Page 1


We Make Your Money Grow!

II

South Ogden

Ogden

Ben Lomond

4605 Harrison Blvd. 801-394-6611

2605 Washington Blvd. 801-409-5000

115 Washington Blvd. 801-399-4425

Bleed Purple

WeberStateSports.com

Fall 2016

www.bankofutah.com


LARRY H. MILLER CHRYSLER JEEP DODGE RAM RIVERDALE

SUPPORTS WEBER STATE ATHLETICS

801-398-2800 • LHMRiverdale.com

LIKE US ON FACEBOOK FOLLOW US ON TWITTER 1481 West Riverdale Rd. Riverdale, Ut 84405 WeberStateSports.com

Fall 2016

801-398-2800 • LHMRiverdale.com

Bleed Purple

1


STARTING LINEUP

CONTENTS

FEATURES 16 MURPHY’S LAWS

Former Atlanta Braves star Dale Murphy’s keys to being a sports parent led his son McKay’s journey into football and to a spot on the Weber State defensive line. BY JIM BURTON

22 SUCCESS FOR THE LONG RUN

Paul Pilkington has helped lead the Wildcat women’s cross country team to a very high level of success over the last six years, and he has his sights set on getting the men’s program to the same level. BY CHRIS J. MILLER

25 JUST LIKE HE DID

Pilkington’s success with the Weber State distance runners stems from teaching his athletes to think big and work hard, just like he did in becoming a world class runner. BY CHRIS J. MILLER

32 PRESERVING MAC’S LEGACY

32

The late Mac Madsen built a Big Sky golf dynasty during his time at Weber State, and his family and former players are committed to an effort that will preserve his legacy with the Wildcat golf program. BY DARIN HOGGE AND MATT SPENCER

30 FORGED WITH FIRE

After a tough first two seasons, Megan Thompson had to learn to reignite her fire and love of volleyball again. The process reshaped her as an athlete and as a person. BY CORIE HOLMES

37 THE WSU COACHING TREE

Over the decades Weber State football has been the ground for the development of several major college and NFL coaches. BY PAUL GRUA

22

37

DEPARTMENTS 4 FROM THE A.D. 6 SNAPSHOTS 14 PLAYIN’ ON PURPLE with Tre’von Johnson 21 COMPLIANCE CORNER Student-Athlete Employment 38 CREATE A LEGACY

Party with a Purpose

42 NAME GAME

30 2

Bleed Purple

Fall 2016

16

44 TOP TWEETS

WeberStateSports.com


W

elcome to the latest issue of Bleed Purple Magazine. In this edition, you will get another great inside look at what is great about Weber State Athletics. Writer Chris Miller gives us a dual angle look at coach Paul Pilkington and the great success that the women’s cross country team has had under his watch. Paul went on to a very successful running career following his All-American performance at Weber State and he is taking what he learned from his own experience and applying that to the way he teaches his current runners. Jim Burton provided us with another great piece, this time giving us insight into football’s McKay Murphy, the son of former Major League Baseball star Dale Murphy, and how his father utilizing some great keys to being a sports parent led to his choice of football over baseball. Corie Holmes does a great job with her Playin’ on Purple videos, and in this issue’s segment she helps us get to know football’s Tre’von Johnson in one of the series’ best episodes yet. Holmes also turned in a great article highlighting volleyball’s Megan Thompson, who just wrapped up her four-year career with the Wildcats. The article shows a great deal of vulnerability from the middle blocker as she talks about how team struggles over her first couple of seasons caused her to lose her passion for the sport, and how she had

WeberStateSports.com

to relearn how to love the game again. It is a great look into the life of a student-athlete and how the process of her career has shaped her life going forward. Paul Grua provides you with an informative piece, looking back on several of the football assistant coaches that have spent time at Weber State that have gone on to coach at major college programs and with National Football League teams. We also have an article on former men’s golf coach Mac Madsen, who built a Big Sky dynasty with his program. Several of Mac’s former players have gone on to great careers in the professional golf industry, and a group of those players, along with the Madsen family, have started efforts to preserve his legacy at Weber State in the form of an endowed golf scholarship. Thank you for being a fan of Wildcat Athletics and we hope you enjoy this issue. We wish you the best in the upcoming Holiday season, and we will be back soon after the new year with another edition. Until next time, Go Wildcats!

THE OFFICIAL MAGAZINE OF WEBER STATE ATHLETICS presented by

Volume 2, Issue 3 Editor in Chief

Darin Hogge

Executive Editors

Paul Grua Chris J. Miller Corie Holmes

Creative Director

Darin Hogge

Contributing Writers

Chris J. Miller Jim Burton Corie Holmes Darin Hogge Paul Grua Jerry Bovee Becky Thompson Will Pridemore Matt Spencer

Photography

Robert Casey Alan Ferrin

Ad Director

Dave Champlain

EMAIL: WEBERSTATESPORTS@GMAIL.COM WEBSITE: WEBERSTATESPORTS.COM FACEBOOK: facebook.com/WeberStateAthletics TWITTER: @WeberState INSTAGRAM: WSUWildcats

Darin Hogge

Director of Digital Media and Publications

Copyright © 2016 by Weber State Athletics Publications All Rights Reserved Reproduction in whole or in part is prohibited. Fall 2016

Bleed Purple

3


From the A.D.

A Message from Jerry Bovee

I

t is remarkable to think that we are almost midway through another school year as the Fall 2016 Commencement is now just a few short weeks away. I enjoy seeing our student-athletes participate in those graduation ceremonies. Success in athletics is primarily measured by the wins that occur on the courts and fields of competition but the successful completion of a degree is right up there with the best of wins. Graduation day is a culmination of the dedication our studentathletes put into their studies over a number of years. Additionally, it’s a payday for their families and loved ones who have supported them through the ups and downs of their academic and athletic journey. Recently, the NCAA released the Graduation Success Rates for all Division I institutions. Studentathletes at Weber State posted a GSR of 78%, which is the highest percentage at WSU in nine years. This mark reflects the efforts of our amazing student-athletes but also the coaches, academic advisors and tutors as well as other athletic staff members and dedicated Weber State faculty. We all celebrate the fact that nearly eight of every ten studentathletes walk across the stage on graduation day with an opportunity at a better life. They understand in a clearer way their place in the world and their responsibility to make it a better place for all humanity. 4

Bleed Purple

Fall 2016

“We all celebrate the fact that nearly eight of every ten studentathletes walk across the stage on graduation day with an opportunity at a better life. They understand in a clearer way their place in the world and their responsibility to make it a better place for all humanity.” They embraced the efforts recently that our department and you the fans undertook to support the grieving families in Chattanooga, Tennessee, who were suffering from a catastrophic bus accident. When we heard of the devastating crash that took the life of six young students, and knowing that we were

traveling to Chattanooga to participate in the 2016 FCS Playoffs, we felt that we could assist in some way to assuage their suffering. We worked with the folks in Chattanooga to create a helmet sticker to honor the victims that both teams wore during the game and we put together an online giving campaign that in just a few short days netted over $9,000 to assist the affected families. The administration and fan base of The University of Tennessee at Chattanooga were touched and a bit overwhelmed at the kindness shown by our community. It put perspective to a football game that we will not soon forget. Graduation day at Weber State brings to conclusion all those experiences for our student-athletes and it’s another characteristic of what truly makes Weber State great, great, great! We’ll see you at the games, go Wildcats!

