Page 1


BASICS


The Cambridge School of Weston has been at the forefront of educational innovation since our founding in 1886. Our progressive pedagogy is rooted in the student-centered philosophy of John Dewey, who advocated active, experiential learning within a curriculum designed to accommodate the interests of individual students. In his eyes—and ours—education is not simply the acquisition of content and proficiency. It’s also a way for students to develop and refine the skills required to become informed, engaged, and effective participants in a democratic society. We believe that the world needs such citizens—individuals who not only have technical competence and skill, but who are also awake to their unique talents and who have developed ways to bring their distinctive skills and perspectives to what the world will ask of them.


Our program develops students’ abilities to explore and engage with curiosity, courage, self-awareness, discipline, open-mindedness, and a sense of personal responsibility. Purposeful classroom experiences and assessments allow students to develop and practice independent thinking, critical analysis, imaginative problem-solving, productive collaboration, and constructive risk-taking. Our curriculum uses primary resources and multiple perspectives, and emphasizes our commitment to human rights and social justice. We value creative process and challenge our students to push beyond perceived limitations and to make their work personally meaningful.

We believe in the power of our approach to be TRANSFORMATIVE.


BY THE NUMBERS Grades

9-12 plus post-graduate

7:1 Student-teacher ratio

Maximum number of students per teacher per term

CSW is nestled on CSW

BOSTON

reach of Boston and Cambridge, public transportation, and major highways.

325 Number of students

70% day / 30% boarding

Faculty with advanced degrees

30

65 woodland acres, within easy

80

%

14 Average class size


CSW students come from

60 Massachusetts communities 10 states 14 countries outside of the United States

19

miles from an international airport

22

languages spoken by campus residents


THE MOD SYSTEM Our program, known as the Mod System, offers breadth, depth, and intensity you won’t find at any other high school. Within its 6x6 framework (six terms of six weeks each), you’ll choose from over 300 different classes, crafting a schedule that prepares you for the rigor of

Times per year you get a full narrative progress report with your class grade

college study, allows you to dig deep into current areas of interest, and invites you to explore new fields of study. Our academic office and your advisors will work closely with you to make sure you meet our graduation requirements while taking full advantage of all that our extensive curriculum has to offer.

Meetings with your advisor per mod

6

Average number of classes an 11th grader takes

12+

17


PACE

Promoting Awareness and Community Engagement

PACE (Promoting Awareness and Community Engagement) is a four-year co-curriculum of experiential classes, events, and activities designed to ensure that all CSW students develop the self-awareness, social consciousness, healthy living habits, and leadership skills required to meet the demands of an increasingly complex and diverse world.

Community service hours completed each year by CSW students

5,000+

63

Hours dedicated to PACE programming each year


GET INVOLVED!

Number of clubs, affinity groups, and alliance groups

40 Number of consecutive years for our annual dodgeball tournament

6

WILDERNESS TRIPS • Backpacking in the White Mountains, NH • Snowshoeing in the White Mountains, NH • Sea kayaking on the coast of Maine

Number of students who attend Boat Dance

• Rock climbing overnight in Rumney, NH • Hiking day trip to Mt. Monadnock, NH • AMC Cardigan Lodge

PRETTY MUCH EVERYBODY

overnight trip


WEEKEND ACTIVITIES Our weekend activities program provides exciting options for both day and boarding students. Weekend activities are provided at no cost to participants. Here is a small selection: • Canobie Lake Park • Franklin Park Zoo • Greater Boston Walk for Hunger • Professional sporting events (Bruins, Celtics, Red Sox, Revolution) • Museum of Fine Arts • New England Aquarium • Blue Man Group • Battle of the Bands • Hypnotist

136 weekend activities per year

Hammocks hanging at CSW right now

6

Number of home countries represented by flags in our dining hall

45

• Boston Symphony Orchestra • Snow tubing • Ice skating • Community service trips (food banks, soups kitchen, community farms, etc.) • Halloween Dance • Indoor trampoline park

Sauces in regular rotation at the noodle bar

12

Galleries on campus

4


ATHLETICS INTERSCHOLASTIC SPORTS

RECREATIONAL SPORTS

Baseball

Cardio Boxing

Boys Basketball

Cycling

Girls Basketball

Dodgeball

Cross Country

Fencing

Field Hockey

Golf

Girls Lacrosse

Indoor Rock Climbing

Boys Soccer

Martial Arts

Girls Soccer

Recreational Frisbee

Boys Tennis

Recreational Soccer

Girls Tennis

Recreational Tennis

Girls Volleyball

Recreational Volleyball

Ultimate Frisbee

Running Strength Training Table Tennis Yoga Zumba


LEARN MORE csw.org Applying to CSW csw.org/apply Tuition and Financial Aid csw.org/tuition College Placement csw.org/college


45 Georgian Road Weston, Massachusetts 02493 781-642-8650

30% Post-consumer

csw.org


VOICES


The Cambridge School of Weston has been at the forefront of educational innovation since our founding in 1886. Our progressive pedagogy is rooted in the student-centered philosophy of John Dewey, who advocated active, experiential learning within a curriculum designed to accommodate the interests of individual students. In his eyes—and ours—education is not simply the acquisition of content and proficiency. It’s also a way for students to develop and refine the skills required to become informed, engaged, and effective participants in a democratic society. We believe that the world needs such citizens—individuals who not only have technical competence and skill, but who are also awake to their unique talents and who have developed ways to bring their distinctive skills and perspectives to what the world will ask of them. Our program develops students’ abilities to explore and engage with curiosity, courage, self-awareness, discipline, open-mindedness, and a sense of personal responsibility. Purposeful classroom experiences and assessments allow students to develop and practice independent thinking, critical analysis, imaginative problem-solving, productive collaboration, and constructive risk-taking. Our curriculum uses primary resources and multiple perspectives, and emphasizes our commitment to human rights and social justice. We value creative process and challenge our students to push beyond perceived limitations and to make their work personally meaningful.

We believe in the power of our approach to be TRANSFORMATIVE.


WE’RE NOT YOUR TYPICAL HIGH SCHOOL


While all students complete foundational requirements across disciplines, CSW’s unique Mod System allows for unparalleled opportunities and choice for students to pursue deeper and more focused content in areas of interest. The courses and activities featured in the following profiles are a snapshot of individual student journeys at CSW.

For a more comprehensive overview of our academic program and offerings, please see the companion EXPERIENCES course catalog or visit CSW.org.

AND THIS IS NOT YOUR TYPICAL VIEWBOOK We know that our students are the best representatives of the value and impact of CSW’s progressive education model. What better way to acquaint you with our school than to introduce you to a few of our students, whose experiences, insights, and academic pathways shed light on what it’s really like to be a part of this community?

Want to meet more students? Visit csw.org/voices


MEET ELLA

Senior | Boarding Student | Plaistow, New Hampshire


COURSE SNAPSHOT + Human Physiology + Molecular Biology + Intro to Computer-Aided Design + U.S. Cold War and Vietnam + Organic Chemistry + Human Rights in Motion + U.S. History of Education + Analytic Geometry + Physics: Mechanics + Physics: Harmonic Motion + Physics: Electricity + Discrete Math + Calculus: Differentiation + Calculus: Integration CLUBS & ACTIVITIES + Dorm leader + Cross Country + Varsity Lacrosse + JV & Varsity Soccer + Judicial Board representative + SALSA (Students Advocating for Life without Substance Abuse)

+ Active Buddies (community

service with disabled children)

COLLEGE

Northeastern University

The classes I took were terrific preparation for an internship at MIT’s Griffith Bioengineering Lab, and for my capstone about hydrogel synthesis.


FAVORITE D BLOCK

“Lacrosse. The team is an amazing group—the time we spend together is always so rewarding.”

Thanks to the breadth and depth of the Mod System, I was able explore a range of science and math classes in my junior and senior years. In particular, my Molecular Biology class reaffirmed and fueled my love of science and my desire to pursue a career in medicine.

FAVORITE SPOT ON CAMPUS

“The hammock outside of my dorm or the Garthwaite. I love the architecture and the light the building gets.”


MEET AMANDA

Junior | Boarding Student | Hong Kong


Since my first mod, I have been empowered by teachers and classmates to participate in experiences that encouraged me to step out of my comfort zone and to take the lead on CLUBS & projects I’m passionate about. ACTIVITIES

+ School Town Meeting Moderator + Boarding Life Town Meeting Moderator

+ Asian Affinity Club + Model United Nations Conference hosted at CSW (founder/lead organizer)

+ SALSA (Students Advocating for Life without Substance Abuse)

+ United Rights of Children (founder/lead organizer)

+ United Students of Color + Peer Mentor + Varsity Volleyball + Empty Bowls (lead planner in

fundraiser for a local shelter)

FAVORITE SPOT ON CAMPUS The Quad

“As an international student, the boarding experience here helped me to transition smoothly and blend into CSW’s inclusive community. Family dinners, talent shows, All Boarders Weekend, and really fun dorm traditions made CSW quickly feel like home.”


“Amanda has had a strong passion for Model UN and global politics since middle school in Hong Kong. We are so pleased with the diversity of the student body at CSW—exposure to a variety of cultures and perspectives is helping Amanda build the skills she needs to be a truly effective global citizen.” – Kuang and Hongwu, Amanda’s parents

COURSE SNAPSHOT + Ordering Chaos + The Bible + Middle East + Theatre of the Unusual Everyday Life

+ What is Human Nature? + Calculus: Integration + Art of Prediction + Youth Subcultures + Entrepreneurship + Sculpture: Raku + Advanced Writing Portfolio + Totalitarianism: Past and Present

+ French 5/6: La Culture Francophone

+ Playing Around with Logic + U.S. Constitution

FAVORITE DINING HALL FOOD

“Chocolate Fountain!”


MEET LINDSAY

Senior | Day Student | Arlington, Massachusetts


COURSE SNAPSHOT + Choreography Seminar + Dissent in World History + Satire + Cultural Studies in Dance + Major Author: James Baldwin + U.S. Women’s Movements + Examining Media as a Mirror + Experiments in Movement + U.S. Black Studies + One-on-One Dance Performance Project

+ Major Author: Flannery O’Connor + Alliance Building Across Cultural Differences

+ Advanced Dance Technique + African Literature + Activism in Action: Documentary Film & Human Rights

Through the wide choice in classes, many learning and leadership opportunities outside of class, and by being part of a community that cares and is interested in what each of us has to say... I found my voice at CSW.


“We have watched our daughter find her passion around social justice issues, confront and succeed in increasingly challenging classes, and excel as a dancer through the outstanding opportunities in CSW’s Dance Department. It has been a delight to watch her navigate that progression during her time at CSW and emerge as a wonderful and self-assured leader.”

— Anthony and Karen, Lindsay’s parents

CLUBS & ACTIVITIES + Assembly Coordinator (leader) + Circle of Sisters (leader) + United Students of Color + Comedy Night Planning Committee + Dance Concert (choreographer/dancer)

+ Peer Mentor + Culture Festival Planning Committee (leader)

FAVORITE SPOT ON CAMPUS

“Library—I know I can always find friends there.”

+ Diversity Day Planning Committee (leader and presenter)

+ Senior Night Planning Committee and Emcee

+ Social Justice Day

Planning Committee

FAVORITE D BLOCK

“Advanced Dance Technique. I got to work with three different dance teachers, and grew immensely as a dancer.”

COLLEGE

Howard University


MEET ANDRIUS

Senior | Day Student | Lancaster, Massachusetts


“One of my favorite upper level classes, while definitely daunting and demanding, was Advanced Drawing Studio. With guidance from a member of the Art Department faculty—all incredible artists themselves—we each managed our own studio practice and self directed our course of study. The class helped me to become a better, more focused and motivated artist, and really embodies the trust, responsibility, and creative freedom CSW grants its students.”

CLUBS & ACTIVITIES

+ Art Club (leader) + Assembly Coordinator (leader) + Sustainability Committee (leader) + United Students of Color + Peer Mentor + Varsity Soccer + Diversity Day Planning Committee + Senior Night Planning Committee and Emcee

+ Social Justice Day Planning Committee

COLLEGE

Cooper Union

In CSW’s discussion based classes—whether in an organized debate, a Socratic, student-led seminar, or an informal conversation—I always feel I have an active role in class and that each person’s contribution matters.


COURSE SNAPSHOT

+ Drawing: Naturalism and Observation

+ Latin American Writers + The Ramayana: An Avatar’s Journey

+ Art and Idea + LGBTQIA Literature + U.S. Jailhouse Nation: History of Crime, Punishment, and Mass Incarceration

+ Art and Science of the Human Body

Andrius, Q is for Quilt (2017), mixed media 45 in x 36 in

+ Wearable Art + Sculpture: Raku + Shakespeare + Major Author: Kurt Vonnegut + Drawing: Otherness and Social Justice

+ Spanish 5/6 + CSW Off Campus to Panama FAVORITE SPOT ON CAMPUS

“The Beach. You really feel connected when you’re on the Beach!”


MEET LIAM

Senior | Day Student | Somerville, Massachusetts


COURSE SNAPSHOT + U.S. Black Studies + Mixed Messages: Conceptual Art & Dance

+ Social and Political Theatre + The Art of Prediction + Topics in Music History + Alliance Building Across Cultural Differences

+ Statistics + Dante’s Inferno + Totalitarianism: Past and Present

+ Sketch Comedy: Writing and Reacting

+ Developmental Psychology + U.S. Women’s Movements + Epics and Heroes + What is Human Nature? + CSW Off Campus to Panama

COLLEGE

Emory University

I’m grateful to have learned things that matter–the work here is not busywork.


CLUBS & ACTIVITIES + Interfaith Club (leader) + Junior Statesmen of America + Model United Nations (leader) + White Students Against Racism + CSW Board of Trustees (Day Student Representative)

+ Comedy Night Planning Committee + Fall Theatre Production + Playwrights, Actors, Directors, Designers (PADD)

+ Varsity Soccer + Ultimate Frisbee (captain) + Diversity Day Planning Committee (presenter)

+ Empty Bowls (lead planner in

fundraiser for a local shelter)

+ National School Walkout

(local organizer and participant)

+ Social Justice Day Planning Committee

Teachers here challenge us to look at the major issues of our time, consider patterns of causality, and explore different approaches to conflict resolution. These skills were so useful in my role as one of the elected student representatives on CSW’s board of trustees.

FAVORITE D BLOCK

“Ultimate Frisbee. I found a passion, and an incredible community that shares it.”

FAVORITE SPOT ON CAMPUS

“Garthwaite pond. I love the novelty of having a pond in a building!”


MEET MILES

Senior | Day Student | Somerville, Massachusetts


COURSE SNAPSHOT + Mandarin + U.S. Markets and Labor + Critiquing Music + The Odyssey + U.S. Black Studies + Introduction to Computer Programming

+ Evolution and Revolution of Love on Stage

+ Robotics + Contemporary Improvisation in Music

+ U.S. Civil War + Appropriation in Film and Video + Writing Plays for Production + History of China + Entrepreneurship + CSW Off Campus to China/Taiwan

CLUBS & ACTIVITIES

+ Investment Club + Judicial Board Representative + Model United Nations Conference hosted at CSW (founder/lead organizer)

+ Cross Country + CSW Wilderness Trips

COLLEGE

George Washington University


I really appreciate that CSW’s student body is not a monolith—each student is interested in something different, and we all develop the skills and confidence we need to communicate in an extremely diverse community.

FAVORITE DINING HALL FOOD Quesadillas

FAVORITE D BLOCK

“Strength Training! Amazing, high quality resources and equipment in the FIT. “


MEET CAROLINE

Senior | Day Student | Watertown, Massachusetts


COLLEGE

Mount Holyoke College

For my senior capstone project I studied the history of the Northeastern United States through the lens of a single tree, the eastern white pine. The project developed into an intersection of so much of what I love—science, environmental history, writing, printmaking, the forest, and trees—all passions that I discovered and fed during my four years at CSW.


COURSE SNAPSHOT + Life Drawing + Calculus: Differentiation + Calculus: Integration + Rock/Pop Ensemble + Cell Biology + U.S. Environmental History + An Exploration of Spiritual

FAVORITE SPOT ON CAMPUS

“The woods behind the George, of course!”

Practices

+ Portrait Photography + Chemistry + Short Fiction: Beauty + Field Research Seminar + The Activist Print + Memoir Writing + U.S. Native Americans + Marine Biology, including off campus on Hurricane Island

CLUBS & ACTIVITIES + Advisory Board to the Head of School (leader)

+ Gryphtones A Cappella Group (leader) + Varsity Lacrosse (captain) + Varsity Soccer (captain) + Empty Bowls Community Fundraiser (performer)

+ Graduation Speaker + CSW Wilderness Trips

FAVORITE D BLOCK

“I don’t think I can pick! What I have loved about D Block is that it has given me the space to fully inhabit those parts of myself that don’t come into play in class. I get to be a student, an athlete, a musician, find new pockets of people to make connections, and collaborate to share a passion with the wider community.”


MEET JOSE

Junior | Boarding Student | Boston, Massachusetts


“My dormmates are like brothers—I know they will always be there for me—and our dorm parents really care for us and take an interest in who we are as people, not just as students. I am so grateful for this community. There is always someone nearby who I am comfortable talking to and who really understands me.”

FAVORITE D BLOCK

“Recording and Production: I love making hip-hop music.”

FAVORITE SPOT ON CAMPUS Music Wing


COURSE SNAPSHOT + Musical Mathematics + Physics: Mechanics + 3D Printing + Music Recording and Production

+ Keyboard Skills + Ecology + BioChemistry:

Foundations of Life

+ Analytic Geometry + Statistics + MIDI + Chemistry + Intro to Journalism + Physics: Harmonic Motion + Major Author: Toni Morrison + Coming to America: The Immigrant Experience

+ CSW Off Campus to China/ Taiwan

CLUBS & ACTIVITIES + Chamber Ensemble (leader) + Cross Country + Diversity Club + Men of Color + Poetic Justice (leader) + Sociedad Latinx + United Students of Color + CSW Wilderness Trips

As a musician and someone who loves science, I was able to combine my interests in a physics class by studying sound waves to design and build my own instrument. At CSW, it’s great that students can bring their own interests and passions and make them part of the academic work.


WANT TO KNOW MORE?


