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CHELSEA — DEXTER — GRASS LAKE — MANCHESTER — STOCKBRIDGE

Connected Spring/Summer 2017

RUN FOR THE ROLLS A race for all

Stockbridge robotics program

giving from the heart

therapy dogs making a difference For the ruff times

chelsea area garden club

serving others

plus CONNECTED CALENDAR A PUBLICATION OF THE 5 HEALTHY TOWNS FOUNDATION

FREE

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NON PROFIT ORG US POSTAGE PAID CHELSEA MI PERMIT NO 40


Sesquicentennial Celebration y

Run Manchester Street Festival Saturday,August 5 v 10AM w6 PM

a Run Manchester a Live Music a Vintage Car Show a Street Food a Bed Races a Duck Races a Craft Show a Kids Bike Race a Kids Korner a Beer Tent uOver the Edge y the Tap a Artisan Demonstrations a Facial Hair Competition a Vintage Baseball Events a Antique Road Show a Antique Tractor Show a Historic Walking Home Tour

Booths are available at the festival ! 2

For more information on the events visit manchesterstreetfestival.org


RSVP TODAY! 517-522-8315

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Welcome to

Connected This magazine is made up of stories that demonstrate social capital. There are many formal definitions of social capital – usually long and complicated. But, it pretty much boils down to something like this: Social capital is created when people work together, sharing the resources on hand and accomplishing a lot for a community. Such capital, in education for instance, is proven to be more impactful on student outcomes than spending, composition of the school, class size, or teachers’ salaries.1 It is powerful stuff. This powerful social capital is obvious when it comes to wellness in the 5 Healthy Towns. What you read in this magazine is the tip of the social capital iceberg in the 5 Healthy Towns. Look around you. All around our communities there are people figuring out how to make something good happen through pre-schools, senior centers, community gardens, neighborhood watches,

chambers of commerce, religious organizations, scouting, and friends looking out for friends. Even the advertisers in this issue offer goods and services that enrich our lives and many of the advertisers made an effort to demonstrate the connection between their services and our mission (check out the Jackson and Chelsea District Library ads, for instance). There are countless opportunities for you and yours to connect and cultivate improvements in personal and community wellness by contributing to and taking advantage of the 5 communities’ social capital investments. To the person holding this magazine we extend our thanks for your contributions, whatever they may be. Amy Heydlauff CEO, 5 Healthy Towns Foundation

For information on how to advertise, please contact 5 Healthy Towns Foundation at 734.433.4599 5 Healthy Towns Foundation makes every effort to provide accurate information in advertising and editorial content, however, does not make any claims as to accuracy of information provided by advertisers or editorial contributors and accepts no responsibility or liability for inaccurate information.

Here You Can Receive a Rigorous and Relevant Education • 1:1 Technology (K-12) • K-12 (STEM) Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Program • Smith Elementary (K-3) State of Michigan Reward School 2013, 2014, 2015 • Stockbridge High School (8-12) State of Michigan Reward School 2014 • State and National Recognition for Journalism and Yearbook Programs • Nationally Recognized Robotics Program • National Advanced Placement Honor Roll for Participation and Performance • Comprehensive Career and Technical Education Program • Strong Parental Involvement and Communication • High School Graduation Rate at 95% • Licensed State and Community-supported Pre-School programs • Before and after school child care on-site

Please give us a call for a tour of our facilities and programming at (517) 851-7188 or email at heidrick@panthernet.net

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1Robert D. Putnam, “Community-Based Social Capital and Educational Performance,: in Diane Ravitch and Joseph P. Viteritti, eds.,Making Good Citizens: Education and Civil Society, New Haven, Conn: Yale Uniersity Press, 2001, pp.58-95.


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spring/summer 2017

A special thank-you to our

C o n t e n t s ADVERTISERS

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on the

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Spring Into

cover exercise By Matt Pegouskie

By Megan Hutfilz

Lt. Gov. Brian Calley and his son Collin joined St. Louis Center and other runners in the 10th annual Run for the Rolls

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Ways to get in your recommended 150 minutes of physical activity per week with inexpensive, easy-to-perform exercises.

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44

Gardeners Reap More Than Flowers and Vegetables

stockbridge robotics

Therapy Dogs

By Mary Jo Frank

By Bob Richards

By Shawn Personke

8 - Thank you Funded Partners Matt Pegouskie 10 - Spring into Exercise Megan Hutfilz 12 - Michigan 4x4 Plan Amy Heydlauff 14 - Join Us At A Coalition Meeting Ashley Tomasi 16 - Chelsea Camp Gabika Ashley Tomasi 20 - Dexter Summer Fitness Festival Brett Pedersen

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23 - Grass Lake Senior Ctr Anne Lavergne 26 - Manchester MMLB Challenge Ruth VanBogelen

Make A Difference 50 - Why Shop At Your Local Farmers Market Ashley Tomasi 52 - Salads – The Ultimate Fast Food Yael Dolev

30 - Stockbridge Healthy Heroes Ashley Tomasi

54 - Lifestyle Diets Defined Courtney Jones

34 - Get out and Play Matt Pegouskie

56 - Healthy food tips to family eating Sheila Gillman

38 - Stockbridge Be Fit Program Ashley Tomasi 48 - Grass Lake: Outdoor Mecca Matt Pegouskie

IN EVERY ISSUE 36 - CONNECTING WITH YOU 46 - CAUGHT IN THE ACT 57 - CONNECTED CALENDAR

9 Round Ann Arbor - 55 AAA of Dexter - 13 Adult Learners Institute of Chelsea - 35 Anytime Fitness of Chelsea - 19 Bryan Herter, Realtor - 39 Breathe Yoga - 19 Chelsea Chamber - 13 Chelsea Coalition - 17 Chelsea Library - 19 Chelsea State Bank - 64 Cherry Optometry - 53 Comfort Inn - 47 Common Grill -13 Copper Nail - 35 Dexter Cabinet - 22 Dexter Coalition - 21 Dexter Community Schools - 35 Dexter Dental Studio - 22 Dexter Pharmacy - 37 Grass Lake Historical Society - 25 Grass Lake Wellness Coalition - 25 Grass Lake Chiropractic - 3 H & R Block - 47 Heydlauff’s Appliances - 13 Huron Clinton Metro Parks - 11 Hylant - 53 Klink Realtors - 19 Jackson District Library - 35 Kari Newman, Realtor - 37 La Maison - 45 Lane Animal Hospital - 25 Main Street Optometry - 53 Manchester Area Friends Group - 2 Manchester Coalition - 27 Manchester Eye Care - 53 Manchester Schools - 28 Mathansium - 35 Michigan Otolaryngology Surgery Association - 45 Namaste Family Services - 39 Robin Hills Farms - 43 Sharee Burkel - N.K.R. Assoc - 29 Silver Maples - 15 SRSLY Manchester - 4 St. Joseph Mercy Chelsea - 9, 63 Stockbridge Coalition - 31 Stockbridge Community Education - 29 Stockbridge Community Schools - 4 Trios Hair Salon - 15 United Methodist Retirement Community - 5 Village Animal Clinic - 29 Waterloo Natural History Association - 47 Wellness Centers - 7 Wolverine Glass - 37 Worth Repeating - 22

Connected is published by Chestney Publishing and is the property of 5 Healthy Towns Foundation


WELLNESS LIVES HERE! Join us and improve your life • Effective weight loss • Manage health issues • Reduce stress The value of a Wellness Center membership Costly insurance co-pays, prescription medicines and lost vacation days can be greatly minimized when you pay attention to your body’s health and wellness. Everything you need to stay dedicated to fitness • Free Polar BodyAge® session, which includes a report with your BodyAge score, free exercise plan, and more • State-of-the-art cardio and strength equipment • Group exercise and aquatic programs • Personal training • Massage

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• Child care • Next Steps includes 10 Specialized Programs: Cancer, Cardiac, Diabetes, Functional, Mental Health, Orthopedic, Fit for Surgery, Pulmonary, Transitional Care and Weight Management To learn more, contact one of our locations: Chelsea Wellness Center • 734-214-0220 14800 East Old U.S. 12, Chelsea • chelseawellness.org Dexter Wellness Center • 734-580-2500 2810 Baker Road, Dexter • dexterwellness.org Manchester Wellness Center • 734-428-0850 710 E. Main Street, Manchester • manchesterwellness.org Stockbridge Wellness Center • 517-851-4486 5116 S. M-106, Stockbridge • stockbridgewellness.org 7


The following organizations are 5 Healthy Towns Foundation’s currently funded partners. They are important contributors to our communities. Thank you! Funded Partners 2016 - 2017

Farm fresh food tasting for students as part of the Dexter Farm to School Program

Seniors participating in chair exercises as part of the Adaptive Movement Program

Manchester preschoolers learn to plant beans as part of the Manchester School Garden project

Participants of PEAC’s summer program in Dexter

Our special thanks to the Wellness Coalitions in Stockbridge, Manchester, Grass Lake, Dexter and Chelsea for their role in coordinating all the amazing efforts funded through these organizations. 8

Alzheimer’s Association Ballet Chelsea C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital Capital Area District Library (Stockbridge) City of Chelsea Chelsea Community Education Chelsea Community Kitchen Chelsea District Library Chelsea Monitors Base Ball Club Chelsea School District Chelsea Senior Center Chelsea Wellness Center Dexter Community Schools Dexter Senior Center Dexter Township Dexter Wellness Center Grass Lake Charter Township Grass Lake Community Schools Grass Lake Farmers Market Grass Lake Senior Center Grass Lake United Methodist Church Healthy Kids Healthy Michigan Jackson District Library (Grass Lake) Legacy Land Conservancy Manchester Area Senior Citizens Council Manchester Community Resource Center Manchester Community Schools Manchester Community Schools Foundation Manchester Community Education Manchester District Library Manchester Wellness Center National Kidney Foundation of Michigan Open Air Market of Stockbridge Program to Educate All Cyclists (PEAC) Project Safe Graduation Riverfolk Music and Arts Organization Run for the Rolls SRSLY Dexter SRSLY Chelsea SRSLY Manchester SRSLY Stockbridge St. Joseph Mercy Chelsea St. Louis Center Stockbridge Community Education Stockbridge Community Outreach Stockbridge Community Schools Stockbridge Wellness Center Village of Grass Lake Village of Manchester Village of Stockbridge YMCA of Jackson (Grass Lake project) Waterloo Recreation Area


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g n i r p S

into

Exercise By: Megan Hutfilz M.S., NASM-CPT, SFS

Warmer weather is right around the corner! The exercises featured below will help you beat the winter blues and get prepared for spring activities. These exercises can be performed anywhere with minimal equipment needed and work a variety of muscle groups. To select the right weight for the exercises, choose a dumbbell that is challenging but not so hard that you can’t complete 10 repetitions with proper mechanics. If you don’t have access to dumbbells using items around the house like canned goods or filled water bottles can make a great substitute to add resistance. Enjoy!

Squat and Press Start with your dumbbells loaded by your shoulders, your feet slightly wider than hip width apart and toes pointing straight forward. Keeping your knees in line with your toes, bend your knees to squat down as if you’re trying to find a chair with your bottom. Next, stand back up and press the dumbbells above your head in one smooth motion. Try for 3 sets of 10 repetitions.

Step Up to Balance This exercise can be done using any solid surface such as a chair, a bench or a step. The higher your step, the more challenging this exercise will be, so select a height that’s right for you. Place one foot on the step in front of you. Step up onto your riser, chair or step and balance on that foot for 5 seconds. Try not to touch your other foot to the step! Repeat 10 times on each leg. Aim for 2 to 3 sets on each side.

Abdominal Toe Tap Begin by lying on the floor with your knees lifted off the ground at a 90 degree angle. While keeping your core engaged and lower back pressed into your mat, slowly lower one leg at a time to tap the floor with your toe. Aim for 3 sets of 10 repetitions on each leg.

Triceps KickbackThis exercise will target the back of your arms without having to extend your arms above your head. Start by bending over slightly from the hip with your knees slightly bent and your feet about hip width apart. Make sure to keep your neck and head in a neutral position. Next, position your hands next to your sides so your elbows are slightly behind your body. Keeping your upper arm stationary, extend your elbow so your arm is straight. Bend the elbow back to your starting position and repeat for 3 sets of 10.

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Single Leg Hip Bridge Begin by lying on the floor with your knees bent. Keeping your thighs parallel to each other, extend one leg out straight. Then, raise your pelvis off the ground while contracting your core and glutes. Hold that position for 10 seconds. This exercise develops core, lower back and pelvic strength and stability! Complete 2 sets of 5 repetitions on each leg.

Bird Dog This exercise focuses on core and lumbar spine stability. Start on your hands and knees with your hands below your shoulders and your knees below your hips. Simultaneously raise your right arm and left leg until parallel to the floor. Keep your core engaged and your neck in a straight and neutral position. Hold this position for 10 seconds. Perform 2 sets of 5 repetitions on each side.

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Abdominal Curl Up Start this exercise by lying on your back with your knees bent and your arms at your sides. Engage your abdominal muscles to lift your shoulders off the mat while reaching toward your heels with your fingertips, keeping your head and neck in a straight and neutral position (pretend you are holding a softball under your chin). Try for 3 sets of 15 repetitions. 11


Michigan’s 4x4 Plan –

Change or Die Written by 5 Healthy Towns Foundation

In the book Change or Die by Alan Deutschman, he tells us that following a heart attack, physicians usually tell their patients they must change their lifestyle (eat better, exercise more, reduce stress, etc.) or die. Only about 10% of patients actually make those lifestyle changes. In other words, “change or die” isn’t a message that resonates with most of us. Curious, isn’t it? If scaring people won’t bring about lifestyle change that might save our lives, what will? The State of Michigan is giving hometown collaboration and positive messaging some attention. In 2012, two years after all five Healthy Towns formed their Wellness Coalitions, the State of Michigan introduced the Michigan Health and Wellness 4x4 plan. The state’s vision is for Michigan’s population to be healthy, productive, and live in communities that support health and wellness. The plan explains the need for a focus on health to combat things like Michigan’s high rates of chronic diseases, 2.5 million obese adults and $13 billion annually in preventable healthcare costs in Michigan. Then it lays out the first four elements of its 4x4 recommendations: • Maintain a healthy diet • Engage in regular exercise • Get a regular physical exam • Avoid use and exposure to all tobacco products

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In addition, the 4x4 plan encourages all residents to know these important health-related numbers: • Body mass index • Blood pressure • Cholesterol • Blood glucose One of their primary strategies for accomplishing the plan is to develop local coalitions. The coalitions are expected to find ways to encourage their communities to consume more healthy foods, increase physical activity and increase awareness of healthy behaviors through community-wide programs, much like the Wellness Coalitions in our 5 Healthy Towns. Another statewide strategy is a multimedia campaign to change Michigan’s culture. Have you seen billboards around the state encouraging healthy choices like being active as a family or eating well? The State is also using facebook, radio and television, their website and other media forms. They are using this approach because it works. The multi-media campaign strategy is wellstudied since it was used successfully in efforts to reduce the prevalence of smoking. In 1965 43% of American adults smoked. In 2015 the percent of smokers in our 5 towns ranged from 4-13%. Good for us!

