Page 1

Connected

CHELSEA — DEXTER — GRASS LAKE — MANCHESTER — STOCKBRIDGE

Fall/Winter 2021

THE BRAIN ACROSS THE LIFE SPAN THANK YOU

Farm to Table Sponsors, Donors and Community Members

ONEBIGCONNECTION.ORG

CHECK IT OUT!

plus

Winter Challenge Photos

BRAIN HEALTH

Important for the WHOLE FAMILY 1

NON PROFIT ORG US POSTAGE PAID CANEY, KS PERMIT NO 7


22


giraffe

Inspired Design. Excellent Craftsmanship. Delighting People & Planet. giraffedesignbuild.com

info@giraffedesignbuild.com

734.489.1924333


Welcome to

Connected “Isn’t it odd. We can only see our outsides but nearly everything happens on the inside,” said the mole. If you haven’t had an opportunity to read Charlie Mackey’s book, The Boy, The Mole, The Fox, and The Horse, I encourage you to find a copy. It’s a beautiful collection of thoughtful reflections that will warm your spirit. In many ways, this quote reminds me that we need to seek to understand each other – that what we see on the outside is only a small piece of the whole person. This edition of Connected is dedicated to exploring our brains and strengthening our understanding of mental health and wellness. When we think about how the brain affects wellness, common themes include regular physical activity, eating healthy foods, furthering social involvement, and staying mentally active. Twelve years ago, the 5 Healthy Towns Foundation, then the Chelsea-Area Wellness Foundation, opened its doors and launched a big, novel initiative to foster a culture of wellness in our communities. Working with community partners, and wellness coalitions made up of committed volunteers from all walks of life, the Foundation has made memorable and lasting contributions to the region in which we live. I feel privileged to have the opportunity to lead the 5 Healthy Towns Foundation into a new phase of its work

as we embark upon our journey towards greater regional collaboration. While these shifts in strategy can bring up questions and uncertainty, they are also an opportunity for us to use our collective brain power to move the work forward in our communities for the betterment of all. I look forward to working with all of our community members, volunteers and organizations in continuing to advance the legacy of health that we strive to create. As we explore in this edition, we are supporting the movement to increase dialogue in the mental health space which we hope allows each of us to begin to talk about our mental well-being with the same level of priority and care as we show towards our physical health. That level of care starts in our minds, our homes, and with our families. It expands to our neighborhoods and in our workplaces. Conversations allow us to be intentional in our efforts to support the well-being of those with whom we live, work, and play. These opportunities and community strengths are the things that drew me to the Foundation, and I’m happy to be here. I look forward to meeting all of you who call our 5 communities, home.

Steve 4


Celebrating 165 YEARS

MORE THAN A COMBINED

We’re Here. For You. Throughout our combined 165 years of experience, UMRC & Porter Hills has always focused on the health and well-being of the older adults we are privileged to serve. Providing a safe, healthy, and nurturing environment for you and your loved one is our top priority.

Call 734.822.7291 or visit us online at www.UMRCPH.com 55


FALL/WINTER 2021-2022

C O N T E N T S

BRAIN HEALTH

10

I MPORTANT FOR THE Brain health WHOLE FAMILY

Written by Michigan Medicine

Gift Ideas

32

Written by Matt Pegouskie

From newborns to seniors, brain health is important for all stages of life.

24

rock steady boxing

Written by Cindy Cope 14 – YOU WERE DREAMING LAST NIGHT Written by Lori Kintz

Brain-healthy gifts can be fun, interactive, and entertaining for all.

26

Aging drivers Written by Linda Fech, Michigan Office of Highway Safety

30 – COLLABORATIVE ALZHEIMER’S AND DEMENTIA RESEARCH IN MICHIGAN

50

busy bodies

strengthen brains Written by Ruth Habrecht

45 – THE IMPACT OF LONELINESS ON BRAIN FUNCTION

18 – OH MY, WHAT’S A RUNNER’S HIGH?

Written by Bruno Giordani, Ph.D.

Written by Amy Heydlauff

Written by Maddy Wierenga

34 – HEARING AND YOUR BRAIN

46 – SEASONAL AFFECTIVE DISORDER

19 – NICOTINE AND YOUR BRAIN

Written by Michelle Rankin, Au.D.

Written by Charlie Taylor, Ph.D.

Written by Lori Kintz

36 – THE BRAIN AND ITS ROLE IN ADDICTION

47 - MARIJUANA USE AND TEEN BRAINS

20 – THE FOURTH TRIMESTER

Written by Amy Heydlauff

Written by SRSLY

Written by Maddy Wierenga

37 – WRITE A LETTER – YOUR BRAIN WILL

51 – ROOT FOR THE HOME TEAM

22 – KEEP THE BRAIN WATERED

THANK YOU

Written by Matt Pegouskie 52 – THE ADOLESCENT BRAIN

Written by Lori Kintz

Written by Matt Pegouskie

24 – ROCK STEADY BOXING

40 – BREATH IN – BREATH OUT

Written by Cindy Cope

Written by Patti Bihn

Written by Angela Tiberia, MPH

28 – WHAT TO DO IN THE EVENT OF A STROKE

42 – HUMOR AND THE BRAIN

54 – IMPORTANCE OF DOWN TIME

Written by St. Joseph Mercy Chelsea

Written by Amy Heydlauff

Written by Steve Petty

29 – HELMET OR NO HELMET – YOU DECIDE

44 – MUSIC & MEMORY

Written by Lori Kintz

Written by Michelle Rankin, Au.D.

6

Special note – due to recent cancellations because of COVID-19, please contact all organizations regarding programming listed in this edition of Connected.

COGNITIVE DEVELOPMENT STUDY

IN EVERY ISSUE 48 – CAUGHT IN THE ACT 56 – RECIPES 58 – CONNECTED CALENDAR


AFFORDABLE LUXURY SINCE 1952

WINDOW TREATMENTS • FURNITURE • FLOORING • CUSTOM CLOSETS • AND MORE! WINDOW TREATMENTS • Hunter Douglas Gallery and Authorized Service Center. • Custom draperies and valances created by our in-house seamstress.

NORWALK CUSTOM FURNITURE • Sofas, sectionals, accent chairs and more custom tailored in over 850 fabrics and leathers. • Ready to ship in 35 days!

THE LATEST FLOORING SOLUTIONS • Carpet, hardwood, luxury vinyl, cork, tile and stone. • Exceptional area rugs to add the finishing touch.

Let us help you make the most of your next project! Call or visit: ANN ARBOR • 734 663-7011

6235 Jackson Rd. (next to Menards)

PLYMOUTH • 734 451-1110

863 W. Ann Arbor Tr. (downtown)

www.EsquireInteriors.com

YOUR LOCATION • 734 663-7011 for a mobile design studio appointment

Follow us for the latest specials and design tips!

7


CONNECT WITH THE COMMUNITY! Reach 30,000 of your closest neighbors!

If you would like to advertise in the next issue of Connected magazine call or email Lori Kintz

(734) 433-4599 lori@5healthytowns.org

Connected is published by Chestney Publishing and is the property of 5 Healthy Towns Foundation

A special thank you to our

ADVERTISERS 5HF Wellness Centers — 17 ACORN Farmers Market & Café — 15 Adult Learners Institute — 55 Chelsea & Dexter Education Foundations — 43 Chelsea Community Foundation — 35 Chelsea District Library — 46 Chelsea State Bank — 64 Cornman Farms/Zingerman’s — 55 Dexter Community Schools — 23 Discovery Toys — 55 Dynamic Edge — 35 Edward Jones — 31 Esquire Interiors — 7 Farm Bureau Eder-Diver — 15 Giraffe Design — 3, 12-13 Go To Roofing — 2 H&R Block — 43 Henry Ford Allegiance Health — 63 Heyldauff’s Appliances — 25 Huron Waterloo Pathway Initiative — 23 Huron/Clinton Metroparks — 21 Johnson’s Services LLC — 35 Michigan Medicine Family Medicine — 1 One Big Connection — 39 Orthopaedic Rehab Specialists, P.C. — 39 Purple Rose Theatre — 23 Rankin Audiology — 35 Silver Maples of Chelsea — 15 Sport Port — 43 St. Joseph Mercy Chelsea — 27 The Copper Nail — 15 UMRC & Porter Hills — 5 Washtenaw County Community Mental Health Millage — 25 Washtenaw County Parks & Recreation — 31 Wine Women & Shopping — 59

For information on how to advertise, please contact 5 Healthy Towns Foundation at 734.433.4599 88

5 Healthy Towns Foundation makes every effort to provide accurate information in advertising and editorial content, however, does not make any claims as to accuracy of information provided by advertisers or editorial contributors and accepts no responsibility or liability for inaccurate information.


99


on the cover

Brain Health Important for the Whole Family Written by Jill Fenske, MD and Tom Bishop, PsyD

Health maintenance exams throughout life can help to optimize health so the brain and body can both work at their best now and into the future.

10

If there is anything that we have come to appreciate as a result of the pandemic, it is the importance of being in community. So much of one’s health depends upon interactions with others and active participation in community. It is increasingly understood that being in community not only strengthens relationships, but social connectedness reduces cognitive decline and the onset of health problems often associated with aging. Surgeon General Dr. Vivek H. Murthy has suggested that social isolation is as bad for your health as smoking and can lead to a greater risk of dementia. Our brains need purpose and socialization that is found when we are in community.


At Chelsea Family Medicine (Michigan Medicine), we believe in the importance of family and community throughout the lifespan. A good beginning for brain health starts in pregnancy. We offer family-centered pregnancy care within a team setting, so we can really get to know a family and develop a care plan to assure that baby gets a great start. Our care team is led by physicians, and includes behavioral health professionals, nurses, a pharmacist, and a dietician. Nutrition, stress management and addressing genetic or health risk factors are very important during pregnancy. We offer individualized nurse teaching, behavioral health consultation, nutrition support, and advanced treatments and consultation for any medical issue that may arise. A child’s brain develops more quickly between birth and age 5 than at any other point in life. Several factors are critical to development at this time, such as loving relationships with caregivers, health screenings and treatments, nutrition, play, and opportunities for learning. We encourage reading out loud to young children, which is why our clinic participates in “Reach Out and Read”. We provide a book at each well child exam in the first 5 years of life and encourage families to read together. Adolescence is another time of brain growth and development when a lot of “remodeling” occurs in preparing for adulthood. Parents can support teens by encouraging healthy choices, and adequate sleep (teens need about 8-10 hours per night). Staying connected as a family is very important, and it’s essential for the whole family to find a good balance with the use of screens and devices. We encourage a yearly adolescent wellness visit to screen for medical and emotional health challenges, and ensure teens are up to date with vaccines and preventive services.

Family physicians screen children for medical concerns and promote good health. Well-child exams are important to make sure development is on track.

During adulthood, many chronic illnesses can impact brain health. Our family physicians and care team are experts in chronic disease management and get to know patients and their families on a personal level, so treatment is tailored to individual needs. We offer care for chronic diseases, addiction, and mental health concerns, while maintaining a focus on wellness, and improving day-to-day function and quality of life. We partner with many community programs and specialty services available through Michigan Medicine to achieve the best health outcomes and help families to thrive. Often with aging, elders experience memory loss and cognitive decline. Our physicians and care team can help patients develop plans to maintain or improve brain health by addressing medical conditions such as high blood pressure, encouraging exercise and healthy diet, controlling stress, and staying connected socially. The physicians and care team at Chelsea Family Medicine believe in linking with the community in improving the health of families and the brains of individuals across the lifespan.

Nurturing care for the mind is critical for brain growth and development. A great relationship with a family physician can support brain health for the entire family.

11


giraffe

Inspired Design. Excellent Craftsmanship. Delighting People & Pla

Inspired Design. Excellent Craftsmanship. Delighting People & Planet.

