Page 1

The magazine that drives the customer relationship

by

Webhelp

Cover story

THE MULTI-CHANNEL CUSTOMER

United Kingdom

Discovery Labs The innovative approach of Webhelp UK P.10 Explained

Guaranteeing phone payment security P.12 Behind the scenes

Derby : guided tour of a production site in Britain P.14

n°16 – July 2013

What’s hot


In this issue

Cover story Cover Story

What’s hot n°16 - july 2013

p.3

The multi-channel customer

United Kingdom

p.10

The innovative approach of Webhelp UK

Explained

p.12

Garanteeing phone payment security

Behind the scenes

p.14

Guided tour of a production site in Britain

Welcome to Webhelp

10

p.16

Higher physical security Chinese walls High authentication Regular monitoring and testing Intrusion detection Correlation of logs and incident alerts

14

Encryption of stocked and transmitted data

Increased physical security Chinese walls Reinforced staff awareness Verification of transaction history

13

MULTI-CHANNEL CUSTOMER

16

Olivier

Aubert

DRIVING THE CUSTOMER JOURNEY 3 2

Publishing directors : Frédéric Jousset and Olivier Duha News Editors : Jérémy Come and Mathieu Bouin Editor: Koussé Makhamat Writing : Laurent Durasnel, Philip Hall Iconography : Fotolia, Infographie Olivier Aubert Design and production : Editialis Factory Publishing manager : Guillaume Bethout ISSN : pending. Printed : Imprimerie Desbouis-Gresil, Imprim’Vert labeled, on the FSC certified.

IT MIGHT BE HARD TO IGNORE A COMMUNICATION CHANNEL USED BY ONE’S CUSTOMERS, BUT IT MAY NOT BE RELEVANT TO BE ACTIVE ON EVERY SINGLE ONE OF THEM. EVERY ORGANISATION SHOULD DEFINE ITS OWN MIX AND OFFER EXPERIENCES JOURNEYS THAT ARE COMFORTABLE FOR YOUR CUSTOMERS AND IN STEP WITH YOUR BUSINESS STRATEGY. WEBHELP SHED SOME LIGHT ON THIS CRUCIAL ISSUE IN TWO PRESENTATIONS AT THE FRENCH TRADE SHOW SECA IN MAY.

3


Cover story

What’s hot n°16 - july 2013

Sébastien Rohart at Photobox. “Customer service was 100% outsourced and we used e-mail with a response time of 48 hours. Then we changed to a ‘one stop shop‘ model with storage solutions, a photo account, etc. This moved us towards a ‘social photo‘ concept, with more mobile use, instantaneously and with more need for personal advice. So each organisation has to find its own balance between standing apart from the crowd and cost considerations, according to its strategy.”

One customer, several channels Who is the omni-channel customer? The answer is simple: each and every one of us. ”We are only just discovering omni-channel as a business, and yet we already experience it every day as individuals,” smiles Chloé Beauvallet, head of Customer Service at PMU. And uses are wide and varied, most often driven by a need for immediate service, whatever channel is used. In essence, omni-channel customers can be summed up by the much-used acronym ATAWAD: any time, anywhere, any device. They expect to be able to reach the brand at all times and through the means of their choice. The challenge is therefore to be on the same channels as them (but not necessarily on all channels) and offer them not just a rapid response but a consistent brand experience and journey. What’s hot and what’s not? Some channels are fast-growing up-and-comers, whereas others are at best levelling off. Traditional post is an obvious loser, but with everything going faster, it is not the only one. “We’ve already stopped offering the post as a channel for customer complaints,” says Sébastien Rohart, CEO Europe at Photobox,“ and we will probably also give up on e-mail soon.”

There is no easy equation to measure a channel’s ROI, but you can measure the calls avoided by running a community on social networks, or the impact of a campaign in volume and in tone. THOMAS LE GAC, CEO OF SYNTHESIO

