the Seventh District of Utah’s District Court. The trial is scheduled to begin on Sept. 23 and last until Monday, Sept. 30 at the courthouse. The judge will hear arguments by the plantiffs who wish the two water right change applications granted to Blue Castle Holdings to be overturned and withdrawn. The two water right change applications for a proposed nuclear power plant near Green River, were approved by Kent Jones in January of 2012, State Engineer with the

410 East Main, Suite B, Castle Dale, UT 84513

Utah Division of Water Rights. The decisions followed more than two years of study. Kane County Water Conservancy District and San Juan County Water Conservancy District are leasing rights to Blue Castle Holdings. This company wants to use water from the Green River for a nuclear power plant. The request has raised many concerns such as the safety and oversight of nuclear power, local water use interference, wildlife concerns including endangered fish, over-appropriation of Colorado River water, the economic viability of the project, and the fiContinued on PAGE 2A.

Fall Rib Eye Steak Dinner will be held in the Orangeville Old Fire House Sept. 26. Dinner tickets at $25 per person are available from each Precinct Chairman and Vice Chairman. The steak dinner will start at 6:30 pm catered by Kent and Julie Wilson. Reservations required, phone Bill Dellos 749-9989 or 748-2488 or Janet Geary 687-2112.

Candidate Pro¿les

The Emery County Progress will be publishing candidate profiles in the Oct. 22 issue. All candidates for municipal offices, mayors and city council members are welcome to submit a 200 word or less bio and a picture. Email to editor@ ecprogress.com or mail to Box 589 Castle Dale, UT 84513 or bring by the office. Due by Oct. 10.

Huntington stake blood drive

Giving blood is a great opportunity to help others and provide an important community service. The American Red Cross blood drive will be held on Thursday, September 26, 200 N Main Street - Cultural Hall; blood drive will run from 2-7 pm, Please contact Peggy Gordon 749-5043 to schedule your appointment to help save a life or to volunteer. If you have questions regarding your eligibility to donate blood, please call 1-866-2363276. Museum of the San Rafael 20th anniversary Come join us in celebrating our 20th anniversary, See our featured exhibits, and join with us in honoring Janet Petersen for her 22 years of outstanding service. This will be held at the Museum of the San Rafael on the 25th of September, at 7 p.m.

E-MAIL Email the Editor editor@ecprogress.com Community Events events@ecprogress.com Alice Wadley/Emery County Progress

Weekend of activities in Green River Melon Days Celebration see page 10

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2A Emery County Progress Castle Dale, Utah Tuesday September 24, 2013

Broncs and bulls event on Saturday at Huntington arena Will and Tammy Payne wanted to sponsor a family friendly event that brings everyone out for a good time. The county is always in need of new events and things for families to do, so they want to encourage everyone to come out and enjoy this exciting event in its fourth year at the Huntington arena on Sept. 28. It might be your last chance to get out and enjoy the fall weather before winter sets in. The Broncs and Bulls all rough stock rodeo will be Sept. 28 at 7 p.m. Mark your calendars for some good

times at the rodeo. This year’s event will include: bareback riding, saddle bronc riding, bull riding, hide race, donkey roping and wild cow milking. Back by popular demand is the third Annual Children’s Rodeo. This will include Junior barrels, stick horse barrel racing, chicken chase, cash calf, mutton bustin’, Junior hide race, calf riding, and mini bull riding. With the help of past sponsorship, we were able to make most children’s events free to participants, with each child receiving some-

thing for their participation. The children’s rodeo was well received and gave local children, whom may otherwise never get the opportunity, a chance to have a rodeo experience. Event organizers said, “We want to have low ticket prices so families can afford to come and enough added money to attract good quality riders to put on a great show. “This year we will be including belt buckles for our rough stock event winners. It is important to us that this be a family event with good entertainment.

The kids rodeo action begins at 4-6 p.m. with a stick horse barrel race that is open to all children who would like to participate. Mutton bustin, junior barrels, calf riding, chicken chase, cash calf, and mini bull riding will take place. Call if you want to enter the mini-bulls. The main event begins at 7 p.m. It might be chilly so bring a jacket and come catch the fun of the rough stock events. If you’d like to try the hide race or the other events you can call Tammy at 749-1471 to register.

Water trial for nuclear power plant Continued from PAGE 1A.

Chase Sherman rides at last year’s Broncs and Bulls event. Tina Oliver/Emery County Progress

Fun at Goblin Valley

September 28: Goblin Valley State Park – Green River Guided Hike: Goblin Valley State Park is home to an expansive cavern with skylights and ceilings 70 feet high. Join us at 10 a.m., for a three-mile round-trip backcountry adventure to this hidden treasure that only a handful of visitors have ever seen. Some rock scrambling is involved. One liter of water per person is recommended. Flashlights are not needed. Meet at the Carmel Canyon Trailhead in the observation point parking lot. September 27: Goblin Valley State Park – Green River Geology of the San Rafael Swell: Join us at 10 a.m., for a geologic walk through time. Learn how the area was formed and why it looks the way it does. Meet at the observation point. 435-275-4584.

New Life Ministries

Has moved into their new church at 5194 N. Hwy. 6. Sunday service 10 a.m. Worship/prayer service, Wed. at 6 p.m. AWANA Bible Club for children 5 year old-6th grade, Thur. at 6 p.m. Youth ministry for 7-12 grade, Tue. at 7 p.m. Visit www.newlifeutah.com.

Community Awareness Program

The Emery County Domestic Violence Coalition is holding their 15th annual program on Oct. 9 at noon at the old courthouse, 2nd floor. It is free to the public. The guest speaker will be Donna Kelly, Domestic Violence Resource Prosecutor for the Utah Prosecution Council at the Attorney General’s Office.

nancial ability of Blue Castle to complete the project. “We have listened to and very much appreciate the concerns raised by those in the local community and others,” said Jones. “Those concerns helped us look carefully and critically at the proposal as we considered the appropriate action on these applications.” The water right approval criteria dictated in state law directs the state engineer to evaluate and investigate applications. An application is statutorily required to be approved if the state engineer believes: water is available from the source; the proposed use will not impair existing rights or interfere with the more beneficial use of water; the project is economically and physically feasible; it would not be detrimental to the public welfare; the applicant has the financial ability to complete the project; and, the application is filed in good faith and not for speculative or monopolistic purposes. Almost 4.4 million acre-

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feet of water flows by the city of Green River every year. Blue Castle is seeking 53,600 acre-feet of that water to be allocated for its project. “That amount of water is not a lot on the Green River,” said Jones. “But it is a significant portion of the water Utah has left to develop on the Colorado River and a significant new diversion from the Green River where efforts are underway to provide habitat for recovery of endangered fish.” Approval of the application does not guarantee sufficient water will always be available from the river to operate the plant. Plant design will need to address the possibility of interruptions in water supply. Nuclear power plants in the United States are developed and licensed for operation by the federal government under the regulation of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, which is charged with promoting the use of nuclear energy to benefit public welfare and protect the radiological health and safety of the public. In pursuing NRC licensing of this project, Blue Castle plans to invest $100 million. Billions of dollars more will be required to construct the facility. The state engineer’s decision on these applications authorizes the use of water for the plant after NRC approvals for the project are obtained. Prior to any construction, NRC will oversee an exhaustive design process to make certain the proposed site is safe for a nuclear power plant and the National Environmental Protection Act and Endangered Species Act requirements are complied with. HEAL and fellow plaintiffs Uranium Watch, Living Rivers, and several Green River-area businesses and residents, will argue that

State Engineer Kent Jones failed to uphold state law when he gave Blue Castle Holdings approval to take more than 53,000 acre feet of water from the Green River to cool a proposed nuclear power project. The plaintiffs contend that Jones should have done much more in reviewing the water rights applications. If the state’s water rights decision stands, Blue Castle Holdings will be free to apply to the federal U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission for a permit to site their nuclear reactors four miles northwest of the city of Green River. On Jan. 20, 2012 the state engineer, Kent Jones approved the change application for both Kane and San Juan counties. This approval was protested by the plaintiffs and on Feb. 28, 2012 the state engineer denied the request for reconsideration of the approval of the change application. The parties involved at that point had 30 days to file their protest with the courts. During the time from the original filing on March 30, 2009 until the change application was approved the opposing parties and groups have voiced their concerns with the project. They protested the change application citing broad impacts of the proposed change in water usage on their individual water rights, businesses or interests in maintaining a healthy river ecosystem and safe environment. Emery County Economic Development Director Mike McCandless has been involved with the nuclear power plant project since the idea was first proposed, “I see a number of reasons why I do not believe the lawsuit will have merit in the courts. The primary reason

is the long standing and well established processes for establishing and utilizing water rights in Utah were followed to the letter. Utah has a long and detailed history of how water rights are allocated. The courts and the legislature have, over the years, clarified this process to the point where the state engineer had a clear and defined path to follow in granting this point of diversion change. If the opponents to the power plant win, it goes against decades of established water rights process and subsequent court rulings. “In addition, I think the plaintiffs in this case may not have standing in the court system. Only one of the plaintiffs appear to actually hold a valid water right. That water right holds a priority date that is above that of the nuclear plant. If there is a water shortage, that water rights holder gets their water first. End of story. That is what the point of diversion approval says, so, the plaintiff has no case or controversy. This is even weakened more, because the location that Blue Castle selected is downstream from this user and virtually every other user on the Green River. This was done to ensure that other valid and existing water rights were not affected. “I just don’t see how the plaintiffs in this case can win the argument that they are adversely affected by the state engineer’s decision. They may not like the decision, but you have to have a case or controversy and standing to successfully appeal a water rights decision. I struggle to see how they have been directly harmed by the state’s actions. That is typically the standard that will be used in a court case,” said McCandless.

Emery County

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Emery County Progress Castle Dale, Utah Tuesday September 24, 2013 3A

Energy West gives 60 day notice to terminate negotiations/ contract at Deer Creek: Mine for sale? By C.J. McMANUS, Sun Advocate reporter

Energy West Mining Company announced on Sept. 13 the possibility of putting the Deer Creek Coal Mine up for sale and gave notice their intention to terminate negotiations and their contract with the United Mine Workers of America unless an agreement could be reached within 60 days. A letter obtained by the Sun Advocate, showed that Energy West notified the UMWA of their intention to move forward with Article XXIX Section 8(d) at 11:59 p.m. on Friday, Sept. 13. This section provides for the 60 day time-line to begin. "Since July the company has been considering all available options, including

the sale of the Deer Creek mine or permanently contracting its operations to a third party. No decision has been made and the company continues to assess all options," said Energy West Spokesperson Maria O'Mara. During a meeting at the UMWA District 22 Offices in Price, Interwest Mining Company and Fuel Resources Vice President Cindy Crane hand delivered a letter detailing the company's intent to terminate negotiations if an outcome was not reached. "Others might have seen this coming but it's a shock to me," said Gary Baker, a miner employed at Deer Creek. According to retired administrator and current negotiator and consultant Marty Hudson, details about

just how Energy West plans to deal with the property have yet to be answered. "They haven't answered any questions about how the mine is going to be sold, (and) they haven't discussed who they might sell it to," said Hudson. "We can't even get information about the pensioners." Hudson reported that matters in the tense 10 month negotiation became even more difficult in the last 30 days when the UMWA went to the National Labor Relations Board over Energy West's refusal to provide pensioner information to the ongoing negotiation. "I do know that there is no way a company of PacifiCorp's size could do their due diligence on a deal of this magnitude in a month," said

Hudson. "They would have to have been working on this for some time." While company officials are direct about the fact that these negotiations are between Energy West and the UMWA. Energy West is a subsidiary of PacifiCorp, which causes many of those associated with the matter to bring up PacifiCorp's name. After noting that the Sun Advocate was present in the room Sept. 13, an attorney from Energy West questioned whether the meeting was private. When Hudson explained that press had not been barred from talks at the onset of negotiations, Energy West asked for a recess and took leave from the UMWA offices. They later returned and discussed the possible

sale and succession of the mine, leaving pensioner and miner benefits without foundation. According to miners at the negotiation, Energy West is considering selling the mine without the pension and benefit obligations which come with it. Since Jan. 1, miners at Deer Creek have been working under an expired contract. According to those present at the District 22 offices, they have been given neither sick nor vacation days for more than nine months. During negotiations, the workforce at Deer Creek has dwindled from more than 340 to less than 230. According to Hudson, the company's profit sheet makes their determination to eliminate pensioner and

miner benefits hard to understand. He also contended that Energy West will most likely attempt to maintain some type of control over Deer Creek's product regardless of a sale. "I could see if this company was pleading poverty, but they aren't," he said. According to O'Mara's email, "the current 100 percent coverage plan provided at virtually no cost to employees, their spouses, eligible dependents and retirees is extraordinary. “In order to manage costs, and keep prices for our customers reasonable, we need to transition to a more conventional health plan structure similar to what most Americans have," said O’Mara.

people are under the same regulations and restrictions as those with secondary water. This mainly applies to the trailer court. A public hearing was already held on the matter and those comments were worked into the ordinance. After this ordinance is posted for 30 days it will become law for Castle Dale City. The Goddard’s addressed the council on troubles they are having with their address and getting packages delivered. The consensus was this is a rural problem and happens to everyone because post office box numbers aren’t considered valid addresses when it comes to shipping. Sometimes when ordering packages there is an override button which will allow a box number to be used. Mayor Peacock said they will talk to the senators representing Utah and see if this problem can be addressed. He will also bring it up in the next COG meeting where all the mayors in the county meet and discuss issues. A dedication of the new portion of the Castle Dale Cemetery will take place on Oct. 10 at 6:30 p.m. right before the next city council meeting. There will be a ribbon cutting to officially open the new addition to the cemetery. Plots are now for sale in the new section. The dedication will take place at the west entrance. The city is upgrading its computer systems and will add another user to the system as well as upgrade programs needed to take care of the city’s accounting system. The council approved up to $6,500 for these upgrades and the training needed for the office workers. The city has two new staff members Lael White is the new recorder and Jackie Collard is the new treasurer. Mayor Peacock said the city was paying a consultant $100 a month to keep the website updated, but Lael

will take over that responsibility now. She will also email out agendas to the city council members each month. The city workers will be out trimming trees and branches which overhang intersections and obstruct stop signs. The city is done watering for the season. Once the irrigation is shut-off the pond will be filled one more time to keep the football field watered. A new light will be installed at the fairgrounds. Oct. 10 is fire prevention day and the Castle Dale fire department will visit the elementary school and do an assembly and teach fire safety education. The number one fire in homes is in the kitchen. They will give out hand-outs and fire hats to the students. The fireworks for next summer have been ordered. Castle Dale City approved a $1,000 reduction in the building permit fee for the county for the weed and mosquito building. The county needs two sewer connections and one water connection for the building. The road into the building runs across private land. A water share must be given to Castle Dale City before the water hookup is approved. The council approved a sponsorship to the CEU Wildman golf tournament which raises funds for a scholarship for two Emery County students to attend USU Eastern. The tourney is on Sept. 28 and Mayor Peacock will find the golfers who must pay their own cart and green fees. Castle Dale fire department held an appreciation dinner for all volunteers which was well attended. The beautification committee will be writing thank you letters to residents for keeping up their yards and they will be encouraged to look for things they can do to improve their yards in the future. Nosh Arrien, fire chief suggested the town look at

purchasing a trailer where sand bags can be stored to be ready for potential flooding events in the future. He will look into prices for trailers. Council member Julie Pizzuto said Castle Dale needs a CERT organization to help in emergency situations and anyone wishing to volunteer to start such an organization should contact the city. The sheriff’s office teaches the classes to become certified in this area. Council member Joel Dorsch said a decision needs to be made on whether or not Castle Dale City keeps the lights over Main Street for Christmas. It costs $2,000 for the rental of the equipment to put-up and take down these decorations. Citizens in Castle Dale have donated money for these decorations. The council decided to keep doing it, because UDOT is very picky about what can go across their roads and since Castle Dale has permis-

sion to do this they should continue. The money for the decorations is in the budget. Pizzuto said her opinion is she would rather see money go into Christmas decorations than fireworks. The city will look into the cost of a lift truck for the future. Dorsch will be cutting down some trash trees by the fairgrounds while the lift truck is rented. The sprinkler system on the ball field is complete, although a main line crashed during the project. Many underground lines from other projects were found during the installation. It was determined the timers from the indoor arena will not be loaned out to other events. Council member Jeremy Jewkes said for the Ferron Peach Days each council member takes charge of an event. He suggested that for Castle Dale Day this could be an option. Dorsch said he would like to

expand Castle Dale Day. He would like to move the timing of the event to the same time as the Desertview Pro Rodeo which is July 24-26 next year. There has been some talk of moving the rodeo into June to pick up more cowboys who are in the state at that time attending other Utah rodeos. But, for 2014 the rodeo will run July 24, 25 and 26. Dorsch said there are some things he would like to do to improve the city celebration. Mayor Peacock said that sounded great and should be discussed in January when the new mayor and council members are in place. Mayor Peacock reported good news in the budget report and sales tax revenue is up for the quarter. The Castle Dale Halloween party will be on Oct. 24 at 7 p.m. There will be dessert and pumpkin carving and activities. The event will be held at the recreation center.

Castle Dale City explains new burn permit procedure By PATSY STODDARD, Editor

Castle Dale City talked about the new procedure for obtaining a burn permit. Burn permits can no longer be picked up at city hall. You must fill out a burn permit application through the Division of Air Quality. There are three ways to do this. The burn window for Castle Dale is Sept. 15-Oct. 13. You can complete an application online at www.airquality.utah.gov/Compliance/ OpenBurning. Completing this form online is the easiest and fastest way to obtain an open burn permit. An electronic copy of the application is automatically submitted to the county or municipal fire authority upon completion. You can also call the Department of Air Quality and complete an application over the phone. A DAQ inspector will ask the applicant for the required information and complete the application in just a few minutes. A hard copy of the application may be completed and submitted by mail to the DAQ for electronic processing. To request a hard copy of the open burn permit application, contact the DAQ by phone at 801-536-4000. It may take up to 14 days from the date of request to receive an open burn permit if a hard copy is submitted for processing. If you need to obtain a special burn permit while the burn window is closed, it will now cost you $25 which you can pay at city hall and must be cleared through the Castle Dale Fire Chief. An open burn permit during the open burn window is free. Mayor Neal Peacock stressed the importance of obtaining a burn permit because if you burn without a permit and the fire gets out of control you will be charged for putting out the fire. The city adopted a water ordinance for properties that use culinary water for outside watering. Those

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MONDAY, OCTOBER 21

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 25

ZOMBIE PROM THEATER PRODUCTION

FOUNDERS CELEBRATION

7:30 PM

6:00 PM

Those wearing a 75th Anniversary T-shirt will get in free All others will be charged $.75

Join us as we honor our past and the traditions that have made the College what it is. A celebration of our past that spotlights a few of our amazing alumni and friends.

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 23

$25 PER PERSON RSVP by October 18 Call 435-613-5256 for tickets or for more information

WEEK OF CELEBRATION 7:30 PM Chancellor Peterson wants to celebrate our birthday and invites the community to come celebrate with us. Free, but tickets will be required. (call or check web for ticket Special Incentives for those wearing a 75th Anniversary Celebration T-shirt throughout the week at Dining Services, BDAC, Bookstore and Prehistoric Museum.

JOIN US

Utah State University Eastern is celebrating 75 years since the opening of its doors to 100 students in October, 1938. We are celebrating this milestone with our alumni, students, employees, friends and the entire community of southeast Utah.

OCTOBER 21-26

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 26 VOLLEYBALL GAME VS COLORADO NORTHWESTERN COMMUNITY COLLEGE

1:00 PM

MEN’S BASKETBALL SCRIMMAGE VS MESA UNIVERSITY

4:00 PM


4A Emery County Progress Castle Dale, Utah Tuesday September 24, 2013

Meet the teams: Emery and Green River High School

Emery High Girls cross country team Emery girls cross country: Back-Valorie Chynoweth, Jacie Huntington, Hannah Dyer, Hayley Procarione, Syrine Honore, Megan Stout, Triston Wayman; middle-Lexy Cox, Erin Hurst, Tarryn Parkins, Sarah Collard, Jamie Gilbert, Kelsie Cox; front-Kassidee Oakeson, Melece Pulli.

Emery High boys golf team

Emery boys golf team: back-Coach Al White, Reece Behling, Tyeray Migliori, Kyler Farley, Tate Webster, Jordan Fuller, Mark Debry, Zayne Cologie, Teigen Jewkes, McKlane Allred, Coach Jordan Leonard; frontCoach Kevin Reynolds, Nick Oviatt, Race Nielson, Deryk Fuller, McKoy Holt, Coach Neal Peacock.

Alice Wadley/Emery County Progress

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Emery County Progress Castle Dale, Utah Tuesday September 24, 2013 5A

Meet the teams: Emery and Green River High School

Phil Fauver/Emery County Progress

Eugene Swalberg

Emery High football seniors: Zach Jacobsen, Gavin McDermott, Carson Healy, Justan Potter, Dillon Greenan; Zach West, Marco Mota, Slayde Childs, Ryan Cox, Tallon Morrey; Kelton Price, Duncan Thomas, Matt Mecham and Derrick Dawes.

Green River varsity girls (not in order): Taylor Johnson, Cassidee Moore, Sydney Thayn, Tristin Lehnhoff, Carlie Swalberg, Hannah Manalili, Kira Engleman.

Emery seniors

Green River Volleyball

Alice Wadley/Emery County Progress

Back: Alex Stilson, David Bird, Jaxon Bradley, Wyatt Cox, Brady Dale, Kaden Oakeson, McKlayne Moss, Lane Taylor; middle-Logan Ewell, Hans Guymon, Nate Gilbert, Travis Fehlberg, Jax Gardner; front-Zach Clifford.

Emery cross country

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6A Emery County Progress Castle Dale, Utah Tuesday September 24, 2013

Obituaries Richard W. Helsten

SCOFIELD/PRICE-Richard W. Helsten, age 71, returned to the loving arms of his Heavenly Father and parents on September 16, 2013. He was born April 19, 1942 in Scofield, Utah to Frank T. and Frances Williams Helsten and for the first 50 years Richard enjoyed a full life in Scofield with his parents and in Castle Dale with his aunt Gwen and uncle Theo Seely. For the last twenty years he has lived in his home in Price with his close friends Kenneth Wade, Tyler Isaacson and Todd Marvidikis. Richard loved everyone and taught all of us how to love unconditionally. He also loved music, especially the polka. He always talked about trucks, trains, keys and money. Richard and his family would like to thank Jeff Hunt and all his caregivers at TKG who cared for him for the past 20 years. He is preceded in death by his parents, sister-inlaw, Ruth Helsten; all his aunts and uncles and many cousins. Richard is survived by his siblings and their spouses, Ted (Pam) Helsten, Harvey

Helsten, Paul Helsten, and Ann (Woody) Carter; and many nieces, nephews and cousins. Funeral service, Wednesday, Sept. 25, 2013, 11 a.m., Scofield LDS Ward. Family will receive friends at Mitchell Funeral Home (233 East Main Street) in Price Tuesday evening from 6-8 p.m. at the church in Scofield and Wednesday one hour prior to services. Interment, Scofield Cemetery. Arrangements entrusted to Mitchell Funeral Home where friends are welcome daily and may share memories of Richard at www. mitchellfuneralhome.net.

Marian Stott Cribby

Green River-Marian Stott Cribby, age 81, passed away on September 16, 2013 in Green River, Utah. She was born on March 4, 1932 in Orville, Wash. to William Herbert and Etha Silvia Estell Norton. Funeral services were held on Monday, Sept. 23, 2013 at 11 a.m. in the Green River LDS Chapel (95 North Clark Street.) A viewing was held on Monday prior to the service at the church from 10 to 10:45 a.m. Interment in the Elgin Cemetery. Services are in the care of Fausett Mortuary. Family and friends may sign the guestbook and share memories of Marian at www.fausettmortuary.com.

Emery volleyball By GARY ARRINGTON Sports Writer

The Emery High volleyball team split games last week as they defeated South Sevier 3-1 on Tuesday night in Monroe and then lost at San Juan 3-0. With the two games in the books, Emery has a 2-1 region record and will face Grand at Moab this week. San Juan leads the region at 3-0 while Grand and South Sevier are both 1-1. A win this week would keep the Emery team in solid contention for the region title. At San Juan, Emery fell 25-15, 25-23 and 25-21. Emery was never in the first set as they scored a point off of a serve only one time. Trailing 17-9, Emery scored the next four points with Sidnee Conder serving to narrow the gap to 17-13 but the team was then outscored 8-2 to close out the set. In the second set, Emery led at 11-9 and 13-10 only to see the lead disappear at 17-16. Emery fought the rest of the way but could never regain the lead. In the third set, San Juan grabbed the lead and stayed just ahead of Emery the rest of the way to secure the win. At Monroe, South Sevier started hot by winning the first set 25-14 as the game

went only through a single rotation. Emery actually led 5-3 and 7-6 before the Rams dominated the end of the set. Emery then played some of their best ball of the season as they blasted the Rams 25-12 and 25-14 and then held onto win the fourth set 26-24. Emery was absolutely dominating in sets two and three as everything they did was almost perfect. They had great kill shots, great digs, played the net well and served well as they thoroughly dominated the host team. The Spartans would be a force in volleyball if they could harness their play in these two sets and duplicate it during every match. In the fourth set, the two teams battled evenly up to 11-11. South Sevier then scored the next five points to lead 16-11 and Emery fans were just a little nervous. Emery retook the lead at 19-16 with Bayler Griffin serving. The six straight Emery points were the most of the set and came at a good time to get the Spartans ready to snatch a win. The score was tied at 23-23 and 24-24 before Emery scored the final two points and left with the win.

Brittany Nicole Lofthouse Brittany Nicole Lofthouse CASTLE DALE – Brittany Nicole Lofthouse, age 21, passed away September 19, 2013 in Lindon, Utah. Our family regrets to announce, but humbly accepts, that she has returned to her heavenly home. Brittany Nicole was born August 9, 1992 in Provo, Utah to Cynthia Ann and Jared Henry Lofthouse. Brittany grew up in Castle Dale, Utah where she graduated from the Emery High School class of 2010. She loved the arts. Brittany was part of the Community Theater and acted in many productions produced through the Emery High drama department. Brittany also loved to sing and dance. She proved her talents when she became Miss Castle Dale. Brittany loved animals and always gave strays a home. She had a vibrant spirit and always told you exactly how it was. She lived her life to the fullest and could light up any room with her smile. She is survived by her mother and father, Cyndie and Jared; grandparents: Ann Gladden Johnson and Terry and Eileen Lofthouse; also by Brian and Tammy Smith and family. She will be missed by her family including aunts, uncles, cousins, friends, and her best friend, Bella. She was preceded in death by grandparents: Ralph and

Kay Gladden, Ruby Seegmiller, Elva and John Lofthouse; niece, Aurora Swineford; and nephew, Chance. Funeral services will be held Wednesday, September 25, 2013 at 11:00 a.m. in the Castle Dale LDS 3rd Ward building (165 West 800 North). There will be a viewing held Tuesday, September 24, from 6–8 p.m. at Fausett Mortuary (720 North Center St., Castle Dale) and on Wednesday at the church from 9:30 – 10:30 a.m. prior to the services. Interment will be in the Castle Dale City Cemetery. Services are in the care of Fausett Mortuary. Friends and family may sign the guest book and share memories of Brittany at www.fausettmortuary.com. In lieu of flowers the family has asked for donations to be made at any Zion’s bank to the Brittany Lofthouse Memorial Fund to assist with funeral costs.

Thomas Gary Thompson

Ferron-Thomas Gary Thompson, age 73, passed away on September 16, 2013 in Ferron, Utah. Gary was born on November 14, 1939 in Tooele, Utah to Thomas Henry and Helen S. Sloan Thompson. He married Jean Pederson, February 9th, 1959, they later divorced. He then married Janie Smith on May 3, 1986 in Salt Lake City, Utah. Funeral services were held at 11:00 a.m., Friday, September 20, 2013 at Fausett Mortuary, 720 North Center St., Castle Dale. There was a viewing Friday, from 10:30 to 11 a.m., prior to the services at the Mortuary. Services are in the care of Fausett Mortuary. Friends and family may sign the guest book and share memories of Gary at www.fausettmortuary.com.

Michael Flores

PRICE-Our special brother, nephew and longtime friend Michael Joseph Flores, age 58, passed away September 17, 2013 at Castleview Hospital in Price. He was born April 30, 1955 in Price, Utah to Joseph T. and Tillie Martinez Flores. Funeral Mass, was held Friday, September 20, 2013, 10 a.m., St. Anthony Catholic Church in Helper. Vigil service, was held Thursday evening 7 p.m. at the church in Helper. Family received friends at St. Anthony’s in Helper Thursday and Friday one hour prior to services. Committal service, Mt. View Cemetery, Helper. Arrangements entrusted to Mitchell Funeral Home of Price where friends are always welcome daily and may share memories of Michael at www. mitchellfuneralhome.net.

Kenny Wells

PRICE-Kenneth Ross Wells, age 60, passed away Sept. 21, 2013 in Price. He was born May 18, 1953 in Price, Utah to Ross Oviatt and Ora Maxine Lambson Wells. Funeral service, Thursday, September 26, 2013, 11 a.m., Mitchell Funeral Home (233 East Main Street) in Price. Family will be at Mitchell's Wednesday evening from 6-8 p.m. and Thursday one hour prior to services. Interment, Cliffview Cemetery, Price. Arrangements entrusted to Mitchell Funeral Home where friends are always welcome daily and may share memories of Kenny at www.mitchellfuneralhome.net.

Gary "GR" Richardson

PRICE/VERNAL- Gary "GR" Richardson, age 77, passed away September 21, 2013 in Price. He was born Dec. 7, 1935 in Vernal, Utah to Kenneth Lafe and Reva York Richardson. Graveside service, Friday, September 27, 2013, 3:00 p.m. Vernal Memorial Park Cemetery, Vernal, Utah. Arrangements entrusted to Mitchell Funeral Home of Price where friends are always welcome daily and may share memories of Gary online at www.mitchellfuneralhome.net.

Huntington Farmers Market

Every Tuesday and Saturday at BKs in Huntington from 4-6 p.m. until it freezes in October.

Thank you volunteers!!! Orangeville City Mayor and Council would like to give a special thanks to all those who recently helped with the flood situation in Orangeville. Thanks to the Emery County Sheriff's Office, Castle Valley Special Service District and any and all others that stepped up to help with the flood waters. You really made a difference to a lot of people that would have experienced flood damage. Your efforts have not gone unnoticed. Orangeville City Mayor and Council

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Lisa Deanna Olsen Raynor PRICE – Lisa Deanna Olsen Raynor, age 39, passed away September 17, 2013. Lisa was born November 27, 1973 to Bill and Grace Olsen in Provo, Utah. She married Danny Daley in Las Vegas, Nevada. They later divorced. She then married Robert Lance Raynor on March 27, 2004 in Price, Utah. Lisa was raised in Emery County. She received her High School diploma. She was a very clean, organized, and artistic individual. She enjoyed collecting coins, and also loved to travel. She especially loved her trip to Hawaii with her soul mate, Justin Ward. Lisa had a great sense of humor and loved to tease. She loved her nieces and had a special bond with them, especially with Whitney. She also had a special bond with her parents. She will be remembered as a loving daughter, sister, mother, and aunt. Lisa is survived by her husband, Robert Lance; parents, Bill and Grace Olsen of Castle Dale; children: Cory Daley of Hawaii, Jesse Olsen of Springville, and Lindsey Raynor of Salt Lake City; and siblings: Scott (Tina) Olsen of Castle Dale, Jedd (Alana) Olsen of Huntington, and Debbie (Bill) Murray of Huntington. She was preceded in death by a son, Robert Paul Daley; soul mate, Justin Ward;

grandparents: Charles Doyle and Rozina Marie Nielsen Olsen and Swen and Jessie LaBelle Brandon Daniels; uncle, Clair Daniels; and infant uncle, Doyle Valdean Olsen. Funeral services will be held Tuesday, September 24, 2013 at 11:00 a.m. at the Castle Dale LDS Stake Center (35 East Main Street). There will be a viewing Monday, September 23, from 6–8 p.m. at Fausett Mortuary (720 North Center St., Castle Dale) and on Tuesday at the Stake Center from 9:30 – 10:30 a.m. prior to the services. Interment will be in the Huntington City Cemetery. Services are in the care of Fausett Mortuary. Family and friends may sign the guest book and share memories of Lisa at www. fausettmortuary.com.

