Page 1

livin Ferryhill Village and Cleves Cross Community Plan 2011-14

And

with the community at heart Revised March 2013


Equality and Diversity livin aims to ensure that Equality and Diversity lies at the heart of our business and allows our customers to access high quality services tailored to their individual diverse needs. It is our policy to provide access to services and employment equality to all, irrespective of age, race or ethnic origin, gender, marital or family status, religious or philosophical belief or political opinion, disability, nationality or sexual orientation. As part of our commitment we, and our working partners, aim to treat everyone as equal citizens and recognise, support and value the diversity of the communities in which they live. Contact Us Communities Team livin, Farrell House, Arlington Way DurhamGate, Spennymoor, Co Durham, DL16 6NL

0800 587 4538 (free from a landline) or 0300 111 2234 (low rate call from a mobile phone depending on your network)

2


Community Ranking - Ferryhill Village and Cleves Cross Based on the intelligence contained within each Plan livin has been able to rank the local community Bronze (potential), Silver (aspiring) or Gold (performing). This will enable livin to see which communities require more immediate and intensive interventions whilst ensuring there are mechanisms in place to maintain Gold standards. Indicator

Ranking

Housing Market Affordability

SILVER

Tenancy Turnover

SILVER

Demand for livin housing Average Repair Costs Per Property Long Term Unemployment (6 - 12 months) Average Household Income Rental Debit

GOLD SILVER GOLD BRONZE GOLD

Educational Attainment (5 GCSE’s Grade C & Above)

SILVER

Environmental Assessment

SILVER

Overall Community Ranking

3

SILVER


Contents Page Section 1 1.1

1.2

Community Profile

Demographics

8 9

1.1.1 Population – Now and in the Future

9

1.1.2 Religion and ethnicity

13

Housing

16

1.2.1 Housing Tenure

16

1.2.2 Average House Prices

17

1.2.3 Current Supply and Demand for Housing

20

1.2.4 livin Tenancy Sustainment

24

1.2.5 Vacant / Abandoned properties

25

1.2.6 Future Demand for Housing

27

1.2.7 Average cost of repairs to livin properties

28

1.2.8 Average Cost of Improvement Programmes

29

for livin properties 1.3

Crime and Antisocial Behaviour

30

1.4

Economy and Employment

34

1.4.1 Economic Activity

34

1.4.2 Jobseekers Allowance claimants

38

1.4.3 Department for Works and Pensions Key

39

Benefit Claimants 1.4.4 Household income

39

1.4.5 Vehicle ownership and cost of travel

40

1.4.6 Rental debit in livin properties

41

1.5

Access to Services and Facilities

43

1.6

Health and Well Being

47

1.7

Education and Training

50

4


Page 1.8

Reputation of the Local Area and Community Cohesion

53

1.9

Local Environment

53

Section 2

Community Priorities

55

Section 3

Review of the Community Plan

57

Appendix 1 livin Strategic Framework and Regulatory

58

Requirements

Appendix 2 Methodology

5

64


List of Figures Page Figure 1.1

Aerial overview of Ferryhill Village and Cleves Cross

8

Figure 1.2

Age Profile of population in Ferryhill Village and

9

Cleves Cross Figure 1.3

Household profile for Ferryhill Village and Cleves Cross

10

Figure 1.4

Population projections for Durham County

11

Figure 1.5

Age pyramid projections for Durham County

12

Figure 1.6

Housing tenure in Ferryhill Village and Cleves Cross

16

Figure 1.7

Average house prices in Ferryhill Village and Cleves

17

Cross Figure 1.8

livin stock in Ferryhill Village and Cleves Cross

20

Figure 1.9

Age profile of livin lead tenants in Ferryhill Village and

21

Cleves Cross Figure 1.10 livin properties available for let during the period 1 October

23

2009 to 30 September 2010 in Ferryhill Village and Cleves Cross Figure 1.11 livin tenancy sustainment in Ferryhill Village and

25

Cleves Cross Figure 1.12 Broom Ward Police Beat Area

30

Figure 1.13 Ferryhill Town and Dean Bank Police Beat Area

30

Figure 1.14 Reported cases of nuisance and antisocial behaviour to

31

livin within Ferryhill Village and Cleves Cross during the period 1 April 2009 to 31 March 2010 Figure 1.15 Economic activity in Ferryhill Village and Cleves Cross

34

Figure 1.16 Occupation profile of 16 to 74 year olds in Ferryhill

36

Village and Cleves Cross Figure 1.17 Economic inactivity in Ferryhill Village and Cleves Cross

37

Figure 1.18 Jobseekers Allowance claimants in Ferryhill Village and

38

Cleves Cross Figure 1.19 Breakdown of persons residing in Ferryhill Village and Cleves Cross claiming key benefits

6

39


Page Figure 1.20 Levels of health in Ferryhill Village and Cleves Cross

48

Figure 1.21 Educational attainment within Ferryhill Village and Cleves

51

Cross Figure 1.22 Route of Environmental Assessment

7

54


Section 1

Community Profile

The community of Ferryhill Village and Cleves Cross is situated in County Durham; 7 miles south of Durham City and 11 miles north of Darlington.

Figure 1.1: Aerial overview of Ferryhill Village and Cleves Cross Source: Ordnance Survey

Originally the town was a small agricultural village, with a forest for the Bishop of Durham to hunt in. The railways and the development of coal mining saw the population increase rapidly during the early twentieth Century. In 1841 the population of Ferryhill Village was 854. By 1911 when the two main collieries (Dean and Chapter Colliery and Mainsforth Colliery) had opened the population had swelled to a total of 10,133. This resulted in lots of new terraced houses being built to accommodate the great influx of labour that came to work in the North East Coalfields. Despite the demise of coal mining during the 1960’s, Ferryhill is still a centre for many of the outlying villages, especially on Fridays when the weekly village market is held.

8


Once part of the former “Sedgefield Borough�, Ferryhill Village and Cleves Cross are now served by the unitary authority of Durham County Council. The community has its own Town Council and is also part of the 4 Together Partnership; the local Area Action Partnership (AAP) covering Ferryhill, Chilton, West Cornforth and Bishop Middleham. 1.1

Demographics

1.1.1 Population - Now and in the future The population of Ferryhill Village and Cleves Cross is approximately 6,373.

Population data indicates that the community has an ageing population with 21% of persons being aged 65 years or over. This is significantly higher than the Durham County and North East averages of 17%.

48% of the total population are male with the remaining 52% being female (Census, 2001, LLSOA, KS01, 004B, 004C, 004D and 006A). Although the population of children aged 0 to 15 years remains in line with the County average, there are a significantly lower percentage of persons aged between 16 to 64 years currently g in the community. 70 60 60 Ferryhill and Cleves Cross

50 40 %

Durham County

64

30 20

21

19 10

19

North East 17

20

64

17

0 People aged: 0-15 People aged: 16-64 People aged: 65 +

Figure 1.2: Age profile of population in Ferryhill Village and Cleves Cross Source: Census 2001, LLSOA KS02, 004B, 004C, 004D and 006A

The main household type within Ferryhill Village & Cleves Cross are single person households (32%), followed by households consisting of married couples with no dependent children (20%) then married couples with dependent children (15%). 9


Married couple household with dependent child(ren)

2%

Married couple household with no dependent child(ren)

15%

14%

Cohabiting couple household with dependent child(ren)

0%

Cohabiting couple household with no dependent child(ren) Lone parent household with dependent child(ren) 20%

Lone parent household with no dependent child(ren) One person household

32% 4% 4% 3%

6%

Multi person household: All student Multi person household: All other Multi person household: With dependent child(ren)

Figure 1.3: Household Profile for Ferryhill Village and Cleves Cross Source: Census 2001, LLSOA KS20, 004B, 004C, 004D and 006A

The number of single person households in the community is higher than both Durham County (29%) and North East (31%) averages. This high representation may be attributed to the higher percentage of persons aged 65 or over who live in the community. Trend-based projections from DCC indicates that the County wide population will initially decline by 2016 before staging a recovery and increasing to an estimated total of 501,625 in 2026 (Strategic Housing Market Assessment, DCC, 2010).

10


2008-based projections: various trends for the overall population

555000 ONS Principal

550000 545000 540000 535000 530000 525000 520000 515000 510000 505000

DCC Principal

500000

DCC NC

495000 490000 485000 480000

DCC Lower

475000 470000

95%

actual

anticipated

465000 1981 1983 1985 1987 1989 1991 1993 1995 1997 1999 2001 2003 2005 2007 2009 2011 2013 2015 201 2019 2021 2023 2025

Figure 1.4: Population projections for Durham County Source: Durham County Strategic Housing Market Assessment, 2010

In the decades following the end of the war there was a significant rise in the birth rate brought about by families catching up with births delayed by the political and economic uncertainties of the late 1930’s and the wartime period. Progression of this ‘baby boom’ generation has caused and will continue to cause different challenges to the County’s population. Currently, this generation falls entirely within the economically active age group, but shortly will begin the transition into retirement and will be the main driver of an ageing population throughout the County over the next 28 years. Increasing life expectancy is also a contributing factor to an ageing population. This future increase in an ageing population and a decline in numbers of those persons in an economically active age group are highlighted in the DCC’s age pyramid (figure 1.5). To facilitate good levels of economic activity within an area it essential that a high percentage of the population are contributing to the local economy through employment or by actively seeking work.

By 2026 the number of persons in the “economically active” age group will total less than present.

11


To encourage and attract an economically active population to reside in an area it is imperative for there to be a good supply of local sustainable jobs and affordable housing. The age pyramid indicates that in 2008 persons aged between 25 to 35 years were in the minority when compared to other age groups within the County. This means that by 2026 when the whole of this age group is expected to be economically active there will be a lesser number of persons contributing towards economic activity than at present. The projection of an increasing elderly population, coupled with an associated fall in the numbers of persons that are economically active will see an increased demand on fiscal, housing and health provisions throughout the County during the coming years. 2008 based projections: the Age Pyramids for County Durham in 2008 and 2026 implied by the DCC and ONS projections ONS 2026

90+

ONS 2008

85-90

2026 DCC

80-84

2008 DCC

75-79 70-74

age groups

2 per. Mov. Avg. (2008 DCC) 2 per. Mov. Avg. (ONS 2008) 2 per. Mov. Avg. (2026 DCC) 2 per. Mov. Avg. (ONS 2026)

65-69 60-64 55-59 50-54 45-49 40-44 35-39 30-34 25-29 20-24 15-19 10-14 5-9 0-4

40000

30000

20000 year 2008

10000

0

10000

20000

30000

40000

year 2026

Figure 1.5: Age pyramid projections for Durham County Source: Durham County Council, Strategic Housing Market Assessment, 2010

Evidence of an ageing population is already starting to emerge within the Ferryhill Village and Cleves Cross community with 21% of the population already aged 65 years or older. The increase in an ageing population within an area will be exacerbated if younger generations are required to move out of the area to obtain employment opportunities and access affordable housing. An ageing population, and fall in the number of persons economically active by 2026 will place an increased demand on fiscal, housing and health provisions. 12


DCC estimates indicate that in 2010 there were 206,281 households countywide. This number is expected to increase by 24.9% to a total of 257,651 households by 2030 (Strategic Housing Market Assessment, DCC, 2010). By 2030 single person households (including single pensioners) are expected to increase by 100.3% to 56,564 whereas two person households are only expected to increase by 18% to 14,087. Larger households of three persons or more, those with a housing need of 2 bedroom properties or more, are expected to reduce by 19,281 (26.9%). This decrease in larger households, coupled with a significant increase in single person households, will have a major impact on the supply and demand of housing throughout the County. 1.1.2 Religion and Ethnicity An understanding of the ethnic and religious structure of the local population enables livin to ensure that its services are equally accessible, responsive and tailored to the needs and requirements of all residents g within livin local communities. It will also help livin to ensure that any minority groups are consulted with during future research and intelligence gathering, and allows for consideration of any specific needs in relation to access for housing, health, and employability during the creation of each community’s key priorities and Local Offers. 2001 Census data indicates that the main religion in Ferryhill Village and Cleves Cross is Christianity (84%). 0.2% stated their religion to be Buddhist and a further 0.2% to be Sikh. The remaining population stated they had no religion or did not provide details (Census, 2001, LLSOA KS07, 004B, 004C, 004D and 006A). Ethnicity within the community predominantly consists of White British (99%). The remaining 1% of the population is from other ethnic backgrounds including; Irish, African, Asian and Caribbean (Census, 2001, LLSOA KS06, 004B, 004C, 004D and 006A). Recent research conducted by DCC and NHS Darlington estimated that 0.43% to 0.57% of Durham County’s population consists of people from Gypsy, Roma and Traveller Households (Renaissance Research, 2010). Further analysis of these figures is currently not possible due to a lack of further data and intelligence. DCC’s Gypsy, Roma and Traveller site at East Howle is the only permanent residential site within livin’s area of operation.

