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Commercial Office Design Studio

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A BO UT

Our Philosophy It’s all about the work / life balance. Commercial and mixed-use are becoming ever more integrated, creating communities that embrace the idea of balance. This increases the opportunities for people to live a more sustainable, walkable life, where work, home and play can all be reached without the need for cars. Inside the office building, flexibility is essential, as is a healthy environment. While the workers might live nearby, they are still spending a lot of time at work, and keeping them healthy and productive is key. At Weber Thompson we understand the new office landscape as we live it every day at The Terry Thomas.

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The Terry Thomas

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S U S TA I N A B I L I T E A M

O U R A PPROAC H TO

Sustainable Design We believe that good design includes green building practices – integrating disciplines that create buildings, interiors and places that are not only good for the environment and community, they are essential to the health and well being of users, are easier to market, more efficient to operate and help “green” the bottom line. Weber Thompson is a member of the United States Green Building Council. Our internal Green Team – the WT Sustainabiliteam – is led by Director of Sustainability Myer Harrell AIA, LEED AP BD+C, Homes. This task force focuses on internal and external green building education, runs projects through a ‘green audit’ to determine how they might be modified to meet stricter sustainability benchmarks, and assists with green building certification for our projects and staff. Speaking of which, our office has over forty LEED Accredited Professionals.

O U R V I S I O N O F S U STA I N A B I LIT Y Since our inception, green practices have been at the core of what we do. When we moved into our LEED Platinum Certified offices over seven years ago, we solidified our commitment to sustainability. Our portfolio contains numerous LEED Certified and Built Green projects. A few highlights include the nationally-recognized AIA Top 10 COTE building The Terry Thomas; Weber Thompson’s LEED Platinum Certified offices; Sunset Electric, a LEED Platinum Certified mixeduse residential project in the Pike/Pine Overlay District in Capitol Hill; and a currently underway mixed-use project pursuing Passive House certification in Capitol Hill.

In addition to our built work, Weber Thompson is committed to thought leadership through research and innovation projects. Our past work in this realm includes: UCSF Net Zero Student Housing Project (Architecture @ Zero Honor Award recipient) Newark Vertical Farm Eco-Laboratory, winner 2008 GreenBuild Natural Talent Design Competition Office Building of the Future R&D for Intellectual Ventures

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Weber Thompson’s Commercial Office Team (L to R): Rachael Bauer, Dan Foltz, Myer Harrell, Todd Mayne, Kristen Scott, David Curran, Bernadette Rubio, Cody Lodi, Marc Furst and Mark Dorsey.

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M EE T O U R

Commercial Office Team Kristen Scott AIA, LEED® AP Senior Principal Kristen is the head of Weber Thompson’s Commercial Office team. Her background spans from designing a broad range of multifamily and mixed-use buildings to leading teams designing commercial tenant improvements and high performance office buildings including Tableau’s new corporate office in Fremont.

Myer Harrell AIA, LEED® AP BD+C, Homes Principal Myer Harrell is known throughout Seattle as a thoughtful dedicated architect with a passion for smart sustainable design. At Weber Thompson, he is our Director of Sustainability overseeing and consulting on projects to ensure appropriate levels of sustainable design. Myer was a member of the award-winning design team for Eco-Laboratory which won the national USGBC 2008 Natural Talent Design Competition and a key member of the Office Building of the Future R&D team.

Todd Mayne AIA, LEED® AP BD+C Principal Todd Mayne is a Senior Project Manager at Weber Thompson specializing in construction administration and quality assurance. His professional interests and passions include building technology and the process of bringing a project from concept to completion. Todd has worked on a variety of projects including Talking Rain’s Corporate Headquarters, Rival Fitness, The Post and numerous tenant improvement projects.

Bernadette Rubio IIDA, NCIDQ, LEED AP Interior Design Principal Bernadette Rubio has 20 years of experience in interior and architectural design for projects all over the country and China, from commercial office tenant improvements to hospitality and residential design. She joined Weber Thompson in 2012, helping the Interior Design studio grow in size and reputation during the subsequent years. In 2016, she was promoted to Principal, and now pilots the firm’s studio of ten interior designers.

Cody Lodi RA, LEED AP Cody is an Architect with ten years of experience envisioning, managing and executing projects ranging from Living Building commercial offices to mixed use and multifamily residential work. Cody is passionate about sustainable, functional design and infuses his work with these principles. Additionally, he is an advocate for the use of virtual and augmented reality tools in the design industry and regularly uses new technology to communicate spatial experience to clients and end users. 5


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A BO UT O U R

Office Experience Work environments have a major impact on employees – their health, productivity and overall morale. Designed well, they can provide a supportive environment that can lead to better retention, happier employees and more successful businesses. Today’s businesses evolve rapidly. Office design needs to be flexible to accommodate the ever-shifting industry. Where once isolating, high walled cubicles were the norm, today, open office landscapes that encourage collaboration are common. Where once recycled air was de rigueur, today more office tenants prefer hybrid systems of natural ventilation and HVAC with lots of natural daylight. At Weber Thompson, we’ve had the luxury of putting these office concepts to the test with our own office and employees. In 2008, we moved into The Terry Thomas, an office of our own design that is filled with natural ventilation and daylight. The move into this office building transformed our company’s ethos into one driven by the interaction between sustainability and humancentered design principles. It was a win-win approach because it turns out that what’s good for employees tends to also be good for the environment – as well as the bottom line. In the following pages, you’ll learn how we’ve put this methodology to work for a variety of clients. We hope you’ll see that we can do it for you, too.