When purchasing involves high personal involvement, the need for human contact is still present but can show up in different ways. “90% of customer contact happens on Internet, but we give our customers the choice,” stresses Jean-Noël Rault, Director of Customer Center & Web Support (France) at Air France. That means that phone and travel agents still remain important, but they plug Internet into their service: travel agents are equipped with interactive terminals offering video assistance, while phone platform advisors also do web call back and on-line chat. “45% of phone contacts are about web support, which allows us to find new ways of adapting to customer requirements. As regards web call back, the customer decides when they want a human contact, but this also requires specific training for advisers,” adds Jean-Noël Rault. Evidently, voice still very much has its place in CRM. However, competition is becoming tougher with the rising trend in mobility through smartphones and tablets, as well as social networks, all of which can create problems. “We are increasingly seeing customers use Twitter as their first port of call,” observes Jean-Noël Rault. “This throws up the question of the size and the cost of the organisation we have to put in place to deal with these requests.” It’s strategy, stupid With a wider range of tools used in customer relations, choices must be made. “You have to make the connection where the customer has moved to,” says Eric Dos Santos, CEO of software publisher Dimelo. “This is a change which has been dictated by web visitors.” Therefore everything depends on the organisation’s business model: it will select the channels it prefers according to their return on investment. And nothing is set in stone on this score. “Our model at first was about printing photos cheaply,” explains

4

Increasing conversion rates And here again, the question is more about the customer experience than about the channel per se. “The challenge is to reduce customer acquisition costs by selecting the channel that delivers the result,” says Matthieu Bouin, director of strategy and innovation at Webhelp. “Using chat, web call back or video chat, it can be possible to raise an e-commerce conversion rate from a typical 3% to 20 or 30%.” These instantaneous forms of interaction are the equivalent of the “Can I help you?” from a shop assistant. And what works for pure players can work in the other way for stores: an interactive screen in a shop can help to serve a customer when there are no sales assistants available. Keep it consistent But the right organisation of the omni-channel customer relationship remains hard to model. “It is impossible to be on every single channel,” says Julie Salzmann, Customer Relations Manager at Française des Jeux. “You have to rationalise and distinguish between the channels with added value and the others, where you are going to let your customers do things for themselves.” One thing is sure: a separate “silo” approach, by channels, is forbidden. The customer is a unique individual and the company must show consistency, adapting to the customer journey and offering the right service according to him and his request. The aim is therefore to put the right skill opposite each need to serve it from start to finish. Rather than being organised by channel, teams could therefore be grouped by product and/or by level of expertise, level 1 for simple answers and level 2 for particularly specific questions. The brand universe must be consistent across all channels and to all customers but this doesn’t mean the same words or tone. Advisors should be able to adapt what they say and how they say it by channel, but also by customer, for example taking particular care of a new customer and giving greater autonomy to a regular or long-standing one.

Mobile accounts for very little of our sales, around 2%, but it has revolutionised our habits because it is a customer contact tool before sales, after sales and on the go. JEAN-NOËL RAULT, DIRECTOR OF CUSTOMER CENTER & WEB SUPPORT (FRANCE), AIR FRANCE

Replying to more than one person And in the midst of all this, one job that stands apart is that of a social network customer relations manager. “We are moving from a one-on-one relationship to a ‘one on many’ and even ‘many on many’, and with different time phases,” says Eric Dos Santos. To put it simply, companies are always having to find a balance between providing a simple answer, an answer dealing with a number of questions and issues, and no straightforward answer at all, because the

5


Cover story

web community will provide it itself. And a final question is thrown up regarding how CRM teams are formed: how do they integrate digital natives, born with a screen in their hand and whose habits are often very different to those of the generation above them? One thing is certain: they bring their own vision and attitude to the omni-channel experience. Unfulfilled challenges Among the big unsolved issues in the area of omni-channel relationships, the first one is how to bring together all of the various identities a customer can assume: one or several telephone numbers, e-mail addresses, user names and avatars (of which some, such as those on social networks, do not require authentication). “You have to build a particularly complex information system,” admits Julie Salzmann. “This means totally rethinking the subject and setting out a master plan to successfully collect data and assemble it for sales advisers.” And so the ideal solution has yet to be found. Other challenges also exist, such as having to meet the need for immediate response implied by the use

What’s hot n°16 - july 2013

of channels open 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Again, the return on investment will be the guide. “My personal feeling,” says Chloé Beauvallet, “is that customers don’t necessarily expect to receive an answer immediately, but to have their request taken on board immediately, which is not quite the same thing.” And the speed of exchanges also has another catch: poor quality service can now be propagated through social media at the speed of light. “Having 85% service quality on traditional channels isn’t profitable any more,” states Matthieu Bouin. “You have to do better than that.” The last difficulty, unforeseen and yet crucial, is language. As emphasises Sébastien Rohart, “in many channels, the communication that takes place is written. We should therefore think about incorporating spelling and grammar tests in our recruitment processes.” Modern technology has found its connection with the good old days.