Doris Carol Olsen Luke ORANGEVILLE - Doris Carol Olsen Luke, age 78, passed away Sept. 22, 2013 in Price, Utah. Doris was born July 25, 1935 in Rochester (Moore), Utah to Travus Deloss and Jessie Hitchcock Olsen. She attended South Emery High School and married her eternal companion Clyde Melrose Luke on May 22, 1951 in the Manti Temple. She was the mother of three children: Karen (Kevin) Tuttle (Orangeville, UT), Roger Clyde Luke (deceased 1975), Eric Allen (Janalee) Luke (Ferron, Utah). She was the loving grandmother of eight grandchildren, 19 greatgrandchildren, and three great-great-grandchildren. Doris was a homemaker and an active member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints where she served in many callings including Ward Relief Society President and in the Stake Relief Society Presidency, Primary teacher for many years, visiting teaching coordinator, ordinance worker in the Manti Temple and, most recently, building cleaning scheduler, and she was always a faithful visiting teacher. She had a strong testimony of the truthfulness of the gospel and was a shining example of service and charity. Doris had a love of flowers, especially roses, but her passion was her family. She loved to watch her kids, grandkids, great-grandkids, and great-great-grandkids play sports and other activities. She felt that her mission in life was to follow and support her family. Doris is survived by her husband, Clyde; two of her

children, Karen and Eric; seven grandchildren; 19 great-grandchildren; three great-great-grandchildren; three brothers-in-law; two sisters-in-law; and other extended family and close friends. Doris was preceded in death by her parents; son, Roger Clyde Luke; grandson, Trever Kevin Tuttle; brother, Travus Boyd (Lecta) Olsen; sister, Norma Dee (Royal) Fox; and brother-in-law, E. Legrand Huntington. Funeral services will be held Friday, September 27, 2013, at 11 a.m. in the Orangeville LDS Chapel located at 45 West 100 South in Orangeville, UT. A viewing will be held Thursday, September 26, from 6 p.m.-8 p.m. at Fausett Mortuary in Castle Dale, UT (720 North Center Street) and from 9:30 a.m.-10:30 a.m. on Friday at the Orangeville church prior to the services. Interment in the Orangeville City Cemetery. Services are in the care of Fausett Mortuary. Family and friends may sign the guest book and share memories of Doris at www.fausettmortaury.com.

Referees needed

Emery County Recreation District is looking for referees for Flag Football and Tackle Football. Call 381-2108 for more information

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Emery County Progress Castle Dale, Utah Tuesday September 24, 2013 7A

EHS hosts cross country home meet

Emery girls begin their run at the Aquatics Center in Castle Dale. By GARY ARRINGTON, Sports Writer

Emery High hosted a region cross country meet last week. South Sevier, North Sevier, Grand and Manti ran against the Spartans. Emery had split results as the girls

finished in first place and the boys finished in last place. The Emery girls scored 33 points for first with Grand County second with 59 points followed by North Sevier with 68 points and Manti with 71 points. Grand won

Alice Wadley/Emery County Progress

the boys side with 27 points followed by Manti with 52, North Sevier with 83, South Sevier with 95 and Emery with 100. Erin Hurst had the fastest time of the day for the girls, finishing first at 21:30.00.

Teammate Hannah Dyer was sixth overall at 24:16 and Kelsie Cox was seventh at 24:42. Tarryn Parkins finished ninth at 24:52 and Sarah Collard finished tenth at 24:59. Teammates Jacie Hun-

tington and Kassidee Oakeson finished in the top 16 as a strong Emery team contests with each other each week for the best performances. Wyatt Cox had the fastest time for the Emery boys at 20:51.17 and finished 14th

while Brady Dale finished 17th for Emery in a time of 21:04.01. Also counting in the Emery totals were Alex Stilson, David Bird and Jaxon Bradley.

Hayley Procarione, Valorie Chynoweth and Triston Wayman help the Emery team to a first place finish.

Megan Stout.

David Bird, Zach Clifford and Jaxon Bradley.

Wyatt Cox.

Erin Hurst takes first in the home meet.

Alex Stilson.

Hannah Dyer. Tarryn Parkins.

The Emery boy’s team at the starting line.

Students of the Week Green River High Carlie Swalberg

Carllie Swalberg is the daughter of Laurie and Eugene Swalberg. She participates in volleyball, basketball and student government. She is the class secretary. Her favorite classes are language arts and science. Her hobbies include sports, reading and music. In the future Carlie plans to have a family and live long and prosper. Carlie loves Green River.

Canyon View Junior High Brittny Richards

Brittny Richards is the daughter of Peggy Farnsworth and Scott Richards. She participates in cheer and track. Her favorite classes are yearbook and language arts. Her hobbies include, hunting, photography, riding horses and four wheelers. In the future Brittny wants to go to college and have a good career.

Huntington Elementary Sunshine Students Huntington Elementary Sunshine Awards for Sept. 6 Mrs. Mills: Bryleigh Pulls and Jaqsyn Rudd Mrs. Allred: Aden Casey Mrs. Wall: Braxton Lucero Mrs. Torres: Hayden Abrams Mrs. Clement: Jesus Leon Mrs. Chapman: Terren Avery Mrs. Ward: Braxton Butler Mrs. McElprang: Tanisha Adams Mrs. Cowley: Jaisly Jacobson, Marcos Lopez Mrs. Rowley: Alivia Christman Mrs. Keele: Elaine Hotchkiss Mrs. Carter: Tenyson Allred Mrs.Martineau: Will Jeffs Mrs. Justice: Ali Garcia Miss Zwahlen: McKenzie Cox Mrs. Justice: Kathleen Winder

Cleveland Elementary Hailey Jo Allred

Hailey Jo Allred is the daughter of Melissa and Cody Allred. Her favorite food is tacos and her favorite colors are purple and turquoise. Her favorite book is the Raft and her favorite movie is Safe Haven. She loves dancing. Her hobbies include dancing, playing sports and hanging out with friends. She thinks the most fun part of school is hanging out with friends. In the future, Hailey Jo wants to become a dentist or a doctor.

Ferron Elementary Olivia Conover is the Student Body Vice-President of Ferron Elementary. She has been chosen as the student of the week. She is the daughter of Meagan and Clint Conover. Her favorite food is poppy see chicken. Her favorite colors are blue and green. The book she likes the most is the Ranger's Apprentice Series. She loves reading, her family and playing. She wants to be a teacher and a mother when she grows up. She likes to learn about new things in school. Her hobbies include reading, playing the piano and

softball. Her favorite movie is the Princess Bride.


8A Emery County Progress Castle Dale, Utah Tuesday September 24, 2013

Aging Department Director Retirement

Maughn Guymon After many long years Maughn Guymon is retiring. He shares some of his story, “After the Wilberg Mine fire I was laid off from my job as Warehouse Supervisor and I went back to college working on my Masters Degree. In July of 1985 I interviewed for the position of Area Agency on Aging Director for Southeastern Utah Association of Governments. The position also included Director of the Emery County Aging Program. I served in those positions, as well as being the Food Bank Director for several years but as the Aging Programs had become much more complicated and I had built better funding sources with the Counties and State, I became totally involved in Aging service. I was instrumental in establishing the State Area Agency Association and have served as Chairman of that group three times. I was also a founding member of the group that established what is now the Utah Aging Alliance. Over the years I have been instrumental in establishing many Aging programs statewide. Services for seniors like the Aging Waiver program, the Alternatives Program, Statewide Ombudsman program, enhanced funding for Home Delivered Meals, Unified reporting system for

Retirement Open House Ralph Pruitt Ralph Pruitt worked at Huntington Elementary for 35.5 years and has now retired. His family is having an open house for him. All are invited to come and share your memories with him either spoken or written. Friday, Sept. 27 at the Huntington Elementary cafeteria from 3:30-4:30 p.m.

Missionaries all services throughout the State, Funding formulas that provide equal base funding for all Area Agencies, Computerized menu planning for the entire state, and many more. As a side note the Utah Aging Alliance has selected me to receive their Lifetime Achievement Award for outstanding service to the Seniors of Utah. That will be at their annual conference in Park City, at the Yarrow, on October 11, of this year. I have loved my time serving the Seniors of Southeastern Utah, the State of Utah, and especially of seniors of Emery County, and serving with so many County Commissioners, who have always had the interest of the Seniors as a priority.” said Guymon.

Sister DeBry Sister Katherine DeBry has been called to serve in the Montana, Billings Mision as a missionary for the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Sister DeBry will be giving her farewell address Sept. 29 at 11 a.m. in the Dutch Flat Ward, Ferron Stake Center. Sister DeBry will enter the Missionary Training Center on Oct. 16. She is the daughter of Mark L. and Darline DeBry of Ferron.

Zions Bank Retirement Jenene Hansen Zions Bank Celebrates Career Of 26-Year Employee On Sept. 17, Zions Bank hosted an open house for Jenene Hansen, customer service manager of the Huntington Financial Center. Friends, family and coworkers stopped by to enjoy refreshments and visit with Hansen. A Huntington resident, Hansen began her Zions Bank career as a secretary in the Castle Dale financial center. She joined the Huntington financial center as a teller. She became a loan officer, and then customer service manager. Hansen was also a loan officer at the Price financial center. Hansen is looking forward to spending more time with family, but says she will miss interacting with her clients. “I’ve always had the attitude that my customers are not just clients, they’re also my friends,” Hansen said. “I’ve appreciated the trust they put in me.” Zions Bank is Utah’s oldest financial institution and is the only local bank with

a statewide distribution of branches, operating 101 full-service offices. Zions Bank also operates 26 fullservice branches in Idaho. In addition to offering a wide range of traditional banking services, Zions Bank is also a leader in small business lending and has ranked as the No. 1 lender of U.S. Small Business Administration 7(a) loans in Utah for the past 19 consecutive years. Founded in 1873, Zions Bank has been serving the communities of Utah for nearly 140 years.

90th Birthday Lena Jensen Lena Jensen will be turning 90 on Sept. 27. An open house will be held on Sept. 28 at Gordon Creek Church from 2-4 p.m. The address is 175 N. 1280 W. in Price. Light refreshments will be served.

Wedding

80th Birthday Sister and Elder Carter Durwood (Woody) and Ann Carter have been called to serve in the Milwaukee, Wisconsin Mission. They will be speaking in sacrament meeting on Sept. 29 at the Scofield Branch at 11:50 a.m.

Library grant Katarina Vasica Daniel Bennion Mr. and Mrs. D. Bennion of Ferron, Utah are pleased to announce the marriage of their son, Daniel Bennion to Katarina Vasica, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Vasica, of Pancevo, Serbia in South Eastern Europe. They will be married on Saturday, September 28th in Pancevo. Daniel and Katarina will eventually make their home in the United States.

Carole Larsen, Director of the Emery County Libraries received a grant through the Utah State Library to attend the ARSL Conference (National Association for Rural and Small Libraries) in Omaha, Nebraska beginning Sept. 25. Four grants were awarded by the Utah State Library, Carole Larsen from Emery County, Dona Gay from Payson, Sarah Rigby from Newton, and Karen Clark from Logan. The conference is specifically geared to small and rural libraries with information that can help them be more successful. This is a great opportunity to not only be taught by leaders in the library field but also learn from other librarians.

VFW Ladies Auxiliary

Meet the second Friday of the month at 1 p.m., 189 N. Carbonville Rd., 637-7424.

Castle Dale Library

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Preschool Story Time is held Tuesday’s at 1:00 p.m. at the Castle Dale Library. Thursday October 10, at 4 p.m. the Castle Dale Library will be hosting a Job Seekers workshop, we will have mini classes on dress and appearance, digital applications and resumes, and interviewing tips. Everyone is welcome to attend.

Oktoberfest

October 4&5 SAVE THE DATE

For Family-Fun-Food-Drink Plan to attend Mexican Dinner Friday Italian Dinner Saturday Kids Activities, Bingo Snacks, Kielbasa, and Italian Sausage, Burgers, Drinks, Beer, Hot Apple Streusel with Ice Cream Notre Dame Hope Community Center 200 North & Carbon Ave. Silent Auction - Baked Goods - Religious Goods - Craft Booths - Kids Activities - Raffle Prize Drawing

Sharpe D. Snow Sharpe D. Snow will be celebrating his 80th birthday on Sept. 28 with his family. He enjoys talking about the old days, working on his tractor at the farm, family reunions in Joe’s Valley, BBQs, golf and caramel popcorn. He is thankful for his wife, his five children, 17 grandchildren, 11 great grandchildren and his sister Juanita. He is grateful for his friends and the good times he has shared with them. We love you Grandpa. Happy 80th Birthday.

RafÀe tickets

Two decorated Christmas trees, and other items for a fund raiser for families in Emery County for Christmas $1.00 each or 6 for $5.00 Purchase tickets at Southeastern Utah District Health Department, Castle Dale & Price, Deb’s Unique Gifts Boyd’s Family Pharmacy.

Lt. Governor’s Conference on service

Oct. 2 at the Jennifer Leavitt Student Center. Check in at 9 a.m. The cost is $50 for the conference, which includes the luncheon. $25 for the luncheon only.

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Emery County Progress Castle Dale, Utah Tuesday September 24, 2013 9A

War on coal continued from page one

of low Nox2 burners. The EPA has not defined a baseline for pollutants. Everything but steam is listed as a pollutant. Loren Huntsman, from Hunter Plant commented on one of the slides in the slide show. He said the graph that showed zero pollutants by 2040 indicates that all the coal fired plants will be shut down. Susan White from DOGM asked how long the Carbon Plant would have kept operating if these new regulations hadn’t come into effect. Lawson indicated the power plant would have kept operating. Any changes at the power plants must be permitted and must meet new standards. The future of coal fire power plants is so uncertain no one is investing in coal fired power plants at this time. It was mentioned that one of the IPP units is also going to convert to natural gas. One question raised is will coal be dead in the near future. Lawson said one of his greatest concerns is that people are not aware of what’s going on with all the new regulations. It may take five or six years for everything to go into effect and by then it may be too late. People need to speak out now against the war on coal and the coal mining industry. If something isn’t done to defend coal right away, the industry will be gone and the cost of power will increase dramatically. In California, regulations prevent any power from coming into the state that is coal power plant produced. This not only limits their options, but drives up the cost of power for industries and households within the state. It also leaves Utah out of the loop in sending power to California. One bright spot might be that other countries want the coal produced in Utah. A problem with this is getting a port to ship the coal overseas. Other states are taking the same approach to coal as California. As power plants convert to natural gas, this will drive up the cost of natural gas. White asked if a brand new coal fired power plant were to be built today, could all the environmental regulations be met. Lawson said everything could be met but the carbon dioxide. If you go to EPA.gov their main focus is on greenhouse gases. Lawson was asked about nuclear power, he replied the problem with nuclear power is it’s a 17 year process through a lot of regulations and a lot of uncertainty. Lawson was asked about climate change. He said he has his own personal opinions about climate change, but he believes climate change has been occurring for a very long time. The question was asked isn’t it better to use the resources we have now and rebuild as needed because the transmission lines and facilities are in place. Lawson said, yes, it’s a challenge to get new transmission lines in place and the EPA is not properly considering costs with transmission for renewables. The EPA Regulations impacting coal-fired Units include, regional haze, Mercury and Air Toxics Standards, National Ambient Air Quality Standards, One-hour Sulfur Dioxide (SO2) Standard, One-hour Nitrogen Dioxide Standard (NO2) Standard, Particulate Matter less than 2.5 Microns (PM2.5) and Ozone Standard. The Regional Haze Rules were developed as a longterm program to achieve natural visibility conditions in specific national parks and wilderness areas by 2064. Pollutants impacted include SO2 NOX and Particulate Matter. The Regional Haze Rules are not a health-based

standard. The Program is broken into 10-year planning periods. Initial planning period focuses on application of Best Available Retrofit Technologies (BART) to control sources of haze-causing emissions from units constructed between 1962 and 1977. This includes power plants, smelters, etc. Coal Combustion Residual Regulations Impact the disposal of fly ash and bottom ash. Water Effluent Limit Guidelines Impact the disposal of waste water. 316 (b) Regulations Impacts water intake structures to make sure there is no damage to fish at the intake structure. From 2005-2012, Implementation of the States’ plans has reduced PacifiCorp’s Utah, Wyoming and Arizona SO2 and NOX emissions by 50 percent. The EPA new regulations are stricter than the States plans. The EPA requires all states to have a plan of their own to address environmental quality issues. Regional Haze – Changes in Interpretation Key Remaining Period I issue is defining BART NOX controls. With respect to NOX controls, EPA’s 2005 Guidelines stated that most coal units would meet BART NOX requirements through the use of current combustion control technology, i.e. the careful control of combustion air and low-NOX burners. EPA’s 2013 plan for PacifiCorp’s 10 BART Units in Wyoming requires 8 SCR and 2 SNCR. This adds hundreds of millions of dollars in additional capital costs and operating expenses. To deal with Regional Haze Impacts, PacifiCorp in Wyoming will convert one coal unit to natural gas. Potentially five other coal units will be converted to gas or retired. The amount of money it would take to bring these other units up to standard is cost prohibitive. In Utah, the NOX controls for Utah’s BART Units are still under review. EPA is pushing the state to require aggressive NOX controls (SCR). The state plan has required the installation of Low NOX burners. The Final rule was released on December 21, 2011 and the compliance deadline is April 16, 2015. This Rule requires Reductions in Mercury Emissions Reductions in Hazardous non-mercury metals and Reduction in Acid Gases. It requires significant increases in monitoring, reporting and recordkeeping requirements. To meet the MATS requirements in Utah the Carbon Plant will be retired in April 2015. Expenses would be too prohibitive to bring the Carbon Plant into compliance. Good news is the Hunter and Huntington units will meet the emission limits with existing equipment. In Wyoming, the Naughton Unit 3 will reduce maximum output until converted to natural gas. All units will install mercury controls. National Ambient Air Quality Standards(NAAQS) One-hour NO2 standard final in January 2010, compliance by 2017. One-hour SO2 standard final in June 2010; state implementation plans to address non-attainment areas due by early 2014, with compliance deadline no later than August 2017. Fine particulate (PM2.5) standard – SIP Due to EPA. Ozone standard - expect proposal in December 2013 and final standard by September 2014 Greenhouse Gas Regulation-Greenhouse gas New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) for new fossilfueled electric generating units proposed in April 2012 at a level of 1,000 lbs CO2/ MWh; to be re-proposed in September 2013 pursuant to President Obama’s Climate Action Plan unveiled on June

25, 2013. EPA to publish a new proposed rule regulating CO2 emissions from new power plants by September 20, 2013, and to finalize the rule in a “timely fashion.” The EPA will publish a new proposed rule regulating CO2 emissions from existing power plants by June 2014, and to finalize the

rule by June 2015. The final rule for existing sources is to include a requirement that states submit implementation plans to the EPA no later than June 30, 2016. The re-proposed greenhouse gas NSPS for new sources will set the stage for legal reviews and legal action against the proposed rule.

Coal Combustion Residuals Rule proposed by EPA in 2010. EPA action on public comments not expected until 2014. Fleet wide proxy Subtitle D CCR compliance projects are incorporated into system planning, pending final rulemaking. Effluent Guidelines-Rule proposed by EPA in 2013. Final rule to be issued by May 2014. No proxy compliance projects incorporated into

current system planning. Clean Water Act §316(b) Rule proposed by EPA in 2011. Final rule to be issued by June 2013. Fleet wide proxy Clean Water Act §316(b) intake compliance projects are incorporated into system planning, pending final rulemaking. Other environmental regulations include ash storage and water discharge.

PUBLIC NOTICES “Because the People Must Know”

UPAXLP

Submission Guidelines: Public notices must be received no later than Friday at 5pm for the following Tuesday publication. Submissions must be e-mailed to legals@ecprogress.com. In the event e-mail isn’t available, submissions may be faxed to (435) 637-2716 and should be addressed to the legal advertising department.

NOTICE OF BID Emery County is receiving bids from any dealers wishing to purchase all of the scrap metal received at the Emery County Landfill this year. Bids must be for FOB Emery County Landfill. All bids are to be sealed and the envelope clearly marked “Scrap Metal Bid” and will be received into the Emery County Clerk/Auditor's Office, Emery County Courthouse, P.O. Box 907, Castle Dale, UT 84513, no later than 12 noon, Friday, October 4, 2013. Bids will be opened during the scheduled Emery County Commission meeting on October 8, 2013 after 9 a.m. In Castle Dale, Utah. If further information is needed please contact Wayde Nielsen at 3815450. Published in the Emery County Progresss September 24 and October 1, 2013.

FERRON CITY PUBLIC NOTICE Notice is hereby given Ferron City has received the Independently Audited Financial Statements for the year ending June 30, 2013. This information is available for review at the Ferron City Hall during regular business hours. Adele J. Justice, CMC City Recorder Published in the Emery County Progresss September 24 and October 1, 2013.

NOTICE TO WATER USERS The application(s) below requesting an EXTENSION OF TIME WITHIN WHICH TO SUBMIT PROOF OF BENEFICIAL USE have been filed with the Division of Water Rights. It is represented that additional time is needed to place the water to beneficial use in Emery County. These are informal proceedings per Rule R655-6-2. Protests concerning an application must be legibly written or typed, contain the name and mailing address of the protesting party, STATE THE APPLICATION NUMBER PROTESTED, CITE REASONS FOR THE PROTEST, and REQUEST A HEARING, if desired. Also, A $15 FEE MUST BE INCLUDED FOR EACH APPLICATION PROTESTED. Protests must be filed with the Division of Water Rights, PO Box 146300, Salt Lake City, UT 84114-6300, or by hand delivery to a Division office during normal business hours ON OR BEFORE OCTOBER 21, 2013.

NOTICE OF INTENT WEATHER MODIFICATION

Emery Water Conservancy District, P.O. Box 998, Castle Dale, Utah 84513 intends to conduct weather modification programs in Utah to increase precipitation. The area in which the effects are intended to occur are in the higher elevation snowpack accumulation regions in portions of Eastern Sanpete and Western Carbon and Emery Counties. The operations may be conducted during portions of the period from December 1, 2013 to April 15 2014. Weather modification operations will be conducted using automated liquid propane dispensers.

Persons interested in this permit application should contact the Utah Division of Water Resources; 1594 West North Temple, Box 146201, Salt Lake City, UT 84114-6201; telephone (801) 538-7269

Emery Water Conservancy District Jay Mark Humphrey Manager P.O. Box 998 Castle Dale, UT 84513 Published in the Emery County Progresss September 17, 24 and October 1, 2013.

BLM SEEKS PUBLIC COMMENT ON VEGETATION REMOVAL PROJECT IN FORD RIDGE AREA

Price, Utah—The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Moab and Price Field Offices invite the public to review and comment on an Environmenta Assessment (EA) analyzing the potential impacts of a vegetation removal and restoration project.

The EA analyzes a 6,840-acre project to thin conifer stands in heavily wooded areas in the Ford Creek/Diamanti Canyon area eight miles northwest of Helper, Utah. Treatments will include mechanical shredding, hand thinning and piling, prescribed burning, and fence and kiosk construction. The proposed project is needed to prevent the potential for catastrophic wildland fires that could threaten life, property, firefighter safety, and ecosystem health It will also benefit wildlife by restoring aspen, grasses and shrubs.

The EA is available for public review and comment on the Environmenta Notification Bulletin Board (ENBB) at: https://www.blm.gov/ut/enbb/; search for project name “Ford Ridge.”

Please visit http://waterrights.utah.gov or call (801)-538-7240 for additional information.

Written comments will be accepted by letter or email until Sept. 30 2013. Please note that the most useful comments are those that contain new technical or scientific information relevant to the proposed action. Comments should be as specific as possible. Comments which contain only opinions or preferences will not receive a formal response, but may be considered in the BLM decision-making process. Please reference “Ford Ridge Fuels Project” when submitting comments.

EXTENSION(S)

Written comments may be mailed or emailed using the following:

93-954 (A9134): USA Bureau of Reclamation -- Provo Area Office is/are filing an extension for 75.0 cfs. from the Huntington Creek (6 Miles NW of Huntington) for IRRIGATION; STOCKWATERING. Kent L. Jones, P.E. STATE ENGINEER Published in the Emery County Progress September 24 and October 1, 2013.

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE APN: 02-0085-0007 TRA: notset Trust No. 1370330-38 Ref: morrey, edwin IMPORTANT NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED April 24, 2009 UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On November 13, 2013, at 12:00pm, James H. Woodall, as duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust recorded April 29, 2009, as inst. No. 393745*, in book xx, page xx, of Official Records in the office of the County Recorder of Emery County, State of Utah executed by Edwin L Morrey WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO HIGHEST BIDDER, PAYABLE IN LAWFUL MONEY OF THE UNITED STATES AT THE TIME OF SALE, (Successful bidders must tender a deposit of $20,000 in certified funds to the Trustee at the time of sale, with the balance due by noon the following business day, at the office of the Trustee), At the main entrance to the emery county courthouse 560 West 1850 North Castle Dale, Utah all right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust in the property situated in said County and State described as: Beginning at the northwest corner of the southeast quarter of the northeast quarter of section 36, t16s, r9e, slbm, and running thence east 80 rods; thence south 48 rods; thence west 80 rods; thence north 48 rods to the point of beginning. less any portion within the road. excepting therefrom all oil, gas and other minerals. *non-hamp loan modification agreement recorded on 12/08/2011 as document number 401319. The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 2395 North State Road 155 Cleveland Ut 84518 Estimated Total Debt as of November 13, 2013 is $133,380.95. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, condition, or encumbrances, including fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust, to pay the remaining principle sums of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust. The current beneficiary of the Trust Deed as of the date of this notice is: Ocwen Loan Servicing, Llc •••• and the record owners of the property as of the recording of the Notice of Default is/are: ••••. James H. Woodall, TRUSTEE •••• 10808 River Front Parkway, Suite 175 South Jordan Ut 84095 •••• (801)254-9450 James H. Woodall Signature/By Dated: September 04, 2013 R-432946 09/17/13, 09/24/13, 10/01/13 Published in the Emery County Progresss September 17, 24 and October 1, 2013.

Mail Bureau of Land Management Canyon Country District Office Attn: Fuels 82 E. Dogwood Moab, UT 84532 Email blm_ut_mb_comments@blm.gov

Before including an address, phone number, email address, or other personal identifying information in any comments, be aware that the entire comment—including personal identifying information—may be made publicly available at any time. Requests to withhold personal identifying information from public review can be submitted, but the BLM cannot guarantee that it will be able to do so. The BLM will not consider anonymous comments All submissions from organizations and businesses, and from individuals identifying themselves as representatives or officials of organizations or businesses, will be available for public inspection in their entirety.

For further information, contact Brian Keating at (435)259-2194 Persons who use a telecommunications device for the deaf (TDD) may cal the Federal Information Relay Service (FIRS) at 1-800-877-8339 to leave a message or question for the above individual. The FIRS is available 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Replies are provided during normal business hours.

The BLM manages more than 245 million acres of public land, the most of any Federal agency. This land, known as the National System of Public Lands, is primarily located in 12 Western states, including Alaska. The BLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. The BLM's multiple-use mission is to sustain the health, diversity and productivity of the public lands for the use and enjoyment of present and future generations. In Fiscal Year 2012, activities on public lands generated $4.6 billion in revenue, much of which was shared with the States where the activities occurred. In addition, public lands contributed more than $112 billion to the U.S. economy and helped support more than 500,000 jobs. Published in the Emery County Progress September 10, 17 and 24, 2013.

PUBLIC NOTICES AVAILABLE ONLINE

Public notices published in the EMERY COUNTY PROGRESS can also be found online. Please visit www.ecprogress.com and click on the Public Notices link

DO NOT EMAIL NOTICES TO THE EDITOR Due to the large volume of email messages that the editor receives, Please DO NOT email legal notices to editor@ecprogress.com. Legal notices should instead be sent directly to legals@ecprogress.com, where they will be handled with proper diligence by the legal advertising department.


10A Emery County Progress Castle Dale, Utah Tuesday September 24, 2013

Melon Games in Green River Tiny Dancers in the parade at Melon Days in Green River.

The wooden watermelon is the oldest float in the parade. Alice and Gary Wadley/Emery County Progress photos

All the melon growers in Green River donate free melon to everyone in the park.

This clown might need a bigger car.

Free melon for everyone in the park all day.

Classic cars and trucks participate in the parade.

This little guy picks up candy along the parade route.

Get Ready for Winter

With Winter just around the corner it’s time to prepare your home, your car and yourself for the cold months ahead. Our

This little girl makes the most of Melon Days.

The giant slide was a big hit.

The Grand Junction clowns visit the Melon Days parade.

Get Ready for Winter

will feature do-it-yourself home maintenance info, automobile care, winter driving tips, and more. Get Ready for Winter will appear in the October 8, 2013 Sun Advocate and Emery County Progress. Deadline is September 24 Call now and let us design an effective ad to maximize your advertising investment.

Call Jenni, Lynna, Diana, Cheryl, or Christa (435) 637-0732 Or toll free 888-637-0732

The Emery High band performs in Green River.

Ask the Vet

by Glen G L. Jensen, D.V.M.

Signs and Symptoms of Dental Disease Believe it or not, dental disease is the most common disease affecting dogs and cats. I know that it is everyone’s least favorite thing in the world to open your pet’s mouth and look at their teeth. It is probably theirs too! However I guarantee that if you look closely at your pets mouth you will find some sign of dental disease. What are the signs of dental disease and how do you look for them? The most common sign of dental disease is halitosis, or bad breath. Most of our pets love to lick our faces, we always say “Oh thanks for the kisses”. However this is a natural behavior in puppies. They know that if they lick their mom’s mouth then the mother will regurgitate food for them. Granted, we are not going to do that, but we accept it as a form of love. Who doesn’t love puppy breath? So as your pet gets older it will change from puppy breath to normal breath to I’m going to die if you lick my face breath! The most common cause of bad breath is periodontal disease, which is an infection of the gums. This happens when plaque builds up around the gum line, over a short period of time this plaque hardens into tartar. When this happens it causes the gums to become infected, causing the structures holding the teeth in to breakdown. The next obvious sign is tartar on the teeth. When you look at the teeth they should be a nice bright white. The incisors usually will stay like this so do not just look at the front of your pet’s teeth and say they look great. The teeth that are affected the most by tartar are the canines, pre-molars and molars. When you pull back their lips there will be a light to dark yellow composite covering the outside of their teeth. This is not normal; it is not on humans either. The only way to get this off and to stop damage to your pet’s teeth is by a dental cleaning. Brushing or scraping will not take all of it off. The next sign that is more difficult to notice is gingivitis. This is defined as inflammation of the gums. This will appear as a red line right above where the teeth meet the gums. It can also appear to streak upwards farther in to the gums. When you look at healthy pet teeth, the gums should appear wave like. Each tooth has its own gum height. When you see a straight line across the teeth this means severe inflammation. This inflammation is due to the infection in the gums. This is what will cause the structures holding the teeth in to break down and cause the tooth to be loose. However if there is a lot of tartar the tooth may not be loose because the tartar is holding it in place. Some of the less noticeable signs may be the way your pet acts. It may all of a sudden decide that it does not like hard food any more. It has to eat soft food. If there was infection and abscesses in your mouth you wouldn’t want to chew on a bone, right? They will choose softer toys and not play as much. It will hurt immensely for them to play tug of war with you. They can also rub their face on the carpet and salivate more. They may just swallow their food causing them to regurgitate it, making it come up whole. It is important that large dogs have a dental cleaning once a year and smaller dogs at least twice yearly. Dental disease can cause heart, liver and kidney disease. The bacteria in the mouth go through the blood stream and break down the organs rather quickly. Make sure you bring you pet in for a free dental exam bi-annually. You will see the benefit in the later years of your pet’s life when they are happy, healthier and live longer.