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Watershed S E AT T L E , WA

Under Seattle’s Living Building Pilot’s third version, this commercial office building in the Fremont neighborhood will be visionary in its material selection, response to the environment and urban context with supplemental energy, water, and stormwater reduction targets. The project includes a 7-story, approximately 61,000 SF office building with approximately 5,000 SF of retail at grade. Two frontages include vibrant pedestrian environments as well as treatment of stormwater from the historic Aurora Bridge. This project links the core of Fremont with the quickly expanding Stone Way developments and reinforces the neighborhood’s collection of high performance buildings.

Over 200,000 gallons of roof water collected and reused on site Over 300,000 gallons of runoff from streetscapes, including the Aurora Bridge, are diverted and cleaned before entering Lake Union SERVICES Architecture Landscape Architecture

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Data 1 Office S E AT T L E , WA

Weber Thompson was approached to design a highly sustainable office project in Seattle’s self-proclaimed ‘Center of the Universe.’ The site and program offer many opportunities to create a handsome building that embraces high performance building design. With a strong east-west orientation, the site is ideal for passive solar design. Pursuing LEED Gold certification, the building will meet vigorous energy benchmarks with a goal of a 30% reduction from baseline code values. Form strategies include a large interior courtyard and extensive glazing for natural daylighting with sensor controlled interior lighting. In addition, a highly efficient, flexible HVAC system and operable windows will maximize individual environmental control. Natural materials, human scale and texture will give this high performance office building personality and warmth to fit easily into the quirky quilt-work of Fremont.

Highly sustainable commercial office project with integrated design strategies More than 11,850 sf of groundfloor retail and 113,000 sf of commercial office space Pursuing LEED Gold certification for core & shell Tableau Software is the future tenant of the building SERVICES

Architecture Landscape Architecture

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Contains bike lockers with storage for 200 bicycles on site Incorporates art and historic elements, including a piece of the historic Berlin wall A series of bioretention cells treat stormwater before returning it to the waterway that connects to Lake Union Project is Salmon-Safe certified

C LE A N I N G S E AT TLE’ S WATERWAYS Along the east edge of the project site, the Aurora Bridge empties stormwater runoff directly onto Troll Avenue. This water typically flows downhill into dedicated storm drains that discharge into Lake Union without ever being treated. When completed, the project will redirect this runoff into a series of deep bioretention cells running alongside the building. These planters will be densely planted with vegetation that naturally scrubs stormwater, allowing dissolved pollutants to settle before the water – much cleaner than before – is diverted back into Lake Union. Adjacent to these planters, a stair climb and new sidewalk will use signage to educate the public about this voluntary altruistic feature and lead pedestrians up the slope of Troll Avenue, a frequent path for neighbors and tourists climbing to see the Troll sculpture dwelling beneath the bridge.

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Ballard Blocks II S E AT T L E , WA

Building on the destination retail provided by the Ballard Blocks I Retail Center located just off the Ballard Bridge and extending into the disputed Frelard neighborhood, Ballard Block II expands the neighborhood’s identity into a shopping and human services district anchored by both local and national tenants. Comprised of three distinct buildings linked by pedestrian plazas and passthroughs, the development brings additional retail, grocery, child care and marine sales to the neighborhood. BBII’s design echoes the historic maritime and forestry industry of the neighborhood, including elements drawn from the nearby Ballard Locks. Pedestrian walk paths recall Ballard’s original wood plank streets, and the project’s massing mimics the shaping of the waterfront. Pops of bright yellow-greens and rusty reds seen in the mottled metal surfaces brought on by Ballard’s century of boat traffic and marine life are threaded throughout the project as wayfinding elements. The project borders The Burke Gilman Trail with a single story structure that will serve as an east gateway into the site and will be reserved for either a local brewery, bike-shop or café.

Mixed-Use project on a former industrial site ‘Frelard’, the area between Ballard and Fremont. Project will contain a grocery store, a marine retailer, small restaurants and retail, childcare and commercial office Full block development will total of more than 100,000 square feet when complete SERVICES

Architecture Landscape Architecture

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Blue Rooster S E AT T L E , WA

Located near Seattle’s historical Gas Works Park and directly adjacent to the Burke-Gilman Trail, this 3-story, 57,000 GSF commercial office building will enhance the neighborhood with a contextually appropriate design and pedestrian and cyclist-friendly features. Electrochromatic glass and exterior shading fins on the south façade of the building will offer an efficient solution to solar gain and glare, a challenge due to the long and narrow, east-west orientation of the site. Operable windows will offer the ability for tenants to easily maintain a comfortable working environment during warmer months. Outside the building, pedestrians will experience the full scope of the prime, waterfront site by using a pass through that connects the north and south sides of the building joining N Northlake Way to the Burke-Gilman Trail. The angled walls of this pass through splay open to create a landscaped gathering area with twinkling overhead lighting elements and al-fresco dining opportunities.

