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ON THE COVER

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President George W. Bush

Our 43rd president talks about his post-White House passion and the humbling experience of capturing America’s warriors on canvas. st

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If words are your favorite thing and you have quite a way with them, this is the list for you. It’s literally literary with the best bookish finds.

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Historic Football

STAFF & CONTRIBUTORS Publisher J. M. Winter

After a 75-year timeout, Texas Wesleyan niversity is building a historic and Texas-sized football tradition that is sure to make people proud.

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ditor Courtney McEwen courtney@postoakmedia.net DIRECTOR

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The Lifelong Learning Issue resident George . Bush is pursuing his goal of becoming a skilled painter. ictured in his Dallas studio, he’s applying what he has learned.

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reating a ummer aradise

dvertising xecutives Lana Hamblin lana@postoakmedia.net Kathy Miller kathy@postoakmedia.net Aimee Hodges aimee@postoakmedia.net Judy Kurani judy@postoakmedia.net

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irculation Manager Marnie Brown subscriptions@postoakmedia.net ontributing Writers Nancy Arredondo Rebekah Bachman Shannon Gillette Lana Hamblin Aimee Hodges Ellen Miller Susan Ogden-McKee Lyndy Phillips Norman Winter

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LiveIt is not responsible for omissions or information that has been misrepresented to the magazine. Advertisers and their agencies assume all liability for advertising content. Reproduction in whole or part without written permission from the publisher is prohibited.


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July/August 2017


from the editor

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The Pursuit of Knowledge... T

he term lifelong learning is defined as the ongoing, voluntary and self-motivated pursuit of knowledge. The older I get, the more I realize that learning is not restricted to our youth but occurs throughout every season. Both of my parents obtained graduate degrees later in life. In fact, attending the same university while I was working towards my undergraduate degree, my father and I created many cherished carpool memories. Remembering my mother’s graduate journey reinforces my Wonder Woman image of her (minus the tall red boots). The foundation of higher education was established early in my childhood but it was my parents’ example of embracing lifelong learning without intimidation that would stay with me into adulthood. Glass blowing class? Sign me up. This same pursuit was the inspiration for our feature. President George W. Bush set out on an expedition through uncharted territory in his post-presidential season. Raising a paint brush for very first time, he was determined to master the art of capturing life on canvas, for himself and the military men and women he deeply respects (page 22). His quest for knowl-

edge has resulted in moving illustrations of American sacrifice and patriotism. Our Actively Speaking contributor shares her fitness expertise by answering all of your exercise questions on page 28; we’re introducing you to Texas Wesleyan University’s academic and athletic heart behind their newly-established and historic football program (page 34); Fancy Nancy is providing tips on customizing the perfect, coveted by all, reading nook in your home that’s able to transport you to a literary wonderland (page 31). The heartbeat of this issue is the tribute to America’s military. With a tour through President Bush’s current work and a special article on inheriting a veteran's heart (page 20), we’re showing our gratitude and recognizing that freedom is in no way free. Even Arabell, this issue’s Carefree Companion (page 42), is sharing her pride in our beloved stars and stripes. 7 No matter what you’re pursuing in life, may it yield July/Aug‘17 fulfillment, freedom, and an overwhelming sense of pride.

Courtney McEwen Editor

Things I especially love in this issue:

Our 43rd commander in chief pays beautiful tribute. (page 22) Find the hidden item in this issue and be the first to post it on the LiveIt Facebook page.

The former first lady shares a recipe from her kitchen. (page 16)

An inspiring story of historic teamwork. (page 20)

THE NEW LIVEIT ONLINE!

Check out our fresh face on the web with more of your favorites. Complete issues, exclusive stories, new contributors and the best of North Texas buzz. www.liveittexas.com


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in the loop

liveit

Quote of the month:

“The most common form of diversion is reading. Nothing makes a man more reverent than a library.” - Winston Churchill, “Painting as a Pastime”

HISTORY IN PHOTOS This iconic image was taken on V-J Day, August 14, 1945. A sailor and nurse passionately kissed in Manhattan’s Times Square, celebrating the end of World War II and Japan’s surrender.

FLAGS AROUND TOWN We asked you to share your Memorial Day flags and you responded from all over Texas, Oklahoma and North Carolina! Follow the link on our Facebook page to see the patriotic post for yourself.

GIVEAWAY We’re giving away a copy of Portraits of Courage: A Commander in Chief ’s Tribute to America’s Warriors. Enter to win by visiting liveittexas.com and clicking on the Giveaway tab. Winner will be announced on August 14th. MEET OUR CONTRIBUTORS Do you find yourself curious about the contributors behind the articles? They’re crazy in the most wonderful ways! Visit liveittexas.com and click on the Contributors tab for the rest of their stories. www.liveittexas.com

Find us on Instagram liveittexas 9


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good works

North Texas Veteran’s Relief Fund Small gestures that make a big difference a

By Sh nnon Gillette

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here are several extraordinary agencies and organizations dedicated to supporting United States military veterans, providing an array of services for those in need. However, due to waiting periods or other factors, some fall through the cracks of the foundation built to support them. The newly-established North Texas Veteran’s Relief Fund (NTVRF) in Wichita Falls began with the purpose of assisting veterans that may have been overlooked. NTVRF started in June of 2016 by 10 July/Aug ‘17 founder, Chris de la Garza. A military brat herself, her heart was to provide assistance to those with no other place to go. According to the Department of Veterans Affairs (as of 2014), there are 18.9 million United States citizens that are veterans of the armed forces. 3.8 million of those veterans are classified as having a service related disability with 1.1 million having a disability rating of 70 percent or higher. With these staggering statistics, it’s easy to see how some veterans’ needs are not being met by current programs in place. NTVRF strives to meet every one, even the smallest. Details such as fuel to ensure transportation to medical appointments or job interviews, car repairs, tools or clothing for new employment, utility bills, home expenses or simply assisting with prescription costs. These are a few everyday expenses that may not be covered by other programs. In comparison to large organizations, these