Advocate Price, Utah Tuesday September 24, 2013 1A Our 122ndSunyear of serving Carbon County

Sun Advocate

Tuesday September 24, 2013

122nd Year - No. 77

845 East Main, Price UT

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Traffic stop leads to drug bust By JOHN SERFUSTINI

Sun Advocate associate editor

and C.J. McMANUS

Sun Advocate reporter

Wellington OKs oil well JOHN SERFUSTINI - SUN ADVOCATE

By JOHN SERFUSTINI

Sun Advocate associate editor

On the outskirts of Wellington, deep beneath the rangeland where deer and antelope play, there’s oil. And that oil will soon be flowing to the surface. The city council last Wednesday granted the conditional use permit necessary for Whiting Petroleum Corp. to begin production on the first of what might become several wells in the area.

The well is near the intersection of Ridge and Lower Miller Creek roads within city limits. The Denver-based company has been exploring for months now with the city’s permission and is ready to begin production. Scott Swain, Whiting’s area foreman, said the well is ready to go. It has been shut in awaiting the city’s approval. Swain said the company will surround the production well with a

gated, six-foot-high chain link fence for security. Fire departments will have keys to access the property in case of emergency. Another measure the city requested was that the company capture the natural gas byproduct rather than burning it. Mayor Ben Blackburn said residents have said they don’t like the idea of flaring. The company intends to save the natural gas component of its production, Swain said.

Castle Country is not generally known for its petroleum production. Its energy resources are overwhelmingly coal and methane. However, there are some producing wells in the Mounds area near Wellington in Emery County. Swain said that oil production will lead to some jobs in the area. However, he added, the exact number of employees will depend on how many wells are eventually developed.

Trial on nuke plant water rights begins By JOHN SERFUSTINI

Sun Advocate associate editor

Attorneys and upstate news media converged on Seventh District Court in Price Monday for the beginning of a trial that could determine the fate of a multibillion-dollar nuclear power plant near Green River. In dispute is 29,600 acre feet of river water that would be diverted from the Kane County Water Conservancy District to Blue Castle Holdings, the backer of the proposed power plant. Opponents of the transfer are asking Judge George Harmond to review the decision of the State Engineer that allows the change in points of diversion, place of use and nature of use of the water. Those opponents include several

environmental groups, along with a river-running business and agricultural users. The petition for review includes Blue Castle, the conservancy district and State Engineer Kent L. Jones as defendants. The petitioners contend in a lengthy lawsuit filed March 27, 2012, that the engineer did not do his job to assure that the nuclear plant’s water consumption would not harm environmental or human interests. They allege that the engineer instead deferred to federal agencies overseeing the power plant permitting. Blue Castle, Kane County and the State Engineer have filed answers with the court denying the allegations. (Continued on Page 2A)

RICHARD SHAW - SUN ADVOCATE

Equinox gives green light to autumn This is the view from Price Main Street as the Harvest Moon sets over the Wasatch Plateau Thursday morning. The Earth

passed through the September Equinox over the weekend, bringing summer to its astronomical end in the north.

Affordable Care Act’s future could be as disputed as its past By RICHARD SHAW

Sun Advocate publisher (This is the final installment of three articles that discuss the Affordable Health Care Act).

It’s hard to tell the future of the Affordable Health Care Act (ACA) because of all the political wrangling around it. Even as this piece is written, a bill before the United States Senate, that was passed by the House of Representatives, threatens to “defund” the act. But as of this time the ACA is the law and parts of it will continue to come into effect unless Congress

makes changes to it. For that reason, it is good to know those changes and what has happened. Now those affected by it need to look at the future and what will be coming into force in the next year, a pivotal year for the ACA. First, there will be a number of consumer protections beginning in 2014. As of Jan. 1, insurance companies will be prohibited from refusing to provide coverage or renew existing insurance policies because an individual has pre-existing conditions. In addition, they will not be able to

charge higher rates to individuals or small group markets for those same reasons. The Act also keeps insurance companies from doing the same thing with gender-based policies. Second, insurance companies will not be able to put limits on dollars that are spent on an individual for medical costs in new plans or on group insurance plans. This has been a problem for many who get a catastrophic disease and find that their insurance would pay up to a certain point during the year, but no more. This also takes affect Jan. 1.

In the past people who volunteered and were accepted into clinical trials for drugs and procedures, were sometimes cut out of their regular insurance for participating. That will no longer happen after the first day of 2014. With the advent of all individuals having to have coverage under the law starting in 2014, a series of tax credits will kick in to help those who cannot afford the coverage needed. This part of the law particularly affects the middle class. The part of (Continued on Page 2A)

A routine traffic stop by Price police last Wednesday led to the arrest of two men suspected of drug dealing and assorted other crimes. According to Capt. Bill Barnes, the bust began to unfold at 10:30 p.m., when officers stopped a 1989 Acura sedan at 50 West 200 South in Price for a malfunctioning light. When police checked the driver’s ID with dispatch, they discovered that Wyatt Anderson, 24, of Ferron was wanted on Wyatt Anderson a statewide warrant. It turned out that Anderson was also driving on a suspended license and was required to have an ignition interlock device on any car he was driving. There was no interlock device because the car did not belong to Anderson, nor to his passenger, William Christian Zele, 31, of Price. So the poWilliam Zele lice arrested Anderson and were ready to let Zele go until they spotted a bag in the back seat that neither man would claim. The officers asked if it would be okay then to release everything inside to the owner of the car. Zele showed signs of panic at that point, the captain said. During the questioning that followed, both suspects gave conflicting stories, so the cops impounded the car and searched it. Barnes said they found more than 21 grams of methamphetamine, 2 grams of heroin and assorted paraphernalia. Police also reported that they found two wallets on Zele. One contained no ID but held $2,000 in cash. The other contained Zele’s ID. Both suspects were booked into Carbon County Jail for possession with intent to distribute and possession of drug paraphernalia. Anderson was also booked for driving without an interlock device, driving on suspended license and for the outstanding warrant.

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2A Sun Advocate Price, Utah Tuesday September 24, 2013

Average Utah gasoline price declines a bit Average retail gasoline prices in Utah have fallen 2.0 cents per gallon in the past week, averaging $3.56/g Sunday, according to GasBuddy’s daily survey of 1,171 gas outlets in Utah. This compares with the national average that has fallen 4.5 cents per gallon in the last week to $3.49/g, according to gasoline price

website GasBuddy.com. Including the change in gas prices in Utah during the past week, prices Sunday were 23.6 cents per gallon lower than the same day one year ago and are 12.8 cents per gallon lower than a month ago. The national average has decreased 7.3 cents per gallon during the last month and

stands 32.1 cents per gallon lower than this day one year ago. “Gasoline prices continue to move lower nationally as we’ve now officially moved into fall,” said GasBuddy.com Senior Petroleum Analyst Patrick DeHaan. “Looking forward, we’re likely to see additional relief at pumps in the months ahead, and it’s quite possible that by the time

we’re observing Thanksgiving that gasoline prices will be twenty or more cents per gallon lower. Californian motorists will see among the larger decreases in the week ahead as refinery issues have become barely visible in the rear view, which has led to a dramatic downward shift in wholesale gasoline prices,” DeHaan said.

The water rights case has attracted statewide attention, as shown by the television remote vans in the courthouse parking lot Monday.

Trial on nuke plant water rights begins in Price court

(Continued from page 1A) The petitioners are asking the court to overturn the State Engineer’s decision based on their contention that: The State has not demonstrated the project can avoid interference with existing water rights; That Blue Castle has not shown that its proposed plan is physically and economically feasible; and That Blue Castle hasn’t show an ability to finance the project. During visits to Carbon County two years ago, Blue Castle executives had received questions from citizens about the water demand at the plant and the impact on the Green River. They answered that the plant would have no more demand than a conventional coal-fired power plant of the

same generating capacity. They added that the water in question had already been allocated for power generation use. In practical terms, plant usage would cause the level of the river to drop about an inch, they said. During times of extreme drought the nuclear generators could be shut off, with water needed only for reactor cooling and general plant uses. Blue Castle expects its construction workforce to employ up to 4,000 workers. Once the plant is built, it would hire between 825 and 1,000 people. The majority of those jobs would not require nuclear engineering degrees. The skills would be the same ones required for conventional power generation maintenance.

RICHARD SHAW - SUN ADVOCATE

School District thanks resource officer Price City Police Sgt. Robb Radley is honored for his many years of service as the Carbon School District’s resource officer. The Price sergeant was presented with his award at a Sept. 11 board meeting by Judy Mainord, the district secondary supervisor. As a member of the Price Police, Radley worked with various schools, helping students

Sun Advocate The voice of Carbon County since 1891

STAFF ADMINISTRATION Richard Shaw, Publisher Linda Thayn, Office Manager

BUSINESS OFFICE Sheri Davies, Receptionist Darla Lee, Circulation

ADVERTISING Jenni Fasselin, Director Lynna Tweddell, Representative Christa Kaminski, Representative Diana Root, Representative Sheri Davies, Classifieds Kelly Wilkinson, Legals

EDITORIAL John Serfustini, Associate Editor Kevin Scannell, Sports Reporter CJ McManus, Reporter

MAIL ROOM Dolly Downard, Manager Justin Cline Courtney Preston Laurie Safley Richard Thayn Malyn Brady Jessica Christensen Debbie Lister

COMPOSITION Kelly Wilkinson, Manager Tammy Woosley, Graphics

WEB, IT / IS Jason Bailey, Manager Tammy Woosley, Graphics Chris Williams, IT Assistant

OFFICE HOURS Monday – Friday 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. ADDRESS 845 East Main, Price, Utah 84501 Phone: (435) 637-0732, Fax : (435) 637-2716

and faculty. Upon returning to a more traditional post, Radley was promoted from detective to sergeant and will be taking charge of the city’s detectives and their investigations. Radley will be replaced at the district by Detective Dan Burke who has been with the Price department for three years.

Youth protection seminar A parent seminar on youth protection is scheduled for Sept. 24 from 5:45 to 7 p.m. at Carbon High School. Topics covered will be suicide awareness, bullying, substance abuse, reducing screen time and internet safety. There

will be two 25 minute break out sessions where parents can attend the session of their choice. Parents can request more information by e-mailing Nikki Vasquez at vasquezn@carbonschools.org.

PUBLICATION Postmaster: Send change of address to 845 East Main Street, Price, Utah 84501. Classifieds deadline: Monday at 10 a.m. for Tuesday’s publication and Wednesday at 10 a.m. for Thursday’s publication. Subscription rates: 75 cents per copy, $42 per year in Carbon and Emery counties, $46 in Utah and $61 outside of Utah per year by mail. World Wide Web: http://www.sunad.com/ Advertising: ads@sunad.com, Editor: editor@sunad.com Publisher: gm@sunad.com, Webmaster: webmaster@sunad.com THE SUN ADVOCATE (USPS 174-960) is published twice weekly each Tuesday and Thursday by the Sun Advocate, 845 East Main Street, Price, UT 84501. Periodical postage paid at Price, UT 84501 and at additional mailing office PO Box 589, Castle Dale, UT 84513. POSTMASTER: Send change of address to the Sun Advocate, 845 East Main Street, Price, UT 84501. Entire contents copyright © 2010 Sun Advocate Inc. All rights reserved. No part of the publication may be reproduced in any form without the express consent of the Sun Advocate’s publisher.

Subscription Rates:

Clip and send to: In county: 12 mos. $42, 6 mos. $25 Sun Advocate In state: 12 mos. $46, 6 mos. $28 845 East Main Price, Utah 84501 Out of state: 12 mos. $61, 6 mos. $36

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Oktoberfest in Helper will have food, music, 5K parks fund raiser Helper Park Partners is sponsoring a Night Light 5K fun run on Oct. 5 at 6 p.m. The race will begin at Gigliotti

Advertising Tip #50 Color Using color in your ads can draw subtle emotions and will make your ad stand out.

Pond and end on Main Street near the Balance Rock Eatery and Pub. Proceeds will go for improvements and equipment at city parks. Entry Fees are $20 for adults and $10 for kids 6-12. Runners will receive glow sticks to carry with them. Runners can register at

Happiness Within Coffee Shop or Utah Power Credit Union in Helper. For more information contact Heele Eden, 650-8165. Main Street/Balance Rock will also be the site of an Oktoberfest from 5 p.m. to dusk featuring food, drink and polka music. Vendors are welcome.

NOTICE

Because of federal mandates, Carbon County will be swapping some of our OVER THE AIR TV CHANNELS during the week of September 23-27. It’s possible and likely that some of the television stations you are watching could disappear. If this happens you should be able to rescan your television or set top box and they should show up as usual. Any problems or questions after rescanning can be addressed by calling Carbon County TV department at 636-3275. This will only affect those now watching OVER THE AIR TV.


Sun Advocate Price, Utah Tuesday September 24, 2013 3A

Affordable Care Act’s future could be as disputed as its past (Continued from page 1A) the law covers people who make from 100 percent to 400 percent of the federal standard for poverty (currently $23,550 for a family of four). That would move the line for tax credits up to $88,000 for a family of four. Because of the burden those who wrote the law saw on families who would have to pay this throughout the year, it is set up so that those tax credits are “advanceable” so that it lowers the premiums each month rather than for April 15 of each year to refund the money spent. Some

will also qualify for reduced co-payments and deductibles. The next year will also bring in the insurance marketplace, where individuals without insurance from employers will be able to buy it from providers within that marketplace. This part of the law also will apply to small businesses, which can use the marketplace to insure workers as well. There will be a number of insurance companies involved in the plan. It is projected that some businesses will give employees a certain amount of dollars to spend and then they can go to

Rocky Mountain Power offers cash incentive for refrigerator recycling What’s the best way to get rid of an outdated refrigerator or freezer? Participating in the Refrigerator Roundup is a great place to start. Through Rocky Mountain Power’s See ya later, refrigerator® program, customers can receive free pickup plus a $30 cash incentive when they recycle an old fridge or freezer. These services are always available, and are offered free of charge to communities served by Rocky Mountain Power all across the state. By participating a customer can not only save up to $150 a year in energy costs – but can also help the region meet growing energy demands. Recycling 2,000 fridges, for example, would save enough energy to power 1,190 homes for an entire month. A final tally will be revealed at the end of the roundup, spotlighting the communities that recycled the most.

the marketplace and pick out which plan is best for them. Utah has led the nation in setting up its own system for insurance for small business called Avenue H. It is set up for small businesses to denote certain amounts of money for their employees to spend with the individuals in the plan making the decision about what is best for them. For more information on Avenue H go to http://www.avenueh. com/ The ACA also sets up tax credits for small businesses. In some cases small companies can get up to 50 cents in tax credit for every dollar they put into employee health care. Probably one of the most controversial sections of the law is the mandated insurance all individuals must have. There will be exemptions available for some, but most people will need to pay for some kind of basic coverage if they already do not have it. The philosophy by the proponents and creators of the law is that for such a national health care system to work, healthy individuals need to pay into the system the same as those that aren’t well to balance out the costs for insurance companies. Those who oppose it see a deterioration of the individuals rights to make decisions about his or her life on their own. Effective January 1, 2015 the payment to physicians will also change. The law denotes that instead of paying doctors for the volume of care they provide, it will

be paid based on the value of the care. One of the biggest controversies in the bill also concerns Medicaid and who will pay what. As of Jan. 1, 2014 people who earn less than 133 percent of the poverty line will eligible to join Medicaid. States that accept the new programs growth will be able to get 100 percent of the funding of the program for the first three years and then after that the funding from the national government will drop to 90 percent. In Utah the decision to take this funding has not been

made yet. Governor Gary Herbert had said a decision will be made and announced sometime in December, but retreated a little on that date because of information gathering that may take longer. Many lawmakers at the state level oppose it, so it is expected to be an issue discussed at the 2014 legislature. Governor Herbert formed a medicaid expansion committee earlier this year to study the situation. That panel consists of representatives from many areas of interest including business leaders, legislators, advocates for the

Local actor stars in festival film Kyle Gundlach, a former student at USU-Eastern and Carbon High School, had a starring role in film that is now slated for screening at the Mile High Horror Film Festival in Denver Oct. 3-6 and at the Freak Show Film Festival at Universal Studios in Orlando, Fla., Oct. 25-27). He attend the festival showing of his movie, “Sink.” While at the festival, Kyle will take part in panel discussions on acting for film. A 2012 graduate of the Masters in Fine Arts program in acting at the University of Southern California, Gundlach stated that he is now working on a new film titled “Jettisoned” that should be out next year. Kyle was seen recently in “An Kyle Gundlach Evening With Words and Music” at Ascension -St. Matthew’s Church, which is developing a reputation for fine theater performances. He will also be seen in a local production of “A Christmas Carol” as Bob Cratchit, that will be produced Dec. 20 and 21 in Price at Ascension-St. Matthew’s. This is a new adaptation that will be produced in Readers Theatre format.

poor and some from the field of medicine. The committee is broken into five sub-committees that are investigating various aspects of a possible Medicaid expansion. Those that are concerned see the expanded program as eventually being a kind of Trojan Horse that comes for the first three years with full funding but then huge chunks of state money having to be expended when the federal share drops to 90 percent. Medicaid differs from Medicare in that Medicaid is a shared program with the federal government, whereas Medicare is paid entirely with federal dollars. Presently about 21 percent of the children in the state are covered by Medicaid. Most are low income or disabled. The program can also cover those children’s parents as well as pregnant women, disabled adults and some seniors. Under the ACA low income single adults and some others would become eligible. Utah presently spends about 10 percent of its state budget on Medicaid (in 2012 that was $1.8 billion). The 2012 fiscal year Medicaid figure went up a little over $80 million dollars in the fiscal 2013 budget. That average for all states to spend on Medicaid is about 15 percent of their budgets. Utah remains amongst a group of about 23 states that have either not committed to the new Medicare program or are rotating to a position of not joining in.

MONDAY, OCTOBER 21

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 25

ZOMBIE PROM THEATER PRODUCTION

FOUNDERS CELEBRATION

7:30 PM

6:00 PM

Those wearing a 75th Anniversary T-shirt will get in free All others will be charged $.75

Join us as we honor our past and the traditions that have made the College what it is. A celebration of our past that spotlights a few of our amazing alumni and friends.

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 23

$25 PER PERSON RSVP by October 18 Call 435-613-5256 for tickets or for more information

WEEK OF CELEBRATION 7:30 PM Chancellor Peterson wants to celebrate our birthday and invites the community to come celebrate with us. Free, but tickets will be required. (call or check web for ticket Special Incentives for those wearing a 75th Anniversary Celebration T-shirt throughout the week at Dining Services, BDAC, Bookstore and Prehistoric Museum.

JOIN US

Utah State University Eastern is celebrating 75 years since the opening of its doors to 100 students in October, 1938. We are celebrating this milestone with our alumni, students, employees, friends and the entire community of southeast Utah.

OCTOBER 21-26

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 26 VOLLEYBALL GAME VS COLORADO NORTHWESTERN COMMUNITY COLLEGE

1:00 PM

MEN’S BASKETBALL SCRIMMAGE VS MESA UNIVERSITY

4:00 PM


Opinion

4A Tuesday September 24, 2013

Sun Advocate

Letters to the Editor Catbox liner

Staff Column

Entitlement pure and simple By RICHARD SHAW Sun Advocate publisher

The word entitlement has been getting a really bad rap as of late. I guess it was never a great word, but in recent years it is often voiced by those that have, complaining about those who they see as taking from what they have. It used to be the talk of entitlement was about welfare recipients. Now it has been stretched to be negatively aligned with many other groups including those who collect (or plan to collect) Social Security, government pensions and even retired military personnel. I hate the fact that people who don’t like these kinds of things lump them all together. Many of the people that get these benefits are entitled to them because they paid for them in sweat, work over many years and yes, sometimes blood. But there is another way that the word entitlement can be used, too. That is by those who think they own the road. Last week I was in Salt Lake and having grown up there I still tend to think of it as a fairly quaint little city (compared to many others). But after living here for over 22 years it seems my propensity to put up with traffic has diminished. After all living in a county where there are only a handful of traffic lights (and most of those are in downtown Price) it is easy to forget what a bunch of lights and crossings can do to travel time. Worst though are the drivers that think they are entitled. We often hear people say that Utah has the worst drivers of all. Well based on everything I have read nationally, Utah isn’t even recognized that way in the slightest. Almost unanimously most people agree that the worst drivers live in the Washington D.C. Area. Of course anything like that is hard to prove so the arguments go on and on. Just like in a big domed building in that same town.. But what isn’t discussed as much

is what kind of vehicles the worst drivers drive. Now naturally bad drivers take the wheels of all kinds of cars. But there have been studies that show that luxury car drivers tend to be the poorest, with BMW drivers getting the worst wrap most of the time. A near second to BMW drivers are those that say Prius drivers are bad too. BMW drivers it is said do almost anything they want because they think they are driving the best car in the world and would spend the money on purchasing it even if it wasn’t the best car. It is said they have the entitlement syndrome because they have the best and are the smartest, so they should be able to break the rules. The explanation for the Prius drivers being dissed is that they drive as they watch their energy gage and that they go slower, even in fast lanes, to keep their gasoline engine from kicking in. They want to run clean. I think part of it is that Prius cars are about the ugliest car on the road. People notice them and even taunt them. I have a friend who says he likes pulling up alongside Prii (Priuses?) with his old Ford F-350 that gets about seven miles to the gallon and just watch what he terms “the greenie in the car turn green from my exhaust.” I have my own feeling about bad drivers and what they drive. I used to think the worst drivers on the road drove minivans. I mean it is kind of understandable if you think about it. Minivans are usually filled with screaming kids and the driver has to avoid being hit by spit balls and half eaten Twizzlers as he or she tries to maneuver down the road. I also have seen guys in minivans who look uncomfortable try to race other cars. I think they are feeling kind of down that they have to drive a minivan while the guy next door owns a Corvette. Sure some minivans have big engines with lots of horsepower, but

they also weigh up to three tons even without the eight kids inside. But I have changed my mind since last week. I now believe the worst drivers are girl/women drivers, between 18-23 years old that drive dark colored Honda Civics. These are always cute little females who are doing their hair or makeup (because they certainly can’t arrive mussed at their destination) and constantly talk on their cell phones all the time while they are driving. In a period of six hours on the road last Monday, three of them cut me off. It was like they were triplets, copies of each other all driving the same kinds of cars, doing something besides driving and thinking they were beyond reproach for it. So entitlement goes beyond thinking you are owed money. It can reveal itself in thinking like “I am rich so I can do what I want” or “I am cute and if this one gets wrecked daddy will buy me a new one.” What I always try to do when I am driving down the road is picture myself as if I do not have steel, glass and plastic surrounding me, but that I am in a line walking with other people. That way I relate to the people, and not to their vehicles. What many people do in their cars on the road, they would never do in a crowd unprotected by their $50,000 vehicle. We all make driving mistakes. I don’t know how many times I have pulled out in front of someone because I misjudged their speed or just didn’t see them. I have cut people off accidentally. I have forgotten to signal a left turn or followed someone too close sometimes. Everyone has done these things.And often we get the one fingered wave for it. But when you see someone in a group of cars on the freeway and you can observe them for miles and miles and they do that kind of thing several times, there is more to it than making a mistake. It is entitlement, pure and simple.

Guest Column

Operation secret loopholes By JO COMERFORD Otherwords

The federal budget expresses our nation’s values and priorities in numbers. It’s a blueprint for how our elected officials plan to make money and how they plan to spend it. What happens in Washington, D.C. has a profound local impact. About 80 percent of all federal tax revenue comes from the paychecks of regular Americans, and every single person and every community in the nation is affected by federal spending priorities. That means rewriting the tax code should be done in the open. A rewrite of the complex and arcane U.S. Tax Code — all 18 pounds of it in its paperback

form — has begun in the Senate. More than $1 trillion per year in tax breaks, which are also called loopholes or tax expenditures, are on the table. Senators Max Baucus and Orrin Hatch, the Committee’s Democratic chairman and top-ranking Republican, are leading on this overhaul. The pair has proposed a “blank slate” tax reform initiative. That means starting from square one — a tax code with no loopholes. Baucus and Hatch asked their colleagues to make a case for specific tax breaks and offer some justification for why a particular loophole belongs in the U.S. tax code. When their Senate colleagues bristled at the thought of having to “go public” in support of specific tax give-backs, Baucus and

Hatch promised them 50 years of secrecy. If this cloak holds, taxpayers won’t know which reforms their representatives fought for until 2063. And all this secrecy will shield the big bucks on the table. Bottom line? When the government issues a tax break, it chooses to forgo the associated revenue. Less money coming in means less money to spend on the federal programs we care about, or to close annual deficits. A new report from my organization, the National Priorities Project, found that the top 10 tax breaks in 2013 will total more than $900 billion. While current loopholes benefit the majority of Americans, wealthy taxpayers fare the best by far. Seventeen (Continued on page 5A)

Editor: I would like to address Mr. Warren who writes a letter to the editor every month in this paper. Your opinion on morals, our country, and social injustices are not truth, they are in fact sir, your opinion. Your “facts” are very twisted in every letter you have submitted. Anyone who has taken a lesson on American history knows matter-of-factually the foundation that this country was built on, and it wasn’t God. That is exactly what our Founding Fathers wanted to protect us from- religious persecution in the government, while giving us the freedom to choose which religion we would like to practice. You are just as entitled to your opinion as the rest of us, but trying to pass it off as “fact” and “truth” is absurd. If you would like to use your rights to preach hatred, bigotry, and judgement well, then that only speaks about your beliefs. Personally, I love using Mr.

Warren’s submissions to the editor to line my cat box. Annalee Howland Price

Climate change bunk

Editor: This drought is a bummer. As I remove my irrigation boots I wear to get through the mud and I shake rain water off my hat, I sit down at my desk and I remember the dire forecasts of 20 years of drought. National Geographic published an article about every issue concerning climate change. Last year the prediction was Texas would be uninhabited due to drought. All their reservoirs were dry and would never fill again. Global warming was the cause of hurricane Sandy. We would see more hurricanes and experience bigger storms. What happened? Texas has had major flooding and their reservoirs are overflowing. This is the latest that we have ever experienced without a hurricane. The heartland of America is experiencing too much water. All of this is a result of global (Continued on page 5A)

Letters to the editor should focus on public issues rather than private personalities or entities. All submissions must be verified prior to publication. The paper reserves the right to edit letters not only to satisfy space constraints, but potential liability concerns. All letters must have a phone number attached for verification and must be signed by the author of the letter. No anonymous letters or letters that authors want published anonymously will be printed. All letters are subject to editing for length and should not be more than 350 words long. All letters are published in the printed edition and the online edition, being part of the public domain.

The Wasatch Behind

The end of civility By TOM MCCOURT Guest Contributor

I was in one of our area’s big box stores a few weeks ago with my wife and a couple of young granddaughters. We were having a good time. But then, a couple of isles ahead of us, I spotted a very large, four-lettered “F” word on the back of a T-shirt. My dear wife was shopping and didn’t see what I saw, and thank goodness my baby granddaughters can’t read. I left the girls with grandma and went to investigate. The porno-guy looked like a typical government entitlement case with long blond hair, baggy pants and the usual accoutrements of immature youth, even though he appeared to be in his early 30s. I approached the offending man-child and asked, “Are you starved for attention or just waiting for someone to call the cops?” “What?” he said with a look of surprise. I told him his T-shirt was offensive and he really ought to have more self-respect than to wear something like that in public. He told me the bad word was from the lyrics of a song. I told him I didn’t care if the word came from the charter of the United Nations. It was offensive. The guy then surprised me by apologizing. It’s a good thing he apologized. Had he decided to fight he’d probably have cleaned my clock. I am, after all, an old man with a bad back. Besides, I never was much of a scrapper. I didn’t feel qualified to accept his apology on behalf of everyone in the store. So I simply told him to think about it and reconsider before doing something like that again. As we parted ways, I watched him walk away with his girlfriend, or wife, who looked angry as she took his arm in a public display of incredibly bad taste in men.

My blood pressure was still up, so I talked with two of the store managers. I asked them if they had a policy about letting people in their store wearing obscene material like that. Both managers told me they couldn’t do anything about it. They said they have no control over what people wear in their store. I told them they were full of crap. There is a long established precedent in this country that allows businesses to refuse service to anyone who poses a threat or demonstrates unacceptable standards of dress or behavior. What has happened to us? Is this something we are willing to accept as normal? There were hundreds of people in that store that day, but I didn’t see anyone else act as if they even noticed that guy and his in-your-face insult to all of us. Everyone went about their business like a herd of submissive, neutered sheep. I don’t think we’re still the same nation that fought the British Empire over a matter of principle. In telling this story, I’ve had people who are smarter than me tell me I was out-of-line. They tell me I was provoking a confrontation and if things had gone south it would have been my fault. I’m the one who would have been arrested. The courts would surely decide in favor of the man who was simply expressing his constitutional right to free speech, no matter how offensive. But then, we can’t have prayer anymore at high school commencement ceremonies or football games because one person might be offended. We can’t have the Ten Commandments on the courthouse steps because one person might be offended. We can’t have a nativity scene in the city park at Christmas time because one person might be offended. I’m one person. I’m offended by obscenities in public places. What happened to my rights?

Write a letter to the editor!

Sun Advocate, 845 East Main, Price, UT 84501


Sun Advocate Price, Utah Tuesday September 24, 2013 5A

Guest Column

Letters to the Editor

Keystone operating for years By MERRILL MATTHEWS Contributing writer

Here’s a little-known fact: The Keystone pipeline system has been transporting oil sands from Canada to U.S. refineries in the Midwest for three years -- with no major leaks and, more importantly, no major complaints from environmentalists. The Keystone pipeline project includes four phases. The Keystone XL that has received so much media attention is only the last phase. Phase 1 has been operating since 2010, carrying oil from Alberta across three Canadian provinces and six states to refineries in Illinois. Phase 2 put a link connecting the Phase 1 pipeline from Steele City, Nebraska, to Cushing, Oklahoma, a major U.S. oil refining and storage hub. It went operational two years ago, again with no major problems or complaints. Phase 3 is currently under construction, extending the pipeline from Cushing to the Gulf refineries in Texas. President Obama even gave a speech in Cushing in March 2012--during his reelection bid--praising the pipeline extension as good for the economy. The Keystone XL, the proposed Phase 4, would build a separate pipeline from Alberta, crossing only three states (Montana, South Dakota and Nebraska), and connecting to the existing pipeline in

Steel City While the Keystone XL would have the capacity to deliver more oil--830,000 barrels a day vs. 590,000 for Phase 1--its U.S. footprint is more than 200 miles shorter than Phase 1. Environmentalists complained that Phase 4 would transport oil across environmentally sensitive areas of Nebraska. Governor Dave Heineman expressed similar concerns. So the pipeline builder, TransCanada Corp., has proposed to reroute the pipeline, which satisfied the governor and the Nebraska legislature. Even the U.S. State Department has said the risks are minimal One reason TransCanada located the Phase 4 route where it did was to transport up to 100,000 barrels a day of U.S. crude oil from the Bakken reserves in North Dakota and Montana. That means the Keystone XL would be shipping high-quality U.S. oil to U.S. refineries. Mr. Obama has recently turned defensive, claiming that the pipeline won’t create many permanent jobs. But pipeline jobs are infrastructure jobs, and the president is promoting more infrastructure spending to create jobs. Phases 1 and 2 directly employed nearly 9,000 workers on U.S. facilities and pipelines. Phase 3 currently employees about 4,000 workers. Those aren’t debatable projections; those are real Americans working at high-wage

jobs. And the pipeline jobs won’t cost the government a dime. In fact, the government will gain revenue from them. The Keystone XL is also a trade-deficit reducer. News reports say that the U.S. trade deficit declined by 22 percent in the last quarter, primarily due to importing less oil. Rejecting the XL means that much of that Canadian oil will be shipped to China for refining instead. And seeing that oil go elsewhere when foreign hot spots like Syria can drive up oil prices or threaten supplies is not a good idea. Unfortunately, environmentalists don’t seem to care about the Keystone XL’s economic merits. They have decided to draw a line in the oil sand at Phase 4. But surely they know that the U.S. leads the world in refining. If Canadian oil is going to be refined, and it is, better to do it under U.S. standards and quality controls. And U.S. workers get the benefits. The fact is that the Keystone XL pipeline is simply an extension of an already existing program that is working well, creating jobs and expanding U.S. manufacturing. It should be an easy, and quick, decision for any president concerned about the economy. Merrill Matthews is a resident scholar at the Institute for Policy Innovation in Dallas, Texas.