3-story building with 7,000 sf of ground-floor retail and 30,000 sf of commercial office space 1 level of parking with 37 stalls Electrochromatic glass offers an efficient solution to solar gain Pass though connects N Northlake Way to BurkeGilman Trail SERVICES

Architecture Landscape Architecture

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Lobby


The Terry Thomas S E AT T L E , WA

“The Terry Thomas provides a window into the soul of a firm that practices what it preaches and whose approach to sustainability is as much rooted in common sense as it is in the eco-enthusiasm of its employees.” – Jim Schneider, eco-structure, 6.2008 The Terry Thomas is a highly sustainable, LEED Gold for Core and Shell certified commercial building located in Seattle’s South Lake Union neighborhood. Wrapped in windows, it is a building designed along a modern aesthetic with a combination of timetested strategies from the pre-HVAC era and complimentary new technologies. It is Seattle’s first commercial office building structure developed in decades without central air conditioning and is a working demonstration of the endless possibilities of sustainable design. The design choices made for The Terry Thomas reflect changing attitudes about the environment, climate change and employee well-being. The building reduces its carbon footprint with no air conditioning, reduced lighting, a feature stair that encourages use,

A four story, 40,000 sf commercial building with two levels of sub-grade parking. LEED Gold certified for Core and Shell WT Offices are certified LEED Platinum Commercial Interiors Consumes 56% less energy than a typical class A office building based on the Department of Energy’s National Action Plan for Energy Efficiency Metric.

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and a single elevator. The passive cooling system features operable windows, automated louvers and a courtyard. Warm air is drawn into the central courtyard, which acts as a chimney, sending it skyward. Glass sunshades, exterior automated blinds, and a reflective roof protects occupants from solar heat gain. Designing to optimize the natural ventilation went hand in hand with enabling natural light to penetrate the building, dramatically reducing the need for electrical lighting. Both strongly contribute to occupants’ wellbeing, satisfaction and productivity – part of The Terry Thomas’s original vision.

Passive cooling system featuring operable windows, automated louvers and a courtyard

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Saves 45-50% water usages through storm water drainage system, efficient plumbing fixtures and waterless urinals. 30% energy savings over typical commercial office through efficient hydronic heating, efficient equipment, electronically controlled lighting, ample daylighting, high windows, and white reflectant ceilings and interior surfaces. Efficient material use by using exposed structure as finish, recyclable materials and materials with recycled content.


Individual control over thermal environment occurs through multiple thermostats, operable windows, and task lights for all employees. CO2 sensors throughout the office monitor indoor air quality and automatically open louvers to allow fresh air in. Used only low VOC adhesives, sealants, paints, coatings and primers; Green Label Plus Program carpet; Green Guard certified workstations and task chairs; and no urea-formaldehyde in any interior product.

TER RY TH O M A S I NTER I O R D ES I G N Weber Thompson’s Offices are probably the best offices anyone here has ever worked in. Fresh air, natural daylight, climate control and a solid connection with the outside all work together to make this a great place to spend 50% of our waking week. As designer and client, we were faced with the rare challenge of creating our own ideal, creative work environment that reflected our culture and gave us a chance to try out some sustainable strategies. We took a collaborative approach and after a series of intensive meetings, an employee survey and focus groups with staff members, consultants, city representatives and owners, it was determined that the office (and by extension, the building) would feature passive ventilation, extensive daylighting, sustainable materials and would aim for LEED certification. Staff members were included throughout the design process and were able to offer their opinions on everything from storage needs to creative re-use for salvaged materials from the construction site. The result is a feeling of ownership and pride from those of us who occupy it and breathe its fresh air daily. 21


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TER RY TH O M A S EN V I RO N M ENTA L D ES I G N Seattle’s first major office building to be developed without air conditioning in decades utilizes passive strategies including operable windows, automated louvers and a central courtyard. Weber Thompson and building management, Stephen C. Grey & Associates, spearheaded an effort to track energy use and engage the tenants of the building in lowering energy consumption even further. The thesis of this effort is the recognition that while strategic sustainable design is key in energy efficiency, ongoing improvement can only occur when all tenants are engaged in the energy conservation goals of the building.

Environmental graphics and wayfinding signage for LEED Gold Certified office building Engages tenants through signage and ongoing data visualization Educates visitors by defining key terms and metrics for building energy use

WT’s graphic design studio created a new set of environmental graphics and wayfinding signage for the building that encourages use of the internal stairs rather than the elevator. The stairwell includes data about overall building energy use, provides space for tracking data in the future, defines key terms and metrics for building energy use, and gives stair users insight about how their efforts are making a difference in the building’s energy use.