A schematic of the proposed Tiny House Village. may seem like small gestures but NTVRF believes that small things can make a big, lifechanging difference. As a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization, they have set goals in three phases. The first phase is raising the funds necessary to assist the everyday expenses listed above for those who come seeking help. Their first major fundraiser was in April during the Wichita Falls Frontier Days with all proceeds, after expenses, going to help fund the program. Future plans to partner with other charities such as Catholic Charities, Faith Mission, Interfaith Ministries, Salvation Army and other local veteran service organizations are on the horizon. When one of these are unable to help, they will refer veterans to the NTVRF. The board will then meet and determine if the request meets their criteria for financial aid. The second phase will be the construction of NTVRF headquarters. This would provide a physical location for veterans to visit, a space for future food pantry areas and storage for household items/clothing. The third, and most essential

and ambitious, involves building a housing community for homeless veterans. The project would be unlike any other in the state of Texas with the goal of constructing a tiny house village. Tiny houses are gaining popularity across the United States. The appeal has been small, mobile domiciles which provide a home of 400 square feet or less at an affordable price, eliminating the need for a huge mortgage. Each home envisioned for the village will be permanent with approximately 200 square feet of living space. In 2014, the National Alliance to End Homelessness estimated that 49,993 homeless veterans are present in the United States. Sources vary but it has been stated they make up anywhere from 8 - 26 percent of the nation’s homeless population. Many are outraged, proclaiming these men and women risked their lives for our freedom and should, at the very least, have a roof over their head each night. NTVRF's tiny house village will consist of 50 10’ x 20’ tiny houses, an office, clubhouse, warehouse, community storm

shelter and garden. The houses are intended to be short-term dwellings for homeless veterans who are struggling financially or medically, finding themselves seeking a safe place to lay their head until their goals and needs are met. Each house will include a kitchen, bathroom with a shower, stacking washer and dryer units, solar panels for electrical power and a ductless heating and cooling system. The office and warehouse will be fitted with rain water capture and containment systems for the gardening system. Residents will be expected to participate in the upkeep of the village, allowing them a measure of dignity as they work to provide for themselves and their neighbors. The plan is to also find area medical, dental and mental health practitioners to partner with the NTVRF, easing the process of waiting on VA benefits. The country’s veterans need support, but more importantly, they deserve it. To donate time, money or other resources to the North Texas Veteran’s Relief Fund, call 940-781-4471 or email NTVRF@yahoo.com.


www.liveittexas.com

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liveit

the garden guy

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Clockwise: Colorful baskets and containers with flowers like the Heavenly Blue Surfinia make you feel as if you are on vacation. Kong coleus, Supertunia Raspberry Blast petunia and Gold Mound duranta create a stunning partnership. Trailing petunias like Waves, Surfinias and Supertunias dazzle in mixed containers. Supertunia Indio Charm petunia, Nirvana Cascade Pink Splash and Serenita Purple angelonia complement the showy Furcraea.

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Creating a Summer Paradise n

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Surfinias, Waves and Supertunia Raspberry Blasts P

etunias in mixed baskets and containers have a way of creating the most festive atmosphere whether at your home, favorite restaurant or retail marketplace. Being hardier than many gardeners realize, they thrive even when removed from beds and incorporated into baskets and containers. Summer can be extremely uncomfortable with triple-digit heat but it produces the prettiest petunias. All across the south, heat, humidity and coastal winds haven’t diminished the trailing petunia. In fact, many of these have mesmerized me to the point of scrambling for my camera. I’ve experienced this horticultural ecstasy in places such as Carmel, California and British Columbia but some late June and July bloomers here in the deep south share the same magnificence. It's been roughly 20 years since the Waves made their debut and were quickly followed by Surfinias. You have to love plant competition in the marketplace, evident even in the competitive names. Both have exploded in popularity. The first time I wrote about Surfinias, there were five colors and presently the series boasts dozens of selections. I recently shared about Supertunias, Vista Bubblegum and Vista Fuchsia are among the leaders in trial awards. However, the Supertunia Raspberry Blast shouldn't be overlooked as it's another outstanding selection with a staggering 116 www.liveittexas.com

The moving water of the fountain and the cluster of colorful containers set the mood for visitors to this retail marketplace in Columbus. awards. At the Coastal Georgia Botanical Gardens, Supertunia Indigo Charm was a stunner in our Formal Garden mixed containers. Waves, Surfinias and Supertunias are the best trailing options for your outdoor space. Though I am touting trailing selections or those used as what I call a spiller, each of these series have options that are compact, mounding and some with double blooms. Whether it's Carmel or in your own backyard, the regimen is the same and one we can easily duplicate. With good soil drainage, adequate and early in the day watering, you'll be surprised at the performance petunias will deliver. Don’t be afraid

to cut back about 20 percent if they begin to look a little straggly. I appreciate Southern commercial horticulturist’s designs with their bold flower and foliage companions. They are so riveting in color that it creates a festive feeling when shopping or enjoying a patio bistro. You're overwhelmed with a sense of being on vacation, instead of simply browsing or dining. The containers that had me mesmerized featured not only these trailing petunias but foliage plants like the recently introduced Kong Junior coleus or another new selection called Coleosaurus. There were elephant ears like Maui Gold and Calidora. The baskets were filled

to the max with petunias, begonias, scaevolas and lantanas. At the Coastal Georgia Botanical Garden, an agave relative called a Furcraea is the thriller plant with Supertunia Indigo Charm and Nirvana Cascade Pink Splash periwinkle. I’m currently seeing fresh product arrive at garden centers so look for these options and be cautioned, you just might be inspired to channel the Beach Boys and belt your own version of “Surfin' U.S.A.” Surfinias, Waves and Supertunias are the best way to create a summer paradise. For more seasonal gardening tips and techniques, follow Norman on Facebook, Norman Winter “The Garden Guy.” 13


