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The Spring Issue

LiveIt staff and Montague County resident, Shea Brown, recently spent a tranquil day in the Japanes Garden at Fort Worth Botanical Gardens. The koi fish were ready for feeding time.

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It’s no secret we southerners love our porches. With longer days, warmer weather, and a glass of sweet tea, here’s a few tips to readying your favorite outdoor space.

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Exploring som most beautif e of the ul landscapes in spring Texas

We’re exploring some of the most beautiful spring landscapes. From stunning botanical gardens to sprawling golf courses, Texas is in full bloom.

STAFF & CONTRIBUTORS

Ed

Publisher J. M. Winter

23 Fresh Perspectives

Repurposing vintage maps

40 Actively Speaking

13 LiveIt List

45 Bookspiration

Amistad Salvias

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Creative Dire tor Kayla Jean Woods kayla@liveittexas.com

Items to add a little outdoor charm

A journey around the world

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Finding the best fit for your feet

vertising xe utives Lana Hamblin lana@postoakmedia.net Stephanie Cox stephanie@postoakmedia.net Kathy Miller kathy@postoakmedia.net c

10 The Garden Guy

itor Courtney McEwen courtney@postoakmedia.net

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My Stuff Bags Foundation

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8 Good Works

usiness Manager Brenda Bingham accounting@postoakmedia.net

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Cir ulation Manager Marnie Brown subscriptions@postoakmedia.net

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Contributing Writers Mark Arredondo Nancy Arredondo Rebekah Bachman Shannon Gillette Aimee Hodges Ellen Miller Ward Wallace Norman Winter

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With amazing patio views of the Trinity River and a menu that’s refreshingly modern, yet casual, every seat is the best seat in the house at Press Cafe.

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14 North Texas Wine Trail 17 Tasting Room

Brushy Creek Vineyards

18 From the Kitchen Hummingbird Cake

25 Trend Hunter

Designer Luggage Trends

36 Spotlight on Health

Colorectal cancer screening

46 Focus on Finances

in association with

Saving is not investing

48 Event Lineup 50 Unleashed

Meet Carefree Kaskae

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LiveIt is not responsible for omissions or information that has been misrepresented to the magazine. Advertisers and their agencies assume all liability for advertising content. Reproduction in whole or part without written permission from the publisher is prohibited.


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editor talk

liveit

Bloom where you’re planted... I

come from a family of green thumbs. The greenest, in fact. My great-grandmother insisted a plant would grow to its full potential if you rubbed the leaves and spoke kind words to it every day. My grandmother keeps up the tradition, evident in her bed of swoon-worthy peonies. My mother prefers daisies, insisting they’re “such a happy flower,” and a brilliant amaryllis proudly blooms in her windowsill every Christmas holiday. Generation after generation, an invitation from spring’s warm rays is one the women in my family can’t resist. There’s something therapeutic about pruning away winter’s canopy and encouraging a sleeping plant to grow. Hollyhocks along a fence or sweet peas up a trelllis, the excitement of the season is the same. Even with winter’s previously harsh conditions, the magic of a single green shoot remains miraculous to behold. In this issue, we’re celebrating spring and the magnificence it promises. Featuring Gardens & Greens (page 27), we take you on a journey to experience numerous stunning Texas landscapes. For plant lovers, we step behind the gates of the most wondrous enchanted gardens from all over the state. For golf enthusiasts, we escape to lush golf greens where memories are made and they’re anything but par

for the course. Inspired to travel? You’ll need the latest and greatest in designer luggage trends that can be found on page 25. If you’re planning on staying closer to home and cultivating your own outdoor space, check out the charming gardening and patio gadgets on page 13. We southerners love our porches. On page 42, Fancy Nancy gives us a few tips on preparing your porch - grab a glass of sweet tea and dust off that swing. What’s a relaxing Sunday, enjoying your well-prepared space, without a good book in hand? Take a peek at Rebekah’s adventurous “bookspiration” recommendation on page 45. We’re also bringing attention to Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month with information on proper screening (page 36) and introducing you to the My Stuff Bags Foundation (page 8) that is loving on children, one bag of goodies at a time. No matter where the breezes of spring blow you, weekend adventures or 7 out your own back door, may the Mar/Apr ‘17 possibilities of spring encourage you to bloom where you’re planted.

Courtney McEwen Editor

Things I especially love in this issue:

My Stuff Bags Foundation, literal bags of love (page 8)

These adorable boots, add to cart! (page 13)

Find the hidden item in this issue and be the first to post it on the LiveIt Facebook page.

A charming DIY to capture your family memories (page 23)


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BY SHANNON GILLETTE

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t's a common practice to take something comforting and familiar when traveling for an extended period of time. A comfy blanket or favorite pillow, for instance. Imagine the prospect of leaving everything behind with no hope of ever seeing home again. Imagine this scenario through the eyes of a child. Over 300,000 children in the nited States are removed from unfit homes each year. Often, taking no more than the clothes on their backs. No worn stuffed animal, no security blanket, just the fear and uncertainty of what their immediate future in foster care will hold. The My Stuff Bags Foundation, with these fears and insecurities in mind, has created a way of providing something each child can call their own. In 2015, 31,200 children lived in foster care in the state of Texas alone. These foster homes provide shelter, food, and safety but don't always have the ability to provide a tangible object that represents security for an individual child. The My Stuff Bags Foundation, established in 1998, provides a duffel bag, filled with items such as clothing, stuffed animals, toiletries and a “security blanket.” The My Stuff Bags are categorized from baby, to young child, to tween/teen, ensuring that all contents will fit the need of each child. The monetary value of every bag ranges from seventy five to one hundred dollars but the emotional value is priceless. Any nonprofit agency serving abused, neglected, abandoned, homeless, or displaced children is eligible to apply for this program. When approved, the bags are delivered, at no cost, to the qualifying agency. Since its inception, the My Stuff Bags Foundation has delivered 500,000 bags across the country, over 45,000 in Texas alone. Some of the Texas-based agencies that have partnered with this program include CASA North Texas, SafePlace, Guadalupe County Child Welfare Board, Texas Panhandle Community Partners, Inc., to name a few. It's a heartbreaking reality that the number of bags needed each year continues to grow. There are three main ways to support the increasing demand and efforts of the My Stuff Bags Foundation. The first is by making a monetary contribution. According to the guidelines put forth by the Better Business Bureau, a charity should “spend at least 65 percent of its total expenses on program activities.” The My Stuff Bags Foundation exceeds that expectation with 90 percent of their expenses being directly allocated to the program. Translated, the majority of all donated funds goes toward the actual program, not to administrative or other costs. The second way to support the program is by volunteering. The number of volunteers needed to ensure the precision of operation is staggering. Each week, approximately 2,000 volunteers gather to stuff duffel bags. These “stuffathons” take place in the southern California warehouse where the volunteers package items, stuff 8

