2022 Annual Report

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2022 ANNUAL REPORT

WWW.SJCOE.ORG |

| #WEARESJCOE


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“I would like to thank the school staff, teachers, and administrators, who, despite the challenges of recent years, have never wavered in their commitment to serving the children and families of San Joaquin County.” - TROY BROWN

SAN JOAQUIN COUNTY SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS


ANNUAL REPORT |3 TROY BROWN, Ed.D.

SAN JOAQUIN COUNTY SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS

A MESSAGE FROM

TROY BROWN

SCOTT ANDERSON DEPUTY SUPERINTENDENT Business Services

SAN JOAQUIN COUNTY SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS The San Joaquin County Office of Education (SJCOE) plays many roles. We work in collaboration with the school districts and charter schools serving our county’s more than 151,000 students by providing leadership, services, and support. We also provide direct services to students and families in our alternative education, special education, and charter school programs. Additionally, we identify needs in our county, recognizing ways to make our community stronger by creating new programs and services for infants, children, teens, and adults. At our core, we are a service organization, doing whatever we can to meet individuals and families where they are -- no matter their circumstances -- so they have an opportunity to grow and live their best possible lives. In this year’s annual report to our community, we highlight some of our departments and programs, new initiatives, continued progress, and significant milestones. Part of our Venture Academy Family of Schools charter school, the new TEACH! Academy was established to help counter the teacher shortage by creating a career pipeline for our next generation of educators. TEACH! is a teacher education and early college high where students graduate with a high school diploma and associate degree, then continue on an affordable pathway to a bachelor’s degree, teaching credential, and a career in the classroom. The inaugural TEACH! freshman class just finished their first year. They are on a path that will lead back to the SJCOE at our Teachers College of San Joaquin to earn their credentials to serve as teachers in local classrooms.

It is our goal at the SJCOE to make sure students are college and career ready. Sometimes, meeting students where they are means helping them get back on track, which has been a long tradition at the SJCOE. This past school year we marked the 30-year milestone of the one.Program, the SJCOE’s groundbreaking alternative education program that continues to evolve to help students find their path to success. We also celebrated the 11th class of graduates at our life-changing Discovery ChalleNGe Academy program, who worked hard to reclaim high school credits and their futures. Science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education continues to be a priority of the SJCOE. Our STEM Programs department offers unique opportunities for student learning and teacher training. These opportunities range from the high-tech makerspace on our SJCOE campus in Stockton that we call our FabLab to the pristine wilderness of our Sky Mountain Outdoor Education Center in the Tahoe National Forest. I hope you enjoy reading about these programs and more on the following pages. I would also like to thank school staff, teachers, and administrators, who, despite the challenges of recent years, have never wavered in their commitment to serving the children and families of San Joaquin County.

JANINE KAESLIN

ASSOCIATE SUPERINTENDENT Student Programs and Services

JANE STEINKAMP

ASSISTANT SUPERINTENDENT Educational Services

BRANDIE BRUNNI

ASSISTANT SUPERINTENDENT

San Joaquin County Special Education Local Plan Area and Special Education

SEAN MORRILL

ASSISTANT SUPERINTENDENT

County Operated Schools and Programs

CHRISTINA TORRES-PETERS Troy A. Brown, Ed.D. County Superintendent of Schools

CHIEF HUMAN RESOURCES OFFICER Human Resources


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WE ARE SJCOE THE SAN JOAQUIN COUNTY OFFICE OF EDUCATION IS ONE OF 58 COUNTY OFFICES OF EDUCATION IN CALIFORNIA The San Joaquin County Office of Education (SJCOE) is a regional agency that provides educational leadership, resources, and customized services to assist school districts. We promote student achievement and accountability, serve San Joaquin County students, and strive to ensure that every student, regardless of circumstances, has an opportunity for a quality education.


WE ARE SERVICE-ORIENTED THE SJCOE PROVIDES QUALITY SERVICES TO SCHOOL DISTRICTS AND OUR COMMUNITY At our core, the San Joaquin County Office of Education (SJCOE) is a service organization. That is as true of the teachers and other employees providing instruction in the classroom as it is for all the staff providing a wide range of services supporting education throughout the county. The work of many of our services is behind the scenes, but it is absolutely essential to the programs and schools we operate and the school districts that call San Joaquin County home. Our Business Services division ensures responsible fiscal management of public funds by providing payroll, budgeting, accounting, auditing, benefits management, purchasing, risk management, and other services to various SJCOE programs and local school districts. Business Services also operates a number of joint powers authorities (JPA) and consortia, which combine the buying power of the SJCOE with multiple local school districts to secure reduced rates for property and liability insurance, workers’ compensation coverage, healthcare, legal services, and technology. Without a robust technology infrastructure, our modern educational system could not function. The SJCOE Information Technology (IT) department provides services that include: •

Administrative software systems for payroll, finance, and the electronic transfer of information to and from financial institutions, county offices, state offices, and the federal government.

Installation, repair, support, and security services for more than eight school districts, 4,000+ teachers and staff, 30,000+ devices and the network infrastructure they use, a help desk call center, and software sales.

Installation and training on computer hardware and software systems.

This includes being the technological team behind the Data Processing JPA, a consortium of the SJCOE and eight county school districts through which technological services and support are provided by our IT department. From recruitment to retirement, our Human Resources (HR) department serves the employment needs of all SJCOE programs and departments. Additionally, the HR team provides employee classification and salary placement information; negotiation and contract administration; and maintains personnel policies, regulations, records, and publications. On top of their duties focused on the SJCOE, the HR team also provides assistance, guidance, and training to support local school districts. Credentialing services are available for a wide range of needs. Applicants beginning a career in education can find guidance and information regarding credential preparation programs and application processing. At the SJCOE, we conduct scheduled credential assignment monitoring and review for school districts and provide warrant verification services ensuring valid credential status for certificated staff. Additionally, our HR Fingerprinting Office provides LiveScan fingerprinting services, as well as Federal Bureau of Investigation and United States Department of Justice background checks for the SJCOE, local school districts, and agencies throughout the county.

THE SJCOE WORKFORCE

426

CERTIFICATED EMPLOYEES

707

CLASSIFIED EMPLOYEES

822

SUBSTITUTE AND TEMPORARY*

Data as of May 2022. * Does not include students in paid work experience.