Jerry Bovee Weber State Director of Athletics

WeberStateSports.com


WeberStateSports.com

Fall 2016

Bleed Purple

5


6

Bleed Purple

Fall 2016

WeberStateSports.com


The Weber State women’s soccer team battled the eventual Big Sky Conference regular season champion Idaho Vandals to a 1-1 draw in the first-ever night match at Wildcat Soccer Field on Oct. 14. (Photo by Alan Ferrin and WSU Multimedia Services)

WeberStateSports.com

Fall 2016

Bleed Purple

7


8

Bleed Purple

Fall 2016

WeberStateSports.com


Sophomore linebacker Landon Stice dives to tackle a Portland State running back during Weber State’s 14-10 win over the Vikings in this year’s Homecoming Game. (Photo by Robert Casey)

WeberStateSports.com

Fall 2016

Bleed Purple

9


10

Bleed Purple

Fall 2016

WeberStateSports.com


Members of Just Jumpin’, a local competition and demonstration jump rope team, perform during halftime of a WSU basketball game at the Dee Events Center. (Photo by Robert Casey)

WeberStateSports.com

Fall 2016

Bleed Purple

11


12

Bleed Purple

Fall 2016

WeberStateSports.com


WSU senior forward Lana Willard plays a ball past a Utah defender during a match against the Utes in Salt Lake City. (Photo by Robert Casey)

WeberStateSports.com

Fall 2016

Bleed Purple

13


with Tre’von Johnson Get to know football’s Tre’von Johnson, a senior linebacker from Salt Lake City, as Corie Holmes met up him for the latest edition of Playin’ on Purple.

Playin’ On Purple: What is something that most people don’t know about you? Tre’von Johnson: Growing up, I was in a band. I was a band geek growing up, so I played the clarinet all through middle school. In high school, I had to make a change, ‘cause I wanted to make a new image of myself. Not many people know I was a band geek and played the clarinet. I try to keep that a secret, but now it’s out, so……

P.O.P If you could play any other sport collegiately, what would you play and why? T.J. Basketball. With football, you’ve got the helmet on, so people don’t get to see you making the

plays, but everybody knows who Jeremy Senglin is because he’s got his face showing. So I would want to play basketball just so the fans would know who I am. I don’t know if that’s selfish or not, I just want to be known, like ‘Hey, that’s Tre’von Johnson right there!’. With my helmet on, don’t nobody know who I am, just another student on campus.

P.O.P. Who is your celebrity crush? T.J. Ohh, Rihanna. Oh my god, I love Rihanna. She’s perfect. She’s perfect, man. I love her.

She’s on my wall, my screensaver. My fiancé gets mad at me sometimes ‘cause all I talk about is Rihanna at home, so I gotta try and switch it up, but I love Rihanna. Rihanna’s definitely my celebrity crush.

P.O.P. What is the best concert you’ve ever been to?….Are you going to say Rihanna? T.J. Rihanna. So she came to Salt Lake at the Vivint Smart Home (Arena) now, and I was lovin’

that concert. I got a bunch of videos. I was in love, man it was the best time of my life. I kind of went through depression when she left. That was a really hard thing for me to get through. I miss her so much, I just want her to come back.

P.O.P. Who is your favorite person in the world? T.J. My daughter. I gotta give that to my daughter. I love that girl so much. Can I do two?

‘Cause I I don’t want my fiancé to be mad at me, so I’m going to say my fiancé also. Both of those two people run my world, they keep me going every day. (POP: How old is your daughter?) She just turned one on October 1st, so she’s growing up. The first year went by so fast. It’s kind of making me sad to think about that now she’s going to grow up into a teenager and not like me. I’m missing these years, I feel like already. 14

Bleed Purple

Fall 2016

WeberStateSports.com


Weber State University

WeberStateSports.com Weber State University

Fall 2016

Bleed Purple

15


MURPHY’S LAWS Former Atlanta Braves star Dale Murphy’s keys to being a sports parent led his son McKay’s journey into football and to a spot on the Weber State defensive line.

A

By JIM BURTON few years back, after an appearance in downtown Ogden, Dale Murphy spent a few minutes in the back of a conference room at the Eccles Conference Center talking baseball with a local newspaper reporter. Murphy, who played 18 seasons in the Major Leagues and twice earned National League MVP honors, spent several minutes sharing his views on being a sports parent. As the father of eight — including seven boys —he’d seen his share of youth sports, most often as an interested, supportive parent, but also a few times as a coach. In Murphy’s mind, two key elements to finding happiness in the world of parents, kids and sports were, No. 1 keep things positive and No. 2, it’s always about the kids and never about the parents, so don’t force the issue. By way of example, Murphy told the story about the time he was driving one of his boys to a baseball game and casually asked, “What’s your favorite position to play?” With perhaps only a slight hesitation, the boy looked at his famed

baseball-playing dad and said, “Sitting on the bench.” Probably not the response the seven-time MLB All-Star was looking for, but one that reinforced his belief that it wasn’t about him anyway.

As it turns out, baseball’s loss was Weber State’s gain. See, McKay Murphy wasn’t really feeling the baseball vibe back then, so he wound up focusing his attention on football. And football eventually brought

Dale Murphy racked up 398 Home Runs and 1,266 RBI over an 18-year career in Major League Baseball. 16

Bleed Purple

Fall 2016

WeberStateSports.com


WeberStateSports.com

Fall 2016

Bleed Purple

17


him to Weber State. A junior defensive lineman on WSU’s 2016 team, Murphy didn’t necessarily take a direct route to Ogden. The trip may well have started that day in the car, as he and his dad drove to the baseball game. Along the way, however, McKay made several interesting stops, including a successful high school football career, a brief time at the University of Utah, a two-year LDS mission, marriage, fatherhood and a frustrating 2015 season that saw him miss the entire campaign after suffering an ACL injury in training camp. “Yeah, that was not a very fun

18

Bleed Purple

Fall 2016

year,” he said. “The whole process was pretty frustrating.” When asked about how he ended up playing for the Wildcats, Murphy put some real thought into the answer “It’s not really complicated, but …” he began. “I was a walk-on at Utah, when (current WSU head coach Jay Hill) was there. So I redshirted my first year there. I loved playing at Utah. Obviously I didn’t play — I was redshirting — but it was fun just being there, being a part of that environment.” While at Utah there was some talk of switching from the defensive side of the ball to the offensive line.