bags and ready them for shipment. The third way to help is by the donation of “stuff.” Acceptable donations include dolls, teddy bears, playing cards, coloring books, crayons, markers, t-shirts, socks, toothpaste, and anything new/relevant for a child from newborn to 18 years of age. The most important “stuff ” items are blankets - especially handmade blankets. The thought and love that goes into a handmade item can send the message to a child that they are important and someone cares about them. There's even an easy tutorial for making a simple fleece blanket on the My Stuff Bags Foundation website (mystuffbags.org). In today’s world, where there's too much focus on material things, it might be easy to dismiss this program - after all, it’s just stuff. Consider this caseworker's recount while working with the Rainbow Room in Borger, Texas. “Recently, I removed a fiveyear-old boy from his home. I took an age-appropriate My Stuff Bag, filled with all sorts of goodies. While waiting at the office for placement and paperwork completion, we went through the big blue bag together. It provided a much-needed distraction. The precious boy was overwhelmed with excitement by the items inside. He was so proud, cherishing each item. As we walked to the elevator to leave that evening, he insisted on carrying HIS bag. The majority of these children already have battered and broken bodies and souls. They deserve something positive and wonderful. The My Stuff Bags help us make a bad situation a little brighter.” These bags, simple blue duffels, are stuffed with far more than things. They're full of love, caring, security, and contain a joyful moment in time. They may be full of “stuff ” but they're things they can call their own. To learn more about the program and how to become involved, visit their website at mystuffbags.org.

March/April 2017


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Top left: Volunteers participate in California warehouse Stuffathon. Top right: Handmade blankets are treasured and stuffed in bags. Middle right: A happy little girl with her new stuffed duffel.

“Imagine the prospect of leaving everything behind with no hope of ever seeing your home again. Now imagine this scenario through the eyes of a child.”


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Amistad Salvia is loved by hummingbirds Amistad Salvia with Bananas and Sunshine Ligustrum

Amistad Salvia with Bananas and Cannas


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W W factor. n this case, try planting with lue ortune agastache. This will give you an incredibly beautiful backyard habitat that's welcoming to bees, butterflies and hummingbirds. or more tips, follow me on acebook at Norman Winter, The arden uy. G

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ellow and gold makes the perfect complementary color scheme. 've always suggested that if you want to look like you've used a landscape designer, then try partnering blue with violet. There is something about this color combination that adds a

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which allows its beauty to be revealed all day or in morningsun-afternoon shade. urs are usually blooming by the first of ay, a regal show that will last until the first frost. o grow yours, choose a site in full to part sun for best flowering. gain, our beds get direct afternoon sun. This plant is winter-hardy from zones eight to ten but only with good drainage. f cold winters are coupled with soggy soil, the plant will be history. n the other hand, good winter drainage and mulch may ensure you a spring return. n colder areas, this will be one of the finest annuals, blooming from summer through frost. o help with drainage issues, prepare your soil before planting by adding three to four inches of organic matter like fine pine bark or compost, and till to a depth of eight to ten inches. While preparing the bed, incorporate two pounds of a 12-6-6 slow-release fertilizer with minor nutrients. Plant them at the same depth they are growing in the container spacing, two to three feet apart. mistad will have no trouble reaching four to five feet in height so plant toward the back of the border. n addition to integrating the unshine igustrum, we gave a tropical look to our bed by incorporating ananas for the element of bold leaf texture. We also planted a few of the golden-yellow version of the tropical milkweed. O

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ntil something unseats it, mistad alvia has to be considered the most beautiful salvia to ever hit the market. mistad is a salvia guaranitica or anise sage and has a rich purple violet hue, fit for royalty. ou can't fault a name like mistad or riendship alvia but, to me, this special plant deserves something regal. s hakespeare once said, "What's in a name?" The most important thing is for you buy it and include in your flower border this spring. o it for the beauty it exudes and the tremendous number of hummingbirds (and other pollinators) it will attract. We planted ours as part of the outhern iving plant collection trial program. When local nurserymen came to our garden party, they were stunned by the salvia and quickly included it in their product line. ucky for us, we received the unshine igustrum for trial in the same shipment. This golden leafed beauty just so happens to perform equally as well and makes an absolutely stunning partner for the mistad alvia. The mistad is rated to ten degrees in cold hardiness. assure you that even if you have to treat it as an annual, it is worth every penny. mistad can grow large, forming a clump four feet tall by four feet wide. mistad, with its elegant royal purple blooms and black calyxes, will thrive in full sun

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liveitlist A few things we’re living with and loving

Floral Garden Boots shopterrain.com

Outdoor Charm

We’re throwing open the doors and welcoming spring with a few unique items that are sure to add a little charm to your outdoor experience.

“Some old-fashioned things like fresh air and sunshine are hard to beat.” Laura Ingalls-Wilder Copper Spade Shovel williams-sonoma.com

Wood Wall Planter wayfair.com

Copper Weather Station gardeners.com

Solar Flower Spinner jossandmain.com

Bee Happy Doormat worldmarket.com

Misting Fan homedepot.com

www.liveittexas.com

Copper Barrel Fountain signaturehardware.com

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North Texas

Blue Ostrich Winery & Vineyard

Marker Cellars

Brushy Creek Vineyards

OG Cellars

5611 FM 2382, Saint Jo www.blueostrich.net

572 CR 2798, Alvord www.brushycreekvineyards.com

Fortunata Winery 2297 FM 2931, Aubrey www.fortunatawinery.com

1484 CR 2585, Alvord www.markercellars.com

704 County Road 1895, Sunset www.ogcellars.com

Sugar Ridge Winery

212 Bolivar, Suite 100, Sanger www.sugarridgewinery.com


s Wine Trail


tasting room

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Mad Scientist Shells & Seafood with Garlic Butter d

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Sunshine in a glass!