ZAP Tax What & Why……

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BS……Why doesn’t anyone address the amount of CO2, carbon particles, PM-10 contamination of our atmosphere that results from 30+ wildfires, which by the way are the result of global warming according to government sources and not the lack of management of our national forests. We have seen a crusade to implement “renewable energy, huge government supplements for wind generation. The next time you drive over Soldier Summit notice the name on our wind turbines at the mouth of the canyon. This is not an American company. This surge in stimulus money was to improve America’s economy, not India. Our wind turbines largely come from overseas, most of our timber comes from Canada, our oil and gas exploration is predominately on private,

state or Tribal lands. What is wrong with this picture? Climate change is a fact. We have had several ice ages in the last few million years. The impact that the burning of fossil fuels has on the rate of climate change is not a fact. It is a speculation that is reinforced by government grants and the current ideology. Will the complete ban of the use of carbon based fuels change the outcome of climate change? I doubt it. Is it worth bankrupting the US economy? I say “No”. We need to ask ourselves whether the current course of action this country is pursuing is worthwhile. And are we so vain we feel we can change the course of nature? Mel Coonrod Helper

Operation secret loopholes (Continued from page 4A) percent of individual tax savings are on their way to the top one percent of U.S. households. Corporate tax breaks are expected to reach $100 billion this year, or more than all federal spending on education. The largest of these loopholes allows multinational corporations to avoid paying taxes on their off-shore profits. That

loophole will cost the U.S. Treasury $42 billion this year, an amount that’s twoand-a-half times more than the cost of Temporary Assistance for Needy Families, the federal welfare program. Taxes and spending are sure to dominate the debate this fall. We’re sure to hear soon about which breaks made it into the proposed new plan. We can bet large

corporations haven’t been shy about making their demands known. Neither should you. Speak up. This is the perfect opportunity to make your voice heard.

Jo Comerford is the executive director of the National Priorities Project which just released the new report, Exposing the Big Money in Tax Breaks.

Money for NRCS Conservation Farm Programs Available 

Friendly & Progressive

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(Continued from page 4A) warming? I wish these people would make up their minds. I have always been told you can’t have it both ways. Apparently, this does not apply to the climate, boys. I believe that in order for our government to feel relevant and demand respect of the American people, they have to have a “cause”. When the Cold War ended they needed another crisis. Apparently 9-11, Iraq and Afghanistan were not enough. We needed global warming which was caused by the burning of fossil fuels. Our government is willing to bankrupt the country, destroy the coal industry, greatly curtail development of government land for oil and gas production, and claim it is to save the planet!

A small 1/10th of 1 percent addition to sales tax that is collected to be invested directly in cultural, parks and recreation facilities and programs in the community. Has been in place for 8 years and needs to be renewed by voters during the general election in November. Without voter approval of the ZAP Tax renewal Price City may need to raise other taxes including property taxes or eliminate some facilities and programs due to rising costs to provide the venues and programs.

. . . Apply by Oct. 18 The Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) provides conservation planning and technical assistance to farmers and ranchers and groups to conserve natural resources. Applications are due at NRCS offices by close of business, October 18, 2013. Example projects you could apply for: xImprovedirrigaƟonsystem xWildlifeprojects xGrazingimprovement xEnergyimprovements xWaterdevelopment xPestmanagementplans xNutrientmanagement xErosioncontrolonfarmland xPollinatorhabitat xSeasonalhightunnels If you have an interest contact your nearest USDA/NRCS Service Center office: Vernal 80N500W 435Ͳ789Ͳ2100  CastleDale 1120NDesͲBeeͲDove 435Ͳ381Ͳ2300

Roosevelt 240WestHwy. 435Ͳ722Ͳ4621  MonƟcello 32S100E 435Ͳ587Ͳ2481

Renew PriceCity ZAPTax

Price 540WPriceRiverDr. 435Ͳ637Ͳ0041  Aneth EHwy262 435Ͳ651Ͳ3330 USDAisanequalopportunity providerandemployer.

ForMoreInformaƟonCall435Ͳ637Ͳ5010 TaketheOnͲLineZAPTaxSurveyatwww.pricecityutah.com

Have a news tip, an idea for a feature story or a suggestion for a photograph?

TalktoYourPriceCityMayor&CouncilorPriceCityStaīToday.

ProRehab Physical Therapy

• Provider for all major insurances • Open 7-5 including lunch • We provide one-on-one care Come as patients, leave as friends

Bookcliff Medical Plaza 590 E. 100 N., Ste. 1, Price East Carbon Clinic • 200 Park Place Castle Dale • 150 E. Main Hours: Monday-Friday

For Appointment Call 613-1500 Locally Owned & Operated

Contact the Sun Advocate office in Price at 637-0732!

Ask the Vet

by Glen G L. Jensen, D.V.M.

Signs and Symptoms of Dental Disease Believe it or not, dental disease is the most common disease affecting dogs and cats. I know that it is everyone’s least favorite thing in the world to open your pet’s mouth and look at their teeth. It is probably theirs too! However I guarantee that if you look closely at your pets mouth you will find some sign of dental disease. What are the signs of dental disease and how do you look for them? The most common sign of dental disease is halitosis, or bad breath. Most of our pets love to lick our faces, we always say “Oh thanks for the kisses”. However this is a natural behavior in puppies. They know that if they lick their mom’s mouth then the mother will regurgitate food for them. Granted, we are not going to do that, but we accept it as a form of love. Who doesn’t love puppy breath? So as your pet gets older it will change from puppy breath to normal breath to I’m going to die if you lick my face breath! The most common cause of bad breath is periodontal disease, which is an infection of the gums. This happens when plaque builds up around the gum line, over a short period of time this plaque hardens into tartar. When this happens it causes the gums to become infected, causing the structures holding the teeth in to breakdown. The next obvious sign is tartar on the teeth. When you look at the teeth they should be a nice bright white. The incisors usually will stay like this so do not just look at the front of your pet’s teeth and say they look great. The teeth that are affected the most by tartar are the canines, pre-molars and molars. When you pull back their lips there will be a light to dark yellow composite covering the outside of their teeth. This is not normal; it is not on humans either. The only way to get this off and to stop damage to your pet’s teeth is by a dental cleaning. Brushing or scraping will not take all of it off. The next sign that is more difficult to notice is gingivitis. This is defined as inflammation of the gums. This will appear as a red line right above where the teeth meet the gums. It can also appear to streak upwards farther in to the gums. When you look at healthy pet teeth, the gums should appear wave like. Each tooth has its own gum height. When you see a straight line across the teeth this means severe inflammation. This inflammation is due to the infection in the gums. This is what will cause the structures holding the teeth in to break down and cause the tooth to be loose. However if there is a lot of tartar the tooth may not be loose because the tartar is holding it in place.

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Some of the less noticeable signs may be the way your pet acts. It may all of a sudden decide that it does not like hard food any more. It has to eat soft food. If there was infection and abscesses in your mouth you wouldn’t want to chew on a bone, right? They will choose softer toys and not play as much. It will hurt immensely for them to play tug of war with you. They can also rub their face on the carpet and salivate more. They may just swallow their food causing them to regurgitate it, making it come up whole. It is important that large dogs have a dental cleaning once a year and smaller dogs at least twice yearly. Dental disease can cause heart, liver and kidney disease. The bacteria in the mouth go through the blood stream and break down the organs rather quickly. Make sure you bring you pet in for a free dental exam bi-annually. You will see the benefit in the later years of your pet’s life when they are happy, healthier and live longer.


6A Sun Advocate Price, Utah Tuesday September 24, 2013

Castle Valley Obituaries Kenny Wells

PRICE - Kenneth Ross Wells, age 60, passed away Sept. 21, 2013 in Price. He was born May 18, 1953 in Price to Ross Oviatt and Ora Maxine Lambson Wells. Married Joy Stanton and they were blessed with three children prior to their divorce. Kenny was a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. He was a lifelong resident of Carbon County and graduate of Carbon High School Class of 1971. He honorably served his country in the U.S. Army. Ken had a passion for coal mining and was proud to work alongside some of the best miners at Plateau prior to his retirement in 2000. He loved to spend time in the mountains and took great joy in teaching his kids to fish and hunt. Kenny had a big heart and greeted everyone with a smile. He will be dearly missed by his family and many longtime friends. Survived by two daughters and one son, Stacey (Jesse) Justice, Washington, DC, Steven (Stephanie) Wells, Eagle Mountain, Summer (Dusty) Henningson, Salem; mother, Maxine Wells, Escondido, California; sister, Kriss (LaMont) Larsen, Wellington; brother, Keith

Brittany Nicole Lofthouse

Wells, Escondido, California; sister-in-law, Lynette Wells, Wellington; grandchildren, Darian, Mikell, Cooper and Chloe. Preceded in death by father, Ross Wells; brothers, Kevin and Kerry Wells; nephew, Justin Wells; grandparents, Tom (Elga) Wells and LaVell (Emma) Lambson; and his dog JJ. Funeral service, Thursday, Sept. 26, 2013, 11 a.m., Mitchell Funeral Home (233 East Main Street) in Price. Family will be at Mitchell’s Wednesday evening from 6 - 8 p.m. and Thursday one hour prior to services. Interment, Cliffview Cemetery, Price. Arrangements entrusted to Mitchell Funeral Home where friends are always welcome daily and may share memories of Kenny at www. mitchellfuneralhome.net.

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CASTLE DALE - Brittany Nicole Lofthouse, age 21, passed away Sept. 19, 2013 in Lindon. Our family regrets to announce, but humbly accepts, that she has returned to her heavenly home. Brittany Nicole was born Aug. 9, 1992 in Provo to Cynthia Ann and Jared Henry Lofthouse. Brittany grew up in Castle Dale where she graduated from the Emery High School class of 2010. She loved the arts. Brittany was part of the Community Theater and acted in many productions produced through the Emery High drama department. Brittany also loved to sing and dance. She proved her talents when she became Miss Castle Dale. Brittany loved animals and always gave strays a home. She had a vibrant spirit and always told you exactly how it was. She lived her life to the fullest and could light up any room with her smile. She is survived by her mother and father, Cyndie and Jared; grandparents: Ann Gladden Johnson and Terry and Eileen Lofthouse; also by Brian and Tammy Smith and family. She will be missed by her family including aunts, uncles, cousins, friends, and her best friend, Bella. She was preceded in death by grandparents:

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Ralph and Kay Gladden, Ruby Seegmiller, Elva and John Lofthouse; niece, Aurora Swineford; and nephew, Chance. Funeral services will be held Wednesday, Sept. 25, 2013 at 11 a.m. in the Castle Dale LDS 3rd Ward building (165 W. 800 N.). There will be a viewing held Tuesday, Sept. 24, from 6 – 8 p.m. at Fausett Mortuary (720 North Center St., Castle Dale) and on Wednesday at the church from 9:30 – 10:30 a.m. prior to the services. Interment will be in the Castle Dale City Cemetery. Services are in the care of Fausett Mortuary. Friends and family may sign the guest book and share memories of Brittany at www.fausettmortuary.com. In lieu of flowers the family has asked for donations to be made at any Zion’s bank to the Brittany Lofthouse Memorial Fund to assist with funeral costs.

PRICE- John Edward “Big John” Hartzell, age 94, passed away peacefully at his home with family on August 24, 2013. He was born Sept. 1, 1918 in NuMine, Penn., to Alberta Alta Smail and Elmer Hartzell. Memorial graveside service Friday, September 27, 2013, 11:00 a.m., Price City Cemetery, Price. Arrangements entrusted to Mitchell Funeral Home where friends are always welcome daily and may

share memories of John at www.mitchellfuneralhome. net.

Doris Carol Olsen Luke

ORANGEVILLE - Doris Carol Olsen Luke, age 78, passed away Sept. 22, 2013 in Price. Funeral services will be held Friday, Sept. 27, 2013, at 11 a.m. in the Orangeville LDS Chapel located at 45 W. 100 S., in Orangeville. A viewing will be held Thursday, Sept. 26, from 6 - 8 p.m. at Fausett Mortuary in Castle Dale (720 North Center Street) and from 9:30 a.m.-10:30 a.m. on Friday at the Orangeville church prior to the services. Interment will be in the Orangeville City Cemetery. Services are in the care of Fausett Mortuary. Family and friends may sign the guest book and share memories of Doris at www.fausettmortaury.com.

Gary “GR” Richardson

PRICE/VERNAL- Gary “GR” Richardson, age 77, passed away Sept. 21, 2013 in Price. Graveside service, Friday, Sept. 27, 2013, 3 p.m. Vernal Memorial Park Cemetery, Vernal, Utah. Arrangements entrusted to Mitchell Funeral Home of Price where friends are always welcome daily and may share memories of Gary online at www.mitchellfuneralhome.net.

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Marriage Licenses September 10 Kaeden Cory Kulow, Price & Kenzie Diane Mantz, Price Emmet Wayne Walker Jr, East Carbon & Pauline Lee Henningson Reid, East Carbon September 12 Mark Dean Luce, Ferron & Brooke Marie Fisher, Price

Cory Jarvis Taylor, Orem & Acacia Leona Davis, Price

Jail Bookings September 9 Jared Worely, 29, Helper, Obstruction of Justice, 72 Hour Hold Julie Whitaker, 50, Price, Domestic Violence/Criminal Mischief

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September 10 Arron Powell, 34, Price, Interference with Arrest Sandra Nicholson, 36, Wellington, Bench Warrant Amanda Youngstrom, 27, Price, One Day Commitment Karen Breyer, 45, Helper, Warrant Caroline Richman, 30, Wellington, Warrant Jesse B Rich, 46, Price,

Warrant September 11 Geric Yazzie, 23, Warrant John Taylor, 49, Price, Two Civil Bench Warrants Pamela Moody, 58, Price, Civil Bench Warrant Joanna Bingham, 38, Price, Warrant Robert Schade, 20, Price, Probation Hold Chelsea Mills, 24, Wellington, Drug Court Hold Kristia Robb, 29 Wellington, Warrants Ray Rivas, 29, Wellington, Drug Court Hold

(Continued on page 7A)

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Sun Advocate Price, Utah Tuesday September 24, 2013 7A

Castle Valley Missionaries

Dog Bookings September 16 Pomeranian, 6, Tan and White, Found at Smiths Food & Drug September 18 Blue Nose Pit Bull, 3 Months, Found at 1490 East 500 South in Price

Chihuahua, 10 years, Black, Found at Washington Park September 19 Terrier, 1.5 years, Found at Mont Harmon

Castle Valley Watch Jail Bookings September 11 Crystal Ceal, 22, Price, Civil Bench Warrant James Meranda, 28, Price, Warrant Katie Yakovich, 25, Helper, Warrant Trevor Bullins, 22, Price, Possession of Methamphetamine with Intent to Distribute/ Possession of Heroin with Intent to Distribute/ Possession of Paraphernalia/72 Hour Hold Ronald Rhodes, 30, Price, Warrants Morgan Glenn Walkup, 41, Sunnyside, Possession of a Dangerous Weapon by a Restricted Person/Possession of Paraphernalia September 12 Camille Taylor, 32, Ferron, Warrant Trevor Whiteside, 46, Homeless, Warrant/ Avoiding Apprehension/ Resisting Arrest Nathan Navarro, 27, Price, Driving on a Suspended License

September 13 Amanda Youngstrom, 27, Price, One Day Commitment Michael Hekmat, 23, Price, Warrant Juanita Withers, 47, Price, Warrant Jeff Manzanares, 27, Wellington, Warrant Jonathan Arriola, 26, Price, Warrant Robert Pike, 31, Price, Two Day Commitment Caroline Richman, 30, Price, Warrant Cameron Noyes, 22, Price, Two Day Commitment September 14 Jeremy Draper, 29, Rock Springs, Warrant/Possession of Paraphernalia/Possession of a Dangerous Weapon by a Restricted Person Chris Polito, 33, East Carbon, Four Warrants Shawn Skinner, 44, Price, DUI Ian Reynolds, 21, Price, Warrant/Possession of Methamphetamine in a Drug Free Zone/ Resisting Arrest/Assault on a Peace Officer Jimmy Brinkley, 29, East Carbon, Warrant

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Charly Holyoak Jordan Hussey Mark and Patrice Holyoak are pleased to announce the marriage of their daughter Charly Kae Holyoak to Jordan Cooper Hussey, the son of Dixon and Robin Hussey on Saturday, Sept. 28, 2013 in the Manti Utah Temple. A reception will be held in their honor that evening from 7-9 p.m. at the Holyoak residence, 1455 W. 620 N., in Price. In case of oversight, all friends and family are invited. Charly graduated from Carbon High in 2011. She has since been attending Southern Utah University, and is currently enrolled at USU-Eastern. She is working at Fresh Market. Jordan graduated from Carbon High in 2010, served an LDS Mission in Nashville Tennessee, and is currently enrolled at USU-Eastern. He is working at Hussey Plumbing. The couple will reside in Price.

Durwood and Ann Carter Durwood (Woody) and Ann Carter have been called to serve in the Milwaukee Wisconsin Mission. They will be speaking in sacrament meeting on Sept. 29 at 11:50 a.m. at the Scofield Branch.

Castle Valley Birthday Lena Jensen

Lena Jensen will be turning 90 on Sept. 27. An open house will be held on Saturday, Sept. 28 at the Gordon Creek Church, 175 N. 1280 W., in Price. Light refreshments will be served from 2 to 4 p.m.

Angela Sampinos Dustin Gurney Angela Sampinos and Dustin Gurney were married Aug. 6, 2013 in Santorini, Greece. Angela is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Nick Sampinos, of Price. Dustin is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Alan Gurney, of Lost Creek, Utah. The couple will reside in Venice, Utah, where they will continue Dustin’s cattle ranching operation. Angela has opened a law office in Salina and will also maintain her practice in Price.

Friends of Rachel is coming to Carbon High School The presentation begins at 7 p.m. on September 24 in the Carbon High Auditorium

From the rachelschallenge.org website: “The Friends of Rachel Clubs are just one of the many benefits of having Rachel’s Challenge in your school. This unique program provides the opportunity for your school to partner with Rachel’s Challenge to continue the chain reaction of kindness and compassion in your school and community. The main goal of these clubs is to help create a permanent cultural change in your school.”

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8A Sun Advocate Price, Utah Tuesday September 24, 2013

PUBLIC NOTICES “Because the People Must Know”

Submission Guidelines: Public notices must be received no later than Friday at 5pm for the following Tuesday publication, or Tuesday at 5pm for the following Thursday publication. Submissions must be e-mailed to legals@sunad.com. In the event e-mail isn’t available, submissions may be faxed to (435) 637-2716 and should be addressed to the legal advertising department.

UPAXLP UPAXLP

PUBLIC NOTICE OF AVAILABILITY

NOTICE

The Utah State Office of the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) has received an Application from UtahAmerican Energy Inc., 794 N. “C” Canyon Road, Box 910 East Carbon, Utah 84520, for a modification to the Aberdeen Logical Mining Unit (LMU) in accordance with 43 CFR 3487.

Notice is hereby given that Price River Terminal, LLC (“PRT”), whose address is 3215 West 4th Street, Fort Worth TX, 76107, has submitted an application to the Division of Oil, Gas & Mining for transfer of all operating and permitting rights in the Wellington Preparation Plant, Permit No. ACT 007/012 under the provisions of R645-303-300, from Nevada Electric Investment Company (“NEICO”). The permit area is located in Carbon County, Utah, and is described as follows:

The modification is related to an application for the partial relinquishment of Federal coal leases SL-027304, SL-063058, UTU-010581, UTU69600, and the relinquishment of Federal coal lease UTU-79975, which was approved on August 20, 2013. Based on these partial relinquishments UtahAmerican Energy Inc. wants to modify the Aberdeen Logical Mining Unit (LMU), UTU- 73865. The proposed LMU modification is available for review at the BLM, Utah State Office, 440 West 200 South, Suite 500, Salt Lake City, Utah. The LMU modification would withdraw portions of the lands contained in Federal coal leases SL-027304, SL-063058, UTU-010581, and UTU69600, and all of lease UTU-79975 from the LMU. The description of the lands contained within the modified area to be released from the Aberdeen LMU is as follows: Lease Number SL-027304

Acreage 80.00

Land Description T. 13 S., R. 11 E., SLM, Utah Sec. 7, S½SE¼;

SL-063058

240.00

T. 13 S., R. 11 E., SLM, Utah Sec. 8, S½SW¼; Sec. 17, N½NW¼, SE¼NW¼; Sec. 18, NE¼NE¼;

UTU-010581

677.16

T. 13 S., R. 11 E., SLM, Utah Sec. 5, lots 4 and 5; Sec. 6, lots 1,2,7, and 8; Sec. 7, W½NE¼, NE¼NW¼; Sec. 8, NE¼SW¼, SE¼; Sec. 17, NW¼NE¼, E½NE¼;

UTU-66069

566.35

UTU-79975

422.73

T. 12 S., R. 11 E., SLM, Utah Sec. 31, lots 3-5, 12-18,and 21; Sec. 32, W½SW¼, SW¼NW¼; T. 13 S., R. 10 E., SLM, Utah Sec. 1, lots 1-3; T. 12 S., R. 11 E., SLM, Utah Sec. 29, SW¼SW¼; Sec. 30, lots 4, 14-16; Sec. 31, lots 1,2, 7-11; Sec. 32, NW¼NW¼. Total Acres: 1,986.24

Kent Hoffman Deputy State Director, Lands and Minerals Published in the Sun Advocate September 17 and 24, 2013.

IN THE SEVENTH DISTRICT JUVENILE COURT IN AND FOR CARBON COUNTY, STATE OF UTAH SUMMONS FOR PUBLICATION STATE OF UTAH, in the interest of vs. Steven Minor DOB: 08JAN83 AND in the interest of M.M. M.M.

DOB: 07JUL09 DOB: 05JUN12

Children under 18 years of age. TO:

Case No. 1040676 Case No. 1087630 Judge: Scott N. Johansen

STEVEN MINOR Biological Father of M.M. and M.M. Carbon County, State of Utah

A proceeding concerning M.M. and M.M., your minor children, is pending in this Court, and adjudication may be made involving YOUR PARENTAL RIGHTS TO M.M. AND M.M.. You are hereby summoned to appear before this Court in Carbon County, Utah, located at 149 EAST 100 SOUTH, PRICE, UTAH 84501, October 1, 2013 at 9:00 a.m. for a Termination of Parental Rights Trial involving the permanent termination of your parental rights to M.M. and M.M. You have the right to be represented by counsel in these proceedings. If you fail to appear in person at the Hearing, your parental rights to the children may be permanently terminated by the Court without further notice to you. DATED this 3 day of September, 2013 /s/ Court Clerk COURT CLERK /SEAL/ Published in the Sun Advocate September 5, 10, 17 and 24, 2013.

ANNOUNCEMENT AVAILABILITY OF FEDERAL TRANSIT ADMINISTRATION FUNDS

The Utah Department of Transportation is pleased to announce the availability of Federal Transit Administration (FTA) funds for Federal Fiscal Year 2013. The Letter of Interest (LOI) and application process will begin on October 1st, 2013.

To submit a LOI, visit our website at www.udot.utah.gov/go/loi. The last day to submit an LOI form is November 1, 2013. If you do not have access to the internet and would like to fill out a hard copy of the LOI, please contact Leone Gibson at 801-718-0798 or at leonegibson@utah.gov .

Township 15 South, Range 11 East, SLBM Section 8: SE ¼, NE ¼, E ½, SE ¼, W ½, SE ¼ except portion north of railroad tracks Section 9: S ½, portion of S ½, N ½ Section 10: W ½, SW ¼ Section 15: W ½, NW ¼ Section 16: All Section 17: E ½, SE ¼, NE ¼ Pertinent comments are solicited from anyone affected by this proposal. Such comments should be filed within the next thirty (30) days with: State of Utah, Department of Natural Resources Division of Oil, Gas & Mining 1594 West North Temple Suite 1210 Salt Lake City, UT 84116 Published in the Sun Advocate August 29, September 3, 5, 10, 12, 17, 19, and 24, 2013.

BLM SEEKS PUBLIC COMMENT ON VEGETATION REMOVAL PROJECT IN FORD RIDGE AREA Price, Utah—The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Moab and Price Field Offices invite the public to review and comment on an Environmental Assessment (EA) analyzing the potential impacts of a vegetation removal and restoration project. The EA analyzes a 6,840-acre project to thin conifer stands in heavily wooded areas in the Ford Creek/Diamanti Canyon area eight miles northwest of Helper, Utah. Treatments will include mechanical shredding, hand thinning and piling, prescribed burning, and fence and kiosk construction. The proposed project is needed to prevent the potential for catastrophic wildland fires that could threaten life, property, firefighter safety, and ecosystem health. It will also benefit wildlife by restoring aspen, grasses and shrubs. The EA is available for public review and comment on the Environmental Notification Bulletin Board (ENBB) at: https://www.blm.gov/ut/enbb/; search for project name “Ford Ridge.” Written comments will be accepted by letter or email until Sept. 30, 2013. Please note that the most useful comments are those that contain new technical or scientific information relevant to the proposed action. Comments should be as specific as possible. Comments which contain only opinions or preferences will not receive a formal response, but may be considered in the BLM decision-making process. Please reference “Ford Ridge Fuels Project” when submitting comments. Written comments may be mailed or emailed using the following: Mail Bureau of Land Management Canyon Country District Office Attn: Fuels 82 E. Dogwood Moab, UT 84532 Email blm_ut_mb_comments@blm.gov Before including an address, phone number, email address, or other personal identifying information in any comments, be aware that the entire comment—including personal identifying information—may be made publicly available at any time. Requests to withhold personal identifying information from public review can be submitted, but the BLM cannot guarantee that it will be able to do so. The BLM will not consider anonymous comments. All submissions from organizations and businesses, and from individuals identifying themselves as representatives or officials of organizations or businesses, will be available for public inspection in their entirety. For further information, contact Brian Keating at (435)259-2194. Persons who use a telecommunications device for the deaf (TDD) may call the Federal Information Relay Service (FIRS) at 1-800-877-8339 to leave a message or question for the above individual. The FIRS is available 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Replies are provided during normal business hours. The BLM manages more than 245 million acres of public land, the most of any Federal agency. This land, known as the National System of Public Lands, is primarily located in 12 Western states, including Alaska. The BLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. The BLM's multiple-use mission is to sustain the health, diversity, and productivity of the public lands for the use and enjoyment of present and future generations. In Fiscal Year 2012, activities on public lands generated $4.6 billion in revenue, much of which was shared with the States where the activities occurred. In addition, public lands contributed more than $112 billion to the U.S. economy and helped support more than 500,000 jobs. Published in the Sun Advocate September 10, 17 and 24, 2013.

NOTICE OF FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT The USDA, Rural Business Service has received an application for financial assistance from the City of Price. The proposal consists of a 75room hotel in the City of Price. West River Hospitality, LLC, will construct the hotel located in the City of Price, Utah. The hotel will be flagged under the Holiday Inn Express brand.

Section 5310 - Enhance Mobility for Seniors and Individuals with Disabilities Section 5311 – Formula Grants for Rural Areas Section 5339 – Bus and Bus Facilities

As required by the National Environmental Policy Act and agency regulations, the Rural Business Service prepared an Environmental Assessment that assessed the potential environmental effects of the proposal and the effect the proposal may have on historic properties. The basis of this determination is Findings of No Significant Environmental Impact.

For more information on the LOI and application process, go to www. udot.utah.gov/publictransit. For additional information on the above programs please go to http://www.fta.dot.gov/map21.html . Published in the Sun Advocate September 24, 2013.

Copies of the Environmental Assessment can be reviewed or obtained at Rural Development, 125 South State Street, Salt Lake City, Utah. For further information please contact Perry Mathews at 801-524-4328. Published in the Sun Advocate September 17, 19, 24 and 26, 2013.

Funding is available for the following programs:

NOTICE OF ELECTION FOR CONSOLIDATION OF MUNICIPALITIES

At the general election on November 5, 2013, the Carbon County legislative body will submit to the registered voters residing within East Carbon City and Sunnyside City the question of:

Shall the municipality of East Carbon City, Utah be consolidated with the municipality of Sunnyside City, Utah? ____YES ____NO

On July 16, 2013 East Carbon City and Sunnyside City each passed resolutions initiating the process for consolidation of the two municipalities and approving a Plan of Consolidation which sets forth the nature of the obligations, assets, and liabilities of each municipality including a list of every public utility or property on which any debt is owed or due which is payable from the revenues of the utility or property, or from taxes which have been levied. The Plan of Consolidation further specifies the rights, duties, and obligations of the consolidated municipality.

The area to be included in the consolidation shall include the legally incorporated city limits of East Carbon City and Sunnyside City as shown on the plat maps of the Carbon County Recorder and shall also include all property owned by each city not within the legally incorporated city limits of each city.

According to the Official 2010 Census of the United States Bureau of the Census the population of Sunnyside City is 377 and the population of East Carbon City is 1301, therefore, the estimated total population of the proposed consolidated municipality is 1,678.

The Resolutions and the Plan of Consolidation are available for public review from 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM Monday-Friday at the following locations: East Carbon City Hall 101 W. Geneva Drive East Carbon City, Utah 84520 Sunnyside City Hall 595 Edgehill Drive Sunnyside City, Utah 84539

PUBLIC HEARING

A joint public hearing with East Carbon City and Sunnyside City will be held at Bruin Point Elementary, at 100 Viking Blvd, Sunnyside, Utah 84539 on the 8th Day of October, 2013 at 6:30 PM. Any interested person may be heard on the question of consolidation and on the plan for consolidation.

Early Voting for the 2013 Municipal General Election will be conducted at the Carbon County Courthouse, 120 E Main St., Price, Utah, Small Meeting Room, during the hours of 9:00 AM and 3:00 PM, October 22 through October 31 and 9:00AM to 5:00PM on November 1. Voting on regular Election Day, November 5, 2013, will be held at the following polling locations between the hours of 7:00 AM and 8:00 PM: East Carbon North #25 East Carbon South #26 East Carbon Senior Citizens Center 451 Denver Ave East Carbon City, Utah 84520

Sunnyside #20 Sunnyside City Hall 595 Edgehill Dr Sunnyside, Utah 84539

Please go to your designated polling location which may be found at www.vote.utah.gov

S/SETH OVESON Seth Oveson Carbon County Clerk/Auditor Published in the Sun Advocate September 10, 17, 24, and October 1, 2013.

PUBLIC NOTICE

Notice is hereby given as required by the Utah Coal Mining Rules, R645-300-121 that Sunnyside Cogeneration Associates (SCA), P.O. Box 159, Sunnyside, Utah 84539, has filed an application for a five year renewal of coal mining Permit No. C/007/042. Approval of this application will allow SCA to continue to operate the Star Point Waste Fuel Mine under the provisions of the Utah Coal Mining and Reclamation Act and the Utah R645 Coal Mining Rules.

The existing permit area is comprised of 153 acres and is located at Wattis, Utah within lands described as:

S½ of S½ Section 10, T 15 S, R 8 E, SLB&M NW¼ of SW¼ Section 10, T 15 S, R 8 E, SLB&M NE¼ of NW¼ of NW¼ Section 15, T 15 S, R 8 E, SLB&M N½ of NE¼ of NW¼ Section 15, T 15 S, R 8 E, SLB&M N½ of N½ of S½ of NE¼ of NW¼ Section 15, T 15 S, R 8 E, SLB&M NW¼ of NW¼ of NE¼ Section 15, T 15 S, R 8 E, SLB&M

Copies of the permit are available for inspection at the Utah Division of Oil, Gas and Mining, 1594 West North Temple, Suite 1210, Salt Lake City, Utah 84114.

Written comments, objections or requests for an informal conference regarding this application must be submitted with 30 days of the last publication date of this notice, to the Utah Division of Oil, Gas and Mining, Attention Coal Regulatory Program, 1594 West North Temple, Suite 1210, Salt Lake City, Utah 84114-5801. Published in the Sun Advocate September 10, 17, 24 and October 1, 2013.