12 12


giraffe

anet.

giraffedesignbuild.com

info@giraffedesignbuild.com

734.489.1924

13 13


You May Not Remember, But You Were Dreaming Last Night Written by 5 Healthy Towns Staff When you sleep, you dream. According to the National Institutes of Health, everyone dreams, whether you remember your dreams or not. Your REM sleep, the phase of sleep where dreams mostly occur, may even play an important role in influencing your memory and your mental health. As you age, your need for sleep and your sleep patterns change, but this varies significantly across individuals of the same age. There is no magic “number of sleep hours” that works for everybody. Babies initially sleep as much as 16 to 18 hours per day, which may boost growth and development, especially brain growth and development. Schoolage children and teens on average need about 9.5 hours of sleep per night. Most adults need 7-9 hours of sleep a night, but after age 60, nighttime sleep tends to be shorter, lighter, and interrupted by multiple awakenings. Some people, including the elderly, may take medications that interfere with sleep. The exact purpose of dreaming is not known, but dreaming may help you process your emotions. Events from the day often invade your thoughts during sleep, and people suffering from stress or anxiety are more likely to have scary dreams. Dreams can be experienced in all stages of sleep but usually are most vivid during the Rapid Eye Movement or REM stage. REM sleep first occurs about 90 minutes after falling asleep. Your eyes move rapidly from side to side behind closed eyelids. Different kinds of brain

14

waves become more active. Your breathing becomes faster and irregular, and your heart rate and blood pressure increase to near waking levels. Clusters of sleep-promoting neurons in many parts of the brain become more active as we get ready for bed. Nerve-signaling chemicals called neurotransmitters can “switch off” or dampen the activity of cells that signal arousal or relaxation. Genes may also play a significant role in how much sleep we need. Scientists

TIPS FOR GETTING A GOOD NIGHT’S SLEEP Set a schedule – go to bed and wake up at the same time each day. Daily exercise should be no later than a few hours before going to bed. Caffeine, nicotine and alcoholic drinks all interfere with sleep.

have identified several genes involved with sleep and sleep disorders, including genes that control the excitability of neurons. Additional research will provide better understanding of inherited sleep patterns and risks of circadian and sleep disorders. Questions or concerns about your sleep? A sleep doctor may be able to help. Find a physician near you at stjoeshealth.org

Relax before bed – try a warm bath, reading, and a room conducive for sleeping. Deep breathing and mindful meditation may also help. See a doctor if excessive snoring is causing problems, if you have a problem sleeping or if you feel unusually tired during the day. Most sleep disorders can be treated effectively.


~ Supporting Grass Lake Non-profit Groups Since 2007~

FIRST RATE SELECTION — SECOND HAND PRICES THANKS TO OUR

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK

Featuring locally grown foods 455 W. Main St., Manchester, MI www.acornfarmersmarketcafe.org

LOYAL VOLUNTEERS, CUSTOMERS AND DONORS, THE COPPER NAIL HAS GIVEN OVER $700,000 TO LOCAL NON-PROFIT GROUPS, SO THEY CAN THRIVE!

When protecting Chelsea, the

EXPERIENCE MATTERS. Call the Eder & Diver Insurance Agency today! (734) 475-9184 EderDiver.com 1250 S Main St., Chelsea

Visit our Facebook page!

(517) 522-8514 • Open 10 to 5 — Tues - Sat Located in Historic Downtown Grass Lake

Auto | Home | Life | Business | Farm | Lake Estate®

A Gre at Pla ce to W ork, the Best Place to Live!

IDENT RES

ENGAGEMEN T

It’s hard to keep quiet about something so good! In the past 3 years, Silver Maples has been honored with 4 national awards for employee and resident engagement. Loyal, connected employees provide a vibrant, fulfilling lifestyle for our residents. Certified as a great place to work, makes Silver Maples the best place to live!

Call (734) 475-4111 • www.silvermaples.org Locally-Owned, Non-Profit Jointly Sponsored by 5 Healthy Towns Foundation and United Methodist Retirement Communities, Inc.

15


THIS IS YOUR

BRAIN ON SUGAR Written by 5 Healthy Towns Staff

Rethink Your Drink gives you sugar content for your favorite beverage

I

cannot count the number of times I have walked into my kitchen and asked myself “Am I really hungry? Or just bored?” Sometimes we want a snack because we have nothing better to do or it sounds tasty in the moment. So how do we know the difference between being hungry and craving a snack? A craving is a strong desire for a particular food item. On the other hand, hunger is your body’s need for nutritious food to use as fuel. You know that you’re hungry when your tummy gets rumbly and you may get a headache or feel shaky. There are a lot of proposed reasons why we get cravings. One common explanation is the positive reward system. When you eat something you like, your brain releases a chemical messenger called dopamine. This messenger improves memory and mood. Dopamine makes you feel good, so it is positively reinforcing eating foods we like. Sugar causes a stronger dopamine response than less sweet foods, which can make us want it more, and lead to cravings. Acting on these cravings and eating more sugar can lead to sugar tolerance. This means that we need to eat more sugar to get a dopamine response for that “feel good” sensation. This can result in stronger cravings and the vicious circular habit of eating, craving, eating, craving… When someone changes the way they eat the brain needs time to adjust. For example, if we usually eat dessert or ice cream in the evening and suddenly quit, our brains are likely to trigger signs of distress and cravings may be stronger. Over time the distress and cravings decrease.

16

We know that eating excessive sugar can have adverse consequences like obesity, tooth decay, acne, and diabetes. However, if someone were to cut out sugar completely, their body will respond by making them crave sugar. It is more than just a dopamine, feel good craving. Our bodies need energy to live. That energy often comes from carbohydrates (sweets, bread, rice, pasta, cereal and the many other foods that contain carbohydrates) all essentially sugars. Without these carbohydrates, our bodies will not be able to function. The trick is to give our body carbohydrates that also contain nutrition. Oreos are not in the category of sugars that are also nutritious!

Now, how do we keep our cravings in check? Here are some tips: 4 Drink more water 4 Manage stress levels 4 Learn which carbohydrates also provide nutrition • Beans and lentils • Berries • Oats • Brown rice • Whole wheat pasta • Sweet potatoes 4 Plan meals and especially snacks in advance 4 Find things to do instead of eating 4 Get a good night’s rest 4 Enjoy foods you crave in healthy amounts


Improving life through exercise and wellness • Effective weight loss • Manage health issues • Reduce stress

Scholarships Available

The value of a Wellness Center membership Feel better, increase productivity and energy, have fun and minimize health care costs with preventative exercise and specialized fitness programs.

Everything you need to stay dedicated to fitness • Degreed and Certified Fitness Professionals • State-of-the-art cardio and strength equipment • Group exercise and aquatic programs

Keeping your safety in mind We are certified by and follow the guidelines of the Medical Fitness Association – the leading authority on medical fitness programs, safety and cleaning protocols. Their seal of approval means that we follow cleaning procedures ranked well above industry standards.

• Personal training • Massage • Child care • Medical fitness programs include 10 specialized fitness pathways: Cancer, Cardiac, Diabetes, Functional, Cognitive Health, Orthopedic, Fit for Surgery, Pulmonary, Transitional Care and Weight Management

TO LEARN MORE, CONTACT ONE OF OUR LOCATIONS: Chelsea Wellness Center 14800 East Old U.S. 12, Chelsea 734-214-0220 • chelseawellness.org

Dexter Wellness Center 2810 Baker Road, Dexter 734-580-2500 • dexterwellness.org

Stockbridge Wellness Center 5116 S. M-106, Stockbridge 517-851-4486 • stockbridgewellness.org CHE-1625812_0721

17


Oh My,

WHAT’S A RUNNER’S HIGH? Written by 5 Healthy Towns Staff

If you’ve ever gone for a run and felt a brief feeling of deep relaxation and intense joy, you may have experienced what’s known as a runner’s high. This phenomenon occurs from endorphins which are known as the feel-good brain chemicals. They do this by promoting feelings of happiness and relaxation while reducing pain and stress. Endorphins act as natural painkillers for your muscles which help you feel like you can run that extra mile. Achieving a runner’s high varies from person to person, and not everyone experiences it. In fact, it is rare. Usually, it occurs after long or intense exercising which may not be realistic for some people. Many studies show that it takes an hour or two of running. However, that doesn’t mean that you won’t get an endorphin release from shorter periods of exercising. Nearly everyone experiences increased endorphins and a positive response when they exercise.

A RUNNER’S HIGH ISN’T THE SOLE BENEFIT OF PHYSICAL ACTIVITY, EVEN WHEN EXERCISE IS LESS THAN AN HOUR. OTHERS INCLUDE:

4 Increased energy levels 4 Elevated mood 4 Reduced feelings of anxiety and depression 4 Lower stress levels 4 Decreased risk of chronic disease (such as cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis, and type 2 diabetes)

If running isn’t your cup of tea, don’t fret. Contrary to its name, you don’t need to run to get a runner’s high. Any cardio/aerobic workout such as biking, swimming, high-intensity interval training (HIIT), or dancing can trigger a runner’s high sensation if performed long enough or at a high enough intensity. Any exercise can help lift your mood. And, if nothing else, there’s always a relaxing shower afterward, to look forward to.

UPCOMING EVENTS IN THE 5 HEALTHY TOWNS REGION: 4 Orthopaedic Rehab Specialists - Octoberfest 8k Run & 5k Run/Walk, Saturday October 23 in Jackson 4 ZOMBIE DASH | Jolly Pumpkin 5K - Michigan Brewery Running Series 4 Kroger A2 Turkey Trot in Dexter - Sat November 13, 2021 4 Grass Lake Road Runners - https://www.facebook.com/GLRoadRunners/ 4 Manchester Area Running Crew - https://www.facebook.com/Manchester-Area-Running_Crew 18


Nicotine and Your Brain Written by 5 Healthy Towns Staff

It has been well documented that nicotine is a serious addictive substance, and quitting is not easy. Everyone is aware, smoking, vaping and using related nicotine products aren’t good for you. But what isn’t quite as well known is that smoking also has detrimental effects on the brain – cognitive abilities, memory, and judgement. According to the National Institutes of Health, nicotine stimulates the pleasure centers of the brain, mimicking dopamine. The result is increasing sensations of feeling good when you smoke or use nicotine products, leading to addiction.

Join us and those who wish to quit for the Great American Smokeout on November 18, 2021 WHY THE GREAT AMERICAN SMOKEOUT IS IMPORTANT? A single day can help people take the first step. The Great American Smokeout highlights the dangers of smoking tobacco and provides a meaningful way for people to avoid cigarettes. It also offers a comfortable environment for family members and friends to speak about tobacco and how to quit smoking.

As we age, cognitive decline is normal. For smokers, studies show that the rate of declineChelsey may be Asquith, faster, especially It brings people together. From left to right-top row: Kaleb Adkins, Chloe Miner,cognitive Sylvia Whitt, Baylee Heidrich, Kael Bunce. Bottom row among men. only Howard, does the Great from left to right: Molly Nichols, Michelle Zemke, Katelyn Knieper, Kaitlin Miller, Hailee Fraser,Not Hailey Julia American Marhofer. And remember, vaping is not a substitute Smokeout speak to the negative effects for smoking or an effective strategy to of smoking, but it also helps people quit tobacco. come together in the name of quitting. People trying to quit can communicate According to the 5 Healthy Towns 2020 with one another online using the of 2662 local residents,High tobacco hashtag #GreatAmericanSmokeout, or by Written bySurvey Julia Marhofer, Stockbridge School Class of 2021 users are declining in our communities. attending local events in various cities. Of our survey respondents, 6% use It provides resources to quit. tobacco and almost half wish to quit. See The American Cancer Society’s Great the side bar for resources in our area to American Smokeout website provides help if you are ready to quit. resources, news, and stories about the journey to quit smoking. www.cancer.org/ healthy/stay-away-from-tobacco/greatRemember, you can quit as many times american-smokeout.html. Smokers can as you need to. Never quit quitting. find inspiration and tips to increase their chances of quitting successfully.

Joining Hands

6% of community members use tobacco, and 45% of them would like to quit

LOCAL RESOURCES: St. Joes recommends working with your primary care, combination therapy, following national guidelines and working with your primary care physician to establish an effective plan. Here are some additional resources: RESOURCES TO HELP YOU QUIT: Michigan Tobacco Quit Line 800-480-7848 | michigan.gov/tobacco Quit Right App quitrightapp.com U.S. Department of Health and Human Services smokefree.gov 800-227-2345 | cancer.org National Cancer Institute 877-44U-QUIT cancer.gov 1919


The 4th Trimester Written by 5 Healthy Towns Staff

Go to https://www.stjoeshealth.org/ classes-and-event to find many Mommy and Me classes offered virtually and at no cost. They include breastfeeding support, preparation, and basics; Infant care and childbirth education. Michigan Medicine https://medicine. umich.edu/dept/obgyn/patient-care/ mipath-prenatal-patient-resources offers postpartum resources including birth control options, depression screening, breastfeeding and healthy healing. At Henry Ford Allegiance HospitalJackson: (517) 205-4800 Postpartum resources can be found at https://www.henryford. com/services/baby In addition, the Southeast Michigan Doula Project https://www.midoula.org/cvcvvg Is a community resource for women and teens using a base of dedicated volunteer doulas who serve the nine southeast Michigan counties. These women provide evidence based, emotional, physical, and informational support to pregnant women and teens and their families, before, during, and after birth. They are all trained and act within the doula scope of practice.