Digital: the 2013 agenda for CRM divisions CXP and Colorado Conseil surveyed CRM, marketing, sales and communications departments in early 2013 on the channels they employ to talk to customers. The main channels used are phone and e-mail, but managers are preparing for a step-up in social media (79% forecast an increase or a high increase in their use) and instant interaction (59% predict an increase in the use of chat, Web call back and video). On the other hand, mobile devices have yet to catch on: mobile apps arrive in second place (40% of those surveyed) in the list of planned information systems projects, well behind improvements to their CRM systems (83%).

In the next five years, companies predict that social media will account for between 5 and 30% of all communication flux. But of course, the customers will decide for themselves. LAURENT DESLANDRES, CONSULTANT AT COLORADO CONSEIL

6

Webhelp supported CXP and Colorado Conseil in carrying out the survey, which resulted in the publication of a white paper called Numérique : l’agenda 2013 des directions de la relation client.

“GIVE CUSTOMERS FREE REIN BUT GUIDE THEM TO THE MOST APPROPRIATE CHANNEL” CHLOÉ BEAUVALLET, HEAD OF CUSTOMER SERVICE, PMU What customer interaction channels do you use, and how? Chloé Beauvallet : Customer contact starts up through a transaction (a bet) in our points of sale, on the web and its mobile and tablet applications, and more recently, through interactive TV. The aim is to make it easy for the customer to place their bet whatever channel they use. In addition from a more relationship point of view, PMU can be reached by phone with a special number, by email, post, chat or social media. Our wish is to make things smooth and easy to use, bringing our customers an experience which at the very least is consistent, and ideally fully integrated.

and efficiency. And we also have to be transparent in terms of legal disclosures. We are the one and only PMU for our customers but we are a monopoly in physical betting offices and subject to market competition on line.

What is your omni-channel strategy? C. B.: It’s a strategy of a stair hand rail: we open up as many channels as possible and we let the customers choose according to their own preferences, needs and age. The main idea is to be available at all times, hoping that the experience delivered by PMU helps the customer to do without the hand rail and learn to climb the stairs themselves. We then have to guide them towards the channel that we think is most appropriate, because relevance is a cross between satisfaction

And what about social media? C. B.: We decided to approach social jointly as Communications, Marketing and Customer Service. There is a lot of common ground between us in this respect: information, push marketing and dialogue. Customers demand more from us than just being reactive: they expect us to display a new way of listening to them and anticipating what they want. Whatever they are talking to us about, the brand can’t afford to miss out on this meeting place.

Where does mobile fit into this strategy? C. B.: We have gradually integrated it as an additional tool that makes life easier for our betters. Mobile is currently growing at the same rate as Internet did in its early days. Just like live chat with customer service, every new channel slightly cannibalises those that already existed, but more importantly it caters to new demand.

“Each new channel slightly cannibalises those that already existed, but more importantly it caters to new demand.”

7


Cover story

What’s hot n°16 - july 2013

OMNI-CHANNEL CUSTOMER THE VIEW FROM BLIGHTY

David Turner, Webhelp UK'CEO

WHY MULTIPLE CHANNELS ARE NOT ENOUGH WEBHELP UK’S CEO DAVID TURNER TAKES THE CONCEPT OF MULTICHANNEL A STEP FURTHER AND DESCRIBES WHAT THE TRULY OMNI-CHANNEL EXPERIENCE MUST DELIVER. Many companies believe that they are doing well by offering their several channel choices for customer service and sales. But the real issue is about connecting the channels up to bring a smooth, consistent consumer journey. If not the customer experience may be disappointing and produce lower revenue than it might. “The truth is that customers expect you to interact with them across a range of channels“, says the Webhelp UK

CEO. “They’ll only be impressed if you can follow them from one to the next.” In today’s connected society with innumerable technological opportunities, it is possible to keep track of a conversation started on one media and continued on another. A follow-up call from a client who has just tried to buy on line is likely to be on that same subject, so the call centre should cut to the quick and carry on where the client left off. If the client entered their customer details via an IVR then they should not be required to repeat them to an agent. “For one of our clients,” David Turner explaines, “we use a unified CRM system to ensure customers are recognised and that our conversations with them can moove smoothing from channel to channel. We also have cross-channel analytics so that, over time, we can model customer behaviour and refine our services to match it.”

Customer first, technology second One simple concept lies at the heart of omnichannel thinking-understand what customers want to do, and make it seamlessly easy for them to do it, no matter what channel or device. Turner throws up one example: “The retail sector has probably gone furthest down this route than most, focussing first on bringing the in-store experience online and are now working to bring the online experience in store. “ These early adopters have used the many channels that they are offered by technology to mirror customer behaviour and drive sales. “Customer first, technology second is the golden rule of omni-channel,” says Turner.