PRICE CITY PLANNING & ZONING COMMISSION

The Price City Planning and Zoning Commission has an opening for two (2) members representing the City at large. Interested persons must be residents of Price City. Please send a letter of interest to Price City, attention Nick Tatton, at P.O. Box 893, Price, Utah 84501. Letters of interest must be received by Price City prior to October 1st, 2013. Upon receipt of letters of interest the Price City Council will appoint the member. Published in the Sun Advocate September 17 and 24, 2013

PUBLIC NOTICES AVAILABLE ONLINE Public notices published in the SUN ADVOCATE can also be found online. Please visit www.sunad.com and click on the Public Notices link.


Sports

Sun Advocate

Tuesday September 24, 2013 9A

Helper, Mont Harmon football teams post wins in CVAA play Both the Helper Junior High and Mont Harmon Junior High football teams posted wins in Castle Valley Athletic Association play last week. The Helper Rams defeated San Rafael 36-16 on Wednesday in Ferron. Head coach Phil Howa said the game went and back forth until Helper’s running game started to take control to help get the win. “This was our toughest game yet,” said Howa. “We used our power running game and it just worked really well for us.” Howa said the Helper defense held strong, keeping San Rafael from getting back into the game. “We’re starting to hit on all cylinders right now,” he said. Helper is now 3-0 on the season and will play Canyon View on Wednesday at 3:30 at

PHOTO COURTESY OF DARLA LEE

Helper Junior High players runs toward a San Rafael ball carrier during their 36-16 win on Wednesday, Sept. 18.

the Mont Harmon Junior High football field. Mont Harmon won their game against Canyon View 30-22 on Wednesday. Head coach Jarad Hardy said the team jumped out to a big lead thanks to performance including Nate Olson with

133 yards on 13 carries and Austin Woodhouse who threw for 80 yards. “We looked better than in previous weeks,” said Hardy. The Pirates took a 30-8 lead before letting some of the younger players get playing time.

Mont Harmon, 1-2 overall, will look for a measure of revenge as they travel to take on San Rafael on Wednesday at 3:30 p.m. San Rafael took the first meeting 22-20 in overtime with a missed twopoint conversion being the difference.

PUBLIC NOTICES

“Because the People Submission Guidelines: Public notices must be received no later than Friday at 5pm for the following Tuesday publication, or Tuesday at 5pm for the following Thursday publication. Submissions must be e-mailed to legals@sunad.com. In the event Must Know” e-mail isn’t available, submissions may be faxed to (435) 637-2716 and should be addressed to the legal advertising department. UPAXLP

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING AND BONDS TO BE ISSUED

NOTICE OF A FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT

PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that on September 17, 2013, the Board of Trustees of Price River Water Improvement District (the "Issuer"), adopted a resolution (the “Resolution”) declaring its intention to issue its Parity Water and Sewer Revenue Bonds (the “Bonds”) pursuant to the Utah Local Government Bonding Act, Title 11, Chapter 14, Utah Code Annotated 1953, as amended and to call a public hearing to receive input from the public with respect to the issuance of the Bonds.

The USDA, Rural Utilities Service has received an application for financial assistance from Wellington City. The proposal consists of construction of a water treatment facility on a two acre parcel, adjacent to the existing 500,000 gallon tank, one raw water pumping and associated piping.

TIME, PLACE AND LOCATION OF PUBLIC HEARING The Issuer shall hold a public hearing on October 15, 2013, at the hour of 7:00 p.m. The location of the public hearing is at 265 South Fairgrounds Road, Price, Utah. The purpose of the meeting is to receive input from the public with respect to the issuance of the Bonds and any potential economic impact to the private sector from the construction of the Project to be funded by the Bonds. All members of the public are invited to attend and participate. PURPOSE FOR ISSUING BONDS

The Issuer intends to issue the Bonds for the purpose of (i) financing all or a portion of the cost to construct culinary water system improvements, including improvements to upgrade the Spring Glen water distribution system, together with related improvements to the District’s culinary water system; and (ii) paying costs of issuing the Bonds.

OUTSTANDING BONDS SECURED BY THE SAME REVENUE

The Issuer currently has outstanding bonds secured by the pledge of water and sewer system revenues, namely: the 1989 Water Revenue Bond sold to the Utah Board of Water Resources in the original principal amount of $561,000; the 1996 Water Revenue Bond sold to the Utah Board of Water Resources in the original principal amount of $1,500,000; its 1989 Water Revenue Bond sold to the Utah Board of Water Resources in the original principal amount of $200,000; the 2000 Sewer Revenue Bond sold to the Utah Permanent Community Impact Fund Board in the original principal amount of $1,000,000; the 2003 Water Revenue Bond sold to the Utah Drinking Water Board in the original principal amount of $1,040,000; the 2004 Sewer Revenue Bond sold to the Utah Permanent Community Impact Fund Board in the original principal amount of $700,000; the 2009 Water and Sewer Revenue Bond sold to the Utah Permanent Community Impact Fund Board in the original principal amount of $225,000; the 2012 Water Revenue Bond sold to the Utah Permanent Community Impact Fund Board in the original principal amount of $2,500,000; the 2012 Sewer Revenue Bond sold to the Utah Permanent Community Impact Fund Board in the original principal amount of $950,000; the 2013 Water Revenue Bond sold to the Utah Permanent Community Impact Fund Board in the original principal amount of $550,000; and the 2013 Water and Sewer Revenue Refunding Bond sold to SunTrust Equipment Finance & Leasing Corp. in the original principal amount of $3,861,000. ESTIMATED TOTAL COST OF THE BONDS The estimated total cost to the Issuer for the proposed Bonds is $700,000. The estimated cost of interest on the Bonds is $204,734.69. PARAMETERS OF THE BONDS

The Issuer intends to issue the Bonds in the principal amount of not to exceed $1,200,000, to bear interest at a rate not to exceed 3.0% per annum, to mature in not to more than 25 years from their date or dates, and to be sold at a price not less than 100% of the total principal amount thereof, plus accrued interest to the date of delivery. The Bonds will specify that any installment of principal and/or interest on the Bonds which shall not be paid when due shall bear interest at the rate of 18% per annum from the due date thereof until paid.

NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that a period of 30 days from and after the last date of publication of this Notice is provided by law during which any person in interest shall have the right to contest the legality of the Resolution or the Bonds, or any provision made for the security and payment of the Bonds, and that after such time, no one shall have any cause of action to contest the regularity, formality or legality thereof for any cause whatsoever.

A copy of the Resolution is on file in the office of the Clerk in Price, Utah, where it may be examined during regular business hours of the Clerk from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday. DATED this 17th day of September, 2013. /s/ Jaci Adams Clerk Published in the Sun Advocate September 24 and October 1, 2013.

As required by the national Environmental Policy Act and agency regulations, the Rural Utilities Service prepared an Environmental Assessment of the proposal and the effect the proposal mat have on historic properties. The Environmental Assessment was published on August 13, 2013 for a 30day comment period. No comments were received during this period. Upon consideration of the applicant’s proposal, federal and state environmental regulatory and natural resource agencies, and public input the agency has determined that the proposal will not have a significant effect on the human environment and for which an Environmental Impact and an Environment Impact Statement will not be prepared. The basis of this determination is that the project will not have a significant effect on the quality of the human environment. In order to avoid or minimize any adverse environmental impacts, the Rural Utilities Service will require the applicant to incorporate the following mitigation (best practices) measure into the proposal’s design. The new pump house (Raw Water pump Station) shall be located to the west of the Town Ditch. Construction activities will be monitored to ensure no damage occurs to the Town Ditch.

KEVIN SCANNELL - SUN ADVOCATE

CHS golfers ready for Region Match

The Carbon High boys golf team is hoping to carry their strong season play into the Region 12 match at Payson on Wednesday. Robbi Eztel, pictured, is one of four seniors hoping to do their best as the team is looking to post one more strong finish before the state tournament on Oct. 9-10.

BID NOTICE

Carbon County will be accepting sealed bids for the purchase and installation of a CCTV IP based Video Surveillance System for use at the Carbon County Jail, consisting of 55 cameras and supporting software. Any persons wishing to submit a bid may obtain specifications from Barry Horsley at Barry.Horsley@carbon.utah.gov.

For each of the items, list all options or other features available, including service plans, set-up and start-up assistance, training, and all maintenance and warranty information.

Bids are due at the Carbon County Clerk’s office at 120 East Main, Price, Utah 84501, prior to 5:00 p.m. October 15, 2013, and should clearly indicate on the outside envelope, “Jail Cameras”. Bid opening date is at 4:30 p.m., October 16, 2013, during the regularly scheduled Carbon County Commission meeting at the County Courthouse, 120 East Main Street, Price Utah.

Carbon County is not responsible for bids that are received late due to delays in delivery by any source. Faxed bids are not accepted.

Bids are subject to approval by the County Commission. Carbon County reserves the right to reject any or all bids, to waive any informality of any bid and select the lowest responsible bid. Published in the Sun Advocate September 24, 2013.

NOTICE OF BOARD VACANCY:

Ken Powell, Wellington City Recorder Published in the Sun Advocate September 24 and October 1, 2013

The Carbon County Tourism Tax Advisory Board has five (5) immediate vacancies to fill at this time. These positions are for two year terms and the Board meets every other month, more if necessary. The focus is on the promotion of tourism and the development of tourism related facilities within Carbon County. Board members are responsible for making recommendations to the Carbon County Commissioners for the expenditure of the restaurant sales tax and transient room tax collected in Carbon County. The Board must be composed of members living within Carbon County, and a majority of the members must be current employees of entities operating restaurants or hotel/lodging businesses within Carbon County. The balance of the board members must be employees of recreational facilities, convention facilities, museums, cultural attractions, or other tourism-related industries located within Carbon County.

IN THE SEVENTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT CARBON COUNTY, STATE OF UTAH SUMMONS CIVIL NO. 130700077 JUDGE DOUGLAS B. THOMAS

Applications are available from the Carbon County Commission Secretary. For more information, please call 636-3226. Mail all applications to: Sandra Lehman, Carbon County Commission, 120 East Main Street, Price, Utah 84501. Deadline: September 30, 2013. All applicants must be willing to regularly attend meetings and actively participate in the committee or board activities. Please do not apply if you have been convicted of a felony. Published in the Sun Advocate September 24 and 26, 2013.

Copies of the Environmental Assessment can be reviewed or obtained at USDA Rural Development located at 340 North 600 East, Richfield, Utah 84701 and telephone (435) 896-5489 extension 123.

LAWRENCE G. JOHNSON & FLOYD L. GOLDING, LLC, Plaintiff, vs. RICHARD KRAUSZ, Defendant. THE STATE OF UTAH TO:

Richard Krausz 6835 S 4000 E Price, UT 84501

You are hereby summoned and required to file, with the Clerk of the above entitled Court, 149 East 100 South, Price Utah 84501, an answer in writing to a Complaint to be filed in the above-entitled case, and to serve upon or mail to Plaintiff’s attorneys, Jamis M. Gardner of ROBINSON, SEILER & ANDERSON, LC, 2500 North University Ave., P.O. Box 1266, Provo, Utah, 84601, a copy of said Answer within twenty (20) days after service of this Summons.

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

The Wellington City Council will hold a “Public Hearing” on October 2, 2013 at 7:00 p.m., at the Wellington City Hall located at 150 West Main Street, Wellington, Utah. Purpose of the hearing is to receive public comment on the proposed “Randy and Loralie Thayn Annexation”. Annexation documents are available for review at the Wellington City Recorder’s Office located at the above address during regular business hours. The real property proposed for annexation into the corporate limits of Wellington City are identified as parcels s/n 2-1887, 2-1887-3 & 2-1887-4 and is located as per the following map. THAYN ANNEXATION TO WELLINGTON CITY SECTION 5 T-15-S R-11-E SLB&M CARBON COUNTY UTAH

If you fail to do so, judgment by default will be taken against you for the relief demanded in said Complaint, a copy of which is attached hereto and served herewith upon you. DATED this 17th day of September, 2013. ROBINSON, SEILER & ANDERSON, LC /s/ Jamis M. Gardner JAMIS M. GARDNER Attorney for Plaintiff Published in the Sun Advocate September 24, October 1 and 8, 2013.

DO NOT EMAIL NOTICES TO THE EDITOR Due to the large volume of email messages that the editor receives, Please DO NOT email legal notices to editor@sunad.com. Legal notices should instead be sent directly to legals@sunad.com, where they will be handled with proper diligence by the legal advertising department.

Published in the Sun Advocate September 24, 2013.


Sports

10A Tuesday September 24, 2013

Sun Advocate

Dinos set to host cross country meet Top 3A runner Garrett Marsing and fellow Dino runners looking to use home meet as a springboard for final stretch By KEVIN SCANNELL

Sun Advocate sports reporter

KEVIN SCANNELL - SUN ADVOCATE

The Grantsville defense made it hard for the Carbon offense to do much as defenders swarmed around Dominic Rondinelli in the first quarter on Friday evening.

With their only home meet on the horizon, the Carbon High Cross Country teams are looking to use their home meet to their advantage in more ways than one. With the season about half way over, the home meet comes at an opportune time for the team as they prepare for the final stretch of the

is compared to a harder surface.” Allen said both the boys and the girls teams have improved over the course of the season. For the boys, it will be the last home meet for Carbon High’s Garrett Marsing. Marsing, a senior, has broken many records for the Dinos during his four-year run with the team. A summer of running has

Cowboys lasso Dinos in lopsided loss Grantsville scores 35 points in first half en route to 48-0 shut out win over Carbon High By KEVIN SCANNELL

Sun Advocate sports reporter

As the season shifts from summer to fall, the Carbon High School football team is hoping that a change of seasons may help give the team a boost after a 48-0 home loss to

Grantsville on Friday evening. With the shut out, the Dinos have been held scoreless since the fourth quarter of a 28-14 loss to ALA on Aug. 30, a span three games and 12 quarters total. Grantsville scored their first

touchdown 41 seconds into the game and built a 35-0 leading going into halftime over the Dinos. The Dinos were stymied on offense by the Cowboy defense as they were held to -11 rushing yards and 13 yards

passing on the night. For the Dinos, the road from here only gets harder as the team will travel on the road for back-to-back games against Morgan this Friday and against Judge Memorial on Oct. 4.

CARBON HIGH JOY MINING MACHINERY ATHLETE OF THE WEEK COURTESY PHOTO

Garrett Marsing, right, runs around the track during an invitational at BYU earlier this season. Marsing, a senior, and the rest of the Cross Country Team is looking to have another memorable home meet when CHS hosts their only home meet of the season on Wedneseday at the Carbon Country Club.

Senior Golfer Blake Bean

THIS WEEK’S JOY MINING MACHINERY CARBON HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE OF THE WEEK IS SENIOR GOLFER BLAKE BEAN. BEAN, WAS THE LOW GOLFER AT CARBON HOME MEET ON SEPT.11 WHERE HE SHOT A 75 HELPING THE DINOS TO A BIG REGION WIN. COMBINED WITH HIS TEAMS GREAT PLAY, CARBON WAS ABLE TO BEAT REGION RIVAL RICHFIELD BY FOUR STROKES. “BLAKE DID REALLY WELL FOR US,” SAID CARBON HIGH COACH TOM KING JR. “HE HIT HIS IRONS WELL AND PLAYED WELL OVERALL SHOOTING EVEN PAR ON THE FRONT NINE.

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season. The Dinos are hoping that the previous experience of running on their home turf at the Carbon Country Club will put them in good position over fellow region teams. Head coach Telisse Allen said the recent rainy weather can make things difficult for runners. “Weather plays a huge role whether it be hot, cold or even rainy,” said Allen. “Runners in general will tell you how much harder running in grass

been one of the keys to his success this season, Allen said. “This summer coming off a great track season he and I talked and I told him summer miles were going to be the turning point for him this year,” she said noting Marsing runs about 45 miles per week during the season. Overall, the Dinos are looking for a strong push from their home meet to carry them through the rest of the season. The races start at 3:30 p.m.


•Sun Advocate •Emery County Progress •Smart Shopper Tuesday September 24, 2013 1B

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•Sun Advocate •Emery County Progress •Smart Shopper Tuesday September 24, 2013 3B By GARY ARRINGTON, Sports Writer

For the third straight game, the Emery Spartan football team lost a game in the second half of play after going to the locker room in relatively good position. This time the Spartans trailed favored Morgan by the score of 14-7 but the second half was all Morgan as the Trojans scored 28 unanswered points and the visitors left town with the victory. Morgan opened the game by scoring on the opening drive of the game to go up 7-0. Emery responded by coming right back at the Trojans and scoring on their opening drive as well and tied the score at 7-7. Emery’s scoring drive went 75 yards and culminated in an 18yard scoring pass from back Brayden Burke to receiver Gavin McDermott. During the drive, quarterback Tai Justice also completed an 18yard pass, a screen pass to fullback Matt Mecham. The score was now tied at 7-7. Morgan’s next drive went into the second quarter and ended on a 39-yard run for another Trojan touchdown. Emery’s next drive stalled after 22 yards of offense and an Emery punt gave Morgan the ball back at their 34 yard line. Morgan picked up 49 yards before a hard Spartan hit caused a fumble which the Spartans recovered. Starting at their own 16-yard line, Emery marched methodically down field toward the goal line. Eighteen plays later, and with the clock almost expired for the half, Emery’s drive stalled at the Morgan 9-yard line and a golden opportunity to score escaped the Emery team. The big play of the drive was a 17-yard run by back Ryan Cox with a 13-yard pass play from Justice to Cox the next big play. In the second half, Emery ran 18 offensive plays in the entire half plus four punts and only gained 31 yards as the Trojan defense smothered everything the Spartans attempted to do. In the first half, Emery gained 170 yards to Morgan’s 188, a pretty even half. In the second half, Morgan added 291 yards to dominate Emery in the stat department. Emery now travels to Roosevelt this Friday night to play the Union Cougars in another region contest. After four straight losses, the Spartans are extra hungry to post a victory and will be ready to run on the Cougars.

Emery football loses at home against top ranked Morgan

Patsy Stoddard/Emery County Progress

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Emery celebrates their only score of the game with a pass completion to Gavin McDermott.

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4B •Sun Advocate •Emery County Progress •Smart Shopper Tuesday September 24, 2013

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104 – Personal

TWO NEUTERED male cats looking for a new home. Younger black kitten & adult gray & white. Both have current shots. Animal Hospital on Airport Road 637-5797.(09244f)

SUN ADVOCATE and Emery County Progress does not endorse, promote or encourage the purchase or sale of any product or service advertised in this newspaper. Advertisements are the sole responsibility of the advertiser. Sun Advocate and Emery County Progress hereby disclaims all liability for any damage suffered as the result of any advertisement in these newspapers. Sun Advocate and Emery County Progress has the sole authority to edit and locate any classified advertisement as deemed appropriate. Sun Advocate and Emery County Progress reserves the right to refuse any advertising. (09038f)

104 – Personal **ADOPTION**Art classes to zoo trips and everything in between, 1st baby will be our King/Queen. Expenses paid 1-800598-4594 **Shira and Justin**(09244p) MEET SINGLES right now! No paid operators, just real people like you. Browse greetings, exchange messages and connect live. Try it free. Call now: 1-800954-1846(ucan)(09242f)

SUBSCRIBE 637-0732 .

Sun Advocate 845 East Main Price, Utah 84501 Emery County Progress 410 East Main, Suite B Castle Dale, Utah 84513

Mail in Address Sun Advocate 845 East Main Price, UT 84501 Emery County Progress P.O. Box 589, Castle Dale, UT 84513

Step #2

Write the text for your ad

Place your classified ad

1) Begin with a “keyword”. Indicate the specific description, location or position you are advertising. This helps people search the categories more quickly and makes your ad stand out. 2) Describe it. More information tells people what they want to know. Think of condition, color, size, etc. 3) Price it. Many people will not call without a listed price. If you’re willing to haggle, list OBO price, if not, list FIRM. When the price is shown in an ad, you know that callers are ready to buy. 4) List contact information. Make sure to include phone number(s), address and other pertinent information.

1) Call, Drop in or FAX. Our Ad-visors will input your copy (ad, info) and help you through any questions you may have. 2) Provide Payment. Line ads need to be paid when the ad is placed. We’ll charge it to your credit card or accept your check or cash. Receipts are provided. 3) Check your ad. Occasionally an ad will need to be corrected. It is your job to check the ad to make sure it is correct. If we’ve made a mistake, call us within the first day. We’ll fix and extend the ad.

105 – Special Notices

105 – Special Notices

105 – Special Notices

105 – Special Notices

$$$$ HUGE TAX Incentives for solar energy! $$$$ Save big on Solar with SolarTek Solutions!!! Stop renting your power. 801-301-1870( u c a n ) (09242f)

DIRECTV - OVER 140 channels only $29.99 a month. Call now! Triple savings! $636 in savings, free upgrade to Genie & 2013 NFL Sunday ticket free!! Start saving today! 1-800-341-2087(ucan) (09242f)

e-CENT-ials Salt City Candle Shop is open Wednesday 2pm-5pm. 150 South 7 East in Price. First Wednesday of the month sale B1G1 1/2 off. 435-650-2233.(0119tf)

SAFE STEP Walk-In Tub Alert for seniors. Bathroom falls can be fatal. Approved by Arthritis Foundation. Therapeutic jets. Less than 4 inch stepin. Wide door. Anti-slip floors. American made. Installation included. Call 888-960-1524 for $750 Off.(ucan)(09242f)

ATTENTION SLEEP Apnea sufferers with Medicare. Get Free CPAP replacement supplies at No cost, plus Free home delivery! Best of all, prevent red skin sores and bacterial infection! Call 888-8054260 (ucan)(09242f) CUT YOUR student loan payments in half or more. Even if late or in default. Get relief Fast. Much lower payments. Call Student Hotline 855-3801487(ucan)(09242f)

113 – Help Wanted

Four Corners Community Behavioral Health, Inc

Licensed Practical Nurse / Outreach Specialist (FT) needed to provide nursing case management services, outpatient medication management under the supervision of an RN, and community client outreach. Must be currently licensed as LPN in Utah. Experience working in the mental health/substance use disorder field is preferred. Starts $16.19/hr or more with experience. Case Manager / Outreach Specialist (FT) needed to provide case management and outreach services to clients with mental illness, often in their homes. CNA certificate and/or experience working in mental health/substance use disorders preferred. $11.37/hr or more with experience. Clubhouse Generalist (FT) needed for recovery program for adults with serious mental illness. Entry level position for a motivated individual working directly with clients primarily in a bookkeeping capacity. Math and organizational skills needed. Also help clients find education and employment opportunities, apply for aid, and possibly even cooking. Some college preferred. $11.37/hr or more with experience. All positions in Price, Utah. Valid Utah driver’s license, background check and drug test required. Maintaining confidentiality is an essential job requirement. FCCBH, Inc. is an EOE and maintains a drug free workplace. Please e-mail ywilson@fourcorners.ws or call (435)637-7200x306 to obtain required application. Positions open until filled.

DISH TV Only $19.99/mo! Tired of paying for cable? TV simply cost less with Dish! Free premium channels*! High speed internet from $19.99! Call 1-888812-0320 (ucan)(09242f) DISH TV Retailer. Starting at $19.99/month (for 12 mos.) & High Speed Internet starting at $14.95/ month (where available.) Save! Ask about same day installation! Call now! 1-800-749-3264(ucan) (09242f)

GUARANTEED INCOME for your retirement. Avoid market risk & get guaranteed income in retirement! Call for Free copy of our Safe Money Guide Plus annuity quotes from A-Rated companies! 800356-1328(ucan)(09242f) REDUCE YOUR Cable bill!* Get a whole-home Satellite system installed at no cost and programming starting at $19.99/ mo. Free HD/DVR Upgrade to new callers, so call now 1-855-4766475(ucan)(09242f)

TO SUBSCRIBE to the Progress call 381-2431. For the Sun Advocate call 637-0732.

113 – Help Wanted

POSITION ANNOUNCEMENT Position: Location: Description:

Contract: Salary:

Girl’s Head Basketball Coach Mont Harmon Jr. High Will be responsible for Girl’s Varsity and JV programs. Position will require supervision, tryouts, scheduling games, working with Athletic Director, teachers, administration. Coaching will include home, away and tournament games. 2013-14 School Year Per Carbon School District Activities salary schedule

Closing Date: October 4, 2013 Those individuals interested in applying, please apply online at www.carbonschools.org or send application to: Nelda Grundy Carbon School District 251 West 400 North Price, UT 84501

SAVE ON Cable TV-Internet-Digital Phone-Satellite. You’ve got a choice! Options from all major service providers. Call us to learn more! Call Today. 877-820-4785.(ucan) (09242f) UPS SERVICE is available at CJ’s Do it center. Open 7 days/wk. 710 E. Main, Price.(0201tf)

107 – Financial B A N K R U P T CY ON a budget *******$350****** Aspire Credit Solutions. Stop garnishments now!! Bankruptcy/Credit Repair. Get a fresh start. aspirecreditsolution.com 801-446-8216 Licensed/Insured (ucan) (09242f) HAVE PAYDAY Loan? Want to Get Rid of Payday Loan? Get Payday companies out of your pocket now! Call Now! No obligation. 1-800-9282045(ucan)(09242f)

Canyon Fuel Company, LLC A Subsidiary of Bowie Resource Partners, LLC

Mining Engineer

Surveyor/CAD Operator

Arch Western Bituminous Group has openings for Mining Engineers at the Sufco Mine located near Salina, Utah. Interested candidates must have a BS in Mining Engineering and must have a complete understanding of continuous miner and longwall mining methods, mine ventilation, rock mechanics, strong written and oral communication skills and strong interpersonal skills. Applicants must be proficient in the use of Microsoft Word, Excel, PowerPoint and CAD. Full time positions with benefits include: • Competitive pay • Medical, dental, vision, Rx • 401 (k) plan with company match • Production bonus • Paid holidays/vacations • Employee assistance program • Company provided life and AD&D insurance • Post-offer drug and physical screening Interested candidates must apply no later than October 11, 2013 by completing an application at Workforce Services located at 115 East 100 South, Richfield, Utah or by submitting a resume via fax or mail to: Sufco Mine 597 South SR24 Salina UT 84554 Attn: Human Resources Fax # 435-826-4494 An EE/AA-M/F-V/D Employer

Sufco Mine, located 30 miles east of Salina, Utah has an immediate opening for a Surveyor/CAD Operator. Interested candidates must have an Associates Degree or equivalent experience in CAD and/or Surveying. Excellent computer (AutoCAD, Excel, Word, PowerPoint) skills, strong communication and interpersonal skills, proficiency with survey note reduction and earthwork modeling programs, proficiency with total station and leveling equipment, proficiency with Trimble GPS and data collection equipment, proficiency with ARC GIS. Full time positions with benefits include: • Competitive pay • Medical, dental, vision, Rx • 401 (k) plan with company match • Production bonus • Paid holidays/vacations • Employee assistance program • Company provided life and AD&D insurance • Post-offer drug and physical screening Interested candidates must apply no later than October 11, 2013 by completing an application at Workforce Services located at 115 East 100 South, Richfield, Utah or by submitting a resume via fax or mail to: Sufco Mine 597 South SR24 Salina UT 84554 Attn: Human Resources Fax # 435-826-4494 An EE/AA-M/F-V/D Employer

The Classified Directory: Lawn & Garden ...................... 124 Miscellaneous Services .......... 125 Painting .................................. 126 Auctions ................................ 129 REAL ESTATE RENTALS 131-140 Apartments for Rent ............... 131 Houses for Rent ..................... 132 Miscellaneous Rentals ............ 133 Mobile Homes for Rent ........... 134 Mobile Home Spaces ............. 135 Office Space .......................... 136 Rentals Wanted ...................... 137 Rooms for Rent ...................... 138 Commercial Rentals ............... 139

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE 141-150 Commercial Property ............. 141 Farms and Ranches................ 142 Houses for Sale...................... 143 Lots and Acreages ................. 144 Mobile Homes ........................ 145 Miscellaneous Real Estate ...... 146 Real Estate Wanted ................ 147 Condominiums ....................... 148 Water Shares ......................... 149 FARMER’S STORE 151-160 Farm Equipment ..................... 151 Fruit and Produce ................... 154 Hay and Grain ........................ 155 Pasture for Rent ..................... 156

LIVESTOCK, PETS 161-170 Boarding & Breeding .............. 161 Livestock ............................... 164 Pets ....................................... 166 Poultry ................................... 167 GENERAL STORE 171-190 Fuel and Wood ....................... 171 Furniture ................................ 172 Yard Sale/Garage Sale ............ 174 Appliances ............................. 176 Miscellaneous for Sale ........... 177 Miscellaneous Wanted to Buy . 178 Musical Instruments ............... 179 Pianos and Organs ................. 180 Sewing Machines ................... 181 Sporting Goods ...................... 182 TVs, Radios & Stereos ........... 183

Weeks

1

2

3

4

14

$6.60

$11.22

$15.84

$19.80

15

$7.05

$11.99

$16.92

$21.15

16

$7.50

$12.75

$18.00

$22.50

17

$7.95

$13.52

$19.08

$23.85

18

$8.40

$14.28

$20.16

$25.20

19

$8.85

$15.05

$21.24

$26.55

20

$9.30

$15.81

$22.32

$27.90

21

$9.75

$16.58

$23.40

$29.25

22

$10.20

$17.34

$24.48

$30.60

113 – Help Wanted CAREGIVER ASSISTANT needed in Huntington $11 hr, part-time, no experience necessary, flexible schedule. Must have Utah drivers license. 435-7491201, 749-1210.(09174b) CLASS A OTR drivers. Excellent miles. 2011 & 2013 Kenworths. E-logs. Scheduled home time. Paid vacation. Rider policy. No east coast. Call Chuck or Tim 800-6453748.(09242f)

CNA, LPN, RN needed for immediate hire at Emery County Care & Rehab. CNA classes on-going. Call Tammy 630-4592 or Diane 749-9158 CTC TRUCKING is looking for CDL Drivers for local hauling and heavy equipment operators, Must have clear MVR. Please call 435-637-2190. (09174p)

NO SUBSCRIPTION? For rates or to subscribe to the Sun Advocate or the Emery County Progress call 637-0732 or 381-2431.

113 – Help Wanted

IN JUST 71 DAYS... You can have the skills you need to get a job as a

DENTAL ASSISTANT

10 week course, Sat. only. Tuition $1950-payment plans. Call Alice at Eastern Utah School of Dental Assisting for info packet 435-650-1413 Dr. Fonnesbeck’s Office 590 E. 100 N. Suite 3

Reg. Under the Utah Postsecondary Proprietary School Act. vancefonnesbeckdds.com

DRIVERS: TRAINING, Class A CDL. Train and work for us! Professional and focused training for your Class A CDL. You choose between Company Driver, Owner Operator, Lease Operator or Lease Trainer. 800-993-7483 www.centraltruckdriving jobs.com.(09038b)

HAVE LOTS of stuff you want to sell? Call 6370732 to place your ad.

113 – Help Wanted *STARLIGHT* NEW program in Carbon/Emery. Love kids? Want to supplement income? Become a proctor/foster parent! $800-$900/month, per child Tax Free. Call Lisa 820-6090, Jaymi 801747-3556.(08298p)

Carbon School District is an equal opportunity employer

Canyon Fuel Company, LLC A Subsidiary of Bowie Resource Partners, LLC

NOTICES 100-110 100 110 Giveaways ............................. 100 Lost and Found ...................... 101 Moving and Storage ............... 103 Personal................................. 104 Special Notices ...................... 105 Financial ................................ 107 EMPLOYMENT 111-120 Business Opportunity ............. 112 Help Wanted........................... 113 Jobs Wanted .......................... 114 School and Instruction ........... 115 Child Care .............................. 116 MISC. SERVICES 121-130 Building and Construction....... 121 Cleaning Services................... 122 Handyman ............................. 123

* How Much Does It Cost?