20

Trimesters are a simple way of understanding the 3 stages of pregnancy. The fourth trimester, a phrase coined by Dr. Harvey Karp in 2002, refers to the 3 months after a baby is born, and all mothers experience it in some capacity. This fourth trimester involves a great deal of physical, social, and emotional change for mothers, their baby, and families. While this early postpartum period is full of joy for many, it’s also a very vulnerable time. Hormones fluctuate throughout pregnancy and childbirth. Right after birth, estrogen and progesterone drop dramatically which can contribute to baby blues or postpartum depression. This can include mood swings, anxiety, sadness, or irritability, which resolve within a week or so of birth. Progesterone and estrogen are key hormones involved in the reproductive system. Meanwhile, oxytocin, “the bonding hormone”, floods the brain after birth. This turns on the protective motherly instinct which means when oxytocin goes up, so can anxiety. Progesterone can help combat anxiety, but it is

low right after birth; It takes time for these hormones to balance each other out. Normally a woman has a postpartum visit scheduled six to eight weeks after childbirth. However, by this point many women have already experienced challenges that should have been addressed sooner, such as pain that occurs after the first couple of weeks after birth or sleeplessness. Some mothers, are also coping with the physical and emotional challenges of breastfeeding. Further, by this checkup, many mothers may have overcome the baby blues without helpful support. Attitudes and awareness around the fourth trimester are shifting. Pregnancy care is evolving, and more mothers are opening up about needing additional support during this period. Friends and family can help by making meals, doing chores, or babysitting while mothers rest. Mothers can also take action by consulting with their physicians about other concerns or needs they may have throughout this period.


THEY’RE YOUR METROPARKS. STOP ON BY SOMETIME. • Hiking • Biking • Golfing • Cross-Country Skiing • Ice Fishing • Educational Programs • And more

OAKLAND Stony Creek Metropark

Indian Springs Metropark

MACOMB Wolcott Mill Metropark

LIVINGSTON Huron Meadows Metropark Hudson Mills Metropark Dexter-Huron Metropark

Delhi Metropark

Lake St. Clair Metropark

Kensington Metropark

WAYNE Lower Huron Metropark

WASHTENAW Oakwoods Metropark

Willow Metropark Lake Erie Metropark

METROPARKS.COM 21


Keep The Brain

WATERED Written by 5 Healthy Towns Staff

Who drinks 8 glasses of water every day? If you do, you have embraced the value of hydration in keeping your brain at optimal performance and your body functions working properly. Water is the one thing the body and brain cannot live without. It’s an essential component the brain depends on to avoid many potential negative effects, including loss of concentration and memory, headaches, sleep disruptions, and more. According to the US Department of Health and Human Services, an important dietary guideline includes “limiting beverages high in added sugars, saturated fat, and sodium, and limiting alcoholic beverages. To help individuals achieve a balanced and nutrient rich diet, avoid or limit sugar-sweetened beverages (e.g., soda, sports drinks, energy drinks, fruit drinks) and sweetened coffees and teas (including ready-to-drink varieties) and instead, try chilled, plain water or sparkling water with a squeeze of fruit for a splash of flavor.”

TIP: Drink water first thing each morning. Also known as fluid balance, the National Institutes of Health analyzed data that suggest that coffee, when consumed in moderation, provides similar hydrating qualities to water. This disputes many claims that caffeine, found in coffee, tea and chocolate, is dehydrating to the body.

22 22

A well-hydrated brain can help you in the following ways: Be More Alert - Our brains are the first to feel the effects of dehydration and it shows by a loss of concentration. Staying properly hydrated enables the brain to stay alert so we can keep our attention and focus. Balance Your Emotions and Moods Studies have identified a link between dehydration and mood disturbances. Drinking water increases the brain’s temperature and gets rid of toxins and dead cells. It also keeps cells active and balances chemical processes in the brain, helping to regulate stress and anxiety. Improve Your Sleep - Water increases blood flow to the brain, which increases oxygenation and calms the brain, helping us to get a more restful night’s sleep. Expand Memory Function - When our brains are dehydrated, it becomes harder for us to memorize things, infer information, draw conclusions, and create long-term memories. Since it takes only mild dehydration to cause adverse effects on short-term memory, it’s important to drink enough water daily. Relieve Headaches - Dehydration has been found to trigger headaches and migraines in some individuals. Several studies have shown that drinking water can prevent or relieve certain types of headaches in those who are dehydrated. By drinking water and staying hydrated, you’re providing your brain with what it needs to continually perform at its best. Not only will you feel better physically, but you’ll be mentally strong and ready to tackle the day ahead.


We cannot wait to welcome you back!

Ticket on sale info coming soon. PurpleRoseTheatre.org

TWO NEW B2B SEGMENTS COMING SOON! CONNECTING THE B2B INTO CHELSEA FROM THE NORTH 1.6 miles from M52 roundabout to Timbertown and Veterans Park DEXTER-CHELSEA CONNECTION

1.6 miles from Dancer Road to Wylie Road y R dMcKinley Rd

* Please note there is an on-road section between the completed and future B2B segments with a planned trail in that area. M5 2

The B2B Trail is a 55-mile, ADAaccessible, paved pathway consisting of 8 different trail segments that connect you to cities, parks and many destinations throughout Washtenaw County. It is supported by people who share a passion for nature, recreation and community.

Mor n i n g Gl o ry

Q Cre uiet e kCt

PHASE A

in N Ma

We

Veteran's

wen Ct

EIndustrial Dr

Be

Park Weber Field

O

F b er A Dr

on D r H il l

Elm St

St

Sibley Rd

ac

McKinley Rd

Jackson Rd

Dexter Chelsea Rd

200

400

0.16

Thank you to

600

800

US Feet Miles

Map Prepared by Washtenaw County Parks, May 10, 2021 Data Sources: Washtenaw County GIS & State of Michigan

a ch an

or EN

n St

rth W No

St

st N Ea St

Support the Trails!

100

Dewey St

T i m b e r t o w n

Bu 0

or

Arden Ln

Gross Rd

Chelsea to Dexter Overview and Location Map

McKinley Rd

tCt

y

Howard Rd

City of Dexte Ar Dexter borRr-Ad nn

Marshall Rd

H ic Dr k

McKinley St

Trinkle Rd

Easton Rd

W B I94

le

Chestnut Dr Che s tn ut

Wy Rd lie

NLima CenterRd ad

N Freer Rd

St

in SMa

Seitz Dr EB I94

Wylie Rd

NLima CenterRd

Trin kleRd

rRd

ow view Rd

EOldU S12Rd L u ickDr

B ake

e

N Parker Rd

M

N Steinbach Rd

DexterChelseaR d DexterChelsea Rd

City of Chelsea

Werkner Rd

kner

Rd

Rd

Beach Rd

ore D r

ake

Rd

ndL

McKinley

S y cam

Isla

d

N Fletcher Rd

WWW.B2BTRAIL.ORG

looR

Wer

2

Butternu

Ma p Ct W ater

M5

N Dancer Rd

B2B TRAIL INFORMATION, INTERACTIVE MAPS, CONSTRUCTION UPDATES AND MORE:

Ct

Ivey Rd

thS

Ja ck

t

Ra ilr St

oa d

St

so n

for your continued support of the B2B trail! 23


Rock Steady

BOXING Written by Cindy Cope, Senior Director, ACSM-CEP

Chelsea Wellness Center is offering a unique new program, Rock Steady Boxing, to help individuals minimize the effects of Parkinson ’s disease. The non-contact boxing-based fitness curriculum has been studied and proven to help slow the progression of symptoms. According to the American College of Sports Medicine, “Research clearly shows that regular exercise can reduce the severity of Parkinson’s disease (PD) symptoms and slow down the progression of the signs of disease, “ says Kaitlyn Schneider. “Being active will help with stamina, walking better, and simply feeling better about life. Although exercise will not reverse the disease, positive effects on the brain may help compensate for some of the changes with Parkinson’s disease,” says Kaitlyn, Medical Integration Coordinator and certified Rock Steady Boxing Coach. A 60-minute pre-assessment is completed for each participant, then exercises are tailored to each person’s physical abilities. Subsequent assessments are completed periodically to track changes in the participant’s scores. Participants receive their own boxing gloves and gel hand wraps to be used during the classes. Rock Steady Boxing coaches go through an extensive certification training program. Training starts with a 15-segment online course to learn about the disease, symptoms, progression of PD and programming of specific exercises. In-person training sessions are then completed for hands-on instruction. The new RSB Coach receives their certification after successfully completing the online course, the in-person training and the Certification Exam. 24

Photos: Participants in Chelsea Wellness Center’s Rock Steady Boxing class

The 90-minute classes at the Wellness Center are offered on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays from 1:30pm-3:00pm. You can enroll and participate in Rock Steady Boxing without being a member at Chelsea Wellness Center. There are monthly dues to participate. If a participant would also like full access to the Wellness Center, discounted monthly membership dues are offered. A program participant may bring a support person or “Cornerman” to assist with the drills and exercises, without additional fees. Getting started requires a referral from your physician. For more information or to set up your initial appointment contact Kari Goorhouse, Fitness Manager at 734-214-0235 or Kaitlyn Schneider, RSB Coach at 734-214-0220.

FROM AMERICAN PARKINSON DISEASE ASSOCIATION: Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a type of movement disorder that can affect the ability to perform common, daily activities. It is a chronic and progressive disease, meaning that the symptoms become worse over time. It is characterized by its most common of motor symptoms—tremors (a form of rhythmic shaking), stiffness or rigidity of the muscles, and slowness of movement (called bradykinesia). There are an estimated 1 million people in the U.S. living with Parkinson’s disease. Most people who develop the symptoms of Parkinson’s Disease do so sometime after the age of 50.


WE ARE LOOKING FOR NEW TEAM MEMBERS —

CALL FOR AN INTERVIEW TODAY!

113 N. Main Street Chelsea, MI 48118 • heydlauffs.com • 734-475-1221 25


AGING DRIVERS & The Elephant In The Room Written by Linda Fech, Michigan Office of Highway Safety

Michigan.gov/AgingDriver Starting around age 55 there is a decrease in how well adult drivers process, remember and judge driving events, such as the distance of oncoming traffic. We may notice losses in our vision, memory, strength, flexibility, and reaction time. Aging doesn’t affect all drivers in the same way. Your health is closely connected to your ability to drive safely. Older drivers and their families should discuss the matter with their healthcare provider. The importance of keeping an aging family member safe without compromising their independence and mobility is essential to maintaining a thriving, engaged life. The topic of driving and seniors generates many concerns and is an uncomfortable topic that becomes the elephant in the room when families do engage parents in aging-related conversations. As a result, the subject is often delayed until evidence of poor driving behaviors or signs of serious cognitive or physical decline begin to appear. The good news is that there are many resources aging drivers and their families can explore to help make the aging driver’s transition from driving to non-driving safe and affirming. One of the first steps is to visit the “Safe Drivers, Smart Options” (SDSO) website at www.Michigan.gov/agingdriver The website provides information and resources for older drivers and their families, including: • How and when to start conversations with older drivers; • How medications and health problems impact driving as we age; • Driving self-assessment tools, videos, and links to driver-refresher courses;

Pete Enderle safely drove cross-country this year.

Mobility is essential to keeping seniors active and engaged in their communities. The SDSO website was developed around three principles: 1. To help aging drivers continue to drive as long as safely possible; 2. To help aging drivers transition into a smooth driving retirement; 3. To educate the community about the support and resources seniors need to maintain their independence and mobility. The SDSO website encourages everyone to be proactive and plan for a future that includes “driving retirement.” With that perspective, the elephant in the room will not seem as threatening. • Washtenaw County ranks among the top ten Michigan counties for the most senior driver fatalities and serious injuries from 2016 to 2020, coming in at Number 8. • Ingham County ranks 10th and Jackson County 13th. *A senior driver crash is a crash involving at least one driver age 65 or older.

Ride The WAVE

• Contacts for local organizations that work with older drivers and their families; and • Resources for transportation options for those who no longer drive. 26

Western Washtenaw Value Express – for door to door transportation service in the local area, including Chelsea, Stockbridge, Manchester and Ann Arbor. For more information, call 734-475-9494.