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Outside R&D Lab

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Board Room


Talking Rain Corporate Headquarters PR E S TO N , WA

Almost every surface in Talking Rain’s new offices is available in case inspiration strikes. Glass walls double as pseudo white boards, ready for notes; desks have both tackable and white board panels; in the marketing office, a central layout work space for building store displays help hone how the product is marketed. In the conference room, a large, interactive touch screen supports conferencing and brainstorming, while barn doors made of reclaimed wood slide away to reveal a presentation wall. The conference room and Research & Development area are separated by a rustic wood wall that displays the company’s legacy product, lit from above to create a glow around the bottles. Seeking to be a more sustainable, environmentally friendly company, Talking Rain features work stations locally commissioned with low cubicle walls and clean surfaces marking the firm’s first foray into a streamlined, more digitally focused work process.

Tenant improvement in existing product warehouse 7,684 gsf new office space for a local beverage company Desks commissioned locally from Watson Furniture SERVICES

Interior Design Interior Architecture

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Lobby

Specialized light fixtures were selected for the lobby and Research & Development lab Reclaimed wood doors used throughout the project Project contains multiple openconcept office areas, a variety of meeting rooms of various sizes, a board room, and private offices, in addition to a lunch room, Research & Development lab and reception lobby area

TA LK I N G R A I N CO NTI N U ED The offices are carved out of the company’s existing warehouse, and act as a palette to inform other Talking Rain offices as they are renovated. The aesthetic is a highly industrial flavor with exposed concrete floors, an open web joist structure and reclaimed wood coexisting with translucent elements evoking the freshness of the brand and culminating in focal points such as the decorative light fixture in the Research & Development area and lobby that recall a cascade of water drops – talking rain, if you will.

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WeWork Holyoke Office Renovation S E AT T L E , WA

The Holyoke Building, located at 107 Spring St. is one of the few examples of pre-20th century architecture remaining in Seattle north of Pioneer Square. Designed for office use, the site was under construction in 1889 during the great Seattle fire and the excavated basement is credited as the fire break that stopped the northern progress of the flames. The building was the first permanent structure to be completed after the fire and was occupied in early 1890.

Six-floor office and tenant amenity renovation project Building is listed on the National Register of Historic Places SERVICES

Architecture

In 1975 the building underwent a restoration effort and was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1976. It became a city of Seattle Landmark in 1978. In 2014 Weber Thompson was approached by WeWork, a New York based co-working company contemplating a full building lease to create their second Seattle facility. Working with the client’s in-house design team, we researched the code compliance issues

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W E WO R K CO NTI N U ED of a new, space-intensive use in a historic building during the due diligence process to ensure their program could be achieved without undue cost. We also worked with the Department of Neighborhoods to bypass additional review processes by avoiding modifications to the building’s exterior elements. Throughout design and permitting, we addressed issues of egress, systems upgrades, energy use, ADA compliance and fire assemblies in the historic building. Careful analysis and negotiation of code requirements were required to avoid any undue burdens in the permit review process. At the same time, the interior layout had to be refined and adapted to discoveries during the demolition of the existing interior office layout, which had hidden many of the building’s best features and materials. The biggest challenges of the project came with the accelerated construction schedule. By phasing the permits we were able to shorten the review cycles and secure approvals sequentially with the needs of the team on site. Again, working with the client’s New York-based design team and the local contractor we adapted to found conditions in the field and worked around material delivery challenges and changing tenant needs throughout the project. In the end, occupancy was achieved on schedule and the client called it the smoothest opening they’ve had in years.

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Rival Fitness S E AT T L E , WA

Upon entering Rival Fitness, multiple activities are within sight. Choose what you are interested in doing, and go for it. This is exactly what Rival Fitness owner Jim Mahan imagined when he conceived of his vision for this Capitol Hill gym. Here, members don’t so much exercise as they are simply active. In the “Playground,” monkey bars run between two concrete columns allowing for a little recess time while also getting in a workout. Underneath, a field of sports turf does double duty – making life easier on the knees while also reinforcing the idea of play.

Tenant Improvement for a two level, multi-functional gym SERVICES

Architecture Interior Design

The spare, industrial space is marked by bright white elements that evoke a clean, modern sensibility while reflecting natural light pours in. Pools of directed LED lights fall on equipment and open areas and dim to allow for varying light levels depending on the activity.

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W.L. Gore Offices S E AT T L E , WA

Upon entering the space, you are faced with the inspiring words of the company’s founder. The office works to uphold that commitment, supporting a tiny staff, some regular, some transient, and allowing for larger events for focus groups, clients and buyers. The large open conference room has a full operable wall that allows large events to spill out into the lobby area. A separate, flexible workspace encourages collaboration among staff members, with an open breakout space for team work sessions. Tucked behind the tiny kitchen, a private conference room allows for smaller internal meetings and private conversations.