McKay, his older brother Jake — a Utes’ tight end — and close friend and teammate Trevor Reilly sat down for a heart to heart discussion. Ultimately, the conclusion was that McKay’s best bet was to transfer to Weber State, where a scholarship would be waiting. “Coach Hill told me that they’d give me a scholarship to play up here,” he said. “The decision was pretty easy because playing football and paying for school so you can get beat up everyday (in practice) was not very fun.” As a redshirt freshman in 2014, Murphy played in all 12 games for the Wildcats. Looking ahead to 2015

WeberStateSports.com


“It’s going to be the same way (with my kids), I don’t want to push it on them or force them to do anything they don’t want to. But I do feel like one of the best things I’ve learned from team sports, I would say, is toughness.’’ there was plenty of hope and excitement not just for Murphy, but for the entire WSU team. Unfortunately for Murphy, he tore the ACL ligament in his left knee on the second to last day of fall camp. That not only meant missing the entire season, it meant spending countless hours doing rehab work far away from the sounds of the cheering crowd. But there was no giving up, not for someone with Murphy’s passion for the game and not for someone who grew up in a successful, high-functioning and internally motivated family. Dale Murphy may not have pushed his children into sports — or even into one particular sport over another — but surely they picked up on their father’s commitment to doing things the right way. “It’s important to be positive,” Dale said that day in 2014, following his speech at the Eccles Center. “All positive.” When he said those words he was actually sharing a bit of advice for youth sports coaches, but the message went beyond youth sports and even athletics in general. What he offered that day, in just one sentence, was something of a life lesson. Work hard, don’t give up, keep a positive attitude and of course, keep things in perspective. As McKay Murphy shared the arduous and tedious details of his knee rehabilitation, it was easy to see he’d been raised to confront WeberStateSports.com

hard things with a healthy attitude. He said playing team sports from an early age helped solidify the message his dad always seemed to convey. McKay said he has expressed to his wife, Sarah, that he’d like to see their children someday do the same thing. And he said he’ll take the same approach his father did with him. “It’s going to be the same way,” he said. “I don’t want to push it on them or force them to do anything they don’t want to. But I do feel like one of the best things I’ve learned from team sports, I would say, is toughness.” Toughness, not just in the physical

sense of the word, but the mental part of it too. “That’s something that you hear a lot (in sports),” Murphy said. “Our coaching staff talks about it a lot. I imagine every coaching staff everywhere talks about it a lot.” From the kid who once told his dad the best part of baseball is sitting in the dugout, goofing around with his teammates, to the grown man, husband and father who plays football for Weber State, McKay Murphy understands what it means to work for something. And he most definitely understands what it means to rise to a challenge.

Fall 2016

Bleed Purple

19


20

Bleed Purple

Fall 2016

WeberStateSports.com


Compliance Corner

Student-Athlete Employment

One of the missions of the Weber State Office of Athletics Compliance is to educate those who support our athletics programs. You may or may not know that NCAA rules control what a booster can and cannot do with recruits and current student-athletes. Improper interactions between a booster and a current or future student-athlete may jeopardize the student-athlete’s eligibility. According to NCAA rules, you are a booster if you 1. Have participated in or have been a member of an agency or organization promoting the institution’s athletics program (e.g. Wildcat Club); 2. Have made financial contributions to the athletics department or to an athletics booster organization; 3. Have assisted or been asked to assist by the athletics department in the recruitment of a prospective student-athlete; 4. Assist or have assisted in provided benefits to student-athletes or their families; OR 5. Have been involved otherwise in promoting the institution’s athletics program. It is important to remember that once you trigger booster status with an institution, you are always considered a booster.

G

reetings and Happy Holidays, Wildcats fans! Like many other college students, our student-athletes work part-time jobs to help cover their educational expenses. As boosters of our athletics program, you may be permitted to employ a student-athlete. Below are answers to some frequently asked questions. Is there a limit on the rate that I may pay a student-athlete? A student-athlete must be compensated only for work actually performed at a rate commensurate with the going rate in the Ogden area for similar services performed.

May I hire a student-athlete because of his athletics ability? No. Compensation cannot include any remuneration for the value or utility a student-athlete may provide to the employer because of the student-athlete’s publicity, reputation, fame, etc.

WeberStateSports.com

May I provide transportation for a student-athlete to/from work? Transportation may be provided only if transportation is provided to all other employees.

May I use a student-athlete’s picture to advertise my business? No. A student-athlete’s name, picture, or likeness cannot be used to advertise, recommend or promote sales or use of a commercial product or service of any kind.

This form requires information from both the employer and employee.

If you have any other questions on employment or any other NCAA rules, please feel free to contact the Office of Athletics Compliance. Until next time,

May I hire a student-athlete as a model? It is permissible for a student-athlete to serve as a model in limited cases, but there are a number of restrictions regarding modeling. Please contact the Office of Athletics Compliance for details. Is there anything I should do before hiring a student-athlete? Yes. Please contact the Office of Athletics Compliance prior to employment beginning to obtain the Student-Athlete Employer Agreement.

Will Pridemore Director of Compliance williampridemore@weber.edu 801.626.8552 Fall 2016

Bleed Purple

21


SUCCESS FOR

Paul Pilkington has helped lead the Wildcat women’s cross country team to a very high level of success over the last six years, and he has his sights set on getting the men’s program to the same level.