ANNUAL REPORT |5

OUR DEPARTMENTS OFFICE OF THE SUPERINTENDENT

Administrative Services CodeStack Educational Foundation Equity, Inclusion, and Access Grant Development Office Human Resources Public Information Office Student Programs and Services

BUSINESS SERVICES

County Office Business Services District Business Services Information Technology Joint Powers Authority Operations and Support Services Payroll Services

COUNTY OPERATED SCHOOLS & PROGRAMS Academic Resources Career Technical Education Discovery ChalleNGe Academy Foster Youth and Homeless Services Greater Valley Conservation Corps one.Charter Academies one.Program Student Services Venture Academy Family of Schools WorkStartYES

SPECIAL EDUCATION LOCAL PLAN AREA & SPECIAL EDUCATION

Special Education Regionalized Programs Program Specialists Related Services WorkAbility I

EDUCATIONAL SERVICES

College and Career Readiness Comprehensive Health Continuous Improvement and Support Early Education and Support Language and Literacy Mathematics Migrant Education Student Activities and Events STEM Programs Teachers College of San Joaquin Visual and Performing Arts


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14

SAN JOAQUIN COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICTS

245

PUBLIC SCHOOLS & PUBLIC CHARTER SCHOOLS

151,179 STUDENTS ENROLLED IN SAN JOAQUIN COUNTY PUBLIC SCHOOLS

WE ARE PUBLIC EDUCATION


2020-2021 ENROLLMENT

K-12 SCHOOL DISTRICT

ENROLLMENT

BANTA UNIFIED

1,943

ESCALON UNIFIED

2,974

JEFFERSON ELEMENTARY

2,236

LAMMERSVILLE UNIFIED

6,397

LINCOLN UNIFIED

8,939

LINDEN UNIFIED

2,323

LODI UNIFIED

30,738

MANTECA UNIFIED

23,660

NEW HOPE ELEMENTARY NEW JERUSALEM ELEMENTARY OAK VIEW UNION ELEMENTARY RIPON UNIFIED

177 6,502 363 4,728

STOCKTON UNIFIED

40,627

TRACY UNIFIED

15,577

SJC OFFICE OF EDUCATION

HOW SCHOOL DISTRICTS OPERATE WHERE FUNDS COME FROM TOTAL REVENUES $1,867,300,474 Local Control Funding Formula 71.6% Federal 12.1% Other State 13.6% Other local and other sources 2.7%

HOW FUNDS ARE USED TOTAL EXPENDITURES $1,714,657,612 Salaries 55.9% Employee Benefits 24.7% Books and Supplies 7.9% Services 9.9% Capital Outlay 0.9% Other 0.7%

3,995

ANNUAL REPORT |7

SAN JOAQUIN COUNTY’S 14 SCHOOL DISTRICTS

7+1+1245416L

San Joaquin County is home to 14 public school districts with 245 schools, including charter schools, and a total of more than 151,000 students. Each independent school district is governed by an elected board of trustees. The San Joaquin County Office of Education (SJCOE) provides a variety of services to support students and educators. Collaborative efforts between the SJCOE and school districts ensure students have access to a high-quality education.

ENROLLMENT BY ETHNICITY

AFRICAN AMERICAN 7.4%

AMERICAN INDIAN OR ALASKA NATIVE 0.6%

ASIAN 12.3%

FILIPINO 4.1%

HISPANIC OR LATINO 53.6%

PACIFIC ISLANDER 0.7%

WHITE 16.5%

TWO OR MORE RACES 4%

NOT REPORTED 0.8%

AVERAGE DAILY ATTENDANCE

GENERAL FUND REVENUE

PER ADA GENERAL FUND EXPENDITURES

LCFF PER FUNDED ADA*

NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES

317

$6,219,191

$18,529

$10,625

54

ESCALON

2,929

$36,383,049

$11,415

$9,651

365

JEFFERSON

2,207

$25,050,721

$10,827

$8,686

258

LAMMERSVILLE

5,931

$66,657,592

$10,402

$8,948

612

LINCOLN

8,882

$123,631,816

$12,179

$10,100

1,125

LINDEN

2,246

$31,218,386

$12,699

$10,284

319

LODI

27,028

$417,234,060

$14,312

$10,676

3,677

MANTECA

22,688

$316,045,094

$12,082

$10,323

2,878

179

$3,167,744

$16,135

$11,304

37

1,823

$28,607,906

$14,500

$10,722

223

378

$4,554,568

$11,096

$9,147

47

3,271

$40,247,266

$11,062

$9,265

419

STOCKTON

35,159

$583,858,987

$15,701

$11,368

5,265

TRACY

13,926

$184,424,093

$12,235

$10,133

1,604

K-12 SCHOOL DISTRICT BANTA

NEW HOPE NEW JERUSALEM OAK VIEW UNION RIPON

2020-2021 fiscal year data | Includes district-operated charter schools | Average Daily Attendance (ADA) *Total Local Control Funding Formula (LCFF) is based on annual accrual calculations.

FIND THE SAN JOAQUIN COUNTY PUBLIC SCHOOLS DIRECTORY AT HTTP://DIRECTORY.SJCOE.ORG/INDEX.ASPX.


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WE EDUCATE THE SAN JOAQUIN COUNTY OFFICE OF EDUCATION PREPARES STUDENTS OF ALL AGES FOR SUCCESS IN COLLEGE, CAREERS, AND LIFE The San Joaquin County Office of Education (SJCOE) educates students of all ages across the county, from the youngest learners in our early childhood education Head Start San Joaquin program to adults in our diploma recovery Come Back Kids program. At the SJCOE, we operate schools and design programs that reflect our community’s needs. This includes offering technology education to aspiring computer coders, educating teachers as they start or grow in their careers, and more.


ANNUAL REPORT |9

OUR SCHOOLS & CLASSROOMS A CELEBRATION OF SERVING STUDENTS FOR 30 YEARS As the team of the one.Program gathered to prepare before the start of the 2021-2022 school year, they also celebrated a milestone. The new school year marked the anniversary of 30 years of the San Joaquin County Office of Education (SJCOE) alternative education program. As it has for the past 30 years, the one.Program team was getting ready to welcome their students, no matter what challenges they brought with them, no matter what struggles they faced at home, no matter what issues they had that prevented them from achieving success in school before, no matter what shadow of past trauma loomed over them and obscured their vision of the bright futures that could be in front of them.

CODESTACK ACADEMY

The first immersive coding school in Stockton.

DISCOVERY CHALLENGE ACADEMY A five and a half month quasi-military residential program located in Lathrop, CA.

HEAD START SAN JOAQUIN

66 sites and 99 classrooms across the county.

Students faced new challenges in 2021-2022 from the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. But helping students overcome challenges is what the one.Program does best. The program has been innovating, adapting, and fighting alongside students since it launched at the start of the 1991-1992 school year at two school sites, though the program wasn’t yet known by the name that defines it and guides it. The last school year began with 23 sites and 62 classrooms ready to serve more than 1,400 students.

one.ALTERNATIVE EDUCATION

The concept of “one.” stands for the idea that each individual student is important and can make a difference in the world. It also stands for the idea that when individuals join together and work as “one.,” they can make miracles happen. It is as much of a concept for the students as it is for the staff that makes up the one.Program.