A 4,200 sf Tenant Improvement for the Seattle office of a technical fabric company based on the east coast. SERVICES

Architecture Interior Design

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Research & Thought Leadership In addition to our own first-hand experience and research with our office building, The Terry Thomas, we’ve recently been spending a lot of time imagining what the future holds for the workplace. In 2014, we were wrapping up a research study for the R&E arms of Nathan Myhrvold’s Intellectual Ventures, leading their deep dive into the “Office of the Future.” For WeWork, we helped transform two existing buildings into co-working offices loaded with amenities. This model of short-term, customizable office building with shared amenities is perfect for start up companies and satellite offices, or businesses that can’t commit to an entire building or doesn’t have the capital to invest in upfront overhead expenses like building out their very own space. Technology is a major factor that affects how teams and business collaborate and communicate, and will be even more important in the future. We know that the commercial landscape is shifting and work styles are constantly evolving. We’ve been tracking these trends for years, which is why we’re never afraid to push the envelope with sustainability and design for the highest level of flexibility. This approach ensures that our clients end up with a building that will withstand the test of time, retain and attract high-quality tenants and be easy on the environment. Keep reading to learn what we think is in store for the future of the commercial office.

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STU DY:

Office Building of the Future VA R I O U S LO C AT I O N S

Every now and then we come across a project that tickles our fancy. One that allows us to do some really big thinking, to partner with likeminded companies and industry experts to push the boundaries of design. In 2014, we were involved in one of these projects. Partnering with Paladino,WSP, Schuchart, and DCI Engineers, we spent several intense months untangling the concept of a ‘plug-and-play office building of the future.’ Our task was to predict the systems and technologies that would be required to create such a building.

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Throughout the process, we considered current, near-future and far-future office needs. We identified the necessary components of an office building (above) and three office configurations that we used to ‘test’ our theories and guide our design development process. Additionally, we considered impact to three core issues: adaptability, innovation, and economics. Ultimately, our functional needs diagram led the way towards our thesis. An office, we discovered, is merely a platform of interconnected modules that support essential functions of an office such as safety, comfort and collaboration.

INNOVATION ECOSYSTEM

ADAPTABLE ENVIRONMENT

ECONOMIC DRIVER

CREATE AN INNOVATION ECOSYSTEM FOR THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT CENTERED ON ADAPTABLE SYSTEMS

CR E ATE AN INTER FACE THAT ALLOWS BUILDING SPACES TO CONTINUOUSLY CHANG E IN R ESPON SE TO USER S’ NEEDS

CREATE THE BUSINESS CASES AND POSITIVE ECONOMIC ENVIRONMENT FOR HIGHLY ADAPTABLE BUILDING SYSTEMS

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A RTI C LE:

Our client understood this, and made the decision to improve water quality in the right of way. This was a completely voluntary act – not required by the city (and in fact, the inclusion of water from O C TO B E R 15, 2 015 the Aurora Bridge might have introduced additional complexity M Y E R H A R R E L L , A I A , L E E D A P B D+C , H O M E S with the Washington State Department of Transportation). Through collaboration between Above the fold on the front page As we started to work with our WT Landscape Architecture and of The Seattle Times last Friday, civil engineer, KPFF and better KPFF Civil, the resulting design Mark Siegel reported on the harm understand the was a series done by highway runoff to our site conditions, of cascading local wildlife, specifically Coho we realized that bioretention cells salmon. Researchers from WSU road stormwater (also known as Puyallup found that two and a half runoff – both from “rain gardens”) – hours was all it took to kill adult Troll Ave and from lined areas filled salmon in water captured from the Aurora Bridge with soil, held State Route 520. Furthermore, the towering overhead back by short unique combination of chemicals – currently end retaining walls, was difficult to replicate in a lab. up in a dedicated between the To anyone concerned with human storm drain piped sidewalk and curb impact on the natural world, to an outfall on of Troll Avenue, this highlights the importance of Lake Union. It seems hard to believe: supplemented with bioswales along mitigating toxins through new urban brake dust, motor oil, gasoline, North 34th Street. The soil provides development. heavy metals and who-knows-what- a natural filtration medium (that else are getting deposited directly WSU researchers determined to Thankfully, the article also proposed into Lake Union in every major rain be the antidote to the poisoning a solution. Biofiltration using soil event. This is the same lake we all of the salmon), while also slowing as a medium can have a dramatic enjoy from water and land – in our and cooling the flow of stormwater effect on salmon’s wellbeing. Early sailboats and kayaks; from Eastlake to the nearby catch basin. As this in the design of the Fremont Office pocket parks and Gas Works Park. bioretention provides a functional Building, the project owner made More importantly, this is the same benefit to site’s stormwater their intentions clear to Weber lake we share with the salmon on management, educational signage Thompson: do what we can to their annual spawning route. This is will engage passersby to tell them minimize the impact to nearby the reason for the Ballard locks fish what’s going on. A sign at the south waterways (both the Fremont Canal ladder – Steelhead, Sockeye, Coho, end of the cells explains the green and Lake Union are within a stone’s and Chinook salmon make their way infrastructure, and numbers set into throw of the project site at North through the locks to Lake Union and the concrete sidewalk subtly call 34th Street and Troll Avenue). then to Lake Washington every year. out how many gallons of water each

Saving Salmon One Building at a Time

“...two and a half hours was all it took to kill adult salmon in water captured from State Route 520.”