T

By CHRIS J. MILLER

he Wildcats’ distance program is in good hands. Or maybe good feet. Former Weber State All-American Paul Pilkington guided the ‘Cats to another successful cross country campaign in 2016, building on the successes of former coaches and runners and squads that have made 22

Bleed Purple

Fall 2016

WSU an established national program year-in and year-out. And the future is bright as well. The young Wildcats ran through their usually difficult season slate, then posted plenty of success at the Big Sky Conference Championships in October in Moscow, Idaho. Weber State’s women’s squad narrowly missed out on repeating

as conference team champions on Oct. 28, finishing second to Northern Arizona in a tight battle for the top spot. Senior Ellie Child won the individual race, the fourth Weber State runner to do so in the past five seasons. Senior Hailey Whetten finished third overall with two other runners in the top 20. Weber State’s men’s squad also WeberStateSports.com


THE LONG RUN

had a solid effort at the Big Sky finale, finishing third to eventual NCAA national champion Northern Arizona and Southern Utah. The ‘Cats’ Jordan Cross led the Wildcats with a 13th-place finish, one of three WSU runners in the top 20. At Saturday’s NCAA Championships, Northern Arizona captured the men’s title, with Colorado third and BYU 7th. On the women’s side, Oregon edged Colorado, Child represented WSU, extending the Wildcats’ participation at nationals for another year. Pilkington’s coaching style is a continuation of tried and true methods WeberStateSports.com

of his WSU mentors --- Chick Hislop and Jim Blaisdell -- as well as a great pool of experience in big races himself. “I think I brought a few different things because I’d been exposed to numerous world class runners and different coaches in my experiences,” Pilkington said earlier this season. “There was very small tweaking from what Chick and Jim did. I still talk to Chick sometimes if I have questions.” “I think one of things I have brought here, having been running at the level I did, was the idea that you can be at the world-class level,”

he said. “We enter each year thinking of competing on the national level. We have that work ethic here in Ogden.” So what have been the memorable experiences for the coach, now in his 11th year at Weber State? “Lindsey Anderson making the Olympic team and two world championships teams was a high, and she broke an NCAA record in the steeplechase as well,” Pilkington said. “Overall, I’ve been pleased with how we’ve been able to impact our top 10 list through the years.” “Other highlights would include the number of All-Americans we’ve Fall 2016

Bleed Purple

23


“At Weber State, track and field and cross country is a big deal. We get support from the president on down. They know me and my athletes. Our athletes love that positive pressure.’’

-- Paul Pilkington

had on the track and in cross country. That and the women winning four of the last six Big Sky titles (and placing second the two years we didn’t win it). It’s always special going to the NCAA Championships and placing there.” “We haven’t won the men’s cross country title, but then again we haven’t put as much money into men’s distance running until recently,” he said. “That’s changed now. And this is the best men’s team we’ve had in 10 years,” he added. Weber State battles a great tradition of in-state running schools for local talent, then spends all season running against those schools for national seeding. “Qualifying for nationals is based on who you beat,” Pilkington said. “We go to meets all year that are almost as tough as nationals.”

“The talent here in Utah is very good, but with Utah Valley and Southern Utah now competing for those same runners, it’s a recruiting challenge,” Pilkington said. “We’ve done a good job of recruiting. The future looks bright.” Among the things Pilkington is pleased about is the progress of individuals as competitors. “Sometimes our goals scare off runners that come from a small high school program,” he said. “I’ve seen so many runners come from those programs and work and work until they are winning conference meets.” Several former Wildcats continue to run professionally, including Taylor Ward, who recently won the 2016 Philadelphia Marathon, and Amber Henry Schulz. “Coach P is very knowledgeable. He changed me as an athlete,” Schulz said. “I definitely wouldn’t have accomplished what I did at Weber without him.” Pilkington knows it’s a team effort. “We have incredible facilities for one thing, with an, indoor track and training environment,” he said. “We have over 200 miles of trails right around us. “Part of staying healthy is getting on soft dirt to run on. Ogden is a

great place to train. We’re able to keep our miles high and not pound the pavement and stay healthy, the multiple-time Big Sky coach of the Year honoree said. “We also have a good support system in terms of athletic training and physicians. At Weber State, track and field and cross country is a big deal,” Pilkington said. “We get support from the president on down. They know me and my athletes. Our athletes love that positive pressure,” he added. We’re also pleased that our program is full of great studentathletes. Some of our best runners are great students. That to me is very satisfying,” said Pilkington. With all those elements in place, it’s easy to see why Pilkington thinks the best is yet to come. “We have a bright future for sure.”

Amber Henry and Taylor Ward helped lead the Wildcats to multiple Big Sky Conference cross country titles. Henry (left) was a two-time individual Big Sky cross country champion. Ward’s (right) post collegiate successes include the 2016 Philadelphia Marathon title. 24

Bleed Purple

Fall 2016

WeberStateSports.com


JUST LIKE HE DID By CHRIS J. MILLER

P

aul Pilkington knows how to take advantage of his surroundings. As he begins his second decade as Weber State’s cross country coach, Pilkington teaches his squads to

think big and work like champions. Just like he did. As a runner, Pilkington earned junior college All-America honors at the College of Southern Idaho under future WSU coach Jim Blaisdell. A year later, at Weber State, Pilkington became one of

coach Chick Hislop’s first AllAmericans in the steeplechase event. After college, Pilkington just kept getting better and better, and became one of the feared marathoners in the big races around the world. Pilkington was a two-time national champion, claiming the marathon crown in 1994 and the 20-kilometer masters title in 1999. He won the Houston Marathon in 1990 and the Los Angeles Marathon in 1994, becoming a rabbit legend in the process. Pilkington’s top-10 all-time posts include marathons in London, Berlin, Moscow, Venice, San Francisco and Twin Cities. The Idaho native represented the United States in the 1995 World Championships in Gothenberg, Sweden, and competed in four different U.S. Olympic Trials.

Speed work And it all began in the potato fields surrounding Blackfoot, Idaho. “I grew up in Blackfoot, and started running while moving irrigation pipes in the potato fields in the mornings and afternoons. I would run my lines, pick those pipes up and run back and forth in the potato fields,” Pilkington said. “So every summer from the time I was 13, I was running for 3 to 4 months, twice a day.” “I didn’t go out and run cross country until my senior year of high school. I had the training, it was just on the farm, not running WeberStateSports.com

Fall 2016

Bleed Purple

25


around a track,” Pilkington added. “I think that helped when I did go out for cross country, I found out I had some talent for it.” After a year of competitive running in high school, Pilkington went to the College of Southern Idaho, where he was a Junior College All-American in the steeplechase, and caught Hislop’s eye. “I came to Weber State in 1978 and ran until graduating in 1981,” he said. “After college, I just kept on running and training,” Pilkington said. “I was teaching school (at Delta High, Mound Fort Junior High and Ben Lomond High) and running full time, and ended up getting better and better as I got older.” Indeed. Pilkington won a pair of U.S. national titles and was known on the marathon circuit. “I made a pretty good living as a marathoner,” he said. Stealing the show Pilkington was making a good

“He gave us the tools to achieve, but I also appreciated his stern encouragement to succeed. I could always hear his voice out of the crowd at a big race. His enthusiasm is what pushed you forward.’’

living as a marathoner, competing for the U.S. in the Worlds in Sweden. He was contracted by the Los Angeles Marathon to set a solid, fast pace in its 1994 race for the sum of $3,000. But after running the first half of the race in an impressive 1 hour, 5 minutes, the former WSU star realized he felt great and just kept