Urgent Care Coming Soon! • Same great emergency physicians and care team • Best care near you • Easy access to emergency care, lab and radiology, if required • Get seen quickly and recover sooner

Opening Soon! StjoesChelsea.org

27 27


Know what to do in the event of a stroke How St. Joe’s Chelsea is supporting those in recovery Courtesy of St. Joseph Mercy Chelsea Do you know what to do when you suspect a loved one is having a stroke? Do you know the common signs and symptoms associated with a stroke? If you answered no to either question, it’s important for you to take a minute to educate yourself on the topic. Strokes occur far more frequently then you may realize. A stroke is a life-threatening medical emergency that occurs when the blood supply to a person’s brain is interrupted or reduced. A stroke reduces or prevents oxygen-rich blood from reaching parts of the brain, which results in damage to surrounding brain tissue. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, not only is stroke a leading cause of serious long-term disability, every year more than 795,000 people in the United States have one. In the event of a stroke, the most important thing you can do for yourself or a loved is to act FAST and call 9-1-1. The acronym F-A-S-T is an easy to remember step-by-step guide for taking appropriate action:

The SJMC Rehab team

In the event of a stroke, calling 9-1-1 immediately is imperative because for every second that the brain is without proper oxygen, brain tissue is damaged. Damage to brain tissue can result in long-term cognitive impairment, physical disability, including vision loss, and even death. “Early recognition of symptoms and seeking care emergently are the most important things a person can do for themselves when it comes to stroke,” says John Danko, DO, the medical director of St. Joseph Mercy Chelsea’s Acute Inpatient Rehabilitation Program. “Every second matters. I’ve been blessed to see some amazing functional outcomes in patients following a stroke, but obviously, every person is different and may have different recovery timelines and outcomes.” The good news for our surrounding communities is that St. Joe’s Chelsea recently expanded its Inpatient Rehabilitation Unit. Following emergency stroke care, this is where patients -with medically complex conditions that require hospitalization -- receive intensive therapy. The expanded unit, which includes Michigan Medicine physicians, quadrupled its size last September from 6 to 24 beds. Michigan Medicine physicians and neuropsychologists provide clinical care and physician oversight on the expanded unit. Therapies, nursing, social work and case management are provided by St. Joe’s Chelsea colleagues. “St. Joe’s Chelsea has invested heavily in inpatient rehabilitation services so that members of our community have a dedicated, resource-rich environment where they can receive experienced, specialized stroke rehabilitation,” says Dr. Danko. “Our team is devoted to getting our patients back up on their feet and moving, functioning independently, and living their best life back home with their loved ones.”

28


Helmet Or No Helmet

YOU DECIDE Written by 5 Healthy Towns Staff

Almost ten years ago, a spike in head injuries occurred in Michigan due to the partial repeal of the state’s motorcycle helmet use law. Research indicates that the trend has continued. MOTORCYCLISTS TOP REASONS FOR NOT WEARING A HELMET: • Interference with driving • Uncomfortable or expensive helmets • Not liking how helmets look • Not really needed for safety reasons

Suzi Greenway enjoys a ride. - Photo credit Lucas Haines

The result is that fewer riders in motorcycle crashes are wearing helmets, and trauma centers and family members of crash victims alike are seeing the brunt of it. When medical rehabilitation specialists discuss traumatic brain injury, motorcycle injuries are common talking points. It’s a somber topic. According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) a traumatic brain injury, or TBI, is an injury that affects how the brain works. TBI is a major cause of death and disability in the US. Anyone can experience a TBI, but data suggest that motorcyclists are at greater risk for getting a TBI or having worse health outcomes after the injury. YOU CAN TAKE STEPS TO PREVENT A TBI: • Wear a helmet when you ride a motorcycle, all-terrain vehicle, snowmobile, or bike • Buckle up for every ride, in both the front and back seats • Never drive while under the influence of drugs or alcohol

Each day, approximately

166 individuals in the U.S. die of TBI related injuries from auto and motorcycle crashes, violence, and injuries.

“A brain is a terrible thing to waste,” says Suzi Greenway, manager of the Open Air Market in Stockbridge. “On July 2, 2000, I was riding my 500cc motorcycle on a back road when a deer came out of a corn field and struck my right side. The deer was instantly killed, and the force threw me over the front of the motorcycle. I remembered to “go rag doll” to minimize my impending injury, but the next thing I knew I was on my head and right shoulder traveling at about 50 mph. My motorcycle nearly hit me as it passed by. My helmet stayed intact. When I came to a stop, I knew something was very wrong. I removed my helmet and leather jacket and rolled it up to put under my head while I shouted for help! My right leg was dislocated and my ankle was shattered. My story was carried by local tv and radio, and The Lansing State Journal. The point they were all trying to make was… the helmet! Years later when the law was going to be changed making it unnecessary to wear a helmet in Michigan, I strongly advocated that helmets save lives. But the bill was signed. Today and every day, I will not ride with anyone unless they are wearing a helmet.”

Think You’ll Never Miss Seeing a Cyclist?

Hold the paper 16-18 inches from your face, cover your right eye and stare at the dot. The cyclist disappears.

29


Collaborative Alzheimer’s and dementia research in Michigan Bruno Giordani, Ph.D., has long-known the strength of Michigan-based Alzheimer’s research. U-M researcher points to the area of a teen brain that lights up when they are given a reward for winning a game.

“We have some of the most knowledgeable, capable, and creative minds here in Michigan,” he said. “They are committed to dementia science and the idea of a world without Alzheimer’s and all other dementia,” said Giordani, associate director of the Michigan Alzheimer’s Disease Center, University of Michigan psychiatry department chief of psychology and tenured professor in psychiatry, neurology, psychology and the School of Nursing. The Michigan Alzheimer’s Disease Center, established in 1984 in the department of neurology at Michigan Medicine, came to include the newly refunded Michigan Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center (MADRC) in 2016. It is funded by the National Institute on Aging (NIA). As one of 32 NIA Alzheimer’s Disease Research Centers (ADRC), it is a leading Alzheimer’s disease and related disorders research center and a leader in the area of underrepresented populations. The MADRC is unique as a tri-university research center made up of the University of Michigan, Michigan State University (MSU) and Wayne State University. As Michigan’s Alzheimer’s population continues to grow, the work of the MADRC is increasingly important. Today, 190,000 Michiganders age 65 and older have Alzheimer’s. By 2025, that is expected to reach 220,000. The Alzheimer’s Association works closely with the MADRC and its researchers, like Peter A. Lichtenberg, Ph.D., at Wayne State’s Merrill Palmer Skillman Institute and the Institute of Gerontology, and Irving Vega, Ph.D., associate professor of translational neuroscience at MSU.

30

Lichtenberg said Wayne State has a strong track record in communityengaged research. Among other research, Vega leads work on a Michigan Center for Contextual Factors in Alzheimer’s Disease grant focused on engaging underrepresented populations such as the Latino and Arab American communities in research. Latinos are about 1.5 times as likely to have Alzheimer’s as older Whites, and older African-Americans are about 2 times as likely as older Whites. Vega’s efforts are directed to empower individuals with scientific-based facts that can be used to reduce their risk of developing AD. According to Jennifer Lepard, president and CEO of the Alzheimer’s Association Michigan Chapter, there’s often a shared mission among those in the dementia community. “The only way forward in finding a prevention, treatment or cure for Alzheimer’s and other dementia is through research and collaboration,” Lepard said. “The Alzheimer’s Association currently funds 590 projects in 31 countries, which includes awards for promising research in Michigan.” Visit alz.org/research to learn more.


Michael O'Quinn, CFP®, AAMS®

IRT-1848G-A

Financial Advisor

edwardjones.com

Member SIPC

1100 S Main Street Chelsea, MI 48118 734-475-0705

31


BRAIN-HEALTHY

GIFTS Written by 5 Healthy Towns Staff

MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS

BOARD OR

CARD GAMES

OR LESSONS

Research shows that playing board and card games can help prevent cognitive decline or perhaps even help build cognitive function. Some good gift ideas could be cribbage, Carcasonne (a popular German strategy game), and of course – chess.

Do you know someone who’s always wanted to play an instrument? Turns out one or both is a great brain strengthening gift. Studies indicate that musical training can change the way the mind works and improve long-term memory.

MOTOR SKILL

BOARDS

Motor skill boards are great development tools for infants. Boards often include zippers, door handles, hinges, and shoelaces. There are plenty of templates online about how to make your own as well!

PUZZLES

Puzzles are a great way for families to get together and problem solve. You can find puzzles in any interest or even go online and have a photo turned into a puzzle and sent directly to distance family members and friends.

32

MODEL

KITS

Model kits like airplanes, cars and boats are popular with both kids and kids at heart. Building models can keep motor skills sharp and encourage learning about the past.


WELLNESS CENTER OR FITNESS

MEMBERSHIPS

ARTS AND CRAFTS

The link between physical activity and brain health is well documented. Physical activity releases endorphins and encourages cognitive and motor skill development.

SUPPLIES

You can even paint designs on small rocks & plant them around the town.

YOGA

MATS AND VIDEOS

COOKBOOKS

Volumes of cookbooks have been written that address good eating and its impact on the brain. Double down on the potential impact by including some spices or cooking together with friends and family.

Allow someone interested in yoga to practice from the comfort of their own home. A good yoga mat and fitness subscription can provide mindfulness opportunities that fit with anyone’s schedule. If you want to get guys who are skeptical of yoga engaged, try DDP Yoga. Former wrestler Diamond Dallas Page created a yoga line for everyday men who “wouldn’t be caught dead doing yoga.” 33


Hearing and Your Brain Written by Michelle Rankin, Au.D., CCC-A

THE BRAIN PROCESSES INFORMATION THROUGH ALL OF OUR SENSES AT A RAPID RATE.

Can music help us heal or restore memory? Does white noise help you sleep more soundly?

Does a particular odor make you feel sick? Or evoke a favorite childhood experience?

Do some colors calm you or excite you? Can you navigate your way back to a place you visited in the past?

34

When you are stressed, would a massage help you to relax? Does hugging or holding someone’s hand provide you with a sense of reassurance?

Are sweet foods more palatable than bitter foods? Can sugar distract you from pain and discomfort?

Think of hearing as a partnership between your ears and your brain. When you are engaged in conversation, it is your brain that processes the incoming sound from your ears which is interpreted as meaningful speech. We truly hear with our brain and our ears are the vehicle that gives our brain the information we need to do the job of listening and interpreting complex sounds into meaningful conversation. When you have hearing loss, the speech signals coming to our brain are degraded, so your brain must work harder to process and understand conversation. When your brain resources are used for understanding speech, other brain tasks such as memory and comprehension become compromised. This is called cognitive load. When you lose hearing ability over time, your brain will stop recognizing crucial sounds needed for understanding speech. This can lead to tinnitus, increased cognitive fatigue, depression, anxiety in social situations, memory loss, and even cardiovascular disease. Hearing loss is the third most chronic health condition in the United States following arthritis and heart disease. Everyone should have their hearing checked by the age of 60 to establish a baseline measurement. Risk factors for hearing loss include diabetes, noise, genetics, medications. Many organizations offer free hearing and tinnitus screening either in person or online and it only takes a few minutes. Early intervention is always the best course of action.


DR. MICHELLE RANKIN, Au.D., CCC-A Doctor of Audiology

ASK US ABOUT: Hearing loss Memory loss Tinnitus (ringing or buzzing in the ears) Wax prevention and removal Dizziness and balance concerns Hearing aids Hearing protection Communication strategies Sleep plugs, musician plugs, swim plugs, and more!