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Fremont Office Building

bioretention cell filters at peak volumes through the course of one year.

“Without this development, untreated runoff from the Aurora Bridge and Troll Avenue would continue to flow into the lake”

The Fremont Office Building is a 130,000 gross square foot, mixed-use building with four stories of office over a ground floor of retail. In addition to stormwater management, it features energy-efficient design that promotes daylighting and natural ventilation, inspired by our award-winning Terry Thomas office building. It is targeting LEED Gold certification. The owners, even prior to the decision to pursue LEED certification, had

begun the process of Salmon Safe certification, to recognize this stormwater effort above and beyond what is required by the city and state, along with protecting habitat by making careful choices about exterior cladding materials.

Salmon Safe is a 501c3 founded in Portland Oregon. Their mission is to transform land management practices so Pacific salmon can thrive in West Coast watersheds. Salmon Safe offers a series of peer-reviewed certification and accreditation programs linking site development land management practices with

the protection of agricultural and urban watersheds. They offer a suite of site certification standards including urban development (under which the Fremont Office Building will be assessed) in addition to farms, vineyards, campuses, green infrastructure, golf courses and parks along with developer and contractor accreditations. We’re excited to be a part of a commercial project that not only does less harm, but also does a net positive good for the surrounding environment. Without this development, untreated runoff from the Aurora Bridge and Troll Avenue would continue to flow into the lake and endanger our cherished salmon.

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A RTI C LE:

Reusing stormwater can release untapped benefits S E P T E M B E R 29, 2 016

R AC H A E L M E Y E R , PL A , G R P, L E E D A P The focus of green stormwater infrastructure (GSI) is to mitigate the downstream effects of stormwater runoff in the urban environment. It does this by mimicking effective natural systems — soils, ground plane, etc. — to absorb, delay and clean the water within a natural watershed before it reaches a collecting body of water. However, GSI strategies have the potential to improve stormwater’s environmental impact upstream as well through lower water usage. This is usually achieved through lowflow plumbing fixtures, or efficient irrigation systems. But, imagine if each water fixture had a label showing how far the water came from and where it goes after it is used. If you knew how far the water you used traveled, and the cleaning effort involved to reach a potable level, would it influence how much water you use? Seattle’s drinking water, collected in the Cascade Mountains from the Tolt and Cedar rivers, is sent

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through drinking water treatment facilities, and then routed to the city in water distribution systems. This means the water we drink is collected 30-40 miles away. Research has shown that the infrastructure needed to move and clean water for city use can actually have a higher overall embodied energy than localized water collection and reuse at the building scale. After water is used, it typically travels through a wastewater treatment facility before it goes to the collecting water body, in Seattle’s case, the Puget Sound. Wastewater treatment is an energy-intensive process, which is unnecessarily overloaded where stormwater and sewer infrastructure are combined, as they are in many areas of Seattle. Based on research from Urban Greenprint, a local research and advocacy effort developing place-based design guidelines to improve Seattle’s ecological health,

evaporation serves a major function in the Northwest’s ecological water cycle. Unfortunately, the reduction of our forests, which dominated Seattle’s predevelopment landscape, has caused the natural water cycle to change. Predevelopment, approximately 49.8 percent of rainfall evaporated from a forested landscape, 50 percent infiltrated into soil and 0.2 percent was surface runoff. As a GSI strategy, evaporation has not received much focus, however the ultimate function of evaporation is to remove water from the system, preventing it from runoff or infiltration. Stormwater reuse, through small-scale collection and cisterns at the building scale, is a strategy that can begin to mimic evaporation by removing stormwater from the natural water cycle. This reuse of non-potable water from onsite collection greatly reduces the effort, energy and carbon expended by our potable water infrastructure. Ideally, we would primarily reuse stormwater that has fallen on a site for all non-potable building water. This would prevent the most amount of water from going through any water treatment facility unnecessarily. In addition to reuse, any measures that prevent water from leaving a site, i.e. evaporation, should also be explored. Combined, these strategies will help restore the function of the ecological water cycle.


Seattle’s Drinking Water System SE ATTLE ’S DRAIN A GE S YS TEM

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A RTI C LE:

Recapturing Wasted Office Space O C TO B E R 2 , 2 015

R AC H A E L B AU E R , N C I D Q, L E E D A P I D+C

What an intriguing, innovative concept for all – taking advantage of the existing office space and using it to its maximum potential. As we work with our clients to plan new offices, or renovate their existing spaces, this information is a powerful design tool.

percentage of individual workspaces being used at any given time – is 40%”. Technology is a key factor in this underutilization due to remote work options, break out spaces and flexible hours. Additionally, conference rooms are often under or overbooked. So the question must be asked – are these rooms actually in use, or just scheduled for use? And how many people are using the rooms relative to their size?