8

In today’s connected society with unending technological opportunities, it is possible to keep track of a conversation started on one media and continued on another.

Shaping the customer journey But it is important to remember that this is not the end of dealing with the omni-channel customer. As David Turner explains : “The second step is about encouraging crosschannel journeys towards the conclusion desired by the brand a completed purchase or a solved problem”. To illustrate this he points to the example of a QR code on an advert pointing to the retailer’s website where the article can be directly purchased, as well as directions to a conveniently located store. “Understanding what customers want to do enables us to design optimal customer journeys and use appropriate channels to make them happen,” he adds. All of this requires a considerable range of expertise in technology, which is why, according to the Webhelp UK director CEO, organisations are turning to outsourcers to help. “Sometimes their own technology environments are

too old or disconnected to join the dots. Certainly the best of the outsourcers can overcome that hurdle,” he adds. Management engagement But to make this omni-channel presence truly work, companies must work to overcome the manmade “silo” organisation so in wich each channel jealously guards their processes and knowledge, which ultimately prevents the company from fully focusing on the customer. “This is something that must be addressed and imposed by top management,“ concludes David Turner. It’s about designing and delivering customer experiences that unlock previously unimaginable opportunities for revenue growth and cost reduction. “A board level executive-with that remit and silostraddling powers-appointed and given the specific task of achieving it!”

Summed up: Channelling the experience • The first step in omni-channel mastery is being capable of following customers seamlessly and consistently from one channel to the next-according to their choice. • Second, use their channel-switching to direct them to the desirable conclusion for the brand-a commercial transaction or selfhelp. • Individual channel silos don’t belong any more in this day and age; management must be fully committed to breaking down these manmade barriers.

9


United Kingdom

What’s hot n°16 - july 2013

DISCOVERY LABS

FROM THEORY TO TANGIBLE RESULTS USING SCIENCE TO DEVELOP BETTER BUSINESS PRACTICE AND INVOLVING FRONT-LINE STAFF IN SEARCHING FOR NEW, INNOVATIVE SOLUTIONS HAS YIELDED DRAMATIC RESULTS FOR WEBHELP UK.

“A GREAT WAY OF SHARING WHAT WORKS AND RESOLVING WHAT DOESN'T” CLAIRE FRENCH IS A SALES ADVISOR AT THE FALKIRK WEBHELP UK SITE. SHE AND HER TEAM TOOK PART IN A DISCOVERY LAB EARLIER THIS YEAR.

A scientific approach of the customer relationship

The project team spends half of its time in investigative sessions, best practice discussions, thought exercises and training sessions. They can also link up live to other sites via SMART screens to involve other units in their investigations and benefit from experience from their colleagues in other parts of the country. The new methods that emerge from these exchanges are subsequently tested in role plays before being put into live practice on the frontline.

Clients of Webhelp's UK business are currently benefiting from a unique project deployed to solve specific issues in their key impact areas. With their scientific approach and environment, the innovative Discovery Labs are a creative thinking space to help individuals and teams review better ways of managing the customer experience, analyse findings, search for a root cause of issues and recommend solutions. To add to the scientific aura and give Anton Manley, team members an authentic and fun Client Director at environment in which to experiment, Webhelp UK purpose-built laboratory facilities were created on five sites across the business. Clinical white lab facilities are fitted with identical SMART screens, whiteboards, behaviour beakers and “periodic process tables”, - not forgetting the regulatory lab coat! Discovery is specifically designed to improve the key business areas of advocacy, cost, loyalty and spend. Ideas for Discovery Labs come from the advisors themselves who from their everyday exchanges with customers and prospects can pinpoint areas for improvement.

10

Results are then tracked post session to gauge long term impacts on behaviours and KPI’s. So far, the programme has significantly improved customer experience with a markedly positive impact on client benefits (see discovery of figures' opposite). In addition to these tangible results, deep involvement from staff members has brought about increased employee engagement levels. “The idea for the Discovery Labs came from a simple belief that to deliver the best customer experience for our company, every member of the team needed to feel inspired and play an important role in shaping the future direction of the company”, says Webhelp UK Client Director Anton Manley, one of the inventors of the Discovery Labs. “By educating our people on Discovery focus areas and empowering them with the ability to investigate these areas we have found that people become more emotionally attached and improve their overall performance.” Discovery has become part of Webhelp UK’s distinctive offering, allowing clients to benefit from genuine and tangible feedback from the frontline. “From Discovery we can make suggestions to the client and give them new insight to help them improve their business proposition,” says Anton Manley. “We want to tell our clients something about their business that they don’t already know. And as a customer solutions provider, we want to get a deep understanding of what makes our customers tick, so that we can deliver them the highest level of service.”