LEARN MORE csw.org Applying to CSW csw.org/apply Tuition and Financial Aid csw.org/tuition College Placement csw.org/college


45 Georgian Road Weston, Massachusetts 02493 781-642-8650

30% Post-consumer

csw.org


EXPERIENCES


The Cambridge School of Weston has been at the forefront of educational innovation since our founding in 1886. Our progressive pedagogy is rooted in the student-centered philosophy of John Dewey, who advocated active, experiential learning within a curriculum designed to accommodate the interests of individual students. In his eyes—and ours—education is not simply the acquisition of content and proficiency. It’s also a way for students to develop and refine the skills required to become informed, engaged, and effective participants in a democratic society. We believe that the world needs such citizens—individuals who not only have technical competence and skill, but who are also awake to their unique talents and who have developed ways to bring their distinctive skills and perspectives to what the world will ask of them.


Our program develops students’ abilities to explore and engage with curiosity, courage, self-awareness, discipline, open-mindedness, and a sense of personal responsibility. Purposeful classroom experiences and assessments allow students to develop and practice independent thinking, critical analysis, imaginative problem-solving, productive collaboration, and constructive risk-taking. Our curriculum uses primary resources and multiple perspectives, and emphasizes our commitment to human rights and social justice. We value creative process and challenge our students to push beyond perceived limitations and to make their work personally meaningful.

We believe in the power of our approach to be TRANSFORMATIVE.

WHAT’S INSIDE DANCE.....................................................................................................................4 ENGLISH..................................................................................................................6

HISTORY................................................................................................................11 LANGUAGE............................................................................................................ 15

MATHEMATICS...................................................................................................... 18 MUSIC.................................................................................................................. 20 SCIENCE................................................................................................................22

THEATRE...............................................................................................................26

VISUAL ART..........................................................................................................28 INTEGRATED STUDIES COURSES........................................................................32

PROMOTING AWARENESS AND COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT (PACE)...............34 SOCIAL JUSTICE REQUIREMENT....................................................................35 SERVICE LEARNING........................................................................................35

D BLOCK...............................................................................................................36

ATHLETICS AND FITNESS.....................................................................................37


IMAGINE A BOOKSHELF filled with books and objects representative of your individual learning experience over time. First, there are the foundational works and textbooks on subjects such as physics, algebra, and writing. Then there are others—books you’ve chosen in pursuit of a specific interest in bioengineering, Chinese culture, sculpture, or 21st-century politics. Mixed in are the various explorations you’ve undertaken along the way, embracing the opportunity to try something new: studies in race relations, marine biology, improvisation in jazz.

THIS IS THE CSW EXPERIENCE. Our academic program, known as the Mod System, offers breadth, depth, and intensity you won’t find at any other high school. Within its 6x6 f ramework (six terms of six weeks each)—and with the guidance of faculty, advisors, and college counselors— you’ll choose f rom over 300 classes to craft a highly personalized schedule that prepares you for the rigor of college study, allows you to dive into current areas of interest, and invites you to explore new fields of study. The CSW academic experience expands and deepens as you progress through the grade levels. Within the 18 main blocks of a single year’s schedule, earlier grades focus on building core competencies and foundational skills while still leaving room for choice and exploration. Scheduling possibilities expand in the upper grades, when opportunities for elective courses increase, and you can more deeply delve into areas of interest, sharpen your focus in chosen subjects, and continue to try out new things. As you read through this course catalog, imagine what your CSW bookshelf might hold!

Please note: These course listings represent the 2018-2019 school year. 3


DANCE

Advanced Dance Technique Students with considerable proficiency in dance technique will be placed in this fastpaced, dynamic, and physically challenging course.

(minimum 1.75 year equivalent in the arts) At CSW, coursework in the visual and performing arts carries as much weight and rigor and requires as much discipline as traditional academic subjects. We offer a broad range of courses in dance, music, theatre, and visual arts. Students are expected to have taken courses in three of these four disciplines by the time they graduate.

All That Jazz This course is a jazz dance class taught to live music provided by CSW’s jazz ensemble. Students will expand their knowledge of jazz, America’s first art form, through the integrated study of movement and music composition. Dancers will focus on the rhythmic patterns that are created through the influence of such jazz genres as swing, blues, bebop, and jazz-fusion, among others. Such terms as syncopated rhythms, body isolations, improvisation, high level of energy, and low center of gravity will be practiced as movement qualities that are direct derivatives of jazz music. Jazz ensemble will learn to perform jazz standards in a group setting. Emphasis will be on establishing a repertoire, building skills in improvisation, and performance.

Ballet (Int/Adv) This course is designed for students who have had at least one year of ballet class experience. Students from the previous mod usually continue on in this class to increase their knowledge of the ballet formation of the body. While the level of the students enrolled in the class does vary, the class is designed to first review the rudiments of the codified classical dance form and then learn to perform more complicated phrasing of the barre and center exercises that lend themselves to a more contemporary use of ballet. The students will study and work on modern ballet movement studies that explore the endless use of this dance form. Students will work on the positioning of the arms (port au bras), proper alignment, transferring of weight, and the fluidity and graceful movement through space. This class is a pass or fail credited course, thus the final grade is mostly dependent on attendance.

Caribbean Dance This course is an introduction to the popular dances performed throughout the Caribbean. The focus of the class is to understand the indigenous people who dance the rhythms of the New World islands, including Cuba, Dominican Republic, Haiti, Trinidad, and Puerto Rico. We begin with an anthropological approach to the dances using the research footage conducted by the late dance anthropologist Katherine Dunham. Students will learn both traditional/ceremonial and social dances of the countries mentioned above. Students will dance the Yanvalou from Haiti, and the Bomba of Puerto Rico, and the most popular movements such as the Rumba, Salsa, and the Bachata that come from the clave rhythm.

4

EXPERIENCES

The Cambridge School of Weston


Contact Improvisation Contact Improvisation will examine the relationships between dancers on stage and the movement dynamics that can be developed from collaboration. Dancers will learn the various partnering pivot points of modern dance and contemporary partnering. Students will also focus on improvisation scores and the foundation building blocks of choreography.

Cultural Studies in Dance In this class we will explore the relationship between “culture” and “dance” and the ways the study of one informs our understanding of the other. We will take a non-comprehensive survey of dance in varied geographic and cultural contexts ranging from East Asia through the Americas. Our readings, viewings, and discussions will examine how culture and history have shaped movement qualities all over the world. As a complement to these larger-scale considerations, we will use movement explorations to reflect on our individual relationships to place, history, and community.

Dance Concert Performance The Dance Concert Performance course is designed for all dancers who are potential performers for the annual Dance Concert. The dancer may be working in a group piece with another choreographer or creating a solo. All participants in this course are required to make all of the rehearsals called by their choreographer and to learn the movement on their own. It is up to the entire group with the choreographer to determine the actual times of the rehearsals and the weekly schedule. Each dancer is also required to be a part of the Selection Day process at which that specific dance may be considered for the concert. Once Selection Day is passed, the dancer is required to be part of the show’s overall stage production in some capacity (lighting, dressing room duty, theatre custodial cleanup, makeup and costume shop, etc.).

Dance Conditioning This class is for anyone who seeks to develop the flexibility and strength for which dancers are known. The course will incorporate some Pilates, yoga, and traditional dance exercises. Those who don’t study dance, but who want to get into shape, will be able to work in a very relaxed and non-competitive atmosphere.

Dance Media and Technology The integration of dance, media, and technology extends the language of choreography and performance, enabling artists to express themselves in new contexts. Through both theory and practice, this class introduces the emergence of new trends in the world of dance having to do with new technologies. We focus on “screen dance,” an experimental art genre started in the 1950s, which is burgeoning today with the proliferation of digital technology (low-cost

cameras, editing software) and populist broadcast/distribution vehicles (YouTube). A “screen dance” is a dance that exists on the screen alone, and nowhere else. We also explore the integration of media with live dance performance using new technologies (video manipulation programs, 3D motion tracking/capture programs, the internet, and communication devices). Class time is split between the computer lab and the dance studio.

Dance Repertory Project: The Company This course is open to the serious, conscientious student who aspires to make dance a career. Students who participate must make a commitment to the rigorous structure of this class. Dance students will participate in the creation of a new dance work by choreographer and Department Chair Nailah Randall-Bellinger and/or a guest artist. Rehearsals for this piece will be scheduled after D Blocks and on weekends, with the goal of performing the work at the annual Student Dance Concert.

Dance Technique Dance Technique focuses on modern and contemporary vocabularies that enhance the artistic and physical prowess of the dancer. Students are placed in appropriate levels of beginning, intermediate, or advanced depending on their level of training. All three levels explore the same content of technique training but at different accelerated paces. Classes are designed to introduce the technical study of dance movement to students of levels beginning through advanced. The style and technique explored is determined by the individual instructor and the dance chair. Students new to CSW who desire to be placed in the intermediate or advanced level must receive the permission of the Dance Department chair.

Evening of the Arts Dance technique classes are designed to create choreographic studies to be shaped into a performance style, presented at the Evening of the Arts in December.

Hip Hop Dance Explore the history, evolution, and physicality of hip hop dance styles. This course will raise awareness of the roots of hip hop dance and its transformation over the years through high energy, expressive movement, and the cultural impact it has had on the 20th and 21st centuries.

Independent Choreography This course is designed for the experienced dancer who is interested in deepening their skills as a dancemaker. Over the course of the mod the student will work independently to develop their own choreographic voice. The instructor will meet with the student to determine the exact project and provide guidelines to reaching individual goals. The instructor will then occasionally drop in on the dancer’s

EXPERIENCES

The Cambridge School of Weston

rehearsals to observe the progress and discuss the process, offering suggestions to improve their approach to moving through space in relation to time and energy.

Introduction to the Art of Ballet This course considers ballet as a historically located and culturally specific art form. Beginning with an exploration of its origins and early development, we continue with an investigation of the aesthetic and thematic choices that are shared among canonical, well-loved productions and that now comprise the classical form. We explore these elements as either deliberately designed by individual innovators or reflective of social, economic, and political changes. In this way, we revisit ballet aesthetics as non-inevitable and open to questioning. Our coursework includes a brief physical practice of ballet technique, visual analysis of selected works, and textbased discussions.

Motion Art This course is a creative movement class designed to introduce the novice dancer to dance in a comfortable learning environment while allowing the experienced dancer to further develop their choreographic tool box. Both novice and experienced dancers will explore and develop creative thinking skills, useful to the learning process. We will look at the different impetus of motion that can be initiated by the stimulus of sound and imagery, as well as external energy forces outside of the kinesthetic realm of the body. The course relies heavily on improvisation as a primary tool for finding one’s own authentic movement quality and is structured to liberate the way we move through space and communicate with each other by freeing up habitual patterns that may be restricting our unconscious and kinesthetic flow of energy. Throughout the mod there will be visiting guest artists who will guide us through their artistic lens to help us explore the dynamics of motion on varying levels.

Movement Improvisation/ Experiments in Movement The Movement Improvisation course introduces students to improvisation as a tool for creation and performance, and as a means to develop students’ creative problem-solving skills. The course utilizes improvisational exercises from various art disciplines (dance, theatre, visual art, music) and introduces students to principles of time and space. Through the course, students develop their awareness of self and the other, their sense of freedom and possibility, and a sense of their unique movement style. The course draws upon selected readings, class discussions, selected videos, and personal reflection. Movement Improvisation is a module designed to develop dance improvisation skills and explores movement through space from a variety of influences. Dancers are asked to create constructive critiques of their own as well as each other’s movement qualities.

5


(cont.)

Dancers must be open to creating a safe, creative space for developing their creative voice. This is a movement class that will develop kinesthetic skills as well as creative and critical thinking. Students will also be introduced to contact improvisation.

Moving Yoga Dance This course compares the elements of dance movement to the practice of the yoga asanas. It is designed to introduce the student to the Vinyasa flow of yoga. The sun salutations A and B sequencing (asanas-positions) will be taught as a means to encourage students to open up, lengthen, and relax their physical body and mental state of being. The final project of the class will be a choreographed dance that incorporates the Vinyasa flow.

One-on-One Project The One-on-One project is an opportunity for students to be creative while exploring new ways of moving with someone they may not be familiar with. Students will work intimately through collaboration. Once they have been assigned a partner, it will be up to the students to establish rehearsal times.

ENGLISH

(minimum 4 year equivalent) The English program at CSW is characterized by thoughtful and specific instruction in writing, literature, and textual analysis. At all grade levels, foundational writing courses are complemented by extensive elective options that focus on specific books, genres, and authors.

West African Dance The content of this course gives an introduction to basic West African movement, rhythms, and songs. Each class begins with a warm-up to prepare the body for this particular style of movement, followed by movements across the floor, and finally work on specific dances. Students will learn several dances from West Africa, primarily from Nigeria, Mali, Guinea, and the Senegambia regions. Classes are accompanied by live drumming, giving the students the opportunity to understand the unique connection between polyrhythmic timing and the body in motion. While the class focuses on the dances of West Africa it is also a means for understanding the culture of the people.

6

EXPERIENCES

The Cambridge School of Weston


Advanced Writing Portfolio (11) Students write daily and work toward developing a variety of essays. The emphasis of this course is process writing—generating and organizing ideas, drafting, revising, and editing papers—with peer or teacher critiques at each stage. At the end of the module, students assemble a portfolio of pieces for evaluation.

Advanced Writing Workshop (11/12) This class is dedicated to exploring the impact of audience, motive, and method on one’s writing and writing experience. We will explore the differences between writing for yourself, for your peers, and for publication. Each student will spend the mod primarily working on a lengthy, independent project, consulting with peers and the teacher for regular feedback. Whether reading professional writers’ own thoughts on writing or responding to each other’s projects, student writers will continue to shape their own views on their artistic process.

African Literature (11/12 literature) To many westerners, Africa is a land of extreme poverty, dangerous militants, and exotic safaris. In this course, we will seek to move beyond reductive stereotypes of this incredibly diverse continent. We will read critical theory, essays, short stories, and at least one contemporary novel, grounding our analysis in the histories of specific countries, but also exploring broader issues of colonialism, immigration, and globalization. Authors studied may include Chinua Achebe, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, NoViolet Bulawayo, Joseph Conrad, Alexandra Fuller, Nadine Gordimer, and Chinelo Okparanta. This course awards credit toward the social justice requirement.

American Dramatic Literature (10) In this course, we’ll learn and practice the basic principles of analyzing plays through the lenses of both literature and performance. Unlike novels, short fiction, and (most) poetry, a play’s primary function is to be performed rather than confined to the printed page, but knowing how to read a play—how to identify its themes, symbols, stylistic choices, and the particular ways its language contributes to the creation of character—is an essential tool in both literary studies and the world of the theater. We’ll focus on a range of semi-contemporary American playwrights, and we’ll take opportunities to collaborate with the CSW Theatre Department.

American Immigrant Literature (11/12) What does it mean to be an immigrant in the U.S.? What do individuals experience when they move from one country and settle in another? What do these immigrants gain in the process, and what do they lose? How do they deal with being “the other?” How do immigrants connect or disconnect with their American- born children? Students explore all these questions and more by analyzing

short fiction, films, and an excerpt from The Namesake, by acclaimed Pulitzer Prize winning author Jhumpa Lahiri. Throughout the mod, students read and respond to text on a nightly basis, gaining a better understanding of how difficult assimilation can often be for immigrants in their new abode. Students come ‘up close and personal’ with immigrant issues by interviewing an immigrant of their choice and writing up their interview in a People magazine manner. The course culminates with a final project which ties all the readings together thematically in a creative and artistic way, addressing the essential question: what is the immigrant experience? This course awards credit toward the social justice requirement.

Bible (9) The Bible offers a vision of humanity from Creation to the Apocalypse. Studying this great work as literature helps us understand our world and ourselves; the Bible also contains some of the most famous stories ever written. While moving from Genesis to Revelation, students will keep an academic journal in which they will try to connect their own life experiences to these ancient texts. This course presents a brief introduction to this compendium of history, literature, and wisdom about the human condition. This course awards credit toward the social justice requirement.

Big Book: Invisible Man (11/12 literature) Written in 1952, Ellison’s novel holds a premiere position in African‑American and American literature. Beside its rite‑of‑passage theme (the literal journey of a black man from the South to the North) lies a world of metaphor. Every action, every transition, every word the Invisible Man speaks—as well as all the people he meets on his journey—carries double and emblematic meaning. We will explore the rich, imaginative texture of this novel. This course awards credit toward the social justice requirement.

Big Book: Jane’s Journey: Jane Eyre and Their Eyes Were Watching God Created 90 years apart, Brontë’s and Neale Hurston’s heroines, Jane and Janie, both embark on complex stories of self-discovery and development. Through struggle of many kinds, as they seek their own confidence as women, these protagonists reveal the worlds in which they live. Through a close reading of the texts, and some uncovering of the differences between male and female journeys, this course will explore how Jane and Janie become Jane and Janie fully realized. Projects and assignments will include literary-analytical essays, a deeper understanding of the journey in literature—the Bildungsroman—and opportunities for creative responses. This course awards credit toward the social justice requirement.

EXPERIENCES

The Cambridge School of Weston

Big Book: Shakespeare (11/12 literature) “A monument without a tomb,” wrote Ben Jonson, Shakespeare is “not of an age, but for all time.” Though William Shakespeare died 400 years ago, the Bard continues to live with us—and we continue to live in a world informed by (and in some sense, staged by) Shakespeare. In this class, we will study and explore Shakespeare’s drama, considering how Shakespeare speaks both to his time and our own. Through Shakespeare’s exquisite and exhaustive language, we will engage varieties of human experience while exploring selfhood and identity, life and death, love and hate, good and evil, heroes and villains, courage and cowardice, communities and kingdoms, and beyond. Class time and assignments will ask students to demonstrate their understanding through close reading, analytical writing, and performance, and we’ll also look at some contemporary adaptations of Shakespeare’s work.

Big Book: Pride and Prejudice (11/12 literature) Almost 200 years after it was written, Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen continues to be a world best seller. What is it about this unlikely love story of mistaken first impressions that hooks contemporary readers? Could it be Austen’s witty, satirical writing style, or her creation of believable, flawed personalities that make this novel so irresistible and evergreen? Set in the bucolic English countryside, where all a woman “of good family” could hope for was marrying a rich man; Austen reveals the riveting tale of Elizabeth Bennet, a bright, discerning woman far beyond her time, who stands up for her rights in a male dominated society, but soon discovers the one man she cannot stand is the one she cannot resist. This course awards credit toward the social justice requirement.