North Texas

Blue Ostrich Winery & Vineyard 5611 FM 2382, Saint Jo www.blueostrich.net

Brushy Creek Vineyards 572 CR 2798, Alvord www.brushycreekvineyards.com

Fortunata Winery 2297 FM 2931, Aubrey www.fortunatawinery.com

Marker Cellars 1484 CR 2585, Alvord www.markercellars.com

OG Cellars

704 County Road 1895, Sunset www.ogcellars.com

Sugar Ridge Winery

212 Bolivar, Suite 100, Sanger www.sugarridgewinery.com


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liveit

from the kitchen

of Former First Lady Laura Bush

Fourth of July Peach Cream Pie 5-6 cups sliced peaches (sweetened to taste) 3 well-beaten eggs 1 cup sugar

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Photo credit: Devian Poteet

1 cup heavy cream 2 unbaked pie crusts

Fill two unbaked pie crusts with sliced peaches (sweetened to taste). Mix together two well-beaten eggs, one cup sugar, and one cup heavy cream. Pour over peaches. Bake for 15 minutes at 400 degrees. Reduce heat to 350 degrees and bake for 30 minutes.

For more of the Former First Lady’s recipes, visit liveittexas.com.


tasting room

liveit

Chipotle Honey Chicken Skewers H

ot summer days in Texas are the perfect opportunity to take a break from those full-bodied reds and try something a little lighter and a bit cooler. A crisp white table wine, like Blue Ostrich 2016 Viognier, pairs quite nicely with many of your favorite outdoor recipes. Notes of stone fruit, like apricot and nectarine, lend a fruity essence and end with a lingering dry finish. Viognier (pronounced vee-ownyay) grows well in our area. Located near Saint Jo, Blue Ostrich produces over 200 cases of this popular wine style each year from grapes grown on their estate vineyard. Fire up the grill with this simply delicious recipe, pop a cork and enjoy a bottle with good friends. The following recipe offers a blend of enticing flavors, clean eating ingredients, and an unexpected taste that will have your guests asking, “What’s in this?” The answer is healthy flavor and a lot of it. Cheers. Ingredients: • 4 chicken breasts • 1/4 cup raw unfiltered honey • 1/4 cup tomato paste or sundried tomato paste • 2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar • 1 teaspoon chipotle chili powder • 1 clove garlic, very finely chopped • Wooden skewers Directions: 1. Slice chicken into very thin strips with a sharp knife. Thread accordion-style onto wooden skewers. 2. In a small bowl, whisk together honey, tomato paste, apple cider vinegar, chipotle chili and chopped garlic. Spoon sauce over skewers. 3. Cook skewers on a hot grill and cook for 10-12 minutes or until chicken is fully cooked, basting with sauce and turning every 2-3 minutes to cook evenly. 4. The skewers can also be baked in a preheated oven to 400 degrees for 16-18 minutes, or until fully cooked. Enjoy.

5611 FM 2382, Saint Jo, TX 76265 Phone: 940-995-3100 | www.blueostrich.net www.liveittexas.com

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liveit

local flavor

THE CULINARY SCHOOL OF FORT WORTH

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ort Worth may not be at the red-hot center of the culinary universe but within it lies a true gem. A place where food's rich history and time-honored techniques are taught and tasted. The Culinary School of Fort Worth (CSFTW) has been ushered into a place of culinary prominence since its inception in 1988. CSFTW has been awash in praise as a unique institution embedded in a great city, and centered around something that will never go away – food and eating. The school is a place where a first-class team of professionally-trained chefs have the opportunity to pass on their knowledge and passion to every student that walks through the door. Not only do they equip students to be contributors in the field of culinary arts, they also equip them to be contributors in their local community. The school was founded by Judie Byrd, a visionary who began cooking classes in her home in 1984. With the help of her husband, businessman and entrepreneur Bill Byrd, they developed CSFTW into what it is today, a licensed and accredited culinary school. With a lifetime of domestic and international achievements, 45 years of marriage, three grown children and five grandchildren, they still find time to gather everybody around the table for Sunday dinners. This dedication to family and food is the foundation on which CSFTW was built. Each instructor has the heart of a teacher, a high appreciation of excellence, and a passion for the industry. Chef Brad Waier is

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the head of faculty and, much like his fellow chefs, has an impressive background. He began his training at the Culinary Institute of America in Hyde Park, New York, and later graduated from The Culinary School of Fort Worth. He’s traveled to Italy as an ambassador for the school, developing the Italian Exchange program and specializes in bread, pastry arts, and is inspired by other culinarians such as Julia Child, Jacques Pepin, and Thomas Keller. His teaching team includes many others with the same invaluable wisdom and life experiences. Networking is also of high value when developing a culinary career and CSFTW is the perfect platform for meeting local chefs, food leaders and developing relationships in the culinary world. With so much to offer, CSFTW is truly a place where chef hats stand tall, the excitement for learning is palpable, culinary goals are accomplished and dreams really do come true. The Culinary School of Fort Worth is a Nationally Accredited Culinary Institution that offers a more personal and hands-on approach to education for each individual. It exists to prepare students to exemplify a standard of excellence in their culinary community. CSFTW also offers taste classes for the novice or professional who is passionate about food. For more information on taste classes or fall enrollment beginning in September, visit csftw.edu or call 817-737-8427.

July/August 2017


Head of Faculty, Chef Brad Waier

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Chef Nona Sivley graduated with honors from the Culinary Arts Program in 2008. Chef Sivley went on to win season 8 of Fox’s Hell’s Kitchen and is now the Chef de Cuisine at LA Market in Los Angeles, California. Her specialties include southwestern cuisine, Italian cuisine and southern cooking.