The strategies of coalitions and multimedia campaigns are not random. Like 5 Healthy Towns Foundation, the 4x4 plan strategy is encouraging action at a local level by and for the people who are part of a community. We believe it is the best way to assure we live in communities that support health and wellness. Visit the 5 Healthy Towns Foundation website (www.5healthytowns.org) to see what’s happening in your own community. And, stop by the healthy Michigan website, select Personal Health Tools on the right and access helpful tools to begin your own journey to improved health. www.michigan.gov/healthymichigan ¹Our Health Begins with: The Michigan Health and Wellness 4x4 Plan, Michigan Department of Community Health. June 2012.


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Join us at a coalition meeting

For more information visit www.5healthytowns.org

Chelsea Friends and Family Wellness Coalition 1st Thursday of the month 12:00 p.m. 5 Healthy Towns Conference Room 14800 E Old U.S. Hwy 12 Chelsea, MI 48118

Dexter Wellness Coalition 2nd Tuesday of the month 5:30 p.m. Dexter Wellness Center Conference Room 2810 Baker Rd. Dexter, MI 48130

Grass Lake Community Wellness Initiative 3rd Monday of the month 6:00 p.m. Grass Lake Charter Township Hall 373 Lakeside Dr. Grass Lake, MI 49240

Manchester Wellness Coalition 4th Tuesday of the month 12:00 p.m. Village Room, Manchester Village Offices 912 City Rd. Manchester, MI 48158

Stockbridge-Area Wellness Coalition 3rd Thursday of the month 6:00 p.m. Room 108 305 W. Elizabeth St. Stockbridge, MI 49285 14


Meet — Karl Fink

Karl is one of 14 participants taking part in The National Kidney Foundation of Michigan’s Diabetes Prevention Program “My Choice . . . My Health” that is being held at the Dexter Wellness Center. The program helps people with prediabetes make healthier lifestyle choices to delay or even prevent the onset of Type II diabetes. Karl, who has a family history of the disease, was motivated to enroll in the program after learning he was prediabetic. He has had much success with the program, finding it easy to follow and the instructor to be very effective. Fifteen weeks into the program, he has been able to lower his blood glucose to a normal level. Karl stated, “The program is an example of the many contributions of the Dexter Wellness Center to better health for the Dexter community.” Karl is a former judge who now practices law part-time with other lawyers in his family. He is a member of the Dexter United Methodist Church and Dexter Rotary and is on the boards of Faith in Action and The Encore Theatre. Karl is also a co-moderator of the Dexter Forum. He and his wife Jane have six children and 13 grandchildren. “My Choice . . . My Health” is supported by the 5 Healthy Towns Foundation and offered at no cost to qualified participants in all five communities in our service area. To learn more, visit the National Kidney Foundation’s website: www.nkfm.org/dpp.

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Chelsea Written by 5 Healthy Towns Foundation

Gabika Camp

Chelsea Community Education and Recreation is gearing up for another fun-filled summer of Camp Gabika. Camp Gabika— which stands for Girls And Boys In Kool Adventures—has been in existence since 2014. Previously, the camp was known as Wild About Summer Camp and Camp Gabogi. The camp provides a healthy daily environment for youth ages 5-12 with a focus on movement, healthy choices, and friendship. Gabika gives youth a great experience during the summer months with elements of decision-making and interaction with peers in a supportive environment. The ultimate goal of Camp Gabika is to instill lifelong healthy habits in campers. “Camp Gabika has become Chelsea’s affordable, healthy summer day camp. We could not have established the extensive programming without the support of the Chelsea Friends and Family Wellness Coalition and 5 Healthy Towns Foundation over the past five years. We have been able to add new components to camp each year and have seen the number of children involved skyrocket,” said Andrew Thompson, Enrichment Coordinator. The camp works in collaboration with the Chelsea Friends and Family Wellness Coalition to align camp activities with the coalition’s four guiding elements: Eat Better, Move More, Connect with Others in Healthy Ways, and Avoid Unhealthy Substances. Campers participate in a variety of healthy activities

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Above: Jim Randolph during his weekly cooking demonstration with campers at the Chelsea Senior Center. On this day campers made potato salad using potatoes and herbs they harvested from the Intergenerational Garden Below: Campers during their field trip to the Impression 5 Science Center in Lansing

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10K, 5K and 2 mile run 5K and 2 mile walk 13.8 mile bike

Chelsea Friends heart & sole and Family Wellness Coalition Supports These Health and Wellness Activities Saturday, May 20, 2017 28th Annual

run walk bike

Proceeds to benefit Behavioral Health Services at St. Joseph Mercy Chelsea

chelseaheartandsole.org

srslychelsea.org

JoinMe

A Seriously Safe Place. A SRSLY Safe Home. Signs out April 23 – May 7

srslychelsea.org 17


Meet — Coy Vaughn Coy Vaughn is the Deputy Director of Washtenaw County Parks and Recreation Commission. He is a certified planner with nearly 25 years of experience in both the private and public sectors, working with regional, county, and local governments as an urban planner, and most recently a parks planner. Coy has served on multiple boards including the Huron River Watershed Council and the SEMCOG Transportation Advisory Council. He works closely with local land conservancy groups on developing and maintaining preserves and natural areas in Washtenaw County. Most recently, Coy has been a critical participant in efforts to develop, improve and connect nonmotorized pathways throughout the county. He is working with multiple governmental and private groups focused on accelerating completion of the Border to Border (B2B) trail. When finished, the B2B will connect the easternmost border of Washtenaw County in Ypsilanti, to the northwest corner of the county between Chelsea and Stockbridge. From there, the B2B will connect to the Lake to Lake Trail (Michigan to Huron), and, eventually, the Iron Belle trail (Detroit to Iron Mountain). Coy and his wife Amy live in Chelsea with their two sons, Evan and Logan. He serves on the 5 Healthy Towns Foundation Board of Directors. For fun, Coy enjoys hiking, biking, golf, fishing, skiing, kayaking, and other outdoor activities.

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Campers during their field trip to the Impression 5 Science Center in Lansing

including weekly trips to the Chelsea Senior Center’s Intergenerational Garden to learn how to plant and harvest vegetables and prepare healthy meals, four hours of daily physical activity (including structured games and free play), healthy snacks, open swim twice a week at Chelsea Beach Middle School, and weekly educational activities with SRSLY Chelsea. Campers also embark on weekly field trips. The camp provides a great mix of local and regional destinations. Past trips have included visits to the Chelsea Farmers Market, Cranbrook Institute of Science, and Brighton Sky Zone. Camp coordinators make it a focus to work with as many Chelsea area groups as possible during the 10 weeks of camp. Chelsea District Library, Chelsea Fire Department, Chelsea Police Department, and Waterloo Recreation Area are some other collaborators in addition to those listed above. As part of the goal to form lifelong healthy habits, camp coordinators feel it is important for campers to learn how to connect with each other and with others in the community. Connecting the campers with community groups assures they know community support is available to them now and in years to come. The 2017 camp season is set to take place from June 19 to August 25. Participants can sign up for single days, weeks, or the full season. Structured camp activities take place five days a week from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Before care and after care are available starting at 7:15 a.m. and ending at 5:45 p.m. For more information, go to https://sites. google.com/a/chelsea.k12.mi.us/communityeducation/home/youthenrichment/campgabika or call 734-433-2208.


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Dexter Summer F i t n e s s F e s t i va l By Brett Pedersen, Dexter Wellness Coalition Dexter residents will be able to enjoy free fitness programs for a fourth year in a row this summer. The Dexter Summer Fitness Festival will again offer Yoga in the Park every Saturday at 8:00 AM through the months of June, July, and August. The Fitness Jam, a group fitness class, will be offered immediately following yoga at 9:00 AM on the same dates. All classes will be held downtown at Mill Creek Park across the street from the fire station at the bottom of the serpentine pathway. Both classes are designed to meet all ages and fitness levels. The classes provide an opportunity to kick your weekend off on the right foot in a beautiful and unique setting. One participant described the environment as a “casual and welcoming atmosphere for people at all different points on the path to fitness.” Yoga in the Park has become a very popular place for area residents to meet and engage in healthy activity. Last summer the program 20

averaged 49 participants on Saturdays. The community has taken notice of this influx of fitness goers. Local business owners and farmers market coordinators commented on the high number of people picking up fresh vegetables or stopping for a bite to eat while toting their yoga mats. All classes are taught by certified yoga and fitness instructors from the Dexter Wellness Center. Instructors have a common goal of creating an environment that is safe and inviting while providing a great workout. Each workout is designed to reach all fitness levels. Modifications are provided for all exercises as well as ways to increase intensity, if desired, on the other end of the spectrum. It is not uncommon to see high-level athletes training for an endurance event next to seniors who want to improve strength and balance so that they can keep up with their grandchildren. We have a number of youth enthusiasts that

come on a weekly basis. We suggest bringing kids who have a genuine interest and desire to participate in the activity. Our general rule is that anyone is welcome as long as they are engaged in the workout and not disruptive and affecting the other patrons’ experience. We work really hard to create a safe, inviting, and calm environment for everyone. The Dexter Summer Fitness Festival is a joint collaboration among the Dexter Wellness Coalition, 5 Healthy Towns Foundation, Dexter Wellness Center, and the City of Dexter. The outcome over the years has been truly special. One of our participants summed it up best by saying that they “loved the opportunity to enjoy free workouts and yoga outside in nature. I liked all the instructors and appreciated getting to experience different instructors each week. Loved the free t-shirts.” Please come out and join us this summer on the banks of Mill Creek in downtown for a wonderful way to connect with your community and enhance your health!

Left: Participants after a Fitness Jam session, part of the Dexter Summer Fitness Festival, Right: Saturday morning at Yoga in the Park, part of the Dexter Summer Fitness Festival.


Dexter Wellness Coalition Supports These Health and Wellness Activities

1 2

Creekside School Spring Plant Sale Saturday May 20th Location: 2615 Baker Road and The Gazebo in downtown Dexter We encourage eating the RAINBOW. Plants available include: tomatoes, peppers, watermelon, squash, broccoli, cabbage, kale, and herbs. All proceeds go to support the Creekside Kitchen Garden Program and Dexter Farm to Schoolwhere students are taught how to plant, grow, harvest and prepare healthy nutritious food.

PEAC Summer Program:

A 7-week summer cycling program designed to empower individuals with disabilities through cycling. We meet any individual at their level and work to achieve their cycling goal! We believe that Everyone Can Ride! Registration: www.bikeprogram.org/summerprogram Fee: $40/participant for the whole summer Location: Dexter High School 21


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grass lake senior center By Annie Lavergne

Grass Lake Seniors visit the Grass Lake Yacht Club

Move More, Eat Better, Connect with Others in Healthy Ways—a motto practiced daily at the Grass Lake Senior Center, and we are having fun while doing it!

Lake is a great community, and we are proud to be part of local events such as the Holiday Cookie Tour where we won the Grand Prize for festive decorations and tasty treats!

After months of gathering ideas, raising funds, and building community partnerships, the Grass Lake Senior Center opened in 2015 with widespread community support. At the center, we are all about having fun and making friends while taking charge of our physical and mental health through exercise and activities.

I have had members say that “being at the Senior Center is like being with family,”“I feel much stronger and better balanced after completing an exercise routine,” and, “It’s nice to come, talk and laugh with other members instead of just being home.”

We offer a variety of programs that support active aging. Classes such as line dancing keep us physically active, games and puzzles keep our minds sharp, and sharing meals and ideas with friends helps to create and maintain social connections. We recently added lifelong learning opportunities such as painting and floral design hosted by The Painted Owl and Designs by Judy. We were proud to welcome the local VFW Auxiliary and American Legion Post at our Veteran’s Day and Open House event. Grass

Our next phase is to identify Grass Lake area residents who could benefit from our programs and need transportation to the Senior Center. We are working on community outreach to local churches, medical offices, and residents to help us launch this new service. Please contact us if you need transportation to the center or are willing to volunteer. The breadth of community support is remarkable: the Jackson District Library provides tech support twice a month; Arnold Law Office offers monthly discussions on legal issues such as estate planning and long term care;

and the Jackson County Department of Aging provides a hot lunch at the Center. The Center is supported by the 5 Healthy Towns Foundation/Grass Lake Community Wellness Initiative, the Copper Nail, St Joseph Mercy Hospital, the Grass Lake Village DDA, Ganton’s Legacy Assisted Living, Henry Ford Allegiance Hospital, Mason’s Excelsior Lodge No. 116, Ghostrider DJ Services, and private donors. The Grass Lake Township generously donates space, and the Chelsea Senior Center continues to share their experience and provides fiduciary support. A steering committee of representatives from Grass Lake and Chelsea strives to ensure the success of this collaboration. Truly, the 5-Healthy Towns model of building healthier, more collaborative communities is exemplified with the Grass Lake Senior Center! The Grass Lake Senior Center is available to those 50 years of age and older. We are open Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday from 10 am – 2 pm; Wednesday evening is Game Night from 6:30 pm - 8:30 pm. Contact us at 517-522-8466, email alavergne@chelseaseniors.org, or check out our website at www.grasslakeseniors.org.