2015 Semillon Double Gold Medal Winner

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ngredients: 1 dozen snails (Escargot) 1 dozen scallops 1 dozen large shrimp (about 26 count) 1-2 cups Semillon 1 small shallot, chopped Bread of choice, optional

Butter mixture: 1 cup softened butter 1 tablespoon lemon juice 2 tablespoons parsley, chopped 3 cloves garlic, chopped 1 teaspoon salt ¼ teaspoon pepper

• Simmer the shrimp, scallops or snails in Semillon (or any dry white wine) for about 5 minutes over low heat then remove with slotted spoon. Save the wine/shallot liquid. • For the snails, put a teaspoon of the wine/shallot mixture in the shell, stuff with simmered snail then cover the opening with some of the butter mixture. • Bake in 400 degree oven for 10 minutes. • Heat your choice of bread at the same time. • Warm the butter mixture ingredients over low heat on the stove. • Add the shrimp and/or scallops and gently cook to the texture you prefer. • Add some of the wine/shallot mixture to the butter, to taste. • You can also finish by increasing the heat for a simple saute on one side of the scallops to give them a bronzed look. • Enjoy your dish and be sure to dip your bread in the butter, it is wonderful. (For those who prefer using olive oil, give it a try and let me know how it turns out. You may consider using more pepper.) For more on Brushy Creek wines, visit brushycreekvineyards.com. www.liveittexas.com

full-bodied wine that boasts aromas of honeyed citrus and apple. The symphony of flavors include citrusy lemon, stone fruit and lychee nut hints, coupled with mouthwatering minerality. njoy with seafood, shellfish, pork, veal, various cheeses and dishes with cream sauces. E

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he idea of this pairing is to use the acidity (pH) of the wine to bring out the complementary flavors. Wine tastes and smells better when it is a bit more acidic. The same applies to many foods.

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from the kitchen

of Mary Jane Niblett Hummingbird Cake Ingredients:

3 cups flour 2 cups sugars 1 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon baking soda 1 teaspoon cinnamon 3 eggs, beaten 1 ½ cups oil 1 ½ teaspoons vanilla 1 (8 oz.) can crushed pineapple 1 cup chopped pecans 2 cups diced bananas Frosting: 12 oz. cream cheese 6 oz. margarine 3 cups powdered sugar 1 ½ teaspoons vanilla 1 cup chopped pecan Directions: Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Combine dry ingredients in large mixing bowl. Add egg and oil, combine gently without beating. Add remaining ingredients and stir. Pour batter into three separate layer cake pans. Bake in preheated oven for 25-30 minutes. When baked thoroughly, let cakes cool before removing from pans. In separate mixing bowl, combine cream cheese, margarine, powdered sugar, and vanilla. When cakes are cool, stack the three cake layers, spreading frosting between each layer. Finish by icing the top (not sides) and sprinkle with chopped pecans. A beautiful cake with superb spring flavors!

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A use wed d t din his gg she spatu ift, M 's b ake la to f ary J d f ros an or e 55 t ever has yea y c rs. ake

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Saturday brunch at the Press Cafe is a refreshingly modern, yet casual experience. Every seat is the best seat in the house but the large patios are what truly beckon (to Fido as well, they're dog-friendly). Located in the heart of Edwards Ranch at The Trailhead, the landscape and view of the Trinity River is magnificent. While others trek the Trinity Trails, there's a spot around the firepit and a mimosa waiting just for you. With a first-class, knowledgeable waitstaff and architectural appeal, it's a place you'll instantly adore, until you peruse the menu...then it's love, true culinary love. As a hot spot for North Texas residents, Press focuses on fresh ingredients and sustainability. It's evident in each dish, including the vanilla spiced oatmeal (piled high with fresh berries) that, I promise, will be life-changing. The egg in a hole, that has an Everestsized mountain of delicious prosciutto on top, has more gooey cheeses than your palate can identify. The trailhead breakfast seems like a traditional choice until the Niman Ranch bacon and homemade jam elevate it to “holy moly� status! Yes, please. Press's lunch menu has its own massive following and the live music, setting the mood for a relaxing weekend dinner, brings people out in droves. Thirty-five ingredients in the vegetable salad (beets, carrots, radicchio, lettuce, green beans, avocados, pistachios, Port Salut cheese, and chia seeds to name a few) is enough to impress but the tasty classic sandwiches and great pasta dishes make this carb-loving girl ecstatic. Flavors are subtle, yet complex and definitely satisfying. An exceptional wine by the glass, cocktail, and drafts list is also available for those wanting a before, during or after dinner drink. Dining in is recommended but take out and catering options are ways Press Cafe is working to make enjoying fresh fare more convenient. Hunger may be the main motivater for your first visit but it's the adventure that awaits bringing you back for seconds. Cheers and I hope you enjoy leaving the road to take the trail! For more information, visit presscafeftworth.com. March/April 2017


local flavor

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Mar/Apr ‘17

Top: Gourmet Charcuterie & Cheese Board Left: Be sure to enjoy a cocktail! Right: Beautiful Steak Salad Bottom left: The patio’s stunning views are a must-see. Bottom right: Pan-crisped crab cakes.

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fresh perspectives

Globe Trotters .

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retrospectivehome

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'm sentimental and save things, probably too many things. The spring cleaning bug bit me recently and I discovered a stash of too many maps from our past travels. No, I will not disclose their age, but am proud to report the majority of them are not quite considered vintage…yet! Time to create an easy, fun and inexpensive Fresh Perspective for these travel treasures.

Create your own

Supplies • Paper maps of your travels • Styrofoam balls in assorted sizes • Waterbased glue product for decoupage • Small brush, sponge or bristle • Clear spray sealer, if desired Instructions • Cut map into ½” strips about half the circumference of your ball. • Cut out the destination name of the map. • Apply a heavy layer of decoupage glue to the ball in sections and begin adding strips, overlapping slightly from one to the next. Work all the way around and fill in where needed, adding glue on top of the strips as you go. Hint: I found using your fingers works best. Very therapeutic! Smooth each strip as much as possible. I recommend keeping a wet cloth nearby to wipe fingers as needed. • Place destination label on top of strips and cover with glue. • Let dry and coat with a final layer of glue, if desired, or spray with clear sealer. • Display and enjoy the memories. Safe travels.