Judie Byrd, Founder www.liveittexas.com

After a successful career in the U.S. Army, Aaron Austin decided to pursue a professional culinary degree and graduated from CSFTW in December of 2015. He is now the Executive Chef at The Vintage Car Museum in Weatherford, Texas. 19


liveit

tribute

HONORING THOSE WHO SERVE

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he realities of military service are never far from my mind. Fathers, sons, mothers and daughters continue to volunteer and, as a result, America’s faraway battles are consistently felt at home. As a little girl, recognized early on my family's deep-seated, generational pride in America and the military men and women who selflessly serve the country they love. A veteran's cap or worn military t-shirt will still, as an adult, give me pause. consider it an honor to take a moment out of my seemingly important schedule, shake a hand and express my sincere gratitude. What a heart it takes to leave one’s family and everything that is familiar behind to fight in a foreign land for a stranger's freedom. The line of my familial patriotism extends all the way back to World War , beginning with my great uncles, Forrest and Clayton arte - brothers and patriots. Their lives drastically changed on Dec. 7, 1941 with the attack on Pearl arbor and they made an important decision, quickly filing in line to defend their country. Age restrictions required my great grandparents to grant permission so Uncle Forrest could enlist as he was too young and together, the brothers embarked on a journey with the Air Force. On a tragic day during a routine practice flight, Uncle Clayton was killed when his wing folded over and he was unable to eject from the aircraft. Uncle Forrest went on to fly 69 more missions in the 320th omber Squadron. The story is told that after 30 missions, he was given the opportunity to return stateside as an instructor but was determined to continue flying with the goal of honoring his fallen brother. Uncle Forrest lived to be 81 years old and, with every breath, he shared his pride of America, proud of what our country stands for, and proud to tell others that he fought for it. y uncles set the tone for many of the men in my family who would follow. From my father who served in the Army to my cousins who still wear the uniform today,

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Inheriting a Veteran’s Heart

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Clayton Harte, WWII

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passion for service comes from the inheritance of a veteran’s heart. y country, our country, it’s a beautiful place we share. thank God every day that e gives our military men and women the selfless desire to serve. To the many who have paved the way, like my great uncles, we are grateful for your courage to stand and protect us and our sweet land of liberty. We are free because of the brave and, as Americans, encourage you to take an opportunity to thank those who keep it safe. Stop, shake a hand, listen to a story and whether or not you support the battle, always support the people who sacrifice for it. I

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it’s only natural that would inherit a veteran’s heart. recall significant moments of pride such as watching my cousin, Thomas Tomberlain, hold high one of the swords that President George W. ush walked under during his inauguration. This same pride is what motivated me to visit only one table at my high school career day - army. The recruiter visited my home and sat awestruck as he shared his presentation. owever, my parents had different ideas. Fast forward a few (or many) years and, as a parent myself, can sympathize a bit more. may not have a specific ranking within a military branch but believe my I

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July/August 2017


trend hunter

liveit

All-American

Once again, this season is witnessing a revival of the All-American trend. From coast to coast, people are subtly embracing red, white and blue without draping themselves in full flag patterns. For your upcoming summer beach getaway, here’s a few must-have items to show your Americana style. Star Wristlet seabags.com

Monogram Crest Tote seabags.com

Tory Burch, Lipsi One-Piece toryburch.com

Tory Burch, Miller Flip Flop shop.nordstrom.com

Beach Please Round Blanket beachblankets.com

Marina Robe flagpolenyc.com

Amita Naithani, Lace-Trim Cover-Up Tunic chicos.com

Beach Please Sequin Floppy Hat shop.nordstrom.com J.Crew Seavees Sneakers jcrew.com

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A Tribute on Canvas N

o matter your political party affiliation, there’s an unquestionable respect for the office of president. The moment George W. Bush, 43rd President of the United States, was elected the noise of campaigns and electoral votes ceased and he officially became the living symbol of the greatest nation on earth, serving as an example for its people. He was given an array of formal titles such as Chief of State, Chief Diplomat and Commander in Chief. More informally, he became “my president.” Laws were enforced for my safety, wartime decisions were made for my security and addresses were given for my peace of mind. As Americans, we claim our president. As civilians, we revere our president. As military, we follow our president. Throughout his time in office, he was challenged regularly to make the best decisions for our country but when the final curtain fell and the once omnipotent voice slowly faded, we found ourselves curious about life outside the White House. Presi22 dent Bush explains it this way, “One day your dance July/Aug ‘17 card is full and the next, you’re getting your own coffee.” I never could’ve imagined my president’s next season would include a paintbrush, canvas and the richly-hued faces of America's heroes. Earlier this year, I had the privilege of attending a luncheon with Former First Lady Laura Bush. She spoke of her husband's surprising interest in pursuing painting. His constant encourager,

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From a Commander in Chief to His Troops

she says, “Painting, even as a pastime is serious business. Like any skill, it takes practice and discipline, which makes it well-suited to George – or, more to the point, George well-suited to it.” The very same determination dedicated to the United States for eight years as president was about to come alive on canvas. In March of 2012, President Bush had a pivotal discussion with John Lewis Gaddis, Pulitzer Prize winner and distinguished Yale professor, where it was mentioned that Gaddis always required his students read Winston Churchill’s essay “Painting as a Pastime.” President Bush says, “I decided to read it because of my admiration for Churchill and because even though I was active, I was antsy. I figured that if painting had sated Churchill’s appetite for learning, I might benefit from it as well.” With Gail Norfleet, a notable and talented Dallas artist as his first instructor, President Bush was resolved to liberate his inner Rembrandt. With hesitant brushstrokes, he began quickly immersing himself. First a cube, then a watermelon and he continued to hone his skills by perfecting family pet portraits - which occasionally ended

July/August 2017


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Mural of America’s Armed Forces