734-433-0699 Funded $1.8M in grants to 40+ local nonprofits since 1995

Faith In Action UMRC Foundation Chelsea Senior Center St. Louis Center St. Joseph Mercy Chelsea Hospital Purple Rose Theatre Silver Maples of Chelsea Chelsea District Library Chelsea School District SRSLY #WhyYouMatter Chelsea Education Foundation Western Washtenaw Area Value Express (WAVE) Chelsea Area Festivals & Events

1600 Commerce Park Drive Suite 300 | Chelsea rankinhearing.com | drrankin@rankinhearing.com

Johnson’s Services LLC Excavating - Trucking

Concrete Tear Out - Demos - Dozer Work Driveways - Footings - Grading Hole Auger - Landscaping Site Preparation

Brian Johnson

517-985-6095

Learn more or donate at:

35


The Brain AND ITS ROLE IN ADDICTION Written by 5 Healthy Towns Staff Two primary places in the brain are involved in addiction. Addiction to things from chocolate cake to alcohol. The first is the frontal cortex, which you would recognize as the large squiggly part in diagrams of the brain. The frontal cortex is responsible for making us responsible. It controls intellect, decision making, rationalization and acts as our moral compass. It is the gatekeeper, filtering out destructive behavior. Or not. The second part of the brain engaged in addiction is the mid-brain. This part of the brain is our pleasure center, intended to help us survive. It’s the part of our brain that tells us to eat, breath, procreate, and engage in other actions that make us feel good and therefore do them again. Take a deep breath. Doesn’t that feel good? And necessary to survive. This is the part of our brain that houses our dopamine reward pathway, the pathway responsible for a runner’s high. You can see the problem. Addiction is rooted in the very part of our brain designed to keep us alive. In spite of 36

the conflict between our frontal cortex, telling us our behavior isn’t good for us - and the mid-brain, convinced we need the substance to survive; the mid-brain often wins the battle by creating a sense of pleasure, eventually reducing the function of the frontal cortex. It becomes less and less interested in interfering. But the good vibes are short lived and in time dopamine is repressed, causing us to need more and more of a substance to get satisfaction. The brain is messed up, sending all the wrong signals. There is good news. The brain can rewire and heal. It takes time – many weeks of abstinence, to begin to see the light. Some people must try over and over to conquer this rewiring and different people respond to different abstinence programs, meaning you may have to try more than one approach before you find one that helps you. Without giving our frontal cortex our support, though, addiction takes a huge toll on the brain, body and psyche. It makes us ill, colors our relationships and perception of ourselves. The longer we ignore the needs of the frontal cortex the harder it becomes to make the break. If you think you need to make a break from something that has hold of your mid-brain, talk to a trusted health care advisor, friend, faith leader or anyone else you can trust to care for you. If it’s substance use disorder, see resources on Page 61 or go to onebigconnection.org.


Write a Letter – Your Brain Will Thank You Written by 5 Healthy Towns Staff

Handwriting. This dying art is somethi ng that most of us learned early in our formal education, either by using chalk on the chalkboard or pencil and lined paper. While many young students are no longer required to learn handwriting, thanks to the ubiquitous presence of computers and tablets, experts in child development are starting to advocate for the return of handwriting. Numerous studies have revealed the po sitive impact of printing and cursive handwriting on motor skill develo pment, especially at a young age. A recent study from Norway sugg ests writing by hand activates more of our brains than simply typing. The motor skills activated by moving your hand to write letters combin e with the creative aspect of writing to use both sides of our brains. Simply taking hand-written notes during class or at meetings reduce s distractions from multitasking. Learning to handwrite and then using those skills improves recall and memory, while reducing spell ing errors. People of all ages will benefit from clo sing the keyboard and picking up a pencil, pen, or crayon, and write so meone you love a handcrafted letter. Your loved ones AND your bra in will thank you.

Another positive side effect of handwriting is the break from screentime. According to the 2019-20 Michigan Profile for Healthy Youth survey, an average of almost 50% of High School students in Jackson, Ingham and Washtenaw Counties said they spend three or more hours on a computer for something that is not schoolwork. While there are many positive aspects to technology, we all need a break from time to time.

3737


Visit onebigconnection.org to learn more about: CHELSEA WELLNESS RESOURCES:

DEXTER WELLNESS RESOURCES:

GRASS LAKE WELLNESS RESOURCES:

MANCHESTER WELLNESS RESOURCES:

STOCKBRIDGE MUNITH AND UNADILLA-AREA WELLNESS RESOURCES: 38

• Big Red Barrel • Chelsea Area Historical Society • Chelsea Friends and Family Wellness Coalition • Chelsea Community Forum • Chelsea Farmers Market • Chelsea Retirement Center

• Big Red Barrel • Cancer Support Community of Greater Ann Arbor • Dexter Forum • Dexter Wellness Center • Dexter Wellness Coalition • Faith in Action

• Big Red Barrel • Grass Lake Community Events Park • Grass Lake Community Wellness Initiative • Grass Lake County Park

• Chelsea Wellness Center • Chelsea Senior Center • Eddy Discovery Center • Faith in Action • Huron Valley Area Intergroup (12-step programs) • Monitor Base Ball Club of Chelsea

• Potowatomi Mountain Bike • Association • Program to Educate All Cyclists • The Cedars of Dexter • Western Washtenaw Value Express (WAVE)

• Huron Valley Area Intergroup (12-step programs) • Mill Creek Park • Mindful Dexter • Mood Lifters • Next Steps Rec • Pinkney Recreation Area

• Grass Lake Farmers Market • Grass Lake Road Runners • Grass Lake Senior Center • Grass Lake Sports and Trails Park

• Pierce Park • St. Louis Center • The Pines Senior Apartments • Timber Creek Counseling • Waterloo Recreation Area • Western Washtenaw Value Express (WAVE)

• Jackson County 12-step programs • Jackson County Health Department • The Copper Nail • Waterloo Recreation Area

• Big Red Barrel • Chi-Bro Park • Community Resource Center • Huron Valley Area Intergroup (12-step programs) • Manchester Area Chamber of Commerce

• Manchester Community Schools • Manchester Area Historical Society • Manchester Masonic Lodge #148 • Manchester Taking Pounds Off Sensibly (TOPS) • Manchester Wellness Center

• Manchester Wellness Coalition • Riverfolk Music and Arts Organization • SRSLY Manchester • Worth Repeating • Manchester to Chelsea W.A.V.E. Connector

• Beckwith Nature Preserve • Big Red Barrel – Unadilla Township • Celebrate Recovery • Huron Valley Area Intergroup (12-step programs) • Jackson County 12-step programs

• Lions Community Park – Munith • Mike Levine Lakelands Trail State Park • Open Air Market of Stockbridge • Stockbridge-Area Wellness Coalition

• SRSLY Stockbridge • Stockbridge Community Education • Stockbridge Community Outreach • Stockbridge Wellness Center • Veterans Memorial Park


Looking for Resources You Can Trust?

One Big Connection

Introducing one stop for finding local resources • Social Support • Nutritious Food • Lifelong Learning • Mental Well-being

Find support near you today:

onebigconnection.org

877-202-2175 ORSMI.COM

NOW ACCEPTING NEW PATIENTS!

&

SERVICES

SPECIALTIES

AlterG® Anti-gravity Treadmill™ Aquatic Therapy Blood Flow Restriction (BFR) Dry Needling Graston® Technique

Massage Therapy Myofascial Decompression (Cupping) PiezoWave² MyACT Women’s Health Therapy Manual Therapy/Mobilization

&

COMMUNITY HEALTH

WELLNESS

Licensed Athletic Training Performance Coaching ORS Race Series Health & Wellness Education ORS Music Concerts

REVIEWS

JOBS

LOCATIONS

scan for ors info 39


Breathe In – Breathe Out Written by Patti Bihn, Faith Community Nurse Liaison

T

he practice of meditation is not new. In fact, it has been around for thousands of years. Meditation was originally used to deepen an understanding of the sacred and mystical forces of life. Recently, however, the public interest in mindfulness meditation has significantly increased and it is now commonly used for relaxation and stress reduction. Andrew Newberg is a central figure in the field of neurotheology (relationship between the brain and religious experience). His research looks at the neurophysiology of religion and spiritual practices, like prayer and meditation. He found that practices that evoke positive emotions, like feeling the love of God or loving-kindness meditation, will activate parts of the reward system in the brain to release dopamine and serotonin, and can affect the limbic system, the emotional center of the brain. Meditation practices that involve calming oneself down cause the heart rate and blood pressure to decrease, and stress hormones go down. Newberg relates that the more you use your brain, the better it functions. Regular use of prayer or meditation makes the practice easier and more effective. He suggests thinking of meditation like exercise. It’s an overall strengthening of important brain regions. Several studies have also shown that meditation can help improve focus and concentration and preliminary research suggests that meditation may help protect the brain against aging. While prayer and meditation is not a cure for chronic emotional and psychological disorders, it does have many extraordinary benefits for mood and overall well-being and can be added to other treatments for those with chronic disorders. In fact, it can be used by anyone to activate the chemical rewards systems in our brain.

Check out Mindful Dexter on Facebook for weekly meditation sessions virtually and in-person https://www.facebook.com/mindfuldexter/ 40


Fall 2021

Community Programs at Chelsea and Dexter Wellness Centers COMMUNITY EDUCATION

FITNESS CLASSES

Healthy Eating 101 – (6-week virtual series) Thurs 9/16 – 10/21 6:30 pm - 7:30 pm FEE $60 MEM $54 CHE There’s so much information out there about what is healthy and what is not. This class will help cut through all that and get to the basics of what is a healthy diet and what you need to improve your overall health. Discussion will also include foods that will help with inflammation, brain health, and weight loss. Note: This series is hosted virtually, you must have access to Zoom to participate.

Equestrian Pilates Tues 9/14-10/12 11:00 am – 12:00 pm FEE $65 MEM $60 Tues 10/26-11/23 11:00 am – 12:00 pm FEE $65 MEM $60

Women’s Health and Fitness Day Wed 9/29 Women workout for FREE

CHE/ DEX

Equestrian Pilates Workshop Tues 9/7 11:00 am – 12:00 pm FREE CHE Tues 10/19 11:00 am – 12:00 pm FREE CHE Be the athlete you expect your horse to be by learning the general Pilates principles to increase body awareness, improve posture, flexibility and balance. Mindfulness Meditation Workshop Sun 10/3-10/24 11:00 am – 12:30 pm FEE $60 MEM $30 DEX Matter of Balance – (8-week virtual series) Tues 10/6-12/1 1:30 pm – 3:30 pm FREE CHE Many older adults experience concerns of falling that could restrict their activities. A Matter of Balance is an award-winning program designed to reduce the fear of falling and increase activity levels. Note: This series is hosted virtually by the National Kidney Foundation, you must have access to Zoom to participate. Cooking Tips and Tricks – (6-week virtual series) Thurs 11/4-12/9 6:30 pm – 7:30 pm FEE $60 MEM $54 CHE We all know that cooking from scratch is the best way to get healthy, but it can be difficult and time consuming. This course will discuss meal planning, easy ways to cook delicious and satisfying meals, how to please the picky eater, and what exactly is a balanced meal. Discussion will also include the best snacks to fuel your day. Note: This series is hosted virtually, you must have access to Zoom to participate. Game of Go Saturdays FREE DEX Game of Go lessons and group problem-solving at 10 AM every Saturday, with paired games starting at 11 AM. Beginners and all level of players are welcome. Rock Steady Boxing Mon/Wed/Fri 1:30 pm – 3:00 pm CHE A non-contact boxing-based fitness program designed to minimize the effects of Parkinson’s disease and improve activities of daily living . Call for more information.

Chair Yoga Tues 11/2-12/14 11:30 am – 12:30 pm

FEE $54

CHE CHE

CHE

Line Dancing Thurs 9/9-10/28 1:15 pm – 2:15 pm FEE $72 Thurs11/4-12/16* 1:15 pm – 2:15 pm FEE $54

CHE CHE

BodyPump ™ Sat 9/11-10/30 Sat 11/6-12/18

7:10 am – 8:10 am FEE $72 7:10 am – 8:10 am FEE $63

CHE CHE

Lunar Flow Yoga Wed 9/8-10/27 5:30 pm – 6:30 pm FEE $72 Wed 11/3-12/22* 5:30 pm – 6:30 pm FEE $63

CHE CHE

*No class 11/25

*No Class 11/24

Pilate Reformer Thurs 9/2-9/23 8:30 am – 9:30 am Thurs 9/30-10/21 8:30 am – 9:30 am Thurs 10/28-11/18 8:30 am – 9:30 am Thurs 12/2-12/23 8:30 am – 9:30 am Sat 9/4-9/25 10:00 am – 11:00 am Sat 10/2-10/23 10:00 am – 11:00 am Sat 10/30-11/20 10:00 am – 11:00 am

FEE $112 MEM $100 FEE $112 MEM $100 FEE $112 MEM $100 FEE $112 MEM $100 FEE $112 MEM $100 FEE $112 MEM $100 FEE $112 MEM $100

Pickleball Intro Class Wed/Fri 9/15-9/24 9:00 am – 10:00 am FEE $40 Wed/Fri 10/6-10/15 5:00 pm – 6:00 pm FEE $40

DEX DEX

Pickleball Intermediate Class Wed/Fri 10/6-10/15 9:00 am – 10:00 am FEE $40 Wed/Fri 11/3-11/19 9:00 am – 10:00 am FEE $40

DEX DEX

DEX DEX DEX DEX DEX DEX DEX

SMALL GROUP PERSONAL TRAINING Strengthening Your Posture Tues 9/7-9/28 11:00 am – 12:00 pm FEE $56 MEM $52 CHE Tues 10/5-10/26 11:00 am – 12:00 pm FEE $56 MEM $52 CHE Tues 11/2-11/23 11:00 am – 12:00 pm FEE $56 MEM $52 CHE R

TRX Functional Training Fri 9/10-9/24 9:00 am – 10:00 am FEE $45 MEM $37.50 DEX Fri 10/8-10/29 9:00 am – 10:00 am FEE $60 MEM $50 DEX

41 41


HUMOR and the

BRAIN Written by 5 Healthy Towns Staff

E.R. Doctor: How are things with that kid who swallowed the roll of quarters? Nurse: No change yet.