Big Book: Romance of the Three Kingdoms (11/12 literature) The Iliad of China, The Three Kingdoms is one of the most popular and influential novels in East Asia. Taking place in one of the bloodiest periods in Chinese history, this historical epic tells the story of the waning days of the Han Dynasty and the three warring states that strove for mastery over the Chinese empire. With their passions and ambitions, colorful heroes with mythical characteristics all play their part in tales of strategy, warfare, political intrigue, and diplomacy. This course awards credit toward the social justice requirement.

Big Book: Satanic Verses (11/12 literature) In this class, students read Salman Rushdie’s The Satanic Verses. Rushdie’s novel is long. Its prose, while beautiful, is full of sophisticated sentence structure, South Asian English speech patterns, and non‑standard grammar, which means it can be a rewarding challenge for an engaged American reader. This is arguably one of the most controversial novels of the

7


twentieth‑century. It explores faith, the immigrant experience, and other themes with great style and deep irreverence as the novel transports its reader between Mumbai and London. As an upper‑level English class, students are expected to enter into the novel with intellectual enthusiasm and grace. This course awards credit toward the social justice requirement.

Big Book: South Asian Literature (11/12) This class introduces students to South Asian literature in English. South Asian writers have emerged on the global literary scene since the end of the colonial era and offer a substantial contribution to world literature. The different short stories and novels in the course can encompass some very important 20th century historical events, such as India’s and Pakistan’s independence; the violence of the ‘Partition;’ the Indo-Pakistan war of 1971, which led to the founding of Bangladesh; Indira Gandhi’s Emergency in 1975; the assassination of Indira Gandhi in 1984; the civil war in Sri Lanka in the 1970s and 80s; and the recent border conflicts between India and Pakistan over Kashmir. Writing either from the South Asian subcontinent itself or from the diaspora, South Asian writers have had a significant impact upon the literary traditions in England, Canada, and the United States. Themes covered include nation building, sexuality, partition, exile, migration, self/other, among others. This course awards credit toward the social justice requirement.

Canterbury Tales (9) In this course, students read and examine Geoffrey Chaucer’s prologue to The Canterbury Tales along with a handful of tales from the pilgrims headed toward Canterbury. They discuss the context for Chaucer’s work, but their main goal will be to explore how The Canterbury Tales addresses the human experience. What do the stories the pilgrims tell and the ways in which they tell them reveal about characters? How do the travelers use storytelling to establish a connection with their audience?

Caribbean Writers (11/12 literature) This class is an introduction to Caribbean literature and culture. Different sections of the course focus on different time periods such as colonial literature, anti-colonial literature, and post-colonial literature; different genres such as fabulist, fiction, nonfiction, and poetry; different linguistic groups such as Anglophone, Hispanophone, Francophone, and Dutch; and themes including rebels and revolutions, women’s writing, bildungsroman, and others. This course awards credit toward the social justice requirement.

Dante’s Inferno (9) In this course, students will follow Dante and his guide Virgil on their harrowing voyage and discuss the ways in which Dante’s social and religious contexts shaped his 8

vision of hell. Although the entrance to this version of hell warns travelers to “surrender… every hope [they] have” (3.9), students must embark on this journey with at least the hope that they can and will consider what this work reveals about faith, art, justice, and the human impulse to explore.

Epics and Heroes (10) Great epics of the past tell us about the culture, history, religion and magic of a particular time. As Joseph Campbell wrote, they are “the wonderful song of the soul’s high adventure.” We will look at powerful stories, as well as their meaning for the period and for today. Possible readings include mythology from around the world, Hermann Hesse’s Siddhartha, and an assortment of modern comic books.

Evolution & Revolution of Love on Stage (10‑12 literature course) From Noah and his wife in the medieval play Noah’s Flood, Rose and Troy in August Wilson’s Fences to Gallo and Juana in Milcha Scott‑Sanchez’s Roosters, students study love relationships including idolatry, adolescents, adults, and religion. Additional readings may include Equus, Golden Child, Lysistrata, In the Blood. This course awards credit toward the social justice requirement.

The Films of Alfred Hitchcock (11/12) This course will explore the work of Alfred Hitchcock, one of the most influential and innovative artists in the history of world cinema. We’ll watch and discuss films from throughout his long career, including The Lodger, The 39 Steps, Notorious, Rebecca, Shadow of a Doubt, Strangers on a Train, Rear Window, Vertigo, Psycho, and The Birds. Our theoretical work will focus on concepts of normalcy, perversion, spectatorship, and surveillance. Students will read some critical essays, but the major focus of the course will involve formal and informal written responses to the films we watch. Background in the basics of film theory will be helpful but not absolutely essential.

Graphic Novels (10) By immersing themselves in the vibrant worlds of graphic novels, students in this course will learn to be critical readers of images and text. Analytical assignments will guide students to unpack the effects of visual and textual choices, while creative assignments will challenge students to harness the power of images as a means of communication. The graphic novels we read will touch on rich themes of immigration, coming of age, race, and sexuality, and may include Shaun Tan’s The Arrival, Craig Thompson’s Blankets, Alison Bechdel’s Fun Home, Gene Luen Yang’s Boxers and Saints, and Marjane Satrapi’s Persepolis.

Great Monsters (10) Perhaps a great monster is one that lingers and survives in stories for generations. Characters like the Golem, Frankenstein’s monster, Dr. Jekyll, and the

EXPERIENCES

The Cambridge School of Weston

Devil have taken root in the imaginations of the people who have read about them or seen them updated in films and TV. In this course, monster hunters/scholars will focus on the great monster in Bram Stoker’s novel, Dracula. They will discuss what makes this Victorian vampire so monstrous in his time and in our own. They will explore what monsters like Count Dracula reveal about the anxieties and values in the world that created them.

Harlem Renaissance (11/12 literature) In the years following World War I, black art and thought bloomed. Josephine Baker stunned and enchanted audiences the world over with her provocative dances. Bessie Smith and Billie Holiday sang the blues and shaped American music. James Van der Zee documented black life with his photographs, while visual artists like Aaron Douglas and August Savage contributed to modern art with pieces inspired by African folk art. Meanwhile, intellectuals like W.E.B. DuBois and Alain Locke articulated ideas at the foundation of the civil rights movement. In this course, students focus primarily on the writers of this “New Negro” movement, this Harlem Renaissance. They discuss how their works are part of the fabric of American literature. They will encounter poems, stories, and essays that touch upon the full range of human experience and that come from a variety of voices within the black community. Students also examine depictions of “passing” as part of a larger discussion on race, class, gender, and sexuality. This course awards credit toward the social justice requirement.

Harry: White Masculinity in American Literature (11/12 literature) Students in Harry investigate traditional American masculine ideals through theoretical and fictional readings, artistic projects, writing assignments, and discussions. Through this process, we examine the problems and questions that American male writers have wrestled with as they navigate the pressures of patriarchal culture. This course awards credit toward the social justice requirement.

Introduction to Journalism (11/12) This course is an introduction to the history and practice of journalism with an emphasis on the role of the print media. We start with the First Amendment’s guarantee of freedom of the press and examine ethical issues, such as the public’s right to know versus the individual’s right to privacy. This hands‑on practical course is taught in workshop style and introduces students to the fundamentals of news writing and reporting as well as offering the class a unique opportunity to write a variety of articles. Over the mod students work at developing a “nose” for news, sift through information, seek the truth, and become aware of bias and opinion and how it impacts their reporting. This course awards credit toward the social justice requirement.


Japanese Women’s Literature (11/12 literature course) Explore works written by prominent Japanese women writers. Readings include Takekurabe by Higuchi Ichiyo, passages from The Tale of Genji by Lady Murasaki, and Totto‑chan: The Little Girl at the Window by Tetsuko Kuroyanagi. Students will also have the opportunity to analyze Tanka, a form of Japanese poetry, and to learn about women’s roles in folktales from Japan. This course awards credit toward the social justice requirement.

Language of Film (10) This introductory film course will focus on the workings of film and begin to explore ways to view film as an art form both comparable to, and different from, literature. Throughout the course, we will explore techniques for analyzing and writing about film. Students write multiple short response papers, and write and revise a scene analysis essay at the end of the mod.

LGBTQIA Literature (11/12 literature) This course approaches American literature with an emphasis on the ways in which non-heterosexual identities and experiences have been represented in post-Stonewall (post-1969) writing. Despite the actual lived range and combination of gender identity, sexual orientation, and sexual practice, mainstream heterosexuality attempts to confine sexuality to a rigid duality where observation of a person’s secondary sex characteristics are supposed to infer hir (gender neutral pronoun) gender identity and sexual practice. In this context, queer is invoked to describe any possible combination of gender identity, sexual orientation, and sexual practice that challenges the norm presented by heterosexism. By reading essays and literature by self-identified gay, lesbian, and trans writers, we will challenge and redefine the concepts of sex, gender, masculinity, femininity, diversity, oppression, and empowerment. By the end of this mod, we will have developed a greater awareness of issues concerning sex, gender, sexual expression, and sexual identity. This course awards credit toward the social justice requirement.

conservative South, O’Connor tackled race, class, gender, religion, and the meaning of human existence in her fiction. Reading her work is a pleasure, a challenge, a shock to the system, and an education in great storytelling. This class will focus primarily on O’Connor’s short stories, but we will also read essays, letters, and literary criticism.

Major Author: James Baldwin (11/12 literature) James Baldwin’s first novel, Go Tell It on the Mountain, made him famous and solidified his place as one of the most important American authors of the 20th century. Baldwin’s other work, including The Fire Next Time and Giovanni’s Room, assured him this place in American Letters as he produced one of the important documents of the Civil Rights Movement and a challenging text of gay literature and self‑identity. His fiction, essays, politics, and life make him a fascinating and compelling figure to study. In this class, we will try to cover the range of his work and examine some of the forces Baldwin struggled to fight and shape. This course awards credit toward the social justice requirement.

Major Author: Mark Twain (11/12 literature) Mark Twain is arguably the most important author in America’s history, producing an opus of work still unrivaled by any major author today. This course is constructed around an important theme in Twain’s writing: race. Twain’s writing spans from the Antebellum to the post Reconstruction era and Twain himself is a product of both the North and the South. His work reflects both the changes that he went through personally and the changes the nation went through in regard to this subject. Works include The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Pudd’nhead Wilson and short stories and essays by and about Twain and his writing. This course awards credit toward the social justice requirement.

Major Author: Octavia Butler

(10) In this course, we will read works from such writers as C.S. Lewis, Lewis Carroll and consider the forces underlying fantasy literature. Why do these writers feel the need to work from established paradigms and add their own imaginative twists? Students write imaginative pieces and analytical papers based on the texts.

(11/12 literature) In her fiction, Octavia Butler imagines worlds where black vampires must struggle to survive in environments hostile to both their thirst and their skin; where aliens and humans have to compromise their bodies and principles to co‑exist; and where time travel allows a couple to confront chattel slavery in the United States. Her work requires readers to explore (nearly) impossible worlds while re‑examining the ones in which we already live. In this course, students will discuss and write about the ways in which Butler’s science fiction comments on the realities of race, class, and gender in modern America. This course awards credit toward the social justice requirement.

Major Author: Flannery O’Connor

Major Author: Toni Morrison

(11/12 literature) In her short career, Flannery O’Connor produced some of the most searing and memorable stories in American literature. Informed by her Roman Catholic faith and her upbringing in the

(11/12 literature) Toni Morrison ranks as one of the most important American authors in history. She writes of a country in which her people have been forced to live, but never fully accepted. Her novels demonstrate that

Literature of Fantasy and Imagination

EXPERIENCES

The Cambridge School of Weston

African‑Americans have fundamentally shaped the United States, as well as vice versa. Passion, violence, music, love, and pain permeate everything she writes. We will consider a range of Morrison’s works, possibly including Song of Solomon, Sula, and Beloved, for which she won the Pulitzer Prize. This course awards credit toward the social justice requirement.

Major Author: Virginia Woolf (11/12 literature) One of the most influential writers of the 20th century, Woolf wrote great novels, thousands of letters, a long and beautiful diary, and reviews and criticism of the most important writers of her time. This class will explore Woolf’s influence as a writer, thinker, and reader through an in‑depth examination of her work. This course awards credit toward the social justice requirement.

Memoir Writing (11/12 writing) In this course students write their own true stories. We learn how to comb our lives for the memories that make for good memoir pieces and learn how to bring those memories to life by creating imagery and dialogue. In this course, students will write, workshop, and revise three short memoir pieces. Being an active member of the writers’ workshop is an important component of this class. Students will read excerpts from published memoirs as models.

The Monkey King (9) Enter the world of Monkey: Folk Novel of China, an adaptation of Journey to the West, a 16th Century novel by Wu Cheng’en. Long before Goku defeats his enemies in Dragonball Z, Sun Wukong—The Monkey King—embarks on an epic journey with the Buddhist monk (Tripitaka) and his disciples to obtain Buddhist scriptures from India and bring them back to China. This folk epic mixes satire, allegory, and history and provides students with the opportunity to explore a classic that is as famous in East Asia as The Odyssey. The students will also have the opportunity to (1) learn about Confucianism, Buddhism, and Taoism, and (2) participate in a Chinese calligraphy workshop. This course awards credit toward the social justice requirement.

Native American Literature, Past and Present (10) In this course, students will start by examining and questioning their knowledge of Native Americans in order to decolonize their belief systems. We will then focus on the importance of the oral tradition and read myths from Native American cultures around the U.S. in order to better understand shared themes, archetypes, and ideas. Each week for four weeks we will concentrate on a particular geographic area in the U.S. and pair older, traditional stories with contemporary texts by Native American authors in each tribe. These may include but are not limited to Vine Deloria of

9


the Sioux (Great Plains), Leslie Marmon Silko of the Pueblo (Southwest), and Sherman Alexie of the Coeur d’Alene (Northwest).

The Odyssey (9) For 10 years Odysseus fought on the fields of Troy, and for 10 more years fights to return to the wife and son he left behind. On his way home he encounters ravenous monsters, willful gods and goddesses, and beautiful, seductive women. We will read the Robert Fagles translation and various poems and artworks that draw on the world of The Odyssey, and do a variety of creative and analytical projects in response to the reading.

The Ramayana (10-12 literature) In this course, we study the 3000-year-old Indian epic poem The Ramayana as a literary masterpiece that embodies the ideals, values, and philosophy of Hinduism. Daily discussion informs students with an understanding of dharma (doing the right thing), karma (the law of cause and effect), reincarnation, and the war between good and evil. Students are made aware of how these ideas are inextricably intertwined within The Ramayana, making it more than just a complex journey of love, honor, and adventure, but also a vibrant metaphor and template for how individuals should lead their lives: putting themselves in the shoes of others and serving the community. This course awards credit toward the social justice requirement.

Sally: White American Womanhood (11/12 literature) This course will explore how the role of women in American society has changed over time as reflected by literature written by women from the turn of the 20th century to the present day. Starting with First Wave Feminism and finishing with today’s Third (and even Fourth?) Wave, we will explore the progression of literature by mostly white, upper-middle-class, heterosexual women authors to women of color and those in the LGBTQIA community. Texts may include The Yellow Wallpaper by Charlotte Perkins Gilman, The Awakening by Kate Chopin, The Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath, The Blu‑ est Eye by Toni Morrison and the anthology This Bridge Called My Back edited by Cherríe Moraga and Gloria E. Anzaldúa. Supplemental readings will include feminist criticism from Sandra Gilbert and Susan Gubar and others in order to better understand how to interpret these pivotal works. This course awards credit toward the social justice requirement.

10

Social & Political Theatre (10‑12 literature course) Students study important social and political literature of the theatre that addresses social justice issues, including experiences of war, personal and political freedom, assumptions, stereotypes, and responsibility. Readings may include the works of well‑known playwrights such as Odets, Brecht, Fugard, Fo, and Durang, as well as contemporary playwrights Ensler, Churchill, Parks, and Hwang. This course awards credit toward the social justice requirement.

Theatre/Unusual Everyday Life (10‑12 literature) Through literature of the theatre, students focus on differences in everyday lives. We take so much for granted. Students have an opportunity to explore many issues of accessibility, physical and mental challenges through time, cultures, definitions, and values. Plays may include The Boys Next Door, Elephant Man, Wings, Children of a Lesser God, Getting Out, and The Ballad of a Sad Café.

Understanding Hayao Miyazaki Through Literature (10) In this course, students will analyze films by Hayao Miyazaki, one of the world’s most famous animators and film directors, well known for masterpieces such as My Neighbor Totoro, Princess Mononoke, and Spirited Away. Ursula K. Le Guin’s Earthsea series, Grimm’s Tales, and Japanese folktales are a few of the works that have inspired his films and will provide literary and cultural context. All of the works will provide ground to discuss the complex role of female protagonists in the world of animation and literature. The students will have the opportunity to create their own folktale. This course awards credit toward the social justice requirement.

What is Human Nature? (11/12 literature) Since the dawn of consciousness, we humans have been on a quest to figure out who we really are. Are we inherently good? Are we inclined toward evil? Are we born innocent, a tabula rasa, only to be shaped by our environment? In this class, we will explore these questions by looking into literature. Golding employs a Hobbesian view of humanity in Lord of the Flies. Thoreau’s Walden and Emerson’s Self‑Reliance will provide us with a Transcendental view. Finally, we will delve into Voltaire’s biting satire Candide.

EXPERIENCES

The Cambridge School of Weston

WHERE ARE WE?: An exploration of short plays from around the world (10–12) WHERE ARE WE? explores a variety of short plays to explore issues of power, justice, and evolution through a range of styles including satire, farce, epic theatre, realism, and verse. Students will learn a dramaturgical approach to the study of short plays, focusing not only on the written text but the cultural context, connections, and societal impact of the work. Students will gain an increased understanding of the work of non-Western playwrights, foundations of playwriting, and specific contexts in history and society that give rise to playwright voices.

World Poetry: An Introduction to Verse from Antiquity to Present (10) This survey of world poetry from ancient Egypt to the late 20th century introduces students to poetry from around the world written in or translated into English. Students will read haikus, Vedic hymns, Icelandic sagas, and verse from Garcia Lorca, Derek Walcott, and Seamus Heaney, among others. They will also examine the poetic form (sonnet, ballad, villanelle, and sestina, among others). Students will also practice their analytical writing and reading skills as they develop a greater appreciation and understanding of the verse form.