Senior Center members having a ball

Exercise classes are offered Tuesdays and Thursdays at the Grass Lake Senior Center

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Grass Lake Community Wellness Initiative Supports

These Health and Wellness Activities

Our Mission is to enhance the quality of life and well-being for area seniors and their families. Join us for a variety of wellness, lifelong learning, and social programs! Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday 10 a.m. – 2 p.m. Wednesday Game Night 6:30 p.m. – 8:30 p.m. Location: 373 Lakeside Dr. Grass Lake, MI 49240 Contact: grasslakeseniors.org or 517-522-8466

Grass Lake project safe graduation — Project Safe Graduation celebration is about keeping our kids and the community safe and to give students positive memories of their last year of High School before they embark on a new phase of their lives. This year’s event for Grass Lake High School’s graduating seniors will take place on June 2nd, 2017 at the Jackson YMCA! 24

A Benefit Dinner for the 5 Healthy Towns’ Farmer’s Markets!


FARMERS AKE MA L S S Our Future is Growing RK A R

ET

G

• Where:

MU

SIC IN

Grass Lake Farmers Market: Wednesdays May 10th- Sept. 27th 4 p.m. – 7 p.m.

R T H E PA

K

Music in the Park: 1st & 3rd Wednesdays of the month May 10th- Sept. 27th 6p.m. - 8p.m.

Michigan Military Heritage Museum & Grass Lake Area Historical Connections presents…

Michigan Military Heritage Museum 153 N. Union St Grass Lake MI, 49240

“A Taste of the

• When: Saturday, April 29th 2017

Trenches”

From 3:00 – 6:00 PM • Admission: $15 for single (3 Cocktails)

• Featuring cocktails, food samples and live entertainment to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the First World War • Live Entertainment provided by “The Dugouts”, performing a full 2 hour program from “Boys in Khaki”! • Period attire is absolutely welcome, but is not required!

$25 for double (6 cocktails) *Single includes museum and entertainment admission, a total of 3 cocktails and food samples ** Double ticket includes museum and entertainment admission, a total of 6 cocktails and food samples *** Ala carte cocktail tickets will be available for purchase as well

Please call the Michigan Military Heritage Museum at 517-926-6696 to order tickets, or visit us on Facebook for more information!

21 And over only, please!

Saturdays • 10 AM

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Manchester

“The 2000 pound challenge�

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MMLB By Ruth VanBogelen

I

n 2016, Manchester Wellness Coalition decided to fund a program specifically addressing two wellness issues in Manchester: 1) the high percentage (68%) of area residents who were overweight/ obese; and, 2) the low percentage (55%) of residents who reported getting the recommended 150 minutes of exercise per week. The program name is derived from MM which is the Roman symbol for 2000 and LB, the abbreviation for pound. The MMLB challenge was designed to motivate residents to lose weight by Eating Better and Moving More. Goals of the program were: 1) register 100 to 200 residents; 2) collectively lose 2,000 pounds; and, 3) average 190 miles of activity per participant. The program was free to all Manchester residents and ran for 19 weeks (September through

In order left to right: Anne Buckalew, Cherie Vannatter, Laura Neal, participants from Manchester Community Schools

mid-January). A 5 Healthy Towns Foundation grant provided funding for incentives including activity trackers, monthly prizes, and a donation to a local non-profit if goal 2 was reached. Data collection was a key component of this program. Monthly weigh-ins were done at the Manchester Wellness Center by Wellness Center staff. One hundred high-quality activity trackers (Garmin Vivofit) were provided to participants. Other participants used their own trackers (Fitbits). These trackers sync with smartphones to record steps and miles and provide weekly totals which participants sent electronically to organizers. The outcomes were: 113 participants, averaging 346 miles per participant (182% of the goal), and a grand total of 329 pounds lost. Though the program did not achieve its 2,000 pound goal, it proved to be a great motivator to get people out and active and resulted in a $123 donation to the Manchester Community Resource Center (www.manchestercrc.org). Continue to page 28..

→


Manchester Wellness Coalition Supports These Health and Wellness Activities For 2016-2017, our Comprehensive Wellness Plan includes $75,000 for funding the following programs:

SR2S

safe routes to school

With Coalition support and a major grant from the State of Michigan Safe Routes to School program, Manchester is installing several new sidewalks and safe crossing improvements in the village this year. We have also implemented several “Walk to School” programs to encourage regular walking habits for school students living within the village.

Manchester SRSLY Gazebo Concerts Farmers Market Stress Management SR2S Coordinator Dance Manchester Phase 2 – Shared-Use Trail Wellness Center MMLB Program Run Manchester 2016 Summer Swim Program Manchester Seniors Program Manchester Mirror Outreach

$20,600 $2,000 $6,000 $1,000 $5,000 $2,400 $20,000 $5,800 $2,000 $2,800 $5,200 $2,200

Gazebo Concerts The Coalition provides financial support for a regular summer series of music concerts at our Wurster Park gazebo in downtown Manchester. This Thursday night activity complements our Farmers Market and highlights folk, blues and country artists along with the opportunity to try old-time dancing and just have fun connecting with your neighbors and friends. The 2017 season runs June 15 – August 4.

Thursdays 3:30 – 7:00 pm May 11 – October 26, 2017 CHI-BRO Park, M-52 Manchester

Shop at our Farmers Market for locally-grown produce, meat, honey, maple syrup, etc. Bread and baked goods made locally. There are lots of events including: Kids’ Activity Tent June 15 – end of August, food demo with free samples, corn roast and more. SNAP, Double Up Food Bucks & produce tokens accepted. Tokens available at Community Resource Center. New vendors are welcome. Email us for special rates & rebates facebook.ManchesterMichiganFarmersmarket.com www.manchesterfarmmarket.com

Manchester Sesquicentennial The Village of Manchester will celebrate the Sesquicentennial (150th anniversary) of its incorporation as a village in 1867. This week-long series of events will take place August 1-8, 2017, and consists of historic tours and lectures, a Sesquicentennial parade and ball, Main Street dinner, agri-tours, re-enactments, old-time beard contest, vintage baseball games, and much more. 27


An incredible 80,100,601 steps (over 35,000 miles) were recorded! Participants were allowed to keep the activity trackers after the program’s conclusion.

Participants in no particular order: Amy Raus, Jeff Wallace, Janice Little, Jan Steinhower, Joan Liebeck, Karen Berg, Meg Bourland, Marsha Chartrand, Joyce Sroufe, Jeannine Uphaus, Ruth VanBogelen

Making the commitment to M MLB was the best thing I could have done ~ Marsha Chartrand

“In my opinion, the MMLB Challenge in Manchester has had the best results of any coalition sponsored walking program in the 5 Healthy Towns area. We had good participation and lots of data. The trackers were the key to the program’s success providing great data to the organizers and motivation to participants,” said Shelley Hehr, Wellness Center Associate and Co-Program Coordinator. According to Marsha Chartrand, MMLB participant, “Making the commitment to MMLB was the best thing I could have done. I never “dieted,” but rather did what I like to call “mindful eating”--and the thoughtful weekly emails from MMLB helped me become even more mindful. From my first weigh-in August 29 to my most recent on January 5, I lost more than 15 pounds. I have a “normal” BMI now for the first time in 10+ years. Just this week, I passed the two million step mark, and I feel great.” The MMLB Challenge is one of 11 programs included in the Manchester Wellness Coalition’s Year 5 Comprehensive Wellness Plan. The coalition is dedicated to improving the culture of wellness in Manchester and meets the fourth Tuesday of the month at noon in the Manchester Village Offices. All community residents are welcome to attend. To learn more, go to www.5healthytowns.org. To learn more about MMLB, email Shelley Hehr and Ruth VanBogelen at mmlb48158@gmail.com. See the results from our MMLB program on the next page!

“We get a great education in a small town environment.” — Manchester parent Accepting School of Choice Applications for the 2017/18 School Year

783-428-9711 28

ManchesterSchools.us


Average Steps

Change in Weight

One surprising outcome of the program is the activity level by age. We found that the average number of steps per person in the 50-59, 60-69 and 70-79 was higher than the younger age groups.

Activity Goals The activity goal was 190 miles per person (1 hour of activity 5 times a week with an average of 2 miles per hour for 19 weeks). Of the 104 who turned in activity reports, 67 % achieved or exceeded the goal. The graph above diagrams the number of people who hit different ranges of the activity goal.

There were 342 weigh ins, 62 people lost weight for a total of 328.4 pounds, 31 people gained weight for a total of 120.2 pounds, 19 people only weighed in at the beginning of the program. The graph above shows the distribution of weight loss.

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Stockbridge community education

Find Where You Fit!

Enrichment and recreation programs for everyone in the family. We’re going digital! Check out our electronic brochure, delivering you the most current information easily found in one place:

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email: commed@panthernet.net Stockbridge Community-Education 305 W Elizabeth St • Stockbridge • 517-851-8222 • Fax:517-851-8334 29


Recognizing Stockbridge’s Healthy Heroes

Written by 5 Healthy Towns Foundation

SAWC Healthy Heroes: Suzin Greenway—

The Healthy Heroes Contest’s Eat Better winner. Suzi is the Manager of the Open Air Market of Stockbridge. Over the past six years, Suzi has worked to ensure that patrons have weekly access to fresh, local, and affordable produce at the market. She has done a phenomenal job of creating a warm, inviting space with events and activities that are fun for the entire family. Suzi recently facilitated a six week cooking workshop called “Learning By Doing.” The workshop provided instruction, cooking supplies, and ingredients to eight families to make healthy meals at home. Incorporating healthy, real ingredients into her meals is a part of everyday life for Suzi, and she is an example to all who know her!

Rachel Jones—

The Healthy Heroes Contest’s Move More winner. Rachel is a teacher at Stockbridge Community Schools. For the past two years, Rachel has organized the Healthy Living Challenge which promotes maintaining or developing a healthy lifestyle. Participants, made up of school staff and community members, form teams and are awarded prizes based on the goals they achieve. To help Challenge participants meet their goals, Rachel held group workouts for 60 minutes per week.

Bill Ballagh—

The Healthy Heroes Contest’s Connect with Others in Healthy Ways winner. Bill has worked tirelessly to preserve and improve the recreational fields and trails near and around Stockbridge Schools, including the recreational baseball and soccer fields, middle school and Heritage school tracks, and Southern Nature Trail. Additionally, the efforts of Bill and his family in fundraising and grants have developed many of Stockbridge Community Schools’ classrooms and programs. His dedication and efforts have provided opportunities for students and the community to connect in educational and recreational ways.

Ron Hodder—

the Healthy Heroes Contest’s Avoid Unhealthy Substances winner. Ron has been the leader of The Young Explorer’s group in Stockbridge for 10 years. In his role, Ron educates high school aged students on the importance of avoiding unhealthy substances such as drugs, alcohol, and tobacco and living a healthy lifestyle. Ron is a first responder with the Stockbridge Area Emergency Services Authority and has seen firsthand the negative impacts abusing these substances can have. Ron has been a great role model for Stockbridge youth and is regarded as a treasured community member.

Thank you to each of our Healthy Heroes’ winners for your role in improving the culture of wellness in Stockbridge. Your effort and dedication has enabled many Stockbridge residents to live healthier lives. Keep up the good work!

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Left: Winners and nominators from left to right: Jo Mayer (nominator), Julie Rentfrow (nominator), Rachel Jones (winner), Suzin Greenway (winner), Joey Lentine (nominator), Heidi Pierce (nominator). Not pictured: Bill Ballagh (winner), Ron Hodder (winner). Center: Healthy Heroes Winner Bill Ballagh with his wife Annette Right: Non-profit donation recipients: Jo Mayer (Community Education), Jennifer Hammerberg (Stockbridge Area Education Foundation), Campbell Laird (Open Air Market of Stockbridge), Nancy Ocwieja (Stockbridge Community Outreach), Karen Smith (Stockbridge Community Outreach)


Stockbridge Area Wellness Coalition Supports These Health and Wellness Activities Let’s Walk Stockbridge! Be part of the 5 Healthy Towns! Join us for casual walks along the Stockbridge Community pathways. All ages and abilities are welcome.

1st Sunday of the month • 2 PM Stockbridge Branch of CADL Sponsored by:

Earth Day Woodland Stewardship at the Beckwith Preserve Saturday, April 22, 10 am–1 pm • Cost: Free The Open Air Market of Stockbridge is entering its 7th season on Friday May 5 from 4 to 7 pm on the square in downtown Stockbridge. Market Music is from 5:30 to 7 pm, featuring local musicians playing jazz, pop, folk, instrumental and country. Our vendors sell products including herbs, food & flowering plants, spring & full season vegetables & fruits, honey, eggs, frozen meats & poultry, bread, cakes & pies, baked goods, soaps and candles, essential oils, baskets and woodworking. Easy parking, and a relaxed atmosphere on the square invites you to sit and listen to the music and let the kids play safely on the grass. For more information call Suzi 517-851-7437 and Meet Us at the Market!

Every year Earth Day gives us a special opportunity to join together in celebration of the beauty and bounty of the living, breathing rock we call home. This year, let’s spend some time in service to the Earth. Join Legacy Land Conservancy for an Earth Day celebration to help steward the Beckwith Preserve. We’ll remove garlic mustard and dame’s rocket to give our native woodland wildflowers more room to breathe. Please dress for the weather, wear sturdy shoes, and bring a water bottle. We’ll provide gloves, tools, and snacks; you just bring your Earthloving attitude! To find out more or register for this event contact stewardship@legacylandconservancy.org or (734)302-5263.

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Cover Feature

Every year people of all abilities take part in Run for the Rolls, including participants from St. Louis Center.

Below - Father Enzo with staff and residents at St. Louis Center accept a donation from Run for the Rolls.

Run for

The ROLLS Written by 5 Healthy Towns Foundation

There’s something about a celebration that brings the community together. Fairs, parades, school athletics, and anniversaries all come to mind. Each August, Chelsea’s Run for the Rolls (RFTR) combines fairs, parades, and athletics. And in 2016, RFTR celebrated its 10th anniversary. It is one of Michigan’s most inclusive physical activity events. Run for the Rolls is made up of a 5k and a 1-mile fun run. Both races take place on the closing day of Chelsea’s Community Fair. At 12:30, just before the big Chelsea

Fair Parade, the RFTR’s racers run the parade route. The racers start in front of the Chelsea Area Fire Authority Station on West Middle Street, take a right turn on Main Street and head down for one last right turn on Old US 12 as 3,000 fans and supporters cheer them on. From there, racers finish just near the Chelsea Fairgrounds where the 1 mile, overall and age division winners receive the race’s epicurean reward treat – Common Grill rolls.