Laughter brings about physiologic changes in nearly all body systems, including the central nervous system, which includes the brain. Because you breathe deeply when you laugh, you increase oxygenation to the brain. Giving your brain more ‘air’ helps you relax. It also releases dopamine, a chemical designed to make us want to do something, again. Because it feels good. Laughter also increases other chemicals like endorphins, another ‘feel good’ chemical responsible for the runner’s high. Laughter can increase pain tolerance, reduce stress, anxiety, and agitation. It can improve cognitive function, like recall, and increase learning. In one study, Parkinson’s patients who participated in comedy improv training had subjective improvement in symptoms. Laughter is a scientifically supported, additive therapy in the treatment of depression. Recent experiments using laughter and electroencephalograms (EEG) demonstrated an interesting fact. While most emotional responses occur in a specific part of the brain, laughter 42

creates electrical currents in many regions of the brain. One part of the brain (left cortex) analyses the structure and words of the joke. The right cortex does intellectual analysis to help you ‘get’ the joke. The entire frontal lobe becomes very active. Brainwaves then spread to the occipital lobe (back of the brain) where our brain processes visual signals (think about how we ‘get a visual’ when we hear a joke). Then the motor parts of the brain trigger our physical responses like laughter, smiles and sometimes, groans. Laughter is so impactful in healing there is an American Association for Therapeutic Humor and an International Society of Humor Studies. What are we waiting for? Let’s throw back our heads & have a good laugh, even if we are alone in our homes. It can’t hurt! Are you interested in learning more about laughter, the brain and healing? You might want to start with Patch Adams. Yes. He’s a real guy! Check it out: www.patchadams.org/


FUNDRAISING KICKS OFF

OCTOBER 1st

& ENDS DURING HALF TIME AT

CHELSEA vs. DEXTER FOOTBALL GAME

OCTOBER 22, 2021

FROM PAYROLL AND BOOKKEEPING TO EXPERT TAX PREPARATION AND ADVICE, H&R BLOCK IS READY TO WORK FOR YOU.

7043 DEXTER ANN ARBOR RD DEXTER, MI 48130 734-426-4313

110 E GRAND RIVER AVE STE 3 WILLIAMSTON, MI 48895 517-655-8485

TO DONATE TEXT

TO 44321

TO 44321

BULLDOGS

Put our expertise to work for you. Come visit or call us today.

1171 S MAIN ST STE 3 CHELSEA, MI 48118 734-475-2752

TO DONATE TEXT

dreads

CEF & EFD enhance educational experiences by financing projects that cannot otherwise be funded by the school district. 109 N CLINTON STOCKBRIDGE, MI 49285 517-851-8739

ChelseaEducationFoundation.org

EFDexter.org

OBTP#B13696 ©2017 HRB Tax Group, Inc.

59

SportPort now available to kids ages 5-18 Learn how you can borrow free sports equipment at

Come play this May!

5healthytowns.org/sportport

43


MUSIC & MEMORY Written by Dr. Michelle Rankin , Au.D.

Music can activate more parts of the brain than any other stimuli we experience. It is the last part of our brain that Alzheimer/dementia can touch. When music has meaning to us and is attached to a particular memory it acts like a gateway to stimulate pathways in the brain that are otherwise unreachable. It is permanently recorded in our motions and emotions like a back door to our memories that are hidden by dementia. MUSIC & MEMORY® is a non-profit organization that helps individuals with a wide range of cognitive and physical conditions to engage with the world, ease pain, and reclaim their humanity using personalized music. Millions of aging Americans face cognitive and physical difficulties. Despite the best efforts of loved ones, their lives often lack meaning, spontaneity, choice, and reliable social interaction. But there’s reason to hope for a better life as we age. Music & Memory can help people in nursing homes, care organizations and at home who suffer from a wide range of cognitive and physical challenges to find renewed meaning and connection in their lives through the gift of personalized music. You can find detailed information about the program at www.musicandmemory.org

I could while away the hours Conferrin’ with the flowers Consultin’ with the rain

Chelsea Senior Center has introduced the Memory Café for individuals with dementia and their caregivers. A memory café is a safe space for individuals with brain changes and their care partners to have fun together. The next Memory Café is October 13. For more information, call the Connections Café at 734-475-9242. Visit www.OneBigConnection.org to learn more about local support resources for individuals with dementia and their caregivers.

And my head, I’d be scratchin’ While my thoughts were busy hatchin’ If I only had a brain I’d unravel every riddle For any individual In trouble or in pain With the thoughts you’ll be thinkin’ You could be another Lincoln If you only had a brain

44 44


of contact with the outside world. The effects on their brains, it turned out, were substantial. Structural MRI performed by neuroscientists at the Max Planck Institute for Human Development before and after the trip showed anatomical changes to the dentate gyrus, a region of the brain that feeds information into the hippocampus and is associated with learning and memory; the crew members’ dentate gyruses had shrunk by an average of around 7 percent. 9 The crew members also had reduced blood levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a protein involved in stress regulation and memory, and they performed worse on tests of spatial awareness and attention than they had before they left. The participants in this study were contending with more than just social isolation during their expedition, making it hard to know whether the observed brain changes are linked to lack of social contact as opposed to circadian disruption or some other aspect of their experience. But researchers studying social isolation and loneliness in the general population are also beginning to document differences in brain

The Impact Of Loneliness On Brain Function Written by 5 Healthy Towns Staff

Yossi Ghinsberg, an Israeli adventurer and author who survived weeks alone in the Amazon, said that loneliness was what he structure that could help reveal biological mechanisms at suffered from most and that he had created play. (See illustration below.) imaginary friendsattothe keep company. Sandra Düzel, a neurobiologist samehimself Max Planck InstiThat may remind youAntarctic of Tom study), Hanksrecently friend tute (though not a collaborator on the set out to study such differences in more than 300 people par‘Wilson’ in the movie Castaway. ticipating in a longitudinal project called the Berlin Aging Study. Using MRI toThis mapdiagram the volume of the brain’s various regions, explains why humans, social Düzel and her creatures colleagues found that, regardless of their level of at heart, need connections. The social contact, people who scored high on the UCLA loneliness parts of our brain controlling decisions and scale tended to have smaller gray matter volumes in a handful of behavior (prefrontal cortex); learning and regions.10 Those areas included the hippocampus and the amygand dala, known formemory its role in(hippocampus); emotion processing. Theprocessing findings don’t information (amygdala) are impacted when demonstrate that loneliness causes shrinkage of these brain structures, Düzel writes in anlonely email to Scientist, but isolated. the researchwe are orThe unexpectedly ers are considering a lack of social loneliThinkboth about that. If westimulation are lonelyand it impacts ness-induced stress as possible contributing factors. the way we make decisions, behave, how Recent research in mice, which, like humans, are social we learn, the of our memory and organisms, supports a role forquality social interaction in maintainhow we process information. It is clearly ing normal brain structure and function, and hints at possible molecular mechanisms. One study, for to example, important for us to 2018 be connected others

and make sure others are connected, too.

THE ISOLATED BRAIN Studies of animals and people experiencing isolation have identified several brain structures that appear to be affected by a lack of social interaction. Although these studies can’t identify causal relationships—and don’t always agree with one another—they shine a light on some of the mechanisms by which physical isolation, or feelings of loneliness, could impair brain function and cognition.

PREFRONTAL CORTEX: In some studies, people who are lonely have been found to have reduced brain volumes in the prefrontal cortex, a region important in decision making and social behavior, although other research suggests this relationship might be mediated by personality factors. Rodents that have been isolated from their conspecifics show dysregulated signaling in the prefrontal cortex. HIPPOCAMPUS: People and other animals experiencing isolation may have smallerthan-normal hippocampi and reduced concentrations of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), both features associated with impaired learning and memory. Some studies indicate that levels of the stress hormone cortisol, which affects and is regulated by the hippocampus, are higher in isolated animals.

AMYGDALA: About a decade ago, researchers found a correlation between the size of a person’s social network and the volume of their amygdalae, two almond-shaped brain areas associated with processing emotion. More-recent evidence suggests the amygdalae are smaller in people who are lonely.

45


Ma for

Get

Dr. Taylor gets his daily dose of Vitamin D

For more information and citations visit

Seasonal affective disorder (SAD) is a relatively common problem that causes sluggishness, sad mood and withdrawal (sometimes oversleeping, weight gain, difficultly concentrating), particularly in the fall and winter months when daylight hours are short.

srslycoalition.org

Seasonal Affective Disorder – Written by Charlie Taylor, PhD

Scientists think that SAD is caused by short daylight hours disturbing the brain’s day/night rhythm. This can decrease the effect of brain chemicals such as serotonin and dopamine that normally keep us alert, awake and motivated. Low levels of vitamin D (normally manufactured in the skin by sunlight) also may contribute. SAD can be treated with medicines such as serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs like Zoloft® or Celexa®), by exposure to bright light in the early morning, and by regular strenuous exercise. If you are a SAD person, consider using a bright light a few feet from your face for about 30 minutes first thing each morning. Therapy lights can be found at most online stores. Moving fast on a Lake Michigan beach.

46


Marijuana is now legal arijuana is now legal for adults in Michigan. r adults in Michigan. Get the Facts.

t the Facts.

• Adults must be 21 or older to use or buy recreational marijuana.

• Adults must be 21 or older to use or buy recreational marijuana.

• It is illegal to drive under the influence • It is illegal to drive under the influenceItofismarijuana. recreational marijuan • illegal to giveFor more persons under the age ofinformation 21. to • It is illegal to give recreational marijuana and citations visit persons under the age of 21.

srslycoalition.org 775 South Main Street Chelsea, MI 48118

Protect our youth by learning and talking to by learning and talking to them about the facts. Harmful effects on teenagers: srslycoalition.org them about the facts. Harmful effects on teenagers:

For more information 775 South Main Street and citations Chelsea, MI 48118 Protect our visit youth

Marijuana can be Marijuana be harmful tocan youth harmful to youth because the human because the human brain is not fully brain is notuntil fully the developed developed until the mid 20s and because mid 20s and because marijuana potency marijuana potency has increased has increased significantly. significantly.

When used by teenagers, marijuana can reduce thinking, memory, andused learning functionsmarijuana and affects thethinking, brain builds connections When by teenagers, canhow reduce memory, areas necessary functions. effects on andbetween learningthe functions and affects for howthese the brain builds The connections these the abilities last a long timefunctions. or even be permanent. between areasmay necessary for these The effects on these abilities may last a long time or even be permanent. Youth marijuana use is associated with increased risk of developing depression and marijuana suicidal behavior later in life, in the risk absence of a premorbid condition. Youth use is associated witheven increased of developing depression and suicidal behavior later in life, even in the absence of a premorbid condition.

Evidence suggests that marijuana use is likely to increase the risk of developing schizophrenia, other and social Evidence suggests that marijuana usepsychoses, is likely to increase the anxiety risk of disorders. developing schizophrenia, other psychoses, and social anxiety disorders. Marijuana can be addictive and research shows that Marijuana can be addictive and research shows that 1 in 6 individuals who use marijuana before the age of 1 in18 6 individuals who use marijuana before the age of will become addicted. 18 will become addicted. Youth can accidentally ingest marijuana that looks like regular candy Youth can accidentally ingest marijuana looks like regular candy or food. Michigan has seen a surge that in marijuana-related poison control or food. has a surge in pets. marijuana-related poison control calls,Michigan especially forseen children and calls, especially for children and pets.