Writing About Reading (10) Through learning the literature, history, art, and music of a particular American decade, students discover how writing and reading affect and reflect a given culture. Students will write frequent responses to the various forms of writing. They will also complete a substantial research project or paper.

Writing About Reading 2 (11) In this 11th grade requirement, students learn the research and writing skills necessary to produce a long research paper. Students spend the beginning of the mod reading and discussing a novella, play, or short story collection together, and then work under close supervision to research and draft a 10‑15 page research paper based on that text.

Writing Foundations Workshop (9) What is your writing identity? How do you see your journey as a writer thus far? Where do you want to go as a writer? In this two-mod course, students will reflect on who they are as writers, set goals for who they want to be, and engage in daily writing exercises. Short stories, poems, and essays will serve as models for our work. In the first module, students will write and revise creative, personal, and persuasive essays. In the second module, students will practice analytical writing, including the literary analysis essay.


Writing Plays for Production (10‑12) Creating the literature of the theatre requires a good ear for the way people communicate, a keen sense of imagination, an understanding of how theatre works, writing skills to give voice to one’s ideas, and a speaking ability to give verbal life to the written plays. This process also demands patience, rewrites, humor, and a general willingness to venture into this often undiscovered literature. Plays from this class are performed as part of the Playwrights’, Actors’, Directors’, Lighting Designers’ Festival (PADD).

Writing Poetry (11/12 writing) Language is the foundational material of poetry. Poetry’s attention to language is what distinguishes it from other literary genres. In this class, therefore, students are expected to develop a facility and versatility with use of language to tell their stories in lyric and associative mode. This is also a workshop class. The first rule of thumb for developing a relationship with any form of writing is to read that genre, because reading is instructive. Students will closely read poems every day. They will also develop a vocabulary to discuss poetry. In addition, they will compose three poems that will be revised over the mod, write a literary analytical essay on one of the assigned poems, write a metacognition on their creative process, and buy a book of poetry.

Writing Short Stories (11/12 writing) Each of us has stories to tell, stories about ourselves and others. In this course, we begin by reading published stories as inspiration for writing our own stories, and continue with a sequence of short exercises designed to explore the various facets of short story writing. In the second half of the mod, we move into a formal workshop period, where each student develops a draft of an original story and receives feedback from peers and the teacher.

HISTORY

(minimum 3 year equivalent) CSW’s history curriculum teaches students the fundamentals of writing and research while also exposing them to a broad range of historical events, movements, philosophies, and contexts from the ancient world to the modern day. All students must take U.S. history in addition to a series of core electives.

EXPERIENCES

The Cambridge School of Weston

11


Activism in Action: Documentary Film and Human Rights (11/12) In this course students will learn how documentary film can be used to amplify voices. Those whose voices are rarely heard can use film as a weapon for change. Students will explore the history of documentary film within the human rights and social justice realm and learn tangible skills of storytelling. By using case studies of communities learning and using this medium to affect change, students will explore the intersection of art and activism. Through media literacy, students will be challenged to understand the responsibility of telling someone else’s story and the power behind an authentic voice sharing experiences. The class will culminate in short 3-5 minute documentary films that explore the importance of voice around a human rights issue and begin to think about how campaigns are created around content. This course awards credit toward the social justice requirement.

Alexander the Great (11/12) In 323 BCE, Alexander the Great died at the age of 33 leaving behind a massive empire and a legend that describes him as a benevolent ruler, a passionate murderer, a pupil of Aristotle, and a brilliant general. This course will explore the many facets of the character and history of Alexander the Great in an attempt to distill the historical truth from the deified myth. We will read several ancient biographies of Alexander, including those by Quintus Curtius Rufus, Plutarch, and Arrian, as well as several secondary sources in order to solve the many mysteries that surround his life. Furthermore, we will examine how his mythology was perpetuated through his artistic representation on coins and in monumental sculpture.

Ancient Rome (9/10) Using maps, art, and primary sources we will discover how the small, collective cultivation of a valley grew into one of the world’s most expansive and powerful empires. This course will look at such topics as Roman religion, the gladiatorial spectacles, the Roman senate, and specific emperors in order to begin an exploration of the dynamic history and resounding impact of the empire, with a specific emphasis on using visual texts like monumental architecture and urban planning. This class encourages students to get comfortable with a wide range skills including debate, seminar discussions, small group projects, and learning how to tackle challenging primary and secondary source texts.

The Art of Prediction (11/12) The 18th century worldview was an empowering one. As a result of the Scientific Revolution, the world and its history were predictable and orderly, subject to natural laws that humans could understand. The innovations in science and political thought in the 19th and 20th centuries profoundly changed this view, as truth and universal

12

law gave way to a new emphasis on the common man and best fit models based on uncertainty, chance, and probability. The micro-history movement and the events leading to the development of the atomic bomb had radical implications for the theory and practices of both disciplines. We will examine the philosophy and methodology of history and science as they evolved to meet a new worldview in this period.

China (11/12) Using both primary and secondary sources, students explore a 5000-yearold history beginning with the last four dynasties and ending in modern day China. Students read historical and contemporary material of both Chinese and Western authors, developing a perspective on the emergence of China on the world stage. Additionally, students examine the interaction between China and the West and how that has shaped China today. This course awards credit toward the social justice requirement.

Discovering India (11/12) The Indian Subcontinent has a rich history of people, cultures, power, and movements. This course examines the origins of that history: the development of a powerful, ethnically diverse structure that unified and broke apart, was invaded, and withstood invasions. Students also explore the question of how a multilingual, multi‑ethnic, multi‑religious, and multi‑racial political entity that was once India produced a non‑violent movement only to divide into three distinct nations. This course awards credit toward the social justice requirement.

Dissent (9/10) Dissent is common to most societies but is given a different reception by each. This course examines the history of dissent and the evolution of the Latin American societies, particularly those of Central and Southern America. Using primary source documents and secondary sources, students will explore the occupation and independence movements from the perspective of dissenting societies. This course awards credit toward the social justice requirement.

Facing History & Ourselves (9) The Holocaust is the most thoroughly documented example of human behavior in an extreme, man‑made situation. The study of this event can teach students the meaning of human dignity, morality, law, and citizenship. We investigate the roles and responsibilities of the individual within a given society, and students struggle with issues and dilemmas which defy simple solutions. Why did it happen? What should they have done? What would I have done? The universal questions of morality and the lessons to be learned from a history of totalitarianism, racism, and dehumanization are

EXPERIENCES

The Cambridge School of Weston

not unique to the Holocaust. Comparisons and parallels are made to past and contemporary issues, events, and choices. This course awards credit toward the social justice requirement.

Food & Culture (9) This course is designed to provide firsthand experiences, lively group projects, and appropriate reading on the history, geography and culture of food. Students take trips, work on writing exercises and analytical skill-building, discuss major themes, and engage in group work with an array of activities and projects. This course awards credit toward the social justice requirement.

The Guillotine & The Gun: French & Russian Revolutions (9/10) This course explores the origins, tumultuous paths, and impact of two of the world’s first truly modern revolutions. The French Revolution promised enlightened equality, but gave rise to the Terror and Napoleon’s dictatorship. The Russian Revolution promised a Marxist utopia, but resulted in the reign of Stalin and the subsequent slaughter of forty million people. Both revolutions also accorded an unprecedented and controversial public role to feminism, atheism, socialist, and anti‑imperialist ideologies, all of which we will explore. In a comparative manner, we will examine the key historical actors and ideas that contoured these revolutions, largely through the exploration of original documents, including speeches, philosophical treatises, diaries, political manifestos, and art. This course awards credit toward the social justice requirement.

Human Rights in Motion (11/12) Human rights are the fundamental rights of every man, woman, and child. They are so basic we assume we know what they are, where they come from, and what we can do with them. And yet, they are in constant motion, subject to interpretation by whoever wields power over other human beings. Our fundamental human rights today are changeable, much as they have been in the past. This course seeks to begin at the beginning, the establishment of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights in 1950, and proceed from there to examine where we are today in respect to the acknowledgement and empowerment of human rights. It looks at the choices nations, leaders, and citizens have and the choices they make that either respect or impede the individual’s ability to enjoy their freedoms and opportunities. Students will be required to work independently and in groups, producing historical examinations and in-depth analysis of situations today where these fundamental human rights (may) have been violated. This course awards credit toward the social justice requirement.


Latin America: Rebels and Revolutionaries (11/12) Latin American countries have consistently been pressed to implement economic, social, and political arrangements that favor the U.S. This course will examine efforts by some Latin Americans to develop alternative visions for their countries. What were these alternatives? Why did some believe they were necessary? In what ways, and why, have these alternatives succeeded or failed? We will examine these questions by studying cases that include the Mexican Revolution, the Cuban Revolution(s), Rigoberta Menchu in Guatemala, and recent experiments such as Lula da Silva’s Partido dos Trabalhadores in Brazil, the Bolivarian Revolution lead by Hugo Chavez in Venezuela, and others. We will also explore the connection between history and memory through the case study of Che Guevara. This course awards credit toward the social justice requirement.

Middle East (11/12) This class begins with the fall of the Ottoman Empire and concludes with post-Arab Spring. We will first examine the map and the birth of the nation state. We always keep religion and natural resources in our lens. We will also take significant time researching the state of Israel and possible peace plans with Palestinians and a one- or two-state solution. At the end, students present a self-directed research project that they have been working on independently. This course awards credit toward the social justice requirement.

Modern Africa (11/12) This course introduces students to the political and economic conditions that have evolved in Africa since the late 19th century. Students consider how actors—both internal and external to African nations—shaped these conditions. We engage these issues through thematic case studies of various African nations. In addition, students perform research on a wide range of topics pertinent to African countries. Course topics include the European colonization and exploitation of Africa, national independence movements, Apartheid, African popular culture, and contemporary crises facing African countries such as poverty, political corruption, civil war, and AIDS. This course awards credit toward the social justice requirement.

Modern Japan (11/12) Japan is a country that remade itself twice in a century. First, it transformed itself from a feudal society to a modern nation state during the Meiji Restoration in 1868, and then from a militarist empire to a modern democratic nation after World War II. Beginning in the pre-empirical age of the Tokugawa Shogunate this course looks at Japan’s emergence into the Western perspective following the arrival of Commodore Perry and the gradual yet determined assertion of Jap-

anese influence over “Greater East Asia.” Using primary and secondary sources this course will examine the remaking of Japan after World War II and its place on the Asian and Western stage today. This course awards credit toward the social justice requirement.

Off Campus to China and Taiwan In this course, students travel to China and Taiwan to strengthen their Mandarin Chinese as well as learn about the history, geography, culture, life, arts, and people in the two different Chinese societies. Students will learn to better understand and appreciate American perspective and culture through the discovery of China’s and Taiwan’s. Students will attend classes and stay in homestays in China and Taiwan. Students will keep personal journals, contribute to a group blog, and complete a research project. There is an additional charge for this course. This course awards credit toward the social justice requirement.

Overview of United States History (10/11) Our United States History Overview course is actually two separate courses focused on (1) content and (2) research writing. The first course will cover U.S. history using a foundational text, supplemented by perspectives and impressions from a variety of sources. Students will cover U.S. history in a thematic and in-depth manner, allowing them the opportunity to examine patterns, conflict/resolution, and long-term developments in U.S. history. The second course will focus on the research of, and writing about, a specific topic of United States history using (1) a time frame between 1960-2000’s, (2) a thematic approach, and (3) student-led interest and choice. The course will set out this process through a multi-dimensional, multi-level approach focused on making it an interactive experience in academic, historical writing. Students will learn and practice the skills related to conducting research and writing a mid-length historical essay.

Totalitarianism: Past & Present (11/12) “Totalitarianism is not only hell, but also the dream of paradise...” — Milan Kundera. This course takes students on a fascinating exploration of the totalitarian and fascistic tendencies that have proven to be alluring alternatives to the democratic states and societies. These movements were often shrouded with utopian promises against a backdrop of apocalyptic struggles, regardless of the temporal or geographic location of the totalitarian movement. We begin by examining five national case-studies drawn from Europe and Asia between the 1920s and 1960s. We then investigate more modern iterations of fundamentalism, including political, racial, and religious fundamentalism. The class concludes by focusing on the nature and appeal of cults. A final project invites students to tie the course’s main themes together. This course awards credit toward the social justice requirement.

EXPERIENCES

The Cambridge School of Weston

U.S. Alliance Building across Cultural Differences (11/12) This course will focus on interpersonal and systemic factors that promote or interfere with between‑group and within‑group communication and relationships. Utilizing affinity group and large group discussion formats, experiential activities, case studies, social science literature, personal journaling, and media examples, students will explore systemic oppression (e.g., racism, sexism, heterosexism, classism, and nativism) and examine their own backgrounds and value systems. We will consider the ways in which both privileged and marginalized status affect our daily interactions and relationships, as well as dynamics at CSW, in U.S. society, and within the world. This course is designed to enhance self‑awareness and empathy, encourage open dialogue, and strengthen inter‑group communication and interpersonal skills. This course awards credit toward the social justice requirement.

U.S. Black Studies (11/12) Using secondary texts, primary documents, and documentaries, students examine the triumphs and struggles of African Americans to gain political, economic, and social equality. Topics may include the concept of race and processes of racial identification in the U.S., colorism, black feminism, cultural politics and artistic production, residential segregation and integration, mass incarceration, and the global influence of hip hop culture. This course awards credit toward the social justice requirement.

U.S. Civil War (11/12) The Civil War is still our Homeric epic—the great watershed in our history. The stories told and the lessons learned, from its earliest origins in 1619 to its bloody conclusion in 1865, and the final period of Reconstruction, are limitless. This class primarily focuses on causes of the war from the Three-Fifths Compromise Amendment to John Brown. Some time is devoted to the battles, but the causes and effects are the core of the study.

U.S. Cold War & Vietnam (11/12) The period of history from 1945 to 1990 has been labeled the Cold War. Students study the role of the United States in this conflict with emphasis on the Vietnam ordeal, both at home and abroad through primary sources including letters and poetry, wide‑ranging secondary sources, music, and film. Students will further their understanding of the relationships between diplomacy and war, domestic and foreign policy, and propaganda and protest.

U.S. Constitution (11/12) U.S. Constitution is a hands-on, project-based class that seeks to examine the roots and development of the Constitution and the Bill of Rights, and then asks students to apply the document practically

13


to several real and fictional Supreme Court cases. Students begin the module with factual readings, the Federalist Papers, and smaller debates and general discussion. As the mod progresses, the assignments become more difficult and intense (briefing cases like Marbury v. Madison and Tinker v. Des Moines School District), culminating in the preparation and presentation of oral arguments for a mock Supreme Court in two cases, and sitting as a justice for one. Much of the grading for the class is done in groups, rather than individually, and students are asked to trust and depend on their peers while making sure to hold up their own end of the workload. This course awards credit toward the social justice requirement.

U.S. Environmental History (11/12) How did European cattle wage war on the Wampanoag in colonial Massachusetts? When did miners and farmers fight for the soul of California? How did soil make decisions about what slavery would look like in the Cotton South? How did capitalist ideas affect changes in the landscape of New England? How does the difference of 20 inches of rain per year lead to drastic differences in population, politics, and culture between Eastern and Western states? What myths do we tell ourselves when we visit our national parks? Why does a statue built in 1919 in downtown Enterprise, Alabama depict a woman holding up a giant bug? How are we, through globalization, forcing ourselves to change the way we talk about the natural world? With this introduction to the newest field of American History, we will learn to study history by looking at the roles humans play within ecosystems and the effects of those ecosystems on human society. This course awards credit toward the social justice requirement.

U.S. History of Education (11/12) This class will examine the history of American Education. From the one-room schoolhouse to the Race to the Top, students will leave with a deep understanding of how America educates its K-12 students. History of Education will study the major areas of theory and pedagogy. The class will understand local, state, and federal oversight for education; from funding to curricular. Students will also learn how to lesson plan in different educational philosophies and evaluate pedagogy from the traditional to progressive.

14

U.S. Jailhouse Nation!: History of Crime, Punishment, and Mass Incarceration (11/12) Jailhouse Nation! explores America’s long and troubled history with crime, punishment, and prisons. By first examining how both crime and thus the “criminal” are socially and historically constructed, students will consider the role of violence and systematic punishment in Puritan New England, the slave South, and later, the modern United States. The institution of slavery will provide an important framework to help students understand how new modes of punishment (namely, incarceration in jails and prisons) emerged alongside the abolition of slavery. Furthermore, we will examine the role of post-emancipation prison regimes in shaping popular (mis) understandings of “race” and the idea of “black criminality.” Lastly, we will discuss the rise of the carceral state in the 20th and 21st centuries, noting long historical parallels and the roles of contemporary political and economic forces driving the prison boom. Throughout the course we will consider the distinct experiences of punishment for men, women, children, African Americans, whites, Latinos, sexual minorities, and non-citizens in order to tease out the specific relationships between race, class, gender, and punishment at various moments in American History. Within our broader exploration of state-based punishment policies, we will also consider community resistance to policing and incarceration and the rise of so-called prison abolitionists.

U.S. Markets and Labor (11/12) How has the relationship between capital and labor developed and evolved? What are the ideas behind capitalism and how does it actually work? What is neoliberalism and what does globalization mean? How have labor’s ideas, goals, and methods changed and how have those ideas and struggles influenced capitalism? What struggles does labor face today? Are labor unions “American?” Who has resisted the market revolution? How and why? Does anyone know? This course awards credit toward the social justice requirement.

U.S. Native Americans Before Europeans arrived, indigenous cultures thrived in the Americas. This course will start by examining their ancient past and move through the impact that Native Americans have had on the development of the United States and vice versa. The indigenous population of North America contains a vast array of cultural diversity. How do our own assumptions about Native Americans compare to their experiences? We will examine how Native Americans have managed to overcome (or adapt to) genocide, warfare, disease, assimilation, and massive land loss in order to retain their unique cultural identities. We will explore the development of Native American history from the early years of the

EXPERIENCES

The Cambridge School of Weston

United States through the radical political movements of the 1970s to contemporary issues Native Americans face. This course will also push students to think of new ways to study history. How can we understand a culture, or cultures, so different from our own, especially when there are no traditional historical documents left? This course awards credit toward the social justice requirement.