“The idea for Run for the Rolls came from when my children were in early elementary. I was involved with the P.T.O. annual jogathon. I noticed parents were simply dropping off their children and there was a fee for almost everything involved. My friend Kelle and I took over, made it a donation to enter, brought nutritious food, water, donated music, and set it up like an event,” said Cindy Burdette, RTFR Executive Director. “Then we noticed parents and even grandparents were attending with their children. That’s when I knew the community would support such an event, but it had to be attached to an already existing great event and that was the Chelsea Fair Parade.” Cindy spoke with a couple of female community leaders for their ideas. Then came the race’s award and name. The award had to be food and one that the community all knew and loved. Craig Common graciously agreed and was on board. The rolls are the main driver for the race. Burdette receives hundreds of emails annually about “how can I win the rolls.” “They want that certificate,” commented Burdette, “The hundreds of pictures over the past 10 years of people smiling, receiving their certificate, is priceless.”

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The accessibility and family-friendly nature of the event allows Run for the Rolls to be a great gateway activity for community members looking to enter the world of timed races. St. Louis Center residents train for and run in the race every year. Young families, people with mobility issues, and regular competitors all sign up to get their move on. People from around the State of Michigan have certainly noticed how effective Run for the Rolls is at allowing everyone a chance to participate. Two years ago, RFTRs was pleased to have State of Michigan Lieutenant Governor and noted special needs advocate, Brian Calley, run the 5k with his son, Collin.

Top — Teams of Chelsea students compete for the coveted Bulldog Team Travel Trophy every August . Featured here: Emma A Middle — The Oliver family make their way down Main Street on their way to the finish line and Common Grill rolls. Bottom — From left to right – RFTR Board of Directors Steven Thoms, Marijane Nelson, Race Director Danielle Matusik and Executive Director Cindy Burdette.

The Governor’s Fitness Council (GFC) regularly endorses RFTR as a Pure Michigan Fitness event. Four regular participants have been honored at recent Governor’s Fitness Council Awards ceremonies. Sophie Lash (2013) won the Conquering Obesity Award while Nicholas Hoffman (2015), Bryce Hotaling (2014), and Jacob Nelson (2013) were nominated as finalists for the Charles T. Kuntzelman Accepting the Challenge award as individuals who’ve overcome great challenges to pursue physical activity as part of a daily life. Run for the Rolls uses the registration proceeds to benefit local like-minded programs. St. Louis Center’s Fitness for Life program received $500 from the 2016 race and $500 for winning the 5H School Challenge. Run for the Rolls has gifted more than $8,700 since the race’s inception. Chelsea High School teams/clubs compete in the Bulldog Challenge. Teams of threeplus can sign up to compete for funding for their programs and the coveted Bulldog Team Challenge Travel Trophy. The challenge is sponsored by Green Tree Pediatrics which has donated $1,000 over the last 5 years. As Run for the Rolls embarks on its 2nd decade, the race seeks to bring awareness to the 5H community and surrounding areas. RFTR is always thinking of different ideas to grow or enhance both the 1 mile and 5K race. The accomplishments of RFTR is from it participants and the community. “We created the initial platform,” said Burdette. “To be recognized at the local, state and even national level is very humbling.” Those interested in competing may learn more at www.runfortherolls.org.

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Get out and

PLAY By 5 Healthy Towns Foundation

If you’ve driven anywhere in the 5 Healthy Towns, you more than likely passed a playground. Whether it’s in a school yard, situated in a public park, or located next to a church, we’ve all seen the evolution of the playground from industrial metal swingsets and slides to plastic and fiberglass play structures. Our love affair with places to play stretches back across the Atlantic Ocean. Defined by Webster’s Dictionary as “a piece of ground for and usually having special features for recreation, especially by children,” the first recorded playgrounds are tracked back to Germany around the 1830s. These playgrounds would remind us of school yards without the equipment. There was a naturalness about these areas that allowed kids to explore, wrestle, plant gardens, and basically let kids be kids. The late 1880s saw American cities and schools start to develop the German model with the addition of playground equipment and toys.

1940s – 1950s: Adventure playgrounds – Playgrounds built out of old building materials, without much supervision. 1950s – 1970s: Themed playgrounds – playground equipment shaped like rockets, animals, ships, etc. Everything is still made out of metal. 1970s – 1980s: Standardized playgrounds – hard plastic equipment and rounded edges in response to parents’ worries about safety. 1980s – present: Modern playgrounds – imaginative playgrounds with different surfaces, more focus on accessibility.

We could add a new era to this timeline. We are starting to see playgrounds built as placemaking anchors that combine open space and play structures which encourage a more natural feel. Think of Chelsea’s Timbertown Park built in 2007 or, more recently, Grass Lake’s Sports and Trails Park, Stockbridge’s play areas behind Heritage and Smith elementary schools and next to the Lakelands Trail, or the proposed natural play area at the Eddy Discover Center in Waterloo Recreation Area. 5HF encourages you to get out and use the playgrounds of the 5 Healthy Towns. Pack a picnic and the kids and go enjoy some fresh air. Below are just a few of the playgrounds you can sample:

Children playing on the Washington Park playground, 1907. Photo from the Senator John Heinz Historical Center Archives Playgrounds remained uncommon in the United States until the early 1900s when the Playground Association of America formed. The group advocated for separate play areas for boys and girls, supervised play, shaded spaces, swimming or wading pools, and shelters and bathing facilities. According to Dr. Joseph Frost from the University of Texas, playground evolution can be placed into seven eras: 1880s – 1890s: Sand Gardens – think open spaces or sandboxes 1900s – 1920s: Model Playgrounds – structures built out of steel and merry-go-rounds

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Chelsea – Timbertown Park in Chelsea is located off Sibley Road. The park has a 12,000 sq ft wooden play structure, sandboxes, and open space. Dexter – Hudson Mills Metropark has several areas where people can enjoy open spaces, playgrounds, walking paths, and more. Grass Lake – Grass Lake Sports and Trails Park, Grass Lake County Park, and Grass Lake Township Hall all have open space, play structures, sports facilities, and more. See page 48 for more details. Manchester – Manchester’s Carr Park and Chi-Bro Park provide community members with play equipment, volleyball pits, ballfields, and a picnic area. Chi-Bro Park is also home to the Manchester Farmers Market and is a trailhead for Manchester’s shared-use pathway. Stockbridge – Stockbridge Community Schools serve as the home to a wonderful play area located behind Heritage and Smith elementary schools. The play area has a disc golf course, playground equipment including a merry-go-round (an old-time favorite), a walking path, and ballfields. In the wintertime, this area also has a beautiful sledding hill. The village, township and DNR partnered with Stockbridge Wellness Coalition and a team of dedicated volunteers to install a new playground at the Lakelands Trail State Park trailhead off Clinton Street. Unadilla Township Park also features a play structure, swing sets, walking path, and picnic area.


Beat Summer Learning Loss

Summer slide is the loss of knowledge over summer vacation. Summer learning loss in elementary school has been linked to consequences in later academic life, affecting whether students drop out of high school and whether they attend college.*

Summer Learning Gap

Con

Sum

2015

mer

Slid

tinu

ed S

tudy

e

2016

2017

* Johns Hopkins University study about summer slide: http://education.jhu.edu/PD/ newhorizons/Journals/spring2010/why-summer-learning/

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Connecting with YOU

How will you take advantage of our improving weather to increase your physical activity?

B

ritt Keane of Grass Lake

“I plan to start cycling to work in the warmer months”

D

onna K. of Manchester

“My husband and I love to bike and our goal this summer is to do a century ride.”

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ob Richards of Stockbridge

“I use the warmer weather to get more time in scuba diving around the Great Lakes.”

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mber Turner of Chelsea

“I like going on walks and playing Pokemon Go!”

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etty Mioduszewski of Dexter

“When the weather breaks, I love running and biking the Mill Creek Trail. I’m also looking forward to biking the new DTE Energy Trail in Waterloo Recreation Area.”

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Meet — Sabrina Edgar

Sabrina is the Coordinator of this year’s Farm to Table Dinner, a fundraiser for the five farmers markets located in Grass Lake, Manchester, Stockbridge, Chelsea, and Dexter. The 2017 Dinner will be held in Grass Lake on August 27th at the Village Events Park under the town’s new pavilion. The event features food made with local produce and prepared by local chefs. Last year’s flagship event in Chelsea raised $11,000 for the 5 Healthy Towns markets. This year’s event will include an opportunity for attendees to meet the growers and producers who provide products for the dinner. Sabrina is also the manager of the Grass Lake Farmers Market which is held on Wednesday from May-September at the Whistlestop Park. In her role, she has been instrumental in promoting an “Eat Better” culture in Grass Lake. By day, she and her family own and operate Lands of Bru-Garick, a small farm in Grass Lake that offers a seasonal CSA, eggs and fresh turkeys at Thanksgiving. Sabrina is also a member of the Grass Lake Community Wellness Initiative, one of the 5 Healthy Towns Coalitions. Visit www.facebook.com/5healthytownsfarmtotable to table to learn more about the 2017 Farm to Table Dinner in Grass Lake.

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Left: Crystal Gallop, MacKenzye Yannella, Zabrina Yannella, Kari Goorhouse (instructor), Hannah Bolton. Right: Be Fit participants cooling down with lunges at the end of class.

Stockbridge

Be fit Written by 5 Healthy Towns Foundation

The Stockbridge Wellness Center has a fun new program designed for teens. Be Fit is a free eight week long fitness program for youth who are interested in an alternative to school sports or who aren’t participating in other physical activities. “We want teens to realize the importance of daily exercise and that you don’t have to be an athlete to exercise,” says Kari Goorhouse, Fitness Supervisor/Be Fit Instructor. “We want them to see that it’s fun to be physically active.” The goal of the program is to provide teens with the tools and knowledge to start a fitness routine that encourages them to be physically active throughout their lives. Teens of all fitness levels and abilities are welcome. Participants work with a fitness specialist to develop an individualized exercise plan that is tailored to each teen’s specific goals and interests. The program consists of two

38

Program

one-hour, instructor-led fitness classes per week and unlimited access to the Wellness Center during the eight weeks. Classes vary from week to week and include activities such as circuit training, weight training, yoga, and more. This is done to introduce participants to a variety of exercise options so they are able to select what works best for them as well as keeping things from getting too repetitive. Progress is measured through fitness assessments that are done at the beginning and end of the program. Each teen who completes the program will receive a t-shirt. “I like how the classes are different every week. It keeps us from getting bored and makes the classes fun!” said Zabrina Yanella, Be Fit participant. Students who participated in the program had successful outcomes with the most notable improvements being in

cardiovascular fitness, upper body strength (push-ups), and leg strength (wall sits) and an overall sense of well-being. In addition to the physical health benefits, regular exercise has been shown to improve academic performance and emotional health. Throughout the program, teens are not only building strength and endurance but also social connections and confidence. The program offers a safe space for teens to realize their potential. Two sessions of the program have been held at the Stockbridge Wellness Center, and a total of 18 teens have completed it successfully. Planning has begun for the next session of the program and is slated to run from June 19 to August 16, 2017. For more information on the Be Fit program, visit www. stockbridgewellness.org and search “Be Fit” or call 734-214-0236.


Meet — Eric Connell Eric is the visionary behind the Island Hills Estates Sidewalk Connector Project. Eric, a resident of the Island Hills Estates Subdivision in Dexter, was prompted to take action after learning his wife Meagan and other residents had a number of “near misses” with traffic on the Island Lake Road from Jessica Lane to Katherine Way due to the lack of a shoulder or sidewalk. Eric approached the Island Hills Estates Homeowners Association (HOA) to propose a sidewalk be constructed to correct the problem. This was unanimously approved by the HOA in 2014. To bring the project to fruition was a community effort involving collaboration with the Washtenaw County Road Commission, Dexter Township, and The Cedars of Dexter and funded by the Dexter Wellness Coalition, Huron Waterloo Pathways, and the Island Hills Estates HOA. Construction on the 500foot sidewalk began in June 2016 and concluded in August 2016. It is due to Eric’s efforts that 59 single family homes now connect safely to Downtown Dexter and the Border to Border Trail. Eric and Meagan have been residents of Dexter since 2010. Their favorite Move More activities include kayaking, jogging, and hiking the area’s abundant trails. Eric and Meagan love their home state of Michigan, spending time “Up North” and exploring new travel destinations as often as possible.

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Gardeners reap more than flowers and vegetables By Mary Jo Frank, Publicity Chair, Chelsea Area Garden Club

“Gardening gets you moving in all directions. It helps with hand strength and dexterity and benefits brain health. Caring for planted seeds and harvesting and enjoying the fresh produce boost self-esteem. You feel connected,” says Forsch, who finds the garden’s sights and sounds, especially songbirds, meditative.

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CAGC members Janet Alford (left) and Mary Randolph work with children at the Chelsea Senior Center’s Intergenerational Garden.

Tending plants is great for the body, soul, and mind, says Chelsea resident and Chelsea Area Garden Club President Christine Forsch.

Chelsea resident Jim Randolph and young friends harvest potatoes at the Chelsea Senior Center’s Intergenerational Garden. (Chelsea Senior Center photo)


CAGC member Kathy Kersten of Manchester grows vegetables— tomatoes, peas, peppers, beets and carrots—organically and admits, “I spend a lot of time weeding.” Chelsea resident Mary Randolph’s specialty is fruit. “It’s satisfying to harvest your own apples, cherries, blueberries, raspberries, grapes, and strawberries,” says Randolph, who, like Forsch and Kersten, is a CAGC charter member.