Following an All-American career at Weber State, Paul went on to success in several national and international events, including an unexpected win at the 1994 Los Angeles Marathon.

on running. The future WSU coach pushed through to the finish tape in 2:12:13, to win the race, the U.S. title that went with it, a $27,000

-- Amber Henry Schulz 26

Bleed Purple

Fall 2016

WeberStateSports.com


Paul’s son Seth started his collegiate career at Oregon, but transferred to Illinois to run for his father and eventually followed Paul to Weber State, where he became a five-time All-American.

purse as well as a Mercedes Benz luxury car. While the second-place finisher and several other top runners cried foul, Pilkington didn’t break any rules and the organizers loved the underdog story. “I’m the rabbit who won,” Pilkington told the Los Angeles Times at the finish line. “I don’t mind that. I don’t mind the word rabbit. It’s what I do.” “I coached at Ben Lomond High for a couple of years, and also started coaching some individuals while I was teaching. At one point, I went back and got a Master’s degree in instructional design, but also worked as a part-time assistant coach to Chick Hislop at Weber State.” Coaching chops Pilkington’s first head coaching

WeberStateSports.com

job came at the University of Illinois for two years, but he returned about the time Hislop retired. “Illinois was a good experience,” Pilkington recalls, “being part of a Big-Ten program. I enjoyed the Midwest, and enjoyed the athletes. There are good people there. But I missed the mountains and skiing.” A highlight for Pilkington was to coach his son Seth here at Weber State. “After high school, I encouraged Seth to go someplace else,” Paul remembers. “I had coached him in high school, and wanted him to have another experience. He ran a year at Oregon. Then while I was at Illinois, he went on a mission. He came back and ran a year at Illinois, then when I came back to Weber, he followed me back here and ended up being a five-time All-American here.” While many of his studentathletes know of Pilkington’s own successes, he doesn’t dwell on himself. “I was around him for six years, and only heard a handful of stories about his running,” Amber Henry

Schulz said. “The only time he said anything about his running, was to teach us something or offer a lesson. “Coach P was usually down to business. But we did enjoy the days when things were goofy and giggly with him,” she said. “One of the most memorable experiences, for me, was when one of the other athletes was sick and we were on a road trip,” Schulz recalled. “He stayed at her side for eight straight hours while we waited for our flights. I feel like he was always determined to help every athlete to be their very best.” Track and field standout Riley Cook only ran a short time for Pilkington, but knew he was ready to lead the Wildcats. “The fact that he was such a great runner back in his prime, really pulled some weight with us,” Cook said. “He was humble about his running, but we knew about it.” “Weber State has had some great distance running success through the years, and Utah has a great load of high school talent. Paul’s done a great job as a coach.” Schulz agreed. “He gave us the tools to achieve,” she said. “But I also appreciated his stern encouragement to succeed. I could always hear his voice out of the crowd at a big race. His enthusiasm is what pushed you forward.” Pilkington still runs, but for his own pleasure. “I don’t run when the team does,” he reflected. “I still run a lot, but don’t have the itch to run competitively, I don’t like hurting anymore.” Fall 2016

Bleed Purple

27


28

Bleed Purple

Fall 2016

WeberStateSports.com


Ogden Courtyard by Marriott

Official Wildcat Athletics Sponsor Make room for a little fun.

We’re on YOUR team. Ogden Courtyard by Marriott is the newest addition to downtown Ogden. Our newly renovated hotel and clean comfortable beds are the best way to celebrate after that big win! Make sure you stop by our bistro for breakfast or pick up a Starbucks Coffee on your way out.

www.ogdencourtyard.com

247 24th Street Ogden, UT 84401 | (801) 395-2046

WeberStateSports.com

Fall 2016

Bleed Purple

29


PRESERVING MAC’S LEGACY The late Mac Madsen built a Big Sky golf dynasty during his time at Weber State, and his family and former players are committed to an effort that will preserve his legacy with the Wildcat golf program.

By DARIN HOGGE & MATT SPENCER

O

ver the past year, the Weber State Athletics and Development departments have been hard at work with efforts to enhance the University’s golf programs. With the sudden passing of Director of Golf Jeff Smith earlier this year, the Jeff Smith Memorial Golf Scholarship was created. A very successful Raise-the-Paddle session at this fall’s ’Cat Bash Dinner and Auction added $16,000 in donations to the many very generous contributions given throughout the year, easily raising the fund’s total to endowment status, providing the WSU golf program with a scholarship in Smith’s name in perpetuity. Another golf scholarship named after a former coach is also in the works, this time to honor the memory and accomplishments of the late Mac Madsen. Donations have

already come in from the Madsen family and former Wildcat golfers who played under Coach Madsen. To date, nearly $30,000 has been pledged, including $5000 commitments from Mac’s son, Casey, and four of his most outstanding former players – John Abendroth (’74), Rich Friend (’81), Mike Malaska (’76) and Mike Stanton (’82). The goal is to create a hybrid scholarship endowment by raising $40,000 (the university’s minimum required amount to establish such a fund). Coach Madsen was at the helm of the Weber State men’s golf team for 33 years, from 1964 to 1997. Under Mac’s guidance, the Wildcats captured 15 Big Sky Conference titles, including an extremely dominant run of

12-straight championships from 1970 to 1983 (no conference tournaments were held in 1975-76). Mike Stanton, who went on to become General Manager/COO of San Luis Obispo Country Club has fond memories of playing for Coach Madsen. “I remember Mac being pretty unflappable,” said Stanton. “It took a lot to make him angry but when he finally got there you were likely to get a stern lecture filled with obscure words whose meaning most of us didn’t know. A few minutes later he would cool down and Madsen with the 1974 Big Sky Championship golf team that included players like John Abendroth, Mike Malaska, Bob Bradbury, Jeff Jerman, Brad Brandenburg.