Academy of Visual and Performing Arts Building Futures Academy Career Readiness Academy Come Back Kids Elementary Academy K-6

Students in the one.Program often have needs that are not being met in traditional school settings. This include students who have been expelled, have attendance issues, come from traumatic family experiences, or face other life challenges. Over the years, the program has met unique needs with unique approaches -- schools for seniors; schools for students with children; themed schools focused on sports, arts, or other areas; and many more. It’s the kind of continual innovation that has led to the creation of the Discovery ChalleNGe Academy, a residential program in partnership with the California National Guard; and Come Back Kids (CBK), a high school diploma program for adults of all ages, which are among the more recent arrivals to the one.Program. Relationships have always been an integral part of the program, both between adults and students and the relationships the whole staff builds with one another. Before the first day of school this year, the relationship-building with students began at enrollment. Each student answered survey questions to help staff understand their needs and expectations for the year. Each of the more than 1,400 students enrolling this year had a unique story about where they had been and where they expected to be. “I was messing up in school. I wasn’t really focused or anything. I was goofing up,” said José, just one of the returning students talking about his experience before the one.Program. “Once I got into the one. Program, I started getting all my work done, started staying busy. It helped me as a person and helped me see things differently.” He also said he was looking forward to graduating high school, which was something he didn’t think could happen before he found the one.Program.

LEARN MORE ABOUT SJCOE OPERATED SCHOOLS AT

WWW.SJCOE.ORG

23 sites and 62 classrooms across the county.

one.CHARTER ACADEMIES

SPECIAL EDUCATION PROGRAMS

McFall and Redwood Schools Plus, we offer many classes on satellite sites located on Banta, Escalon, Jefferson, Lammersville, Lincoln, Linden, Manteca, Ripon, and Tracy school district campuses.

TEACHERS COLLEGE OF SAN JOAQUIN

Located on our Stockton campus, Teachers College of San Joaquin is the only regionally accredited institution of higher education that is a department within a county office of education.

VENTURE ACADEMY

Academic Performance Excellence (APEX) BrainWorX Delta Visionary Integrated Science, Technology, and Academics (Delta Vista) Durham Ferry Excel Foundations ImagineIT Independent Study Kinect Synergy Teacher Education and Early College High (TEACH!) Venture Integrated School of the Arts (VISA) Ventureland


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INSPIRING EVERY CHILD AND FAMILY TOWARDS LIFELONG SUCCESS Head Start (HS) programs prepare America’s most vulnerable young children to succeed in school and life beyond school. To achieve this, HS programs deliver services to children from birth to age 5 and their families in core areas of early learning, health, and family wellbeing. HS services are provided in centers or the family’s own home. In 2015, the San Joaquin County Office of Education (SJCOE) was awarded a federal grant to provide these valuable services to eligible children and families in San Joaquin County. Through a partnership with Lodi and Stockton unified school districts and nonprofit organizations Child Abuse Prevention Council and Creative Child Care, Inc., Head Start San Joaquin provides Early HS and HS services to 1,754 children from birth to age 5, pregnant women, and their families.

FREE SERVICES EDUCATION

HEALTH DEVELOPMENT BEHAVIOR SCREENING SOCIAL AND EMOTIONAL HEALTH NUTRITION FAMILY GOAL SETTING SOCIAL SERVICES TRANSITION SERVICES DISABILITY SERVICES

A HEALTHY START

HEAD START SAN JOAQUIN’S HEALTH INSTITUTE MAKES AN IMPACT The Head Start San Joaquin (HSSJ) Health Institute engaged with families through a series of interactive health education sessions to help them learn more about preventing illness and improving the health of children and adults alike. The Health Institute’s impact rippled through the Head Start community, from children learning the right way to brush their teeth to parents and guardians receiving step-bystep guidance on caring for a child who becomes ill. And even though the three-year grant has run its course, its legacy has already grown and the program is expected to continue and increase the health literacy of Head Start families and the wider community, too. “The whole premise of the Health Institute is that we are building families’ health literacy,” HSSJ Director Leticia Sida said. “Helping to expand the knowledge and understanding of health-related topics ultimately impacts children’s lives.” Funded through a grant from University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), and the National Center for Early Childhood Health and Wellness, the Health Institute began in 2019, offering instructional sessions with hands-on activities for parents and children. Only 25 Head Start programs nationwide received the grant. In the first year, the focus was on common childhood illnesses, including first-aid safety and how to administer medication.

The second year focused on oral health. Parents learned the importance of beginning dental visits by age 1, while children learned dental hygiene habits. The plan for the third year of the Health Institute was to focus on mental health even before the COVID-19 pandemic arrived. “It came at a good time because we were able to offer sessions that focused around understanding trauma and learning techniques to manage stress,” Sida said. Sessions focusing on mental health, eating well, and staying active were offered virtually beginning in June 2020 to families experiencing trauma and stress during the lockdown. HSSJ’s focus on health literacy is expected to continue. It expanded the SJCOE team providing mental health services and training. And it also received a grant from the Community Health Foundation to work with San Joaquin Public Health Services, and Family Resource and Referral Center of San Joaquin. That grant funded train-the-trainer sessions during the past year. The next phase will extend the reach of HSSJ into the community to improve health literacy. “That was the whole intent, to extend it beyond just the children and families enrolled in Head Start,” Sida said.


ANNUAL REPORT |11

SERVICES FOR FAMILIES WITH CHILDREN

BIRTH TO AGE FIVE

Head Start (HS) programs primarily serve 3- and 4-year-old children, and Early Head Start (EHS) programs serve children from infancy to age 2, and pregnant women.

2021-2022 PROGRAM DATA

HS

EHS

FAMILIES SERVED

1,307

257

CHILDREN SERVED

1,224

220

ELIGIBLE PERCENTAGE SERVED

69%

97%

AVERAGE MONTHLY ENROLLMENT

93%

96%

MEDICAL EXAMS

77%

86%

DENTAL EXAMS

42%

24%

Percentage of funded enrollment

For enrolled children

For enrolled children

THE HEAD START

ADVANTAGE

HEAD START SAN JOAQUIN BUDGET As part of the Head Start Act, the Secretary of Health and Human Services conducts the federal monitoring review for all HS programs. Head Start San Joaquin (HSSJ) did not receive a review in the 2020-2021 fiscal year. The annual independent audit conducted by Christy White Associates Firm noted no major findings or deficiencies in internal controls related to HSSJ. Annualized Budget Salaries Fringe Benefits Out-of-Area Travel Equipment Supplies Contracts Construction/Renovation Other Indirect Total

Budget

Actual

$3,063,114

$2,994,243

FUNDS RECEIVED

$1,397,015

$1,295,809

PUBLIC

$72,076

$4,139

$3,178

$344

$120,533

$20,507

$18,865,128

$17,533,005

$0

$0

$1,136,595

$396,946

$624,807

$492,889

$25,282,446

$22,737,882

Includes EHS, HS, and One-Time funding.