U.S. Rebels and Revolutionaries in American Dance You don’t have to be a dance fan to find this topic arresting. As in visual art, music, and theatre, dance pioneers throughout the 20th century challenged the current artistic dogma and rebelled against tradition. The arts are a lens through which we may glimpse how generations and cultures have viewed their worlds. Political and social upheavals and technological breakthroughs in the 20th century such as the Industrial Revolution, Women’s Suffrage, WWI, WWII, Civil Rights, the Cold War, the Vietnam War, the drug culture, urbanization, and women’s liberation affected and were reflected in the dances of their time. Often, these artists were ridiculed, repressed, or marginalized, yet their new ideas and aesthetics kept flowing across racial and social boundaries. We will look at African American dance pioneers and their white counterparts and follow them all the way through to what dance artists (and maybe you too) struggle with today. Auto‑biographies, dance master‑pieces on video, reviews, interviews, and historical commentaries will reveal what the dances have to tell us “between the lines.”

U.S. Voting and Elections Who has been likely to turn out to vote and what difference does that make for electoral results? What is the Electoral College and how does it work? How do voters decide their choice for president? What is involved in a presidential campaign? These questions are among the issues that students will explore by examining current and past presidential races. We will also explore American politics in general, examining the ideas, ideologies, policies, people, and events of the American political scene. This course awards credit toward the social justice requirement.

U.S. Women’s Movements This course explores the history of women’s movements in the United States. We’ll take a chronological and thematic tour of the first, second, and third waves of feminism (mid-1800s to the present day), as well as the mainstream context that each movement rose up against. Students will read secondary sources as well as original materials from the women’s liberation movement, including handwritten minutes, leaflets, and newsletters. Class discussions will range from fundamental


questions—what is feminism? Is “women” a meaningful category, or a mere cultural construct, or both?—to concrete discussions of the major players and events in the history of women’s fight for equality in the United States. This course awards credit toward the social justice requirement.

U.S. Youth Subcultures (11/12) This course explores the role of subcultures in contributing to the cultural spectrum of the United States between the 1920s and the 21st century. Studying subcultures can reveal as much about the shadows of society in which they resided as it does the mainstream. Subcultures also represent a unique intersection of radical political ideologies and innovative artistic trends, often expressed through a group’s attachment to a specific genre of music, social outlet, and/or fashion. We will examine the value systems of, and the broader historical contexts that gave rise to: the flappers, hipsters and beatniks, greasers, hippies, the hip‑hop and punk rock scenes, and street art. We will also focus on the ways in which society has repeatedly co‑opted these previously marginal movements, rendering them into yet another popular means of corporatized mass consumption. This course awards credit toward the social justice requirement.

Weimar Republic & Third Reich (11/12) The Weimar Republic spans a relatively short time in German history, 19191933, and yet has been viewed by historians as a leading example of a perfect storm: a political, social, and economical storm. Students will explore the transformation of Europe and Germany as this continent sets off to war in 1914 and continue with the examination of Germany’s following transition into a Republic. The course spends considerable time investigating the inner workings of the Republic only to see Germany undergo a third transition into the Third Reich. This course is offered every other year.

World Religions (9/10) This class will examine the origins and practices of major world religions. We will examine religion and our relationship with it. The class will explore the main characters and practices of these religions and how they have spread and developed. We will also explore the main schisms in such religions and analyze why and how they happened. By the end of the class, we will develop a comparative study and identify commonalities and differences between these faiths. We will also explore religious tensions in current domestic and international arenas. This course awards credit toward the social justice requirement.

LANGUAGE

(minimum through level 3) The CSW Language Department offers instruction in French, Mandarin, and Spanish, with coursework that addresses all four language areas: speaking, listening, reading, and writing. The Language Department also offers off-campus study courses, during which students participate in immersive, intensive, and interdisciplinary experience learning in China and Taiwan, France, or Latin America.

EXPERIENCES

The Cambridge School of Weston

15


French 1 In this course, students begin to learn to listen, read, speak, and write in another language. They practice drills for pronunciation and structure and are required to take frequent written and oral quizzes. They learn three verb tenses: the present, past, and immediate future. Class work incorporates creative activities, as well as films. Homework is assigned for each evening. This course serves as an introduction to the many aspects of a foreign culture.

French 2 Classwork reinforces grammatical structures and pronunciation, as students engage in more complex conversation. Short stories, video segments in French, cultural projects using the Internet, and movies vary the course content and activities. Homework assignments are an integral part of the course.

French 3 Classes are conducted primarily in French. After an initial intensive review, complex vocabulary, idioms, and the conditional and subjunctive moods are practiced in more complex structures and tense patterns. Students read The Little Prince, by Saint‑Exupéry, and discuss short stories, poems, and articles from French publications. Video and news segments help students develop listening comprehension skills. The development of writing skills is addressed in depth.

French 4 Class will be conducted entirely in French. Oral/aural skills are reinforced, and formal instruction is provided for reading short stories, poems, and articles. Students also read a novel or a play by authors such as Sartre and Camus. These form the basis for class discussion and writing assignments. We apply an in‑depth study of grammar in writing compositions. Some independent projects, movies, and field trips are included to enrich the course. This course awards credit toward the social justice requirement.

French Language Lab Students may attend the Language Lab in order to develop their skills in French. The skill levels of the students range from beginner to advanced. This is an opportunity for each student to receive individualized attention; some tackle work in their current course, and others have a chance to prepare for a future course. Students practice their oral proficiency by conversing with one another and work independently on grammar exercises or other language computer software.

developed through a variety of mediums including literature, film, news sources, and poetry. This dénouement course for French students may be repeated as the themes taught will vary. This course awards credit toward the social justice requirement.

Off Campus to France Students spend three weeks in France for a program of total immersion in French language and culture. During the first week, they tour Paris and Versailles. During the last two weeks, they live with families in a quaint city outside Paris, take a French course, and explore the area. Prior to departure, the group has an intensive orientation on the culture, art, history, and architecture of France. While traveling, students keep a journal and fulfill other requirements adapted to their language and/or art background. Upon their return, students prepare mandatory projects, including a research paper, to earn full credit. There is an extra charge for the course, which is offered every other year.

Mandarin 1 This course is an introduction to the language known as Mandarin and to Chinese culture, and thus develops listening and speaking skills in everyday life situations. Students also begin to build basic reading comprehension and writing skills. Students become familiar with basic sentence patterns and expressions and are able to converse on such topics as family, friends, houses, travels, hobbies, sports, cultural activities, school life, food and clothes shopping, going to a restaurant, and weather. Chinese history, art, music, calligraphy, and cuisine are also parts of the course. Classwork incorporates field trips and creative activities, as well as films.

Mandarin 2 Students will continue to establish a foundation in listening, speaking, reading, and writing Chinese. They will also gain an understanding of Chinese culture through activities both inside and outside of the classroom. In terms of specific language ability, emphasis will be on improving listening and speaking skills and expanding vocabulary. Topics will include school life, movies and television, Chinese holidays, making friends, travel, sports, gender equality, and environmental protection. Students will also master important grammatical structures, such as the usages of the particles “le,” “guo,” and “zhe.”

Mandarin 3

(11/12) We will explore various francophone cultures including L’Indochine, Le Maghreb, Les Antilles, le Québec and L’Afrique de l’Ouest. This survey course will focus on the four skills of language: reading, writing, speaking, and listening. The skills will be

The goal of this course is for students to continue developing their Chinese listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Students will enjoy following the stories and characters in the textbook and will feel more of a personal involvement in the process of learning the language. In order to increase students’ cultural competency and knowledge of Chinese society, the course will explore various topics in Chinese life and culture. The lesson topics have also

16

EXPERIENCES

French 5/6: La Francophonie à travers la littérature et le film

The Cambridge School of Weston

been designed to reflect students’ interests. Some of the topics include: Chinese festivals, history, changes in Chinese society, and gender equality. Integrated within these topics will be an emphasis on learning complex conjunctions and other grammar patterns. Student debates in Chinese will allow them to practice their speaking skills and review important sentence patterns. Long Chinese passages without pinyin Romanization will improve students’ reading ability and their confidence in recognizing Chinese characters.

Mandarin 4 The course will cover comprehensive topics such as Chinese festivals, changes in China, gender equality, environment protection, and Chinese history. Listening and speaking skills will be reinforced, and advanced reading skills will be nurtured through intensive study of longer and various styles of texts. Students will also explore more aspects of Chinese culture through videos, music, and class demonstration. This course awards credit toward the social justice requirement.

Mandarin 5 This is an advanced Mandarin course devoted primarily to reading and discussion of literature and culturally-related topics in Chinese. It aims to enlarge students’ vocabulary, increase reading skills and speed, improve reading comprehension, and strengthen speaking skills through class conversation and discussion. It will also enhance students’ writing ability through compositional writing assignments. This course awards credit toward the social justice requirement.

Mandarin Language Lab Students may attend the Language Lab in order to develop their skills in Mandarin. The skill levels of the students range from beginner to advanced. This is an opportunity for each student to receive individualized attention; some tackle work in their current course, and others have a chance to prepare for a future course. Students practice their oral proficiency by conversing with one another and work independently on grammar exercises or other language computer software.

Off Campus to China and Taiwan In this course, students travel to China and Taiwan to strengthen their Mandarin Chinese as well as learn about the history, geography, culture, life, arts, and people in the two different Chinese societies. Students will learn to better understand and appreciate American perspective and culture through the discovery of China’s and Taiwan’s. Students will attend classes and stay in homestays in China and Taiwan. Students will keep personal journals, contribute to a group blog, and complete a research project. There is an additional charge for the course. This course awards credit toward the social justice requirement.


ASL Beginner ASL 1 American Sign Language courses offer students a unique opportunity to learn about the language and the culture of the Deaf. Students learn the basic structure and history of ASL while building their ASL vocabulary. Attention is given to developing both receptive and expressive skills. Students have the opportunity to meet Deaf adults and students. This course awards credit toward the social justice requirement.

Beginner ASL 2

Spanish 1

Spanish 5

The first level of Spanish introduces students to basic communication skills. The main structural aspects of the language studied include present, near future, and preterite tenses. Students are also introduced to diverse cultural aspects of the Spanish‑speaking world through reading, discussion, music, film, art, food, and the Internet. Students are regularly tested on material and can expect nightly homework.

Spanish 5 is a discussion‑based course taught entirely in Spanish in which students learn about topics ranging from the immigration debate in the U.S. to magic realism in the works of Gabriel Garcia Marquez. Students will have a better understanding of why people, historically and presently, have emigrated from Spanish‑speaking countries to the U.S. and their experiences upon arrival. They will also have more familiarity with current events in the Spanish‑speaking world and magical realism. Topics will rotate and students may take this class more than once. This course awards credit toward the social justice requirement.

Spanish 2 The first module of Spanish 2 reviews and reinforces the fundamental concepts presented in Spanish 1. In the following modules, students study commands and the present and past progressive, preterite, and imperfect verb tenses. Themes and vocabulary presented throughout the course are designed to build stronger comprehension and conversation skills and are the basis for class discussion and short creative writing. We address the four areas of language learning (listening comprehension, speaking, reading comprehension, and writing), which serve as a basis for evaluation of student progress.

Spanish 3 The course begins with a review and reinforcement of grammar, syntax, and vocabulary presented in Spanish 2 as a point of departure for more sophisticated language study. Students review the simple and compound tenses of the indicative. They also study the more complex elements of language, including the indirect and passive voice, and the subjunctive, and conditional moods. Class discussion, written essays, and presentations are based on the short stories and poetry of Spanish and Spanish‑American authors or on a variety of other themes presented throughout the course.

Spanish 4 Spanish 4 is devoted to an intense review of grammar as well as an introduction to new verb tenses and vocabulary. Short novels, short stories, poetry, drama, and films are used as the basis for in‑class discussion and written compositions. Students also learn about the rich historical, socio‑cultural, political, and artistic background of Latin American countries. This course awards credit toward the social justice requirement.

Beginner ASL 3 American Sign Language 3 classes give students more complex grammatical material and vocabulary. Additionally, students will experience and explore Deaf culture and Deaf world issues. This course awards credit toward the social justice requirement.

Pocket Players

Spanish 6 The principal goal of Spanish 6 is for students to continue to establish fluency in their writing and speaking. Readings range from newspaper and magazine articles dealing with current events in Spain and Latin America to short stories by Gabriel Garcia Marquez. Students are expected to demonstrate their knowledge of different verb tenses and other advanced concepts of grammar through discussions about the readings and other cultural topics that are introduced throughout the course, as well as in their written work. Students will also have the opportunity to hone their listening comprehension skills by listening to songs, radio programs, and podcasts from Spanish‑speaking countries, and watching Spanish‑language films and television programs. This course awards credit toward the social justice requirement.

Spanish Language Lab Students may attend the Language Lab in order to develop their skills in Spanish. The skill levels of the students range from beginner to advanced. This is an opportunity for each student to receive individualized attention. Some tackle work in their current course, and others have a chance to prepare for a future course. Students practice their oral proficiency by conversing with one another and work independently on grammar exercises or other language computer software.

EXPERIENCES

This class is a continuation of ASL 1 and will encourage students to deepen their understanding of Deaf culture as well as continue to develop their expressive and receptive ASL skills. This course awards credit toward the social justice requirement.

The Cambridge School of Weston

Pocket Players is CSW’s unique bilingual touring children’s theatre that performs in ASL and spoken English for Deaf and hearing children and adults throughout the greater Boston area. At the end of the module, the students perform delightful stories replete with costumes and scenery. Some rehearsals occur outside of class time. The course qualifies for ASL or arts credit and community service. Previous study of ASL is not required. This course awards credit toward the social justice requirement.

Off Campus to Neotropics of Latin America Offered every other year, this trip is a cooperative effort between the Language and Science departments. Students travel to the neotropics of Latin America for a program of immersion in tropical ecosystems and in Spanish language and culture. In the science component, students travel to various tropical ecosystems and conduct field experiments and projects. The challenges of economic development, conservation and sustainable agriculture are examined in an interdisciplinary manner. The language program consists of homestays with local families, organized field trips, and everyday conversational Spanish. Students maintain both science and Spanish journals as they travel. The program starts with an intensive pre‑orientation week at CSW prior to departure. There is an extra charge for this course. This course awards credit toward the social justice requirement.

17


Algebra 1

MATHEMATICS

(minimum 3 year equivalent) In addition to foundational courses in algebra (I and II), geometry, and quantitative reasoning, the CSW mathematics program offers an unprecedented variety of coursework in fields beyond the typical high school curriculum. Following the completion of core courses, students may choose to pursue a more applied or theoretical path.

This course is a standard first-year algebra course. Topics covered include: signed numbers, rational numbers, linear equations, systems of equations, word problems, exponents, polynomials, quadratic equations, factoring, the quadratic formula, graphing, and radical and fractional expressions. Students are expected to have solid arithmetic skills before beginning this course, and calculators will not be used until students are comfortable with arithmetic. This course emphasizes understanding of basic concepts as well as development of solid algebra skills.

Algebra 2 This college-preparatory, second-year algebra course emphasizes applications and models. Topics covered include: linear equations, combinatorics, probability, systems of equations, quadratic functions, powers, roots, complex numbers, trigonometric functions (sine, cosine, unit circles), radians, polynomial and exponential functions, matrices, and logarithms. Each student is expected to have a {TI-83 Plus} or {TI-84 Plus} graphing calculator. This course prepares students for the Precalculus sequence and the quantitative courses they will encounter in college.

Analytic Geometry This course combines algebra and coordinate geometry, and the techniques of this combination are used to study vectors in 2D and 3D space, parametrically defined curves, conic sections, and polar coordinates. Additional topics covered vary but may include: advanced topics in Euclidean geometry, non-Euclidean geometry, quadric surfaces, and isometries of the plane.

Calculus A: Differentiation This course is the first of three courses in Calculus. Differential Calculus includes the study of limits, continuity, and derivatives of algebraic, transcendental, and trigonometric functions. Applications of the derivative include optimization, related rates, examples from the natural and social sciences, and graphing of functions. Students are expected to have and use a Texas Instruments programmable graphing calculator.

Calculus B: Integration This course is the second of three courses in Calculus. Integral Calculus includes the study of definite integrals and areas, the fundamental theorems of calculus, techniques of integration, computation of volumes, arc length, average of a function, separable differential equations and slope fields and applications to physics, chemistry, and engineering. After this course students will be prepared to take the AP Calculus AB exam. Students are expected to have and use a Texas Instruments programmable graphing calculator.

18

EXPERIENCES

The Cambridge School of Weston


Calculus C: Series

Introduction to Linear Algebra

Propositional Calculus and Logic

This course is the third of three courses in Calculus. It includes study of sequences, series, power series, Taylor and Maclaurin series, parametric equations, and polar coordinates. After this course students will be prepared to take the AP Calculus BC exam. Students are expected to have and use a Texas Instruments graphing, programmable calculator.

In this class students will use matrices to learn how linear algebra is being applied in various fields. The class will cover content including matrix operations, row-reductions, determinants, vector space, eigenvalues, and transformations. From this course students will be able to further their understanding of the connection between geometry and algebra. In addition, students will further their logical thinking while being introduced to different abstract topics in mathematics. This course will expose students to higher-level mathematics that will better prepare them for the rigors of a college math program.

(11/12) Propositional calculus is a system of formal reasoning. The ability to reason formally is a fundamental skill required in life. It is essential to coherent English composition, to basic rhetoric, to building solid, convincing arguments, and, in fact, to avoiding being swindled by fast talkers. In this course, we will study the formal basics of logic using words such as “not,” “or,” “and,” and “implies.” We will use truth tables and formulas to develop concepts such as negation, conjunction, disjunction, implication, tautologies, contradictions, and equivalences. We will also explore propositional calculus in the context of multiple subjects, such as philosophy and linguistics, as well as mathematics.

Computer Science I Computer Science I lays the foundation for computer science learning. Students learn and practice using algorithmic thinking for problem solving, as well as gaining an introduction to computer programming.

Computer Science II Computer Science II builds on the foundations laid in Computer Science I. Students will work more with algorithms and data structures, and they will also continue to develop their skills in computer programming. With a common foundation in place, students will be able to push into more sophisticated thinking and programming.

Discrete Math This course covers combinatorics, probability, matrices, sequences, series, and recursively defined functions. The course may also include an introduction to programming the {TI‑83 Plus} calculator.