30

Bleed Purple

Fall 2016

WeberStateSports.com


Former PGA Tour player John Abendroth (left) and 2011 PGA Teacher of the Year Mike Malaska (below right) are two of Madsen’s players who have generously donated to the scholarship fund.

explain to us what he just said! By this time we were all laughing!” Madsen was named the Big Sky Conference Coach of the Year 15 times. He led Weber State to 12 team appearances at the NCAA Men’s Golf Championships, and during his career he produced three PGA Tour players and over a dozen NCAA All-Americans. Madsen was inducted into the Weber State Athletics Hall of Fame in 2004. Former PGA Tour player John Abendroth, coach Madsen’s first All-American who played on four Big Sky championship teams from 1971-74, learned about the scholarship fund initiative in November and immediately pledged his commitment. “Mac Madsen made a huge, positive impact on my life and my golf career,” said Abendroth. “Entering Weber State as a 17-year old, Mac became a guiding light, helping me grow as a young adult and helping me succeed as a student and as an athlete. “In my adult life I have done a great deal of charitable work, much WeberStateSports.com

of that with young golfers and golf related groups...I often think of Mac when I am doing that work. “It is exciting and very appropriate that Weber State University would establish a scholarship in Coach Madsen’s name, and I’m honored to be a small part of seeing that become a reality.” Former Wildcat golfer Rich Friend, who recently was hired in the newly-created Director of Player Development position with the Weber State golf programs after spending over 30 years as a golf professional at the Tacoma Country and Golf Club, also played under coach Madsen and credits him with much of his success. “What Mac started, and built here, I think all Weber State golfers are proud of,” said Friend. “To this day when I meet people that know golf, they still talk about the teams

and about how Weber State competed on a national level alongside some of the best teams in the country. It’s something that Weber State and coach Madsen’s family should be proud of.” Not only is Coach Madsen’s family proud, but his son, Casey, and daughter-in-law, Katie, were really the impetus behind this effort. The St. George couple serves on the Regional Alumni Network board of Southern Utah/Nevada and got this initiative underway by making the first gift commitment toward the scholarship. “Dad was so passionate about the success of Weber State and the golf programs,” said Casey. “Donations to his scholarship keep that passion alive.” Whether you are a former varsity golfer from the Mac Madsen era or simply somebody who wants to see Weber State golf flourish, please consider a gift yourself to the Mac Madsen Memorial Scholarship Endowment. For more information contact Jerry Graybeal at jgraybeal@ weber.edu or at (801) 626-8114.

Fall 2016

Bleed Purple

31


FORGED W

32

Bleed Purple

Fall 2016

WeberStateSports.com


WITH FIRE After a tough first two seasons, Megan Thompson had to learn to reignite her fire and love of volleyball again. The process reshaped her as an athlete and as a person.

T

by CORIE HOLMES here’s a big difference between a freshman in college and a senior in college. The difference is bigger in studentathletes and it’s even bigger when the student-athlete has fought through adversity. Megan Thompson from the Weber State volleyball squad has been through a lot. She’s been mentally broken down and physically broken down. She’s also been through an emotional roller coaster, but she wouldn’t change any of the adversity because she came out a strong and confident person. Coming into Weber State as a wide-eyed freshman she had high expectations for her career as a collegiate volleyball player. “I had been successful throughout high school in athletics, but I was intrigued to come to a program that needed help,” Thompson said. “I felt that I could come in and make a difference in the program and help it become successful. “It was a lot harder then what

WeberStateSports.com

I expected, “ she said. “There were six freshmen coming in that year and I felt like we were successful at first. After the beginning of that year, things went back to how they were before we got there. It was disappointing. “As the season went on I didn’t feel like what I did and what I had to contribute really mattered,” she said. “I guess I just stopped caring.” In 2013-14, Thompson’s freshman year as a Wildcat, the volleyball team posted a 7-27 record and went 3-17 in Big Sky Conference play. Thompson had lost her passion for volleyball after her freshman year and by the end of her sophomore year she didn’t care about the game at all. “I didn’t care about volleyball at all,” Thompson said. “At that point I was okay with just being average. I just wanted to get through and get volleyball over with as soon as possible.” After her sophomore year, the Wildcat volleyball program underwent some big changes with

the hiring of new head coach Jeremiah Larsen. “When Jeremiah came in he was able to show me the potential I could have with volleyball again,” Thompson said. “Jeremiah helped me realize that there was so much more to volleyball. He told me it would be a rough road, but in the end it would be worth it. He rekindled my fire and passion for volleyball.” Thompson’s junior year was probably the toughest for her. “Going through my junior year I was broken down mentally because I was rethinking the way I thought about volleyball again,” she said. “I was coming back to feelings I haven’t felt since high school. I was learning how to want to play volleyball again and wanting to get better and wanting to win. I was learning how it wasn’t okay to lose anymore. I was reshaping my mindset. I was broken down and reshaping mentally. I was a mess all the time.” Thompson was put into a leadership role her junior year as she Fall 2016

Bleed Purple

33


“This year has meant so much more than just having a winning season. We had to start from the bottom up. It hasn’t been easy these four years and I think that’s why I appreciate it more.” was named a team captain. She’d never been a leader before and having to reshape her own mindset and lead her teammates to do the same wasn’t easy, but it was rewarding. “The most rewarding thing of being a leader was being able to be a part of the change the program has gone through,” she said. “To go through everything with my teammates is something that is unique and will stick with me forever.” Her senior season was one of the best years for Wildcat volleyball

since 1983. The Wildcats finished with a 14-13 winning record and started out the year with a 9-0 start, the best start to any season in school history. Thompson also was top five in the nation in blocking for the entire season, often times at No. 1. “Coming into my senior year I had confidence for the first time in a long time in the way I play,” she said. “I was more emotional this year about it than I have ever been. I care so much about volleyball and this team.

“This year has meant so much more than just having a winning season. We had to start from the bottom up. It hasn’t been easy these four years and I think that’s why I appreciate it more.” Thompson also had some major personal life changes in the last four years. Thompson married husband Luke Thompson in 2014 between her freshman and sophomore years. “Having that extra support with Luke has made a world of difference,” Thompson said. “For some people it might be different, but going from being a single freshman to married my sophomore year, it was so good to have an out. “I’ve been so grateful to my husband for putting up with all the emotional feelings that come from being mentally, emotionally and physically exhausted. He’s been so good with me through everything. “He’s there to listen when I need someone to listen or he’s there to snap me out of the stress haze I was in. He just makes stupid jokes all the time to get my mind off of things. He’s definitely my favorite person in the world.” Four years is a long time and in the college years everyone learns and changes. Thompson was not an exception. “I think of myself as a ditzy, naïve, Thompson learned the joy of volleyball again during her junior year, and spent her senior season ranked in the top-five in the nation in blocks.

34

Bleed Purple

Fall 2016

WeberStateSports.com


narrow-minded freshman and I wasn’t confident,” Thompson said. “Now at the end of my senior season I’ve learned and grown so much. I can talk to people more confidently. I speak my mind more often now when I feel like something isn’t right. I’m open to new things and I’ve gained a lot of experience.” Thompson attributes her change

WeberStateSports.com

and growth to being a part of Weber State volleyball. “This volleyball program has a lot to do with my change,” she said. “My coaches demanded that confidence of me and I’m more proud of the person I’ve become coming out of this year.” With Thompson’s collegiate volleyball career coming to an end

and graduation looming closely in the future, she is ready for the next chapter in life. “The future for me will be to get through graduation,” she said. “Then get my husband graduated, start a family, get a dog, and then eventually I want to start a business. I just know that I need to start the next chapter of my life and I’m excited to do so.”