Financial figures are from the 2020-2021 and 2021-2022 grant fiscal years and the 2019-2020 program years.

$25,282,446 PRIVATE

$0

One-Time $0 Early Head Start $2,727,418

Head Start San Joaquin prepares children for kindergarten and beyond by: •

Utilizing developmental assessments and screenings to identify the child’s development and any additional supports that may be needed.

Collaborating with parents and caregivers to develop a school readiness plan based on their child’s development.

Providing resources and referrals to support overall family needs.

Conducting screenings such as vision and hearing and supporting families to ensure a child has medical and dental care.

Offering opportunities for parents and caregivers to engage as leaders and advocates by participating in Policy Council and Parent Advisory Committees.

Head Start $22,555,028 Non-Federal Share $6,402,742 Program Income $0

FIND HEAD START CENTERS AND APPLY AT

WWW.SJCOE.ORG/HEADSTART


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COME BACK KIDS

MAKING A COMEBACK PROGRAM OFFERS SECOND CHANCE FOR ADULTS TO EARN A DIPLOMA “Attending Come Back Kids has completely changed my life in many ways,” said Phetmany, who enrolled in the high school diploma program 11 years after dropping out of high school when she became pregnant with her first child.

NEW PROGRAM PROVIDES HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS WITH A DIRECT, AFFORDABLE PATHWAY TO THE TEACHING PROFESSION High school students in San Joaquin County now have a new, affordable path to becoming much-needed teachers in local communities at the TEACH! Academy, a new teacher education and early college high program that welcomed its inaugural freshman class in 2021. Local officials celebrated the launch of the new academy at a September press event. TEACH! is a joint effort of Venture Academy Family of Schools, San Joaquin County Office of Education, Teachers College of San Joaquin, San Joaquin Delta College, and San Joaquin A+. “We couldn’t be more excited about the opportunity this program will provide for the students enrolled this year and for all those who

will attend in years to come,” said Troy Brown, San Joaquin County Superintendent of Schools. “The launch of this school is a testament to the hard work of our San Joaquin County Office of Education team and our partners. We look forward to continued collaboration to grow this program and to nurture the students here into the talented educators of the future for our region,” said Brown. Members of the new freshman class spoke at the event. “Teachers have made a difference in my life, and I want to make a difference in the lives of my students, one day, too,” Rudy said. “Being a student at TEACH! Academy will help me do this. It also means I have the opportunity to be able to earn college credits while I’m still in high school.”

TEACH! Academy is an early college high school where students can receive an associate degree from San Joaquin Delta College when they receive their high school diploma. Through partnerships, graduates can continue an affordable and direct pathway to a bachelor’s degree, teaching credential, and job in the classroom. Enrollment is open for students across San Joaquin County.

LEARN MORE AT

VENTUREACADEMYCA.ORG

Before the program, life was a struggle. “I just couldn’t seem to get ahead,” she said. As a Come Back Kids (CBK) graduate, she now has a job, is signing up for college classes, and put her sights on dreams of a career in the medical field which she once put on hold. “Getting my high school diploma taught me to be proud of my accomplishments. I am proof that if you put your mind to something, focus on it, and believe in yourself -- you can achieve it,” she said. A free program offered by the San Joaquin County Office of Education (SJCOE) for anybody 18 years and older, CBK is a direct path to receiving a high school diploma. There are many reasons why some adults haven’t received their diploma by the time they reach the age of 20, or older. There are just as many reasons why it can be challenging for an adult to balance work, family, and other responsibilities while doing the work to get their diploma. CBK provides flexibility and resources to help students graduate high school and achieve their education and career goals. Eliza, 31, shared that CBK gave her the flexibility to work and be a mom and still graduate with a diploma. “It made me feel good. It made me feel like I accomplished something. I did it for my kids, too.”

Come Back Kids is a free and flexible educational program offered by the SJCOE to help adults complete the requirements to earn their high school diploma. Call (209) 313-2374 to learn more or enroll.


ANNUAL REPORT |13 SINCE 2009,

621

TCSJ STUDENTS HAVE GRADUATED WITH A MASTER OF EDUCATION

AND MORE THAN

2,700 TCSJ STUDENTS HAVE GRADUATED WITH A PRELIMINARY CREDENTIAL

ON THE LEADING EDGE OF EDUCATION GROUNDBREAKING PROGRAM ONE OF FIVE TCSJ MASTER’S CONCENTRATIONS NOW AVAILABLE ONLINE Carlos Flores has brought a host of new ideas into his sixth- and seventh-grade classroom in Kern County since earning his master’s degree (M.Ed.) in environmental literacy from the Teachers College of San Joaquin (TCSJ). Not only are his students getting outdoors and gaining the academic and social-emotional benefits of keeping a nature journal, they are also enjoying an interconnectedness between different subject areas. Through collaboration with other teachers, Flores has initiated to bring English, social studies, and science teachers together through ideas he traces back to his degree. He chose his M.Ed. focus because he wanted to be among the first wave of educators in the state to introduce the new concepts of environmental literacy. “I wanted to become a better advocate and become a better teacher through this program.” And because TCSJ offers certain master’s degree programs online, Flores was able to complete the course over the past two years while living in Southern California. TCSJ is the only college in California offering an Environmental Literacy M.Ed. program. It was created following the passage of a 2018 law requiring the inclusion of environmental literacy concepts in the K-12 classroom. When it became available online, it opened up to a wider audience of educators eager to add the knowledge and skills from that degree to their educator’s toolbox. “Teachers College always wants to be on the leading edge of education in our community and beyond. With our environmental literacy master’s concentration, this is just another way we are preparing educators for the future - not just here in California, but nationwide,” said Katie Burns, program advisor. The college also offers five other master’s degree concentrations, four of which are offered online: early education, educational inquiry, educational leadership and school development, and special education.

A DEPARTMENT OF THE SJCOE SINCE 2009

Founded in 2009 by the San Joaquin County Office of Education (SJCOE), Teachers College of San Joaquin (TCSJ) is the only regionally accredited institution of higher education that is a department within a county office of education. TCSJ provides a variety of options for those who wish to pursue a career in the field of education: Teaching and Administrative Service Credentials, Induction (teaching and administrative), six Master of Education concentrations, as well as non-degree programs. The college serves over 1,300 students who work across 60 districts and schools (including charter organizations) in an eight county region of California.