13


Key Demographic Characteristics: The Community has an ageing population with 21% of residents are aged 65 years or more. This is significantly higher than the Durham County average. Only 60% of residents are aged between 16 to 64 years; this traditionally being the most common age of persons who are economically active (in employment or actively seeking employment). 32% of households are single person households. This is higher than the Durham County average. Trend-based projections indicate that the countywide population will increase to an estimated total of 501,625 by 2026 (DCC, 2010). During 2008 the 35-64 year old age group was the largest age group within County Durham. By 2026 this age group will move past the age of 64; resulting in an increased ageing population. By 2026 the number of persons in the “economically active� age group will total less than present. As a high level of economic activity is a key component of a sustainable community effort should be made to attract more persons within this age group into the community during the coming years. An ageing population, and fall in the number of persons economically active by 2026 will place an increased demand on fiscal, housing and health provisions. 2001 Census data indicates that 99% of residents are White British; with the remaining 1% being of Irish, African, Asian and Caribbean ethnic origin. The most prominent religion is Christianity, followed by Buddhism and Sikhism.

What does this mean for livin? It is imperative that the available housing stock within the community of Ferryhill Village and Cleves Cross is able to meet the housing demands of its current and future population. An ageing population will have increased demands on future fiscal, housing and health demands. It will also have significant demand on the types and provision of housing within an area; many older people now wish to remain in their own home and will therefore be reliant on mainstream housing to meet this demand. There may be requirements for extra help and services to help people adapt their homes to meet their changing needs. 14


Currently 60% of livin’s housing stock within the community consists of bungalows; together with a sheltered housing scheme at Cleves Cross Grange consisting of a number of one bedroom flats and bedsits. To meet current and future housing demands of an ageing population within Ferryhill Village and Cleves Cross there will be a requirement for livin to complete a comprehensive review of the provision and suitability of its current housing stock for older persons. In addition, some vulnerable groups may require more intensive support or bespoke housing solutions to meet this demand over the coming years. To facilitate good levels of economic activity in a community it is essential that a high percentage of the population are contributing to the local economy through employment or actively seeking work. An understanding of the ethnic and religious structure of the local population will enable livin to ensure that its services are equally accessible, responsive and tailored to the needs and requirements of all residents g within livin’s local communities.

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1.2

Housing

1.2.1 Housing Tenure The community of Ferryhill Village and the Cleves Cross has a wide range of housing tenures. This is very important as a varied mix of different housing tenures will positively contribute towards making the community more sustainable, by meeting the need of a cross section of the population.

3%

3%

2% Owner occupied: Owns outright 23% Owner occupied: Owns with a mortgage or loan Owner occupied: Shared ownership

32%

Rented from: Local Authority including livin Rented from: Housing Association / Registered Social Landlord Rented from: Private landlord or letting agency 0%

Rented from: Other 37%

Figure 1.6: Housing Tenure in Ferryhill Village and Cleves Cross Source: Census, 2001, LLSOA KS18, 004B, 004C, 004D and 006A

The majority of households in Ferryhill Village and Cleves Cross own their properties. 23% of households own their property outright and 37% own their home through a mortgage or loan scheme. Social housing consists of domestic properties which are owned by Registered Providers, housing associations and the local Authority. All social housing in Ferryhill Village and Cleves Cross that was previously owned by Sedgefield Borough Council is now owned and managed by livin.

A high percentage (34%) of social housing is located in the community when compared to the County average of only 25%.

There is a lower than average percentage (3%) of households in Ferryhill and Cleves Cross g in privately rented properties when compared to the rest of the County (5%).

16


In the past the private rented sector has played an important role in the housing market by offering accommodation for those households unable to access owneroccupation or socially rented housing. 3% of households in Ferryhill and Cleves Cross live in privately rented properties when compared to the rest of the County (5%).

Tighter controls and restrictions on mortgages and financial lending are likely to place an even higher future demand on the private rented housing market from low income households or first time buyers. Those households unable to access social housing will be required to look to the private rented sector to meet their housing need; placing an even higher demand on this already limited sector. Generally, Ferryhill and Cleves Cross exhibits a slightly unbalanced housing market with a larger than average social rented sector and a small private rented sector. There is a residential Gypsy, Roma and Traveller site located at East Howle near to Ferryhill Village. The site is provided by DCC and has 25 permanent pitches. It is the only permanent residential site within livin’s area of operation. 1.2.2 Average House Prices Analysis of average house prices for the community indicates a steady rise in the cost of property from 2000 to 2008. During 2009 and 2010 average prices for terraced and detached properties increased but the average price for semidetached properties decreased. £200,000 £180,000 £160,000 £140,000

Flat

£120,000 Terraced

£100,000 £80,000

Semi

£60,000

Detache d

£40,000 £20,000 £0 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 Figure 1.7: Average House Prices in Ferryhill Village and Cleves Cross Source: www.email4property.co.uk, 2011 (based on Land Registry information)

17


The majority of housing stock in the community consists of terraced properties; many of which were built at the beginning of the 20th Century to accommodate the influx of labour that came to work in the North East Coalfields. From 2002 to 2007 the sale of terraced houses more than doubled with average prices reaching a high of £67,893. During this period 2,355 terraced properties were sold in the community; compared to 677 semidetached and 405 detached properties. The average house price During 2010 only 60 terraced properties were sold for a terraced house fell with the average price decreasing to £56,090. A from £67,893 in 2007 to total of 61 semidetached and detached properties £56,090 in 2010. were sold in 2010. Semidetached properties sold for an average price of £89,432 and detached properties for £166,401. These figures are lower than the County average for 2010 where a terraced property costs on average £59,977, a semidetached £93,213 and a detached £176,519 (Land Registry, 2011). A number of residents are concerned about the current affordability of local properties for first time buyers and young families. Although the cost of terraced and semi-detached houses have marginally decreased over the last two years current restrictions on money lending and the overall availability of mortgages has reduced the number of homes bought and sold in the community during 2010. The County Durham Strategic Housing Market Assessment assesses affordability between lower quartile house prices and lower quartile earnings. Buyers would need to borrow 4.6 times the lower quartile earning to purchase a lower quartile house in the former Sedgefield area (Durham Strategic Housing Market Assessment, 2008). For Ferryhill Village and Cleves Cross the multiplier is 4.23; resulting in a community ranking of SILVER. Full details of the methodology to this ranking can be found in Appendix 2. Although there are a number of current Government incentives available nationwide to help first time property buyers these are only available on new build properties. There are currently only two housing developments within the local area which are eligible for buyers to obtain help from the Home Buy Scheme. These can be found at Ferryhill Station and Spennymoor; with the latter only being available until March 2012. It is currently unknown if the Home Buy scheme will be extended past March 2012. A new scheme called First Buy will be introduced from September 2011. The scheme will be jointly funded by the Government and house builders and will provide a 20% loan to top up the first time buyers’ own deposit of 5%. This will allow them to take out a mortgage for 75% of the property. Loans will be free of charge for the first 18


five years and repaid when the property is sold on. The funds will then be recycled to fund more homes for the scheme. It is not yet known if any of the First Buy schemes will be made available within the local area.

Key Housing Market Characteristics: The Community has a wide range of Housing Tenures; this is important as a varied mixed of tenures will contribute towards making an area more sustainable by meeting the need of a cross section of the population. 60% of households own their property outright, or through a mortgage or loan scheme. The Community has a high percentage of Social Housing (34%) when compared to Durham County. There are a low percentage of privately rented properties (3%) in the Community when compared to Durham County. The private rented sector plays an important part in any local Housing Market as it is able to offer accommodation for those unable to access owner occupation or social housing. The number of sales and cost of properties in the Community have decreased since the property boom at the beginning of the 21st Century. During 2010 a terraced property cost on average £56,090, a semidetached property £89,432 and a detached £166,401. Residents had few comments regarding housing in their communities. The level of housing market affordability within the community is lower when compared to the rest of Durham County. However many local residents are unable to access the housing market and purchase their own homes as a result of restricted access to mortgage products and financial lending. What does it mean to livin? livin has a significant stake in this community given the higher than average percentage of social housing in the community. It is also worth noting that the private rented sector and number of owner occupied homes within the community are comparatively small. It is important that as a key player in this community’s housing market livin have a role in balancing the local housing market and make efforts to meet housing need as identified in Durham County Council’s Housing Strategy. livin need to consider the health of the local housing market and the ability of households to meet their own housing need. Lack of access to the owner occupier

19


and the private rented sectors could increase pressure on livin’s housing stock, particularly for single/ couple households under 65 and families. 1.2.3 Current Supply and Demand for Housing livin owns 929 properties in the community; 60% of these are bungalows.

livin Housing Stock

livin currently owns and manages a total of 929 properties in the community of Ferryhill Village and Cleves Cross (livin, 2011). Ownership of these properties transferred to livin in March 2009 during stock transfer from the now disbanded Sedgefield Borough Council.

356 of these properties are located in Ferryhill Village and 573 in Cleves Cross. These properties include; a number of one to two bedroom bungalows, a three bedroom bungalow, a four bedroom bungalow and a number of two to four bedroom houses; together with a number of bedsits and flats. A breakdown of these property types and the age profile of the lead tenants can be seen in the following tables. Property Types Ferryhill Village

Cleves Cross

1 Bedroom Bungalows

123 Bedsits

14

2 Bedroom Bungalows

70

Bedsits (sheltered scheme)

15

2 Bedroom Houses

60

1 Bedroom Flat (sheltered scheme)

8

3 Bedroom Houses

94

3 Bedroom Flat

1

4 Bedroom Houses

9

1 Bedroom Bungalows

20

2 Bedroom Bungalows

342

3 Bedroom Bungalows

1

4 Bedroom Bungalow

1

2 Bedroom Houses

95

3 Bedroom Houses

72

3 Bedroom Maisonettes

4

Total

356 Total

Figure 1.8: livin stock in Ferryhill Village and Cleves Cross as at 14 March 2011 Source: livin, 2011

20

573


Currently 60% of livin’s housing stock in the Ferryhill Village and Cleves Cross community are bungalows; this being the second highest stock level of bungalows within all of livin’s communities. Of the total number of bungalows that livin own in the community, 74% have two or more bedrooms. Current housing demand within the community is high for properties with two bedrooms or more. Although the bungalows located within the community can be utilised to meet the future demand of an ageing population, and those wishing to remain in mainstream housing through their later years, current policies will restrict lettings to younger couples, families and smaller households. This means that households unable to meet their housing need due to an inability to access owneroccupation, social housing or the private rented sector will be forced to move out of the area. As the majority of persons within these households may be of an age where they may contribute towards the economic activity this can lead to a downturn in local economy. Age Profile Ferryhill Village

Cleves Cross

16-20

2

16-20

7

21-30

22

21-30

28

31-40

33

31-40

45

41-50

47

41-50

56

51-60

55

51-60

63

61-70

75

61-70

104

71-80

57

71-80

155

81+

57

81+

92

Unknown (Void, non livin managed)

8

Unknown (Voids, non livin managed)

23

Total

356 Total

573

Figure 1.9: Age profile of livin lead tenants in Ferryhill Village and Cleves Cross as at 14 March 2011 Source: livin, 2011

21


livins Housing Demand, Need and Turnover Since the 1 October 2009 livin has allocated properties through a Choice Based Lettings Scheme (CBL), known as Durham Key Options (DKO). DKO is a partnership of Registered Housing Providers across County Durham. CBL allows applicants to place an interest or “bid” for the type of property they require based on their housing need. Analysis of livin’s Housing Register in February 2011 indicates that 289 applications for housing were received from residents already g in the Ferryhill Village and Cleves Cross community (including Dean Bank). 37% of these applicants were banded by DKO in Bands A to C+ highlighting a high level of housing need. 107 households from Ferryhill Village and Cleves Cross are currently on the waiting list and in housing need.