Elementary Functions This course is an introduction to a general study of functions. Topics covered include polynomial functions, exponential and logarithmic functions and their properties, graphs, and applications. It is a prerequisite for Calculus.

Entrepreneurship This course will give students the opportunity to experience and practice entrepreneurial thought and action, which involves acting quickly with the means at hand, bringing other people along, staying within your affordable loss, and/or reflecting and building on what you find (based on Keifer and Schlessinger’s Just Start.) Class projects may include interviews with local entrepreneurs, starting a business on campus, and developing and presenting a business idea.

Fundamentals of Calculus This course will serve as an introduction to the two main ideas of Calculus—differentiation and integration. If you want to know what Calculus is about before taking it in college, this course is for you.

Math Lab Math Lab is a D Block offering, two days a week. Students may sign up for this course if they want extra support for a math class they are taking, or if they want to review material for an upcoming course. The course is limited in size and requires permission of the instructor and the Academic Office.

Math Skills This course is designed for students who need individualized instruction in mathematics. The school may request that students who are not adequately prepared for the level and pace of CSW mathematics take this course. The class is limited in size and requires the permission of the instructor and of the Academic Office. Students should not schedule a Math Skills course and another math course in the same module, nor should Math Skills be used for a Precalculus course. There is an additional charge for each block of this individualized course.

Multi-Variable Calculus (11/12) Students will learn how to differentiate and integrate functions with multiple variables. In this class students will cover topics such as vector functions, partial derivatives, multiple integrals, and vector calculus. As a result of this class, students will be able to better understand the connection between single-variable calculus and multivariable calculus. Students will further their logical thinking while also being introduced to different abstract topics in mathematics. Students will be exposed to higher-level mathematics that will better prepare them for the rigors of a college math program.

Musical Mathematics Part history, part analytical theory, and part composition, this course will consider mankind’s quest to organize sound from Pythagoras to Stockhausen. Open to all students.

EXPERIENCES

The Cambridge School of Weston

Re‑Ordering Chaos (11/12) Using math and visual arts, students will explore a variety of questions, assumptions, projects, and theories that challenge stereotypes about math and art. Possible topics could include the following: the meaning of zero and infinity, the square root of two, Platonic Sections, the geometry of five pointed stars, what makes math beautiful, what makes art practical, what is the role of chaos and creative risk-taking in math, why does art require discipline and order, what happens with fractals, and more.

Robotics Student learn the basics of robotics design from an academic and engineering perspective. Students will also compete in the VRC robotics competitions.

Statistics The study of statistics applies the calculations and deductive thinking of mathematics to the real-world problems of the social sciences, the decision‑making needs of medicine and business, and the laboratory methods and experimental procedures of the natural sciences. This course covers descriptive statistics including the standard deviation and the normal distribution, and inferential statistics, including sampling and confidence intervals, the chi‑square test, and curve fitting.

Transition to Algebra 2 This course is for students who, based on their previous coverage of Algebra 1 and Geometry, need additional preparation in fundamental algebraic concepts prior to enrolling in Algebra 2. Topics reviewed will include equations of lines, solving simultaneous linear equations, quadratic functions, factoring, polynomials, and math modeling.

Trigonometry This course combines a practical study of right and oblique triangle trigonometry with a theoretical study of the trigonometric functions as periodic functions; it also prepares the student for the treatment of trigonometric functions covered in Calculus and is a prerequisite for Calculus.

19


All That Jazz All That Jazz is a jazz dance class, taught to live music provided by CSW’s jazz ensemble. Students will expand their knowledge of jazz, America’s first art form, through the integrated study of movement and music composition. Dancers will focus on the rhythmic patterns that are created through the influence of such jazz genres of swing, blues, bebop, and jazz‑fusion, among others. Such terms as syncopated rhythms, body isolations, improvisation, high level of energy, and low center of gravity will be practiced as movement qualities that are direct derivatives of jazz music. Jazz ensemble will learn to perform jazz standards in a group setting. Emphasis will be on establishing a repertoire, building skills in improvisation and performance.

Chorus The chorus works intensively in preparation for end of mod performances. In addition to rehearsing the featured repertoire, we also focus on developing good choral skills, including sight singing and rhythm skills, breathing and tone production, diction, and solo repertoire. Examples of a typical repertoire from recent years include Britten’s “Hymn to St. Cecilia,” the Brahms and Mozart “Requiems,” Handel’s “Dettinger Te Deum,” Mercury’s “Bohemian Rhapsody,” and Thompson’s “Alleluia.”

Contemporary Improvisation This course is designed for students who want to take their improvisational skills to the next level. It will introduce the basic concepts of modern improvisation and how to go about mastering the different musical and mental skills involved in the process to make improvisation happen effectively. Students will learn improvisation techniques and how to apply them to different kinds of contemporary music, including but not limited to jazz, blues, funk, rock, metal, electronic loops, third‑stream, 12-tone, structured or conducted improvisations, and original compositions. Classwork and assignments emphasize altered upper‑structures and dominants, chords, modes of melodic minor, harmonic minor, substitutions, advanced rhythmic development, listening, and ear‑training. This class is open for all instrumentalists and singers with an intermediate/advanced level of proficiency.

Critiquing Music

MUSIC

(minimum 1.75 year equivalent in the arts) At CSW, coursework in the visual and performing arts carries as much weight and rigor and requires as much discipline as traditional academic subjects. We offer a broad range of courses in dance, music, theatre, and visual arts. Students are expected to have taken courses in three of these four disciplines by the time they graduate.

20

EXPERIENCES

The Cambridge School of Weston

This course will equip the student with the skills to listen to, understand, and critique music. Through comparison we will explore specific compositions and discuss abstract and concrete musical themes as they relate to music. This course is open to all students. This course awards credit toward the social justice requirement.

Ear Training 1 For a developing musician, ear training is one of the most essential skills. Students will learn how to recognize melodies, harmonies, and rhythms in both notated and aural exercises. Students will be given the tools to transcribe and perform their favorite music on an instrument, or voice regardless of style.


Level 1 skills include: • Four basic triad types and Sus 2 and 4 • ii‑V‑I, I‑V‑vi‑IV, and other diatonic chord progressions • All intervals (diatonic and chromatic) • Conducting basic patterns of 2/4, 3/4, and 4/4 • Transcription of 4 bar diatonic dictated melodies

Ear Training 2 For a developing musician, ear training is one of the most essential skills. Students will learn how to recognize melodies, harmonies, and rhythms in both notated and aural exercises. Students will be given the tools to transcribe and perform their favorite music on an instrument or voice, regardless of style. Level 2 skills include: • All Level 1 skills • Seventh chords and other tensions • Compound time signatures and odd meters • Hindemith combined action drills • Transcription of chromatic melodies

Film Scoring This course will cover the important techniques of film scoring. Students will have to compose music for specific scenes using our digital software program Finale®. Collaboration with students in other disciplines will be greatly encouraged. Guest artists working in the film industry will be invited to campus to share their expertise.

Guitar Ensemble In this course the students learn how to develop instrumental ensemble skills. Some of the main topics covered in this course include development of melodic performance sight‑reading, repertoire, rhythm guitar/accompaniment techniques, the role of the bass, and improvisation in an ensemble setting. Material is learned through the use of written music pieces and exercises.

Improvisation Techniques This performance-oriented class introduces basic skills essential to effective improvisation. Techniques covered include memorization procedure for song melody and harmony, listening skills, exercise design, pacing, chord‑tone soloing, tempo accuracy, swing rhythmic feel, melodic and rhythmic embellishment of song melody, and soloing with play‑along CDs. The student will be helped in the development of effective practice skills. Books, audio recordings, and videos will be used for demonstration, practice, and performance activities.

Instrumental Ensemble This group is designed to work on pieces in preparation for concerts, collectively and with other performing arts disciplines (choral concerts, dance concerts, multimedia performances). In addition to a general performance, smaller ensembles of players will be arranged and coached by music faculty members. We will be working toward performing both in student recitals and more formal concert settings.

Jazz Ensemble Students learn to perform jazz standards in a group setting. Emphasis is on establishing a repertoire, building skills in improvisation, and performance. Students are expected to sign up for two consecutive mods of this course. This course awards credit toward the social justice requirement.

Keyboard Skills Are you interested in the piano? Feel like coming back after a little time off? Do you want to take it to the next level in terms of technique or repertoire? Using the abundant keyboard resources of the CSW Music Department (two grand pianos, seven uprights, one harpsichord, one organ, and a keytar!) we will work on the many scales/ modes and interval patterns that make up the building blocks of our various music. Additional topics covered include: the historical evolution of keyboard instruments, how to become a better sight‑reader, negotiating notation practices in piano writing, keyboard repertoire, improvisation, and memorization. The course will end with an informal, low‑pressure “recital” using our Mugar Arts Center Steinway Model M.

MIDI In this course, we explore the dimensions of sound and texture in music through the use of synthesizer and various MIDI applications. Classwork involves weekly projects in the Electronic Music Studio. Although this may be viewed as an entry‑level composition class, good musicianship skills are a must. This is not a computer course; it is a course in music composition.

Music Theory 1 After a review of note‑reading skills, this course will explore the basic elements of music including: scales, intervals, chords, and key relationships. Also included will be musicianship skills such as intervallic and melodic dictation, rhythm drills/conducting patterns, sight‑singing, and introductions to the piano keyboard & the guitar. Students will be encouraged to label the fundamental music terms that encompass all historical periods and musical styles.

Music Theory 2 This music composition course will focus on melodic and harmonic writing in traditional and contemporary styles. Analytical tools and typical melodic transformational tricks in use by current composers will be explored. Further drills in keyboard and ear‑training will give students the skills necessary to notate on paper what they hear in their inner “composer’s” ear.

Music Theory 3 The culminating seminar in music composition will focus on the techniques of contemporary composition. Advanced studies in form and analysis will help to sharpen the student’s theoretical sense, as well as his or her stylistic inclinations. The

EXPERIENCES

The Cambridge School of Weston

class will compose pieces for the resident CSW New Music Ensemble for recording and public performance.

Musical Mathematics Part history, part analytical theory, and part composition, this course will consider mankind’s quest to organize sound from Pythagoras to Stockhausen. Open to all students.

Rock/Pop Ensemble This class is an opportunity for those interested in working with rock/pop original songs and instrumental music. Students will be asked to write music in various rock/ pop styles and also to perform covers from the repertoire drawn from the 70s, 80s, 90s, and beyond.

Songwriting Songwriting is a performance‑oriented course in which the students will be taught melodic writing, how to set a lyric, standard song forms, and how to add harmonies and bass lines. Students will be encouraged to improvise/compose and then transcribe their ideas into standard notation. We will then create lead sheets using the Finale® notation program. Students will write and record their work in an MP3 format and there will be an informal lunchtime, coffee house-style performance at the end of the module. A willingness to learn some standard notation and perform with your peers is most helpful in this course.

Sounds of the World Ensemble In this performing/writing course, we will explore, connect, and engage cultures from different corners of the world through music composition and improvisation. Students will have access to the many traditional instruments owned by the CSW Music Department. All participants will share equally in the creative process and an end-of-the-mod performance will highlight the experience.

Topics in Jazz History Come explore the development of jazz from slavery through bebop. Through recordings, guest artists, and readings, we will attempt to define this uniquely American idiom. Recent topics have focused on the music of John Coltrane, Charlie Parker, and Duke Ellington. This course awards credit toward the social justice requirement.

Topics in Music History This survey course covers selected developments of Western music from the ancient world to contemporary times. Standards for exploration will include examination of the elements of music and their evolution. Music examples will include live performances as well as recorded examples. We will explore the current trends of each period. Recent topics have considered the music and lives of Beethoven, Stravinsky, Mozart, local Boston area composers, and 20th century music. This course is open to all students.

21


20th Century Physics (10/11/12) Students need not have taken Physics 1 or 2 to enroll in this course. This class will venture to the extremes of the universe, beyond the scope of human experience, to explore physical phenomena that many people may never have thought possible. Starting with Quantum Mechanics, we will explore the land of the tiny, where a particle may be everywhere and nowhere at once. We will then travel to the land of the fast, where the speed of light is king, and where Relativity suggests that a meter and a second are actually the same thing. We shall then confront a central problem in modern physics: the incompatibility of Quantum Mechanics and Relativity. And from there, we will dive into the abyss of cutting‑edge physics and try to answer questions such as: why are there only three spatial dimensions? What would it mean if there were two time dimensions? Why does time appear to flow? And when and how will it switch direction? And finally, what are the implications of modern physics for free will and religion?

SCIENCE

Animal Behavior

(minimum 3 year equivalent) CSW’s Science Department introduces students to best practices of scientific study through hands-on experiences in laboratory-based classes, with regular opportunities for in-depth research projects. After completing required coursework in the 9th and 10th grade years, students are afforded curricular choice seen only at the college level, with program tracks in physics, biology, and chemistry that cover a diverse array of topics and material.

(11/12) Why do some animals live in groups, and others singly? Why are some animals monogamous while others have multiple mates? Who cares for the young? Why do birds sing and wolves howl? In this course, we will begin to answer these questions. We will read a text that provides an introduction to all areas of animal behavior, as well as selected articles. Our focus will be on social behaviors. Using films, we will observe the social behaviors of animals as diverse as termites and wolves. We will use fieldwork to study the role of society in the foraging behavior of honeybees. Students will be required to write a research paper on a topic of their choice.

Art and Science of the Human Body This integrated studies course provides students with an innovative and challenging way to explore the complexity of human physiology. Students will be asked to use visual arts and graphic design skills to document many aspects of the mystery and wonder of the human body systems. The course will involve independent research on the systems of students’ choosing and the students will engage with this material from a scientific and artistic point of view. Students will research one of the body systems in its entirety or in detail. The systems to be considered are: the nervous, the cardiovascular, the respiratory, the skeletal, the endocrine and muscle, or the digestive, reproductive, and lymphatic systems. After their research, students must create a significant artwork or series of pieces which communicates the beauty, the function, and emotional elements connected to the system. Finally, students are required to think independently and devise a final project of their own design that incorporates very clear scientific understanding with the craft and vision of an original artistic statement. This course awards credit toward the social justice requirement.

22

EXPERIENCES

The Cambridge School of Weston


BioChemistry: Foundations of Life

BioExplore: Population Genetics

(9/10) In this required course, students will learn the basic biochemistry that drives life. Content will focus on how atoms build the macromolecules that make up the cell, the nature of chemical reactions, and how specific reactions like photosynthesis and cellular respiration power life. Students will also study the structure of the cell and the function of the subcellular organelles. Statistical analysis will be introduced as a tool to draw conclusions from data. Students will demonstrate their learning through activities such as structured experiments, modeling, and other summative assessments in various forms. The course will provide students with content and skill foundations for their future work in biology.

In this course, students will build on the skills and content covered in BioChemistry. All of the BioExplore elective offerings will explore the fundamentals of evolutionary theory and investigate biological concepts scaling from organisms to populations, communities, and ecosystems. The course will develop skills in data analysis and statistics, scientific literacy, communication, and complex systems thinking. As part of the course, students will engage with science taking place beyond CSW and consider the implications of current scientific investigations occurring in the larger scientific community. The BioExplore: Population Genetics course covers topics such as Mendelian genetics, application of Hardy‑Weinberg equilibrium to populations, evolutionary processes, and various topics related to human genetics.

BioConnections: Cells, Organisms, and Society (9) In this required course, students will examine the structures and processes of the cell and human body. The course will investigate body functions from the micro to the macro level, examining how the activity of genes leads to cell specialization in organs and body systems. Our major themes, sickle cell anemia and diabetes, will provide depth and context to our work, emphasizing connections between biology and issues of social justice and equity. Students will experience the process and practice of scientific research through an in‑depth, self-directed research project, which will culminate in a public poster symposium. Skills in dissection and microscopy will be a component of this course. Students will demonstrate their learning through activities such as structured experiments, modeling, a poster symposium, and other summative assessments in various forms. This course will expand on the content of BioChemistry to consider nested levels of organization and complexity in biology. Students will leave with the ability to anticipate the interplay between biology and the larger social context. This course awards credit toward the social justice requirement.

BioExplore: Ecology (10) In this one-mod course, students will build on the skills and content covered in BioChemistry. All of the BioExplore elective offerings will explore the fundamentals of evolutionary theory and investigate biological concepts scaling from organisms to populations, communities, and ecosystems. The course will develop skills in data analysis and statistics, scientific literacy, communication, and complex systems thinking. As part of the course, students will engage with science taking place beyond CSW and consider the implications of current scientific investigations occurring in the larger scientific community. The BioExplore: Ecology course covers topics such as energy dynamics in a community, interdependence of biotic and abiotic factors, relationships between species, fundamentals of field biology, and effects of human intervention on our environment.

Biology of Cancer (11/12 Lab Science) Cancer is the second leading cause of death in the United States and this disease affects many families. The profound impact of cancer on society has been the driving force behind major research advances and led to a better understanding of cell biology. Understanding the basic biology of cancer and its impact on the human body has led to more effective treatments, enhanced detection methods, and the development of prevention strategies. This course will provide an overview of the biology of cancer. The course will focus on the genetic and molecular basis of cancer. We will explore the role of mutations in cancer cells and how they lead to the deregulation of essential biological processes such as cell division, programmed cell death, and differentiation. We will also examine the interface of cancer and medicine. Classical treatment methods will be compared with newer treatment modalities, such as targeted therapies. The challenges associated with diagnosing cancers, preventing cancers, and curing cancers will also be discussed in light of current technological advances such as genomics and bio‑informatics.

Botany by Design (11/12) This course enables students to design their own course. With the help of the instructor, students will choose from a list of activities that include projects in landscape architecture, growing plants from cuttings, plant ID books, and in-depth visual and experimental analyses of specific plants. The course will begin with field trips, videos, and lectures to provide background information to support the projects. The students are evaluated on the depth and quality of their work as well as their ability to meet scheduled deadlines.

Chemistry (11/12) This course covers all the material usually included in a college‑preparatory chemistry course, including gas laws, atomic and kinetic theory, reaction theory and kinetics, and electrochemistry. Students also study thermodynamics, organic

EXPERIENCES

The Cambridge School of Weston

chemistry, and chemical analysis. We want students to master the fundamental concepts of chemical change, acquire lab skills, and develop critical thinking. Experimental design and data analysis are emphasized, and lab reports require the students to use spreadsheets and graphing programs. A standard scientific calculator is required.