Follow Ellen on Facebook at www. facebook.com/ retrospective home. www.liveittexas.com

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Mar/Apr ‘17

There are many ways

to display your globe trotters but try inserting three oversized pins in the bottom for a stand to showcase your artistic creation. 23


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Out of the Bag by courtney mcewen | courtney@postoakmedia.net

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includes planning: itineraries, activities and Traveling wardrobe. Careful consideration goes into selecting

appropriate and stylish apparel for weather and various outings on your list. Your luggage should receive the same attention. Here are a few fun and functional options to make your next adventure stylish.

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1 • Gray Arrows Weekender Tote shopwhiteelm.com

2 • Miniemergency Kit for Him pinchprovisions.com

3 • Eagle Creek Load Warrior luggagepros.com

4 • Monogrammed Hotel Laundry Bag

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thelaundress.com

5 • Andrews Weekend Duffel ernestalexander.com

6 • Miniemergency Kit for Her pinchprovisions.com

7 • Hanging Gardens Four Wheel Suitcase shop.nordstrom.com

8 • Forestbound ESCAPE Canvas Utility Bag forestbound.com

www.liveittexas.com

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pring inspires adventure. For the plant lovers, step inside some of Texas’ most enchanting gardens with blooming dogwoods, outstanding orchids, and a Japanese festival rich with culture. For the golf enthusiasts, experience a few of Texas’ most stunning golf greens where you can relive history and make a little of your own. With sun overhead and green beneath your feet, these are landscapes you absolutely must see.


Fort Worth Botanic Garden

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among the canvas of green. y design, Japanese gardens practice mono no aware, translating to “transient and bittersweet beauty.� n this belief, if the transitory nature of the garden was consistently in bloom, it would lose its unique ability to move us. 2017 is the year of the rooster and will be celebrated during the spring festival on pril 22-23. eople born in the year of the rooster are said to be organized, beautiful, hard-working, and courageous. The garden will host taiko drummers, raku pottery, tea ceremonies, dancers, arts, crafts and more. For more information, visit fwbg.org.

Clockwise: The moon bridge is an ideal spot to take in the view. A winding path through the garden provides a tranquil strolling experience. Traditional dancers perform during the spring festival.

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110 acres of beauty, in the heart of Fort Worth, have been mystifying visitors for over 80 years. n architectural gem is the rose garden, a natural oasis is the rock springs garden, and the whispers of spring wisteria can be heard throughout the fuller garden. The 7.5 acre tranquil experience of the Japanese stroll garden, completed in 1973, keeps guests returning. ransporting you to another place, the moon bridge, expansive pond with over 1,200 koi fish, pagodas, cherry trees, Japanese maples and the resident Great Blue Heron are a sight to behold. utside of the spring season, you'll notice very few blooms

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FORT WORTH, TEXAS


Cowboys Golf Club GRAPEVINE, TEXAS

Clockwise: Making a statement is the signature Cowboys star on hole number 4. Five Points Patio is a great place to relax. Brilliant views are at every turn. Be sure to stop by the full-service golf shop. www.liveittexas.com

Etched into the rolling hills of Grapevine, Texas, Cowboys Golf Club is the first and only NFL-themed golf club in the world. An all-inclusive, resort facility that offers an unparalleled experience, guests can see replica super bowl trophies and rings of the five time Super Bowl Champion, Dallas Cowboys. Follow the story with markers at each tee box highlighting great moments in history, and have photo ops around the course, like the signature Cowboys star on hole number 4. The newly added Ring of Honor Kitchen and Bar pays homage to the beloved Cowboys legends who are members of the team’s official Ring of Honor at AT&T Stadium.

The expansive restaurant-bar delights food aficionados and football fans alike. In a vibrant, interactive experience, the restaurant showcases original artwork depicting great moments in Dallas Cowboys history and team memorabilia. Outside is the “Five Points Patio,” named in honor of the iconic star on the Cowboys’ helmets, provides an enjoyable dining experience. This is a true embodiment of imaginative design and remarkable playability. For more information, visit cowboysgolfclub.com. 29


Shangri La Botanical Gardens & Nature Center Orange, Texas

Shangri La began with H.J. Lutcher Stark, a prominent philanthropist, who was inspired by the mystical retreat represented in the 1933 novel, Lost Horizon by James Hilton. Utilizing artistic concepts, the Botanical Gardens are a modern day oasis, featuring hundreds of plant species in artistically themed displays. In March each year, spring bursts to life with the diversity and beauty of orchids and many other blooms. Also a world-class Nature Center, visitors can explore the Nature Discovery Center,

a hands-on exhibit dedicated to Shangri La’s wetland ecosystems. No visit would be complete without an Outpost Tour journey along Adams Bayou, offering a glimpse into the wonder of our Southeast Texas wetland ecosystems. Shangri La is not only a living paradise, where visitors can better observe how art serves nature and nature serves art, but a place to gain a true understanding of the complexity and fragility of our natural world. For more, visit starkculturalventures. org/shangrilagardens.

Clockwise: Outpost Tour along Adams Bayou. The striking beauty of a peach Phalaneopsis orchid. The Cypress Gate at Pond of the Blue Moon. The orchid exhibition can be seen in the Epiphyte Greenhouse. 30

March/April 2017


Old American Golf Club exas

necessary, one that intrigues the golfer with ever-changing elements that create a different experience each time it is played. From the historic steel railroad bridge (connecting holes 2 and 3) to the 48 star merican flag that flew proudly over classic golf courses from 1912 through 1959 and now welcomes visitors to the ld merican restaurant, this is a classically pure course that's “guided and touched, but not manipulated.” For more, visit theoldamericangolfclub.com. A

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esigned by ripp avis and 12-time PGA Tour winner, Justin Leonard, Old American Golf Club began with the natural beauty of prime landscape along the shores of Lake Lewisville. Davis and Leonard kept the purity of the land while crafting a course design that is representative of classic merican golf. The naturally formed bunkers, native grasses, and strategically designed holes resulted in a course with exquisite balance. It is a true golfer’s course where strategic play is D

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Davey Dogwood Park Palestine, Texas