During the period 1 October 2009 to 30 September 2010, livin had a total of 71 properties (7.6%) becoming available for let in the Ferryhill Village and Cleves Cross community. The level of tenancy turnover is marginally lower that livin’s total turnover of 9%. Based on national benchmarking figures provided by House Mark, stock turnover of 7.6% has resulted in the Community being ranked as SILVER for tenancy turnover. Further details on the methodology used to achieve this ranking can be found in Appendix 2. To maintain sustainability within a community there will always be a need for some level of tenancy turnover. However, it is important that turnover does not reach a level where it becomes detrimental to housing demand, the reputation of the area or the local economy. At this time livin are unable to provide further analysis on the reasons for tenancy turnover within this community. The types of properties available for let within the community were mainly one and two bedroom bungalows, and two and three bedroom houses. As there was no turnover of livin’s three bedroom bungalow or any four bedroom properties, any households in housing need of these property types will be required to consider other housing options.

22

During 1 October 2009 to 30 September 2010 there was no turnover of three bedroom bungalows, or any four bedroom properties.


Again, for many households, including first time buyers or those on a low income, buying their own home is not a viable option leading to an increased demand on the private rented sector. High market rents or a lack of availability of larger properties within this housing sector may ultimately force some households to move out of the local area in search of suitable accommodation. One One Bedroom Flat Bedsit Bedroom (Supported Bungalow Scheme)

Two Bedroom Bungalow

Two Bedroom House

Three Bedroom House

Ferryhill Village

0

1

13

6

7

5

Cleves Cross

4

0

0

23

7

5

Figure 1.10: livin properties available for let during the period 1 October 2009 to 30 September 2010 Source: livin, 2011

There were a total of 1,196 bids received for these 71 properties during 1 October 2009 to 30 October 2010. 606 of these bids were received for a total of 31 properties within Ferryhill Village and 590 bids for the 40 properties available within Cleves Cross. Based on the total number of bids received per property the highest demand was for two bedroom houses; receiving on average 38 bids per property. Demand for two bedroom bungalows is also good with a total of 329 bids being received for a total of 29 properties. It is however important to remember that policy decisions and legislation will affect the levels of demand for particular house types. Increased demand for two bedroom houses could be due to need and eligibility from several household groups including families, couples, and single persons whereas three and four bedroom properties will only be eligible for larger families to rent, and bungalows for older persons or those with a medical need. It is therefore important that lettings policies are regularly reassessed to reflect the supply of housing and the current levels of demand with the aim of promoting sustainability within an area. During the period 1 October 2009 to 30 September 2010 the highest demand was for two bedroom houses.

Demand was slightly lower for one bedroom bungalows with only 132 bids being made for a total of 13 properties. There was low demand for bedsits with only 36 bids being received for these 4 properties. Only 1 bid was received for the one bedroom flat located within a livin supported scheme highlighting a definite need for 23


a stock options appraisal and review of the housing stock provided for older persons by livin. Countywide there is currently an increased demand for bungalows with two bedrooms or more (County Durham Strategic Housing Market Assessment, DCC, 2010).

“Houses are too expensive.� Resident from Ferryhill Village

Of the 71 properties available to let in the Ferryhill and Cleves Cross community during the period 1 October 2009 to 30 September 2010, only 7 were required to be advertised with CBL on three or more consecutive bidding cycles before being let. Although bids may have been received for a property within each individual bidding cycle they were not allocated for let due to the applicant withdrawing their bid for personal circumstances upon offer. These properties were predominantly bedsits and one bedroom bungalows; indicating unpopular house types. Data from DKO’s database indicates a good level of demand from applicants for livin housing. Due to high levels of bids received per property advertised, no hard to let properties in the community and a high amount of applicants indicating Ferryhill Village and Cleves Cross as an area of preference; the community has been ranked as GOLD. During the consultation event at Ferryhill Leisure Centre one resident expressed concerns about the size of their current property and explained how the level of demand and affordability of larger properties has restricted their ability to acquire a more suitable property for their circumstances. This high level of demand is reflected in the high number of bids received by livin when a property with two bedrooms or more becomes available for let in the community. There were also concerns raised about the rising costs in housing related repairs, with one private resident stating that they are struggling to maintain their property to an acceptable level of repair. 1.2.4 livin Tenancy Sustainment There is a high percentage of long term tenancy sustainment within the 929 properties owned by livin in Ferryhill Village and Cleves Cross community. These high levels of tenancy sustainment are reflected in the low level of turnover of livin properties in the community. As at 7 March 2011, 30% of livin tenants have sustained their current tenancy for a period of 0 to 4 years. A further 22% of tenants have sustained their tenancy for a period of 5 to 9 years and 48% of tenants who have a tenancy in this community have lived in their current home for 10 years or more. 24

48% of tenants who have a livin tenancy in this community have lived in their current home for 10 years or more.


Community sustainability requires an appropriate level of tenancy turnover. High levels of tenancy sustainment within social housing can be for a multitude of reasons. Although some may be favourable it is important to ensure that tenants are not remaining in their current home due to restrictions in their housing options (i.e. ability to purchase own property), or if looking for a more suitable property to meet their housing need, financial restrictions around the cost of relocating. High tenancy sustainment may result in housing stock being under occupied. Larger households may over time reduce in size due to children growing up and leaving home, relationships breakdowns and deaths. In addition, a detrimental effect on the level of housing demand within a community there may be financial implications to the tenant as a result of the forthcoming Welfare Reform which aims to reduce benefit payments for under occupiers (excluding persons aged over 65 years). 300

Number of Tenancies

250 Ferryhill Village

200 150 100

164

Cleves Cross

103 83

50 172

116

266

0 - 4 years

5 - 9 years

10 years +

0

Figure 1.11: livin tenancy sustainment in Ferryhill Village and Cleves Cross Source: livin, 2011 (not including void properties or non livin managed properties)

1.2.5 Vacant / Abandoned Properties High levels of void or empty properties can be a strong indicator of low demand housing within an area. Ferryhill Village and Cleves Cross has a low percentage of housing stock consisting of empty and/or abandoned properties; indicating a good level of demand for housing within this community. Data obtained from DCC’s Council Tax database at the end of December 2010 indicated there to be 54 possible empty and/or abandoned properties (this figure may include properties that are currently for sale) within Ferryhill Village and Cleves Cross. Based on a total of 3,077 domestic dwellings (Office for National Statistics, March 2009) in the community this is only 1.8% of the total stock. Data collection limitations have restricted further detailed analysis of this information.

25


Key Supply and Demand Characteristics: livin currently own 929 properties in the Community; 60% of these properties are bungalows. 74% of these bungalows have 2 bedrooms or more. 37% of applicants on the housing register that currently live in the community were classed as having a Housing Need (Bands A to C+) During 1 October 2009 to 30 September 2010, 71 properties became available for let; making tenancy turnover within the community 7.6%. During 1 October 2009 to 30 September 2010 there was no turnover of 3 bedroom bungalows or 4 bedroom properties. Households requiring these property types will be forced to access the private rented sector or move out of the area to meet their housing need. Demand for properties with 2 bedrooms or more is high. There is a high demand countywide for these property types. Demand is slightly lower for 1 bedroom bungalows and bedsits. There is very low demand for property within livin’s supported housing scheme. livin lettings policy normally restricts the letting of bungalows to persons aged 60 years or over, unless there is medical need. This restricts the availability of social housing within the community for households that do not meet the eligibility criteria for a bungalow. Local residents are concerned about the rising costs of housing related repairs and how current mortgage and financial lending restrictions are increasing the levels of demand for social housing within the community. 48% of livin tenants living within the community have sustained their tenancy for a period of 10 years or more. What does this mean for livin? Demand for livin housing in this community has been ranked as Gold. It is essential that this ranking is maintained to this level over the coming year. The presence of an ageing population within the community, in conjunction with high levels of demand for two bedroom bungalows and very low demand for properties within livin supported schemes highlights a clear need for livin to review its provision of accommodation for older persons to meet the current and future housing need of the local population. It is important that current housing stock is able to meet the demand for housing within a community. This low demand indicates that this property type is no longer meeting housing demand in the community resulting in the 26


need for a stock options appraisal and review of livin’s housing provision for older persons. Ferryhill Village and Cleves Cross has a good level of supply for two bedroom bungalows; therefore meeting the County Council’s identified need for this property type. Consideration of this community’s current population and the 2028 forecasted population projection by DCC indicates that this demand for larger sized bungalows will continue to increase over the next 10 years. Community sustainability requires an appropriate level of tenancy turnover. It is important that consideration be given to the reasons behind high levels of sustainment to ensure residents are not being forced to remain in their current home due to restrictions in their housing options or financial circumstances. 1.2.6 Future Demand for Housing Population and household projections for an area can be used by local service providers to predict the future levels of demand on their services. In conjunction with other social, economic, and environmental indicators these projections can also be used to forecast the demand and need for housing in an area. DCC have recently conducted a Strategic Housing Market Assessment (DCC, 2010) which can be used by registered housing providers to help determine the expected level of demand for housing through the coming years and develop future housing strategies. Population and household projections are based on this assessment and other intelligence gathered during the completion of this Community Plan. It is expected that the vast majority of older persons will decide to remain in their own homes with mainstream housing providing the primary means of meeting this demand. Local housing providers required to support this, including extra support services and help for people to adapt their homes to meet their changing needs. Some vulnerable groups will require support or bespoke housing solutions and it is expected that there will be a sharp growth in demand for specialist housing projects for persons aged 75 years or older during the coming years. The decisions of older households to remain in their homes will influence the supply of housing available for other household groups. As a result it is important that local housing providers recognise the potential opportunities for supporting older households to downsize thus releasing the supply of larger family homes for other household groups. In recognition of this increased demand on mainstream housing the Northern Housing Consortium (NHC) published a guide to Age Friendly Communities in the North: People and Places 2020. This publication is the result of a two year project surrounding consultation with local communities and key Consortium members, and focuses on building an evidence base to demonstrate the impact housing can have on the physical and mental health and wellbeing of older people.

27


Key Future Demand Characteristics: By 2026 the number of persons in the “economically active” age group will total less than present. This will increase demand on fiscal, housing and health provisions. By 2030 the County is expected to see:   

single person households increase by 100.3% two person households increase by only 18% three person households or more decrease by 26.9%

The majority of older persons will want to remain in their own homes through their senior years. This will place an increased demand on mainstream and social housing. Increased future demand is expected for support services for vulnerable groups, and a need for bespoke housing solutions or specialist housing projects for persons aged 75 years or more. What does this mean for livin? livin’s Development and Asset Management strategies must take into account future population projections and consider the expected demand for social housing within the community to ensure the housing stock meets the needs of local residents. livin will have to consider housing and meeting the need of an elderly population and finding bespoke solutions to meet the individual needs of vulnerable groups. Anticipation of an ageing population and poor demand for livin’s sheltered housing scheme highlights the requirement for livin to review its current provision of housing stock for older persons. There are potential opportunities for housing providers to support older households to downsize thus releasing the supply of larger family homes for other household groups. 1.2.7 Average cost of Repairs to livin properties The repair and maintenance of livin’s properties is essential to ensure that they remain in excellent condition and to the high standards expected by our tenants. Ferryhill Village and Cleves Cross has a Silver ranking for average repair cost per property compared to other livin communities. During 2009/10, livin spent an average repair cost of £644 per property in the areas of Ferryhill Village and Cleves Cross.

28


During the period 1 April 2009 to 31 March 2010 livin, together with livin’s repairs and maintenance partner Mears, completed 3,722 repairs (including Gas Safety) to properties in the Ferryhill and Cleves Cross community. 33% of these repairs were emergency repairs which required immediate attention. 1.2.8 Average cost of Improvement Programmes for livin Properties Over the next few years, and as part of promises to tenants, livin are investing over £100 million pounds on a rolling programme of modernisation and improvements to the properties that livin own. The modernisation and improvement programme that livin are carrying out in their properties is to a much higher standard of works than that of the Government's Decent Homes Standard. The improvements that livin are completing include:      

New Kitchens New Bathrooms Central Heating Replacement Electrical Works Internal and External Door Replacement Roofing works

During the programmes of works not all of livin’s properties will receive all of the improvements at the same time. There are a number of factors that determine which improvement works are completed at the property during forthcoming programmes in each community. For example some properties may only receive new internal and external doors, whereas other may be due the new internal and external doors plus the replacement of their kitchen and bathroom. During 2009/10 average cost per property for the modernisation and improvement of 294 properties in Ferryhill Village and Cleves Cross was £3,304.