Tulips and grape hyacinths herald spring along Chelsea’s Main Street. (Photo by Charlene Harris, CAGC)

Founded 20 years ago by 12 women, the CAGC has grown to more than 60 members and meets monthly May through September at Chelsea First United Methodist Church. Members plant and maintain flowers along Chelsea’s Main Street and at the Chelsea District Library. Randolph co-chairs the club’s spring plant sale, its major fundraiser. The 19th annual sale will be held May 6, 8 a.m.–noon at the Chelsea Community Fairgrounds, 20501 W. Old U.S. Highway 12, just west of M-52. “It’s a terrific way to stock up on locally grown perennials, ornamental grasses, daylilies and other plants that thrive in this area,” Randolph says. The plants come from members’ gardens and most sell for $5 or less. Proceeds fund civic beautification and horticulture-related grants and scholarships. Past grant recipients include the St. Louis Center in Chelsea for its Take Root program that engages center residents in caring for St. Louis gardens; the Giving Garden at Dexter’s St. Joseph Catholic Church, which donates the produce to hunger alleviation programs; and the Michigan State University Organic Farmer Training Program. Chelsea’s St. Barnabas Episcopal Church, a 2016 grant recipient, built a watering system to distribute rainwater collected from the church’s roof to improve the quality of and increase the amount of produce it grows to feed the hungry.

Plants at the CAGC May sale are organized by type, including whether they thrive in shade or sun, to make for easy shopping. (Photo by Charlene Harris, CAGC)

The Chelsea Senior Center hired a summer intern in 2016 to work with seniors and children ages 4 to 13 at its Intergenerational Garden and will do so again this summer. Last year the garden produced more than 300 pounds of produce which was used in senior center meals and sold to seniors for nominal prices. Other 2017 CAGC grant recipients include the Chelsea Farmers Market for children’s activities, Chelsea District Library to create a fairy garden, Chelsea Faith in Action to spruce up its entrance and the Dexter District Library for elevated beds for its new seed library, a resource for regionally hardy heirloom and open pollinated vegetables and flowers. CAGC members enjoy sharing their love of gardening with the wider community, especially children, Forsch says. “We like to plant the gardening bug in little ones early.”

CAGC members plant annuals at Chelsea First United Methodist Church, where the group meets monthly Photo by BrianSeptember Reynoldsthrough May. (Photo by Charlene Harris, CAGC) 41


Students with a

HEART Written by Bob Richards

On March 6, two hearts and a forearm complete with working hand and digits (fingers) visited 5HF. These hearts and hand were not living tissue. They were created by students in Stockbridge with 3-D printers. The goal of the robotics program at Stockbridge High School is to “Inspire, Engage and Educate students while providing them with experiential learning activities that leave a positive impact on the students and the world around them.” A talented group of 45 students is doing just that. Colin Lilley (Grade 11) exhibits to Governor Snyder how we incorporate 3D printing into our UROV.

With that in mind, the group began exploring ways to use 3D printers to make prosthetics and other assistance devices. After spending a few weeks researching possible projects, the students agreed they would like to use 3D printers to create free (and inexpensive to produce) prosthetic hands and arms for those born without fingers, or who have lost them due to war, disease, or an accident. Twenty-five prosthetic hands were produced and distributed to the Enable Community Foundation – a worldwide foundation that provides access to millions of individuals who are living with limb loss. Students are also exploring ways to provide artificial limbs that are more lifelike in order to defeat cultural taboos in some parts of the world.

SHS added Robotics 10 years ago and then added underwater robotics to the curriculum. Robotics goal was to build an underwater robot to explore the pond in our nature center. Students entered our first underwater robot or ROV into the Great Lakes ROV competition in 2010 and won. That win qualified them for the International Competition in Hilo, Hawaii. Since then, the students have participated in initiatives such as the BentProp project in which eight students traveled to Palau in the Pacific Ocean to search for aircraft shot down during World War II. The class made four consecutive trips to Palau with the BentProp Project. In 2016, a group of students began brainstorming project ideas for the upcoming school year. During the course of the conversation, it became apparent that they were all interested in pursuing a project that matters and one that will leave a lasting impact. Each of them has an interest in a future STEM career and several expressed an interest in biomedical engineering.

The hearts were produced this school year as a way to allow students to learn about the human heart without having to acquire one from a science supply store. The cost of purchasing a single-use heart from a supplier costs around $100. The cost to produce these replicas is $10 each, allowing Stockbridge to have copies that will survive multiple classes and examinations. Over the next two school years, students will search for five airplanes flown by the Tuskegee Airmen while they trained in Michigan before deploying overseas to fight in WWII. Four of the aircraft crashed into Lake Huron on separate training flights. The fifth crashed into the St. Clair River. Students will dive, survey the wrecks and report their findings. For more information, people can follow Stockbridge Robotics on facebook. 42

Calla Coleman (Grade 12) and Michelle (Grade 10) show Governor Rick Snyder 3D printed object


43


Therapy Dogs

of the R.E.A.D ud to Bella as part A student reads alo District Library ea els Ch at m g progra to the Library Do

Make a Difference Written by Shawn Personke

Benefits for Volunteers and Those in Need of Friendly Support Rotary Club and given to the district as a gift – a gift that keeps on giving. “For five years, we dropped him off in the morning and picked him up after school so that he could work with students at Mill Creek,” Novak recalled. “They loved him and he spent quality time tending students in several classrooms and playing in gym class.”

Kristen Novak and her dog Dexter

Dexter is now based in Novak’s classroom where he is creating healthy connections for students and teachers alike. He’s a friendly and comforting presence in the hallways with people stopping for a quick pet or a “Hi, Dex!” Novak said they have a dog care team: students who apply for the job to take on the responsibility of walking, feeding, and brushing Dexter. The team’s roster changes throughout the year giving more students the chance to interact, especially important for those who cannot have a pet at home because of allergies or hectic schedules. Novak said that Dexter attends counseling groups to provide support, and he generally provides love and goodwill as their school “dog.” It’s common most days to find a student reading next to him quietly, stroking his fur. She adds that Dexter is valuable in a variety of capacities. While his “day job” is at Creekside, he has also spent time in the greater Dexter community. After the tornado that hit town a few years ago, Novak said they walked with Dexter to Wylie School which was offering counseling to families who had been affected, and through Huron Farms, a subdivision that had been particularly hard-hit.​

nSickle, Alayna Wholihan, Jack Va n lia Jil ht: rig to ft Le ra) Sikora, Wyatt Nova

D

exter the English Labrador has a busy schedule at Creekside Intermediate School in Dexter. There are students to meet, teachers to greet, and kids who need a little TLC to help them through the day. Dexter’s work is part of a growing trend of using trained therapy animals to help people cope, succeed, relax, or connect. Research by the American Heart Association and others show that spending time with an animal can lower your risk of heart disease and increase levels of serotonin and dopamine, the “happy chemicals” that help your body feel relaxed and calm. And, when that pet is trained to “help,” the benefits multiply for both the pet owner and those they are serving.

Kristen Novak, a teacher at Creekside Intermediate School, is Dexter’s caregiver. He lives with Novak and her family but was originally purchased by the Dexter 44

Novak and her family are also on the receiving end of Dexter’s innate compassion. “We are more loved because of his sweetness, and we are more fit because he begs to go out to play or walk. He is a sensitive soul and will hang with us when we are under the weather for any reason,” Novak said. Chelsea resident Barb Marshall also knows the value of bringing together pets and people in need. She takes Bella, her Alliance of Therapy Dogs certified black lab, to St. Joseph Mercy Chelsea, the Chelsea Retirement Community, North Creek Elementary (Bella is the school’s official reading dog), and to the Chelsea Library, where she was named one of the 2016 Library Volunteers of the Year for her work. Marshall said it’s amazing to see the reaction that their visits have upon people. “We see the stress level and pain level of patients at the hospital immediately decrease when the dog visits. Nursing home residents look forward to our visit each week, and some residents who are typically non-responsive will brighten up and talk when the dog comes,” said Marshall. “Our job is to make people smile and bring joy and I would say we accomplish that every time we visit!”


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Meet — laura seyfried

Laura serves the Manchester community as Executive Director of the Manchester Community Resource Center (MCRC), a position she’s held since 2011. Over the years, MCRC has partnered with the Manchester Wellness Coalition on projects such as the “5-A-Day Fruits and Veggies” challenge and promoting Wellness Center scholarships to eligible community members looking for physical fitness engagement opportunities. She oversees projects that provide access to health and nutrition programs through public benefits enrollment services (SNAP and medical coverage), healthy food pantry offerings, and the Wooden Nickel Farmers Market produce program. MCRC hosts the Women, Infant and Children (WIC) nutrition program for area families and partnered with St. Joseph Mercy Chelsea to bring a Behavioral Health Navigator to Manchester on a weekly basis to meet with interested clients. When Laura is not working, she enjoys outdoor activities like trail walking, biking, canoeing, and playing with the grandkids.

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Locals are caught making healthy choices all around our communities ...

Caught ACT IN THE

Chalk veggies at the Manchester Farmers Market.

Kids taking advantage of the nice weather to shoot some hoops on the basketball court near Heritage and Smith Elementary Schools in Stockbridge.

A busy morning on the Chelsea Wellness Center fitness floor.

Grass Lake students try out Yoga as part of the School Fitness Coordinator program at George Long Elementary School

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5 Healthy Towns Foundation representatives wearing their athletic shoes to the Governor’s Fitness Awards Banquet at the request of the Michigan Fitness Foundation

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Grass Lake

Outdoor Mecca

Written by 5 Healthy Towns Foundation

E

very April, health and wellness advocates from around the state of Michigan gather in Lansing and then Detroit for the Governor’s Fitness Awards (GFA). The event recognizes excellence in categories such as overcoming adversity, veteran of the year, event of the year, and promoting active communities. On April 20, Grass Lake will learn if its commitment to being an active community can move them from one of the top three communities in the state to the top spot as Michigan’s most Active Community. Grass Lake Charter Township and the Village of Grass Lake were selected as one of three finalists for the GFAs’ Active Communities Award, joining the City of Ishpeming and Waterford Township. The award recognizes communities that have taken a team-oriented, holistic approach to creating a healthy, vibrant community by increasing opportunities for physical activity; designing and building on-theground changes that lead to safe, inviting spaces; and creating and implementing policies to sustain their efforts for the longterm. While the state of Michigan is just now taking notice, Grass Lake has long planned to become an outdoor mecca. The community turned grant funding, volunteer hours and long term planning

into welcoming spaces where people of all ages can be active. Grass Lake’s natural centerpiece is a lake nestled into their village. The waterfront, along with abundant open spaces and a location adjacent to Waterloo Recreation Area, provides ample active-lifestyle opportunities for Grass Lake residents. One of the first projects to be funded by the Grass Lake Community Wellness Initiative was a study conducted by Michigan State University and its Small Towns Design Initiative program. The project considered community input on three green spaces around the Grass Lake community: Grass Lake Sports and Trails Park, Grass Lake County Park, and the downtown Grass Lake Community Events Park. Recommendations were given for all three. Grass Lake is off and running, following many of the recommendations by MSU. Grass Lake Sports and Trails Park is the community’s crown jewel of outdoor active living. The 50+ acre park, developed over the past several years, includes baseball, softball and soccer fields; hiking trails; open space; and playground equipment. Construction will begin on two basketball courts this spring. Grass Lake Township Hall has options for kids of all ages to be active. A playground was installed in late 2015, and a nine-hole disc golf course and a sand volleyball

Grass Lake Farmers Market at Whistlestop Park

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Aerial photo of Grass Lake Sports and Trails Park

court will be built this spring. When winter inevitably rolls around, the volleyball pit will transform into an ice rink. The Village of Grass Lake recently broke ground on Grass Lake Community Events Park, which is the open space behind Grass Lake’s Whistlestop Park. The space serves as a location for everything from sledding hills to concerts and an ice rink. Now it will be home to a pavilion for Grass Lake’s Farmers Market, musicians, exercise classes, and other community events. Finally, Grass Lake County Park is home to tennis courts, play areas and a beach. The park also hosts Yoga by the Lake, a free yoga class that runs from June through the end of July at 10 a.m. on Saturday mornings. Good luck, Grass Lake. We hope the GFA judges recognize what we already know – Grass Lake is a Healthy Place to Call Home!


Come Join the FUN!

Soccer on the fields located at the Grass Lake Sports and Trails Park. Photo by Scott Bray, The Grass Lake Times

Grass Lake Trails Photo of a kayaker on Grass Lake

Kids participating in the cardboard boat races on Grass Lake, photo by Scott Bray, The Grass Lke Times

Participants of a Saturday morning Yoga By the Lake session, held at Grass Lake County Park Water-skiers on Grass Lake, photo by Scott Bray, The Grass Lake Times

Kids enjoying the outdoors at the Grass Lake Sports and Trails Park Playground

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Chalk art at the Manchester Farmers Market

Check out our 5 Healthy Towns Farmers Markets! Chelsea Farmers Market Saturdays 8 am-1 pm May-October chelseafarmersmkt.org Chelsea Bushel Basket Farmers Market Wednesdays 2 pm-6 pm May-October chelseafarmersmkt.org

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Grass Lake Farmers Market Wednesdays 4 pm-7 pm May-September Facebook: Grass Lake Farmers Market

Manchester Farmers Market Thursdays 3:30 pm-7 pm May-October www.manchesterfarmmarket.com

Stockbridge Open Air Market Fridays 4 pm-7 pm May-October Facebook: Open Air Market of Stockbridge

Dexter Winter Marketplace Every Other Saturday 9 am-1 pm November –April www.dextermarket.com


Why Shop at Your Local Farmers Market? By 5 Healthy Towns Foundation Spring has arrived, and you know what that means . . . the start of market season! We are fortunate to have both winter and summer farmers markets in each of our 5 Healthy Towns. There are countless reasons to visit your local farmers market. Here are just a few!

Patrons are treated to local music at the Dexter Winter Marketplace

Tasty and Nutritious The produce you purchase at the market is seasonal and reflects its truest flavor. Producers allow their fruits and vegetables to ripen fully in the fields before they are brought directly to you at the market. Allowing the produce to ripen fully before picking allows it to absorb more nutrients, making it more nutritious! Fun Fact: 92% of farmers markets have vendors that sell local, fresh fruits and vegetables. Supports the Local Economy Purchasing local fruits, vegetables and other goods at the market not only helps support local vendors by providing them with the capital they need to keep operating but also boosts the local economy. Most of the vendors at the farmers market live locally and spend the profits they make at the market in their community.