Electrochemistry & Battery Design (10–12) Oxidation-Reduction reactions and electrochemistry are a very important field of applied chemistry. We will discuss some basic chemical principles and do a series of labs related to the topic. We will ultimately do research on the latest innovations in battery design and then design and build our own devices, considering power, battery life, and the potential for using sustainable materials. No previous chemistry required.

Environmental Chemistry (11/12) The environmental movement has brought widespread attention to the complex issues resulting from our increasing use of Earth’s finite resources. This course addresses environmental issues such as global warming, acid rain, rainforest depletion, water pollution, the ozone hole, alternative energy resources, and reusable/ recyclable products. Students study the fundamental chemistry that accounts for the environmental phenomena shaping our ecosystems. Throughout the course, students are engaged in extensive fieldwork in which they observe first-hand our local environment and its ecological problems.

Ethics of Science (11/12) In Ethics of Science, students will study, discuss, and analyze current ethical issues in science, such as stem cell research, human cloning, testing on human and animal subjects, genetic modification of agricultural crops and animals, military research, regulation of research, and ownership of intellectual property. Students will be expected to develop an understanding of the rationales behind multiple positions by reading background materials; discussing and debating issues in class; researching, writing, and presenting independent topics; watching relevant videos; and hearing speakers. This course awards credit toward the social justice requirement.

Field Research Seminar (11/12) Students in this course will work in small groups to choose a problem in a local environment to study and then conceive, execute, analyze, and write up small‑scale field experiments. Literature searches and statistical methods will be integrated into these studies. Independence, creative thinking, the ability to work with others, and attention to detail are required in this class. Students in Marine Biology are required to take this class; however, it is open to all students who have taken Cell Biology, and highly encouraged for those considering a Capstone Project in the sciences.

23


Freshwater Ecology (11/12) Topics in this course include water chemistry, diurnal and seasonal patterns in northern freshwater ecosystems, and aquatic flora and fauna, as well as general ecological principles. Extensive fieldwork is done in the living laboratories of nearby Hobb’s Brook and Cat Rock Pond, with associated marshes, and in on‑campus vernal pools.

Issues in Global and National Public Health: Analysis and Action The goal of this class is for students to use the lens of global and national public health issues to understand how decisions can be made about complex problems with often incomplete data. In addition to these issues, students will learn to see patterns in data, analyze their significance and visualize them in a variety of ways. Case studies on infectious and chronic diseases and the role of social inequity in health outcomes will be examined through a variety of assessments, including research and opinion papers and a final project with a service component in which students will address a local issue. Students may focus on topics within global and national public health ranging from racial, socioeconomic, and political forces on access to health care, women’s health, infant mortality, food safety and water issues, vaccines, immigration and language barriers, prescription drugs and intellectual property, and the role of world health organizations.

Love: Chemistry or Culture? (11/12) In this class we will consider the role of culture and chemistry in love from a variety of perspectives. We will discuss the biological basis of love and the role of nature and evolution through an examination of the physiology and neurology behind ideas like attraction and maternal instinct and a comparative analysis of breeding and mating patterns in a variety of animals, including humans. We will also address the role of culture in considering issues of beauty, sexuality, and gender identity. For their final project, students will design and implement a research study in which they examine a topic of their choice.

Marine Biology (11/12) The goal of this class is to give students a field research experience in which they come to understand how to work as a team to conduct experimental studies in marine science. Students will be off campus on Hurricane Island off the coast of Maine, where they will be involved in a variety of new and ongoing projects. They will study the structure of intertidal communities, develop hypotheses, and then implement a research study that will provide baseline data for future work in the area. The students will also study lobster biology and the historic management of the fishery so they can start to look critically at the current state of the Maine lobster industry. In the larval settlement project, students will study

24

organisms that recruit on docks and in the intertidal of Penobscot Bay, and consider the role of invasive species and climate change in affecting biodiversity. Finally, they will learn about the efforts on Hurricane Island to design a sustainable campus and to reduce the carbon footprint. They will help monitor energy use and also learn about various innovative solutions to the problem of living “off the grid.” There is a charge for the off‑campus portion of the course. This course awards credit toward the social justice requirement.

Molecular Biology (11/12) The rapid progress of biotechnology is raising questions and controversy in the new millennium. Should we clone humans? What is stem cell research? Is there truth behind fears of bio‑terrorism? Are we determined by our genes, and does that raise the specter of eugenics? What is the real story behind genetically engineered foods? In this fast‑paced, challenging lab and lecture course, learn the science behind the headlines. Try your own hand at isolating DNA, genetic fingerprinting, virus antibody tests, and genetically engineering bacteria to glow in the dark.

Off Campus to Neotropics of Latin America This trip is a cooperative effort between the Language and Science Departments. Students travel to the neotropics of Latin America for a program of immersion in tropical ecosystems and in Spanish language and culture. In the science component, students travel to various tropical ecosystems and conduct field experiments and projects. The challenges of economic development, conservation, and sustainable agriculture are examined in an interdisciplinary manner. The language program consists of homestays with local families, organized field trips, and everyday conversational Spanish. Students maintain both science and Spanish journals as they travel. The program starts with an intensive pre‑orientation week at CSW prior to departure. There is an extra charge for this course.

Neurology of Teaching and Learning (10/11/12) Ever wonder what “experiential learning,” “brain‑based teaching,” or “progressive education” mean? In this class, we will discuss education theories and applications after learning about the neurology and anatomy behind how the brain learns, remembers, senses, and prioritizes information. In the second half of the mod, each student will design their own school, applying these elements of neurology and philosophy. In the final week, students write a short lesson plan and teach it to the class, receive teacher and student feedback, and end with a reflection of the teaching experience.

EXPERIENCES

The Cambridge School of Weston

Organic Chemistry (11/12) Carbon forms an infinite variety of molecules that are abundant throughout our world. Molecules are found in our bodies, reside in plastics, and give food a hot taste, to name a few examples. We will examine the structure of organic molecules and how they react. In the lab, we will synthesize and investigate a wide variety of compounds which include nylon, aspirin, and oil of wintergreen.

Physics 1: Mechanics (11/12) This course covers the material contained in the first half of a basic college‑preparatory course: study of the natural laws relating space, time, matter, and energy. Topics include measurement, motion, forces, energy, momentum, and rotation. We want students to understand the behavior of matter, and to become aware of the importance of the physical laws of nature. The approach to the material is highly mathematical. Students will use spreadsheets and graphing programs to analyze laboratory data. Students with a strong interest in science should take some precalculus and chemistry before Physics 1.

Physics 2a: Harmonic Motion (11/12) This course examines periodic motion of all kinds, from bouncing springs to vibrating strings to resonating pipes. The underlying similarities in the cause and analysis of these motions will be addressed, and we will examine a variety of behaviors including reflection, refraction, diffraction, and interference. This information will be applied to a wide variety of situations including the behavior of musical instruments, acoustics, and earthquake and water waves.

Physics 2b: Electricity (11/12) Electricity is the basis of much of modern society, since it is easily transportable over long distances and can be made to do a wide variety of tasks including heating, lighting, computing, moving cars, creating sparks, etc. Magnetism, in comparison, seems like more of a curiosity. In this course, we will see how electricity and magnetism are just different manifestations of the same force, and how one can create the other. Our analysis of electricity will begin with point charges and their interactions and move on to circuits and their components (resistors, capacitors, etc). We will also discuss the transmission of electromagnetic energy in the form of waves (radio, visible light, etc).


Science Lab

STEAM: From Virtual to Reality

Science Lab provides an opportunity for students to get additional support in their science classes. Students may also use it to prepare for standardized testing or to pursue an independent project they might be interested in.

(10) In this class students will be learning to use the technological tools of programming or graphic communication (CAD) to help them create tangible solutions to real life problems. Students will create, design, build, discover, and engage in hands-on projects that require applying these technological skills using failure-based learning, where failure is seen as part of the natural process to solve problems. Students will also work collaboratively as “specialists” in groups, where each student is responsible for different skills and roles. Whether they solve their problems by writing a program, creating structures through 3D modeling in CAD and printing, or building and programming robots to accomplish a task, students will be given the opportunity to exercise the technological tools they have developed.

STEAM: Energy in Disguise (10) In this two-mod class, students will explore the concept of energy and energy transformations in the fields of both physics and chemistry. Students will also become “specialists” in a number of skills, so that each student will have a dedicated role within their project groups. They will also use mathematical models to plan and construct devices that will transform energy from one form to another and collaborate in their groups to solve real-world problems. In the physics section, we will examine energy transformations and conservation of energy. We will make use of simple machines to design and build a Rube Goldberg device, calculating energy loss and considering the role of aesthetics. The chemistry section will focus on heat energy and heat flow as well as the thermal properties of materials. Students will consider sustainability and social justice issues around energy and build a solar water heater using their understanding of the thermal properties of materials.

Zoology (11/12) This course examines the major groups within the animal kingdom and emphasizes the adaptations of animal systems to different habitats. Evolution and its genetic basis will also be considered. Laboratory work includes the dissection and detailed study of several representative animals. This course awards credit toward the social justice requirement.

EXPERIENCES

The Cambridge School of Weston

25


All the World’s a Stage: From Cave Painting to Kathakali, In-Between and Beyond “By their performance we will know them.” — Victor Turner, anthropologist. Students will explore definitions of culture and how that manifests in a variety of artistic forms throughout the world. Beginning with Shakespeare, we’ll then scope out thousands of years into the past and zoom into the future. Students will have opportunities to create their own cultures and to refine the art of speculating about what makes us human. This class is open to new and current students and is not limited to those experienced in the techniques of theatre.

Auditioner’s Tool Box Put together a personal repertory of strong skills, perhaps a monologue or a song. Based on exercise, practice, and research find how you can showcase the best you.

Cabaret for the Acting Singer Love to sing? Love to act? Come perform songs and monologues from all types of theatre. Learn to program and transition a cabaret performance. Students will be able to pick their material and will have a chance to write their own monologues and dialogues. The class will end with a cabaret performance. This course awards credit toward the social justice requirement.

Comedy: An Approach to Acting Come discover elements of physical theatre with a focus on stand‑up and slapstick comedy, drawing in elements of the classical, universal divine spirit. Get to know radio, movie, theatre, performance, and street artists. Explore “to clown.” Create a working repertory for yourself. No theatre experience required—just a willingness to have deep fun. This course awards credit toward the social justice requirement.

Costume Design for Production

THEATRE (minimum 1.75 year equivalent in the arts) At CSW, coursework in the visual and performing arts carries as much weight and rigor and requires as much discipline as traditional academic subjects. We offer a broad range of courses in dance, music, theatre, and visual arts. Students are expected to have taken courses in three of these four disciplines by the time they graduate.

26

EXPERIENCES

The Cambridge School of Weston

This class is a hands-on introduction to the world of theatrical design. Students work on the concept and costume design for Short Dramatic Pieces and the upcoming main stage performance. Script and character analysis, costume chart, research and sketching, choosing fabrics and color schemes, pulling stock pieces, and some work on the sewing machines are included. Explore the impact of age, class, race, status, and stereotyping on design.


Design for Performing Arts What is the role of the designer in American Repertory Theatre’s Donnie Darko, Blue Man Group, or the world wide Live Earth concerts? What are the steps from idea to production? Learn how to use the necessary tools and find out about scenic materials and the elements of composition. Research, basic drafting, model making, and imaginative input based on text are part of this course. The period of design depends on the Spring Theatre Production and the class will prepare and present design options for the actual play.

Dramatic Production Disciplined and daring, thought‑provoking plays often reflect social and political issues or explore a particular dramatic literary style. Actors, assistant directors, stage managers, and designers are required to be part of the production process during Saturday work calls (15 hours total) building sets, lights, costumes, sound, and props, often student designed. Rehearsals, meant to be an exciting learning lab, are scheduled during D and E Blocks, at least one night a week and some Sundays. Past productions include Charandas Chor by Habib Tanvir, Confucius’ Disciples with the Shanghai Theatre Academy, Doctor Faustus Lights the Lights by Gertrude Stein, Street Scene by Elmer Rice, The Bathtub by Paul Schmidt, The Martyrdom of Peter Ohey by Slawamir Mrozek, Picnic on the Battlefield by Fernando Arrabal, Brecht’s Galileo, Emily Mann’s Execution of Justice, and Hellman’s The Children’s Hour.

Intensive Production (Musical) And Intensive Production (Play) Intensive Production offers students a short, rigorous rehearsal process resulting in a full production. This D block will be audition based and material selected will typically feature small cast sizes in a variety of styles, including comedy, drama, and musical theatre. Auditions will occur the last week of the preceding mod.

Lighting Design Get out the wrenches, lighting templates, gel color books, and scripts! Learn the basics of theatrical lighting design. Help design, hang, focus, and cue the lights for Fall Production or Short Dramatic Pieces. Become a lighting designer for the Student Directors’ Workshop, Student Designers’ Musical, Dance Concert, or PADD. Find out how they do it in the real world, in theatrical unions and in small, found theatres. Some time outside of class may be required to see or run shows.

The Masks We Wear: Bodies in Performance Students will explore the basic principles and history of creating characters and performance without words, including corporeal mime, masks, clowning, stage combat, and other forms of physical theatre. This is a hands-on class and is not limited to those experienced in the techniques of theatre.

Musical Theatre Production Students who love to sing, dance, and perform (but may not have done so before) will be helped by a musical director who will guide them through the important process of stage and musical rehearsals and performances. All students enrolled in this class will have an opportunity to shine. There is usually collaboration with the Dance Department or student choreographers. The ensemble commitments and credits are the same as all main stage productions: 15 hours for Saturday production work (often student-designed) and rehearsals during D and E Blocks at least one night a week and some Sundays. Past productions include Three‑Penny Opera, The Mystery of Edwin Drood, Into The Woods, Anything Goes, The Pirates of Penzance, The Pajama Game, Urinetown, Chess, and Dido and Aeneas.

PADD Students gain valuable experience by directing, performing in, or illuminating scripts by the Writing Plays for Production class (see English offerings). The student directors are expected to attend the weekly Directors’ Workshops. Rehearsals happen throughout the day, occasionally in the evening, and there may be one Saturday workday. This final performance of the year is a highlight of our program.

Puppetry Students explore one form of puppetry, its history, land of origin, and scripts, then build characters in the traditional way. After viewing how the form is used in performance, students will design and build figures for a performance that will take advantage of puppets’ unique storytelling style. This course awards credit toward the social justice requirement.

Scene Study and Directing Students will learn skills in the areas of acting, directing, and (if time permits), devising, by watching and reading a variety of materials and reflecting thoughtfully on an array of theories. Students will work independently and in collaboration to present/direct short scenes. Students will be exposed to a variety of styles of theatre/ performance to deepen their interpretive and creative skills.

EXPERIENCES

The Cambridge School of Weston

Self‑Portrait‑Theatre Each of us will have to present in a public setting, be it an assembly, classroom, college or job interview, or as a character in a show. Knowing your audience and yourself will help you grow into a stronger speaker and performer. Come explore how to best present the creative individual that is you.

Short Dramatic Pieces Short Dramatic Pieces is a perfect place to try out theatre. Students work on a variety of short pieces that are performed at the end of the module. This class is for the seasoned student who wants to work in depth on performance and develop as a performer or for the student who doesn’t have time for the bigger productions. It is also for students that never imagined themselves on stage and are curious about it. Some rehearsals may occur outside of class time.

Sketch Comedy: Writing and (W)reacting “Analyzing humor is like dissecting a frog. Few people are interested and the frog dies of it.” — E.B. White. Students will explore the weirdo worlds of SNL, Kids in the Hall, Key and Peele, Carol Burnett, Second City, and more as they learn the techniques of sketch comedy writing. Two‑liners, monologues, desk pieces, parodies, and more await our students’ comedic chops!

Stagecraft Be the force behind the scenes for the Spring Theatre Production and possibly a show in the Moir Theatre. This physical, hands‑on class, allows students to build, paint, and put in scenery, as well as hang and focus lights. Students will learn how to use shop tools and lighting instruments safely and to use scenic paint and brushes correctly. When necessary, we tackle the basics of sewing and costuming, too. No theatre experience is required.

Student Directors’ Workshop (SDW) This is a splendid opportunity for a few students to direct a scene, one‑act play, or original script. Recent shows have included Coming Through the Rye, a scene from Doubt, Getting Out, and As the Crow Flies. Rehearsals happen throughout the day and occasionally in the evening. The student directors are expected to attend the weekly Directors’ Workshops. There is one Saturday workday per project. With further research, development, and expectations, SDW can be done as a Capstone Project. Student-driven theatre companies such as Poetic Justice can develop through this venue.

27


3D Printing: Body Edition

VISUAL ART (minimum 1.75 year equivalent in the arts) At CSW, coursework in the visual and performing arts carries as much weight and rigor and requires as much discipline as traditional academic subjects. We offer a broad range of courses in dance, music, theatre, and visual arts. Students are expected to have taken courses in three of these four disciplines by the time they graduate.

In this course, students will explore 3D printing technology and materials to create adornments and small objects for the body. We will learn basic hardware and software skills, along with skills rooted in the hand to further manipulate materials. Concepts will relate to the wide and varied history of adornment, jewelry, clothing, and sculpture.

3D Printed Art In this course students will learn basic computer aided design (CAD) software, explore the possibilities of 3D printing, and solve various challenges by designing solutions to those challenges. Challenges might relate to architecture, product design, wearable objects for the body, art objects, toys, and more. Fundamentals of design theory, and how design fits into our world will be included.

Animated Film In this course, students will explore a range of animation techniques across both analog and digital platforms, including long-exposure photography, digital scanning, and 3D tracking and compositing. Approaching animation as a concept, rather than a technique related to any specific technology, they will learn how to think across multiple art disciplines, incorporating a range of mediums into their projects.

Appropriation in Film & Video In this course, students will learn how to incorporate a wide range of found materials into the medium of film, including still imagery, sound, physical objects, 3D models, and much more. Focusing on appropriation as a form of cultural critique, they will learn how to re-contextualize found material with film in ways that challenge and provoke dominant cultural expectations.

Art & Idea Students examine a variety of concepts and motivations behind contemporary art making. This is a demanding course, which requires students to work on projects that will be critiqued the next day in class. There are a variety of reading and writing assignments, including a written personal statement about their interest in art. This course is for senior students planning on going to art school or majoring in art in college.