What does this mean for livin? This community has a good repair cost per property, however one third of the repairs are emergency and further investigation into this could be undertaken to minimise the amount of emergency repairs.

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1.3

Crime and Antisocial Behaviour

The community of Ferryhill Village and Cleves Cross is located in the Police Beat areas of Ferryhill Town and Dean Bank, and the Broom Ward. Although there is a local Police Office in Ferryhill centre, this is only used as a base for the Neighbourhood Beat Team and is not permanently staffed. The nearest staffed station is located in the neighbouring town of Spennymoor.

Figure 1.12: Broom Ward Police Beat Area

Figure 1.13: Ferryhill Town and Dean Bank Police Beat Area

“Durham Constabulary reports the level of crime and disorder within Ferryhill Town and Dean Bank to be “Above Average” and the area of Broom Ward to be “Average” when compared with the rest of England and Wales.” During 2010 there were a total of 2,334 reported Police incidents of crime and antisocial behaviour in the Police Beat areas of Ferryhill Town and Dean Bank and the Broom Ward (Durham Constabulary, 2010). The majority of reported incidents occurred in the areas of Ferryhill Village centre and Dean Bank. Crime and Antisocial Behaviour in Ferryhill Town and Dean Bank Beat Area is “Above Average” and “Average” in the Broom Ward. (Source: Police.uk, 2011)

Of these total reported incidents, 55% related to antisocial behaviour and 33% related to other crimes including criminal damage, shoplifting and drugs. A total of 12% of the reported incidents were in relation to robbery, burglary, vehicle crime and violence. From 1 April 2009 to 31 March 2010, livin’s Support and Intervention Team received 28 complaints of nuisance and antisocial behaviour in the community of Ferryhill Village and Cleves Cross (figure 1.14). Overall the most frequent type of complaint received was in respect of youths causing a nuisance or antisocial behaviour in the local area. 30


Reports of nuisance and antisocial behaviour from youths were higher in Ferryhill Village. Complaints of harassment and intimidation and damage to property were also higher in Ferryhill Village. In the Cleves Cross area the most common type of complaint was noise nuisance and criminal behaviour (including drug related crimes).

Number of Reported Incidents

High levels of antisocial behaviour or nuisance caused by young persons can often suggest a need “Stop Drinking on Streets” for an enhanced programme of diversionary activities Resident from Ferryhill Village (e.g. sporting events or activities, play or craft and Cleves Cross activities and youth clubs) within the local area. Research has proven that the provision of diversionary activities that have been developed in conjunction with the young persons g in the targeted area can have a positive effect on lowering levels of antisocial and nuisance behaviour. 5

5

4 4 4

3

4

3 2 2 1

Ferryhill Village

2

1 1 0

0 1

1

Cleves Cross

Figure 1.14: Reported cases of Nuisance and Antisocial Behaviour to livin within Ferryhill Village and Cleves Cross during the period 1 April 2009 to 31 March 2010 Source: livin 2011

Durham Constabulary’s reported crime figures and the complaints received by the Support and Intervention Team closely mirrors the issues raised by residents during livin’s consultation events. Local residents highlighted issues relating to an increased usage of illegal drugs in the community and problems surrounding young people drinking alcohol on the streets. There was recognition that specific areas, such as the market place, are more affected than others by the highlighted problems. These views are reflected in Durham Constabulary’s reported crime data which indicates that antisocial behaviour and drug use equates to more than three quarters of all reported incidents to the Police. 31


Consultation completed by DCC for the 4 Together AAP indicates that youths congregating on local streets is a countywide issue and the main reason residents feel unsafe g in their local area. 3% of residents g in the 4 Together area (Ferryhill, Chilton, West Cornforth and Bishop Middleham) stated they felt unsafe in their local communities during the day and 14% felt unsafe during the evening. These findings were further confirmed during livin’s consultation events with a number of residents highlighting that they did not feel safe in their local area due to a fear of vandalism, drugs, binge drinking, and the presence of youths congregating on the streets. Residents also felt there was a need for improved street lighting in specific areas, especially around local alleyways and footpaths at the rear of properties. There was also a fear that ongoing bugdetry reductions being imposed by local Police Authorities would see the removal of the local Police Beat Officers from the community. Currently Durham Constabularly provide a dedicated Police Beat Team that carry out high visability patrols throughout their local communities with the aim of dettering crime and antisocial behaviour. Key Crime and Antisocial Behaviour Characteristics: The level of crime and disorder within Ferryhill Town and Dean Bank is considered by the Police to be “Above Average” when compared to the rest of England and Wales. The level of crime and disorder within Broom Ward is considered by the Police to be “Average” when compared to the rest of England and Wales. During 2010 in Ferryhill Town and Dean Bank and Broom Ward:   

55% of reported incidents were in respect of antisocial behaviour 33% of incidents related to other crimes, such as criminal damage, shoplifting and drugs 12% of incidents related to robbery, burglary, vehicle crime and violence

During 1 April 2009 and 31 March 2010, livin’s Support and Intervention Team received 28 complaints of antisocial behaviour and nuisance Consultation found that local residents are concerned about the use of illegal drugs and youths drinking alcohol on the streets. A recent AAP survey found that 14% of residents living in the areas of Bishop Middleham, Ferryhill, Chilton and West Cornforth felt unsafe in their communities during the evening.

32


What does this mean for livin? Increased reports of antisocial and nuisance behaviour caused by young people highlights the need for a robust programme of diversionary activities that local youths want to engage with. It is important that livin maintain the level of commitment to low level crime and intervening in more serious matters. Partnership working with the Police, Durham County Council and others is essential to making people feel safer in their communities.

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1.4

Economy and Employment

1.4.1 Economic Activity “Economic activity relates to persons aged 16 to 74 years who are in employment, or actively seeking employment and are available to start work within 2 weeks.� (Source: Census, 2001) During 2001 economic activity within Ferryhill Village and Cleves Cross was 59.8%; marginally lower than the County average of 60.2%. (Census, 2001, LLSAO KS09A, 004B, 004C, 004D and 006A) Of this total economic activity 40.7% were in full time employment and 10.6% in part time employment. Only 3.7% of persons were self-employed; this being considerably less than the Durham County average of 5.4%. It is acknowledged that as a result of the current economic climate the level of economic activity within the community may have changed since this data was collated in 2001. 45 40

40.7

35

Ferryhill and Cleves Cross

30 25 %

20

Durham County

15 10

10.6

5 10.7

38.5

3.7 5.4

3.6 3.7

1.2 1.9

0 Employees Employees Part-time Full-time

Self Unemployed Employed

Students

Figure 1.15: Economic Activity in Ferryhill Village and Cleves Cross Source: Census, 2001, LLSOA KS09A, 004B, 004C, 004D and 006A

The availability of local employment was a key issue highlighted by residents during consultation. It was reported that a lack of local employment and recent redundancies from local businesses has placed an increased requirement for residents to travel out of the area to gain sustainable employment. This necessity to travel is currently being hampered by rising fuel costs and the affordability of car ownership; together with an increased reliance on what is seen by residents to be an 34


unreliable and irregular bus service to surrounding areas. However, residents are hopeful that the development of the Durham Gate site at Spennymoor and the provision of a new Hitachi factory in Newton Aycliffe will help to boost economic activity and employment levels for local residents.

“New jobs at Durham Gate” Ferryhill Village and Cleves Cross Resident

Census data indicates that residents within Ferryhill Village and Cleves Cross are employed in a wide range of different occupations (Census, 2001, LLSOA KS12A, 004B, 004C, 004D and 006A). There is a marginally higher percentage (14%) of skilled trade workforce (including Motor Mechanics, Electricians, Plumbers, Plasterers and Chefs) g in the community. The community has a high percentages of persons employed in elementary occupations (e.g. labourers, kitchen assistants, bar staff, farm labourers) or as plant and machine operators when compared to the rest of the County. (Source: Census, 2001)

There are a low percentage of residents in the community employed as professionals, such as Doctors and Dentists (4%), or in a management or senior role (9%) when compared to the rest of the County. Low levels of employment within these occupations also reflect the low percentage of residents in the community who hold an educational qualification at levels 3 to 5 (section 1.7). Level 3 qualifications are necessary for progression to higher education or University. Qualifications at levels 4 to 5 are equivalent to degree or professional level. During consultation there were concerns expressed by local residents about the “Lack of training courses” availability of training and skills courses for those not in employment, and how increases in University Ferryhill Village and Cleves Cross Resident fees may restrict the number of residents that continue their education to attain a degree or professional qualification. 2001 census data highlighted that the majority of residents within this community were employed within the plant and machine processing industry. Over the past ten years this type of industry has been one of the hardest hit resulting in many large scale local employers, including Black and Decker, Flymo, Thorn and Electrolux relocating or ceasing to trade.

35


This reduction in local job opportunities within the industry; together with a high percentage of residents that hold no educational qualifications indicates a need for an increased provision of skills and training courses. This can help local residents to retrain or gain new qualifications, skills and experience thus assisting them back into long term employment. 20 20 18 15 Ferryhill Village and Cleves Cross

14 10 %

9

10

9

8

8

5 12

4

Durham County 9

12

12

13

7

8

13

14

0

Figure 1.16: Occupation profile of 16- 74 year olds in Ferryhill Village and Cleves Cross Source: Census, 2001, LLSOA KS12A, 004B, 004C, 004D and 006A

Economic inactivity was also slightly higher than the County average with a total of 40.2% of the population not employed, and not actively seeking work. There were a higher percentage of persons in the community who were retired, or unable to work due to being permanently sick and / or disabled in comparison to the rest of the County. A high percentage of economic inactivity due to retirement is a key characteristic of an ageing population. “Economic inactivity relates to persons aged 16 to 74 years who are not in employment, or not actively seeking employment and available to start work within 2 weeks.� (Source: Census, 2001)

36


18 16 14

14.8

Ferryhill and Cleves Cross

12 10 %

10.3

8

Durham County

6

6.3

4 2

5.1 3.3 17.7

2.7

Retired

Student

5.8

11.1

2.9

0 Looking after Permanently home/family sick/disabled

Other

Figure 1.17: Economic inactivity in Ferryhill Village and Cleves Cross Source: Census, 2001, LLSOA KS09A, 004B, 004C, 004D and 006A

Analysis of Department for Works and Pensions (DWP) data from March 2011 highlights that the communities of Ferryhill Village, Cleves Cross and Dean Bank have a higher percentage of persons who have been claiming Jobseekers Allowance for up to 6 months (78.6%) when compared to the There are a higher County average (73.5%). percentage of residents However, figures for longer term unemployment claiming Jobseekers within the communities are much lower than both Allowance; but a lower County and National averages. Only 15.4% of percentage of long term residents have been claiming Jobseekers Allowance unemployment when for a period of 6 to 12 months when compared to compared to Durham 18% throughout the County and 17.3% at National County. level. The percentage of residents claiming Jobseekers Allowance for 12 months or more (6.2%) is also lower than County average, and more than half the National average of 14.2%. This low percentage of residents claiming Jobseekers Allowance for a period of 6 to 12 months has resulted in the community being ranked as GOLD. Full details of the methodology for this ranking can be found in Appendix 2. Sustainable communities require high levels of economic activity; this can be facilitated by a high percentage of the resident population being economically active. Although long term unemployment is low when compared to County and National levels, it is important that local service providers work in partnership to proactively identify and minimise the barriers experienced by residents who have become unemployed within the last six months.