Vendors from the Open Air Market of Stockbridge on the final day of the 2016 season

Fun Fact: For every $100 spent at a farmers market, $62 stays in the local economy, and $99 stays in state. Family Fun Going to the market can be a great activity for the entire family. At the market, you will find local musicians, cooking demonstrations, giveaways, contests, and children’s activities. The market is a great place to get kids engaging in healthy habits, too. Have them pick out things they have never tried before or use the produce you purchase to make healthy snacks. Fun Fact: Combined, the 5H markets coordinated 198 events and activities during the 2016 summer farmers market season. Food Assistance Programming All of our markets participate in one or more food assistance programs including Double Up Food Bucks, SNAP, Prescription for Health, Senior Project Fresh, WIC Project Fresh, and Market Bucks. Thus, increasing access to nutritious food.

Judy Radant during a cooking demonstration at the Chelsea Farmers Market

Fun Fact: 19.4 million dollars in SNAP benefits were spent at farmers markets in 2015. Connect with Others Your local farmers market is a great place to meet up with friends and meet new members of your community. It’s also a perfect opportunity to get acquainted with the vendors. Vendors are passionate about the items they are selling and are a great source for free advice. Ever heard of kohlrabi? The vendor selling it can tell you not only what it is and how it was produced but also how to store, prepare, and cook it. Fun Fact: Farmers market shoppers have three times as many social and informational interactions at the farmers market as compared to other locations where they shop. Fun Facts 1, 2, 4, and 5 were compiled by the Farmers Market Coalition. Facts can be accessed here: http://bit.ly/2a2C2QA or by visiting the Farmers Market Coalition’s website www.farmersmarketcoalition.org

Fresh from the fields lettuce and garlic at the Grass Lake Farmers Market

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Salads –

The Ultimate Fast Food

By Food Coach Yael Dolev*

W

hat do you think of when you think of fast food? Webster Dictionary defines fast food as “specializing in food that can be prepared and served quickly,” “Designed for ready availability, use, or consumption ...” For many dealing with hectic schedules and time constraints, the term fast food may bring to mind items from their local fast food chain. It is much less time-consuming to pick up a ready-made meal than to make one at home, right? Wrong! For me, fast food is SALAD! By combining a few simple ingredients you can have a fast, nourishing meal that can be prepared in less time than it takes you to get in your car and drive to pick up something. Salads are a fundamental part of Mediterranean cooking, as for many parts of the world. Growing up in Israel, meals always consisted of plates rich with colors and textures. The more variety added to your salad, the better! This is a notion I have carried with me from birth and something I always keep in mind when preparing my salads. Kids to elders, skilled cooks to kitchen novices can follow this simple recipe: cut a few ingredients, add oils, spices or herbs, eat, and enjoy. Anything can go together; it depends only on the availability of what’s in season and your preference. There is no one recipe. All you need to create a quick, nourishing meal is a bowl and your imagination. Here is one idea for a salad you can try at home. Salad serves six people.

Mediterranean Salad Foundation 3 Tomatoes (choose any variety you like) 3 English cucumbers Dressing 3 Tbs Olive oil ½ Lemon ¼ tsp Black pepper Directions: Clean vegetables and dice into small cubes, place in a serving bowl. In a separate bowl whisk dressing ingredients together. Pour mixture on diced vegetables and mix well.

Alternatives: Try adding a few of these ingredients to the above recipe. Mix and match. Add one or add them all. By switching up the ingredients you can create something new each time you make your salad. Try: Produce - diced green or red pepper, onion, celery stalks or roots, edible leaves and lettuces of all kinds, carrots, radishes, beets, avocados Herbs - ½ cup washed and chopped basil, dill, mint, marjoram, green onions, chives, garlic, scapes Legumes - ½ cup lentils, chickpeas, or lima beans Cheese - ½ cup Bulgarian feta or goat cheese Pickles - ½ cup capers, olives, diced cucumbers, artichoke hearts, or hearts of palm Pasta - ½ cup couscous, Israeli couscous, bulgur, buckwheat, quinoa, or wild rice Nuts and seeds - ½ cup pumpkin seeds, sunflower seeds, pine nuts, pistachios, or almonds Add to the dressing: 1 cup plain yogurt or tahini

ENJOY!!!

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*About Yael: Yael is an Israeli-born Food Coach who educates people on Mediterranean ways of eating and cooking. She has degrees in Botany, Agriculture, and Ecology. Yael is also a board member of the Chelsea Community Kitchen and a member of the Chelsea Friends and Family Wellness Coalition.

Salad Making Tips • Aim for half of your salad to be fruits and vegetables. Fresh produce should be the main part of your food, not the decoration! Packing your salads full of fresh produce makes it easy to consume the daily recommended amount of fruits and vegetables. • Dare to combine less traditional ingredients. Blend cooked and raw vegetables. Add fruits to savory dishes. Try incorporating items such as grape leaves, roots, and fruits. Add a rainbow of produce to make your salad nourishing and beautiful. Add: cheese, meat, legumes, whole-grains, nuts, and herbs. By using variations, you get all the elements that support your body and you will not have to think about it or count! Salads are great way to use up leftovers! Sauté vegetables in olive oil, add garlic, lemon juice, and last night’s chicken breast to get a tasty new salad. Amp up the spices and herbs! This not only adds flavor, but can reduce the amount of salt you need to use.


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Lifestyle Diets Defined: Clean, Paleo, Vegan, Gluten-Free, Primal and Mediterranean By Courtney Jones The Village Journal, Gainesville, FL., http://thevillagejournal.com/lifestyle-diets/

In the trendy world of diets, buzzwords like “clean,” “paleo” and “primal” are aplenty. But what do they mean? We dove in to explore the differences in these diets to provide an explanation about these eating lifestyles.

CLEAN A common thread among diets is the idea of eating “clean.” The basis of this theory is avoiding eating processed foods where unhealthy ingredients are often snuck into recipes. This diet includes fruits, vegetables, whole grains, protein such as meats and nuts, and dairy products. The key is to ensure these items are free of preservatives and chemicals. By eating five or six small meals a day, it is easier to control the ingredients and portions that go into each meal. Bottom Line: Avoid foods containing ingredients that are difficult to pronounce. Guidelines: •Stay away from processed or refined foods •Steer clear of refined sugar, such as artificial sweeteners like NutraSweet, Equal or Splenda •Avoid high fructose corn syrup •Nix soda Benefits: • Eating several small meals a day revs up the metabolism, making “calorie counting” unnecessary. Being full from these meals wards off hunger that may lead to snacking on junk foods. • Sticking to healthy, natural foods can balance energy levels, regulate hormonal function throughout the day (leading to a better night’s sleep), promote cell growth and help the body absorb nutrients more efficiently. 54

PALEO A diet based on food groups of pre-agricultural, hunter-gatherer lifestyles, the Paleo diet includes grass-produced meats, fish and seafood, fresh fruits and vegetables, eggs, nuts and seeds and healthy oils, such as olive, walnut, flaxseed, macadamia, avocado or coconut. Bottom Line: If it comes pre-cooked, pre-packaged or in bulk, don’t eat it. Guidelines: • Increase protein intake • Eat fewer carbs to lower the glycemic index • Eat more fiber • Cut trans fat and omega-6 polyunsaturated fats and increase omega-3 fats • Eat more potassium and less sodium • Avoid excessive amounts of foods with dietary acid • Eat more vitamins, minerals, antioxidants and plant phytochemicals • Avoid cereal grains, legumes (including peanuts), dairy, refined sugar, potatoes, processed foods, salt or refined vegetable oils. Benefits: • The unlimited number of fruits and vegetables in the diet have a low-glycemic index, which regulate blood sugar and insulin levels, helping to prevent Metabolic Syndrome. • Because of the fruits and vegetables intake, the body will become slightly alkaline, improving acid/base imbalance diseases, such as osteoporosis, kidney stones, hypertension, stroke, asthma, insomnia, motion sickness, inner ear ringing or exercise-induced asthma. • The high-soluble fiber content of the Paleo diet will improve most diseases of the gastrointestinal tract, and high omega-3 fat content can improve inflammatory diseases.

GLUTEN-FREE Eating gluten-free is primarily for individuals with a gluten sensitivity or intolerance, known as Celiac disease. Eliminating gluten from the diet works as a form of treatment by excluding the protein gluten, which is found in wheat, barley, rye and triticale, a cross between wheat and rye. There are no proven health benefits to a gluten-free diet for those without a gluten sensitivity. Nonetheless, this has been a popular diet for those looking to lose weight or boost their energy. Bottom Line: Stay away from wheatbased products or any food containing gluten. Guidelines: Always avoid Wheat, Barley, Rye, Triticale Avoid beer, bread, cake, pie, candy, cereal, cookies, crackers, pasta, pizza and sauces unless labeled “Gluten-Free” Allowed: • Beans, seeds, nuts in their natural, unprocessed form • Fresh eggs • Fresh meats, fish and poultry (not breaded, batter-coated or marinated) • Fruits and vegetables • Cider is naturally gluten free • Most dairy products Benefits: • Individuals suffering from Celiac disease or gluten sensitivity who follow a glutenfree diet experience fewer symptoms and complications from the disease and experience increased energy levels.


PRIMAL This diet references evolutionary biology to determine what should be eaten today. Similar to the Paleo diet, this theory states that since these foods existed when humans evolved, they provide balanced nutrition. More modern foods, such as vegetable oils, grains and dairy promote fat storage and are not part of this diet.

MEDITERRANEAN The Mediterranean Sea and its surrounding coasts provide a wealth of nutrients. The style of cooking adopted by countries such as Greece and Italy has been known to help reduce the risk of heart disease while providing a well balance diet.

VEGAN Following a vegan diet means excluding meat, fish and poultry and animal byproducts such as eggs, dairy and honey. This is one of the more strict diets to follow since animal byproducts are in so many inconspicuous ingredients, like food dye.

Bottom Line: Focus on healthy, non-processed foods.

Bottom Line: Don’t eat anything that comes from an animal.

Bottom Line: Eat as the cavemen did. Guidelines:

Guidelines: • Primarily eat plant-based foods • Replace butter with healthy fats (like olive oil or grape seed oil) • Instead of salt, use herbs and spices to flavor foods • Cut back on red meat • Eat fish and poultry • Drink red wine in moderation (optional) • Choose low-fat dairy

Guidelines: • Include fruits, vegetables, leafy greens, whole grain products, nuts, seeds & legumes. • Consume high-fat foods sparingly • It is recommended to spend at least 10 to 15 minutes in the sun two-to-three times per week, as Vitamin D is not included in vegan diets.

• Completely eliminate processed foods in favor of foods humans have been eating since the beginning of time. Benefits: • By eliminating processed foods and increasing omega-3 fats, high-glycemic index carbohydrates are reduced, which can help improve weight loss • Reduces risk of chronic diseases related to insulin resistance • Improves body function on the cellular level

Benefits: • Reduced risk of heart disease • Reduced incidence of Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s diseases • Reduced blood pressure levels

Benefits: • Vegan diets are free of cholesterol and are generally low in saturated fat, reducing the risk of heart disease, cancer and other chronic diseases • Better control and prevention of diabetes • Healthier body mass index • Lower blood pressure

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Healthy Recipes for Kids

Written by 5 Healthy Towns Foundation

Cauliflower “Bread”

Family eating Studies show that kids who eat family meals are more likely to eat fruits, vegetables, and grains. Family meals are also a good time to reconnect with your kids and catch up on everyone’s day. Strive for a time when everyone can be there; this may mean eating dinner a little later to accommodate a teen who’s at sports practice or setting aside time on the weekends for brunch. Keep mealtime calm and friendly — no lectures or arguing and NO electronics. According to the New England Journal of Medicine, obesity rates have more than doubled among children 6 to 11 years of age since 1970 and more than tripled among 12- to 19-yearolds. In order to help children grow and advance optimally, it is important for them to get the right vitamins and minerals in their diets. Kids who eat a healthy diet have more energy and motivation, which reinforces their ability to learn, and children that have been educated on healthy eating make healthier choices as they become adults. Sometimes parents are just plain busy and it’s easy to throw a bag of chips or some other packaged food in your child’s lunch. Instead, try packing your youngster’s lunch with other fast and easy options: roll a slice of lean meat around a cheese stick; include hummus or ranch dip with veggies; hard boiled eggs are always good to have around in a pinch; and cucumber is actually good with peanut butter. Make healthy, fun, edible projects with your kids! Frozen Yogurt Dots Snip the ends off several baggies and fill each with a different flavor of yogurt. Squeeze dots on a baking sheet and freeze. Once frozen they can be stored in a baggie and kept in the freezer. Edible Trains Cut the tops off red, yellow, orange, and green peppers and hollow out. Your child can use cucumber slices as wheels, securing with toothpicks. Let them select dip, veggies, and fruit to fill the train cars. Place them back to back and you have an edible train. 56

1 large cauliflower head 2 large eggs 2 cloves garlic, minced ½ tsp. dried Oregano 2 - 3 cups shredded mozzarella ½ cup grated parmesan

kosher salt black pepper marinara or ranch for dipping

Preheat oven to 450 degrees . Remove outer leaves from cauliflower and cut into florets. Place them in the food processor and pulse until cauliflower is finely chopped and resembles rice. Mix cauliflower in a bowl with eggs, garlic, oregano, 1 cup mozzarella, parmesan. Add salt and pepper and Italian seasoning, stir until combined Transfer “dough” to a baking sheet lined with parchment and pat down into a crust. Bake until golden, about 25 minutes. Sprinkle with remaining cheese and bake until cheese is melted and golden 5-10 min. Slice and serve. Recipe courtesy of Julie Doman, Chelsea

Pork and Vegetable Deconstructed Pot Stickers 1 pound fresh ground pork (can be substituted with ground turkey) 2 cups coleslaw mixture 4 stalks green onion 2 tablespoons fresh ginger root minced

2 t sesame oil 2 T low sodium soy sauce 4 ounces dry rice noodles

Add the pork, coleslaw mix, chopped green onion, minced ginger, sesame oil and soy sauce to a large bowl. Mix until well combined, then place into a skillet and cook over medium heat until pork is no longer pink. Meanwhile, cook the rice noodles as directed on the package and drain immediately. Add noodles to pork mixture and toss to combine, Serve with a side of pineapple. Recipe from Super Healthy Kids, Courtney Lopez

Banana Split on a Stick 3 bananas ¼ lb. cored pineapple 6 strawberries 1 cup of dipping chocolate ¼ cup chopped peanuts* 12 popsicle sticks Cut strawberries in half For each strawberry half, cut an equal size piece of banana and pineapple. Push one piece of fruit on each popsicle stick–pineapple first, then banana and lastly strawberry. Place in freezer for 10 minutes. Put chopped nuts on a small plate for dipping. Melt chocolate by heating in microwave for 30 seconds, stirring and repeating until melted and smooth. Dip cold fruit in chocolate, then into nuts, place on tray lined with waxed paper. Recipe from Our Family of Seven *Coconut can be substituted for nut allergies.