Painting in his Dallas studio. President Bush says, “I studied the stories and photographs of the warriors. As I painted them, I thought about their background, their time in the military, and the issues they dealt with as a result of combat.” www.liveittexas.com

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with his subjects napping. “I've been painting ever since,” says Bush. “From that point forward, I became a student of art.” With an online art course under his belt and two subsequent instructors, President Bush was blazing a trail to becoming a skillful painter. It was the conversation with a young Fort Worth painter by the name of Sedrick Huckaby that lit the path to the president’s current work, “Portraits of Courage: A Commander in Chief 's Tribute to America’s Warriors.” The suggestion to paint faces of unfamiliar subjects became an opportunity to honor the men and women who daily advance liberty. This was also a perfect way to call attention to the visible and invisible wounds of war, educate people about the various Bush Presidential Center military programs and raise funds to provide assistance. The mission was to highlight their courage but also reassure them that they've contributed once and they can contribute again. “The whole purpose is to provide a bridge from military service to additional service,” says President Bush. Painted with compassion and respect, the message of each canvas is to encourage and hopefully ease the process of transitioning from military to civilian life. It has been said the most sobering responsibility as commander in chief is the decision to put Americans in harm's way. “We're an amazing country to produce people like this – those that know the dangers and still volunteer to face them,” says President Bush. In his father's memorable 1,000 points of light speech, President George H.W. Bush states that life is truly about duty, sacrifice, commitment and helping others. There can be no definition of a successful life

Top Right: President Bush and First Lieutenant Melissa Stockwell (United States Army). Stockwell says, “I joined because I love our country, short and simple.” Bottom: A depiction of true comradery on the wall of the George W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum. 24

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Top: Making memories during the W100K mountain bike ride, hosted by the Bush Institute. Bottom: The Portraits of Courage Exhibit at the George W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum is filled with artistic works and cherished snapshots.

that does not include service to others. No limits can hold back a person determined to make a difference. This innate character, discipline, integrity, principle of volunteerism and dedication to America is the core of President George W. Bush – evident in every stroke of his brush. Each carefully crafted canvas is a genuine and heartfelt tribute, from a commander in chief to his troops. You can see this moving exhibit, painted by our nation’s 43rd President, through Oct. 1, 2017 at the George W. Bush Presidential Center on the SMU Campus in Dallas. President Bush leaves you with the reason for his exhibit on the wall of the center: “I painted these men and women as a way to honor their service to the country and to show my www.liveittexas.com

respect for their sacrifice and courage.” Purchase your very own copy of Portraits of Courage: A Commander in Chief ’s Tribute to America’s Warriors by visiting bushcenter.org. We’re also giving away a copy and you can register by visiting liveittexas.com. All proceeds from book sales will benefit the efforts of the Bush Institute and the Military Service Initiative. Participating in this summer’s Blue Stars Museum program, the George W. Bush Presidential Library & Museum in Dallas, the LBJ Presidential Library in Austin, and the George Bush Presidential Library & Museum in College Station offer free admission to the nation’s active duty military personnel, including National Guard and Reserve, and their families from Memorial Day through Labor Day 2017. 25


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spotlight on health

liveit

Beneficial Bacteria Health Uses and Advantages By Susan Ogden-McKee, PA-C

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rom television to print media, probiotics are the new “best thing.” Your healthcare provider, nutritionist and friends all suggest you take some form of this natural cure. Let's start by asking the questions, what are you taking and what are the benefits? Probiotics are live microorganisms believed to provide significant health benefits when consumed. The important fact to remember is the microorganism must be “live” to provide the maximum benefit. It is suggested (not proven) that probiotics modify the complex community of microorganism species that live in the digestive tracts (gut flora) and replace harmful bacteria with more useful bacteria. This change in the gut flora is suspected to help the

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body’s immune system fight off invading bacteria or virus that produces illness. Probiotics are usually prescribed with antibiotics to help prevent side effects such as diarrhea and yeast infections that are associated with antibiotic use. It is suggested that probiotics aid in decreasing the imbalance of colonic microbes that alter the carbohydrate metabolism and decrease short-chain fatty acid absorption in the gut. Such decreases can cause diarrhea to occur. The probiotics also help prevent antibiotic-induced yeast infections by keeping the body’s good bacteria level intact as the antibiotic works to rid the body of bad bacteria. Probiotics are suggested to help control and treat many

chronic illnesses like hypertension, elevated cholesterol, chronic diarrhea, childhood eczema, Helicobacter pylori (bacteria that causes chronic inflammation of the inner lining of the stomach or “gastritis”), irritable bowel disease, inflammatory bowel disease, lactose intolerance, necrotizing enterocolitis and improve immune system capabilities. As with any supplement, there are related side effects that should be discussed with your healthcare provider prior to starting any supplement. One of the most common side effects is short term diarrhea due to changing of the gut flora. Live probiotic cultures are available in many forms such as liquid, dairy products, fortified foods, tablets, capsules

and chewables. Most tablets, capsules and chewables are microencapsulated to protect the live cultures from the stomach’s acidic conditions (enabling the live microorganisms to pass through the gastrointestinal tract unharmed). The question is whether or not to take probiotics. While most people want to find something that works for them, probiotics are not a quick fix. They are a more natural way to help boost your body’s immune and defense system. Research on the actual effects probiotics have on the human body are still ongoing. Consult your doctor to see if probiotics are right for you and seek medical attention if you experience severe side effects or allergic reactions. 27