Step #1

Words

Offices

Industrial Equipment ............... 184 Computers ............................. 185 Fireplaces and Stoves............. 189 Tools ...................................... 190 AUTOS, RVS ETC. 191-203 Auto Parts and Services ......... 191 Autos, New and Used ............. 192 Boats ..................................... 194 Motor Homes ......................... 195 Campers and Trailers.............. 196 4 Wheel Drive......................... 197 Motorcycles ........................... 198 Bicycles ................................. 199 Trucks and Vans..................... 200 Snowmobiles ......................... 201 Airplanes................................ 202 ATVs ...................................... 203

113 – Help Wanted

Company Secretary Wanted Cottonwood Creek Consolidated Irrigation Company has an opening for the position of company secretary. The position is part time, requiring being in the Company’s office for four hours twice a week. The work consists of preparing stock transfers, keeping financial accounts, paying bills, attending monthly board meetings, preparing minutes, preparing annual assessments for each stockholder, preparing and attending annual stockholder meeting, keeping stock records, preparing annual gate lists for each canal, keeping records of all company business transactions, and other duties as assigned. Accounting background is necessary to meet our audit requirements. The salary is $12,000 per year. Applications with resume’ can be submitted to Clyde Magnuson, President, or at the Company’s office, or mailed to PO Box 678, Orangeville, Utah, 84537. All applications must be submitted before October 10, 2013.

POSITION ANNOUNCEMENT Position:

Part time English Language Learner Paraprofessional Location: All schools in Carbon School District Qualifications: Spanish speaking skills preferred. Associates Degree, 48 semester hours post high school or pass the ETS Parapro Assessment Test. Cost$45.00 Must pass the Live Scan Fingerprint/Background Check if hired. Cost-$25.00 Description: Will work with non-English speaking students. Salary: Per Carbon School District salary schedule Closing Date: October 4, 2013Those individuals interested in applying, please apply online at www.carbonschools.org or send application to: Nelda Grundy Carbon School District 251 West 400 North Price, UT 84501 Carbon School District is an equal opportunity employer


•Sun Advocate •Emery County Progress •Smart Shopper Tuesday September 24, 2013 5B 113 – Help Wanted DRIVERS: CDL-A train and work for us! Professional, focused CDL training available. Choose Company Driver, Owner O p e r a t o r, L e a s e O p erator or Lease Trainer. (877)369-7092 www.cen traltruckdrivingjobs.com (ucan)(09242f) MAID FOR You LLC. Looking for honest, dependable employee to join our crew, Must be able to pass criminal background check. Call 435-650-3341. (09194b) PINNACLE NURSING & Rehabilitation has a PT opening for a Dietary Cook/Dishwasher. Cleanliness is a must. Must have or be able to obtain a Food Handlers permit. Cook experience is preferred but not required. If interested please pick up an application at 1340 East 300 North, Price.(09126b) R COOPER Sales wants you! Earn $20-$25 per sale doing store promotions. Must have working vehicle and a cell phone. Call Jill 801-709-6138. (09242p)

114 – Jobs Wanted CHEF FOR Hire: Having a party or BBQ? You get stuck cooking instead of having fun? I will cook for you! Call Jesse @ 6360351, 630-9700.(08298p)

116 – Daycare DARLENE’S DAY Care is accepting children for full time care. Pre-school included w/full time care. 637-5128.(09176p)

121 – Building and Construction CABINETS, FROM complete design to installation. CJ’s Do it center, 710 E. Main, Price. (0201tf) LARRY DAVIS Construction. General contractor. Licensed and insured. No job too small. Call 6502022.(1004tf) METAL ROOF/Wall Panels, Pre-engineered Metal Buildings. Mill prices for sheeting coil are at a 4 year low. You get the savings. 17 Colors prime material, cut to your exact length. CO Building Systems 1-800-COBLDGS (ucan)(09242f)

122 – Cleaning Services ALWAYS CALL a professional. Walls, ceilings, windows. Free estimates. Call Trudy Axelsen, SpicN-Span, 637-4558, 6509327.(1203tf) GET A jump on Fall pruning, 40% off! 435-637-8733, 800-735-9123. DMP Tree Service.(0808tf)

LOOKING FOR something? Look here in the classifieds! Advertise at 637-0732.

122 – Cleaning Services

131 – Apartments for Rent

MAID 4 YOU: Licensed, insured, bonded. Cleaning, commercial & residential. Call 650-3341 because we’re the only one who appreciates your dirt!(0208tf)

2 BDRM 1-1/4 BATH Apt. in Wellington. Nice views, covered parking, W/D hookups, partial utilities included. $500 per month. Call Laura at 435-6300007 for more info.(0305tf)

WE MEAN Klean, LLC Weekly, biweekly, monthly, construction clean-outs, residential & commercial, licensed, insured, bonded. Don’t stress call the best 435-650-1322(0507tf)

123 – Handyman GET A jump on Fall pruning, 40% off! 435-637-8733, 800-735-9123. DMP Tree Service.(0808tf)

124 – Lawn & Gardening GET A jump on Fall pruning, 40% off! 435-637-8733, 800-735-9123. DMP Tree Service.(0808tf) TYSON’S TREE removal 435-277-6614. Call for free estimates.(09178p)

125 – Miscellaneous Services GET A jump on Fall pruning, 40% off! 435-637-8733, 800-735-9123. DMP Tree Service.(0808tf)

129 – Auctions

Annual Fall Consignment Auction

Saturday September 28th, at 9:00am, 2368 S. 1500 E. in Vernal, UT. Equipment of all kinds, Many Vehicles, Trucks, Trailers, Campers, Boats, ATV’s, Motorcycles, Snow Machines, Pipe, New and Used Tools, Lumber, Tack, Camping and Hunting items, Guns, Antiques, & Collectables, Coins, Household Miscellaneous, and much more! If you would like to consign please call now so we can advertise your items.For more information or to consign call ZJ Auction Service, Inc. 435-789-7424 or go to www.zjauction.com.

131 – Apartments for Rent 1 BD 1 BATH apt for rent. Newly painted and carpeted. $400 per month tenant pays utilities. Please call Darlene at 435-630-3877. (0912tf)

1 BED 1 BATH basement apartment, $350. mo 144 South 100 East, Price. 435-650-5049.(09194b) 1 BEDROOM APARTMENT close to college $400/month $400/dep.No smoking/pets. 435-6500809.(0919tf)

1, 2 & 3 bed. W/D hookups. Rent based on income. Foxborough Apts. 655 E. 300 S., in Price 820 E. 100 N. in Wellington or call 637-4930

113 – Help Wanted

Barney Trucking is looking for Drivers in several locations. Valid CDL with Doubles/Triples endorsements required. Great pay and benefits available. To apply, go to www.barneytrucking.com or call 435-529-4422.

2 BEDROOM APARTMENT close to college. No smoking/pets. W/D and WiFi included. $500/mo. 435-650-6615.(09174p) 2 BEDROOM APT. for rent, 505 North Cottonwood Dr., Price. $490/ mo., heat paid. No pets/ smoking. 650-4540, 6504542.(0418tf) 2 BEDROOM HOMES $450 mo. 3 BEDROOM $495 mo. Homes for purchase available from $1,000-$6,000. Central Park (1265 North Carbonville Rd.) in Price 435-6501523.(0124tf)

2 BEDROOM IN 4 plex. recently remodeled -No smokers/pets $475 plus security deposit.637-5836, 6504711(0716tf) 2 BEDROOM IN Huntington, w/d hookups, stove, refrigerator, carport, no pets. 687-9261.(0502tf) 2-3 BEDROOM APARTMENTS for rent in Huntington. Call JuNette Terry with Trails End Realty @ 435-749-0389.(0910tf) 3 BD, 1 BATH apts for rent in Wellington. Excellent location, great neighbors. $550 to $600 per month depending on location in complex. Please call 435-637-RENT (7368) Mon thru Fri or 435630-3877 on evenings or weekends.(0124tf) 3 BEDROOM APARTMENTS for rent in Castle Dale. Call JuNette Terry with Trails End Realty @ 435-749-0389.(0910tf) APARTMENTS FOR RentStarting at $475! Please call Trails End Realty @ 435-637-1884.(0716tf) APARTMENTS for rent: Castle Dale, Orangeville, Ferron. Call 435-8200976.(082948p) FERRON: 2 bedroom, W/D hook-ups, fenced yard, no pets, $425. 3842865.(0702tf) LARGE 2 BEDROOM & Large 3 bedroom in Price. Lots of kitchen storage. No pets. 472-0255, 650-1882. (0905tf) LARGE TWO bedroom apartment, refrigerator/ stove, W/D hookups. Nice location. No pets. 6501129. (1004tf)

131 – Apartments for Rent

132 – Houses for Rent

132 – Houses for Rent

GOVERNMENT SUBSIDIZED HOUSING FOR THE ELDERLY, HANDICAPPED OR DISABLED

1 BDRM 1 BATH $400/mo. +deposit. 435-820-4732. (08278p)

Beautiful 6 bedroom, 3 bath home for rent. $1500.00 per month/ $1500.00 SD

WEDGEWOOD VILLA 530 West 200 South Price, Utah 84501 637-2009

APARTMENTS AVAILABLE IMMEDIATELY

ONE BEDROOM, fully furnished. Utilities, cable, WiFi included. No smoking/pets. 637-2830. (09174p) PRICE: 3&4 BEDROOM rentals, $700, washer/dryer hookups, air conditioning, yard. Call Bridge Realty 435-650-4067(0924tf) STUDIO APARTMENT, Price. $400/mo $400/dep. with full kitchen and separate bath. Heat included. No pets/smoking. 6500809, 637-2846.(0903tf) TWO BEDROOM apartment in Ferron. 749-1541. (0411tf)

NEW ONE BEDROOM APARTMENTS NOW AVAILABLE * Rent based on Income * Must be 62 or older * Elevator to 2nd floor

EASTWOOD APARTMENTS 1481 East 150 South, Price, Utah 84501 (435) 637-1811

GOOD JOB CLASSIFIEDS!! I SOLD EVERYTHING IN 1 WEEK! Thank you! R.P.

113 – Help Wanted

POSITION ANNOUNCEMENT Position: Location: Qualifications:

Substitute Bus Drivers Transportation Department Must hold CDL or be able to get one. Training will be available. Must clear a fingerprint/ background check if hired. Cost $25.00 Salary: Per Carbon School District salary schedule Closing Date: October 3, 2013 Applications need to be picked up and returned to the Transportation Office Kerry Jensen CSD Transportation Supervisor 609 East 400 North Price, UT 84501 435.637.3421

D TE

1 BEDROOM HOUSE, fenced back yard, garage, sprinklers, w/d hookup, no pets/smoking. 637-0335, 650-2546/ 9am-1pm. (0709tf)

N E R

2 BEDROOM 1 BATH house in Price. Newly remodeled, detached garage, large fenced back yard. $600/mo, $500/deposit. No smoking/pets. Available Oct. 1st. 435650-5808.(09174p)

NO Pets/Smoking. Call Deb with The Mike Metzger Team at Bridge Realty 637-7900

2 BEDROOM 2 FULL Bath mobile home. Nice kitchen w/fridge, gas stove & dishwasher. Large laundry room w/washer & dryer. Recently remodeled w/ new flooring. Large deck & storage shed. Small pet okay. $495/mo. +deposit. 435-275-8075, 623-2712852.(09174p)

AVAILABLE IMMEDIATELY. 3 bed 2 bath close to college. $800/rent $800/ deposit. No smoking/pets. 650-5670. To see pictures go to rm-property.com. (0716tf)

2 BEDROOM HOMES $450 mo. 3 BEDROOM $495 mo. Clean Mobile Home Community’s in Price 435-650-1523 and Wellington 435-650-1435. (0124tf)

CUTE 2 BEDROOM 1 bath house in Price. Newly remodeled inside and out. $550/mo, $500/dep. No smoking/pets. 6505670 or visit rm-property. com(0827tf)

2 BEDROOM, 1 BATH home, newly remodeled in Price by College. No pets/ smokers, $650/mo. $500/ dep. 749-2364.(09244p)

EAST CARBON: 3 bed 1 bath $515/mo, $500/ damage deposit. 801-8675704.(09124p)

3 BEDROOM 1 BATH in Price, no pets. 472-0255. (0829tf) 3 BEDROOM HOME for rent in Helper. Fenced in back yard. $650/month. Call Irene @ Nagel Realty 435-636-6720.(0919tf) 3 BEDROOM HOME in Price. No pets/smokers. Call w/references 6371439 after 7p.m.(0604tf) 3 BEDROOM HOME, 2 bath, double car garage. For sale or rent. 6509002.(0910tf) 3 BEDROOM, 2 BATH, newly painted/carpeted home in East Price. Large 2 car garage w/carport. $700/month with $500 security/cleaning deposit. 1 year lease, firm. Yard work optional. Available Sept 21st. No smoking/ pets. Call 435-650-5298, 435-472-5323.(09174p) 4 BD, 2 bath near college. Large open rooms, $850/ mo. +deposit. 1 yr lease. No smoking/pets. 435609-0612 or 687-2219. (09036p) 4 BEDROOM, 2 BATH house in East Price. Available Oct. 1st. Call 6501408.(09242b) 440 NORTH 1230 WEST in Price. 5 Bedroom 2 full bathroom, family room with fireplace, front room, living room, laundry room, storage room, small storage garage, a large enclosed backyard, and a nice patio. No pets. $975/ month Contact Bert @ 637-5959.(0822tf)

Plant an ad for your business in the classifieds and watch your business grow!

HELPER: NEWLY remodeled 3 bedroom 1 bath, fenced yard, single car garage, mature fruit trees, $550/month. www. guardrightproperty.com 801-842-9631, 637-5888. (0611tf) LARGE 1 BEDROOM duplex in Helper. $400 a Month. Contact Irene @ Nagel Realty 435-636-6720(0813tf) ORANGEVILLE, FOUR bedroom, two bath, fenced yard, two sheds, great neighborhood. $800 per month. Ask for Joan 435749-6169.(09128p) PRICE: 3&4 BEDROOM rentals, $700, washer/dryer hookups, air conditioning, yard. Call Bridge Realty 435-650-4067(0924tf)

132 – Houses for Rent

134 – Mobile Homes for Rent

SMALL HOUSE in Price at 61 West 500 South. $400 first and last. No pets. Call 650-5390.(09192p)

HUNTINGTON M.H.P. 2 bedroom, 2 bath $450/ mo, includes water/sewer/ trash, W/D hookups. No pets. Family friendly. 435590-4141.(0214tf)

TWO STORY house for rent. Excellent location near college. 3 bdrms 2 baths, 2 kitchens. Asking $950 per month with $950 security deposit. Tenant pays utilities. Available to move in. $30 credit bkgrnd check required at time of application. Please call Darlene at 435-630-3877. (0822tf)

134 – Mobile Homes for Rent 2 BEDROOM 1 BATH, includes washer/dryer on main street in Orangeville. 435-749--1541.(0625tf) 2 BEDROOM HOMES $450 mo. 3 BEDROOM $495 mo. Homes for purchase available from $1,000-$6,000. Central Park (1265 North Carbonville Rd.) in Price 435-6501523.(0124tf) 2 BEDROOM, 1 BATH in Huntington, nice lot. No smoking/pets 687-9261. (0312tf) 3 BEDROOM 2 BATH M.H. New carpet-living room, master bedroom and office. Quiet neighborhood, network throughout, large storage room, sprinkling system. $450/mo. $450/deposit. No smoking/pets. 435-650-1397. (0905tf) 3 BEDROOM 2 bath mobile home in Carbonville on private lot. Storage shed in back. New carpet throughout Housing approved call to see. 435650-9084.(0905tf) 3 BEDROOM TRAILER in Ferron. Call 381-7433. (0711tf) EASTRIDGE (485 South 100 East) MOBILE home community in Wellington 2 bed room $450 mo. 3 bedroom $495 mo. Includes sewer and trash. Handyman Specials available to buy $1,000-$6,000 435650-1435.(0124tf)

SUBSCRIBE 637-0732 .

HUNTINGTON M.H.P. Partially furnished 3 bedroom, 1 bath, $800/month, includes electric/water/ sewer/trash. No pets Laundry mat on site, 435590-4141.(0514tf)

PRICE: Fair Haven M.H.P. Newly remolded 2-3 bedrooms, starting at $425/ mo. No pets. 435-5904141(0329tf)

PRIVATE LOT, Price, 2 bedroom, tipout, carport, covered porch, washer/ dryer, trees. $400/mo $500/deposit, no smokers/ pets. 630-0956(09038p)

135 – Mobile Home Spaces RV/MOBILE Home spaces available in Huntington. For more information 435590-4141.(1004tf)

136 – Office Space

OFFICE SPACE for lease. Utilities, janitorial and private parking included. 637-2945.(030812tf)

138 – Rooms for Rent FURNISHED $255 TO $305 per mo. All utilities and cable included. 6137546 after 3pm. (0525tf)

139 – Commercial Rentals

1,800 SQ. FT. Office/ warehouse space. Newly remodeled, $975 month. Call Jim 637-5279.(1129tf)

142 – Farms and Ranches

RANCH FOR Sale. Year round Cow/Calf operation White Pine County, NV. 1020+/- Ac. with private BLM allotment. Great water rights. Dunn Properties LTD 702-878-5000 (ucan)(09242f)

SELL YOUR stuff here! We have buyers just waiting to call you! 637-0732 or call 381-2431.

113 – Help Wanted

UNDERGROUND MINERS & MECHANICS Canyon Fuel Company, Skyline Mine, located near Scofield, UT is now accepting applications for full time underground miners & mechanics. Rotating shifts, with schedules dependent on operational needs. Employee’s primary area of assignment will be made according to skills and preference. Candidates must be capable of repeated lifting of 50 pounds or greater. An excellent attendance and safety record are required. Full time positions with benefits include: • Competitive pay • Medical, dental, vision, Rx • 401 (k) plan with company match • Production bonus • Paid holidays/vacations • Employee assistance program • Company provided life and AD&D insurance • Post-offer drug and physical screening Resumes must be submitted no later than Wednesday September 25, 2013. to: Fax: (435) 448-2632 or E-mail: chanks@bowieresources.com or Canyon Fuel Company, LLC Skyline Mines HC 35 Box 380 Helper, UT 84526 Attn: Chad Hanks

Carbon School District is an equal opportunity employer

Your future starts here. POSITION ANNOUNCEMENT Position:

POSITION ANNOUNCEMENT Position: Location: Qualifications:

Boy’s Head Basketball Coach Mont Harmon Jr. High Good knowledge of offense and defensive systems. Description: Be able to guide and direct a basketball sports program along with organizing practices and overseeing and directing assistant coaches. Contract: 2013-14 School Year Salary: Per Carbon School District Activities salary schedule Closing Date: October 4, 2013 Those individuals interested in applying, please apply online at www.carbonschools.org or send application to: Nelda Grundy Carbon School District 251 West 400 North Price, UT 84501 Carbon School District is an equal opportunity employer

Part-time Custodian, 19.5 hours per week Location: Carbon School District Description: Carbon School District is now accepting applications for a parttime custodian, work site to be determined. Will work under the direction of the school principal. Duties include general cleaning and maintenance of the building and other tasks that may be assigned by the principal. Qualifications: Applicants should have some knowledge of custodial work and must have a high school diploma or equivalent. Contract: 2013-2014 School Year Closing Date: September 27, 2013 Individuals interested in applying, please apply on line at www.carbonschools.org or send application to: Nelda Grundy Carbon School District 251 West 400 North Price, UT 84501 Carbon School District is an equal opportunity employer

If you want to be challenged and love what you do, then your future starts here with FMC Corporation. As one of the world’s leading specialty chemical companies, we offer an excellent, safe work environment and opportunity for career growth. Currently, our Green River, Wyoming plant, the world’s largest trona mine and producer of natural soda ash, has full-time opportunities for:

Mechanics Our preferred candidate will be someone who has an associate’s degree or approved certification in a mechanical maintenance or welding discipline from an accredited technical college or university, or who has a journeyman license in the ironworkers, millwrights or mechanic disciplines. We are also looking for individuals with seven or more years of experience in industrial maintenance, as well as military and veterans with relevant training. We offer a hiring incentive of up to $7,500, and up to $12,000 for individuals relocating from beyond a 50-mile radius, plus competitive wages, benefits and retirement plans. To learn more and apply, visit www.fmc.com/careers/ EOE/M/F/D/V/AA


6B •Sun Advocate •Emery County Progress •Smart Shopper Tuesday September 24, 2013

BUSINESS DIRECTORY To advertise in this section please call the Sun Advocate at 637-0732 or the Emery County Progress at 381-2431 Air & Heating

Boutique

PSM

Price Sheet Metal Heating Air Conditioning & Refrigeration Sales & Service In-House Financing 594 So. Carbon Ave., Price

(435) 637-2580

24 hours (435) 820-4052

Asphalt

NEED SEALCOAT? State Licensed & Insured Contractor We Service Parking lots small and large, Roadways, ResidenƟal Areas & Driveways • Seal CoaƟng • Hot Rubber Crack Fill • Striping • Pressure Washing • Signage Local Company. Superior Quality & Service! Call For a Free EsƟmate

Fitness

Health

FITNESS WORLD

NEW SCHEDULE

Helping you Look and Feel Your Best! * Apparel * Fashion Jewelry * Handbags/Wallets

* Accessories * Gifts * Footwear

159 N. 100 E, Price, UT (435) 650-4468 Mon.-Fri. 10-6 Sat. 11-4 (435) 650-6648

Yoga, pilates, dance aerobics, zumba, circuit & strength training, step-kickboxing, turbo kick & bootcamp www.facebook.com/ fitnessworldpriceutah

Best prices around KEYLESS ENTRY 47 W. MAIN, PRICE 613-SLIM

Psychic Medium

Transmissions

Jo’Anne Smith 801-859-3323

Price Autoplex & Trans Rebuild

Special Local Rates

Total Care! Specializing in TRANSMISSION

saltlakemedium@gmail.com www.saltlakemedium.com

Southeastern Integrative Healing Arts Center Massage•Energy Work Book/Gift Shoppe 790 N. Cedar Hills Dr.

435-637-5556

Southeastern Integrative Healing Arts Center 790 N. Cedar Hills Dr. Price, Utah 84501

www.healingartscenter.net

Housecleaning

Publisher’s Notice

Tree Service

Beauty & Scents Need a unique gift for a

Dumpster Rentals

WE MEAN KLEAN, LLC

Protect Yourself!

Tree Top Service

special occasion? Weddings • Anniversary • Specialized Orders Personalized Gifts • Pe

15yd & 30yd container. Oil and Gasfield locations. Commerical, Residential Scrap Metal Recycling

Stephenson Removal Services

Take time for yourself Let us hurt your dirt!

Weekly * BiWeekly * Monthly Construction Clean Outs Residential * Commercial Lic * Insured * Bonded Satisfaction Guaranteed Free Estimate We honor ALL Competitors Coupons!

The Sun Advocate and Emery County Progress do not verify or require license numbers from all of our advertisers. Before hiring a service provider, you should verify their status or check for any complaints by calling

(435) 820-6523

435-636-0144

435-650-1322

Auto Recycling

Chimney Cleaning

General Contracting

Insurance

Removal Services

Home Remodeling, Kitchen & Bath, Cabinets & Countertops Outdoor Kitchens Dealer for Dale Tile Jones Paint & Glass Arizona Shower Doors

Sitterud Insurance Solutions

Small Fee charged for Gift Delivery

Clean Sweep Professional Cleaning • Low Cost • No Mess • Fireplaces • Inserts • Wood Stoves

• Junk Cars • Quick Cash • Free Towing 435-636-0144 1780 W. Ridge Rd. Wellington, UT 84542

Call Clean Sweep now for discounts now 1-435-637-8733 or 1-800-735-1923

Autos

Computer Services Computer Services Max Technology LLC SERVING ALL OF EASTERN

YOUR TRUCK ACCESSORY HEADQUARTERS We buy Cars • Lift Kits • Tires & Wheels • Brake Work • Tune Ups • Auto Detailing • Used Cars and Trucks

-REPAIRS -NETWORKS -REMOTE SUPPORT -DATA P3 PLANS

-PROGRAMMING -MICROSOFT OFFICE DEVELOPMENT -DATABASE DESIGN

LOCALLY OWNED AND OPERATED HERE IN CARBON COUNTY

FLAT RATE SERVICE FEE ONLY $69.99

Blinds

All Types of

Squeeky Clean Windows

DENNY’S HANDY MAN SERVICE

• Roofing • Remodels • Concrete • Painting • Yard Work

No Job Too Small We Fix It All Lowest Price Best Quality

Fall Clean Up

We work hard for your yard!

Jerrit O’Berto owner

Salon

Quality Handyman Small Home Repairs

AutoChip Detailing Rock Repair Rock Repair AutoChip Detailing Carwash Carwash Laundromat Laundromat

ccfencing@ymail.com

27 YEARS EXPERIENCE No Job Too Small Free Estimates

KEVIN HILL (435) 630-6045

For more information call Dylan

435-650-3939 Roofing

Talk of the Town Salon

435-472-TALK (8255)

WEEDS DOWN Free Estimate

97 East 100 North 637-8184

820-2608

Signs

Workers

Wide variety of Tropical Fish, Reptiles, Guinea Pigs, Hamsters, Dwarf Hamsters, Parakeets, Zebra Finches, Crickets, Mealworms, Feeder Mice, Feeder Fish, Frozen Fish Food. Supplies for all your pets.

Patio Decks, Doors Windows, Kitchen, Bath, Flooring, Roofing, Demolition, LOWEST PRICES GUARANTEE

• Professional Window Cleaning • Business • Residential • Tinting • Weathering • Cleaning

10-4 M-F, Evenings & Saturday by Appointment 157 S. Main St., Helper Like us on Facebook

HILLS

Handyman Services

ISA Certified Arborist/Forestry Graduate

We Cut

Castle Valley Services

CASTLE COUNTRY FENCING L.L.C.

Licensed & Insured Contractor

Free Estimate

Laundromat/Car Wash

Pets

435-637-1882

Roofing 820-2608

Handyman

650-1028 650-1027

Call us at

435-637-7869 office 435-299-0944 cell

Fencing

VINYL • CHAIN-LINK • ETC. RESIDENTIAL • COMMERCIAL

• Tree Trimming • Tree Removal • Guaranteed Lowest Prices for Certified Arborist

Window Cleaning

Call for Estimates 435-630-5524

OVER 37 YEARS EXPERIENCE • Local, Friendly Service • No Job Too Small or Too Large

Free Estimates Licensed • Liability Insured

Roofing

Wellington, UT

YOUR FENCING SPECIALISTS

We want your non-running backyard junk cars.

Tree LLC Since 1975

Landscaping

MineWest Sales & Service

435-637-2214 435-630-5153

DEAD OR ALIVE!

Handyman

Handyman

www.reinke.com

DMP

Don M. Purper 435-637-8733 • 1-800-735-9123

Farming

We will meet or beat any prices Same Day or Next Day Service

Ben Lindley

FALL SPECIAL

435-820-0599 435-820-6027

Automotive Glass

REPLACEMENT

Home, Auto, Business, Health, Life, Retirement

Tree Service

5 No. Main St. 435-650-3059 • 435-472-0507 tghatt@emerytelcom.net

801-900-6393

Call 435-650-2946 or 435-637-4460 435-299-0725

Solutions Made Simple

* Top Tree (trimming) * Removal * Shape Trees * Stump Removal Guaranteed Lowest Prices

We Pay $CASH$ for anything metal Free Towing

AN ANOTHER CABINET SHOP, INC.

We’ll meet or beat any price!

W

Don’t Stress, Call the Best

Adam Robison 820-1835 820-0067

Branch Manager 365 S. Main St. Huntington Office 435-687-5655 Cell 801-616-1177 Fax 435-687-5039 ben@sitterudis.com

435-630-4364 970-317-4184 or 719-680-4960 Free Estimates

SHIELD IND S

Big or Small we can fix them all

Garbage Removal

Call Kathy at 435-472-1494 or 801-814-2440

Mike Decaro, Manager Price 637-3633 Helper 472-0120 410 E. Main 5129 No. Hwy 6

REPAIR! Trany Service, Trany Flushes & Full Service Oil Changes

Candles

Utah Department Division of Occupational and Professional Licensing 866-275-3675 or doplweb@utah.gov

Stephenson Metal Recycling

771 E. Main Street, Price, Utah (435) 637-5059

J’s Pet Store 637-4234

260 South Hwy 55 Price

Across the street from Walmart.

Change is hard... ...Labor Finders is easy! Labor Finders provides quality workers for a day, a week, temp to permanent. Big jobs, small jobs... We do it all!

435-637-1782 159 North 100 East Laborfinders.com


•Sun Advocate •Emery County Progress •Smart Shopper Tuesday September 24, 2013 7B 143 – Houses for Sale

LARGE 2005 HOME, 6 bedrooms, 2 living rooms, 4,000 sq.ft., 0.6 acre, $299,000. 630-7581. (09058p)

Check out what the Classifieds have to offer!

4 BEDROOM 2 BATH, 2,000 sq.ft. home in Orangeville. Fenced yard. 435-749-0479.(09248p) EAST CARBON: 3 bed 1 bath Fenced yard. Asking $38,000 801-867-5704. (09124p) GET A jump on Fall pruning, 40% off! 435-637-8733, 800-735-9123. DMP Tree Service.(0808tf)

I found the perfect buyer for my house the first day it was in the paper!! R.H.

Please remember ... the deadline for submitting or canceling items for the Classified section is Monday and Wednesday before 10am.

LOG HOMES: Shells, kits, logs, machine turned logs, beams or raw logs for hand crafted homes. Locally cut and manufactured in Wellington, Utah. King Log & Beam 435613-1553, www.kinglogs. com(0625tf)

144 – Lots and Acreage 26 ACRES NEAR Strawb e r r y. J u s t $ 2 9 , 9 0 0 . Large camp pad. Heavily wooded. Private and gated area. Outdoor paradise. Owner will carry contract. Flexible low down and low monthly payment plans. Over 30 other available properties. Call (801)6333469 or (435)901-3172 for land tour.(09194p) LOTS FOR sale in Liberty Estates Subdivision, Circle K Subdivision, and North Creek Subdivision. Prices start at $47,000. Call Dino @ 435-650-0039.(0222tf) LOTS FOR sale. New subdivision. Excellent NE Price location, close to schools, churches and parks. Priced from $45,000. Call 650-3520. (1004tf)

145 – Mobile Homes $850! FIXER-UPPER in Wellington Mobile Home Park. 2 bedroom 1 bath. 435-590-4141.(0822tf) 14X60 2 BEDROOM 1 BATH at Eastridge (485 South 100 East) in Wellington $3,995. Handyman Specials available $1,000$6,000. Call for availability. 435-650-1435.(0124tf)

145 – Mobile Homes 3 BEDROOM MOBILE home on own lot. Double car garage. For sale or rent. 650-9002.(0910tf) HANDYMAN SPECIALS. Homes available from $1,000 to 6,000 at Central Park (1265 North Carbonville Rd.) in Price. 435650-1523.(0124tf) WELLINGTON/HUNTINGTON: Newly remodeled 3 bedroom mobile homes in park. Rent-toown. W/D hookups. Owner Financed. 435-590-4141 or 323-496-6106.(0502tf)

149 – Water Shares WANTED: MUDDY Creek Irrigation water shares, lease or buy. 435-7491364 or 435-749-0168. (09178p) WANTED: WATER shares Scofield (P.R.W.U.A.), Carbon Canal, Pioneer #1, Pioneer #2, Price Water Co., Allred Ditch. Submit proposals to P.O. Box 700, Price, UT 84501 or call 650-0039.(0512tf) WATER SHARES for sale. Scofield (P.R.W.U.A.). Call 435-637-4008.(0914tf)

154 – Fruit and Produce TAKING ORDERS for tomatoes. Call 472-3171 for details.(0808tf)

155 – Hay and Grain 2ND CROP Hay for sale, no rain, covered. $5.50 per bale. Call 650-1561. (09194p) EXCELLENT ALFALFA hay! First crop $5.50/bale, no rain, in stack. East Price 435-630-1548, 435630-1549.(09248p)

164 – Livestock ADORABLE MINIATURE goats for sale, $50 each. 630-3449.(0806tf)

171 – Fuel and Wood FIRE WOOD 4 sale. 820-6789 or 637-0668.(0910tf)

172 – Furniture GREENWELL INN remodeling sale! Room furnitureArmoires, dressers, TV’s, granite top desks, night stands, headboards, small round tables & chairs. No mattresses. 435-6373520.(0326tf)

174 – Yard Sale/ Garage Sale HELP US clean out building. All inventory is free!! Sat. only! 9am till everything is gone! 2010 South Hwy 10, Price. (09242b)

You can sell almost anything in the classifieds. Call 637-0732 OR 381-2431 today!