Chelsea • Dexter • Grass Lake • Manchester • Stockbridge

connected calendar April 11 – Dexter Wellness Coalition Meeting 5:30 pm, Dexter Wellness Center

14 – Free Senior Swimming Chelsea Wellness Center, 1 – 4 pm

14 – Free Senior Swimming Dexter Wellness Center, 1 – 4 pm

15 – Grass Lake Road Runners 8 am, Roaming Goat Café

15 – Dexter Forum

8:30 am, Dexter Wellness Center

15 – Chelsea Winter Farmers Market 9 am – 1 pm, Washington Street Education Center

17 – Grass Lake Community Wellness Initiative

6 pm, Grass Lake Charter Township Hall

18 – 5H Cooking Class – Very, Vegan 6 pm, Grass Lake Whistlestop Depot

20 – Stockbridge Coalition Meeting 6 pm, Stockbridge School Administration Building Room 108

21 – Free Senior Swimming 1 – 4 pm, Chelsea Wellness Center

21 – Free Senior Swimming 1 – 4 pm, Dexter Wellness Center

22 – Grass Lake Road Runners 8 am, Roaming Goat Café

22 – Chelsea Farmers Market 9 am 1 pm, Downtown Chelsea

22 – Dexter Winter Marketplace 9 am – 1 pm, Dexter Senior Center

22 – Woodland Stewardship at Beckwith Preserve 10 am – 1 pm, Stockbridge

22 – Arrows Away

2 – 4 pm, Eddy Discovery Center (recreation passport required)

23 – Strange Creatures of the Spring Pond 2 pm, Eddy Discovery Center (recreation passport required) $

25 – Manchester Coalition Meeting 12 pm, Manchester Village Offices

27 – Diabetes Prevention Program Information Meeting 6:30 pm, Dexter Wellness Center

28 – Free Senior Swimming Chelsea Wellness Center, 1 – 4 pm

28 – Free Senior Swimming Dexter Wellness Center, 1 – 4 pm

28 – Essential Oil Classes Grass Lake Chiropractic, 6:30 pm

29 –A taste of the trenches 3 – 6 pm, Michigan Military Heritage Museum

29 – Grass Lake Road Runner 8:30 am, Roaming Goat Cafe

29 – Chelsea Farmers Market 9 am 1 pm, Downtown Chelsea

29 – Spring Ephemerals Walk 11 am, Eddy Discovery Center (recreation passport required)

May 3 – Chelsea Bushel Basket Market 2 – 6 pm, Downtown Chelsea

4 – Minding your Health 6:30 pm, Chelsea Wellness Center

4 – Chelsea Friends and Family Wellness Coalition Meeting noon, Chelsea Wellness Center

5 – Free Senior Swimming 1 – 4 pm, Chelsea Wellness Center

5 – Free Senior Swimming 1 – 4 pm, Dexter Wellness Center

6 – Grass Lake Road Runners 8 am, Roaming Goat Café

6 – Dexter Forum

8:30 am, Dexter Wellness Center

6 – Chelsea Farmers Market 9 am – 1 pm, Downtown Chelsea

6 – Arrows Away

2 pm, Eddy Discovery Center (recreation passport required)

8 – Dexter Coalition Meeting 5:30 pm, Dexter Wellness Center

10 – Chelsea Bushel Basket Market 2 – 6 pm, Downtown Chelsea

10 – Grass Lake Farmers Market 4 – 7 pm, Whistlestop Park

11 – Manchester Farmers Market 3:30 – 7 pm, Chi-Broil Park

57


12 – Free Senior Swimming 1 – 4 pm, Chelsea Wellness Center

12 – Free Senior Swimming 1 – 4 pm, Dexter Wellness Center

12 – Open Air Market of Stockbridge

June 1 – Chelsea Friends & Family Wellness Coalition Mtg 12 pm, Chelsea Wellness Center

4 – 7 pm, Downtown Stockbridge

1 – Manchester Farmers Market

8 am, Roaming Goat Café

2 – Free Senior Swimming

9 am – 1 pm, Downtown Chelsea

2 – Free Senior Swimming

9 am – 1 pm, Eddy Discovery Center (recreation passport required) reservations necessary – 734.475.3170, $

2 – Open Air Market of Stockbridge

6 pm, Grass Lake Township Hall

3 – Grass Lake Road Runners

6 pm, Grass Lake Whistlestop Depot

3 – Free Yoga in the Park

2 – 6 pm, Downtown Chelsea

3 – Dexter Forum

13 – Grass Lake Road Runners 13 – Chelsea Farmers Market 13 – Fly Fishing and Fly Tying Workshop

15 – Grass Lake Community Wellness Initiative Meeting 16 – 5H Cooking Class – Grilling 3.0 17 – Chelsea Bushel Basket Market 17 – Grass Lake Farmers Market 4 – 7 pm, Whistlestop

18 – Manchester Farmers Market 3:30 – 7 pm, Chi-Broil Park

3:30 – 7 pm, Chi-Broil Park

1 – 4 pm, Chelsea Wellness Center 1 – 4 pm, Dexter Wellness Center

4 – 7 pm, Downtown Stockbridge 8 am, Roaming Goat Café

8 am, Dexter Mill Creek Park 8:30 am, Dexter Wellness Center

3 – Outdoor Exercise Class 9 am, Dexter Mill Creek Park

19 – Stockbridge Be Fit begins

3 – Chelsea Farmers Market

19 – Free Senior Swimming

3 – Yoga by the Lake

Stockbridge Wellness Center

1 – 4 pm, Chelsea Wellness Center

19 – Free Senior Swimming 1 – 4 pm, Dexter Wellness Center

19 – Community Country Dance 6 pm, Dexter Wellness Center

9 am – 1 pm, Downtown Chelsea 10 am, Grass Lake County Park

3 – Hook, Line and Sinker 10 am, Crooked Lake Fishing Pier, Waterloo Recreation Area (recreation passport required)

19 – Open Air Market of Stockbridge

3 – Arrows Away

20 – Creekside School Spring plant sale

4 – Rockhound Basics

4 – 7 pm, Downtown Stockbridge

Dexter Monument Park and Creekside Intermediate School District

20 – Grass Lake Road Runners 8 am, Roaming Goat Café

20 – Dexter Forum

8:30 am, Dexter Wellness Center

20 – Chelsea Farmers Market 9 am – 1 pm, Downtown Chelsea

20 – Heart and Sole Race benefitting SJMC Behavioral Health 8:15 am, Chelsea High School

20 – Quaking Bog Hike 11 am, Eddy Discovery Center (recreation passport required)

20 – Arrows Away

2 pm, Eddy Discovery Center (recreation passport required)

2 pm, Eddy Discovery Center (recreation passport required) 2 pm, Eddy Discovery Center (recreation passport required) (reservations required – 734.475.3170) $

7 – Chelsea Bushel Basket Market 2 – 6 pm, Downtown Chelsea

7 – Grass Lake Farmers Market 4 – 7 pm, Whistlestop

8 – Manchester Farmers Market 3:30 – 7 pm, Chi-Broil Park

9 – Free Senior Swimming 1 – 4 pm, Chelsea Wellness Center

9 – Free Senior Swimming 1 – 4 pm, Dexter Wellness Center

21 – Edible, Medicinal or Poisonous?

9 – Open Air Market of Stockbridge

24 – Chelsea Bushel Basket Market

10 – Grass Lake Road Runners

2 pm, Eddy Discovery Center (recreation passport required) reservations necessary – 734.475.3170, $ 2 – 6 pm, Downtown Chelsea

24 – Grass Lake Farmers Market 4 – 7 pm, Whistlestop

25 – Manchester Farmers Market 3:30 – 7 pm, Chi-Broil Park

26 – Open Air Market of Stockbridge 4 – 7 pm, Downtown Stockbridge

27 – Hook, Line and Sinker

10 am, Crooked Lake Fishing Pier, Waterloo Recreation Area (recreation passport required)

27 – Arrows Away

8 am, Roaming Goat Café

10 – Yoga in the Park 8 am, Dexter Mill Creek Park

10 – Outdoor Exercise Class 9 am, Dexter Mill Creek Park

10 – Yoga by the Lake 10 am, Grass Lake County Park

10 – Yoga on the Lawn 10 am, Chelsea District Library

6 pm, Portage Lake Campground (recreation passport required)

10 – Chelsea Farmers Market

11:30 am, Chelsea Wellness Center

10 – Arrows Away

12 – 1:30 pm, Chelsea Wellness Center

11 – Turtlemania!

31 – Sit n Be Fit

31 – Healthy Living for Your Brain and Body 31 – Healthy Living for Your Brain and Body 3 – 4 pm, Dexter Wellness Center

58

4 – 7 pm, Downtown Stockbridge

9 am – 1 pm, Downtown Chelsea 2 pm, Eddy Discovery Center (recreation passport required) 2 pm, Eddy Discovery Center (recreation passport required)

Check 5healthytowns.org for the latest additions or cancellations


(reservations required – 734.475.3170) $

June

(continued)

13 – Dexter Wellness Coalition Meeting 5:30 pm, Dexter Wellness Center

14 – Diabetes: How nutrition and exercise play a role

1 – 4 pm, Dexter Wellness Center

23 – SRSLY Cinema

6:30 pm, Dexter District Library

23 – Open Air Market of Stockbridge 4 – 7 pm, Downtown Stockbridge

6:30 pm, Dexter Wellness Center

24 – Grass Lake Road Runners

2 – 6 pm, Downtown Chelsea

24 – Yoga in the Park

4 – 7 pm, Whistlestop Park

24 – Outdoor Exercise Class

14 – Chelsea Bushel Basket Market 14 – Grass Lake Farmers Market 15 – Diabetes: How nutrition and exercise play a role 6:30 pm, Dexter Wellness Center

15 – Manchester Farmers Market 3:30 – 7 pm, Chi-Broil Park

15 – Stockbridge Area Wellness Coalition Meeting 6 pm, Stockbridge School Admin Building

16 – Free Senior Swimming 1 – 4 pm, Chelsea Wellness Center

16 – Free Senior Swimming 1 – 4 pm, Dexter Wellness Center

16 – Open Air Market of Stockbridge 4 – 7 pm, Downtown Stockbridge

17 – Men’s Health Week Open House 9 am – 12 pm, Chelsea and Dexter Wellness Centers

17 – Grass Lake Road Runners 8 am, Roaming Goat Café

17 – Free Yoga in the Park 8 am, Dexter Mill Creek Park

17 – Dexter Forum

8:30 am, Dexter Wellness Center

17 – Free Outdoor Exercise Class 9 am, Dexter Mill Creek Park

17 – Chelsea Farmers Market 9 am – 1 pm, Downtown Chelsea

17 – Yoga on the Lawn 10 am, Chelsea District Library

17 – Yoga by the Lake

10 am, Grass Lake County Park

17 – Positively Chiropractic Day in the Village 5k 8 am, Downtown Stockbridge

19 – Grass Lake Community Wellness Initiative Meeting 6 pm, Grass Lake Township Hall

20 – 5H Cooking Class – Pungent, Potent and Powerful

8 am, Roaming Goat Café

8 am, Dexter Mill Creek Park 9 am, Dexter Mill Creek Park

24 – Chelsea Farmers Market 9 am – 1 pm, Downtown Chelsea

24 – Yoga on the Lawn 10 am, Chelsea District Library

27 – Manchester Wellness Coalition Meeting 12 pm, Manchester Village Offices

28 – Chelsea Bushel Basket Market 2 – 6 pm, Downtown Chelsea

28 – Grass Lake Farmers Market 4 – 7 pm, Whistlestop Park

29 – Manchester Farmers Market 3:30 – 7 pm, Chi-Broil Park

29 - SRSLY Cinema

Sundown, Chelsea Clocktower Commons

30 – Free Senior Swimming 1 – 4 pm, Chelsea Wellness Center

30 – Free Senior Swimming 1 – 4 pm, Dexter Wellness Center

30 – Open Air Market of Stockbridge 4 – 7 pm, Downtown Stockbridge

July

1 – Grass Lake Road Runners 8 am, Roaming Goat Café

1 – Yoga in the Park 8 am, Dexter Mill Creek Park

1 – Dexter Forum

8:30 am, Dexter Wellness Center

1 – Outdoor Exercise Class 9 am, Dexter Mill Creek Park

1 – Yoga by Lake

10 am, Grass Lake County Park

1 – Yoga on the Lawn 10 am, Chelsea District Library

1 – Chelsea Farmers Market 9 am – 1 pm, Downtown Chelsea

6 pm, Grass Lake Whistlestop Depot

5 – Chelsea Bushel Basket Market

2 – 6 pm, Downtown Chelsea

5 – Grass Lake Farmers Market

4 – 7 pm, Whistlestop

6 – Chelsea Friends and Family Wellness Coalition Meeting

21 – Chelsea Bushel Basket Market 21 – Grass Lake Farmers Market 22 – Manchester Farmers Market 3:30 – 7 pm, Chi-Broil Park