In 1938, friends Eugene Fish and Charles W. Wooldridge shared a casual cup of coffee and their collaboration birthed the future of premier East Texas tourism events and the dogwood trail. With more than 20,000 visitors the first year, Davey Dogwood Park (Benefactor, M.A. Davey assured the park's permanency during WWII by purchasing and donating the land) and annual Texas Dogwood Trails Celebration have continued to draw thousands of nature lovers and tourists to the Palestine area each spring where businesses and locals wait with open doors and open arms. Whether visitors are exploring the new five to seven miles of mountain bike trails (currently under development) or enjoying a picnic under the trees in the heart of the park, the experience of unadulterated natural beauty is one that will leave a vivid and lasting memory. For more information on the park and upcoming events (stay tuned, mountain biking enthusiasts), visit texasdogwoodtrails.com. Clockwise: There are many different types and species of dogwoods, but the kind that grows native in Palestine is the white Cornus Florida. There’s also a mixture of other native blooms. Palestine is also rich with historical sites. 32

March/April 2017


Horseshoe Bay Resort Golf Course Horseshoe Bay, Texas

Take a deep breath and treat yourself to some Texas Hill Country golf. Known as the granddaddy of all Texas golf resorts, this stay and play course is located on the stunning banks of Lake LBJ. It's the only resort in the contiguous United States with three Robert Trent Jones, Sr. golf courses, including Apple Rock and Slick Rock. With some of the most scenic courses in the state, each course has dramatic elevation changes that allow for some of the most stunning views during play. You can also take time to enjoy the many amenities the resort has to offer and if you make plans to visit on Easter weekend, the skies will be ablaze with the 5th Annual Balloons over Horseshoe Bay Resort. The Resort Shootout, featuring PGA tour pros, on May 22 is also worth adding to your calendar. No matter the reason, luxury is always in season at Horseshoe Bay. For more information, visit hsbresort.com. Top to bottom: Apple Rock, Ram Rock, Slick Rock, and Summit Rock are the four courses offering something unique to each and every golfer.

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Amarillo Botanical Gardens Amarillo, Texas

One of the most notable gardens in the panhandle of Texas began in 1967 as a place for 13 gardening clubs in Amarillo to gather, meet, and garden. With growth and popularity, a new direction for the Garden Center was adopted by the Board of Directors in 1996 to become the Amarillo Botanical Gardens. In the early 2000's, additional land was acquired from the City of Amarillo Parks Department to expand the grounds to 4 acres of gardens and build the Mary E. Bivins Tropical Conservatory, completed in 2004. There are so

many enchanting spaces, including the serene Wagner Japanese Garden with its tall trees, waterfalls and a meandering deck system that leads you to stunning hillside views. The Attebury Amphitheater, with its grassy tiers flanked by gardens, is a popular spot for Music in the Gardens. Events like this, and the Annual Iris Show on April 30th, keep Texas residents traveling from far and wide to experience the beauty blooming in the high plains. For more information, visit amarillobotanicalgardens.org.

Clockwise: The meandering deck system leads to breathtaking views in the Wagner Japanese Garden. Waterfall and Xeriscape garden. Brilliant charm in Butterfly Garden. 34

March/April 2017


The Tribute Golf Club the colony, Texas

Scotland is widely recognized as the “home of golf � and located in The Colony, Texas, just off the eastern shores of Lake Lewisville, The Tribute embraces the game's heritage while offering a unique Scottish links-style golf experience (created by acclaimed architect, Tripp Davis). It pays homage to the legendary courses (St. Andrews, Muirfield, Troon and Prestwick), complete with wind-swept dunes and seawashed grasses. At 7,002 yards from the tips and four sets of tees, it is sure to challenge players from all skill levels. All amenities and programs offered are designed to help golfers enhance their experience and skills, while simultaneously building friendships and connecting with others who share their interest in the game. Where old world charm meets modern elegance, it's sure to be an unforgettable experience. For more information, visit thetributegc.com. Top to bottom: From the award-winning championship layout to the majestic clubhouse, your visit will be one to remember.


liveit

spotlight on health

Are cancers of the colon and rectum preventable? , M.D. FACS

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ancer of the colon and rectum will top 135,000 new cases in America this year. While the number of colorectal cancers are fewer than breast cancer, prostate cancer or lung cancer (nonsmokers get a free pass on this last one), the death rate is only second to lung cancer. Compared with other cancers in which screening can identify the earliest stages of cancer, screening for colorectal cancer has a unique advantage of not only cancer detection in the earliest stages but also of prevention by removal of precancerous polyps. The incidence of cancer of the colon and rectum in United States has decreased steadily since the 1980s when endorsement and availability of screening became more uniform. Our chance of colon and rectum cancer is 1 in 20, but it may be lower in the absence of any family history and higher if there is a family history for certain disease states. In spite of knowing that cancer can be detected earlier or even prevented, it is estimated that only 65 percent of Americans over age 50 follow any of the screening guidelines available. If we wait for our colorectal cancer to develop symptoms, it is unlikely to be an early stage (Stage I or even Stage II). With symptoms of anemia (from slow GI iron loss not recognized as blood in the feces), we uncover right-sided colon cancers which have not caused narrowing or frank bleeding. With symptoms of narrow stool, or blood visible in bowel movement, or symptoms 36

of blockage, we find more advanced colon cancers on the left side of the colon or lower down into the rectum. Very low cancers of the rectum can be felt with the physician’s gloved finger and these commonly cause pelvic pain and a sense of urgency for diarrhea but with the inability to pass a bowel movement. More often with symptoms, the culprit cancer is larger and more deeply penetrating as later Stage II, or the lymph nodes are involved as Stage III, or evidence of cancer spread to the liver (most common) or lung, bone or abdominal lining (peritoneum) as Stage IV cancer. The US Preventive Services Task Force, the American Cancer Society and others, have endorsed methods of screening for colorectal cancer broadening some of the screening methods for patient comfort and access at the expense perhaps of slightly less efficacy. As an oncologist, I can say that my preference is a colonoscopy because it has the advantage of evaluating the entirety of large intestine (colon and rectum) and if an abnormality is identified such as a polyp or tumor, it can be biopsied for further management. The term biopsy means simply giving some tissue to the pathologist for diagnosis so that in one setting, a biopsy may be a small sampling of a larger tumor that would need surgical removal. In another setting, an excisional biopsy is removal of the entire small (Continued on page 39) March/April 2017


