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Rise of the

Entrepreneur Jasmine Simmons Contributing Writer

This goes out to my recent college graduates... lost & found IMAGE COURTESY OF HEATHER LASHUN - ATLANTA, GA

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ike a dreamy-eyed twenty-something, I approached my graduation from UNCG with great vigor and motivation to tackle the “real world.” I’m not sure what I imagined defined the “real world,” but I was certain it was where I was headed. Plus, it was excessively appealing to finally activate my 17 years of education and apply it for a righteous bi-weekly salaried paycheck sans complacency. I sat up in my swivel chair, knocked my keyboard keys with sheer artfulness and sophistication and excitedly added Bachelor of Arts in English, Cum Laude; Double Minor: Dance and African American Studies to my resume. Unfortunately, months later I found my euphoric “endless possibilities” philosophy faded and replaced with an anxious frustrated angle towards the molding of my future. Unremittingly I applied for every promising entry level position to no avail with responses solely from spam and donotreply automated rejection emails. “I’ve been duped,” I said to myself with my fists rested on my hips. The “American Dream” of graduating from a prestigious university and then getting a traditional job was no longer applicable to most and positively not for me...even with my internship experience and degree. I had to re-mold my futuristic career plan, find what worked for me and remember not to be prideful while looking for a job but rather create the position I wanted where ever I ended up. As my fiancé repeatedly says quoting his witty father, “Only thing pride ever did for a [wo]man was leave him[/her] hun-

gry or dead.” Therefore, my stomach and I practice humility. So what’s the moral of this anecdote? Whatever you’re passionate about; by all means go for it. I’m not the only one that has had to alter their career plans due to the sluggish economy and I’m sure I won’t be the last. Forbes Magazine remarked, “people of all generations are taking a chance on their own businesses: About 15 to 20% of the workforce–regardless of age– is engaged in running a startup or a more established business.” Ask around in Greensboro, search the hashtag #shamelessplug, Generations X, Y, & Z are developing an adapted American Dream that involves working for themselves as a freelancer or owning their own business. It’s an awakening and inspirational movement to be engulfed in and I believe Greensboro to be the perfect soil to nurture your inner-entrepreneur. With organized events like First Fridays (downtownfridays. com), City Market (www.gsocitymarket.com) and Cash Mobs (facebook.com/CashMobGreensboro), where locals assemble to support local businesses, it’s a haven for young freelancers to promote their expertise or at least get some inspiration and first hand advice. When you find yourself flustered because you’ve realized you’re not where you want to be in life, “remember a constant struggle, a ceaseless battle to bring success from inhospitable surroundings, is the price of all great achievements.” Keep on keeping on. 09 09

Profile for We Are Greensboro

Sept/Oct2013  

We Are Greensboro magazine is dedicated to serving our community by supporting our local businesses, arts & events. KEEP IT LOCAL

Sept/Oct2013  

We Are Greensboro magazine is dedicated to serving our community by supporting our local businesses, arts & events. KEEP IT LOCAL

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