775 South Main Street, Chelsea, MI 48118

47


Locals are caught making healthy choices all around our communities ...

Caught IN THE

ACT

Thank you to our community members who submitted a photo for the Winter Wellness Photo Challenge!

Submitted by Heather Trudeau

Submitted by Robin Bergman 48

Submitted by Douglas Jackson

Submitted by Mary Crisenbery


Submitted by Debbie Sullivan

Submitted by Anonymous

Submitted by Ashley Elliston-Cowher

Submitted by Joanne Rau

Submitted by Natalie Jentzen

Submitted by Santa Claus 49


Busy Bodies Strengthen Brains Written by Ruth Habrecht

Preschool motor play requires a great deal of communication with peers. Children use more words and complex sentences during play than they do in other types of classroom activities (Cohen & Uhry, 2007). The sheer practice of language in play is likely to promote communicative competence. When children move, they act out with their bodies, the structure and meaning of words and sentences. Children who are throwing a ball are essentially making physical statements that include all the grammatical parts of a sentence—an agent (the child), an action (throw), and an object (the ball). When they intentionally cause an event to occur with their movements, they are physically making a causal statement: “When you throw the ball hard, it goes really far.” Preschoolers moving in BobALoo activities

When children move through a tunnel, under a climber, or over a bridge, they are physically expressing prepositions. In this sense, movement helps lay the foundation for the understanding of word meaning. The relationship between language and physical action can be strengthened, from this view, when adults overlay words and phrases across children’s activities (“When you threw the ball harder, look how far it went.”). More important, motor activities should be challenging enough that children can experience accomplishments congruent with their abilities. In Chelsea and Dexter, Bob-a-loo activities and interactions promote motor abilities that aim to strike an ideal balance between adult encouragement and involvement and autonomous play. Experiences are designed to promote self-motivation, instead of always including external rewards and praise.

50 50


Root for the Home Team Written by 5 Healthy Towns Staff

For more opportunities to get your fandom on, visit the links to our local school sport schedules. CHELSEA HIGH SCHOOL chelseabulldogs.net DEXTER HIGH SCHOOL dexterathletics.com/main/calendar GRASS LAKE HIGH SCHOOL grasslakewarriors.com MANCHESTER HIGH SCHOOL sites.google.com/mcs.k12.mi.us/ manchester-athletics/athleticcalendar STOCKBRIDGE HIGH SCHOOL stockbridgeathletics.com

If you’ve cheered on most of Detroit’s professional sports teams for the past few years, the old adage that ‘misery loves company’ hits a little closer to home. It might also be more accurate than we realize. Whether it’s cheering on our team at the stadium or rink, or with friends and family at home, we are engaging in an activity where your body releases dopamine into your system. When we share the excitement of a big win with others, the dopamine provides a feel-good response. What keeps Lions fans coming back year after year? After all, most of us wouldn’t order food from the same restaurant if they messed up our order 10 out of 16 times. The answer is two-fold. First the dopamine comes into play even if your team isn’t on their way to a championship. If there is the hope of winning, we can receive some of that dopamine. That means when the Lions make a play or Red Wings score a goal, we feel our team has a chance to win, and we feel good.

The other – and perhaps more important reason – is that sense of community that sports fans experience. The tradition of gathering around to watch or listen to a game with our families and friends provide us with that belonging that most of us crave. It’s also one of the few ways that people moving to a new area can feel like they are part of the social process. Going to a local establishment to watch the local team or heading to the high school gym to cheer for your children as they compete with their new classmates are ways in which we connect with strangers over a common bond. By the way, this sense of community is not exclusive to sports. It can be going to a concert with 10,000 people to sing the same songs or to the movie theatre to cheer on the hero of the day. These outlets provide a sense of belonging and community. So, cheer on, 5 Healthy Towns! And don’t worry Lions fans… there is always next year, right? 51


The Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) Study Written by Angela M. Tiberia, MPH The teen years are a time of major change. This is when teens are exposed to new experiences that can shape who they become. Parents have growing concerns about how the lifestyles and experiences of their children will shape their future. There are so many unknowns.

Nearly 12,000 youths from all over the country joined the study when they were 9 or 10 years old and are being followed over the course of the next 12 years. ABCD researchers are still regularly collecting information to answer parents’ concerns about how the lifestyles and experiences of their children will shape their future.

It’s common for parents to wonder: • Is it okay for my child to pay video games so much? • Does social media put too much pressure on my children? • My child is sadder and more irritable lately. What are the warning signs for childhood depression?

Five years after being in the study, the kids are now entering their teenage years. Researchers are using the information already collected to explore some preliminary findings such as: • The relationship between sleep problems at 9 and 10 and depression one year later, especially for girls. • Medications for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) may lower suicide risk in children with major behavioral problems. • Kids that are allowed to sip alcohol are more likely to think that alcohol has positive effects. They are more likely to have interest in alcohol, start drinking sooner, and also drink more heavily.

In 2016, researchers at the University of Michigan launched the biggest long-term research project to study child health and brain development in hopes of answering some of these questions. It’s called the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development Study (ABCD). The goal of this 12-year study is to learn more about what helps and what gets in the way of the health and well-being of teens. The study is particularly interested in how the growing teen’s activities affect brain development. Then further, if these potential effects might change their health and behavior as adults.

52

In the years to come, the ABCD team, its amazing study participants, and many others, hope that this study empowers researchers, doctors, parents, and other health professionals all over the world to discover new ways that will help the next generation have a bright and healthy future. To learn more, including the latest research findings, visit abcd.org.

A child volunteer shows what it’s like to have a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scan – the machine that takes pictures of the brain “at work” when you perform a task.


The Brain — is wider than the Sky — For — put them side by side — The one the other will contain With ease — and You — beside — The Brain is deeper than the sea — For — hold them — Blue to Blue — The one the other will absorb — As Sponges — Buckets — do … The Brain is just the weight of God — For — Heft them — Pound for Pound — And they will differ — if they do — As Syllable from Sound — ~ by Emily Dickinson

53 53


IMPORTANCE OF DOWN TIME Written by 5 Healthy Towns Staff

Day to day we find our time being divided into smaller and smaller pieces. Add in a healthy dash of a global pandemic and for many of us, 2020 became an act of survival. Now, as we return to workplaces, and our children have returned to school, it’s an opportune time to take a moment to reflect on your priorities and set goals that help keep you and your mind healthy. Today, more than 50% of all children report having two working parents compared to 25% of households in the late 1960’s. Additionally, shifting work patterns, like working remotely, often impact our ability to disconnect from work. The boundaries become blurred, and work may interfere more frequently with our personal lives. As you can imagine, academic research supports what we might assume – when we don’t disconnect from our work, relationships, health, and happiness suffer. It’s important to understand the benefits of down time and use your down time effectively so that you feel well rested when you return to work. Ever find yourself going around in circles when it comes to problem solving? Sometimes our brains need a break from solving the same problems in order to process problems differently. New information can come to light when you step away and come back to it. 54

Each day you deal with tasks that require you to think critically, communicate with care, and interpret important information. Staying focused on a particular task and proactively driving processes is known as executive control. Maintaining this type of rigorous focus requires a great deal of physical, emotional, and mental energy. When you relax, consider activities like reading a book or watching a movie. When others create the environment that you experience, it gives your mind a chance to rest. Unplug & be present in the moment Technology allows us to be connected 24/7. How often do you find yourself distracted by a notification on your phone? Or how often do you go to check the time on your phone, get sidetracked, put your phone down, and realize you still don’t know what time it is? Exercise and meditate Work-life balance is about dedicating time to the activities that are important to us. Even at our busiest we find time to eat and sleep but we can often sacrifice exercise to prioritize work. Physical activity boosts endorphins that improve mood and help us sleep.


Whether you practice yoga or other meditative techniques, or simply find 5 minutes to take a few deep breaths, creating mindful moments each day help us to lower stress, and better manage anxiety over the long-term. What Can you Do? 4 Identify what is important to you and how you want to make the best use of your time. Sometimes, it’s ok to

SHIRLEY BITTERS, Consultant

(734) 678-3165 Discoverytoys.com/SBitters

say no. 4 Silence notifications after a certain time each evening.

Adult Learners Institute of Chelsea, Michigan, Inc.

4 Plan time to take a walk or try finding 15 minutes each day for mindful meditation.

We are about life-long learning!

4 Set limits for yourself and stick to them. 4 Don’t respond to emails when you’re spending time with friends and family.

ALI IS OFFERING ZOOM AND IN-PERSON CLASSES THROUGH NOVEMBER 2021

4 Turn off your phone when possible. There are great resources to be found online, and in this magazine!

For more information visit:

AdultLearnersInstitute.org Or call 734-292-5540

From our kitchen to yours. Cornman Farms Retail Shop Dexter, MI Available for preorder only

shop.zingermanscornmanfarms.com 55


Foods linked to better brainpower tend to contain one or more of the following: Antioxidants, B vitamins, Healthful fats and Omega fatty acids. Walnuts are an excellent source of protein and healthy fats.

Healthy

Salmon Patties

Leafy greens are rich in nutrients like vitamin K, lutein, folate, and beta carotene.

Fatty fish are abundant sources of omega-3 fatty acids.

Berries are rich with flavonoids which give berries all of their brilliant colors.

Dark Chocolate Covered

Raspberries Ingredients 6 Ounces dark chocolate 1-2 pints fresh raspberried Paper candy cups Directions Place clean, dry fresh raspberries in a paper candy cups. Set aside. Place chocolate in a glass bowl and place over a pan with hot, barely simmering, water. Stir until melted and if using couverture chocolate heat to 113F degrees. Remove from heat and stir until the temperature drops to around 86F degrees. The chocolate should become thick at this point. Drizzle cooled chocolate over raspberries. Chill until chocolate is firm Nutrition Amount Per Serving (1 g) Calories 76 Fat 4.1g Saturated Fat 2.5g Trans Fat 0g Polyunsaturated Fat 0g Monounsaturated Fat 0g , Cholesterol 0mg Sodium 0mg; Potassium 0mg Carbohydrates 10.3g Fiber 1.4g Sugar 8.5g Protein 0.1g Vitamin A 0IU Vitamin C 0mg Calcium 0mg Iron 0mg Recipe from SimplySoGood.com - Janet Barton

56

Ingredients 1 large egg 1 (15-ounce) can salmon drained (wild caught if possible) 1/2 cup Italian seasoned dry whole wheat bread crumbs 1/4 cup nonfat plain Greek yogurt or sour cream 1 1/2 teaspoons Dijon mustard 1 teaspoon white vinegar or lemon juice 1 teaspoon onion powder 1 teaspoon garlic powder 1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper 2 tablespoons finely chopped fresh parsley plus additional for serving 1–2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil for cooking the patties Directions In the bottom of a large mixing bowl, lightly beat the egg. Add the drained salmon to the bowl. Add the breadcrumbs, Greek yogurt, Dijon, white vinegar, onion powder, garlic powder and cayenne. With a fork lightly mix to combine, breaking apart the salmon further. Gently stir in the parsley. Scoop 1/3 cup of the mixture and shape into 6 patties that are about ½ inch thick. Arrange on plate. In a large cast-iron or similar sturdy bottomed skillet, heat 1 tablespoon of the oil over medium. Swirl to coat. Brown the patties on both sides until the outsides are very deep golden brown and the patties are cooked through, about 5 to 6 minutes total. When flipping the patties, be very gentle and use a long, flexible spatula, such as a fish spatula. Top with Greek yogurt, a squeeze of lemon, and a sprinkle of fresh parsley. Nutrition SERVING: 1 patty Calories: 177kcal, Carbohydrates: 8g, Protein: 20g, Fat: 7g, Saturated Fat: 1g, Cholesterol: 87mg, Sodium: 432mg, Potassium: 289mg, Fiber: 1g, Sugar: 1g, Vitamin A: 140IU, Vitamin C: 0.2mg, Calcium: 234mg, Ir on: 1.2mg Recipe from Well Plated By Erin Clarke


Rosemary

Berry Spinach

Spiced

Salad

Walnuts Ingredients 2 cups walnut halves Olive Oil Cooking spray 2 teaspoons dried rosemary, crushed 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt 1/4 to 1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper

Ingredients 6 cups baby spinach 1/2 cup raspberries 1/3 cup Feta cheese 1/4 cup pecans

Directions Place walnuts in a small bowl. Spritz with cooking spray. Add the seasonings; toss to coat. Place in a single layer on a baking sheet.