37


1.4.2 Jobseeker Allowance Claimants During August 2009, there was a wide age range of persons that were unemployed and claiming Jobseekers Allowance in the Ferryhill and Cleves Cross community (DWP, 2009). 51% of persons claiming Jobseekers Allowance were aged between 25 to 49 years; slightly lower than the County average of 53%. The percentage of persons aged 16 to 24 years claiming Jobseekers Allowance (36%) is higher than the County average at 32%. 60 50

53

Ferryhill and Cleves Cross

40 % 30

Durham County

32

20 15

10 36

51

13

0 Claimants Aged 16-24 Claimants Aged 25-49 Claimants Aged 50+

Figure 1.18: Jobseeker Allowance claimants in Ferryhill Village and Cleves Cross Source: DWP, August 2009

A number of residents highlighted the need for an increased provision of local training courses to help unemployed residents gain new skills and qualifications to help them back into employment (Section 1.4.1). Although the LADDER Centre provides a local job club and a number of basic training courses there is a perceived need for the range and availability of these courses to be expanded with the aim of offering more residents the chance to gain new skills and qualifications for future long term employment. The percentage of persons aged 16 to 24 years claiming Jobseekers Allowance was higher than both North East and Country averages. This highlights a clear need for service providers to target this age group when delivering future skills and training courses. It is important that the provision of future skills and training courses targeted at this age group will help the individual to meet their training needs and future aspirations to gain long term employment.

38


1.4.3 Department for Works and Pensions Key Benefit Claimants During August 2009, an average of 24% of residents in Ferryhill Village and Cleves Cross, aged 16 to 64 years, were claiming a key DWP benefit. Of this total, 12% were claiming Incapacity Benefit as a result of a disability or illness. These figures are comparative with the intelligence contained in Section 1.6 which indicates that the general health of the population within Ferryhill Village and Cleves Cross is poorer when compared to the County. 0 1

Job Seekers

1 5

1

Incapacity Benefits

2 Lone Parent Carer

2

Others on Income Related Benefits Disabled 12

Bereaved

Figure 1.19: Breakdown of persons residing in Ferryhill Village and Cleves Cross claiming key DWP benefits Source: DWP, August 2009

1.4.4 Household Income During 2001/02 estimates of mean weekly household income (gross) in the Ferryhill Ward, including Ferryhill Village, Cleves Cross and Dean Bank was ÂŁ40 per week lower than the North East average (ONS, Ferryhill Ward, 2005). Based on this intelligence the community has been ranked as BRONZE for average household income. Full details of the methodology for this ranking can be found in Appendix 2. Although residents made no specific comments relating to levels of household income there was clear recognition of a need for increased local employment to enable residents to move away from a reliance on the current State Welfare system. There was also a request for the provision of increased support and advice for residents with financial difficulties. Residents at both consultation events expressed significant concerns about the rising levels of fuel and housing costs and how the affordability of these costs are beginning to have a detrimental impact on income and lifestyle.

39


1.4.5 Vehicle Ownership and Cost of Travel In 2001, 38% of households in Ferryhill Village and Cleves Cross community did not own a car or van; this being slightly higher than the County average of 31%. The remaining 62% of households owned one or more cars or vans (Census, 2001, LLSOA UV62, 004B, 004C, 004D and 006A). Although levels of vehicle ownership may have altered since 2001, the rising cost of fuel and other related costs will now have a significant impact on vehicle usage, particularly amongst low income households. Low levels of vehicle ownership and restricted use will affect residents’ lifestyles by restricting their access to services and facilities outside of the local area. Throughout the consultation process a number of residents expressed their concerns about the increasing need to travel outside of the local area for large brand supermarkets and shopping, employment, and specialist services such as colleges, universities and hospitals. This reliance on travel outside of the local area, in conjunction with low levels of private vehicle ownership places an increased need on a reliable public transport system. There are fears from residents that ongoing budgetary reductions to rural transport services being imposed by DCC will see many residents become more isolated and detached from obtaining specialist services and restrict their ability to obtain sustainable employment. Key Economic characteristics: During 2001/02 the weekly household income estimate was £40 less than the North East average of £410. During 2001, economic activity within Ferryhill Village and Cleves Cross community was lower than the Durham County average. 40.2% of residents in 2001 were not in employment, and not actively seeking work. 11.1% of residents were economically inactive due to being permanently sick or disabled. During 2001, 38% of residents were employed in low skilled job roles. Only 13% of residents were employed in professional or management roles. During March 2011 the percentage of residents claiming jobseekers allowance as a result of long term unemployment (6 months or more) was low. Short term unemployment (0 to 6 months) levels are higher than the County The percentage of residents aged 16 to 64 years that are claiming jobseekers allowance is higher when compared to the County average Health levels within the community are poor when compared to the county. During August 2009, 24% of residents were claiming a key DWP Benefit. 12% of this total was claiming Incapacity Benefit.

40


1.4.6 Rental Debit in livin properties To assess the rent payments made by tenants within livin properties in the community of Ferryhill Village and Cleves Cross an analysis and comparison of livin’s rental debit figures for 2009/10 to 2010/11 have been utilised. For the financial year 2009/10, the total rental debit charge (rent charged for all of livin’s properties in this community) was £3,004,692. At the end of this financial year there were outstanding arrears (unpaid rent) of £28,839; making an unpaid rental debit charge of 0.96%. For the financial year 2010/11 the total rental debit charge was £3,037,666. At the end of this financial year there were outstanding arrears of £24,807; making an unpaid rental debit charge of 0.82%. Based on the unpaid rental debit charge of 0.82% for 2010/11 the community of Ferryhill Village and Cleves Cross has been ranked as Gold. By the end of the financial year 2010/11 livin reduced its outstanding rental debit figure (unpaid rent) to 0.14%; a total of £4,032. Over the last year livin has introduced the option for tenants to pay their rent via Payment Card. The payment card can be accepted at over 60 local outlets (including Post Offices) wherever the “Paypoint” sign is displayed. This method of payment is only one of the many that livin offer was introduced with the aim of making access to paying rent as easy and accessible as possible for livin’s tenants. During livin’s consultation events a number of residents expressed concerns about the rising level of housing costs and how the current economic climate is increasing the level of debt for low income households and community members. A number of residents felt there to be an increased need for the provision of a local debt management advice service to provide help and guidance for those households experiencing debt and money worries. What does this mean for livin? Although livin will aim to reduce the outstanding rental debit year on year the current economic climate and future reforms to the Welfare Benefits systems will provide for challenging times. These challenges will require livin to work proactively with tenants and other household members by providing a dedicated financial inclusion team to provide advice, guidance or sign posting about money and debt management.

41


livin must be aware of the contribution made by partners in supporting resident and tenants to gain employment and skills, and increase their economic well-being. livin must support local community organisations such as the LADDER Centre to ensure its resources are fully utilised by local residents and services are widely publicised throughout the local area. The LADDER Centre currently provides skills based training courses but there is an identified need for the range and availability of these courses to be expanded to help more local residents, and specifically livin tenants, attain new skills and qualifications for employment. It is evident from the analysis that any employability work undertaken by livin must help reduce the amount of Jobseekers Allowance claimants (as numbers are above average); specifically younger claimants aged 16 to 24 years. Effects of the recession are felt in this community and livin must be mindful that residents and tenants will need support through these financial difficulties. This could mean signposting tenants and residents to debt and financial inclusion and support agencies, such as Citizens Advice Bureau. livin need to understand barriers to employment experienced by residents and tenants and assess the level of support it can offer. During consultation residents were apprehensive about a cut to bus services and this community has lower than average car ownership; therefore travel to work has the potential to become a major barrier to employment. livin must be mindful that Ferryhill Village and Cleves Cross shows low levels of educational attainment, and the loss of jobs within the plant and machine processing industry highlights a need for increased provision of skills and training courses to help local residents and tenants retrain or gain new qualifications. Without some form of intervention many of livin’s tenants may be required to rely on the welfare benefit system.

42


1.5

Access to Services and Facilities

Ferryhill is well served by a number of local shops, health services and other public amenities.

There is a local GP surgery and Dental surgery located in the Market Place which provides healthcare to local residents. A local leisure centre, owned and managed by DCC, is located within the village. Recent public spending cuts has required the County Council to review their current provision of local leisure facilities so the continuing future of the leisure centre is uncertain at this time. The Leisure Centre also houses an indoor bowling green and is home to Ferryhill Indoor Bowling Club which has over 150 “Cutting bus services because members from other local areas including the of reduced subsidies.� Trimdons, Fishburn, Sedgefield, and Newton Aycliffe. Ferryhill Village and Cleves Cross Resident

Located within the Market Place is one of DCC’s local libraries. There is a free provision of internet and email facilities and the library also contains a HealthZone information point. HealthZone provides information and leaflets for local residents to help them adopt a healthier lifestyle, learn more about an illness, or locate a local support group. The HealthZone is located within a prominent place within the library, resulting in a number of persons that visit the library taking interest in the books and leaflets it contains. Publicity for HealthZone is conducted countywide by DCC. The main shopping area is located around the market place in the centre of the Village. There are a number of local and regional stores including: a bank, fruiters, butchers, local Post Office, florist and numerous food outlets. Grocery shopping can be obtained from a local branch of the Cooperative and there is a branch of B&M Bargains where other smaller household items may be purchased. In Cleves Cross there is a local convenience store selling a range of small household items and groceries. For the requirement of more specialist goods and services residents are required to travel out of the area to neighbouring Spennymoor, Bishop Auckland or Newton Aycliffe. Larger supermarkets are also located in these neighbouring towns. Many residents have highlighted the need for travel out of the local area for access to more varied or low cost grocery or specialist shopping. livin currently own six retail units and seven office units within the community; the majority of these are currently let on lease to local and national businesses.

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This need to travel has been frequently highlighted by local residents throughout the consultation process. As many households do not own their own vehicle or have access to private transport extra costs associated with travel can place an increased strain on household income. Many local households will already have low income levels due to their reliance on welfare benefits. livin own seven garden sites within the Ferryhill Village and Cleves Cross community which can be used to grow fresh vegetables, fruit and flowers. Ferryhill Town Council currently own two allotments sites and there are a further four independently managed sites within the community. The LADDER Centre is a local resource centre located within Ferryhill Village and is accessible by local residents. The Centre is located within a purposely converted property leased from livin. It provides a number of local services including access to learning, and hosts regular training and employability courses and a local job club. The Centre also provides free “What is the point in having access to the internet and computers and is host to a Leisure Centre if there are a weekly fruit and vegetable coop. no affordable activities for young people?” A number of organisations can be found within the LADDER Centre, including Durham County Credit Ferryhill Village and Cleves Cross Resident Union, Sedgefield Employability Consortium Job Club, NECA (North East Counselling on Addictions) and CAVOS (an organisation dedicated to community and voluntary work within Sedgefield). The Centre provides a number of activities for children and young “Having Ladder Centre to use people within the local area and currently offers the computer is important” the services of two Employability Mentors and a Ferryhill Village and Cleves Cross Connexions Advisor who can provide advice on resident education, training and employment opportunities. Consultation found the LADDER Centre is viewed by a wide range of local residents, including children and young persons, as a valuable service provider and resource. Many residents are keen to see the facilities and courses provided by the Centre be expanded with an increased provision on activities for children and young persons, and more courses and training relating to employment and education. There is also a strong reliance by local residents on the use of computers and the internet at the Centre. After school activities and those provided during the school holidays are well attended by local families and young persons living in the community.

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Ferryhill E CafĂŠ is located in the Village Centre and has been open since April 2002. The E CafĂŠ provides a wide range of facilities for young persons aged 8 years and above. Facilities include the provision of computer games, pool table, table tennis, and allows young people to take part in many activities including art and crafts, mural painting, competitions, and health and safety and first aid training courses. The King George V Recreation Ground in Ferryhill is managed by Ferryhill Town Council. Facilities include play equipment, two 5-a-side pitches, a bike track, floodlit basketball court, and two youth shelters. The ground is also the home venue for Ferryhill Celtic Football Club. There are also a number of local play parks located within the area but local residents consider these to be underutilised due to their location near to main roads, and broken glass and litter being found in them.

There are concerns about younger children playing in the parks unsupervised due to the fear of drug and alcohol use and incidents of antisocial behaviour.

Although the community has a wide variety of services and facilities available for local use there were still concerns about the facilities provided for children and young persons. Feedback gained from young persons at the Ladder Centre highlighted issues with the affordability of some of the activities at the local leisure centre and a need for more activities that older youths and teenagers wish to participate in. There was considerable interest from young residents for the provision of a local boxing and sports club, a local skate park and an Astroturf football pitch to allow for year round sporting activities.