LEARN MORE ABOUT TCSJ AT

TEACHERSCOLLEGESJ.EDU


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WE INNOVATE THE SAN JOAQUIN COUNTY OFFICE OF EDUCATION DESIGNS PROGRAMS AND SERVICES THAT MEET THE NEEDS OF THE COMMUNITY In a rapidly changing world, we strive to create innovative programs and services to meet new challenges and achieve new goals to uplift San Joaquin County students and families. Through departments like Continuous Improvement and Support, we support districts and provide training to elevate instruction for students.


ANNUAL REPORT |15

HIGH SCHOOL APPRENTICES EARN WAGES AND TAKE COLLEGE COURSES The San Joaquin County Office of Education (SJCOE) Apprenticeships Reaching Career Horizons (ARCH) program continues to expand, adding new options for students looking to get paid job experience and a leg up on their careers.

UP FOR THE CHALLENGE TEENS CHALLENGE THEMSELVES TO GET BACK ON TRACK TO EARNING A HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA AND RECLAIMING THEIR LIVES When Vincent, 17, first came to the Discovery ChalleNGe Academy (DCA) in January 2022 -- he was pretty certain about one thing. This residential program for teens on the wrong path was not going to change him. By April, everything was different. “I’m like: Wow, I’ve changed. I’m much more positive. More patient. I want to be in a better place,” he said. “I’m trying to set a goal to have a career.” Vincent, who is from Stockton, went from fighting and getting in trouble at his prior school to setting an example for others. He said that he has been trying to get four of his friends to follow his path. “This is the place to come to when you’re struggling and you need a change and get yourself back on track if you’re really going down the wrong path,” he said. “We’re all here to succeed and graduate.”

Education (SJCOE), DCA has been the turning point for hundreds of cadets since opening its doors in 2017. Many have similar experiences of falling behind on credits, getting into trouble, and thinking that getting a high school diploma is far out of reach. After the 22-week residential program, cadets not only see their path to graduation, but to the careers that can follow.

ARCH began in 2020 with students from the SJCOE and Linden and Ripon unified school districts putting students to work in their own information technology (IT) departments. Now, students are also working in classrooms as paid teacher aides/paraprofessional apprentices. ARCH students concurrently earn college credit at San Joaquin Delta College. Bethany, a Linden High junior, loves working with students as an apprentice teacher’s aide and feels like it is helping her prepare for her dream career. “I want to take this experience and put it into doing something that I love.”

“Life at DCA is challenging, but there is support every step of the way,” said Daniel, a cadet from Lathrop in the Titan platoon with Vincent. It is one of four platoons at the academy. “You have mentors on top of mentors,” said Daniel. He says his path now leads to graduation and a job in construction. That’s not where he was headed before, and he is grateful he chose to go to DCA. “It’s a second chance that you will never get again.”

A joint operation with the California National Guard and the San Joaquin County Office of

Discovery ChalleNGE Academy is a quasi-military program in partnership with the California National Guard. The Academy welcomes Northern California 16- to 18-year-olds who are at risk of not graduating, to its residential campus in Lathrop, CA, where they live for five and a half months while reclaiming credits and learning life and leadership skills. At the academy, students receive meals, housing, and a quality education.

LEARN MORE AND APPLY AT

IAMDISCOVERY.ORG

ARCH is the first program in California offering stateregistered apprenticeships to high school students. The SJCOE College and Career Readiness department can assist school districts wishing to offer ARCH to students. The program is currently seeking employers in the private and public sector interested in hiring high school students as apprentice farm managers, IT workers, educational paraprofessionals, and other professions.


16| ANNUAL REPORT

GUIDING THE WAY

CODESTACK ACADEMY GUIDES AND INSPIRES YOUNG MAKERS AND CODERS At the third annual Girls Coding Collaboration at the San Joaquin County Office of Education (SJCOE), young innovators from across the county gathered to engage in hands-on computer coding activities. Students and staff from the SJCOE’s CodeStack Academy were on hand to help guide the young innovators through the day’s activities, as well as to future opportunities. The SJCOE hosts the free Girls Coding Collaboration to provide elementary, middle, and high school students the opportunity to engage with their peers, while teaching them how to work together to engineer and code simple smart devices. It started in 2019, in partnership with Girls Who

Code -- a national organization on a mission to close the gender gap in technology due to the decline in women computer scientists in the field and the drop-off of girls in computer science between the ages of 13 and 17. The event is held in the SJCOE’s FabLab makerspace and organized by the SJCOE’s STEM Programs and CodeStack departments. CodeStack Academy, operated by CodeStack, is an accelerated software engineering school established in 2018 to provide affordable and immersive coding instruction for students interested in a career in the technology industry. Increasing access through events like the

LEARN MORE AT

WWW.CODESTACK.ORG

free Collaboration fits within the Academy’s mission to build a local network of software engineers, entrepreneurs, and tomorrow’s workforce. It also hosts regular Coding Meetup events and Let’s Learn workshops to build community and provide opportunities for all to learn new skills. CodeStack Academy offers students a chance to learn the state-of-the-art skills that could launch them into careers in San Joaquin County or around the world. The CodeStack volunteers at the Girls Coding Collaboration weren’t just there to provide technical support -- they wanted every young person curious about coding to know that path was open to them, too.

THE LARGEST SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT GROUP IN SAN JOAQUIN COUNTY CodeStack Academy is part of CodeStack, which is the name of the SJCOE’s software engineering department. With more than 70 engineers, CodeStack is the largest software development group in San Joaquin County, building and maintaining software, web, and mobile applications used by over 5,000 school districts nationwide and other public and private organizations, such as EdJoin - the go-to website that connects job seekers to careers in education, which has over 2 million applicants with 10 million hits per week.


ANNUAL REPORT |17

NATURAL WONDER THE SJCOE OPENS 62-ACRE SKY MOUNTAIN OUTDOOR EDUCATION CENTER IN THE HIGH SIERRA The Sky Mountain Outdoor Education Center is providing a new opportunity for year-round learning and activities for San Joaquin Valley students.

WHF oversees the protection of the ecological habitat and ensures the appropriate use of this natural open space.

Situated at the top of the North Fork of the American River in the Sierra Nevada region of the Tahoe National Forest in Placer County, Sky Mountain is also the new location for Science Camp. The first student campers to experience outdoor education in snow country arrived during the 202122 school year.