Can you tell us how and why your Discovery Lab took place? Claire French : I took part in a Discovery Lab on the theme of sales, which involved a two-hour session every day for a week. We all work for the same client, and the whole 15-member team took part including our team leader. A number of other managers also made contributions during the process. We had all expressed the need to enhance our sales skills and find ways of improving our performance. We all brought our individual skills to the table. For example, I’m quite good at customer service and managing people who are upset, but I sometimes have difficulty in spotting the best time to move in and close a sale. Once we were in the Lab, we simulated calls amongst ourselves and then analysed our language and the way we had directed the conversation ; we then made suggestions on how we could improve on that, in particular avoiding the use of negative language, for example “No problem” – which could infer that there might potentially be a problem! The result was that we all came away with better ways of directing our calls and we could apply them straight away in our jobs. What have you gained from taking part in a Discovery Lab? C. F. : I think we all gained a lot from Discovery. It was a great way of sharing what works and resolving what doesn’t. I personally feel more confident with sales and I now find it easier to talk to customers about the products we are selling. Sales virtually doubled for all of us once we put our new methods to work. And this obviously had an effect on our pay, as we receive bonuses for the sales we complete. In addition to the material benefits, we were able to share our ideas with colleagues who didn’t take part in the Discovery

Sales virtually doubled for all of us once we put our new methods to work. session. And we also talk to friends who are interested in working for Webhelp UK about the experience and how Discovery has helped us to work better.

Discovery in figures Results directly attributable to the Discovery Lab process include: 11.8% increase in “first time resolution” calls Customer satisfaction up 9% Transferred calls down 39% For one retail client, 50% decrease in revenue lost due to returned products An estimated £600,000 of annual savings

11


Explained

What’s hot n°16 - july 2013

GUARANTEEING PHONE PAYMENT SECURITY HEARD OF PCI DSS? THE IMPLEMENTATION OF PAYMENT CARD INDUSTRY DATA SECURITY STANDARDS ENTAILS SIGNIFICANT INVESTMENT FOR COMPANIES DEALING WITH THIS TYPE OF TRANSACTION. WEBHELP HAS TAKEN A STEP AHEAD ON THIS THORNY ISSUE, AND TODAY OFFERS CLIENTS A HANDY TURNKEY SOLUTION.

Paying by card on-line or over the phone is growing fast: in France it accounts for 8.4% by value of all card payments. And so fraudsters are keen to cash in on the opportunity. In 2011 61% of all payment card fraud occurred on line or by phone, representing a massive €413.2 million. Telephone payment is in a category of its own. To prevent cardholder data being lost or compromised, PCI DSS now apply to all companies that collect, store and/or process payment card data on line or by phone. The French CB payment card grouping incorporates PCI DSS compliance in its contractual terms and conditions, and Visa has gone a step further, refusing to cover non-certified e-business transactions since 1st January 2013. It is therefore critical to become compliant, but this comes at a cost. Indeed, many a company is daunted by high investment costs in the right technical and organisational solutions when they try to become compliant on their own.

Higher physical security Chinese walls

RYPTION ENC E C

High authentication

VO I

VOICE

ENC R

Webhelp sets the pace Webhelp therefore decided to make an investment itself and offer its clients a PCI DSS-certified outgoing and incoming call platform. The highly demanding security measures deployed apply to both the data centre and the call centre (see diagram opposite). As the first French operator to offer this turnkey service on its market, Webhelp has taken a considerable lead. This generalist PCI DSS solution, perfectly adaptable to every client situation, can be set up in all Webhelp facilities, whatever their location.

N TIO YP

Regular monitoring and testing Intrusion detection Correlation of logs and incident alerts Encryption of stocked and transmitted data

Increased physical security Chinese walls Reinforced staff awareness Verification of transaction history

(1) Source: Observatoire de la sécurité des cartes de paiement (2) Total cost of compliance with standards such as PCI DSS: €2.8 million for mid-sized companies, according to research conducted in 2011 by Ponemon Institute.

Payment card security in brief PCI DSS is a set of data security standards for payment card transactions on line or over the phone. Following their adoption by card groups such as CB and Visa, the standards apply to companies that collect, transmit and/or process payment card data.