Fall 2016

Bleed Purple

35


Friends. Football. Food.

36

Feed Your WildCats! GameDayGreats.com Bleed Purple

Fall 2016

WeberStateSports.com


THE WSU COACHING TREE Over the decades Weber State football has been the ground for the development of several major college and NFL coaches.

O

by PAUL GRUA

ver the years, Weber State football has had numerous coaches come through Stewart Stadium and coach the Wildcats. WSU has had 11 head coaches as a Division I school including Sark Arslanian, Mike Price, Dave Arslanian, Ron McBride and current head coach Jay Hill. Weber State has also been a proving ground for many assistant coaches. From Robb Akey to Mike Zimmer, and from Mike Bellotti to WeberStateSports.com

Bobby Petrino, Weber State has been an important part of a lot of football coaching trees. A number of former Weber State coaches have gone on to become prominent coaches in college football and the NFL. Many of the ties can be traced back to the 1980’s under former Weber State head coach Mike Price, who later was the head coach at Washington State and UTEP. When Price arrived in Ogden in 1981, several coaches on his first

staff would go on to become wellknown in the coaching industry. The assistant head coach and defensive coordinator under Price his first two-years was Dave Campo. After his two seasons with the Wildcats, Campo went on to a long coaching career in college football and the NFL, including three seasons (2000-02) as the head coach of the Dallas Cowboys. He also spent time at prominent college programs like Syracuse and Miami and coached with the Browns and Jaguars in the NFL. Fall 2016

Bleed Purple

37


Mike Price was the mentor for several WSU assistant coaches who would go on to coach at the major college and professional levels.

In 1981, Price hired a young 24-year old coach to coach the Weber State linebackers. Now Mike Zimmer is the head coach of the Minnesota Vikings. After his playing days at Illinois State, Zimmer started his coaching career at Missouri for one season before landing a full-time

coaching job at Weber State in 1981. He would spend the next eight seasons under Price with the Wildcats, coaching the linebackers and defensive backs. Weber State was also where he met his wife Vikki, a former WSU cheerleader. Vikki passed away in October 2009 when Zimmer was

coaching with the Cincinnati Bengals. Among the players Zimmer coached at Weber State was Robb Akey, who played four seasons as a linebacker with the Wildcats and was an All-Big Sky performer as a senior. Akey then jumped into coaching, beginning his career as an assistant at Weber State. He spent seven years as an assistant with the Wildcats. He later became the defensive coordinator at Washington State and then became the head coach at the University of Idaho where he spent six seasons with the Vandals . Then, in 2014, Akey became an assistant coach with the Minnesota Vikings, where Mike Zimmer was the head coach. Akey is now the defensive line coach with the Washington Redskins. Another assistant on Price’s first staff in 1981 was Gregg Brandon who coached the tight ends. Weber State was his first collegiate coaching job and he spent six years in Ogden coaching tight ends, linebackers and wide receivers. Brandon then went on to a long collegiate coaching career, including stops at Utah State, Wyoming, Northwestern, Colorado and Virginia. He spent six years (200308) as the head coach at Bowling Green where he replaced Urban Meyer when Meyer went to Utah. Brandon is currently the head coach at the Colorado School of Mines. Weber State was the first full-time coaching job for Bob Former Wildcat assistant Dave Campo was the head coach of the Dallas Cowboys from 2000-02.

38

Bleed Purple

Fall 2016

WeberStateSports.com


Mike Zimmer (left as a WSU assistant and below as head coach of the Minnesota Vikings) coached eight seasons at Weber State.

Bratkowski and he’s been coaching ever since. He joined Price’s staff in 1981 and spent five years in Ogden coaching wide receivers and as the offensive coordinator. He then spent the next six years coaching college football at Wyoming, Washington State and Miami under Dennis Erickson. He then started a 24-year

WeberStateSports.com

career in the NFL where he has coached with the Seahawks, Steelers, Bengals, Falcons, and Jaguars and is currently the wide receivers coach for the Tennessee Titans. Larry Lewis was also a member of Price’s first coaching staff and spent all eight years with Price at Weber State. He later followed him to Washington State and then became the head coach at Idaho State for eight seasons. Lewis also later coached at Colorado State, Nevada and Virginia. In 1984, Price hired a graduate assistant coach from Lewiston, Montana named Bobby Petrino. Now 32 years later, Petrino has become a prominent coach in the college and professional football. From 1987-88 he coached the wide receivers and tight ends at Weber State. He then followed former WSU player and

assistant coach John L. Smith to Idaho where Petrino was an assistant coach for two years. He also coached at Arizona State, Nevada, Utah State and Louisville before jumping to the NFL as the offensive coordinator with the Jacksonville Jaguars. He became the head coach at the University of Louisville from 2003-06, before becoming and NFL head coach with the Atlanta Falcons. After leaving the Falcons, he was the head coach at the University of Arkansas and Western Kentucky. Since 2014, Petrino is back as the head coach at Louisville. WSU has had many other coaches call Ogden home. Mike Bellotti was an assistant coach in 1979 at Weber State and later became the head coach of the Oregon Ducks. In addition, former WSU assistant coach Derek Mason is now the head coach at Vanderbilt University. Mason was an assistant for two seasons at Weber State from 1995-96 under Dave Arslanian.

Fall 2016

Bleed Purple

39


Create a Legacy

F

undraising events are a great way to raise money, raise awareness and just have fun! On Friday November 4th, the Wildcat Club hosted our annual fundraising ‘Cat Bash Dinner and Auction. We made a bold move and brought our event to campus this year, and it did not disappoint! Cat Bash was held on the George S. Eccles field located in the Robert and Annette Marquardt Field House. This beautiful facility was the perfect setting for an evening of fun, and all for a great cause! Proceeds from this event directly benefit our student-athlete scholarship fund. Thanks to our presenting sponsor Young Automotive Group, our many volunteers, donors who very generously gave items to be auctioned, and those that attended. Our event was a huge success. We appreciate your generosity! What a great community we live in! Click here for a full list of sponsors. During our live auction, the paddle was raised to donate towards the

40

Bleed Purple

Fall 2016

Jeff Smith Memorial Scholarship. $16,000 was generously donated, completing the fundraising efforts needed to create an endowed fund. The Jeff Smith Memorial Scholarship Fund will now provide scholarship assistance for the WSU Men and Women golf program indefinitely. What a way to honor our “Smitty” while providing educational opportunities for an amazing group of student-athletes. Mark your calendar for next year’s Cat Bash, which will be held on Friday November 3, 2017. Once again, thank you to all who supported this event. We cannot do this without you! For those of you who could not be there, make your plans now to attend, this is an event

Party with a Purpose you don’t want to miss. Next up on our major events calendar is the Crompton Golf Classic, which will be held on Monday May 15th, 2017. Please save the date and make plans to hit the links for another great opportunity to support Weber State student-athlete scholarships.