There are concerns about the current and future accessibility of public transport in and around the community. Many residents highlighted concerns about the reliability, cost and restrictions of the current public transport service and its vital role in providing access to employment, education and shopping. A recent survey of residents g within the 4 Together Area Partnership (DCC, 2010) indicated that only 56% were satisfied with public transport; this being the lowest level of satisfaction throughout the County. As car ownership in the community is relatively low; this coupled with rising fuel and maintenance costs places an increased need on a reliable, wide reaching public transport system that serves the needs of the community as a whole. There is a fear from residents that public sector budget cuts will see the current level of local services within the community decrease and the possibility of the public transport service and its links to the surrounding area being reduced.

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Key Services Characteristics: The community is well served by local shops, health services and public amenities. The local library and LADDER Centre provide internet access and email facilities for local residents. The local library contains a HealthZone where residents can obtain information on healthy eating and adopting a healthier lifestyle. The local leisure centre provides health related activities for adults and young persons; although its future is currently uncertain due to a public sector funding reviews. Some households are unable to afford the fees for the use of the leisure centre and its activities. Residents have highlighted a need for travel out of the area for specialised goods or services. Many households in the community do not own their own vehicle or have access to private transport. Satisfaction with the public transport service in the area is poor with many residents feeling that the current provision is unreliable and restrictive for their needs. Residents are concerned that public sector spending cuts will further reduce the transport links with surrounding villages and towns. The LADDER Centre is a well utilised and valued service provider. They provide access to learning and employment and a successful out of school activities programme for young people in the area. Residents would like to see the Centre’s services expanded so that more people will be able to access the services. There is a large recreational ground and a number of play areas in the community; however they are underutilised as residents are fearful of drug and alcohol use and antisocial behaviour occurring within them. Some activities provided for young persons are underutilised. Local youths want to have a say in the activities that are provided for them. Youth activities held at the LADDER Centre are well attended.

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What does this mean for livin? livin need to be aware of the positive impact that local services and service providers have on sustaining local communities. Closure of local facilities, such as leisure centres could have an impact on diversionary activities for young people. A reduced bus services may increase the barriers to employment experienced by livin tenants and local residents. livin need to be aware of the pressures communities are under and work in partnership with organisations such as Durham County Council to ensure the effects of service withdrawals are minimal and that tenants are aware of the implications.

1.6

Health and Well Being

The general level of health in Ferryhill Village and Cleves Cross is notably lower than the County average.

During 2001, the total percentage of residents who were in “Good” general health was 4% lower than the County average; together with 2% more residents suffering from “Not good” health (Census, 2001, LLSOA KS08, 004B, 004C, 004D and 006A).

“Lots of take away shops in the area.” Ferryhill Village and Cleves Cross resident

2001 Census data also indicates that 21% of working age residents suffer from a limiting long term illness; again being higher than the County average (20%). “A limiting long-term illness covers any long-term illness, health problem or disability that limits daily activities or work. Working age for this data is defined as persons aged between 16 to 64 years inclusive for men and 16 to 59 years for women.” (Source: Census, 2001)

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70 60 50

59

63 Ferryhill Village and Cleves Cross

40 % 30

County Durham 26

20

24 15

10

13

0 General health: Good

General health: Fairly good

General health: Not good

Figure 1.20: Levels of Health in Ferryhill Village and Cleves Cross Source: Census, 2001, LLSOA KS08, 004B, 004C, 004D and 006A

Feedback obtained during livin’s consultation events highlighted that residents are concerned “Expensive for Shopping.� about the affordability and availability of fresh, healthy food from local shops. There were also Ferryhill Village and Cleves Cross resident concerns that households on low incomes may experience difficulties with the affordability of purchasing healthy food when compared to cheaper and more convenient take away meals available within the area. There were numerous concerns expressed about an increase in drug and alcohol use by some local residents and the how this is seen to affect health and levels of antisocial behaviour in the community. When asked about the provision of health related facilities in their community residents felt there was a need for more activities aimed at children and young persons. Although there are provisions at the local Leisure Centre and the E Cafe located in the market place residents felt these are being underutilised. It was suggested that an increased and more varied provision of activities that local children and young people would be willing to participate in will help lower levels of antisocial behaviour and alcohol related incidents. Some of the young people spoken to at the LADDER Centre stated that they felt some of the local activities provided by other services providers were not suitable for their age range, were unaffordable, or did not reflect the type of activities they actually wished to participate in. There were concerns raised about the future of the local leisure centre. DCC has recently detailed plans of a spending review in respect of its countywide leisure facilities. Currently, the leisure centre provides a number of exercise classes and activities for local residents and their families; although there were concerns raised 48


about current affordability of gym membership and the exercise classes. The loss of this facility would require residents to travel to other local leisure centres at Spennymoor, Newton Aycliffe, Coxhoe or Bishop Auckland. Many households are in receipt of a low income; with many not having access to private transport. Extra costs relating to travel and the use of other facilities may result in access to leisure facilities becoming unaffordable for some members of the community and their families. Key Health Characteristics During 2001, general levels of health in the Community were lower when compared to the County average. 21% of “working age” residents are suffering from a limiting long term illness. There is a need for fresh and healthy food that is easily accessible within the community and affordable for those households in receipt of a low income. Many residents feel that levels of health and antisocial behaviour are being affected by an increase in drugs and alcohol use. There is an increased need for more activities for young residents. Youth activities need to be affordable and reflect the hobbies and interests that youths want to participate in. Leisure centre activities and access to its facilities are unaffordable for some households within the community. There is a fear that public spending cuts will result in the loss of health based facilities in the community. This will result in a need for travel to access leisure facilities in other areas. Increased costs associated with travel may result in access to leisure facilities becoming unaffordable for some local households.

What does this mean for livin? There has been a long established connection between health and housing. livin has a stronger role emerging out of Government’s Health Reform proposals to act in partnership with health services to improve the health of tenants and their families. As a “frontline” service provider livin has a privileged position to access tenants and potentially signpost customers to health services and healthier lifestyles. Good levels of health can have positive effects on educational achievement and promote employment within a community.

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In Ferryhill Village and Cleves Cross there is intelligence indicating poorer average health and high levels of disability. There are projects that could link into the preventative health agenda that livin could undertake and it is critical livin engage with local health stakeholders to ensure maximum use of resources and assess opportunities. 1.7

Education and Training

Levels of educational attainment are lower within the Ferryhill and Cleves Cross community when compared to the Durham County average (Census, 2001, LLSOA KS13, 004B, 004C, 004D and 006A). 2001 Census data indicates Although a higher percentage of the population that 43% of the population have attained a level 1 qualification (18%) in the community have no when compared to the County average this is formal qualifications reflected in the lower percentage of persons continuing their education to gain qualifications at higher levels. Level 1 qualifications include 1+ 'O' level passes; 1+ CSE/GCSE any grades; NVQ level 1; or Foundation level GNVQ. The average percentage of the population gaining a level 2 qualification is equivalent to the County average of 18%. Level 2 qualifications include 5+GCSEs (grades AC); 1+ 'A' levels/'AS' levels; NVQ level 2; or Intermediate GNVQ. Based on this percentage the community has been ranked as SILVER for Education attainment; based on the attainment of 5+ GCSE’s at Grade A-C or equivalent. Only 5% of the population hold qualifications at level 3. Level 3 qualifications are necessary for advancement into University, higher education or professional qualifications and include 2+ 'A' levels; 4+ 'AS' levels; NVQ level 3; or an Advanced GNVQ. This lower level of attainment at level 3 reflects on the percentage of the population that have gained a level 4/5 qualification through higher education. There is a difference of 7% between County average and Ferryhill Village and Cleves Cross community for those who continue their education to gain qualifications equivalent to First Degree, Higher Degree, NVQ levels 4 and 5; HNC; HND; or professional qualifications including qualified teacher; medical doctor; dentist; nurse; midwife; or health visitor. There is a difference of 7% between the Durham County average and Ferryhill Village and Cleves Cross community for those who continue their education to gain Higher Education qualifications. The community is well served by two local primary schools; Broom Cottages Primary and Cleves Cross Primary School. The local secondary school serving the 50


community is Ferryhill Business Enterprise College. The nearest further education colleges are located at Bishop Auckland, Darlington and Durham, all of which will require access to public or private transport. 50 45 40 35

36

30

Ferryhill and Cleves Cross

% 25 20 15

18

17

5

43

18

County Durham

15

10 18

5 7

8

8 7

0

Figure 1.21: Educational attainment within Ferryhill Village and Cleves Cross Source: Census, 2001, LLSOA KS13, 004B, 004C, 004D and 006A

There is a lot of concern from local residents about the opportunities for training and education within the community. Although the LADDER Centre provides a number of training courses for local residents, availability is often limited as a result of financing and resources. Many residents felt there to be an increased need for the provision of more skill based courses that will help residents secure future long term employment or enable them to enter further or higher education. Residents were also concerned about the current cost of university tuition fees and feel this may deter or restrict many young people and adults from obtaining higher level qualifications thus restricting future career prospects and job opportunities. The above concerns, together with the levels of educational attainment for the community, highlights a clear need for an increased provision of training courses within the local community to help many residents gain new skills and qualifications to help them into employment or enhance future job prospects

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Key Education Characteristics There is good access to local primary and secondary schools. In 2001, 43% of residents held no formal educational qualifications. Although the percentage of residents that gain qualifications at level 2 (equivalent to 5+ GCSEs A-C) is equivalent to the County average a lower percentage continue their education. Only 5% of residents hold qualifications at level 3. Educational attainment at level 3 is necessary for advancement into higher education or university. There are a low percentage of residents that hold qualifications at levels 4 to 5 (equivalent to Degree level) when compared to the County average. Attendance at further education colleges at Durham and Bishop Auckland require access to public or private transport.

What does this mean for livin? Education is a cornerstone of a sustainable community as it will promote financial inclusion and economic activity. It is likely that at least 43% of livin tenants in this community have no formal educational qualifications and although livin can play no direct role in education there are opportunities to link with Surestart, local schools and colleges to increase educational opportunities for livin’s tenants. Lower levels of educational attainment in the community highlight the need for an increased provision of training and skills courses that will allow local residents to access further education or gain long term employment.

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1.8

Reputation of the Local Area and Community Cohesion

Some residents felt that to be a poor perception of specific areas located within Ferryhill Village and Cleves Cross due to the appearance of poorly maintained properties, gardens and the local environment. “Too much rubbish, dog Although the community as a whole is deemed to mess and broken bottles” be a pleasant and quiet place to live there was acknowledgement that a small minority of Resident from Ferryhill Village and Cleves Cross residents responsible for causing antisocial behaviour and nuisance around their homes diminish the reputation. What this means for livin? A poor reputation for a community can last for many years and remain regardless of significant changes and improvements to social, economic or environmental factors. A reputation, even if it is a perception, can have a detrimental effect on housing demand within the community. It can also tarnish the reputation of the local community and that of the registered providers providing housing within the community. 1.9

Local Environment

The majority of environmental feedback received from residents during the consultation events centred on a demand for enhanced street cleaning. There were concerns about litter, rubbish, and broken glass being found in the streets, and in local play areas. Binge drinking and the prevalence of youths hanging around the streets on an evening, weekend and during school holidays were felt to be the main causes for this. The issue of dog fouling and the failing of dog owners to remove faeces from public areas was a common complaint at both consultation events. Further causes for concern were the limited number of car parking spaces within the estates and surrounding areas. There were also requests for an enhanced maintenance programme of public footpaths and highways by the County Council due to many being littered with potholes and crumbling tarmac and/or paving slabs.

Many residents feel there to be a need for more dedicated ‘off street’ parking to help ease parking issues.

On the 8 April 2011, an Environmental Assessment of the community was conducted by members of livin’s Improving Communities Team. The Assessment was 53


completed by assessing a number of environmental indicators at four designated “stopping� points on a pre-determined route through the community (figure 1.22). At each stopping point a number of environmental indicators were assessed and a number of points awarded. Based on the average points awarded at each stopping point, the community scored a total value of 23. As a result the overall condition of Ferryhill Village and Cleves Cross community, as determined by this assessment, has been ranked as SILVER. The full methodology to this Environmental Assessment is detailed in Appendix 2.