By owning Sky Mountain, the SJCOE has the flexibility to offer year-round programs to students of all ages and provide other opportunities for educators and community partners.

Sky Mountain includes cabins, a gymnasium, lodge, and other facilities surrounded by acres of forest alongside a pristine mountain lake. The 62.68-acre parcel was donated by the Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) to the San Joaquin County Office of Education (SJCOE). Preexisting infrastructure, capital assets, and $2.5 million to support code compliance and infrastructure reinforcement were donated by the Pacific Forest and Watershed Lands Stewardship Council. In 2016, the SJCOE applied to become a grantee of the property through the Stewardship Council, which oversees more than 140,000 acres of watershed lands owned by PG&E to ensure they are used to benefit the residents of California. As part of the transaction, the SJCOE is working closely with the Wildlife Heritage Foundation (WHF), a nonprofit organization dedicated to protecting and enhancing wildlife habitats and connecting Californians to the outdoors. As the holder of the conservation easement, the

Since 1976, the Sky Mountain property had been leased from PG&E for a camp and conference center. Since acquiring the property, the SJCOE has been renovating the preexisting facilities and has designed a new curriculum specific to the unique ecosystem that aligns with the Next Generation Science Standards and makes connections with California’s Environmental Principles and Concepts. “Students are learning about different ecosystems and how watersheds are connected. Snow is connected to rivers, the rivers are connected to the Delta in San Joaquin County, and the Delta is connected to the ocean,” said Annie Cunial, director of SJCOE STEM Programs. “Year-round activities range from canoeing and archery in the summer to snowshoeing in the winter,” she said. “These activities enhance students’ experiences as they learn about the history of the land from the Native American tribes to early California explorers, as well as flora, hydroelectric dams, conifer forests, wildlife, industries, careers, and more,” said Cunial.

STEM OPPORTUNITIES Students and educators can hike along the San Joaquin River at our STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math) Programs Durham Ferry Outdoor Education Center, wire something that glows at our FabLab, compete to build an app that solves the state’s water issues at the H2O Hackathon, and more with the following unique experiences offered by the SJCOE: • • • • • •

CA Streaming Media for Education Durham Ferry Outdoor Ed. Center Environmental Literacy Networks Environmental Literacy Summit FabLab H2O Hackathon

LEARN MORE AT

• • • • • •

SJ Delta VEX Robotics League STEAM Fair Sky Mountain Outdoor Ed. Center Summer STEM Camps Professional learning for educators Zoomin’ with a STEM Professional

WWW.SJCOESCIENCE.ORG


18| ANNUAL REPORT

WE INSPIRE WE OFFER TRAINING AND LEARNING EXPERIENCES FOR EDUCATORS AND STUDENTS OUTSIDE THE CLASSROOM The San Joaquin County Office of Education inspires educators by offering professional development and other support to enhance their skills and add new tools to inspire their students. We also provide an abundance of rich and rewarding learning experiences inside and outside the classroom for students throughout the county. At our countywide organized events and academic competitions, students have a platform to showcase their talents and inspire others to achieve, too.


A NEW AGVENTURE

ANNUAL REPORT |19

PROGRAM FOR THIRD-GRADERS ADDS NEW LOCATION AT DURHAM FERRY IN MANTECA The annual AgVenture experience for third-graders added a fourth location this year at Durham Ferry, a San Joaquin County Office of Education (SJCOE) site on the outskirts of Manteca in April.

STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math) Programs.

About 950 students from Banta, Lammersville, and Ripon unified school districts, and Jefferson and New Jerusalem elementary school districts came to learn about the agriculture industry from an army of volunteers.

The AgVenture field trip to Durham Ferry supported what students had been learning in social studies and science, said Shabana Boparai, a third-grade teacher at Monticello Elementary School (Jefferson Elementary School District). “It’s a good experience to have first-hand,” she said. “I feel this is something students are going to remember for a long, long time.”

The Durham Ferry site is home to many animals that introduce the third-graders to life on a farm. The site, owned by the SJCOE, is home to Venture Academy Family of Schools’ Durham Ferry Academy and the Durham Ferry Outdoor Education Center, which offers learning experiences to students and educators through SJCOE

Also held in Lodi, Manteca, and Stockton, AgVenture is organized by San Joaquin County government and supported by sponsors and partners, including the SJCOE, and made possible by volunteers. According to organizers, about 9,500 thirdgraders took an AgVenture field trip this school year.

AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION The agricultural industry has long been an integral part of the San Joaquin County economy and it will continue to be into the future. The gross value of agricultural production was more than $3 billion, according to the 2020 San Joaquin County Crop Report. This year, the San Joaquin County Office of Education added the new position of director of agriculture and environmental technology with a goal of creating opportunities for students, including high school apprenticeships, by connecting agriculture industry partners with school districts, students, and the community. For more information, contact Agriculture and Environmental Technology Director Katie Wipfli at kwipfli@sjcoe.net.

STUDENT EVENTS

OPPORTUNITIES FOR STUDENTS TO EXHIBIT THEIR SKILLS OR COMPETE ALONGSIDE PEERS

Students from public and private schools across San Joaquin County are invited to take part in these SJCOE student events and activities that motivate student learning, promote teamwork, build school spirit, and celebrate education. Research shows that students taking part in extracurricular activities outperform their peers in academic achievement. They also have a chance to have fun and grow outside the classroom. The knowledge, skills, and leadership experience students gain from participation further prepares them for success in college and their careers. They also make new connections with their classmates and students from other schools. Some of the events and competitions organized by Student Events and Activities and other SJCOE departments include: • Academic Decathlon • Academic Pentathlon • Best of San Joaquin County High School Art Show • Electronic Sports (Esports) • H2O Hackathon • Honors Concerts • Math Tournament • Mock Trial

• • • • • • • • •

Pinnacle Awards Seal of Biliteracy Science and Engineering Fair Science Olympiad Spelling Bees STEAM Fair Summer Art Camp Youth in Government Day Zoomin’ with a Scientist

FIND THE STUDENT EVENTS CATALOG AT

WWW.SJCOE.ORG


20| ANNUAL REPORT

BUT FIRST, WORK EXPERIENCE

SAN JOAQUIN COUNTY SPECIAL EDUCATION LOCAL PLAN AREA ROLLS OUT FOOD AND DRINK CARTS TO PROVIDE ON-THE-JOB TRAINING FOR STUDENTS IN SPECIAL EDUCATION Outside the Manteca Unified School District’s central office in the fall, students in the district’s Young Adult Program were hard at work making sure that the students and employees who come to the district office campus could get a cup of coffee, a cold drink, or a snack. Angelina and Elizabeth arranged creamers in a basket on the side of the cart. Oswaldo and Jesus transferred cold drinks into a cooler. Angela dove into the cooler when it arrived, turning the jumble of cans and bottles inside into a neat display. While she did that, Meranie Marks-Edmonson -paraprofessional and job coach -- explained the importance of “facing” the merchandise so the customer could see what was for sale. The tasks the students performed helped develop important skills, which is why the cart was there. The purpose of the coffee cart is to provide students with special needs work-based learning

opportunities. Its operation is a collaboration between the San Joaquin County Special Education Local Plan Area (SELPA) and Manteca Unified.