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at this and not that. Do this and not that. Are we even sure anymore? We’ve believed one set of rules and recommendations and for so long and now, science gives us a complete 180 degree turn on nutritional advice and exercise guidelines. From time to time, we all need a refresher on the latest standards. As a personal trainer, I'm constantly answering clients’ questions which I'll address below. Q: What should I eat? A: Only a registered dietitian can prescribe a meal plan but I always recommend eating real food. These are clean foods that will typically expire within a week. Consume vegetables, fruits, meats and cheeses. Eat less processed products with preservatives and a long shelf life; try to consume as little as possible from a box or bag. Just by following the real food principle, you're already well on your way to a healthier lifestyle. Q: How important is breakfast? A: I always lean towards preference is best. For years, I advised my clients to eat within thirty minutes of waking to kick-start their metabolism. The word “breakfast” literally means you are breaking the fast. Science now shows benefits to intermittent fasting, boosting weight loss by reducing your calorie intake for the day. While there are many protocols for this method, ideally you must be able to tolerate long periods without eating as to not experience lows throughout the day. 28

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Q: What duration of exercise is optimal for weight loss? A: We’re so used to hearing cardio, cardio, cardio. One hour minimum of steady state cardio and high intensity training, most of the week for weight loss benefits. Science has now shifted its recommendation to high-intensity interval training known as HIIT workouts. HIIT is a technique in which the purpose is to give bursts of intense exercise immediately followed by very short recovery periods. This type of workout demands more oxygen from the body during performance which raises the heart rate and keeps it elevated, creating an oxygen shortage. This results in your body asking for more oxygen during recovery. HIIT increases your metabolism and can be performed in 30 minutes or less, using body weight only and no additional equipment needed. Q: What’s the point of strength training? A: The more lean muscle mass you create by lifting weights, the better fat burner you are at rest. Nothing can make you feel more empowered than pumping a little iron. Q: Should I lift weights every day? A: I usually recommend one day off per week from all workouts for rest and recovery, unless you’re on a specific training plan. You shouldn’t focus on the same muscle groups for consecutive days. If you are doing the work in the gym you should be creat-

ing tiny muscle fiber tears with each workout and you need a minimum of 24 hours for those to repair themselves, making them stronger. Q: Is it okay to drink diet sodas? A: Science has revealed many

dangers in consuming artificial sweeteners. My recommendation is to avoid drinking your calories if weight loss is your goal. Artificial sweeteners consumption have many known and documented dangers. Although sugar is not our friend,

Get moving and if you have questions, Aimee can be reached at Fit-N-Wise in Decatur (940-627-2708) or Opposite Way Training in Bowie (940-389-1229).

July/August 2017


when it comes to weight loss, your body can process the natural sugar from a soda better than an artificial sweetener created in a lab. Our bodies weren’t made to receive satiation from nonnutritive sweeteners. Research also shows artificial sweeteners can cause a dangerous addiction to overly sweet foods as they retrain the taste buds to need more and more. Q: Should I exercise when sick? A: The body has a wonderful communication tool if we will listen. When you are feeling groggy with cold-like symptoms the general rule of thumb is you have a green light. A workout may be exactly what the doctor ordered as it can refresh and energize by yielding an endorphin rush. However, if you are feverish, your body is fighting off some form of infection and rest is what is needed most. Listen to your body's cues.

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Q: If I can’t put 100 percent into my workout, should I bother? A: Most emphatically, yes. Walking one mile is better than not walking at all, getting in one set of strength training is better than never lifting a weight, and most definitely, a walk up the hill to your mailbox is better than munching on the couch. Sometimes life gets in the way of your workout but don't underestimate the benefit of a brisk walk for ten minutes around your neighborhood, stretching those legs and getting some extra steps in for the day. A little can add up over time. There will always be new research about this complex thing called the human body. The beauty is figuring out what works best for each of us. As long as we are striving to be active, we’re at least moving in the right direction. www.liveittexas.com

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THE READING NOOK

make yourself at home

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Creating a coveted space in your home by fancy nancy, interior decorator

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ummer is in full swing. This means longer days and optimistically, a slightly shorter to-do list. Hopefully, less activity also translates to more down time and opportunities to read the book that's been on your nightstand for months. was one of those strange children who actually looked forward to the summer reading assignment; it gave me an excuse to curl up for hours with a book and be transported to a faraway place. s an adult, it's a little harder to find a block of hours to indulge in reading. More often, it’s done in the most unconventional ways. find myself taking advantage of small snatches of time and reading in unlikely places, like waiting in line at the bank drive-through. What better way to treat yourself after a hectic day than with a few minutes to read, giving your mind a mini-escape from the stresses of life. n this issue, my goal is to inspire you to create a reading nook in your home. Think of it as a safe haven in the storm, a small refuge where you can sit for a few minutes and check in with your favorite character or catch up on your favorite fashion or style trends. ake a look around your house and see where you could create a quiet corner dedicated to reading, whether inside or out. That awkward space that's been giving you a decorating twitch, turn it into a comfortable area for a little rest and relaxation. ll that's required is a comfortable chair, light (natural is best) and a good book. small table for a lamp and refreshments, comfortable pillows and a plush throw will complete your space. Maybe your reading place is an dirondack chair on the porch, or a floatie in the pool (paperback recommended). n either space, the goal is to create a spot where each member of the family can retreat for a few minutes of peace and quiet, whether to read, make a phone call or write that magazine article that has a rapidly-approaching deadline. f done with a little bit of thought and planning, it will quickly become everyone’s favorite space in your home. nd remember, “ book is a dream you hold in your hands.” For more of Fancy Nancy's design tips, visit her at persnicketyhp.com. www.liveittexas.com

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fresh perspectives

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ld books are a treasure. When you find one completely intact, it’s quite a feat. Historically, I've passed on purchasing finds in not so perfect condition until now! In this issue, I've breathed new life into some beautiful vintage book pages, giving a Fresh Perspective and creating adorable graphic art. Getting started requires discovering the perfect book and the rest is quite effortless. I have a soft spot for old etiquette books. The contents are charming and occasionally downright silly. Good manners never go out of style so why not put them on display (as seen here). Right? This technique is perfect for any subject matter. Determining the space where you plan to display them may help you decide on a theme. With a computer, laser printer, sharp knife, picture frame and a little creativity, the possibilities are endless! For detailed, step-by-step instructions on creating your own book art, visit liveittexas.com. Keep creating.