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spotlight on health (Continued from page 36) growth (polyp). Many of the smaller polyps can be removed by multiple bites of the instrument or by electrified wire, termed snare polypectomy. In addition to biopsy, a tumor can be assessed both for its appearance and chance that it’s a cancer and its location is determined. For a surgeon, having more information of the tumor appearance and especially of its location will streamline an operation. If we cannot avoid a colon or rectum cancer, it’s only logical to find it early. By definition, all screening programs are designed to identify a cancer at the earliest stage which can be more easily curable with an operation alone, rather than requiring chemotherapy and radiation-chemotherapy if more advanced. As we mentioned above, colonoscopy has the opportunity to identify the earliest of cancers, but also can prevent cancer by removing precancerous polyps. Any other method might identify polyps but most will find earlier cancers instead. Any screening test will obligate a colonoscopy to identify if there is any other lesion

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in addition to the main one, and to perform biopsy and identify its location for the surgeon. A colonoscopy can be an ”all-in-one” test, whereas all other screening tests will identify a problem and will require colonoscopy afterwards. A colonoscopy requires a day of laxatives or purgatives with liquids only, followed the next day by a colonoscopy. A CT Colonography will require one day of prep and then a CT scan after a combination of air and contrast is gently instilled into the colon via a rectal tube. An air contrast barium enema or full contrast barium enema also requires a full day prep and then the x-ray study, also with air and contrast or contrast gently instilled into the colon. A flexible sigmoidoscopy is a shorter scope only looking at the last two feet of colon (shorter prep required) but it can be combined with a non-intervention test such as fecal immunochemical test (FIT) or guaiac fecal occult blood test (gFOBT), with these last two tests searching for the presence of blood that is otherwise undetected (the blood source can be a polyp or a cancer). A newer test added

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by Medicare in 2015 is called multi-target FIT–DNA which assesses the feces, with no prep required, for the presence of blood or the presence of shed DNA protein that we now know are associated with advanced polyps or cancers (you may have seen television ads). In a person with any intestinal symptom that can be reflective of a cancer of the colon or rectum, any investigation is now called “diagnostic” and it cannot be called “screening.” Investigation to uncover a cancer (malignancy) starts with a gloved finger exam if the tumor can be felt or it can start with colonoscopy or CT scan imaging of the abdomen and pelvis, and both are often performed. With a first degree relative with colorectal cancer, our screening can begin 10 years earlier than they were. For those of us of average risk, the American Cancer Society advises to begin screening at age 50. You’ll need to discuss with your caregiver which method to pursue. For me, I have already scheduled my second 10-year colonoscopy.

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actively speaking

The Best Fit

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ay I begin with a confession? I am secretly judging your shoes. I notice all types of shoes, from high heels to running shoes. Spotting the latest trends in stilettos or tall wedges, the only thought running through my mind is, “How is she walking?” I also, unintentionally, observe foot strike patterns. If I see someone giving it their best, while pronating or supinating, I fight the feeling to approach and offer advice about proper shoe selections. The struggle is real! My knowledge comes from an active girl's struggle, born with genetically inept and uncooperative feet. Not to mention, I have invested a small fortune trying to find shoes that will alleviate this pain or that. The arduous journey to the perfect shoes could've been prevented with a proper shoe fitting. It sounds simple but there is a science to it. If you spend a little time educating yourself on proper shoe choices, you could easily be on your way to checking that marathon off your bucket list. To begin the proper shoe selection process, determine the 40

type of activity you will be performing the most. If you prefer to hit the track for a brisk walk, then you need to be on the lookout for a proper walking shoe. They tend to be more stiff for support than a running shoe or cross trainer. If you prefer hiking or trail walking then a trail shoe is what you need. If hitting the pavement to log a few miles of running is your focus, a running shoe is what you need. Forget the preconceived notion that brand is what matters, let's look at structure of the foot bed. Supporting your feet requires sport specific shoes. Injuries can begin from the ground up so the importance of selecting the right shoe with the right fit is imperative. Next, trace your foot with the wet test method. Wet the bottom of your foot and place it on a piece of brown paper or cardboard, tracing the outline of your footprint. This will show your foot's natural strike tendency. There are three factors to consider when fitting someone with the proper shoe: pronation, supination, and neutral. Putting it simply, if you overpronate, your footprint should be full. Your arches are flat March/April 2017


and you weight bear towards the inside of your foot. This will also be evident in the wear pattern of your old shoes, worn on the inside of the shoe and outside of your heel. Some of this motion is natural but if there is significant wear patterns, you should lean towards choosing a design described as a stability shoe. These shoes tend to have internal wedges that act as arch support, preventing arch collapse during activity. If you underpronate, or supinate, your footprint on the brown paper should have little to no contact along the outside edge and you mainly notice the ball of your foot and heel print. Your old shoes will be worn along the outside, as well as the outside of the heel. You should look for shoes labeled as cushioned with little to no arch support. If you see half of your arch region in the brown paper print, you have the most common foot type - neutral. Your shoe choices are vast! I would recommend looking for shoes described as neutral. These have very little motion control or stability as to not overcorrect the foot. The wet test is only an estimate so I highly recommend trying on any shoe before purchasing. Before committing, stand in the shoe. Make sure you have about a half inch clearance between your longest toe and the end of the shoe. Don't forget to wiggle your toes to make sure there is enough room for shifting forward as you walk or run. Walk around in the shoe to determine if you have a nice snug fit on the heel and no slipping or rubbing occurs. Another helpful tip is to wear the same type of socks you will wear while working out. It is a good idea to try on shoes in the afternoon or at the end of the day as when your foot is at its fullest. Remember to measure both of your feet as they can measure different sizes and select your size off of the largest foot. Do this each year as your shoe size can change due to collapsed arches and widening. Be bold and do not hesitate to ask a lot of questions. Try on multiple options to determine the best fit and don't worry about appearance. Some may feel it's important to make a fashion statement but it's even more important to protect your machine. Get moving and if you need someone to help or have questions, Aimee can be reached at Fit-N-Wise in Decatur (940-627-2708) or at Opposite Way Training in Bowie (940-389-1229). www.liveittexas.com