“Clearly, space utilization has changed – and the design of the workplace must follow suit.”

We recently heard about a leading-edge service to help in this work. Rifiniti is a company that offers a software analytics service to help companies better understand how their spaces are being used, and then makes suggestions for spatial efficiencies.

Clearly, space utilization has changed – and the design of the workplace must follow suit. The traditional offices generally run 80/20* – 80% individual stations; 20% meeting spaces. As Allsteel, a commercial office furniture manufacturer, points out, “For many organizations…the

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Underutilized real estate costs money. Larger office spaces bring higher operations costs and more risk. So what does Rifiniti mean for all this? With the help of systems that may or may not already be in place within the building (such as badge swipes or wireless sensors installed on furniture that monitors use), Rifiniti keeps track of the utilization of different spaces within the workplace. The information is presented in an organized manner that helps the customer make valuable changes.

Rifiniti’s technology is not just intended for existing companies; it also works for those inquiring about a new space or developers looking to purchase real estate to sell or lease to tenants. They can evaluate a potential space to see if it is a good fit with a company’s actual needs. Could a company do this on its own to save on costs for the service? Perhaps, but the sheer number of variables make it a tricky proposition. Cutting too much real estate might negatively affect workflow. Knowing the decision to cut floor space is backed by actual data can help ensure workplace efficiency and preserve employee satisfaction. That helps in continuing to attract talent. With Seattle becoming denser – resulting in less real estate at a higher cost – it only makes sense for companies to carefully evaluate their space needs based on facts, not suppositions. This technology seems to be a viable tool that has the potential to bring greater profitability to companies and impact the real estate market.


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Resumes

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Kristen Scott AIA, LEED AP S E N I O R P R I N C I PA L Kristen Scott is Managing Partner and Senior Principal of Weber Thompson where she heads the commercial office architecture design team. As Managing Partner of Weber Thompson for more than 20 years, she has overseen the growth of the firm from its beginnings to the sustainably focused 70 person multi-disciplinary firm it is today. Her background spans the design of a variety of affordable and market-rate homes, multifamily and senior housing in both urban and suburban communities to currently leading teams designing high performance office buildings. Watershed

Kristen received her Master of Architecture and a Bachelor of Arts in Psychology from the University of Washington, a background which provides a foundation for her collaborative, solution oriented approach to design. She is licensed to practice architecture in the State of Washington and became a LEED AP in 2007. Active in the broader architecture community, she has held various leadership roles in Seattle and at the state level.

Data 1 Office

E X PE R I E N C E Data 1 Office | Seattle, WA Watershed | Seattle, WA Blue Rooster | Seattle, WA W.L. Gore TI | Seattle, WA Hansen Belyea TI | Seattle, WA

Blue Rooster

WeWork TI | Seattle, WA Terry Thomas | Seattle, WA Howard S. Wright Corporate Headquarters TI | Seattle, WA Dwelling Company Corporate Headquarters | Seattle, WA Bagley Lofts | Seattle, WA Woodinville Wine Village | Woodinville, WA Aljoya Mercer Island | Mercer Island, WA

Terry Thomas

Blakely Community Center | Issaquah Highlands


Myer Harrell AIA, LEED AP BD+C, Homes P R I N C I PA L , D I R E C T O R O F S U S TA I N A B I L I T Y Principal Myer Harrell serves as Weber Thompson’s Director of Sustainability. He is known throughout Seattle as a thoughtful, dedicated architect with a passion for environmentally conscious design. His current work as a Project Manager for Weber Thompson is primarily in highly-sustainable commercial office and mixed-use residential projects. Myer strives to balance vision and action with creative and integrative problem solving solutions. He was a member of the award-winning design team for Eco-Laboratory, which won the national USGBC 2008 Natural Talent Design Competition, and was included in the Cooper Hewitt’s 2010 Design Triennial Exhibit.

Data 1 Office

Myer’s passion for both theory and practice keeps him heavily involved in the academia of architecture. Nationally, he has been actively engaged with the US Green Building Council as a member of the Greenbuild Program Working Group. In recent years he has co-instructed architecture studios at the University of Washington’s College of Built Environments, and was elected to the Board of the Cascadia Green Building Council. Watershed

E D U C AT I O N Master of Architecture – University of Washington Bachelor of Science Architecture, Philosophy Citation – University of Maryland