“I like meeting people,” said Oswaldo, a student who said this was the first job he’s ever had and that he feels prepared for other jobs now, too.

“It gives them an opportunity to learn how to socialize with the public. It gives them an opportunity to work with money. Also, it gives them like a sense of accomplishment because they have a job, they’re working, and they have the ability to know that they can do it too,” said Dr. Jody Burriss, the school district’s director of Special Education. “The empowerment is the biggest piece.”

Since the start of the pandemic, those job experiences have been harder to find, said Frank Souza, program manager for the San Joaquin County SELPA. The coffee cart was created through the SELPA’s WorkAbility I Program to fill that gap. Named “But First, Coffee,” the cart is not alone. A second cart, “But First, Ice Cream,” rolled out with students from Mountain House High School in Lammersville Unified School District.

The cart was at the district office for a 10-week stint, just steps away from the students’ classrooms. Being located by the district office puts the students in a place that is surrounded by potential student and staff customers as well as opportunities to have a richer experience through interactions with the variety of programs and people located there, too, she said.

The collaboration between school districts and the SELPA can open up many more work-experience opportunities for students, Souza said. “That’s one great thing about the carts, we can take them to different programs throughout the entire county.”

SPECIAL EDUCATION LOCAL PLAN AREA

The San Joaquin County SELPA (Special Education Local Plan Area) is administered through the San Joaquin County Office of Education (SJCOE) and coordinates special education efforts to ensure all students with special needs are identified, parents have opportunities to be involved, and school districts have a continuum of options to meet student needs in the least restrictive environment. The SELPA includes 10 of the county’s school districts and SJCOE Special Education Programs.

SPECIAL EDUCATION PROGRAMS

The San Joaquin County Office of Education (SJCOE) Special Education Programs serve students with special needs from birth to age 22. Programs are designed to meet the individual needs of each child, while protecting and nurturing personal dignity, ensuring health and safety, and promoting understanding of each child. The SJCOE offers two special center sites at McFall and Redwood schools, and many classes on satellite sites located on Banta, Escalon, Jefferson, Lammersville, Lincoln, Linden, Manteca, Ripon, and Tracy school district campuses.

WORKABILITY I

San Joaquin County SELPA WorkAbility I is a grant-based program offering career assessments, skills verification, and subsidized work-based learning opportunities to high school-aged students with special needs. WorkAbility staff partner with parents, teachers, employers, and agencies to provide services that help students learn the skills needed to become valuable employees. Some of these services include job preparation, job searching skills, job training, placement services, and job coaching.


ANNUAL REPORT |21

EARN & LEARN

CREATING OPPORTUNITIES

CORPSMEMBERS EARN PAYCHECKS WHILE WORKING TO MAKE REGION GREENER AND CLEANER Last summer Anthony Williams was one of the members of the Greater Valley Conservation Corps (GVCC) on a crew in the High Sierra to remove undergrowth and dead trees that could fuel future wildfires. Not only did Williams and his team learn valuable job skills while getting the Sky Mountain Outdoor Education Center ready to serve students from the San Joaquin Valley region, but they were also able to enjoy the view and all the recreational activities the Tahoe National Forest had to offer during their week-long trip. “It was a once in a lifetime opportunity,” Williams said. Creating opportunities is what the GVCC is all about. In the GVCC’s Forestry Corps, young adults earn a paycheck while keeping forests healthy and reducing wildfire danger in multiple counties. These corpsmembers are also moving closer to a career in forestry by earning certifications and other training through partnerships with Columbia College and San Joaquin Delta College. The Forestry Corps is just one component of the GVCC, which is the only local conservation corps in California operated by

a county office of education. And everything that GVCC offers has one thing in common: Young adults between the ages of 18 to 26 get paid, on-the-job experience while benefiting the community by working with public agencies and other organizations. The Natural Resources division restores natural habitats, removes invasive species, maintains landscaping, improves fire safety, and provides many more services related to the natural environment. The Recycling division supports our communities by providing waste diversion for businesses, schools, special events, nonprofits, municipalities, public works departments, and cities. In addition to collecting aluminum, glass, plastic, and paper products, the Recycling division also collects mattresses, tires, and electronic waste (e-waste) for recycling. The City Action Team works with municipalities to keep urban environments clean. This team cleans up illegal dumping, removes graffiti, and provides other services that both show and build pride in the cities where GVCC members live.

The Greater Valley Conservation Corps (GVCC) hires young adults ages 18 to 26. GVCC members can work up to 40 hours a week and earn $15 an hour. The job comes with access to training, education, and programs to connect members to careers after the GVCC. The GVCC provides flexible schedules to work around school schedules. The GVCC headquarters is in central Stockton. A second facility in Sonora extends the reach of GVCC’s services, while providing a prime location for corps members to work with partners to build their forestry and construction skills.

SERVING OUR COMMUNITIES

2020-2021 PROGRAM DATA

293,215 POUNDS E-WASTE COLLECTED

55,465 POUNDS CRV COLLECTED

9,157

ILLEGALLY DUMPED TIRES COLLECTED

91,480 POUNDS LITTER ABATED

220,430 SQ. FT.

GRAFFITI ABATED & REMOVED

3,711

MATTRESSES COLLECTED

LEARN MORE AT

WWW.GREATERVALLEYCC.ORG

68

RECYCLING AMNESTIES & COLLECTION EVENTS


22| ANNUAL REPORT

While searching to do its part in providing children with additional educational opportunities, the San Joaquin County Office of Education (SJCOE) founded the SJCOE Educational Foundation in January of 1995. Foundation funding supports countywide academics, student events, and other valuable programs. The Foundation’s support would not be possible without community donations. Sponsors mentioned on the Honor Roll of Sponsors list reflect donations of $250 and above to the Foundation from July 1, 2020, through June 30, 2021. The foundation is appreciative of all of our sponsors, including the businesses and individuals that donate between $1 and $249 annually.