Ellen

To see more of Ellen’s fresh perspectives, follow her on Facebook (Retrospective Home).


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vantage point

TEXAS WESLEYAN UNIVERSITY FOOTBALL Taking the field after a 75-year timeout

by courtney mcewen | photos by jose valdez & texas wesleyan athletics

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hile I know very little about fumbles and formations, an inspirational story is one I instantly recognize. As a key part of the Texas Wesleyan University's 2020 Vision strategic plan, the university announced in February of 2016 it will reestablish its football program after a 75-year timeout. Texas Wesleyan's football program began in 1934 and competed against rivals like Austin College and John Tarleton Agricultural College (now Tarleton State University). During the 1940-41 season, the team triumphed, winning a conference championship on December 6. The very next day, a devastating attack was launched on Pearl Harbor and with a shortage of servicemen, the Texas Wesleyan players answered the call to serve. The championship would be

their last time to play as a team and their selfless involvement and sacrifice in World War II signaled the university's official suspension of Texas Wesleyan football. 75 years later, the university has made the decision to once again reinvest in Rams football. With over two decades of experience, seven-time Texas Association of Private and Parochial Schools (TAPPS) state football champion coach, Joe Prud'homme was hired in March of 2016 and says he couldn't pass up the opportunity to write history and create something special. In the fall of 2016, a red-shirt leadership class began practicing and scrimmaging in preparation for games beginning this September within the NAIA's Central Football League. “This program is really an involvement injection for the university.

Football helps round out the college experience, creating community, comradery and school pride,” Prud'homme says. “Ram football has brought people together, from coaches, to players and administration. If you have a united system, you have a great chance at success. We're not just building a football program, we're raising great men. Teaching them to give back and seeing all they receive in return - on and off the field. Football is a great instructor and a vehicle to long-term success for the students. We're growing their network by encouraging a model of education, athletics and community – in that order.” Ram players are from all over, Tennessee to Louisiana. Many are local students that have returned from other institutions for various reasons and now have the chance to

(Top) Pictured is the 1941 football team that served at Pearl Harbor. (Bottom) The 2017 Blue and Gold Spring Scrimmage.

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vantage point play in their own backyard and over 30 of the players are first generation students. What makes this program and its players special is adaptability and attitude. “Players have to think abstractly with the limited resources a new program offers. Plans are in the works for future expansion but we're building this airplane as we fly it,” says Prud'homme. Band and cheerleading pro-

grams are on the horizon and the university is currently exploring the possibility of developing a new stadium adjacent to campus through a collaborative partnership. “Texas Wesleyan students are already receiving a top-tier education, and now, we’re adding a Texas-sized football tradition. We're in the process of building something people can be proud of and invite you to

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join us as we embark on this momentous journey,” says Prud'homme. From the historic team that served our country with distinction to the exceptional athletes of today, this is your opportunity to be part of history. Coach Prud’homme and his Rams hope to see you, cheering in the stands beginning Sept. 9 at Farrington Field.

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“When you’re part of something special, it sticks with you forever.” ~ Joe Prud'homme, Rams Football Head Coach

Coach Prud'homme

The annual Rams Football Fundraiser Golf Tournament is held in April. This year, 31 teams came together and raised over $25,000 for the program. For more information, call Tournament Chair, Susan Caffee at 817-771-2339. Curious about other ways to get involved? Visit TXWES.edu or email Coach Prud'homme at joeprudhomme@txwes.edu. Season tickets are now available at ramsports.net/tickets.


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Delights & Shadows By ed Kooser

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ave you ever been presented a food, activity or perhaps a new friend, about which you already had an opinion? Had my brother-in-law never provided a proper re-introduction to farm fresh asparagus, I would have missed out on some delicious dining experiences. Had my husband not invited me to learn to play tennis in my mid-thirties, I would have deprived myself of years of physical activity and cherished friendships. Had a gentleman, who I greatly respect and admire, never suggested reading “ elights & Shadows” ( ed Kooser), poetry would probably not have found such a meaningful place in my heart and on my bookshelf. Merriam-Webster defines poetry as, “Writing that formulates a concentrated imaginative awareness of experience in language chosen and arranged to create a specific emotional response through meaning, sound, and rhythm.” As a young adult, I read “The Raven” by dgar Allen Poe and “The Road Less raveled” by Robert Frost. Like many, my notion of poetry as a style of writing was limited to those works that followed traditional rhythm and rhyme and the meaning may have become muddled in such. This small volume was the winner of the 2005 Pulitzer Prize for Poetry and that alone intimidated me. As I began to read, I was immediately drawn in by Kooser’s thoughtful words. I found myself transported to my youth as I read “A Jar of Buttons.” The poem “ urkey ultures” made me smile as I recalled pointing out one from our patio to a friend just last week. “At the Cancer Clinic” brought thoughts and prayers for those who are winning—and those who have lost—their battles with the disease. For those of you with an appreciation for poetry, “ elights & Shadows” may already have a place in your library but, should you not yet have formed a full opinion, consider this an invitation to give it a try.

Rebekah www.liveittexas.com

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Kidnappers are not very interested in you.

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In a hostage situation, you are likely to be released first.

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reetings and welcome to augh More, ive More! ’m thrilled to be the newest member of the ive t family and appreciate you taking a moment to read my weird take on life. grew up in the exas anhandle ( arrouzett, exas) where graduated fifth in my senior class - out of eight. attended college in two terms, Reagan and ush. ’ve been married to my sweetheart for 31 years and we have two grown children, ezlie and aylor. ecause have the need to parent something, we have two wonderful new dog children, epper and Zuzu. ’m 52 and find getting older has many challenges, as well as perks. hen asked about the challenges, tell people each is like a V show, movie, etc. For instance, my eyes would be the movie, “ oney, hrunk the Kids.” My bones and muscles would be the game show, “ et’s Make a eal.” My mind, “ here’s aldo?” And my sleeping can be summed up as, “A River Runs Through t.” ( ’ve never had to pee at night so much in my life.)