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Office of the Future

COLLABO RAT ION

OFFICE FUNCTIONAL NEEDS

Data 1 Office | Seattle, WA

CULTURAL DISPLAY KITCHEN / DINI NG

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Watershed | Seattle, WA

CY EN ING ND JAC AD BRA AL LE P ON O ATI Z PE NTS I N UME GA DOC OR NCE PLIA M O C GRESS IN PRO WORK

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Sunset Electric

SEATING

R E L E VA N T PRO J EC T E X PE R I E N C E

Sunset Electric Building | Seattle, WA Office of the Future | Various Locations 316 Alaskan Way | Seattle, WA* Point Edwards Building 10 | Seattle, WA The Wally | Seattle, WA Eco•Laboratory | Seattle, WA Aljoya Mercer Island | Mercer Island, WA *a project of design team partnership, WTGBD


Todd Mayne AIA, LEED AP BD+C P R I N C I PA L Principal Todd Mayne is a Senior Project Manager at Weber Thompson specializing in construction administration and quality assurance. His professional interests and passions include building technology and the process of bringing a project from concept to completion.

The Post

Todd is a vital asset to his team and to the culture here at Weber Thompson through his work ethic, well-rounded knowledge in design and technology, and overall engagement in firm life. He is a valued resource on technical matters and mentors various staff members as they work through construction administration issues. Joining Weber Thompson in 2000, Todd has worked on numerous projects including The Post, The Premiere on Pine, TalkingRain Offices and Rival Fitness. His array of work also includes working on a high-rise office and residential project in Denver, Colorado and a wide range of commercial tenant improvements. E D U C AT I O N Bachelor of Arts in Architecture – University of New Mexico Master of Architecture – University of Washington E X PE R I E N C E

Premiere on Pine

Premiere on Pine | Seattle, WA The Post | Seattle, WA TalkingRain Headquarters | Preston, WA Woodinville Village | Woodinville, WA Crofton Springs | Issaquah, WA Coppins Well | Seattle, WA

TalkingRain Headquarters

W.L. Gore | Seattle, WA Hansen Belyea Offices | Seattle, WA Penterra Plaza | Denver, CO


Bernadette Rubio LEED AP, NCIDQ I N T E R I O R D E S I G N P R I N C I PA L

4730 California

Interior Design Principal Bernadette Rubio joined Weber Thompson in 2012 with 20 years of experience in interior and architectural design and was promoted to Principal in 2016. She started her career as an architect, but shifted to interior design in order for her designs to have a more direct impact on people’s lives. For her projects, Bernadette believes in understanding who it is one is designing for and seeing the importance of both aesthetics and functionality. For her, that process of analysis, problem solving and collaboration is one of the most enjoyable aspects of her job. E D U C AT I O N Bachelor of Science, Architecture – Portland State University E X PE R I E N C E Sunset Electric | Seattle, WA Fremont & 9th | Las Vegas, NV

Pike Motorworks LTD

Radius SLU | Seattle, WA WeWork SLU Office Tenant Improvement | Seattle, WA Pike Motorworks LTD | Seattle, WA Pike Motorworks | Seattle, WA 4730 California | Seattle, WA 2nd & Pine | Seattle, WA

WeWork SLU Office TI

Le Caviste | Seattle, WA Lincoln Plaza Refresh | Bellevue, WA BOKA | Seattle, WA Ian Menswear | Seattle, WA Elleven | Los Angeles, CA* Luma | Los Angeles, CA*

Ian Menswear

Riva on the Park | Portland, OR* 12 Moons Restaurant | Snoqualmie, WA** *designed while at Ankrom Moisan. **designed while at MulvannyG2.


Cody Lodi AIA, LEED AP S E N I O R A S S O C I AT E Joining Weber Thompson in 2012, Cody has over 10 years of experience working on a variety of projects ranging from commercial office, single family, midrise and high rise residential mixed-use developments to retail.

Watershed

His early experience working in the construction industry gave Cody an appreciation for the craftsmanship that goes into constructing a building, and a greater depth of knowledge as to how a building comes together. He has applied this to his architectural designs, striving to achieve a balance of design and constructability in each of his projects. Cody is an strong advocate for leveraging technology like BIM and Virtual Reality to design and build beautiful, sustainable architecture. E D U C AT I O N Bachelor of Science in Architecture – University of Idaho Master of Architecture – University of Washington PRO J EC T E X PE R I E N C E

ELAN Uptown Flats

Watershed | Seattle, WA 2nd & Pine | Seattle, WA South Kirkland TOD | Kirkland, WA ELAN Uptown Flats | Seattle, WA 2nd & Stewart Feasibility | Seattle, WA 5th & Stewart Feasibility | Seattle, WA 425 Fairview | Seattle, WA Bellevue Plaza Mixed-Use | Bellevue, WA UCSF Mission Bay Net-Zero Student Housing | San Francisco, WA Luna Sol Mixed Use | Kirkland, WA* SafeCo Tower TI | Seattle, WA**

2nd & Pine

*designed while at ShugartBates Architects **designed while at Gensler Architects

Weber Thompson Commercial Office Brochure  

Our philosophy at Weber Thompson is quite simple: we seek to understand our client's vision, to excel at teamwork, and believe that our succ...

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