Women’s Supernova Glide Boost 8 adidas.com

Women’s Roshe One iD nike.com

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Men’s Adrenaline Trail brooksrunning.com

Men’s Gel – Kayano 23 asics.com

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liveit

make yourself at home

Porch, Sweet Porch

Preparing your space for spring he official arrival of the spring season is upon us, more specifically the spring equinox. All over the world on March 20, days and nights are approximately equal. That means that we get to enjoy increasing sunlight hours, with earlier dawns and later sunsets, and the beginnings of nature’s renewal. Worms begin to emerge from the earth (much to the delight of the robins), birds are migrating northward and the increasing sunlight triggers bird song. Crocus and daffodils begin to waken from their winter sleep which, according to the Farmer’s Almanac, means that the weather is right for planting radishes, parsnips and spinach (who knew?). The longer days bring warmer weather, time to strip off the heavy coats. Best of all, time to ready the porch for observing the arrival of spring and the magnificent show it has to offer. It’s no secret that we southerners love our porches. Is there any better memory than swinging the afternoon away with your grandmother in the porch swing, drinking a cold glass of sweet tea? I can’t think of one. Naturally, the first step is to give the porch a thorough cleaning. Those industrious spiders have been busy building apartment complexes in the corners and the dust angels have 42

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been hard at work. Move everything off (or out of ) the porch and give it a good sweep and mop. Strip the covers off the chair cushions and throw them in the washer. Channel your inner Good Housekeeping diva and wipe down every surface. Then reassemble and start thinking of how to make this sparkly clean space an extension

for leisurely Sunday afternoon naps, listening to the patter of a summer shower or reading a good book. It is a little slice of heaven, and makes even those cooler days comfy and cozy. Add a lamp on a small table for reading, a bistro table for al fresco dining and a foot stool for comfort. Go ahead, use real furniture

of your living room. Spring is the absolute best time to enjoy a porch but there may be a few cool days still to come so the mosquitoes, flies and bugs have not emerged yet. It’s a great time to move the plush and heated throws to the porch for coffee on the those cool mornings. I even put a heated mattress pad on the double chaise lounge

on the porch. There are no furniture police coming to get you for moving a piece outside and it will make the space much more inviting. Weatherproof, flameless candles are an easy and affordable way to add light and ambiance. If it’s in the budget, consider adding an outdoor fireplace or at least a propane patio heater. Think about hanging a ceiling

fan now, this will make even the hottest days bearable for they are certainly on the way. I can’t write an article about a porch without suggesting to paint the porch ceiling blue. It’s an old southern tradition with numerous theories as to why – from fooling spiders and wasps into thinking the ceiling is the sky, to blue being a harbinger of good luck, to the color extending daylight, to scaring away evil spirits. People have always painted porch ceilings blue in the south, because it's what their grandmother did. Maybe that is reason enough. Don’t forget the migrating birds, hang a feeder on a pole within viewing distance of the porch. Consider a second pole for a bluebird house and if you're lucky enough that a pair like the real estate, you will enjoy hours of watching them build a nest and seeing bluebird fledglings take flight for the first time. That, my friends, does the heart good. These are just a few ideas to transform the porch into one of your favorite rooms of the house and ensure many moments of relaxation and enjoyment that will last into fall. Don’t forget the porch swing, you're sure to make some new memories of your own. March/April 2017


“It’s no secret that we southerners love our porches. Is there any better memory than swinging the afternoon away with your grandmother in the porch swing, drinking a cold glass of sweet tea? I can’t think of one.” Your porch should be a happy place. For more tips from Fancy Nancy on adding a little extra charm to your space, visit her website at persnicketyhp.com.


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Eighty Days By Matthew Goodman

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Rebekah “Energy rightly applied and directed will accomplish anything.” Nellie Bly

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hen (1889), the most common modes of transportation were horse-drawn carriages, trains and steamships; now (2017), we travel by airplane, high-speed rail, and luxury cruise ships. Then, travel arrangements were made by telegraph, letter or messenger; now, we use websites, email, and telephone. Then, the travel route around the world was 24,899 miles and took 72 days; now, the travel route of 24,899 miles can be completed in less than 72 hours. With that perspective, the accomplishments of Nellie Bly and Elizabeth Bisland during their history-making race around the world shared in Eighty Days (Matthew Goodman) become even more remarkable. These two women, actual contemporaries of novelist Jules Verne, set out to test the fictional Phileas Fogg’s record set in Verne’s novel, Around the World in 80 Days. One headed west, the other started on an eastern route and their accounts of what followed are amazing! Not just focusing on the journeys, the author does a very good job of giving a fuller view of both women before, during, and after the race. I appreciated this, as there are instances I wish for the “rest of the story” when reading about specific historical events. Do not be deterred by the 453 pages or the fact that this is a historical non-fiction book. You will get caught up in the action and particulars of their trips, the differences and similarities between the two gals, and the other happenings of the period. I believe this is one you should skip the digital version and choose holding the book in your hands, while you tag along for the ride. Nellie Bly had a saying by which she tried to live, “Energy rightly applied and directed will accomplish anything”. As I think about some of my endeavors that seem to be at a standstill, I’m wondering if I’ve been applying my energies the most accurate way in the best direction. Whether or not it’s travelrelated, don’t be surprised if you find yourself moved to action on a delayed adventure when you finish reading this book.


liveit

focus on finances

Saving is Good...But It's Not Investing

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your children and a comfortable retirement for yourself, most individuals typically can’t simply rely on their savings — they’ll need to invest. Why? Because, quite simply, investments can grow — and you will need this growth potential to help achieve your objectives. To illustrate the difference between saving and investing, let’s do a quick comparison. Suppose you put $200 per month into a savings account that paid hypothetical three percent interest (which is actually higher than the rates typically being paid today). After 30 years, you would have accumulated about $106,000, assuming you were in the 25 percent federal tax bracket. Now, suppose you put that same $200 per month in a tax-deferred investment that hypothetically earned seven percent a year. At the end of 30 years, you would end up with about $243,000. (Keep in mind that you would have to pay taxes on withdrawals. Hypotheticals do not include any transaction costs or fees.) This enormous disparity be-