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People no longer view you as a hypochondriac. There is nothing left to “learn the hard way.” Things you buy now won’t ever wear out.

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No one expects you to run — anyway.

People call at 8 p.m. and ask, “Did I wake you?”

Lyndy Lyndy Phillips is a humorous speaker and comedy magician who recharges, renews and refreshes corporate, association and educator audiences with his clean, inspirational, positive and upbeat presentations. For more from Lyndy, visit liveittexas.com and get to know more about him by clicking on the Contributors tab. July/August 2017


the

liveitlist A few things we’re living with and loving

Personalized Library Embosser horchow.com

Bookish

It’s been said that between the pages of a book is a good place to be. Here are a few bookish items we think you’ll enjoy. Artori Word Bookmark amazon.com

Sugarboo Notepad persnicketyhp.com

Sugarboo Paperweight persnicketyhp.com

Literary Soy Candles uncommongoods.com

www.liveittexas.com

Fingerprint Bookmark amazon.com

Reading Figures Bookends theliterarygiftcompany.com

Bookopoly Board Game amazon.com Red-spotted Purple

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Event Lineup 40

July/Aug ‘17

Have an upcoming event? Send it to us...

We’ll add it to the Event Lineup Event spaces are available on a firstcome, first-served basis. Include date, time, location and ticket details.

Send your event to... courtney@postoakmedia.net

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featured event concerts in the garden: star wars & beyond july 7-8 • fort worth. 3220 Botanic Garden Boulevard.

After two sellout shows last year, Star Wars & Beyond returns to light up the sky and awaken the force in all of us. Fire up your lightsaber and have your picture taken with some of the franchise’s most iconic characters. The first half of the program features music from iconic films like Harry Potter, E.T The Extra Terrestrial, and more. In the second half, you’ll hear your favorite themes from Star Wars enhanced with an epic laser show. Hosted by Fort Worth Symphony Orchestra. To purchase tickets, call 817-665-6000 or visit fwsymphony.org. July/August 2017


Event Lineup A Star-Spangled Spectacular!

Don Henley 70th Birthday Celebration D

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Main Event - 407 W. Hwy 114. Honoring ony orsett and hosted by ssociation of exas. For information, visit secure2.convio.net. ALS

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Grapevine Convention Center 1209 S. Main. Offering merican antiques and collectible glassware that includes elegant glass, Depression glass, art glass, china, pottery and kitchen collectibles. ome see why collectors have made this the largest and longest running glass show in orth exas. For more information visit meyershows.com

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Ray Clymer Exhibit Hall - 1000 5th Street. elebrating its 36th year, the weekend kicks off on Thursday with the consumer show opening from 3-8 p.m. and continuing Friday through aturday. vents begin on Friday with the 13-mile Wee- hi- ah Mountain Bike ace and HH100 ndurance ides on aturday morning (10K, 25 mile, 50 mile, 100K and 100 mile). For runners, the Wee- hi- ah rail un is on Sunday with a half marathon and 10K route. For more information, visit hh100.org. S

Fossil Pointe Sporting Grounds7282 N. FM 51. et your teams together and start practicing! ll proceeds go to the Wise egional Health Foundation, your support has an impact! Door prizes, gun raffle, lunch and more. egister today by visiting wisehealthfoundation.com/ events. G

Decatur Municipal Airport — 351 Airport Road. Offering 7, 25, 53 or 106 mile races, the day will be filled with familyfriendly festivities designed to get participants out to enjoy the back country roads of Wise and Montague counties while raising money for a worthwhile cause. For more information, visit ighter from Decatur Bike Rally on Facebook.

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Downtown Historic District — With more than 30,000 people in attendance last year, this is an event that you won’t want to miss. isit the more than 200 arts, crafts, food and activity booths, enjoy lots of live music and participate in all the family activities. egister today for the each edal Bike ide and 42 domino tournament. For more information, visit parkercountypeachfestival.org.

Eighter from Decatur Bike Rally

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WinStar World Casino — 777 Casino Avenue. rab a few friends and come experience a legendary evening with rock icons. For tickets, visit ticketmaster.com.

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Downtown Grapevine - S. Main St. Don’t miss the excitement with a show set to patriotic music and the perfect way to celebrate merica’s birthday. For more information, call 800-457-6338.

Steve Miller with Peter Frampton

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American Airlines Center - 2500 Victory Ave. This once-in-alifetime event will feature songs by Henley spanning his entire career from the agles and his vast solo catalog. Don will be joined by several very special guests throughout the night. For information and tickets, visit ticketmaster.com.

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Morton H. Meyerson Symphony Center - 2301 Flora St. Strike up the band and hoist the stars and stripes - it’s a star-spangled salute to our country featuring patriotic music, confetti and a cameo from Uncle Sam. Hosted by Dallas Winds. For more information, call 214-565-9463 or visit dws.org.

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Meet Arabell... Don't forget to submit your companion on the LiveIt website at www.liveittexas.com by clicking on Carefree Companions. 42

Pet Parent: Devian Poteet Breed: Labrador Home: Bowie, Texas Arabell likes to do the very things she’s not supposed to, like climbing on the bed. These images portray her expression, “Is she going to make me get down?” Arabell is an absolute and unexpected joy. Her presence has prevented immeasurable loneliness after the loss of Devian’s grandmother. Dogs innately know exactly how to warm your heart when you need it most. This loving, brown-eyed labrador is a blessing from God every day. July/August 2017


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