Director, Wildcat Club Athletic Fund

WeberStateSports.com


Click HERE to join the Wildcat Club. For more information on membership, call 801-626-6576 or visit WeberStateSports.com

‘Cat Bash 2016

WeberStateSports.com

Fall 2016

Bleed Purple

41


Name Game

Weber State SAAC Claims Big Sky Title

By CHRIS J. MILLER

T

he Wildcats are getting it done on and off the field. Weber State University was awarded the 2016 SAAC Cup in July, during a meeting of Big Sky Conference schools. Each year, the schools’ Student Athlete Advisory Committees compete in activities that engage the student-athletes in the community, in worthy causes, improving student-athlete welfare and improving the athletes’ understanding of issues and forums that impact them. Weber State shared the title with Southern Utah in 2014, but won the top spot in 2016. During the last school year, schools conducted the Big Sky Box Top drive, donating over 43,000 hours in their local communities while collecting redeemable box tops. The Wildcats led the competition with 7,174 volunteer hours and more than 15,000 box tops. Well done, Wildcats.

Gold-medal performance Weber State alum Dave Blair won a gold medal at the 2016 Paralympic Games in Rio in mid-September, setting a world record in the men’s discus. Blair, an Ogden native who attended Davis High School, competed for the Wildcats from 1993 to 1999, set a record mark of 210 feet, 4 inches in the discus on Sept. 16, breaking a 16-year-record. “I should have been at this party a long time ago,” the 40-year-old Blair lamented. 42

Bleed Purple

Fall 2016

Blair, now a father of four who lives in Eagle Mountain, competed for the Wildcats in the shot put, hammer, indoor weight and discus. He was born with a club foot, and only found out in early 2015 that he was eligible to compete in the Paralympics. He won a silver in the discus and bronze in the shot put in the 2015 World Championships while representing the United States. Basketball officiating group The Big Sky Conference just joined the Western Officiating Consortium this summer. The consortium includes officials from the Pac-12, Mountain West, Big West, West Coast and Western Athletic conferences. The group now comprises all six Division 1 men’s basketball leagues in the western U.S. The goal of the group is to develop consistency and performance in basketball officials throughout the season. Veteran official Bobby Dibbler

leads the consortium.

Beehive Classic Longtime Weber State basketball fans can recall great in-state battles through the years, and now a new chapter begins with the summer announcement of the Beehive Classic. The Classic, sponsored by Zions Bank and backed by Larry H. Miller Sports and Entertainment, will feature WSU, BYU, Utah and Utah State playing in doubleheaders each December at Vivint Smart Home Arena, home of the Utah Jazz. The three-year event will begin in December 2017. Golf staff changes Scott Erling, who has been the WSU men’s golf coach for four seasons, has been named the new Director of Golf at Weber State. He replaces former colleague Jeff Smith, who passed away this year. Sara Federico will be the women’s golf coach. A former assistant WeberStateSports.com


to Smith, Federico played for the Wildcats from 2010 to 2013, helping WSU win the 2010 Big Sky championships. As interim coach earlier this year, she guided WSU to fourth place in the 2016 tournament. A newly-created position in the WSU golf program will be the Director of Player Development, which was filled by Rich Friend.

Friend played at Weber State in the late 1970s, and helped the Wildcats witn Big Sky titles in 1979 and 1980, and posted top 25 finishes at the NCAA tournament as well. He was the 1980 Big Sky medalist. Friend has been the head golf pro at Tacoma Country Club (Lakewood, Wash.) since 1989.

Tidbits The Weber State soccer field will feature night games, thanks to a generous donation from the Robert Burton family, WSU’s on-campus field received lights around the soccer pitch. Their first night match was held on Oct. 14, against Big Sky rival Idaho. … After a stint on the Toronto Raptors NBA Summer League squad, former ’Cat guard Davion Berry recently joined the VAP Kolossos WeberStateSports.com

Rodou basketball squad in the Greek A-1 League. ... Former WSU All-American David Hale has joined Wildcat football radio broadcasts as color commentator on KL-AM 1430. Hale, who spent three seasons in the NFL will team up with Steve Klauke for football games. … Former Weber State football star Lee White (1965-67) is on the 2017 ballot for the College Football Hall

of Fame ballot. White, an All-American running back from Las Vegas, is a member of the WSU Hall of Fame and Big Sky Conference Silver Anniversary Team. He was drafted by the New York Jets in the first round of the 1968 NFL draft. The inductees will be announced in January. … Weber State’s men’s basketball attendance average was 75th best in the nation, and among the top 14 schools in the western U.S. Averaging 4,744 fans per game at the Dee Events Center, the Wildcats topped the Big Sky attendance for the eighth-straight season, 13 of the last 15 years. … Former Weber State standout steeplechaser Farley Gerber will be inducted into Utah Sports Hall of Fame on October 18. ... Former Weber State basketball

star Brittney Dunbar just started her first season as a member of the Maxol WIT Wildcats, a women’s

basketball squad in the IrelandSuper League. … WSU quarterback Jadrian Clark participated in the NCAA Career in Sports Forum in June. … Weber State’s men’s and women’s track and field teams were named to the All-Academic Team by the United States Track and Field and Cross Country Coaches Association.

Chris J. Miller, a 1986 graduate of Weber State, is a former Weber State Signpost sports editor and editor in chief, as well as a former longtime sports editor at the Standard-Examiner. He can be reached at cjmiller62@outook.com. Follow him on Twitter at cjmsports.

Fall 2016

Bleed Purple

43


TOP

44

Bleed Purple

TWEETS

Fall 2016

Recent highlights from our Social Media Channels

WeberStateSports.com


WeberStateSports.com

Fall 2016

Bleed Purple

45


“My scholarship means a lot to me because not a lot of people get the chance to play at the collegiate level. So I thank God every day.� Richaud Gittens - Basketball Tempe, AZ Class of 2017

Join the Wildcat Club and help support WSU Student-Athlete Scholarships Call 801-626-6576 or visit WeberStateSports.com for more information or to join. 46 Bleed Purple Fall 2016

WeberStateSports.com


WeberStateSports.com

Fall 2016

Bleed Purple

47


48

Bleed Purple

Fall 2016

WeberStateSports.com


Bleed Purple Magazine - Fall 2016  

The Official Magazine of Weber State University Athletics.

Advertisement
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you