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t’s a good thing to have some savings. When you put the money in a low-risk account, you can be pretty sure it will be readily available when you need it. Nonetheless, “saving” is not “investing” — and knowing the difference could pay off for you far into the future. Think about it this way: Saving is for today, while investing is for tomorrow. You need your savings to pay for your daily expenses, such as groceries, and your monthly bills — mortgage, utilities, and so on. In fact, you might even want your savings to include an emergency fund containing six to 12 months’ worth of living expenses to pay for unexpected costs, such as a new furnace or a major car repair. These are all “here and now” expenses — and you could use your savings to pay for them. But in thinking of your longterm goals, such as college for

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tween the amounts accumulated in the two accounts clearly shows the difference between “saving” and “investing.” Still, you might be thinking that investing is risky, while savings accounts carry much less risk. And it is certainly true that investing does involve risks — investments can lose value, and there’s no guarantee that losses will be recovered. Nonetheless, if you put all your money in savings, you’re actually incurring an even bigger risk — the risk of not achieving your financial goals. In fact, a low-rate savings account might not even keep up with inflation, which means that, over time, you will lose purchasing power. Ultimately, the question isn’t whether you should save or invest — you need to do both. But you do need to decide how

much of your financial resources to devote toward savings and how much toward investments. By paying close attention to your cash flow, you should be able to get a good idea of the best savings and investment mix for your particular situation. For example, if you find yourself constantly dipping into your long-term investments to pay for short-term needs, you probably don’t have enough money in savings. On the other hand, if you consistently find yourself with large sums in your savings account even after you’ve paid all your bills, you might be “sitting” on too much cash — which means you should consider moving some of this money into investments with growth potential. Saving and investing — that’s a winning combination.

Ward Wallace has been with Edward Jones for the past 19 years. If you have questions about your financial future, give him a call at 940-872-3071.

March/April 2017


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Event Lineup

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featured event

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KW southlake charity golf tournament

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March 27 • roanoke. Trophy Club Golf Course, Roanoke, Texas With over 250 people expected this year (playing both courses), this popular event raises funds to benefit Spokes4Hope and other KW charities. The tournament will take place from 1:30-4:30 p.m. For more information, visit 1kw.golfreg.com.

Event spaces are available on a firstcome, first-served basis. Include date, time, location and ticket details.

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JS Bridwell Ag Center, 111 N. Burnett, Wichita Falls, TX. Join in from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. for the 55th nnual ll- reed og onformation how. og lovers can expect to see more than 130 breeds at the event, including a few new ones. ogs will compete for Best of Breed, Best of Group, and the big kahuna prize — est in Show. For more information, visit faithcitykennelclub.org. A

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Quakertown Park, 321 E. McKinney Street, Denton, TX. The Denton Arts and Jazz Festival is a celebration of the arts in a community known for embracing and nurturing music, dance, choral, drama and the visual arts. The event features continuous music, fine art, crafts, food, games, and information booths in the beautiful outdoors. For more information, visit dentonjazzfest.com.

1000 W. California St., Gainesville, TX. ttend the egg hunt in the Frank Buck Zoo, meet the Easter unny, and enjoy an all-day pass to the zoo to tour our amazing animal collection! gg hunt in the zoo starts promptly at 9 a.m. - be sure to arrive no later than 8:30 a.m. For more information, call 940-668-4539.

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Diamond T Arena, 6900 E. Sherman Drive, Denton, TX. Vintage arket ays is an upscale vintage-inspired market featuring orginal art, antiques, clothing, jewelry, handmade treasures, home décor, outdoor furnishings consumable yummies, seasonal plantings and a little more. t is open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. For more information, visit vintagemarketdays.com.

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Kay Yeager Coliseum, 1000 5th Street, Wichita Falls, TX. lease join in from 7-9 p.m. for a special ignature eries event - a romantic night at the ballet, featuring music by pianists r. artin amacho and r. uth arrow. This special event takes place at Fain Auditorium on the campus of idwestern tate niversity. For more information, call 940500-0175.

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Texas Opry Theatre, 315 York Avenue, Weatherford, TX. Great songs have provided the foundation for Shenandoah’s illustrious career. They became known for delivering songs that celebrated the importance of faith and family while reveling in the joys of small town life. oncert begins at 7 p.m. For ticket information, call 817-341-1000.

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JS Bridwell Ag Center, 111 N. Burnett, Wichita Falls, TX. ovices to connoisseurs can choose from over 44 different exas wines to sample and craft beer tastings, all under one roof. Guests can also tap their toes to live music or learn more about wine at one of the winery booths. The event will take place from 6-10 p.m. For more event and ticket information, visit redriverwineandbeerfestival.com.

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Wichita Falls Ballet Theatre Signature Series

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Kay Yeager Coliseum, 1000 5th Street, Wichita Falls, TX. Join best-selling author eth oore at a Living Proof Live event and see how one weekend can change your life. The truth is a powerful tool for life change—the truth spoken in love, taught from a bold and trustworthy teacher will rearrange you. This is a two-day event on arch 31- pril 1. t begins at 11:45 a.m. For ticket information, visit lifeway.com/ events.

Dallas Arboretum & Botanical Garden, 8525 Garland Road, Dallas, TX. This premier, spring social event will feature savory bites made by award-winning chefs from many fine restaurants around the metroplex. et against the backdrop of 500,000 spring blooming bulbs during the spring festival allas looms. ample hundreds of fine wines and craft beers, and end the evening with dessert, coffee, and a special concert. The event will take place from 6-9 p.m. For more information, visit dallasarboretum.org.

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First-Ever International Food & Wine Fest

Denton Civic Center, 321 E. McKinney Street, Denton, TX. The Denton Redbud Festival features dozens of vendors with tree and plant sales, gardening supplies, household items and local/handmade products, along with familyfriendly activities and live, local music. The festival will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. For more information, call 940-349-8737.

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Meet Kaskae... Don't forget to submit your companion on the LiveIt website at www.liveittexas.com by clicking on the Unleashed tab. 50

Pet Parent: Casey Kleeb Breed: Golden Retriever Home: Denton, Texas Profile: Kaskae (Kosh-KUH) was born in Alaska, so his pet parents decided to name him an Inuit name, which means “chief.” He’s a 100-pound, energetic ball of love who enjoys snow, adventures, watching television, and being his mom’s cutest model! He even has his own Instagram, photo journaling his travels which you can follow at @kaskaethegolden. March/April 2017


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