Figure 1.22: Route of Environmental Assessment

What does it mean for livin? A Silver ranking for Ferryhill Village and Cleves Cross is a good result for the community. It means that the community does not require intensive support and may only require targeted work in specific hotspots area. It is important that livin ensure that Environmental Assessments within this community are conducted at appropriate intervals to ensure the community is able to maintain or improve its current ranking.

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Section 2

Community Priorities

Based on the intelligence contained within this community plan livin has been able to identify and assess a number of key strengths and challenges being faced by residents g in the community of Ferryhill Village and Cleves Cross. Strengths in Ferryhill Village and Cleves Cross include a high demand for housing, good progress reducing rental debit, low cost of repairs to properties and low levels of long term unemployment. Additionally the community is well served by local services and there are a number of well-established partnership agencies, including the 4 Together AAP and Ferryhill Town Council, that livin can work in partnership with to improve the sustainability of the community. To improve the levels of sustainability within this community it is important that key strengths are maintained; together with conscientious efforts being made by livin, other community stakeholders and local residents to address and reduce identified challenges. Local Offers have been established for livin in most of the themes in this plan by way of enhancing the efforts of partners and identifying new areas in which livin can add to sustaining the community socially, economically and environmentally. Taking into account these challenges livin and the community has developed six key priorities for the Ferryhill Village and Cleves Cross community:

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Targeted environmental improvements in hotspot areas

Maintain and enhance levels of engagement and the provision of activities for children and young people

Help to influence and maintain services that benefit the needs of local residents and the community as a whole

Develop a partnership approach to reducing barriers to work and increasing employment opportunities for residents, particularly for younger people and short term unemployed households.

Develop a partnership approach to further develop local health based initiatives to help residents adopt healthier lifestyles and improve health levels

Maintain a partnership approach to manage and reduce incidents of low level crime, antisocial behaviour and nuisance


The development of these key priorities and the creation of realistic Local Offers that can be used by livin, community stakeholders and local residents to address and achieve them will enable the maximisation of internal and external resources available throughout the community.

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Section 3

Review of the Community Plan

The original actions contained within this Community Plan were revised in March 2013. Based on what livin has learnt from your community, and our work with local partners we have now developed a set of Local Offers for Ferryhill Village and Cleves Cross. The Local Offers have taken into account the original actions from the community plan and the views of the community obtained through consultation, leading to a new set of standards and actions aimed at supporting and benefiting your area. Delivery of the local offers will be monitored by livin tenants. A copy of livin’s local offers for Ferryhill Village and Cleves Cross can be found on our website at www.livin.co.uk. This main Community Plan will be revised in 2014.

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APPENDIX 1

livin STRATEGIC FRAMEWORK & REGULATORY REQUIREMENTS

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livin Strategic Framework livin’s role as a Registered Provider of social housing extends beyond managing houses. This has been identified within livin’s Corporate Plan for 2011 – 2014 which highlights the importance of improving the economic viability of local communities, followed by social factors such as health and education, and enhancing the local environment. As such livin is focused on supporting the development of sustainable communities for the current and future generation of residents. This is articulated through the Company’s vision, mission and personality which are; Mission “working with the community at heart” Vision “sustaining and growing safe, cohesive and vibrant communities through excellent customer services” Personality “Caring, supportive, helpful and community orientated” It is acknowledged that livin can play a key role in contributing to the delivery of sustainable communities. By developing strong and coordinated partnership working with residents and key stakeholders livin will develop: 

Prosperous Communities - addressing economic viability of communities by helping people to improve their financial circumstances, become less dependent on benefits, positively address employability and increase financial confidence.

Healthy Communities – addressing social wellbeing, community cohesion and health inequalities by improving health and wellbeing, secure access to further opportunities and develop their aspirations.

Green Communities – addressing environmental quality and sustainability by enhancing the setting of homes and promoting and supporting green initiatives in communities.

During April 2011, livin introduced the “Your Voice, Local Choice”, Local Offer document to ensure that “the right services are delivered in the right place for the right people”. The Local Offer is a list of ten pledges that livin has made to tenants in order to deliver key priorities. Full details of the pledges contained in livin’s Local Offer can be found on the website at livin.co.uk or alternatively a copy can be requested by contacting livin on 0845 505 5500 or 0300 111 2234 (low rate from a mobile depending on network).

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In addition to helping livin work towards sustaining and growing safe, cohesive, and vibrant communities the Community Plans will play an important role in shaping and articulating the Local Offer to tenants. They are the delivery mechanism for the pledges contained within the Offer and will enable livin, community stakeholders and local residents to tailor services and resources to the specific needs of each individual community and enhance local service delivery. This relationship is illustrated in the diagram below:

Local Offer Established guiding principles

Community Plan Strategy

Locality 1

Locality 2

Locality 3

Locality 4

Locality 5

Byers Green

Dean Bank

Trimdon Village

Shildon

Aycliffe Old Town

Kirk Merrington

Ferryhill Village & Cleves Cross

Trimdon Grange

Middridge

Aycliffe New Town

Middlestone Moor

West Cornforth

Trimdon Colliery

Spennymoor Town

Bishop Middleham

Fishburn

Chilton & Chilton Lane

Sedgefield

Aycliffe Village

The development and implementation of the Community Plans represents a strategic change in livin’s approach to supporting the sustainability of communities and will help deliver the corporate improvement themes of “Customer Focussed Services” and “Efficient Assets” by:   

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improving lives, neighbourhoods and communities improving customer involvement and empowerment, and increasing the sustainability of tenancies and homes


The Plans will be utilised to inform and enhance livin’s strategic planning and asset management framework whilst helping to deliver customer and community focused investment. They have an impact on all areas of service delivery, renewal and regeneration, and have departmental cross cutting themes. Each Plan takes into account a whole spectrum of current national, regional and local strategic agendas whilst retaining enough flexibility to address future emerging policy and structural changes at all levels. They complement the Government’s Localism Bill by facilitating and empowering local communities to improve local services in their local area and careful consideration has also been given to relevant housing strategies adopted by Durham County Council and the implications of the Housing and Communities Agency (HCA) new role in regulating social landlords. Tenant Services Authority Regulatory Requirements The development and implementation of Community Plans also reflects livin’s commitment to adhering to the Tenant Services Authority’s (TSA) current regulatory regime. This regime requires livin to meet six separate service standards:      

Tenant Involvement and Empowerment Home Tenancy Neighbourhood and Community Value for Money Governance and Financial Viability

Comprehensive consultation to support each Plan will help livin to enhance customer services and encourage local residents to become more responsible for local services and the improvement of their communities thus addressing the Tenant Involvement and Empowerment standard. The Home standard will be addressed by assessing the current condition of the current housing stock in each community to ensure that it is of high quality, well maintained and suitable for demand. It is crucial that the Tenancy standard be incorporated into the outcomes of the Community Plan through the consideration and effective use of lettings policies, rent management policies and the enhancement of tenancy sustainment. As part of the Neighbourhood and Community standard livin is required to deliver on three separate outcomes; local cooperation, antisocial behaviour and community management. All of these will outcomes will be considered and addressed within the outcomes of each Plan.

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The Plans will also address the Value for Money standard by ensuring that livin prioritise resources based on the actual needs and requirements of local residents whilst enabling confidence for external stakeholders and businesses to invest in the communities. Durham County Council Strategic Framework Durham County Council’s “Sustainable Communities” Strategy 2010-2030 is the overarching plan for delivering long lasting improvements throughout the County. It sets out five key strategic priority themes that will be focused on during the next 20 years:     

Altogether Wealthier Altogether Better for Children and Young People Altogether Healthier Altogether Safer Altogether Greener

Whilst, Registered Providers are essential partners in delivering sustainable communities, local authorities have the key strategic responsibility in this area. This is particularly important for livin given its current geographical boundary within County Durham and its relatively high levels of deprivation. Therefore the Company’s approach of aligning key elements of its Corporate Plan 2011 – 2014 to the priorities set out in Durham County Council’s Sustainable Communities Strategy is vital in allowing the Company to play its role as a key partner in delivering sustainable communities. The provision of sustainable communities and vibrant and successful towns sits within the key strategic theme of “Altogether Wealthier” and places a significant emphasis on local housing markets and improvements in employability and skills as key drivers in this achievement. Although the provision of a successful housing market is predominantly featured in the theme of “Altogether Wealthier” there can be cross cutting themes across the other four priority themes as demonstrated in the community plans. This theme of housing being a key driver in creating sustainable communities is further detailed in “Building Altogether Better Lives: A Housing Strategy for County Durham 2010-2015” (DCC, 2010). This strategy focuses on the ability for housing and other related services to create better life chances for persons living in County Durham by delivering better housing markets and high quality housing stock through enhanced partnership working.

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National Housing Federation Research conducted by the National Housing Federation (NHF) found that numerous RP’s are now using their presence and impact within their local communities to provide services outside of their core housing management activities. These activities are centred on employment and enterprise services, education and skills services, wellbeing services, poverty and social inclusion, safety and community cohesion. During 2006/07 the NHF found that RP’s nationally delivered 6,800 community services (including facilities) and invested £435 million (£272 million internal and £163 external) into resources outside of their core areas of activity. This study highlighted the prominence that RP’s have within their local communities and their perfect position to act as place makers in their communities. Further information and details relating to this research is contained within the full NHF report, “The scale and scope of housing associations activity beyond housing”.

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APPENDIX 2

METHODOLOGY

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livin Communities With the help of livin’s Tenants Panel 19 local communities were defined. These 19 communities are also loosely based around Durham Constabulary’s local Police “Beat” patches and the boundaries of Durham County’s local Area Action Partnerships (AAP) Locality

1

2

3

4

5

Community

Estates

Byers Green

Byers Green

Kirk Merrington

Kirk Merrington

Middlestone Moor

Middlestone Moor

Spennymoor Town

Town Centre (inc Bessemer Park), York Hill, Tudhoe, Tudhoe Grange

Dean Bank

Dean Bank

Ferryhill Village and Cleves Cross

Ferryhill Village and Cleves Cross

West Cornforth

Topside and Lowside

Bishop Middleham

Bishop Middleham

Chilton and Chilton Lane

The Poets and Windlestone

Trimdon Village

Trimdon Village

Trimdon Grange

Trimdon Grange

Trimdon Colliery

Trimdon Colliery

Fishburn

Fishburn

Sedgefield

Sedgefield

Shildon

Central Shildon, Jubilee Fields, New Shildon

Middridge

Middridge

Aycliffe Old Town

Shafto, Simpasture, Central

Aycliffe New Town

Horndale, Agnew, Burnhill, Western

Aycliffe Village

Aycliffe Village

To successfully complete each individual Plan a wide range of quantitative and qualitative data from an extended range of sources has been utilised. Data obtained from these sources has focused on several social, economic and environmental 65


indicators. Qualitative data collection methods has required livin to hold a number of consultation events within each community to gain the views and opinions of local residents; together with anecdotal data from members of staff within livin’s Communities and Homes Support Teams. Social, Economic and Environmental Indicators Several social, economic and environmental indicators have been established for each community; with some being benchmarked against County and National data averages. The table below shows the themes and topics each Community Plan has explored and the data sources used to populate the required intelligence. Themes

Housing

Method Quantitative- National statistics, livin stock data, DKO lettings data, Council tax data, Durham County Council strategic housing market assessment, House price websites and Land Registry data Qualitative – Interviews and consultation events

Crime Rates and Perception of Crime

Quantitative – Durham Constabulary crime data and livin internal data Qualitative – Interviews and consultation events

Economy and Employment

Quantitative - National statistics and DWP Benefit data Qualitative – Interviews and consultation events

Accessibility to Services and Facilities

Qualitative – Interviews and consultation events

Quantitative - National Statistics Health and Well Being Qualitative – Interviews and consultation events Quantitative - National Statistics Education and Training Qualitative – Interviews and consultation events Reputation and Community Cohesion

Qualitative – Interviews and consultation events

Local Environment

Qualitative – Interviews, consultation events and community environmental assessments

(including built environment, management of public areas)

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Community Views and Opinions The community in Ferryhill Village and Cleves Cross were invited to tell livin their views, concerns and opinions about their local community. Two consultation events took place at the beginning of February 2011, one at the LADDER centre which centred on children, young adults and families, and a general session for collecting views at Ferryhill Leisure Centre. The table below highlights the main concerns and areas for improvement highlighted by residents during these events: Themes