Classified Photos The Sun Advocate and Emery County Progress will put photos of your vehicle, RV, motorcycle or Home with your paid private party in-line classified ad for FREE!

FREE

Bring in your ad and photo of your house or the vehicle being sold in anytime during our office hours (8:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.) For vehicle sales, if needed bring it in and we will take a photo of it. \No appointment necessary.

Sun Advocate 637-0732 Emery County Progress 381-2431

174 – Yard Sale/ Garage Sale

191 – Autos, Parts and Services

GOOD THINGS, beautiful plants, Saturday Sept. 28, 9-5. 1st North and Main Street, Orangeville. (09242p)

DONATE YOUR car, truck or boat to the Heritage for the Blind. Free 3 day Vacation, Tax deductible, Free towing, All paperwork taken Care of. 800-5298641. (ucan)(09242f)

ORANGEVILLE: HUGE block yard sale. 200-300 North, 400 West, Saturday, Sept. 28th, 8-5. (09242p) YARD SALE Thur., Fri., Sat., 10am-5pm. 787 South 400 East, Price. (0910tf) YARD SALE! Sept. 28th and 29th, 9a.m. 450 South, 400 East in Price. (09193p)

177 – Miscellaneous for Sale

115 – Schools and Instruction

THIS WEEK’S SPECIAL 2006 DODGE CARAVAN

NEW MINER CLASSES

Price Mine Service is Offering a New Miner 24 hr Surface October 7th - 9th New Miner 32 hr Underground October 7th - 10th Annual Refresher – October 11th Applications & Interviews for Employment to follow call: Sherrie at (435) 637-9300 ext 10

3RD ROW SEATING - CLEAN - A REAL PEOPLE MOVER! THE LAST LITTLE GUY

KRAYNC MOTOR Est. 1945 435-650-1729

TO SUBSCRIBE CALL 637-0732

www.krayncmotorcompany.com

195 – Motor Homes

PAINT UP a storm with Pratt & Lambert paint in stock at CJ’s, 710 E. Main, Price, 636-8100. (0201tf)

1 9 9 8 PA C E A R R O W, class A, 30 ft motor home. 34,634 miles, $21,000 like new. Call 637-3764. (0924tf)

178 – Misc. Wanted to Buy

196 – Campers and Trailers

BUYING SHED antlers. We buy antlers of all types, any condition. Call for prices or with any questions. Steve 435-2453497.(0813104b)

2009 28½FT 5TH Wheel, Jayco Eagle Super Lite, built-in Onan 4,000 generator. Excellent condition. 435-650-9633.(09056p)

182 – Sporting Goods

2006 700R RAPTOR 4 Wheeler, 50th anniversary, like new, all original, asking $4,000 OBO. 435-8204947.(0521tf)

2- WINCHESTER MODEL 12 shotguns for sale. $450 each. 254-979-5853. (09174p)

189 – Fireplaces and Stoves VENT-FREE fireplaces. 99.9% efficient. Starting at $399. CJ’s Do it center, 710 E. Main, Price. 6368100.(0201tf)

Natural Gas Fireplaces, Inserts, Stoves 99.9% Ventless

John M. Howa’s

651 N. Carbonville Rd. 637-2012

eastern.usu.edu/mining

192 – Autos, New & Used

ONLY $7,595 ( GRACE QUILTING frame with lamp. Like new condition. $350 For more info 637-3764.(0827tf)

MSHA MINER TRAINING 435-613-5500 or 1-800-230-8580 ext 5500 550

203 – ATVs

2006 HONDA 250 EX 4 wheeler, rode very little, all original, asking $2,000. 435-820-4947.(0521tf)

TO ADVERTISE CALL 637-0732 177 – Miscellaneous for Sale

ATV - UTV Heater kits installed $450. Street legal kits installed $450. Call Jared 801-367-5217, Chuck 435-636-5377. (09128p)

Why advertise in the Sun Advocate and Emery County Progress? Reach, Quality, Target, Immediate, Flexible, Trusted, Selective not intrusive, Reliable, and most of all RESULTS.

Grace Quilting frame with lamp. Like new condition. $350 For more info 637-3764.

SUBSCRIBE TODAY! Emery County

Progress

381-2431 In-County 6 months $12.50 1 year $25.00 In-State 6 months $16.00 1 year $30.00 Out-of-state: 6 months $19.00 1 year $35.00

Sun Advocate 637-0732 In-County 6 months $25.00 1 year $42.00 In-State 6 months $28.00 1 year $46.00 Out-of-state: 6 months $36.00 1 year $61.00 Ask us about our Digital Paper Boy

d n a New ed! v o r p Im

Digital Paper Boy 2.0 To learn more, visit www.sunad.com and click on the Digital Paper Boy button


Then Take Over The Payments

37.00 ACQUISITION FEE*

JUST TUG IT, TOW IT OR TELL US WHERE IT IS!

*With qualified credit. Plus all fees.

1355 S. CARBON AVE. PRICE, UTAH 1.888.588.3590

CHEVROLET • BUICK GMC • CADILLAC

YOUR CREDIT PROBLEMS ARE “GONE IN 60 SECONDS”

NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE. No Dealers Allowed Until Monday, September 30, 2013! Bankers will be on the premises. Don’t Wait, Hurry For Best Selection!

ALL CREDIT APPLICATIONS WILL BE REVIEWED!

All you pay is $37.00 Acquisition Fee then take over the payments. All credit applications will be reviewed. You may already be pre-approved for $17,500! Just ask your sales person. Bring your trade/title and/or payment book. Be prepared to take immediate delivery!

NEW AND USED CARS, TRUCKS & VANS!

Choose from Subarus, Fords, Lincolns, Mercurys, Hondas, Toyotas, Nissans, Cadillacs, Dodges, Chryslers, Chevrolets, Buicks, Hyundais, Kias, Suzukis, Jeeps, Highlines, SUVs, All Makes of Trucks, and Hundreds More.

hundreds OF OF VEHICLES VEHICLES ON ON HAND, HAND, OVER OVER $3 $3 MILLION MILLION hundreds WORTH OF OF INVENTORY INVENTORY WILL WILL BE BE DISPOSED DISPOSED OF. OF. WORTH

These vehicles have been acquired at incredible savings from Local Trades, Banks, Credit Unions, Lease Companies, Rental Companies, as well as other dealers inventories....

$

FOR 4 You DAYS ONLY! Can Pay A

WE WON’T CLOSE UNTIL THE LAST CUSTOMER IS SERVED!! TONY BASSO CHEVROLET-BUICK-GMC-CADILLAC HAS JOINED FORCES WITH SEVERAL LENDERS FOR THIS ONCE IN A LIFETIME EVENT.

FRIDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 25 SEPTEMBER 26 SEPTEMBER 27 SEPTEMBER 28 OPENS 9AM OPENS 9AM OPENS 9AM OPENS 9AM

NS

VANS

TRUCKS

SPORT UTIL ITIES

CARS

RETUR

IMPORTS LEASE

ACQUISITION 00

$37.00 ACQUISITION SALE!

CUSTOMER IS SERVED

CUSTOMER IS SERVED

CUSTOMER IS SERVED

*With qualified credit. Plus all fees.

1355 S. CARBON AVE. PRICE, UTAH 1.888.588.3590

CHEVROLET • BUICK GMC • CADILLAC

WE WON’T CLOSE UNTIL THE LAST CUSTOMER IS SERVED!!

CUSTOMER IS SERVED

FRIDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY SATURDAY 27 SEPTEMBER 28 SEPTEMBER 25 SEPTEMBER 26 SEPTEMBER 9AM UNTIL THE LAST 9AM UNTIL THE LAST 9AM UNTIL THE LAST 9AM UNTIL THE LAST

FOR BEST SELECTION, COME EARLY! Warranties available on most vehicles.

THIS IS A ONCE IN A LIFETIME OPPORTUNITY!

You will never receive more money for your trade! Special appraisers will be on hand!

• Don’t Worry About Past Credit Problems . . . All credit applications will be reviewed! • Don’t Be Concerned About Your Current Pay Off . . . We can help!

Pay the $37.00 Acquisition Fee* then take delivery!

$37.00 Acquistion Fee, Then Take Over The Payments! PICK YOUR VEHICLE - PICK YOUR PAYMENT!

You can choose from HUNDREDS OF VEHICLES . . . NEW and USED, IMPORTS and DOMESTIC cars or trucks . . . even UTILITY VEHICLES qualify. You can take immediate delivery of any vehicle simply by paying the

FOR 4 DAYS ONLY!

Price, Utah has been selected as the exclusive site for this

00

37 SALE

PUBLIC public NOTICE! $

IT’S COMING TO PRICE!!

8B •Sun Advocate •Emery County Progress •Smart Shopper Tuesday September 24, 2013


C HOTSPOTS

Emery County Progress Castle Dale, Utah Tuesday September 24, 2013 1C Sun Advocate Price, Utah Tuesday September 24, 2013 1C

astle ountry’s hoices

Published by the Sun Advocate and the Emery County Progress • September 2013


C

2C Sun Advocate Price, Utah Tuesday September 24, 2013 2C Emery County Progress Castle Dale, Utah Tuesday September 24, 2013

astle ountry’s hoices

Spotlight

• Year Round Swimming Lessons • Exciting Waves • Lap Swimming • Private Parties • Heated Bubble In Winter

• Fun Winter, Spring, Fall or Summer • Water Aerobics/ Water Zumba • Aquaclimb Wall • Water Canons

WINTER HOURS

Public Monday, Tuesday & Thursday .....................................5:00-8:00 PM Wednesday & Friday ....................................................4:00-8:00 PM Saturday......................................................................12:00-8:00 PM Lap Monday - Friday............................................................5:30-8:00 AM Monday - Friday..........................................................11:00-1:00 PM Monday - Friday............................................................6:00-8:00 PM

PRICE CITY

240 East 500 North, Price UT (435) 637-7946

Shop Local – Quality. Value. Variety. A Utah native, Bill Knott brought his young family to Price for a better way of living. Bill found a great community and a great opportunity to start a home furnishings store. His goal in starting such a business was to bring quality home furnishings from the industries leading manufacturer’s, competitive pricing and a personal touch in customer service. Over the early years, Bill’s Home Furnishings worked to bring quality, well known manufacturer’s to Price for the benefit of Carbon and Emery county residents. Companies like La-Z-Boy, Lane, Ashley for your rooms, Whirlpool and Kitchen-Aid for the kitchen, Tempur-Pedic and Serta for a superb nights sleep and a host of great brands of electronics for your car or home. After several moves and expansion efforts, Bill’s has brought us the area’s largest selection of quality, affordable home furnishings. After 30 years of business in Castle Country, Bill recruited his son-in-law, Mark Jespersen, to move to Price and take over the daily operations as General Manager; thus keeping the business in the family and community. Mark continues to pursue the same goal as Bill from so many years ago. If you’re looking to upgrade your furniture

or replace a worn out/broken down piece, Mark and Bill invite you to SHOP LOCAL by visiting the store at 45 S. 300 E. in Price. Bill Knott hopes you will visit his beautiful showroom soon to see the large selection of quality home furnishings that fill every corner.


Emery County Progress Castle Dale, Utah Tuesday September 24, 2013 3C Sun Advocate Price, Utah Tuesday September 24, 2013 3C

Veterinary medicine undergoing big changes Highly trained animal health professionals increasingly more complex Pets, farm animals, exotic creatures just like people, animals need health care from time to time. When it’s time to see the doc, animals turn to veterinarians. These highly trained health professionals can accurately diagnose animals and perform the appropriate treatments, whether they be of a medical, surgical or preventative nature. But veterinarians don’t just help animals. Even the owners of animals can benefit from their expert advice. Veterinarians possess extensive training that gives them unique skills and knowledge when it comes to treating various animal species and understanding their potential impacts on ecosystems. Some veterinarians choose to work in the

field of veterinary medicine research, while others work in general research on human, animal and environmental health. In addition to caring for various species of wildlife including animals found in zoos, veterinarians play an important role in public health, particularly when it comes to diseases that can be transmitted from animals to humans. Just like human medicine, the field of veterinary medicine is becoming increasingly complex and specialized. When we speak of cardiology, dermatology, dentistry, neurology and behavioural science, we can also be talking about the many specialized fields of veterinary medicine.

ANIMAL HOSPITAL

ROCKY MOUNTAIN CARE Home Care Skilled Nursing & Rehabilitation

S I M P LY

THE

Hospice

BEST CARE

Carbon and Emery Counties Experienced Health Care Team Rocky Mountain Care has provided care since 1990. Our commitment to you remains constant. Your expectation for responsive service and competent care is our highest priority. The team at Rocky Mountain Hospice provides quality care for patients and families by fostering individual choices for dignity and comfort. For more information contact April Barrett or Sunny Ring 435-637-8070.

LARGE AND SMALL ANIMALS J. BOYD THAYN, D.V.M. SERENA K. YOUNG, D.V.M.

WE CARRY SCIENCE DIET PET FOOD

637-5797

Hospice • 435-637-8070 60 East 100 North, Price, Utah Toll Free 877-637-0665 • Central Intake 1-800-574-7666

1-800-718-5797

1989 E. Airport Rd. • Price

Carbon Medical Service * Accepting most insurances * Sliding fee scale available Carbon Medical

305 Center Street, East Carbon • 888-4411

Helper Clinic

125 South Main, Helper • 472-7000

* Newly remodeled, competitively priced, full service pharmacy * Schedule an appointment today for affordable,dependable, preventative care and sick visits.

Carbon Medical Service Association, Inc. in East Carbon was established in 1952. The Helper Clinic in Helper is our other site to provide quality health care to anyone. We bill your insurance plus we are a Federally Qualified Health Center. Carbon Medical receives grant money to serve the uninsured. Carbon Medical has a dedicated and experienced staff who can take care of your primary care: David Watkins, FNP, Lisa Clark, LPN, Dalen Johnson, FNP, and Shannon Cooper, MA are in our East Carbon clinic. At the Helper Clinic are Joe Morrison, FNP and Sharon Rogers, LPN. Andrea Barney, FNP is part-time in East Carbon and Helper. Mike Peyton is Carbon Medical’s behavioral health provider that is in East Carbon and Helper every other week, and a Diabetic Educator – Pam Konakis. Carbon Medical is Joint Commission Accredited and also Patient Centered Medical Home Accredited. Which means, you the patient, choose a provider. The provider, nurse, pharmacy, front desk and you the patient are a team. This is a Team Based approach to your care. Carbon Medical offers the Patient Portal. When you sign up for the Patient Portal you are able to access your medical records. It is HIPAA Compliant and secure. You have a personal log in & you choose the password. This enables the patient to have access to their medical records. You can get your lab results, request an appointment, request refill, leave messages for your provider or nurse and also update your information. Carbon Medical Pharmacy is a full service pharmacy at East Carbon. The Pharmacy Director is Joyce Caviness. The pharmacy fills patient prescriptions and prescriptions from other providers. Call our East Carbon site at 435-888-4411 or the Helper site at 435-472-7000 to make an appointment. These clinics are accepting new patients.

Say it with love Love Floral proudly serves the Price area. We are family owned and operated. We are committed to offering only the finest floral arrangements and gifts, backed by service that is friendly and prompt. Because all of our customers are important, our professional staff is dedicated to making your experience a pleasant one. That is why we always go the extra mile to make your floral gift perfect. Our shop is open from 9:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m., Monday through Friday and from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. on Saturday. We are closed on Sundays. We specialize in the following services: • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Large inventory of fresh flowers Tropicals Plants European/dish gardens Contemporary and traditional arrangements High-style floral arrangements Silk arrangements Dried floral arrangements Weddings Funeral designs Extensive gift line Gourmet and fruit baskets Gift baskets Greeting cards Candles

Let Love Floral be your first choice for flowers.

64 N. 100 W., Price • 637-3377


4C Sun Advocate Price, Utah Tuesday September 24, 2013 4C Emery County Progress Castle Dale, Utah Tuesday September 24, 2013

Southeast Wallcovering Paint & Blinds Quality Paints, Helpful Service

Ask about our discount hotel packages when you pick up your travel card.

196 N. Main, Huntington 30 W. Main, Ferron (435) 687-2472 www.dview.org

FEDERAL CREDIT UNION

Quality comes in literally hundreds of colors at Southeast Paint. As your local Devoe Paint dealer, Southeast Paint is your one stop shop to quality pproducts, which are also backed by their quality and friendly service. At Southeast Paint, you will be able to find the knowledge and necessities you need to complete almost any domestic orr commercial project. Located at 20 East Main in Price, pphone (435) 637-4560, Southeast Paint offers a line of quality interior and exterior paints, ppainting supplies, faux finishes, wallpaper, and blinds. Southeast Paint also satisfies a unique niche in our community by combining with Dunkers that ensures shared sentiment through specialty gifts and gourmet. From paint supplies, wall coverings, blinds, and fine gifts all yearr round, Southeast Paint will make sure thatt you are well taken care of. Come on in and d talk to Ed.

Industrial • Commercial • Residential

DEVOE NEW

Regency Paint + Primer in one

INN

is our finest quality paint that saves you time! New Regency is specially formulated to provide excellent coverage and application properties, and has superior durability and stain resistance, making it ideal for withstanding wear and tear in high traffic areas. Interior or exterior paint.

Accomodations & Amenities

• Cabins with Kitchenettes • Fresh Homemade Food • Car Wash • Sunday Rib BBQ

• • • • •

We will help you with your home projects every step of the way!

Onsite Beauty Salon Convenience Store Gas Station Propane Daily Lunch Specials

15 North State Street Ferron, Utah (435) 384-3333

Central Location - near to: Golfing, ATV Trails, Snowboarding, Snowmobiling, Skiing (water and snow), Hiking, Boating, Camping, Fishing, Mountain Biking, Museums, State Parks, San Rafael Swell, Pictographs and Petroglyphs

ASK TODAY ABOUT

DEEP TISSUE

LASER THERAPY DRUG-FREE

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S U R G E R Y- F R E E

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PAIN RELIEF

• Wallpaper In Stock & Special Orders • Custom Blinds & Shutters

• Custom Match Paint & Supplies • All Faux-Finish Needs • Metallic to Venetian Plaster

20 East Main, Price • 637-4560 Southeast Chiropractic Inc practices at 55 North 600 East, Price, UT 84501. Chiropractors diagnose and treat common spinal misalignments that can occur from lifestyle or injuries causing pain, discomfort and degenerative conditions. Dr. Kelly D. Terry practices a non surgical, drug free approach to health care. Certified in Acupuncture and extremity adjusting, Dr Kelly D. Terry practices a conservative and non-surgical approach to neck, back hips, sciatica, neck pain, headaches, sports, injuries, auto accidents, elbows, wrist, feet, shoulders and knee pain. Also come in for a free consultation and see how deep tissue laser therapy can relieve your pain, along with chiorpractic adjustments which is drug free, surgery free, pain relief therapy. To learn more, or to make an appointment with Southeast Chiropractic Inc in Price, UT, please call (435) 637-4621 for more information.

SOUTHEAST

FIND OUT HOW DEEP TISSUE LASER THERAPY CAN RELIEVE YOUR PAIN

CHIROPRACTIC Inc.

therapy lasers

Working to create decent affordable housing in partnership with those in need in Carbon & Emery Counties.

“We are building homes and changing lives.” To volunteer or to make a donation please call.

Habitat For Humanity of

Castle Country try Phone 435-637-9701 PO Box 724 Price, Utah 84501

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Personal Health Care

www.sechiropractic.com

637-4621

Habitat for Humanity of Castle Country is a nonprofit, ecumenical Christian housing ministry. HfH seeks to eliminate poverty housing and homelessness from the world, and to make decent shelter a matter of conscience and action. Habitat invites people of all backgrounds, races and religions to build houses together in partnership with families in need. Through volunteer labor and donations of money and materials, Habitat builds simple, decent houses with the help of homeowner (partner) families. Habitat houses are sold to partner families financed with affordable no-interest loans. The homeowners’ mortgage payments are used to build more Habitat houses. Habitat for Humanity of Castle Country is not a giveaway program. In addition to a down payment and the monthly mortgage payments, homeowners invest hundreds of hours of their own labor--sweat equity—into building their Habitat house and the houses of others. Habitat for Humanity’s A Brush With Kindness program can provide the up-front money and expertise to improve the durability or accessibility of your home. Typical projects include exterior painting, siding repairs, roof repairs, exterior ramps and stairs, landscaping. To learn more and apply, contact the Program Manager for this area: Jack Forinash, 180 S. Broadway, PO Box 444, Green River, Utah, 84525. Phone 435-564-3330, email habitat@ruralandproud.org. To volunteer, donate materials, and learn more, go online to www.hfhcc.tumblr.com/abwk Families in need of decent shelter may call 435-637-9701 and leave a message with name and mailing address for an application. To make a donation, please mail your check to Habitat for Humanity CC; PO Box 724, Price, Utah 84501.

Pinnacle Brewing Company/Groggs is very proud of our catering abilities. We offer on or off site catering for all types of different functions. Whether you are looking for extravagant to simply, Groggs can customize your catering needs to fit your event and budget. From our gourmet sandwich trays to our in-house smoked prime rib dinner, we can provide an outstanding meal and outstanding service to accommodate any event. Christmas parties, weddings, business meetings, family functions and anything in between, large or small, Groggs will make it a success. Remember Groggs for all your catering needs and give us a call so we can start helping you plan your next great event. You’re going to like the way it tastes, we guarantee it.


Emery County Progress Castle Dale, Utah Tuesday September 24, 2013 5C Sun Advocate Price, Utah Tuesday September 24, 2013 5C

Magnuson Lumber - now 48 years old Magnuson Lumber has been serving the public for 48 years. This experience shows in the wide variety of products and services for both the Do-It-Yourself homeowner and professional contractor. Customer Service is first class. If Magnuson’s doesn’t have it, they will quickly custom order it for the customer. Magnuson Lumber is located on the corner, at 495 East Main in Castle Dale. There is a trained staff of employees who are on hand and ready to serve each customers needs. Products include every category for the Homeowner, Do-It-Yourselfer, and Contractor. They stock lumber, hardware, plumbing and heating supplies, insulation, roofing products, DeVoe paints (with computer color matching), power tools, hand tools, electrical, and a section of home décor and crafts to finish off the job. Magnuson Lumber is owned by Randy and Laurel Magnuson, and managed by Eric Howes. Customer Service is their main concern. Randy and Eric are ready to advise, custom order, and deliver needed goods and materials to the job site in a timely manner. With hundreds of vendors, and internet search capability, they are ready and able to serve. Randy credits the bustling business to the ongoing support and loyalty of customers all over Carbon and Emery counties. He feels his business is successful because Magnuson’s listens to the customer, and try to adjust business practices to be customer friendly. He says to look for more of the same customer oriented service in New shipments of home the future. decor arriving weekly!

Roger Kneipp

Something for everyone at Stewart’s Market in Castle Dale Here at Stewart’s Market, we operate a modern, spacious, well stocked grocery store that takes pride in offering a variety of food products at competitive prices. Stewart’s Market is noted for our quality as well as diverse food products and friendly service. Wayne Huntington is the manager of Stewart’s Market in Castle Dale and is pleased with the opportunity to serve this area’s needs with all manner of services including; groceries, fresh cut meats, bakery goods that are made from scratch, farm fresh produce and a large selection of videos. To add to an already huge selection of meat products, Stewarts has recently added a stock of delicious marinated beef, pork, chicken and fajita mix . New produce racks and Gluten free products are also now available at Stewart’s Market as part of our ever expanding inventory. Our bakery offers a wide variety of products including beautiful affordable wedding cakes. Stewarts is also there for

every occasion, specialty fruit & meat trays are a great way to feed your guests, make sure and place orders early for the upcoming holidays! Here at Stewarts, you can find new camping and fishing supplies, including worms and minnows, coolers, campstove and lantern fluid, fishing poles, lures, and more. As an added service, did you

know you can pay your bills at Stewart’s? DishNework, Direct TV, Questar Gas, Rocky Mountain Power, Sprint, Verizon, and AT&T can all be taken care of right here at Stewarts, we also

offer money orders, Western Union, film developing, phone cards and holiday gift certificates. And don’t forget our daily lunch specials at the deli.

621 East Main - Castle Dale • 381-5660 • New Summer Hours 8-10 Mon.-Sat.


6C Sun Advocate Price, Utah Tuesday September 24, 2013 6C Emery County Progress Castle Dale, Utah Tuesday September 24, 2013

How To get same day service for your Automobile Today’s family automobile is a sophisticated, computer controlled machine that requires less care and is more dependable than its predecessors. But to keep your car running efficiently, regularly scheduled maintenance is key to reliable performance and can mean savings down the road. Without regular maintenance, you can shorten the life of your vehicle and void its warranty.

vechicle in promptly. We are not like other shops that have a long wait time , we understand you rely on your vechicle and guarantee to return it to you as quickly as possible. We intend to solve any issues that may arise in an immediate and equitable manner once asked.

We are concerned about you, your family and your automotive needs!

At Supreme Muffler & Brake “We know what it takes to get the job done right, the first time.” This is our creed and it must be expressed in all we do and say each and everyday. We are concerned about you, your family and your automotive needs. We are car repair specialists and we are equipped to service and repair mufflers, performance exhaust systems, brakes, shocks, steering and suspension, alignments, tune-up and drivability complaints, ABS braking systems, fuel filters, fuel induction and injections systems, and many other drivability concerns related to cars and light trucks.

In order to complete your repair we will: • Road test vehicle to replicate the complaint or concern. • Provide a step by step analysis. • Provide diagnosis in a efficient expertly manner. • Check related components to the problem. • Provide you with full information and bulletins for your car. • Use proven parts and merchandise of high quality.

Owner Joe Piccolo

Ethics: Quality Service • Quality Technicians • Reputable Parts • Trusts • Itemized Receipt • Respect of your Property • Quality Diagnostic Equipment • Clean Comfortable Establishment • Uphold High Standards • Remain Trained • Present Integrity on all work and in all Relationships • Up Front Pricing • No Guesses • No Surprises • No Hassles • Added Value with Every Purchase! Why Should I Call? We offer same day service. Call us and we will get your

We Guarantee...every operation we offer to the satisfaction of our customers. We promise a timely delivery of a valuable finished produce, on time and right the first time. We promise up front pricing every time and jobs done to the estimate, no surprises. We will price match anyone and want to work for you.

SUPREME MUFFLER & BRAKE 911 E. 100 N., Price 637-4493 Mon-Fri 8:30 am - 6:00 pm Sat 8:30 am - 1:30 pm

TRANSMISSION EXPRESS

DRIVE LINE SPECIALIST • FREE LOCAL TOWING

925 E. 100 N., Price • 637-8494 Hours Mon-Fri 8:00 am- 5:30 pm

ULTRA LUBE

955 East 100 North • 637-8512 Hours Mon-Fri 8:30 am- 6:00 pm Sat 8:30 am - 4:00 pm

Quality Products, Quality People “The number one factor is the quality of the product. Without that customers aren’t going to stay around long,” says Joni Hackwell. “We have unique in-store candy making demonstrations. Customers smell caramel bubbling in a traditional copper kettle on a electric stove. They can watch the cook spin a skewered apple in the hot caramel being made before their eyes. That’s what people remember most about the experience.” Old Fashioned Treats, Upscale Gifts Another trademark is the unusually large portions of chocolate on display. That was a fortunate mistake. In the early days, they did not know how to make chocolate and had to literally learn on a ping pong table. From the start they made the candy centers too big, not compensating for the added size and weight when coating the pieces in chocolate. And if they didn’t look quite right they would dip them again. But the mountain-sized pieces instantly caught on and have remained the Rocky Mountain benchmark ever since. Best of all are the classic treats the visitor will find at Rocky Mountain Chocolate Factory – many of which haven’t been seen by more mature adults since childhood. Besides the delightful caramel-covered apples, a variety of fruits, nuts, pretzels and cookies are also dipped by hand in pots of melted milk, dark and even white chocolate. Fine chocolates, such as the Company’s signature piece, the Bear® a paw-sized concoction of chewy caramel, roasted nuts and a heavy coating of chocolate, are shipped fresh on one of the Company’s many refrigerated trucks. Other pieces include favorites like nut clusters, butter creams, exotic flavored truffles, toffee and a king-sized peanut butter cup appropriately dubbed the “Bucket™”. Recently, the Company developed a new line of sugar-free and no-sugar-added candies. Results have been “spectacular”, filling a need for those with special dietary requirements. Also featured are a variety of packaged candies in traditional boxes, decorative tins and bags, perfect for gift giving, holiday time and special occasions. Store operators are happy to prepare special requests for fund raising, corporate gifts or catering for weddings or other special events. Traditional Methods, Contemporary Presentation Rocky Mountain Chocolate Factory shops are a unique blend of the traditional and contemporary. The recently redesigned store concept features a more contemporary design that prominently features the in-store cooking while providing an ideal backdrop for the newly redesigned upscale packaging. Every cooking area features a hand-forged copper kettle on a electric or gas-fired stove, and a variety of hand instruments, reinforcing the quality and freshness of the products.

Celebrating 25 Years of the Ultimate Ice Cream Experience® C Can you believe it’s been 25 years? When we opened our first store in 1988, we knew our passion for making fresh ice C c cream every day in every store would be popular, but we didn’t know it’d be this popular! Now we’re delighting ice cream c lovers in more than 20 countries around the world! Thank T you to all those who’ve helped get us where we are today — our amazing crew members, fantastic franchisees, a of course, you — our adoring fans. and Here’s H to celebrating another 25 years of the Ultimate Ice Cream Experience®!


Emery County Progress Castle Dale, Utah Tuesday September 24, 2013 7C Sun Advocate Price, Utah Tuesday September 24, 2013 7C

FARM BUREAU FINANCIAL SERVICES

Elaine C. Wood has been an agent for Farm Bureau Financial Services for over 10 years, and has worked for Farm Bureau for over 21 years. She is located upstairs in the Key Bank Building on Main Street in Price. Her phone number is 435637-8400. Elaine has completed extensive training in the areas of life insurance, investments, property & casualty, and senior issues, and as a result, has won several awards in the insurance business. She carries policies for home, auto, farm, health, business Insurance, workman’s comp. as well as life insurance, and investments. Elaine loves helping her clients understand insurance and how to make it simple. Elaine along with her friendly and knowlegeable staff are here to help with all your insurance needs. Elaine has lived in the Carbon County area for over 35 years, and loves the people here. She has clients all over the state of Utah. “When my client’s children grow up and leave the area, they call as ask if I can still be their agent.” I follow them through all the stages of life, from adding them on the policy when they get their drivers license to watching them attend college or get their first careers, or through marriage and having their families. It’s a nice feeling to be able to watch them grow and help them with their ever changing insurance needs.

Elaine qualified for MDRT (Million Dollar Roundtable) this year. This is the second time she has qualified for this award. Elaine’s life goal is to make a positive difference in others lives.

Please stop by her office at 690 E. Main St. (Upstairs in the Key Bank Building) and come meet her and her friendly staff.

Hardware For over 77 years and 4 generations, Jones Jones Ace Hardware/ has offered a wide variety of goods and services The Jones’ have been in the hardware business for 77 years and their customers keep coming and their selection continues to increase. Need a battery? We’ll likely have it. Need a RF Modulator - We’ve got it. How about an atomic clock or a wireless CD adaptor for the car? We’ve got all the fun stuff from car phones to satellite TV. We can fix you up at the right prices too! The business has been in the family now for four generations. Peter Christian Jones, a truck gardener, produce peddler and thresher came from Sunnyside in 1936. He bought the lot and building from the Algers who ran a Ford dealership at the location and sold Model T’s and A’s. Pete and his two sons, Carlyle and Lewis, built the business into a grain and feed business, where they threshed grain and processed it for the farmers. They also sold custom feeds, seed grains and garden products. The business today offers over 30,000 items in inventory. The staff works very hard to provide excellent service to the customer. They can’t distinguish between their friends

and their customers so they band together to offer only the best customer service to the people they call friends. Ace offers housewares, home appliances, home furnishings, hardware, plumbing, electrical, lawn and garden, paint, sundries, sporting goods, automotive, toys, seasonal green goods, RV supplies, cell phones, satellite dishes, cards and the best service around. Our friendly staff are here to help you so drop by at 195 East Main, Castle Dale, and see how they can assist you.