22 – SRSLY Cinema

Sundown, Chelsea Clocktower Commons

23 – Free Senior Swimming 1 – 4 pm, Chelsea Wellness Center

23 – Free Senior Swimming

2 – 6 pm, Downtown Chelsea 4 – 7 pm, Whistlestop Park

12 pm, Chelsea Wellness Center

6 – Manchester Farmers Market 3:30 – 7 pm, Chi-Broil Park

6 – SRSLY Cinema

Sundown, Chelsea Clocktower Commons

59


July (continued)

July

7 – Free Senior Swimming

18 – 5H Cooking Class – On the Side

1 – 4 pm, Chelsea Wellness Center

7 – Free Senior Swimming 1 – 4 pm, Dexter Wellness Center

7 – Open Air Market of Stockbridge 4 – 7 pm, Downtown Stockbridge

7 – Traffic jam’in 5k downtown Grass Lake $

8 – Grass Lake Road Runners 8 am, Roaming Goat Café

8 – Chelsea Farmers Market

19 – Chelsea Bushel Basket Market 2 – 6 pm, Downtown Chelsea

19 – Grass Lake Farmers Market 4 – 7 pm, Whistlestop

20 – Manchester Farmers Market 3:30 – 7 pm, Chi-Broil Park

20 – SRSLY Cinema

Sundown, Chelsea Clocktower Commons

9 am – 1 pm, Downtown Chelsea

20 – Stockbridge Area Wellness Coalition Meeting

10 am, Chelsea District Library

21 – Free Senior Swimming

Grades 8 – 12, Robin Hills Farm $

21 – Free Senior Swimming

8 – Yoga on the Lawn

10 – Eco Art + Science Camp 11 – Dexter Coalition Meeting

6 pm, Stockbridge School Administration Building 1 – 4 pm, Chelsea Wellness Center 1 – 4 pm, Dexter Wellness Center

5:30 pm, Dexter Wellness Center

21 – SRSLY Cinema

6:30 pm, Dexter Wellness Center

21 – Open Air Market of Stockbridge

12 – Melanoma, Fact or Fiction 12 – Chelsea Bushel Basket Market

6:30 pm, Dexter District Library

4 – 7 pm, Downtown Stockbridge

2 – 6 pm, Downtown Chelsea

22 – Grass Lake Road Runners

4 – 7 pm, Whistlestop Park

22 – Chelsea Farmers Market

3:30 – 7 pm, Chi-Broil Park

22 – Yoga by the Lake,

12 – Grass Lake Farmers Market 13 – Manchester Farmers Market 13 – Manage Your Damage Keep Healthy Skin 6:30 pm, Chelsea Wellness Center

13 – SRSLY Cinema

Sundown, Chelsea Clocktower Commons

14 – Free Senior Swimmin 1 – 4 pm, Chelsea Wellness Center

14 – Free Senior Swimming 1 – 4 pm, Dexter Wellness Center

14 – Open Air Market of Stockbridge 4 – 7 pm, Downtown Stockbridge

15 – Grass Lake Road Runners 8 am, Roaming Goat Café

15 – Yoga in the Park 8 am, Dexter Mill Creek Park

15 – Dexter Forum

8:30 am, Dexter Wellness Center

15 – Outdoor Exercise Class 9 am, Dexter Mill Creek Park

15 – Chelsea Farmers Market 9 am – 1 pm, Downtown Chelsea

15 – Yoga by the Lake

10 am, Grass Lake County Park

15 – Yoga on the Lawn 10 am, Chelsea District Library

17 – Grass Lake Community Wellness Initiative Meeting 6 pm, Grass Lake Township Hall

17 – Eco Art + Science Camp Grades 6-8, Robin Hills Farm $

60

6 pm, Grass Lake Whistlestop Depot

8 am, Roaming Goat Café

9 am – 1 pm, Downtown Chelsea 10 am, Grass Lake County Park

22 – Yoga on the Lawn 10 am, Chelsea District Library

25 – Manchester Wellness Coalition 12 pm, Manchester Village Offices

26 – Chelsea Bushel Basket Market 2 – 6 pm, Downtown Chelsea

26 – Grass Lake Farmers Market 4 – 7 pm, Whistlestop

27 – Manchester Farmers Market 3:30 – 7 pm, Chi-Broil Park

27 – SRSLY Cinema

Sundown, Chelsea Clocktower Commons

28 – Free Senior Swimming 1 – 4 pm, Chelsea Wellness Center

28 – Free Senior Swimming 1 – 4 pm, Dexter Wellness Center

28 – Open Air Market of Stockbridge 4 – 7 pm, Downtown Stockbridge

29 – Grass Lake Road Runners 8 am, Roaming Goat Café

29 – Yoga in the Park 8 am, Dexter Mill Creek Park

29 – Outdoor Exercise Class 9 am, Dexter Mill Creek Park

29 – Chelsea Farmers Market 9 am – 1 pm, Downtown Chelsea

29 – Yoga by the Lake

10 am, Grass Lake County Park

29 – Yoga on the Lawn 10 am, Chelsea District Library


August

15 – 5H Cooking Class – Power Foods

1-8 – Manchester Sesquicentennial Celebration 2 – Chelsea Bushel Basket Market

16 – Grass Lake Farmers Market

2 – 6 pm, Downtown Chelsea

2 – Grass Lake Farmers Market 4 – 7 pm, Whistlestop Park

3 – Chelsea Friends and Family Wellness Coalition Meeting

6 pm, Grass Lake Whistlestop Depot

16 – Chelsea Bushel Basket Market 2 – 6 pm, Downtown Chelsea 4 – 7 pm, Whistlestop Park

17 – Stockbridge Area Wellness Coalition Meeting 6 pm, Stockbridge School Admin. Building

17 – Manchester Farmers Market 3:30 – 7 pm, Chi-Broil Park

12 pm, Chelsea Wellness Center

17 – SRSLY Cinema

3:30 – 7 pm, Chi-Broil Park

18 – Free Senior Swimming

3 – Manchester Farmers Market 3 – SRSLY Cinema

Sundown, Chelsea Clocktower Commons

4 – Free Senior Swimming 1 – 4 pm, Chelsea Wellness Center

4 – Free Senior Swimming 1 – 4 pm, Dexter Wellness Center

4 – Open Air Market of Stockbridge 4 – 7 pm, Downtown Stockbridge

Sundown, Chelsea Clocktower Commons 1 – 4 pm, Chelsea Wellness Center

18 – Free Senior Swimming 1 – 4 pm, Dexter Wellness Center

18 – SRSLY Cinema

6:30 pm, Dexter District Library

18 – Open Air Market of Stockbridge 4 – 7 pm, Downtown Stockbridge

5 – Grass Lake Road Runners

19 – Grass Lake Road Runners

5 – Run, Manchester

19 – Yoga in the Park

5 – Manchester Street Festival

19 – Outdoor Exercise Class

8 am, Roaming Goat Café

8 am, Downtown Manchester

10 am – 6 pm, Downtown Manchester

5 – Yoga in the Park

8 am, Dexter Mill Creek Park

5 – Dexter Forum

8:30 am, Dexter Wellness Center

5 – Outdoor Exercise Class 9 am, Dexter Mill Creek Park

5 – Chelsea Farmers Market 9 am – 1 pm, Downtown Chelsea

5 – Yoga on the Lawn

10 am, Chelsea District Library

8 – Dexter Coalition Meeting 5:30 pm, Dexter Wellness Center

9 – Chelsea Bushel Basket Market 2 – 6 pm, Downtown Chelsea

9 – Grass Lake Farmers Market 4 – 7 pm, Whistlestop Park

10 – Manchester Farmers Market 3:30 – 7 pm, Chi-Broil Park

10 – SRSLY Cinema

Sundown, Chelsea Clocktower Commons

11 – Free Senior Swimming 1 – 4 pm, Chelsea Wellness Center

11 – Free Senior Swimming 1 – 4 pm, Dexter Wellness Center

11 – Open Air Market of Stockbridge 4 – 7 pm, Downtown Stockbridge

11 – Grass Lake Road Runners 8 am, Roaming Goat Café

11 – Yoga in the Park 8 am, Dexter Mill Creek Park

11 – Outdoor Exercise Class 9 am, Dexter Mill Creek Park

12 – Chelsea Farmers Market 9 am – 1 pm, Downtown Chelsea

12 – Yoga on the Lawn 10 am, Chelsea District Library

8 am, Roaming Goat Café

8 am, Dexter Mill Creek Park 9 am, Dexter Mill Creek Park

19 – Chelsea Farmers Market 9 am – 1 pm, Downtown Chelsea

19 – Yoga on the Lawn 10 am, Chelsea District Library

21 – Grass Lake Community Wellness Initiative Meeting 6 pm, Grass Lake Township Hall

22 – Manchester Wellness Coalition Meetin 12 pm, Manchester Village Offices

23 – Chelsea Bushel Basket Market 2 – 6 pm, Downtown Chelsea

23 – Grass Lake Farmers Market 4 – 7 pm, Whistlestop Park

24 – Manchester Farmers Market 3:30 – 7 pm, Chi-Broil Park

25 – Free Senior Swimming 1 – 4 pm, Chelsea Wellness Center

25 – Free Senior Swimming 1 – 4 pm, Dexter Wellness Center

25 – Open Air Market of Stockbridge 4 – 7 pm, Downtown Stockbridge

26 – Grass Lake Road Runners 8 am, Roaming Goat Café

26 – Run for the Rolls 12:30 pm, Downtown Chelsea

26 – Chelsea Farmers Market 9 am – 1 pm, Downtown Chelsea

27 – 5 Healthy Towns Farm to Table Dinner 4 – 7 pm, Grass Lake Village Event Park

30 – Chelsea Bushel Basket Market 2 – 6 pm, Downtown Chelsea

30 – Grass Lake Farmers Market 4 – 7 pm, Whistlestop Park

31 – Manchester Farmers Market 3:30 – 7 pm, Chi-Broil Park

61


September 1 – Free Senior Swimming

2 – 6 pm, Downtown Chelsea

1 – 4 pm, Chelsea Wellness Center

20 – Grass Lake Farmers Market

1 – 4 pm, Dexter Wellness Center

21 – Stockbridge Area Wellness Coalition Meeting

1 – Free Senior Swimming 1 – Open Air Market of Stockbridge 4 – 7 pm, Downtown Stockbridge

2 – Grass Lake Road Runners 8 am, Roaming Goat Café

2 – Dexter Forum

8:30 am, Dexter Wellness Center

2 – Chelsea Farmers Market 9 am – 1 pm, Downtown Chelsea

6 – Chelsea Bushel Basket Market 2 – 6 pm, Downtown Chelsea

6 – Grass Lake Farmers Market 4 – 7 pm, Whistlestop Park

7 – Chelsea Friends and Family Wellness Coalition Meeting 12 pm, Chelsea Wellness Center

7 – Manchester Farmers Market 3:30 – 7 pm, Chi-Broil Park

8 – Free Senior Swimming 1 – 4 pm, Chelsea Wellness Center

8 – Free Senior Swimming 1 – 4 pm, Dexter Wellness Center

8 – Open Air Market of Stockbridge 4 – 7 pm, Downtown Stockbridge

9 – Grass Lake Road Runners 8 am, Roaming Goat Café

9 – Chelsea Farmers Market 9 am – 1 pm, Downtown Chelsea

12 – Dexter Coalition Meeting 5:30 pm, Dexter Wellness Center

13 – Chelsea Bushel Basket Market 2 – 6 pm, Downtown Chelsea

13 – Grass Lake Farmers Market 4 – 7 pm, Whistlestop Park

14 – Manchester Farmers Market 3:30 – 7 pm, Chi-Broil Park

15 – Free Senior Swimming 1 – 4 pm, Chelsea Wellness Center

15 – Free Senior Swimming 1 – 4 pm, Dexter Wellness Center

15 – Open Air Market of Stockbridge 4 – 7 pm, Downtown Stockbridge

16 – Free Grass Lake Road Runners 8 am, Roaming Goat Café

16 – Chelsea Farmers Market 9 am – 1 pm, Downtown Chelsea

18 – Grass Lake Community Wellness Initiative Meeting 6 pm, Grass Lake Township Hall

19 – 5H Cooking Class Salsa Sensations,

6 pm, Grass Lake Whistlestop Depot

62

20 – Chelsea Bushel Basket Market

4 – 7 pm, Whistlestop Park

6 pm, Stockbridge School Admin. Building

21 – Manchester Farmers Market 3:30 – 7 pm, Chi-Broil Park

22 – Free Senior Swimming 1 – 4 pm, Chelsea Wellness Center

22 – Free Senior Swimming 1 – 4 pm, Dexter Wellness Center

22 – Open Air Market of Stockbridge 4 – 7 pm, Downtown Stockbridge

23 – Grass Lake Road Runners 8 am, Roaming Goat Café

23 – Chelsea Farmers Market 9 am – 1 pm, Downtown Chelsea

26 – Manchester Wellness Coalition Meeting 12 pm, Manchester Village Offices

27 – Chelsea Bushel Basket Market 2 – 6 pm, Downtown Chelsea

27 – Grass Lake Farmers Market 4 – 7 pm, Whistlestop Park

28 – Manchester Farmers Market 3:30 – 7 pm, Chi-Broil Park

29 – Free Senior Swimming 1 – 4 pm, Chelsea Wellness Center

29 – Free Senior Swimming 1 – 4 pm, Dexter Wellness Center

29 – Open Air Market of Stockbridge 4 – 7 pm, Downtown Stockbridge

30 – Grass Lake Road Runners 8 am, Roaming Goat Café

30 – Chelsea Farmers Market 9 am – 1 pm, Downtown Chelsea


63


KUP

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FINA

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E ALT H C H L H IA

the bank will see you now Financial wellness starts with an understanding of how your savings and investments can best be fostered and grown. Join us for workshops and speakers addressing elder abuse, cybersecurity and using the internet.

CSB FINANCIAL HEALTH FAIR Location: 1010 S. Main Street, Chelsea • Outside Plaza office

May 13 • 10:00 am to 2:00 pm

GREAT INFORMATION • LOTS OF GIVEAWAYS • FUN ACTIVITIES

www.chelseastate.bank 64

5ht connected spring2017lr  

Connected is a semi-annual publication that celebrates and encourages healthy living by offering many programs throughout Chelsea, Dexter, M...

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