Housing

Crime Rates and Perception of Crime

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Community Comments                      

Property Size – small properties in areas House Prices are expensive Can't afford to repair houses (private tenants/owner occupiers) livin to do all major refurbishments at same time Untidy properties and gardens Vandalism Feel unsafe whilst in the area Problems with youths and use of illegal drugs/alcohol Needles found at the rear of garage plots Need to maintain/increase the level of local Police on the streets Regular fights between Youths Increased drinking by under 18’s Recent Burglary (Bowes Crescent) Concerns about persons dealing illegal drugs in the area Need to reduce illegal drug use Youths littering the streets Feeling that children are not safe when plating in the area Quiet area with no drug problems Need to reduce the drinking of alcohol in public places Crime not a big issue in specific areas (Lakes Estate) Some parents will not allow children to visit local Play areas due to safety fears


 Economy and Employment

    

Accessibility to Services and Facilities

Health and Well Being

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Hope that new commercial and housing development at Spennymoor (Durham Gate) will bring more local jobs to the area Lack of jobs for local residents Enhance and improve the services of the Credit Union that is ran at the LADDER Centre Card meters for Gas and Electric are very expensive

           

No affordable activities for young people at the Leisure Centre Good level of services in Ferryhill Village but need a large supermarket for more choice and cheaper shopping Bus Schedules not reliable - never on time Gym unaffordable for young persons No supermarket in local area No links with Surestart Need to improve local bus services Not enough Activities for younger children at the Leisure Centre Requirement for more after school clubs for children - Drama/Sports Concerns about the possibility of the Leisure Centre closing Nothing for teenagers to do Concerns about cutting local bus services as a result of reduced subsidies Use of the computer at the LADDER Centre is very important E Café

             

Requirement for more sport facilities and clubs (including boxing and Astroturf pitch) There is no local swimming pool. There is no free Swim at Durham County Council Leisure Centres Need for more activities at the Leisure Centre (Boxing) Expensive for shopping in the local area Limited availability of fruit & vegetables at local shops Difficult for elderly to get their shopping Too far to walk to Leisure Centre Local market – limited fruit & vegetables LADDER Centre provides a weekly (Tuesday) fruit and vegetable Coop for local residents Too expensive to go to the gym Problems with drugs and alcohol Lots of take away shops in the area People are binge drinking


Education and Training

       

Universities cost too much Job choice restricted due to lack of training Not enough provision of training at LADDER Centre due to resources and budgets Lack of opportunities for Training Weekly job club held at LADDER Centre Activities at Ladder Centre e.g. Dancing/Drama The Ladder Centre is an access into Learning LADDER Centre employs two Employability Mentors

Reputation and Community Cohesion

   

Generally a good place to live - but few problem families cause wide spread disruption Some areas are rough and scruffy Cleves Cross area is nice and quiet – no problems Good community spirit in areas

Local Environment

                 

Too much rubbish Lack of activities and provision for children and young persons (sports facilities) Broken glass from smashed bottles on street Smashed glass bottles in play areas, Recreation areas not properly maintained Dog fowling in public areas and play areas Need better street cleaning More street lights in Cuts/poor lit areas Need provision of a child minder at Ladder Centre No skate park in local area Highways and footpaths need to be repaired Got to cross main roads to get to Parks – safety concerns Vacant/abandoned properties Not enough trees in area No dog bins in areas Charge for bulky rubbish removal Requirement for more off street Parking Need to improve the overall appearance of the area.

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Community Ranking Methodology Based on the intelligence contained within this Community Plan livin has been able to rank the community based on; Bronze (potential), Silver (aspiring) or Gold (performing). This will enable the identification of the communities which require more immediate and more intensive interventions whilst ensuring there are mechanisms in place to maintain Gold standards. The following are details of the methodology used by livin when determining the ranking for each community indicator. Indicator

Ranking Affordability ratios have been devised by comparing income to house prices in order to calculate how many times their average income an individual would be required to borrow to purchase their own property. It is particularly interesting to assess how well lower income households can access the housing market. To gauge access to entry level housing the data used is the lower quartile income of residents within the former area of Sedgefield Borough and the average price of terraced housing within the community (the assumption is that this house type is often the lower quartile house type). Data sources for this information were the Annual Survey of Hours and Earnings (ASHE) 2010 and house price data from email4property.com.

Housing Market Affordability

To assess the level of affordability it is important to rank the multiplier by the England average. In England during 2009 the lower quartile house price was 6.28 times the lower quartile full-time individual earnings (http://www.communities.gov.uk/publications/corporate/statistics/housingplanningstatistics2010). Access to lending on homes is still calculated using a multiplier of 3.5 for single households and 2.9 for dual income households, therefore a multiplier of 3.5 or less can be deemed as affordable. Therefore the ranking system will be simplified by stating: Gold = Multiplier of 0-3.5 is affordable Silver = Multiplier of 3.6 to 6.3 (the 2009 English average) Bronze = 6.4 and above Tenancy Turnover is determined by the percentage of houses available to let compared with the total housing stock in a community. It is recognised that this methodology is very simplistic and there are several factors that should be considered in conjunction with this ranking. These include: 

Tenancy Turnover

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Turnover rates in specific house types are generally higher than others (one bedroom bungalows) so consideration must be given to the total community stock profile


Gold communities will have a lower tenancy turnover; however a Gold ranking could indicate lack of access to housing and affordability issues requiring more households to have a housing need for socially rented properties in a particular community

It is important that when considering tenancy turnover; further investigation be given to the circumstances surrounding the ranking and circumstances that may have contributed towards a high level of turnover. Further investigation should also be made into stock types within the community and the accessibility and affordability of housing. To compile the percentage rates used to calculate this ranking consideration has been given to Housemark’s national Benchmarking figures Gold = 5% less of turnover Silver = 8-9% turnover Bronze = 10% turnover or more Demand for livin properties has been determined by the comparison of three indicators of demand taken from Durham Key Options (DKO) data. Each of these indicators has been scored accordingly with the overall score of all three determining the ranking allocated to the community: Gold = 11-15 points Silver = 6-10 points Bronze = 1-5 points 

Demand for livin housing

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Hard to let properties in a community: This defined as properties that have been advertised in three or more bidding cycles with DKO before being let. It is important to note that the presence of low demand house types within a community can increase the percentage of hard to let properties within a community. The community ranking has been determined by setting the percentage of hard to let properties in the community stock: - No properties hard to let = 5 points - 1-2% of properties hard to let = 3 points - 3% or more properties hard to let = 1 point Area of preference: Upon application households can choose their areas of choice. These indicate a “perception” of an area therefore producing a demand. Areas of preference between communities have been determined by analysing the number of applicants showing a preference for each community compared to the amount of applicants received by livin (by percentage). Applicants can indicate a preference for more than one area and it must be noted that area of preference is made at point of first application to DKO and is a snapshot in time of demand. Often applicants do not update their areas of preference and these areas of preference may differ from their original indications during time on the housing register.


- 50% or more applicants expressing the community as an area of preference = 5 points - 21-49% of applicants expressing the community as an area of preference = 3 points - 0-20% of applicants expressing the community as an area of preference = 1 point Average (mean) bids per property by community: Demand is evident by the volume of bids received for a property. It is noted that this method will disguise some house types or very localised areas where the bids per property are very low and in some areas where there are exceptional number of bids per property. - 20 bids or more = 5 points - 10-19 bids = 3 points - 9 bids or less = 1 point

These three indicators considered together give livin a fair indication of demand for its communities. Anecdotal evidence from staff has uncovered that this methodology may disguise the actual experience of demand in livin communities by using a general mean average over all house types and sizes. This ranking together with the analysis does indicate areas of further in depth analysis.

Average Repair Costs Per Property

Long Term Unemployment (6 to 12 months)

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This has been calculated by analysing the total repair costs for livin properties within each community for the period 01 April 2009 to 31 March 2010. To calculate the average repair cost per property the total cost of all repairs for all livin properties in the community has been divided against the total number of stock livin owns within the community. Based on average repair cost per property the ranking used is: Gold = £599 and less Silver = £600 to £650 Bronze = £600 or more This ranking is based on data supplied by the DWP in March 2011 and relates to the percentage of persons residing in the community of Ferryhill Village, Cleves Cross and Dean Bank (Broom Ward and Ferryhill Ward) claiming Jobseekers Allowance for a period of 6 to 12 months. This data has been compared to the overall percentage for Durham County of 18%.  Gold = 17% or less (lower than the County percentage)  Silver = 18% (equivalent to the County percentage)  Bronze = 19% or more (higher than the County percentage) Data was obtained from the NOMIS Official Labour Market Statistics supplied by the Office for National Statistics.


Average Household Income

This ranking is based on national statistics and relates to model-based average weekly household total income estimates for households in the communities of Ferryhill, Cleves Cross and Dean Bank (Broom Ward and Ferryhill Ward) for 2001/02. This data has been compared to the North East average weekly household total income estimate of £410.00.  Gold = £411.00 or more  Silver = £410.00  Bronze = £409.99 or less Data was obtained from the Office for National Statistics. To assess the rent payments made by tenants within livin properties in the community of Ferryhill Village and Cleves Cross an analysis and comparison of livin’s rental debit figures for 2009/10 to 2010/11 were utilised. The total rental debit charge is the total rent charged for all livin properties within Ferryhill Village and Cleves Cross throughout a financial year. At the end of the financial year the total amount of rent payments collected by livin is offset against the total rental debit. The total amount of rent payments collected by livin is calculated within the first week of the following financial year; this ensures that any housing benefit payments have been processed and credited to the relevant rent account. All housing benefit payments paid by DCC are received every 4 weeks and are paid in arrears.

livin Rental Debit By offsetting the amount of rent paid throughout the year against the total rental debit charge for the year livin are able to calculate how much outstanding debt it has within each individual community. This outstanding debt is commonly referred to as “rent arrears”. This figure is then calculated as a percentage of the total rental debit charge and has been used to provide the community’s ranking.   

Gold = 0 to 0.99% Silver = 1.00% to 1.99% Bronze = over 2.00%.

livin has not been able to base the ranking of rental debit against any validated local benchmarking figures.

Educational Attainment (5 GCSE’s Grade C & Above)

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This ranking is based on national statistics from the 2001 Census data and relates to the percentage of persons residing in the Ferryhill Village and Cleves Cross community that have an educational attainment of 5 GCSE’s Grade C and above. This data has been compared and ranked against the County and North East averages of 18%.  Gold - 19% or more  Silver - 18%  Bronze - 17% or less Data obtained from the Office for National Statistics at www.statisics.co.uk


Environmental Assessment

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On 8 April 2011 staff from livin’s Communities and Improving Communities Team conducted an Environmental Assessment on a pre-determined route through the community. At each of the four “stopping points” a number of economic indicators were scored. The maximum number of points that can be awarded at each stopping point is 35. Environmental indicators included:  Grassed areas & shrubs  Fly tipping & litter  Garages  Pathways, roads & parking  Trees  Boundary walls & fences  Gardens The route through the community began at Cleves Avenue and continued through to Hudson Street. The total number of points attained throughout the assessment is then divided by the number of stopping points to provide an average total for the community. The community scored a total of 23 points (92 divided by 4) making an overall ranking of Silver based on the scoring system below:  Gold = 30 to 35 points  Silver = 21 to 29 points  Bronze = 7 to 20 points Full details of the Environmental Assessments can be found at www.sedgefieldboroughhomes.co.uk


15

Substantial issues

10

Prominent issues

5

Low level issues

0 Economic

Social

Total Score for Ferryhill Village and Cleves Cross

Environmental

24

This score is based on a range of economic, social, and environmental indicators contained within the Community Plan for Ferryhill Village and Cleves Cross. These issues have been scored against strategic priorities from livin’s Corporate Plan 20112014. The maximum a community can score is 36. This is based on a maximum of 15 points for economic issues, 12 points for social issues and 9 points for environmental issues. Contact Us: livin, Farrell House, Arlington Way, DurhamGate, Spennymoor, Co Durham, DL16 6NL visit: livin.co.uk e: contactus@livin.co.uk t: 0800 587 4538 (free from a landline) or 0300 111 2344 (cheap rate from mobiles depending on your network

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Ferryhill Village and Cleves Cross Community Plan 2011 2014  
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