JACALYN DAVIS BOARD MEMBER

JANWYN FUNAMURA BOARD MEMBER

DYLAN GEORGE BOARD MEMBER

CHARLYNN HARLESS BOARD MEMBER

DEAN JANSSEN BOARD MEMBER

RAYMOND MCCRAY BOARD MEMBER

GREG MCCREARY BOARD MEMBER

WILLIAM TREZZA BOARD MEMBER

TROY A. BROWN

CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD

HONOR ROLL OF SPONSORS SUPERINTENDENT’S CIRCLE $75,000 OR MORE Amazon

BENEFACTOR SPONSOR $10,000 - $34,999

Albert & Rina Brocchini Family Foundation Premier Community Credit Union United Way Van Groningen & Sons, Inc.

PLATINUM SPONSOR $5,000 - $9,999

Financial Center Credit Union Legacy Enterprises PG&E Corporate Foundation Raymus Foundation Staples University of the Pacific

CORPORATE SPONSOR $3,000 - $4,999

Blackwing Foundation Keenan & Associates Lorna L. Boothroyd Fund

GOLD SPONSOR $2,000 - $2,999

JANE STEINKAMP PRESIDENT

Kory Brown New York Life SONITROL

SCOTT ANDERSON

SILVER SPONSOR

MARLENE FLAU

Atkinson, Andelson, Loya, Ruud & Romo YouthBuild USA

CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER SECRETARY

A special thank you to former Board Director Christoffer Wardell for his service from December 1998 to June 2022.

$1,500 - $1,999

BRONZE SPONSOR $1,000 - $1,499

CB Merchant Services Diane and James Mousalimas

BRONZE SPONSORS CONT. Janwyn and Jack Funamura North Stockton Rotary Club Port of Stockton Progressive Designs Regional Parent Advisory Committee Roebbelen Contracting, Inc. WARDEN’S

EXECUTIVE SPONSOR $500 - $999

ARCHITECHNICA Ardent General Inc. Bank of Stockton Brig Summers of First Student California Waste Dean and Kathleen Janssen Korean Professional Building Maintenance MassMutual Michael Cardenas Mimms Electric Inc. RADON San Joaquin County Bar Foundation Sheri Coburn Terracon Consultants, Inc. Waterford Almond Huller & Sheller

CENTURY SPONSOR $250 - $499

American Fidelity Assurance Co. First Commercial Real Estate Henry & Associates Architects Jim and Carol Thomas Linda Melson Mamie and Charlie Starr Ross Nelson SECURITAS Stockton Golf & Country Club Walter and Sandra Loheide Weibel Family Winery William Trezza


HOW WE OPERATE

24+19+2928L 32+14+326421L 18+39+1169215L 2020-2021 FISCAL YEAR DATA

WHERE FUNDS COME FROM

HOW FUNDS ARE USED

EXPENDITURES BY SJCOE PROGRAM

WHERE FUNDS COME FROM TOTAL REVENUE $286,654,018 •

LOCAL CONTROL FUNDING FORMULA 24%

FEDERAL 19%

OTHER STATE 29%

OTHER LOCAL AND OTHER SOURCES 28%

ANNUAL REPORT |23

SAN JOAQUIN COUNTY BOARD OF EDUCATION The five members of the San Joaquin County Board of Education (SJCBOE) each represent a geographic area of San Joaquin County. Board members are elected into office and serve six-year terms. The SJCBOE approves the San Joaquin County Office of Education’s annual budget and serves as an appellant board with actions such as interdistrict transfers, student expulsions, and charter school petitions. The SJCBOE also serves as the county committee on school district organization, which addresses changes in school district boundaries and areas represented by school district governing board members. Regular meetings of the SJCBOE are held the third Wednesday of each month, at noon, in the Board Room at the Gaylord A. Nelson Administration Center, 2922 Transworld Drive, Stockton, unless otherwise posted.

JANET D. DYK HOW FUNDS ARE USED TOTAL EXPENDITURES $267,1670,836 •

SALARIES 32%

EMPLOYEE BENEFITS 14%

BOOKS AND SUPPLIES 3%

SERVICES 26%

CAPITAL OUTLAY 4%

OTHER 21%

AREA 1 | BOARD MEMBER

Includes parts of Banta, Escalon, Lammersville, Manteca, Ripon, and Tracy unified and Jefferson and New Jerusalem elementary school districts.

KEN VOGEL

AREA 2 | BOARD MEMBER

Includes parts of Escalon, Lincoln, Linden, Lodi, Manteca, Ripon, Stockton unified school districts.

DOUGLAS I. VIGIL

AREA 3 | BOARD MEMBER

Includes parts of Manteca and Stockton unified school districts.

VERNON J. GEBHARDT EXPENDITURES BY SJCOE PROGRAM •

COURT AND COMMUNITY 18%

SPECIAL EDUCATION AND SELPA 39%

CAREER TECHNICAL EDUCATION <1%

MIGRANT EDUCATION 1%

RESTRICTED SPECIAL PROGRAMS 16%

DESIGNATED SPECIAL PROGRAMS 9%

UNRESTRICTED PROGRAMS 2%

CHILD DEVELOPMENT 15%

LOTTERY <1%

ADULTS IN CORRECTIONS <1%

AREA 4 | PRESIDENT

Includes parts of Banta, Lammersville, Lincoln, Lodi, Manteca, Ripon, and Stockton unified school districts.

GREG CLARK

AREA 5 | VICE-PRESIDENT

Includes parts of Lincoln, Linden, Lodi , and Stockton unified and New Hope and Oak View Union elementary school districts.

FIND THE MAP OF TRUSTEE AREAS AT

WWW.SJCOE.ORG


WE ARE YOUR COUNTY OFFICE OF EDUCATION WE EDUCATE

The SJCOE is a regional agency that leads San Joaquin County education forward. We support San Joaquin County’s 14 school districts by providing leadership, fiscal oversight, overseeing compliance with state and federal mandates, offering professional development opportunities, maintaining countywide technology and infrastructure, developing Local Control Accountability Plans, building and maintaining technology, and more.

WE INNOVATE

The SJCOE believes in the potential of all students. We operate court, community, special education, and charter schools to meet our county’s vast variety of student needs. Meeting those needs often means developing new, innovative programs, because we believe in doing what is necessary to meet students where they are and help them overcome barriers to reaching their academic and career goals.

WE INSPIRE

The SJCOE strives to inspire students and families. We provide an abundance of rich and rewarding learning experiences for students countywide, such as student events and academic competitions where students have an opportunity to shine outside of the classroom. We also collaborate with community partners to provide resources that further support students, strengthen families, and benefit our community.

SAN JOAQUIN COUNTY OFFICE OF EDUCATION 2922 TRANSWORLD DRIVE, STOCKTON (209) 468-4800 | WWW.SJCOE.ORG

WWW.SJCOE.ORG |

| #WEARESJCOE