Aubert Olivier

In response to the costs associated with achieving compliance internally, Webhelp has invested in a generalist turnkey solution, adaptable to its clients’ wide-ranging businesses.

12

13


Behind the scenes

What’s hot n°16 - july 2013

GOOD MORNING BRITAIN!

The Call Hall ! Enter the Call Hall, the daily operational hub. It is strategically zoned to guide Webhelp people on a journey. It comprises: • 4 main zones dedicated to bringing to life the customer experience; • 4 break-out areas to promote collaboration and a supportive culture; • A central support hub, highly visible and accessible to all.

OPENED IN JANUARY 2012, THE DERBY SITE IS TODAY WEBHELP’S LARGEST CALL CENTRE IN THE UK. WHAT’S HOT TAKES YOU ON A GUIDED TOUR OF THIS WORLD CLASS FACILITY RUN BY A COHESIVE AND ENERGETIC TEAM.

Charity work In May, staff from the centre organised a charity football match at nearby Pride Park, the home of Derby County. The aim was to raise funds for a colleague who is currently fighting cancer. And at Easter, Team Derby also visited a local hospital to hand out Easter eggs to children.

Happy People Webhelp UK continually strives to make the Derby centre a great place to work. This includes regularly organising fun activities for its people.

Derby

Smart as standard At Derby, clients such as media giant Sky can rely on Webhelp UK’s insight, experience and full support to achieve their objectives.

14

The Derby facility employs 1,230 people. 15


Welcome to Webhelp

What’s hot n°16 - juillet 2013

NEW CLIENTS AT WEBHELP SAGE, the world’s third largest supplier of business software, has assigned Webhelp with the management of its Help Desk. Webhelp will deal with all the requests and computing incidents from internal SAGE users by phone or via tickets entered on the internal portal. SAGE is benefiting from Webhelp’s expertise to offer its staff high service quality and support in the development of cross-business projects. Planetveo, a pure player travel agent in made-to-measure holidays, has in recent years become the success story of on-line travel. Planetveo has asked Webhelp to manage two of its back-office activities: sending travel confirmation to suppliers and producing travel document packs to be sent to customers. Wengo is the leading e-commerce site in Europe dedicated to specialist advice over the phone. It has already provided 2 million advice sessions. Webhelp takes incoming calls from customers and sales contacts and connects them to the network of specialists. To strengthen its position on the life insurance market, the AXA group has assembled within a new entity, AXA Direct Protection, all the latest personal insurance sales techniques and solutions. Its retail model revolves around a multiple channel direct sales approach: over the phone and on Internet and using every direct marketing technique (mailshots, press, TV and Web adverts). AXA Direct Protection has chosen Webhelp, a specialist in insurance telesales, to support it with its deployment scheme, started up in April 2013. AG2R La Mondiale is the leading health insurance organisation in France with over 8 million insured clients and beneficiaries. In a fast-evolving insurance environment and on an increasingly mature market, AG2R La Mondiale has asked Webhelp to deploy an outbound call platform to make customer appointments with a sales force made up of five business-to-business sales managers. Coface, the world leader in credit insurance has assigned Webhelp with an appointment generation mission. Coface has thereby chosen the guarantee provided by Webhelp’s experience in B2B outbound sales to provide its direct sales force with qualified leads.

About Webhelp Webhelp is a specialist in delivering outsourced CRM services through multiple channels (voice, e-mail, social, chat), multiple services (consulting, integration etc.) and multilingual. The Group employs over 16,500 people in 34 contact centres and 7 countries: France, UK, Morocco, Romania, Algeria, Belgium and Madagascar.

16

Welcome to Webhelp UK ! Learn Direct is a non-profit organisation that provides a vast range of skills development courses for people either within or looking to enter a wide range of industries. Dubbed ‘The University for Industry’, the organisation, which offers online and classroom based learning, has signed up more than 3.5 million students. Lean Direct signed with Webhelp UK a twelve month contract with 10 full time advisors based at the Dearne Valley contact centre in the Yorkshire region. The team will handle outbound calls to businesses across the UK, discussing the benefits of modern apprenticeships for both employers and their people. Webhelp UK has won a significant new contract with PhotoBox, Europe’s leading online digital photo service. The new contract will see over 110 jobs created at Webhelp TSC’s Glasgow contact centre. The UK based team will handle European customer management services in twelve languages including French, German, Spanish, Italian and Swedish.

What's hot - July 13 Edition  

Webhelp UK's monthly newsletter, covering industry trends, company updates and news and lots more!