Instructions Add the spinach, strawberries, raspberries, blueberries, red onion, feta and pecans to a large mixing bowl and toss together. Serve the salad with the raspberry vinaigrette dressing.

Bake at 350° for 10 minutes. Serve warm, or cool completely and store in an airtight container. Nutrition: 1/4 cup: 166 calories, fat: 17g (2g saturated fat), cholesterol: 0, sodium: 118mg, carbohydrate: 4g (1g sugars, 2g fiber), protein: 4g. Recipe adapted from Tasteofhome.com - Renee Ciancio

Nutrition Calories: 283kcal, Carbohydrates: 16.7g, Protein: 10.2g, Fat: 20.6g, Saturated Fat: 6g, Cholesterol: 13.7mg | Sodium: 295mg | Fiber: 7.2g | Sugar: 6.2g Recipe adapted from Downshiftology.com – Lisa Bryan

Raspberry

Berry-and-

Vinaigrette

Beet Green Smoothie

Ingredients 1 1/2 cups unsweetened almond milk 1/4 cup fresh orange juice (from 1 orange) 2 cups stemmed coarsely chopped beet greens (from 1 bunch) 1 1/2 cups frozen mixed berries 1 medium raw red beet, peeled and cut into wedges (about 7 oz.) 1 medium frozen banana, broken into large pieces Directions Place almond milk and juice in a blender; top with beet greens, berries, beet, and banana. Start blender at lowest setting and gradually increase to one-third power; process for 30 seconds. Increase to half power; process 30 seconds or until very smooth. Let mixture stand 1 minute before serving. Nutrition: Calories: 84, Fat: 1.5g, Satfat: 0.1g, Monofat: 1g, Polyfat: 0.1g, Protein: 2g, Carbohydrate: 18g, Fiber: 4g, Cholesterol: 0.0mg, Iron: 1mg, Sodium: 127mg, Calcium: 111mg. Recipe from CookingLight.com - Hanna Klinger

1 cup strawberries 1/2 cup blueberries 1/3 cup red onion 1/2 recipe Raspberry Vinaigrette

Ingredients 1 1/2 cups raspberries 1/2 cup olive oil 1/4 cup red wine vinegar 1 small shallot 1 tsp Dijon mustard 1/4 tsp salt pepper Instructions Add all ingredients to a food processor and blend for 30 seconds. You can store this raspberry vinaigrette for up to a week in the fridge. Nutrition Calories: 90kcal, Carbohydrates: 2g, Fat: 9g, Saturated Fat: 1g, Sodium: 54mg, Potassium: 29mg, Fiber: 1g, Vitamin A: 5IU, Vitamin C: 4.1mg, Calcium: 4mg, Iron: 0.2mg Recipe from Downshiftology.com – Lisa Bryan

5757


CONNECTED CALENDAR SEPTEMBER 2021 - APRIL 2022

Chelsea • Dexter • Grass Lake • Manchester • Stockbridge

FARMERS MARKETS Chelsea Farmers Market May through October Wednesdays, 1 – 5pm, Chelsea State Bank (Old US 12 Location) Saturdays, 8 am – 1 pm Palmer Commons – 222 Main Street Chelsea Winter Farmers Market chelseafarmersmkt.org Dexter Winter Marketplace dextermarket.com Open Air Market of Stockbridge, May – October F r i d a y s , 4 – 7 p m , S t o c k b r i d g e To w n Square f a c e b o o k . c o m /o p e n a i r m a r ke t o f s t o c k b r i d g e

With the uncertainty of the COVID-19 situation and events in and around the 5 Healthy Towns Area, we’ve included links to partners who have listed events in past editions of Connected. We invite you to visit them for the latest details. 58

Check 5healthytowns.org and follow 5HF on Facebook for the latest additions or cancellations


Grass Lake Road Runners running group Saturday mornings, 7:50 am meet at Roaming Goat Café facebook.com/GLRoadrunners C h e l s e a C o m m u n i t y Fo r u m 2nd Saturday of the month, 9 am, see website for meeting details h t t p s : //s i t e s . g o o g l e . c o m /s i t e / chelseamiforum/ D ex t e r Fo r u m 1st and 3rd Saturdays of the month, 8:30 am, see website for meeting details dexterforum.com

AREA SENIOR CENTERS Chelsea Senior Center Chelseaseniors.org Dexter Senior Center dexterseniors.org/

S R S LY Chelsea – srslychelsea.org D ex t e r – s r s l y d ex t e r. o r g M a n c h e s t e r – s r s l y m a n c h e s t e r. o r g Stockbridge – srslystockbridge.org

Grass Lake Senior Center

Mindful Dexter • 2nd Saturday and 3rd Thursday of the month facebook.com/mindfuldexter

council-inc/

grasslakeseniors.org; facebook.com/glseniorcenter Manchester Area Senior Citizens Council blueprintforaging.org/manchester-area-senior-citizensfacebook.com/groups/manchesterseniors/

5 HEALTHY TOWNS WELLNESS CENTERS Chelsea Wellness Center - Chelseawellness.org Dexter Wellness Center - Dexterwellness.org Manchester Wellness Center - https://sites.google.com/ mcs.k12.mi.us/manchesterwellnesscenter/home* Stockbridge Wellness Center - Stockbridgewellness.org *Manchester Wellness Center is owned and operated by Manchester Community Schools with financial support from 5 Healthy Towns Foundation.

59


LIBRARIES Chelsea District Library events V i s i t c h e l s e a d i s t r i c t l i b r a r y. o r g f o r m o r e information and to register for events Dexter District Library events V i s i t d ex t e r. l i b . m i . u s f o r m o r e i n f o r m a t i o n a n d t o register for events. Grass Lake Branch of Jackson District Library events, call 517.522.8211 to RSVP V i s i t m y j d l . c o m /g r a s s - l a ke / f o r m o r e o f f e r i n g s Manchester District Library V i s i t M a n c h e t e r l i b r a r y. i n f o f o r a l l o f f e r i n g s Stockbridge Branch Capital Area District Library https://www.cadl.org/about/our-locations/stockbridge Adult Learners Institute Register for online classes here – adultlearnersinstitute.org Riverfolk Music and Arts rivermusicandarts.org Wine, Women and Shopping www.shopchelseamich.com Wa s h t e n aw C o u n t y Pa r k s a n d R e c r e a t i o n Commission www.washtenaw.org/288/Parks-Recreation

COMMUNITY WELLNESS COALITION MEETINGS

Email Lori@5healthytowns.org for more information on locations or virtual meeting links. Chelsea Friends & Family Wellness Coalition, December 2nd 2021 and March 3rd, 2022, D e x t e r W e l l n e s s C o a l i t i o n , 2 n d Tu e s d a y o f t h e month, 5:30 pm Grass Lake Community Wellness Initiative, 3rd Monday of the month, 6 pm M a n c h e s t e r W e l l n e s s C o a l i t i o n , 4 t h Tu e s d a y o f the month, 12 pm, S t o c k b r i d g e A r e a W e l l n e s s C o a l i t i o n , 3 r d Tu e s d a y of the month, 4:30 pm Go to www.5healthytowns.org to check scheduling.

FRIENDS OF WATERLOO/WATERLOO NATURAL HISTORY ASSOCIATION

at Eddy Discovery Center A d v a n c e d r e g i s t ra t i o n r e q u i r e d f o r a l l eve n t s ; w n h a . o r g Call 734.475.3170 to registerwnha.org

Check 5healthytowns.org and follow 5HF on Facebook for the latest additions or cancellations

60


ST. JOSEPH MERCY – CHELSEA Breastfeeding Basics and Beyond 9/14, 9/21, 9/28, 10/12, 10/19, 10/26, 12/7, 12/14, 12/21 - 6 pm 11/6, 11/13, 11/20 – 10 am stjoeshealth.org/breastfeedingclass For other events please visit Stjoeschelsea.org w w w. f a c e b o o k . c o m /s t j o e s c h e l s e a

12-STEP PROGRAMS L i v i n g s t o n a n d Wa s h t e n aw C o u n t i e s hvai.org/index.html Jackson County area32d2.org Chelsea AA Monday Night, 8:30 pm Chelsea, United Methodist Church (zoom) To d a y G r o u p o f C h e l s e a Saturdays, 9 am United Methodist Church (zoom) AA Forgiveness for Ladies 6 : 3 0 p m , Tu e s d a y, S t . J o s e p h P a r i s h H a l l , D ex t e r, ( z o o m ) AA Women of Substance 6 : 3 0 p m , T h u r s d a y, Dexter United Methodist Church Outside, bring chairs and masks. Celebrate Recovery Crossroads Community Church, Stockbridge, Thursdays, 7 pm, COVID-19 compliant meetings - c3stockbridge.org Celebrate Recovery Faith Baptist Church of Chelsea fbcchelsea.com 61


Brain Health Word Search X

V

Z

M

Q

G

M

X

L

N

Y

G

Q

R

S

W

H

Y

E

O

W

U

E

Q

S

D

O

O

W

U

A

F

O

R

O

L

T

O

K

O

Q

P

S

S

W

J

G

F

J

T

K

N

E

H

C

F

E

Y

P

G

G

Z

I

D

B

M

J

S

N

S

S

F

B

M

I

G

Q

W

Y

P

W

B

C

L

V

E

N

L

V

T

E

Q

P

D

A

O

B

N

I

M

W

X

R

S

P

W

O

R

S

A

S

J

Z

A

L

P

L

O

R

R

Q

H

E

G

J

T

I

A

V

E

I

E

V

R

-

D

U

I

H

E

R

H

X

Y

V

F

T

S

I

R

C

K

R

K

I

C

E

T

A

A

B

E

E

S

U

Y

A

P

C

P

R

Q

Q

-

N

C

B

I

B

D

F

D

W

R

G

B

T

B

C

L

E

A

C

C

T

W

E

R

Y

I

C

Y

M

O

B

G

I

E

U

B

X

R

W

H

E

N

R

T

Y

N

O

N

V

Y

U

A

D

R

A

Z

E

R

X

O

R

O

R

U

E

G

Y

D

D

M

D

L

E

R

F

Q

-

F

K

C

A

M

I

N

P

E

A

V

A

R

W

B

M

I

N

K

Y

R

C

O

C

V

E

E

M

U

I

V

J

C

S

N

E

E

R

G

R

U

K

L

T

R

S

I

J

N

R

P

F

P

O

Y

D

S

J

H

O

O

E

A

I

F

I

S

H

P

A

S

X

Z

T

V

A

N

Q

B

M

V

O

T

O

N

U

N

L

Q

S

Q

J

T

J

A

A

T

X

N

E

L

Z

E

N

G

O

Y

R

H

J

F

H

I

C

Y

Z

N

S

V

M

O

U

K

R

I

B

M

L

B

I

O

Y

R

C

U

S

R

W W

T

W

I

W

J

O

D

C

G

U

NUTRITION REST BLUEBERRIES DARK-CHOCOLATE RASPBERRIES

62 62

FISH NUTRITION AVOCADO NUTSREST GREENS BLUEBERRIES MEMORY-EXERCISES

DARK-CHOCOLATE RASPBERRIES FISH AVOCADO

EXERCISE NUTS SOCIAL-INTERACTION GREENS READING MEDITATION MEMORY-EXERCISES

EXERCISE SOCIAL-INTERACTION READING MEDITATION


LUNG CANCER TESTED JEFFREY. He Found Advanced Care and Hope Close to Home.

H enry F ord C anCer I nstItute

JEFFREY CLARK Lung Cancer Survivor

THANKS TO HIS TEAM IN JACKSON, JEFFREY’S BACK LIVING LIFE TO THE FULLEST. It makes a difference where you go for cancer treatment. Just ask Jeffrey. After an X-ray for shoulder pain revealed a spot on his left lung, he worked with experts from the world-renowned Henry Ford Cancer Institute at Henry Ford Allegiance Health to craft a personalized treatment plan. This included a minimally invasive robotic procedure that removed the portion of his lung containing the tumor, with improved surgical precision and smaller incisions. After a quick recovery, Jeffrey was back at work – and back hunting with his beloved dogs. HenryFord.com/LungCancer | (866) 879-3640

63


time for serious planning Let CSB determine how financially well you are today. Financial wellness starts with understanding how to save and grow your money. Visit one of our branches and we’ll give you a prescription for your financial wellness. BUDGETING • SAVINGS • INVESTMENTS* • LOANS • DREAMS *Investments are not FDIC Insured, not guaranteed by the bank and may lose value.

64

Grade your financial wellness here!

chelseastate.bank