Great People, Quality Food, and Low Prices Hometown Market – located conveniently in Huntington – is a full service grocery store offering a great variety of grocery, dairy, frozen food, produce, bakery, and quality fresh meat items. The staff at Hometown Market is constantly looking for ways to improve customer service and product selection. We have renovated the store. We offer a deli case and custom meat selection. In store weekly sales, stop in and take advantage of our in-store weekly flyer on many great deals on the products you use every day and on exciting new merchandise arriving almost weekly. The staff at Hometown Market expresses their appreciation to the residents of Emery County for their support. Hometown Market announces the addition of Wane Justice as the new meat manager. Custom processing is available for beef, lamb and pork. Offering the same service & quality meats.

Come in for our Daily Deli Specials Monday - Chinese Tuesday - Barbeque Wednesday - Baked Ham Thursday - Lasagna Friday - Chinese Saturday - BBQ Pulled Pork

Open Monday-Saturday 8-9 221 North Main, Huntington • 687-9976

Wane Justice Meat Manager.


8C Sun Advocate Price, Utah Tuesday September 24, 2013 8C Emery County Progress Castle Dale, Utah Tuesday September 24, 2013

Sportsman’s Corner After a few years as General Manager at Bill’s Home Furnishings, Mark Jespersen saw an opportunity to expand the inventory into something outside of home furnishings and Sportsman’s Corner was born. Housed inside Bill’s, SC has the same goal and mission…to bring quality, name brand sporting goods, competitive pricing and a personal touch in customer service for the residents of Carbon and Emery county.

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SP O

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Sportsman’s Corner focus’s on archery, optics and shooting with leading manufacturer’s like Swarovoski, Vortex, Leupold, SMA T R Browning, Remington, Ruger, Springfield, PSE and many others you know and trust.

OR

Over the first few years, Sportsman’s Corner has nearly tripled its selection of product and continues to be the LOCAL SHOP for quality sporting supplies. Locating inside Bill’s Home Furnishings, stop by before you go anywhere else.

R E N

82 North, 100 West 637-7676 facebook.com/bicyclewerks What’s next for Bill Knott and Mark Jespersen? Always looking to fill a void in the business community and keep the community shopping local they began to discuss an opportunity with Fuzzy’s Bicycleworks. Long story short, Bill and Mark started Bicyclewerks in June of this year. Fuzzy, after several years of going at it alone, was excited to dissolve his business and become a key cog in Bicyclewerks as the lead sales guy, lead bike tech (the only certified tech in Castle Country) and general trail guru. What’s different? Not too much. Mark continues to pursue Bill Knott’s original goal at Bill’s Home Furnishings in bringing quality, name brand product, competitive pricing and a personal touch in customer service by working with companies like Specialized, Sub Rosa, Santa Cruz, Shimano and others and bringing them to our local market. After a full year in the business, Mark and Bill are more excited than ever. Bicyclewerks is turning into Castle Country’s lifestyle shop - the place to go for bikes (road, mountain & youth) of course, but also SUP boards, yoga, and most likely other exciting inventory items. SUP - stand up paddle - boards are great fun in the water and form of exercise. Not sure what they are or if you will like it? Don’t worry, rent it first. Bicyclewerks rents bicycles & SUP boards. Their goal isn’t the sale, but creating an enjoyable customer experience and encouraging a lifestyle of cycling. As the 2013 season winds down, Bill, Mark and Fuzzy are excited for the future of Bicyclewerks and invite you to SHOP LOCAL at 82 N. 100 W. in Price.

• Main Office

675 East 100 North • Price

• East Carbon Branch

105 West Geneva • East Carbon

• Moab Branch

860 South Main • Moab

(435) 637-2443 • www.euccu.com

“People Helping People”

THE

MAKE

Grade

t Eastern Utah Community Credit Union A“People we take the credit union philosophy of Helping People” to heart. You’ll see

this in the way we strive to provide friendly and personalized service to meet our members financial needs. We do our best to offer the highest earnings for your savings, the lowest rates on loans and to keep fees to a minimum. Come in today and let our experienced staff show you what makes us different from other financial institutions.

7th-12 grade students can earn cash for A’s! Buying a car?

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Your savings federally insured to $250,000 by the National Credit Union Administration, a U.S. Government Ahency

We do business in accordance with the Federal Fair Housing Law and the Equal Credit Opportunity Act.

Member appreciation BBQ

New from EUCCU... Articles and multimedia resources geared at helping you make the most of your financial resources.

Information you can use to get help with everything from buying a car to financing an adoption. Available on our website at www.euccu.com

We’re Your Locally Owned, Locally Managed Financial Institution


Emery County Progress Castle Dale, Utah Tuesday September 24, 2013 9C Sun Advocate Price, Utah Tuesday September 24, 2013 9C

Emery County Business Chamber growing stronger The Emery County Business Chamber is now in its third year. In the first year the group saw a lot of success. They began a bi-monthly program entitled Lunch and Learn. For these business luncheons there have been many varied topics for discussion and learning. Once each year the business chamber takes the luncheon to Green River to ensure the whole county can participate with the business chamber. Topics for lunch and learns have included, building an internet business, health care and options for small business, financing for small businesses, nuclear power, using social networking to advance your business and customer service to name a few. Julie Jones is the chamber president. Dane Behling is the vice president. Other board members include: Jenene Hansen, Ann Jones, Dallen Skelley, Ethan Migliori, Jerry Stotler, Keith Brady, Patsy Stoddard, Nanette Tanner, Tyler Jeffs, and Jared Anderson. The business chamber director is Shalane Christiansen. Mike McCandless, Emery County Economic Development director is an advisory member. The chamber has been developing an online presence with the assistance of board member Keith Brady. You can register online for the lunch and learn meetings and more information is becoming available online. A big project the chamber took on was the Economic Summit. This event included several speakers on various topics of interest to business. There were breakout sessions and a lunch session held at the Millsite Golf Course where speakers talked about tourism and promoting our area for events and activities.

The project the chamber is the most proud is the Emery County: Your first choice campaign. This campaign promotes the benefits of shopping at home. Top 10 Reasons to Shop Emery County: $100 spent at locally owned stores generates $45 back into the Emery County economy; $100 spent outside the county generates $0 back into the Emery County economy. $100 spent at a big box store only generates $13 back into their economy. Locally owned businesses are committed to Emery County’s prosperity, cities, schools, and people. Stores outside the county (especially bigbox stores) do not care. Tens of thousands of dollars are generously donated from locally owned businesses to organizations in support of Emery County You owe it to our local business owners to support them back. Local businesses will in turn be able to support even more organizations with a good cause. It costs $5.66 for every 10 miles driven in the average vehicle, that’s $36.79 from Castle Dale to Price and back, and $124.52 to travel to Provo and back (this does not include lunch). You cannot afford to keep driving so much now that you know the real costs of driving. (Based on research from AAA) Supporting local businesses will create more local jobs and a stronger local economy for you and your children. Supporting local businesses will generate more money for our local schools, parks, streets, and public works that we all enjoy. Communities that preserve their one-of-a-kind businesses and distinctive character have an economic advantage. Local ownership ensures that important decisions are made locally by people who live in the

community and who will feel the impacts of those decisions. The best social media is found at our local stores when we bump into our neighbors and a real sense of community exists. You love where you live, you want to support it, and you’re loyal to it. The Emery County Business Chamber is here to support the businesses of Emery County in return, we need your support. The following businesses are members, please support them call 381-2431 to join the chamber today. Emery County Business Chamber Members 2013: Fausett Mortuary/Steven Furner; Affordable Flooring; Pat’s Sew n’ Stuff/ Pat Behling; Price Small Business Deve. Center; United Way of Eastern Utah; So Ea Ut Econ Deve. District; Gilly’s/ Taina Benson; Trails End Reality/Ethan Hurdsman; Magnuson Lumber; Emery Telcom Nielson Construction; SOS Staffing; Forbidden Fruit; Village Inn/ Mark Peters; EC Community Volunteer Center, Main Street Market; BK’s; Emery County Sanitation; Zions Bank; Ferron City; Emery County Progress/Sun Advocate; Heritage Funeral Home; Mark H Tanner Attorney at Law; Epicenter/Jack Forinash; EAO Services Inc/Angie Fillmore; David O Robertson & Sons Construction; Ace Hardware/ Pat Jones; Castle Service; Castle Valley Co Op; Caterpillar; Emery Animal Health; Castle Café; J&D Auto; Superior Security Services; Jerry Stotler Utah Power Credit Union; Magnuson Livestock and Meat Market; Hometown market; Beehive Homes; TC Builders; Mike Olsen law office; Rendezous Pages LLC; Food Ranch; Cleveland Town; Huntington City; PDC Phone Directory and Emery Town.

HOSPICE

Caring Professionals & Volunteers Pain & Symptom Management Like a wonderful Physical & Emotional Support shade tree giving Medical Equipment & Supplies UTAH 2012 comfort. Respect for Social & Spiritual needs Medicare & Medicaid Certified Caregiver Teaching & Respite Your Doctor is part of our team The decision to enter into hospice care need not cause anxiety or concern. When the time Caring for our Communities over a lifetime

Home Health & Hospice 81 years and still making housecalls

435-613-8887 (Carbon) • 435-381-2044 (Emery) • 877-613-8887 (toll-free - anywhere)

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for hospice care is determined by family members and the family physician, it is time for tenderness, comfort and relief. Our team includes Nurses, Therapists, Social Workers, Spiritual Counselors, Aides and Volunteers. The services of this very qualified group are available to the patient and the family. At this time we wish to do all we can to ease the burden of everyone involved.

e f i l d l i W d e m a t n U

Historical Heritage

Riding the Trail’s

UTAH 2013


10C Sun Advocate Price, Utah Tuesday September 24, 2013 10C Emery County Progress Castle Dale, Utah Tuesday September 24, 2013

The Tuscan is a perfect venue for your event The Tuscan Restaurant, Lounge and Event Center opened in 2012 and is the “talk of the town” with its many beautiful features and services being offered. Upon entering the facility it is beyond compare. From the hallway to the event to the restaurant to the “VIP” room, the Tuscan is decorated in rich, warm colors with a Tuscan vineyard theme with elegant fabrics aligning entryways and windows. It is a design that can be incorporated into any event planning. Unlike any other facility, the Tuscan features the “VIP” room that offers a small intimate group setting, no matter the occasion, the “VIP” room

will work for you. The Tuscan specializes in weddings, class and family reunions, anniversaries, business retreats, meetings, conventions, birthday parties and more. The Tuscan has a full catering service with a menu that is sure to please any event planner and their guests. The Tuscan can also cater to your event location. The Tuscan can handle both large and small events with an experienced staff offering the best price, service and value. They are committed to excellence. To inspire the best service, a manager will supervise every party from start to finish. Our individual attention

is focused on providing the best atmosphere with warm, friendly, personalized service.

Celebrating 90 years

Photos, clockwise from left: Mary Giacoletto and an unidentified employee; Workmen’s Market Founders Mary & John Giacoletto; A crowd gathers at the door Workmen’s; The original Workmen’s Market storefront.

Four generations of Giacoletto’s have been operating Workmen’s Market in Helper for 90 years. From the beginning, Workmen’s has excelled at knowing and catering to the community’s needs. In the 1920’s they offered everything from hay, coal, corn and other fresh produce as well as groceries. The produce sold in their store was grown on the Giacoletto’s own farm, and all the milk products – including homemade ice cream – came from their very own dairy as well. At the time, there were thirteen grocery stores in Helper – Workmen’s is one of the few remaining. One thing is for sure, Workmen’s Market is still the place for personalized service that is honest, fair and friendly, and where the customers are our friends. We look forward to seeing you soon!

Book your

Wedding Reception, Reunion, or other Event at

The

TUSCAN Bridal & Events Center Contact Kathy Hanna-Smith or Sam Farlaino 23 East 100 North, Price

613-CLUB


Emery County Progress Castle Dale, Utah Tuesday September 24, 2013 11C Sun Advocate Price, Utah Tuesday September 24, 2013 11C

Service is #1 at the Price Auto group, find out today by contacting their friendly and professional Sales Team. Whether you are in the market for a new or used vehicle, their extensive knowledge and commitment to service after the sale will make you a customer for life. The Service Department at the Price Auto Group defines a friendly and knowledgeable experience in the Castle Valley. Whether you are in the need for a complete rebuild or overhaul or just looking for a quick replacement part, the Price Auto Group will always be your Community Motors. Continuing to define the “all in one” service dealership, the Price Auto Group also delivers a full variety of car and truck tires and custom wheels. Stop by today for anything and everything needed for your car. Remember, the Price Auto Group is your friend, your neighbor and still your Community Motors. First Choice Auto Body is the #1 name in auto repair in the Castle Valley. Working closely with local insurance agencies they eliminate the need to chase bids following an accident. Additionally, if you are looking to dress up your vehicle, their service and skill are unmatched in the area.

Auto Sales & Leasing • Parts & Service • Collision Repair Facility • “When only the BEST will do!”

THE PRICE AUTO GROUP, LLC 354 South Hwy 55, Price, Utah 84501

(435) 637-3360 • (435) 637-1972 • TOLL FREE 1-800-944-0219

www.thepriceautogroup.com

$

3 colors to choose from

199

HARD HAT

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FURNITURE & APPLIANCE

21 West Main, Price 637-0140 Hours: Mon.-Fri. 9 ‘til 6, Sat. 9 ‘til 5, Closed Sunday Your Neighborhood

3 colors to choose from

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Queen bed, dresser mirror & nightstand

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5 Pc. Dinettes

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Similar to Illustrations

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12C Sun Advocate Price, Utah Tuesday September 24, 2013 12C Emery County Progress Castle Dale, Utah Tuesday September 24, 2013

PAWN

Karen Martino-Basso

For 25 years, people from all over the Carbon and Emery County area have from time to time found themselves with one problem in common – the need for cash. At Charlie’s Pawn, there is almost always one easy way to solve it: to “pawn” personal items of value for a cash loan. All over the United States, pawnbrokers just like Charlie’s have provide monetary loans in exchange for valuable items. These items are then held by the pawn shop for a contractual period of time during which the owner of the item can repay the cash loan, plus an amount of interest, to reclaim their goods. However, pawn for loan is only one part of the “pawn shop equation,” many individuals do not return for their property or sell them outright in the first place. This leads to a large amount of inventory for most shops and Charlie’s is no different, in fact it could be said that they have “an inventory for the masses.” If you need it, its a good bet the folks at Charlie’s have it. This long time Carbon County shop has crafted a great reputation with the local community for fair service and a huge product store. “We meet a lot of different and unique people and I love that about this business. We have enjoyed getting to know many of the great people in the Castle Valley,” said Janet Roedel, Owner at Charlie’s Pawn. “Additionally, you get to help people out in this business and it’s always nice to help someone in a tight spot.” Stop by Charlie’s today, no matter what it is you are looking for, if you need it, there’s a good chance Charlies has it and it looking to sell it.

Karen Martino-Basso has been a licensed Realtor Since 2004. She has a true passion for helping people with all Their Real Estate needs. She takes great pride in the work she does for her clients, and the received referrals show clients are happy with her services. This year she has been elected to be the Carbon Emery Board of Realtor President, and also was nominated and graduated from the Utah Association Of Leadership Academy. Here you will find a REALTOR® that has your best interest in mind. Give this Proud Realtor a call to help you. Call Karen she has the key.

US OUT!

Rifles, Knives, TVs, Snowboards, Video Games, Guitars, Tools, Binoculars, DVDs $2.00, and Much More

Large Selection of Jewelry!

We negotiate prices and guarantee what we sell

“Do one thing. Do it well.” ~ Steve Jobs s s e r g o

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This on nc an is wa for wa provem that imousl e, which Allred United States network of on itprtoopyou tem im $81,596 grantJu an enth get y, se y; erhere.” e own, theesint ia den Jima as ing Cit d to the Sa n tab- s r thhte tyg in illery pos through Burto ner Jim ou st he heroforig hat w go us ut ild ing u a ha fighting and hidden art . colltoectheon ci Iwo of an us aw ar de Mu nic ipa l Bu sion cordin ould didn’t knre three . 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The riders in that is co umion for e ich at as e op . wh eec my ds d ke $1 e tim es s n Gr ply tr to ed a t. le drsafintion Sa yi of said by ene at sim an d an are be Burea signs th some pa nfrontin eyart the act the cintrnSp le He ar behe e are Win know w ng to do dollars ep them e dVofor d to the l Bu ild ing Jere de lu use g u at ar in y aseun nt detailing All red 's Pu rp munitionran farst“Th rt kl ha ancie A ty ipa my eftheir eers aw put up g take of Lan direct s of TV t the With er. t trai is to ha more. in co thaun am pa strucC ty Mu nic ls they n do ted fort to plCo ac un ve up by idhor tap . lea d to d ran out of ve cil’ tec watyer pro p sticrity for the con wn asd Manag riders toarbon themselv the sign d a me rent s to retrie skip ou “I bing mark me tho can tr markers erst the rs on intenance sho “They ha ed someone ll, Allred bin, the ci hat ha y tha fast as emen Auore ke in six n one pl ap- while da es on tr s missi lls descri's acav wa w rto s ma ed We Bu Ca el the ho a tra co ty t RI d ne er. ng on,” d rsy.on CHAR ro ai m tr they an evns,”ntsai ande thenAllred and of tion of ilsing said Carsoni ace up by in thCit uawn al firepow are beutes th ails are aging th ls not ea , riders runner gh er w r in bt.citize lly leby e area ite sign sho ng D SHAW - SUN AD my shield addition to be a fast e co rm co ey ar also in Bland for thJosh Win tes and th Kenilw ing . ackipoles la ck throu“W, e the honoidenin d, thifts is It protects ted e dang not m untrys arked fo uld ¿nd rsep VOCA st ye mp needns. “They saig gyalo was no d his way ba ions ni dugh of th e BLM kler, ou ey have orth I ha TE ide. At re ne. ar r tr ar du er Free Ho hop t,” tects mine ld sa tio to Dar ring an Thu e Carbo Price tdoor re all been ve put ing or the state ous in ked for In some avel, he weave to the munit he , it pro cou l sstth t itunispano rellinV idbuco on fire tr my left my shield works of cr rs on San Rafae ammo meeaga is to enemy take day afte n Count ¿ce du eation taken,” entity isremovin level tam e way oravel becacases l mrem brocithe l - with ted by the men. Come ting aldemy up all theenemy fire z, rea die n pl duc g l ri y y pe rn du ked le us an do wil ng a B Con a an ver re Tra oo pic ring ad C riy. well e si ne w ot ” la priormy RICH Iny a ngIa be cit r y. Su r ny.gu d faced try Horse various as ar n north n. “We ar ils Com a meeti r in ja to a ¿nelass B m gn put th with, her. rlwa for wen A ou n Ad y ssc to th carry an k to his compa“T orem Backcoun to pack using eld e cothe ng de ound voca RD pu red k s a shi is m il e of hedu ing er SHt Allhe demonciou unci wa teHe ty is gh fac the ea Price also seei ittee on and up. At the of $1,000demeano e by a stroypubl AW lese, to get bacreported thatmuc learn hows. There will be saddle l’s Lize d seDon ishyer asns. k hthr pu fede sen st co on othe ng sign t wd a ver revehissimpl d ouratcit Quinn ring his treP ion. ral and up r which blic y lontr techniqueusing barrels on ctice yssan W to six unty Uus on nue. cou k mud SUan ee du sing tinueerdthe dr ween area r trails ass situat inkler sa months level th to six could any e” E ytepro ve di injured ver vid t conor strations lothofple nty of prawould o .¿We .” are aft, re his bodytobet ro pro ion an ys th in jail ere ca month fire bu s ab fferentashe rnwatrs studen witgh thingswh ni o lePto re my A T nds “t his n em enemy m fr . ene ad ne . sta s e ts he av tha e be a let D d t ntsuch eled ica,t ov an the ki F or ex ens evet ryo and wa ti ededcoto aream sh ac ¿ne M thee fac E opco plac e or m looking BLM is se in . id intby If you etyav course power ne to e for on ofy nt try. ds kitsa an uity Am re pl - d thhom e. builet sha andurrai Mag m toinsaf himayan e er fo ove e, O ents: Asitim ovgiv of th of ir wa ut rent card ge last erenighpac d com the the r those onitorin the fire fight the ilitn, ania a,like to too,come Aily. e coe gi erlik nd” thicas. vic eceon boar d t inker li rn y ch v edpackin sign g s e Do at thnce llecuti fam andexperie d me tinar- geabl Lea companyuse ofco inpin s thatthat dam the eyser er le s con ncner has,” - fulev e ballrcam dge. th stud thgem diod part of s bea to his used th knoewle ag n to ca Priion ce Carbo toriou “Beca entTra are insg als omad dit the a frIn yourem ce. avwa m wam cent a oo a ve No put e, sthare hlin were vic the kcaitGu itho e Cit suf¿cien heere pehes n ion red opleLeach to co All in an tie er.hig ut ise.act Marines . na too a, hitc to T nc y “H ce It m w t re he ich Jim Ho ha wh gave s ve inn plac wass in idea to ency Ca ” o.” mpel rk-of EIwo cy of He pu as lccher ued Qu a rea esque techni tinFgen was with e ho M) forthces. ytoEmerg se .” er na y at Pa the or thet con ese s of w Acer or annd DirmecJap sen, DV the age ta w em To dion ckatCountr Glelinve Jenin brai ng eseat - k fro o rin t- actionring lathe tothe sombon b, All redd di of to Ba A lc nchi O ble te tend Ma from n ld hato bac re codllint of it is Du Human e na o r of S art on Ve se aight dtrRe 2 p.m. Car pos oact expo n Tuesd nnis. ege. tudethe án taitio e st. to san ale rple He re23a10tha.m alt h esnt r,wit have(strcu ivl epatost pass ay ud , th draftean thhin sev Indtsoor Are achieved nt Lifner s the Pung in the Parkd nus da le Hethore osd by e dsen agera Ma “p cuss sed to A studen eve virch e th oun e,rs. e sa 18 “Wde wmachine gun rgras e h e of de have Ma rton, pin s ¿Fai speor ion mTh lea frica, ts wer are noe w nty d any0 eaned not be nters one ant tothe battleatoftheIwo area th lledcom and h ice was hon te witda Cou in ryitoff n S. 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Emery County Progress Castle Dale, Utah Tuesday September 24, 2013 13C Sun Advocate Price, Utah Tuesday September 24, 2013 13C

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14C Sun Advocate Price, Utah Tuesday September 24, 2013 14C Emery County Progress Castle Dale, Utah Tuesday September 24, 2013

The Cowboy Club: A Family Affair

When Glen Wells and his partner Ralph Stevenson started the Cowboy Club in 1972, it would have been hard to image that Wells envisioned the rowdy cowboy bar as a place to spend quality family time. Nearly 40 years later, however, a family affair is just what the Cowboy Club has become. With a reputation for fine dining, a newly refinished interior and a kitchen staff that includes Wells' wife Tammy, daughter Lyn and son Ty, Wellington's CC Kitchen is as tasty and family friendly as a club can be. "The food in this place started as nothing more than a pizza kitchen," laughed Wells from his establishment Wednesday morning. "While the pizzas were great, if you wanted to be on top in the local bar trade, you had to run a steak house." According to Wells, in 1974 major renovations were made to the Cowboy Club's property and the staff began serving the menu many locals are familiar with today. "I tell you it was touch and go during some of those early years," said Wells. "To tell you the truth, we simply had no idea about how to run a steak house. One time after things got a little 'hot' in the kitchen and I lost my entire staff, I had to walk across the road and ask Carolyn McLean to help me out. She was running the local cafe at that time and she came right on over and started teaching me to cook." McLean stayed on for a few years according to Wells and things at the Cowboy began to turn around. Going into the 1980s and '90s the CC Kitchen developed and maintained a reputation for great food, served in a fun atmosphere for a great price. As Wells' kids, who grew up around the restaurant, got older it became apparent they had a taste for entertaining all their own. "I was signed up for Pro-Start the first year they taught the course at Carbon High," said Wells' son Ty, who described Pro-Start as advanced Home Economics. "I was all set to drop the class the first day of school but my mom asked me to try it for one day. I did, I had a great time and I have been involved with cooking and entertaining ever since." Ty went on to graduate from Utah Valley University with a degree in culinary arts and made his way back to Carbon County and his family's establishment. His sister Lyn, the baby of the group, is still taking classes at UVU working toward her bachelor's degree in hospitality. The family as a whole loves to cook and they love to eat. "We take vacations based solely around food," laughed Ty. "The whole family will go down to Las Vegas just to try some new food. You know, trying out different kinds of food is the way we come up with many of our local specials."

PHOTOS BY C.J. MCMANUS - SUN ADVOCATE

Ty and Lyn Wells get ready for another shift at their home away at the Cowboy Club. Ty and Lyn are responsible for creating and cooking the masterpiece that has become the Saturday Night Special. This

weekly five course meal is a great way to enjoy a night out in Carbon County and taste some very creative cooking from two of the Castle Valley’s up-and-coming chefs.

Those local specials have brought the family closer together and turned up some of the most original food to be seen in the Castle Valley. The crew's "Saturday Night Special," brings together five courses and includes an appetizer, main course and dessert which would be at home on any Food Network show. "This whole idea started with my very first cooking competition," explained Ty. "I stole my sister's famous Caesar Salad recipe and we blew the judges away with a rack of lamb entree." Ty's presentation took fifth in the state overall and brought home the best entree honor to Carbon High. From these humble beginnings, a tradition was born. Every Saturday night, Ty, his sister Lyn, Glen and Tammie put together an eclectic blend of western flavors for local palates to enjoy. Saturday night appetizers move from Chili Rellenos

wrapped in Won-Tons then covered in Chili Verde and Jalapeno Sour Cream to Ahi Tuna with Mango Chutney. Entrees are anything from Steak Au Poivre to Lyn's Lamb Shanks. Desserts include Stacked Apple Pie, Peanut Butter Cup Mousse and fresh Doughnuts made in house along with coffee ice cream. All ice cream served at the Cowboy Club is made from scratch and in the restaurant. "It's funny, Lyn is the baby but she pretty much runs the show these days," said Ty of his soft spoken sister. "She puts the menu together most weeks and is responsible for making most of the desserts. And I have to say we couldn't do this without our mom's help in the kitchen." Whoever is doing the cooking, the Saturday Night Special at Wellington's Cowboy Club is not to be missed.

Fielding appointed Rural Program Director

After working to facilitate multiple successful initiatives in Castle Country, Carbon County Economic Development Director Delynn Fielding has been appointed to the Governor's Office of Economic Development as Rural Program Director. "As I started the job, our office knew that we wanted to expend resources chiefly on local business," said Fielding. "The county had used funds to recruit outside business with little success and we could see that our efforts would be better spent working to create and expand the area's market from within." One of the first projects Fielding worked on was the Southeastern Utah Small Business Investment Fund or SEUSBIF, which used multiple sources to create new business opportunity for 78 start-up enterprises in the four-county area. As 60 of those businesses hailed from Carbon and Emery County,

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the program was an instant success. "It was a great feeling to work with those start-up businesses," said Fielding. "There were some fantastic success that came from that program, many of which are still in operation today." According to Fielding, the strength of SEUSBIF came from the inter-agency cooperation at its core. Some of the funds major players included the College of Eastern Utah, the local Association of Governments, the Small Business Development Center, the Utah Department of Workforce Services, Vocational Rehabilitation and city governments from every municipality in the area. Looking to grow on the success SEUSBIF has created, Fielding again partnered with multiple agencies and put Carbon County Economic Development at the very center of the

Castle Country Business Expansion and Retention Project. Starting in 2006, BEAR as it is known locally, used a revolutionary software program to catalog and gather information from every business operating in Carbon and Emery County. Once obtained, that information was used to disburse nearly $3 million in funding to local businesses, working to promote their continued expansion. Because of its success, BEAR has been expanded to include independent rural programs all across the state of Utah. "The best part of this job has been working with the agency partners in these programs," said Fielding. "Working with them to see a business start up and grow, that's a rewarding thing." Watch for the announcement of the new economic development director soon.

mason Out of the Jar The voice of Carbon and Emery County, Keith Mason, is back on the air. Listen to his podcasts now at sunad.com.


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Emery County Progress Castle Dale, Utah Tuesday September 24, 2013 15C Sun Advocate Price, Utah Tuesday September 24, 2013 15C

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A very abbreviated history of the Sun Advocate

When S. K. King put out the first issue of the Eastern Utah Telegraph on Jan. 15, 1891, he probably envisioned himself being in the town of Price for many years, with its 300 residents growing to thousands. The town grew, but it was without the Sun Advocate’s earliest ancestor. By November 1891, S.I. Paradice and J.A. Sarvis were listed as the owners/editors of the paper. The papers that came and went in Carbon County’s history numbered many, most either dissolving into

history or devoured by bigger papers. Within the next four years the Eastern Utah Telegraph would become the Eastern Utah Advocate. In 1898, a paper called the Carbon County News appeared. A battle between the Advocate and the News raged, with outlandish charges concerning the newspapers’ competitors appearing on the front pages weekly. It was around that same time that Robert Crockett came to Carbon County. Probably, one of the two most influential publish-

ers to ever run the paper, he bought the Advocate and also began the Emery County Progress. A squabble over ownership of the Eastern Utah Advocate occurred between Crockett and another man in 1915, when Crockett sold the paper on a contract and the other party didn’t make any payments. But a fly in the ointment in the contract allowed the other party to keep the name Eastern Utah Advocate, which he promptly sold to the owners of the Carbon County News. They almost

immediately changed the name of their paper to the News-Advocate. This infuriated Crockett who still owned the print shop, the office and the subscriber list for the paper. That put him in the position of starting a new paper, which he called The Sun. Thus began a volatile relationship between the two newspapers, which resulted in various flare-ups over the years. In fact, between 1915 and 1932, some of the most interesting news in town was about the two papers fighting, at times

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literally. A knife fight at one point and gunshots issued by the two sides punctuated the quiet of the town a couple of times. In 1932, after Crockett left The Sun, it and The News-Advocate merged. At that time, Joseph F. Asbury took over the paper. In 1935, Asbury, who also owned the Richfield Reaper, sold the paper to Val Cowles and longtime owner/publisher Hal G. MacKnight. MacKnight would become the stabilizing force for more than 30 years. The paper reported on the area through the Great Depression, World War II, the Korean War, and up through the middle of the Vietnam War with MacKnight at the helm. Then in 1966 he sold the paper to Robert Finney and a group of California investors, who formed the Sun Advocate Publishing Company. In 1975 the Helper Journal, a publication that had run under two different names since 1911, was merged into the Sun Advocate. However, the little paper did make quite a mark on the community and the Sun Advocate. Before the merge, the two papers were once a week publications. After the merger, the Sun Advocate became a twice a week paper, publishing on Tuesdays and Thursdays. By the time the Sun Advocate was sold again in 1981, the paper was part of a pairing with the Emery County Progress-Leader once again. The two papers were sold to George Hatch of the Ogden Standard Examiner. Finney stayed on as publisher for some time, but was later replaced

by Dan Stockburger. In 1988, Hometown Communications Inc. purchased the two papers and, within a short time, McGinnus Communications was given the task of managing the publications. In 1993, Kevin Ashby came to the helm of the newspapers. In May 1996, Brehm Communications, which also owned the Richfield Reaper, purchased the Carbon and Emery papers. Brehm Communications still owns the three newspapers as well as the Uintah Basin Standard and Vernal Express which they purchased four years ago. In 2001 Ken Larson was named publisher of the paper by Brehm when Ashby moved to Idaho to work for Pioneer Press. In 2005 Larson departed for a Brehm property in Palm Springs, Calif. He now works for Brehm as publisher of the Eldorado Hills and Folsom Telegraph newspapers in northern California. Based on printed accounts, the Sun Advocate has one of the most convoluted histories of any newspaper in Utah. The unique, often colorful history, makes the Sun Advocate’s 122 years very interesting. As one looks back, where else is the history of the community recorded. If the Sun Advocate and other papers hadn’t existed in the past 120 years, what would be known about the area? There is no official historian who is keeping tabs, day to day. The paper may change, maybe even become totally paperless one day, but the news of the area will still need to be reported and its stories told.

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16C Sun Advocate Price, Utah Tuesday September 24, 2013 16C Emery County Progress Castle Dale, Utah Tuesday September 24, 2013

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