Art Lab This is open to students who have received the department chair’s permission to work in the art building during D Block. Students must be enrolled in an art class during the module they take D Block Art Lab.

Art and Science of the Human Body This integrated studies course provides students with an innovative and challenging way to explore the complexity of human physiology. Students will be asked to use visual arts and graphic design skills to document many aspects of the mystery and

28

EXPERIENCES

The Cambridge School of Weston


wonder of the human body systems. The course will involve independent research on the systems of students’ choosing and the students will engage with this material from a scientific and artistic point of view. Students will research one of the body systems in its entirety or in detail. The systems to be considered are: the nervous, the cardiovascular, the respiratory, the skeletal, the endocrine and muscle, or the digestive, reproductive, and lymphatic systems. After their research, students must create a significant artwork or series of pieces which communicates the beauty, the function, and emotional elements connected to the system. Finally, students are required to think independently and devise a final project of their own design that incorporates very clear scientific understanding with the craft and vision of an original artistic statement.

Black & White Digital Photo The goal of this course is for students to discover the expressive possibilities of monochrome digital photography. Exploring the unique beauty and subtlety of grayscale images, they are asked to make personal visual statements. As in all of our digital photography courses, Adobe Photoshop software is viewed as a vehicle for making qualitative changes to views of the external world—as opposed to being the basis for the creation of computer-generated art. Assignments include portrait and self‑portrait, landscape, fashion, still life, and street photography.

Digital Collage Digital Collage explores software-based collage possibilities while also incorporating analog drawing. In this class, students will expand their definition of drawing to include mechanical-made imagery in tandem with handmade imagery. Some projects will exclusively utilize digital collage practices, while others will involve over-drawing and transfer drawing techniques. This course examines the history of digital and analog collage.

Digital Photo 1 (Color Photo) In this color photography course, students will learn the basics of making images with digital cameras and entering these images into the computer to correct/improve them in the “digital darkroom.” Technical and aesthetic issues will be addressed through various assignments. Students will leave this course with a solid foundation in the aesthetics of photography, combined with skills to shoot, manipulate, and print.

Digital Street Photography In this course, students will explore the street photography genre. This is the candid, spontaneous photography of people going about their daily lives—on the streets, in parks, in museums, in malls, in any public space. Students will experience the challenge of working with a subject that is constantly changing before them. By looking at the work of past masters of

this form such as Kertesz, Cartier‑Bresson, Levitt, Friedlander, and Winogrand, they will gain an understanding of the importance of timing—both in terms of recognizing strong human moments and quickly organizing forms within the picture frame.

Documentary Photo Project In this course, each student will use photography to make a visual statement about a specific aspect of our society. Students will first consider the meaning and function of social documentary photography. Projects by photographers such as Lewis Hine, Dorothea Lange, and Sebastiao Salgado will be viewed. Students will then research a subject of importance or personal interest and create a photographic essay about it. As the mod progresses, students will print and edit their images, refine their ideas and produce a final portfolio. This course requires a commitment to doing consistent off‑campus photography. This course awards credit toward the social justice requirement.

Drawing: Abstraction and Process In this class, students build upon the foundational rendering skills developed in Naturalism and Observation and move from rendering the world naturalistically to embracing issues of abstraction to varying degrees. This class includes an in-depth exploration of the principles of design and the construction of composition, as well as the processes of intuition, gesture, and mark‑making, emphasizing personal self‑expression to gain a richer understanding of non‑objective approaches to drawing.

Drawing: Advanced Drawing Studio Even though this is an advanced-level drawing course, all levels of students can benefit from taking this class. Students are expected to work for an extended period of time on a suite of 10‑20 drawings in which visual style and conceptual ideas are thoroughly developed. This class is designed for experienced art students looking for an opportunity to explore content in their art.

Drawing: Collage Students will learn about the history of collage as they work with a wide variety of materials to create two‑dimensional artworks. Students will be asked to create carefully and precisely, as well as to work spontaneously. They will be using strategies from surrealists to pop artists and beyond, to work with found images as well as images.

Drawing: Conceptual Strategies In this class, students build upon the foundational skills developed in Naturalism and Observation and Abstraction and Design, and will focus on conceptual approaches to drawing and art‑making. Students will develop a wide range of strategies for visually and conceptually expressing ideas in drawing.

EXPERIENCES

The Cambridge School of Weston

Drawing: Life Drawing Learning to draw the human body is a very challenging and rewarding visual problem. The class draws from the nude model on most class days. We want students to develop an understanding of proportion, anatomy, gesture, and creative use of line in two‑dimensional space.

Drawing: Naturalism and Observation In this foundational drawing class, students will focus on developing their observational/ representational rendering skills (Naturalism). The course is structured to train the eye to see and the hand to respond. This is a challenging course designed for both beginning and advanced students. The homework is significant. Many students take this course more than once to develop their skills.

Drawing: Naturalism and Observation (Still Life & Life Drawing) In this foundational drawing class, students will focus on developing their observational/ representational rendering skills (Naturalism). The course is structured to train the eye to see and the hand to respond. This is a challenging course designed for both beginning and advanced students. The homework is significant. Many students take this course more than once to develop their skills. In this particular course, the course material culminates with a weeklong focus on life drawing (nude models).

Drawing: Otherness & Social Justice In this class students explore human rights and develop a body of drawings addressing their study. The course is designed to provide students with opportunities to explore fundamental human rights and varying Western/non-Western viewpoints and perspectives through the exploration of art as a vehicle to promote and encourage social change. Areas of focus include: otherness, prejudice, discrimination of and advocacy for minority groups, the LBGTQIA community, and women. Historical examples of art and advocacy are examined. The course blends both the critique and debate teaching models with studio art practices. This course awards credit toward the social justice requirement.

Drawing: Self‑Portrait Students will be asked to explore the possibilities of self‑portrait, focusing on charcoal drawing as well as using a variety of other techniques and materials. All students are welcome to explore this challenging opportunity.

29


Environmental Photo Students will explore the concept of environment in various forms—as the natural world, as human‑altered landscapes, as interior spaces, or as personally interpreted worlds. Slide presentations on the work of artists include Atget, Walker Evans, Richard Misrach, and Lois Connor. In addition to darkroom work and slide presentations, classes will include weekly critiques.

Experimental Film In this course, students will explore various alternatives to traditional narrative and documentary filmmaking, including non-continuity editing, video installation art, and methods for manipulating video file data. Using a variety of technology and software, they will create three projects designed to teach them these skills while helping them develop their own personal mode of filmmaking. In addition to learning experimental techniques, they will also examine the ideas and attitudes upon which the genre is based by watching and discussing numerous works by prominent experimental filmmakers.

Exploring World Cinema This course is a film history beginning with German Expressionism and exploring Surrealist film, Neorealism, and the New Wave, and culminating with a look at world cinema from Africa, the Middle East, and Asia. We will study filmmakers Djibril Diop Mambety (Senegal), Bahman Ghobadi (Iran), Satyajit Ray (India), and Wang Xiaoshuai (China), among others.

From Venus to Guerrilla Girls: Women Redefining Self through Art (10/11/12) In this course students will become familiar with art made by women (women’s art history), the multitude of subject matters of women’s art, the systematic and political influences that affected women’s ability to make art and the subject matter of their art, and historical changes that allowed for an emergence of women’s art on a larger scale. Art projects will examine issues, materials, and art forms that relate to the women’s art movement and women’s art in general. This course awards credit toward the social justice requirement.

Historical Processes in Black and White Photography This photography course will combine early photo history and practice. We will begin with the camera obscura, work through to pinhole cameras, continue through the late 19th century‑early 20th century in coating materials with various emulsions, expose light sensitive materials using ultraviolet light instead of an enlarger, and complete the mod exploring medium- and large-format photography, which produces extremely detailed negatives with fine grain.

Installation Art Students will explore the creative possibilities of using space as an artistic medium, examining an array of installation practices, from ancient Greek theatre to Walt Disney World rides, and experimenting with a variety of different media and techniques. They will also discuss several prominent installation artists, including Felix Gonzales‑Torres, Yayoi Kusama, James Turrell, Kara Walker, and Ai WeiWei, becoming fluent in such concepts as immersion, interactivity, simulacrum, and gesamtkunstwerk, and learning how to apply them to their own work.

Motion Graphics Design In this course, students will learn a variety of advanced video editing techniques primarily in Adobe After Effects software, including chromakeying, masking, rotoscoping, and 3D tracking and compositing, culminating in a final project in which they create a dynamic, animated film using 3D models and third-party plug-ins. Throughout the course, they will also examine works by numerous contemporary artists who incorporate motion graphics into their work.

Narrative Film In this course, students will learn the fundamental techniques of narrative filmmaking, include storyboarding, cinematography, micing, and continuity editing. Working independently and in crews, they will create three films designed to tell stories visually with DSLR cameras, high-quality microphones, lights, and Final Cut Pro software. Throughout the course, they will also watch and discuss films by numerous narrative filmmakers.

Ordering Chaos (9/10) This Integrated Studies course is designed to inspire students to develop their creative problem‑solving skills. Students are continually asked to think “outside the box” as they make connections among different disciplines like science, English, math, and art. Using skills and ideas from each discipline, students are given the opportunity to reflect on concepts and ponder their own newly formed ideas as they create a variety of projects. Working successfully in groups and being an active, thoughtful participant throughout the course are important goals for each student. This class is designed in part as an introduction to the type of creative problem solving that students will be asked to do throughout their time at CSW. It is also a vehicle for the students to understand better who they are as learners, to celebrate cognitive diversity, and to acknowledge both the strengths of their intelligences and their challenges as learners.

Painting: Naturalism Students are introduced to skills, techniques, and concepts basic to painting, particularly color theory and color mixing, composition, paint application, and surface treatment. There is no prerequisite, but the department strongly encourages students to take Drawing: Naturalism and Observation before taking this course. Specific assignments will vary depending on instructor.

Photography 1 This is an introductory course in black and white photography with instruction in camera technique, film exposure, development, and printmaking. This class provides students with a basic understanding of the photographic process. Weekly assignments encourage students to think about photography as a means of personal expression.

30

EXPERIENCES

The Cambridge School of Weston


Photography 2 This course is for students who already have a basic understanding of the black and white photographic process. Students are asked to experiment with the compositional structuring of their photographs through a variety of visual assignments. These visual exercises challenge students to discover their personal strengths while developing individual styles and techniques. Additional emphasis is placed on refining printing techniques.

Photography 3 Each student in this advanced class pursues a project of choice and produces a portfolio of photographs, which will work together with respect to a series, style, and point of view. Emphasis is placed on developing personal imagery and achieving excellence in printmaking techniques.

Pinhole Photography Students will create their own pinhole cameras and explore the unique picture‑making possibilities of this most basic photographic apparatus. Students will experience the paradox of photography’s technical simplicity and expressive open‑endedness. Paper negatives are made in daylight and artificial light and these are then used to produce positive prints in the darkroom.

Portrait Photography In this course, students will explore the possibilities of the photographic representation of the human face. Through slide presentations and discussions of historical and contemporary photographic portraiture, many different approaches to the subject are considered. The portrait as fact might include physical description or objective record. Dramatized, stylized portraits involve arranged lighting, costumes, and props. Other exercises may include distorted portraits or portraits of someone the photographer is curious about, but hesitant to approach. In addition to darkroom work and slide presentations, students will have time to shoot in the classroom with studio lighting.


Re‑Ordering Chaos Using math and visual arts skills, students will explore a variety of questions, assumptions, projects and theories that challenge stereotypes about math and art. Possible topics could include the meaning of zero and infinity, the square root of two, Platonic Sections, the geometry of five pointed stars, what makes math beautiful, what makes art practical, what is the role of chaos and creative risk-taking in math, why does art require discipline and order, what happens with fractals, and more.

Sculptural Elements: Line and Form Line is one of the most basic of all visual elements. In this course, students will explore line (through the material of wire) and how it can be used to define a surface, a form, and even an environment. We will

learn basic wire manipulation techniques of attaching, weaving, and forming, as well as how to attain structure on various scales, how it works with light to create shadow, how adding a skin can transform a structure, and more.

Sculpture: Introduction to Sculpture In this course, students will explore various basic methods and materials related to creating sculptural artwork. Both traditional and non-traditional aspects of working in three dimensions will be investigated. Each module will begin with a series of exercises to familiarize the students with fundamental skills. This will be followed by longer projects that explore observational, conceptual, and abstractive methods. All projects ask students to consider the specific qualities, traditions, and meanings related to sculpture. This class is open to all.

Sculpture: Jewelry and Small Objects This course will teach students to use metalsmithing techniques in creating jewelry, small sculptures, and objects. Students will learn basic techniques of cutting, cold joining, forming, soldering, and various finishing techniques. We will explore jewelry not only as decorative adornment, but also as small objects that interact with the body, and can convey ideas as with any work of art.

Sculpture: Raku Raku involves a unique method of firing which originated in Japan in connection with the Tea Ceremony. Pieces are removed from the kiln while red hot, and then may be placed directly into materials, such as leaves or sawdust, to be reduced in an air‑free atmosphere. The pots are cooled instantly in cold water. This process produces some exciting glaze effects. Students have the opportunity to fire their own pieces. This course awards credit toward the social justice requirement.

Sculpture: Wearable Art In this course, students make art that can be worn on the body. Students use traditional sewing materials but also work with non-traditional materials, with a strong focus on concepts and the transformation of materials. Some sewing experience is strongly recommended.

Sculpture: Wheelworking Students focus on basic wheel throwing techniques, such as centering and throwing cylinders, bowls, and bottles. Assignments stress the functional qualities of the thrown form. By the end of the module, there may be some time to explore the personal expression one can achieve with wheel‑thrown forms.

EXPERIENCES

The Cambridge School of Weston

Video Art: The Moving Image Video art has been described as the “electronic canvas.” In this course, students will learn to use the moving image as an artwork unto itself. Students will be exposed to video art’s unique history, as well as the video art pioneers and contemporaries who have created work outside the traditions of the narrative and documentary. We will explore the technical aspects of video, including using the camera, the software, and the moving image in both traditional and experimental ways. Editing will be done using the digital process of Final Cut Pro®, but students may also explore other methods of creating moving images. How, where, and when to present work will also be explored.

Video Installation In this course, students will explore the unique potential of video as a medium for creating and developing new forms of installation art. Working with projectors, as well as direct view displays, they will experiment with various methods of combining video and space to create immersive aesthetic experiences, including site-specificity, live-feed, and viewer interaction pieces. Hands-on work will be accompanied by screenings and discussions of important video installation artists.

Wearable Art: Advanced Concepts and Design This course can be seen as an extension for those who have taken Wearable Art, and are interested in pushing conceptual and traditional forms, or art that refers to clothing. We will focus on wearable art that plays with assumptions about clothing and its functions, social and historical concepts of the body and clothing, current events and technologies, and more. This is less about fashion and more about ideas. Some sewing experience is strongly recommended, but student ideas may lead into other areas such as electronics, sculptural forms, 3D printing, social design, installation, performance, and more.

What It Is: Journal as a Creative Site What It Is: Journal as a Creative Site will focus on a series of exercises meant to ask the questions: What is a good drawing? How do drawings communicate? How do we tap into our own experiences and turn them into creative forms of communication? Where do ideas come from, and how does our imagination help? Are there any taboos in the creative process, and how do we have fun with them? What does it mean to be blocked, and how do we allow ourselves to go beyond blocks? The main goal of this course will be filling an entire composition book with these explorations, focused on the connection between the hand and brain. Imagery and text will be combined. The course is focused on the process more than the product; the product is just a tool to help explore these ideas. Willingness to play and be uncomfortable are the only prerequisites. (This course is loosely based on the writings of Lynda Barry. Her book Syllabus is a required text).

31


INTEGRATED STUDIES COURSES

How does media shape our society? How can we use algebra to respond to health crises? How can we use film to raise consciousness about injustice? These are the type of questions students encounter in our integrated studies courses, where they are challenged to think by integrating knowledge and skills from a variety of academic disciplines.

The Art of Prediction (11/12) The 18th century worldview was an empowering one. As a result of the Scientific Revolution, the world and its history were predictable and orderly, subject to natural laws that humans could understand. The innovations in science and political thought in the 19th and 20th centuries profoundly changed this view, as truth and universal law gave way to a new emphasis on the common man and best fit models based on uncertainty, chance, and probability. The microhistory movement and the events leading to the development of the atomic bomb had radical implications for the theory and practices of both disciplines. We will examine the philosophy and methodology of history and science as they evolved to meet a new worldview in this period.

Art and Science of the Human Body This integrated studies course provides students with an innovative and challenging way to explore the complexity of human physiology. Students will be asked to use visual arts and graphic design skills to document many aspects of the mystery and wonder of the human body systems. The course will involve independent research on the systems of students’ choosing and the students will engage with this material from a scientific and artistic point of view. Students will research one of the body systems in its entirety or in detail. The systems to be considered are: the nervous, the cardiovascular, the respiratory, the skeletal, the endocrine and muscle, or the digestive, reproductive, and lymphatic systems. After their research students must create a significant artwork or series of pieces which communicates the beauty, function, and emotional elements connected to the system. Finally, students are required to think independently and devise a final project of their own design that incorporates very clear scientific understanding with the craft and vision of an original artistic statement. This course awards credit toward the social justice requirement. Â

Botany by Design

(11/12) This course enables students to design their own course. With the help of the instructor, students will choose from a list of activities that include projects in landscape architecture, growing plants from cuttings, plant ID books, and in-depth visual and experimental analyses of specific plants. The course will begin with field trips, videos, and lectures to provide background information to support the projects. The students are evaluated on the depth and quality of their work as well as their ability to meet scheduled deadlines.

32

EXPERIENCES

The Cambridge School of Weston


Off Campus to Neotropics of Latin America This trip is a cooperative effort between the Language and Science Departments. Students travel to the neotropics of Latin America for a program of immersion in tropical ecosystems and in Spanish language and culture. In the science component, students travel to various tropical ecosystems and conduct field experiments and projects. The challenges of economic development, conservation, and sustainable agriculture are examined in an interdisciplinary manner. The language program consists of homestays with local families, organized field trips, and everyday conversational Spanish. Students maintain both science and Spanish journals as they travel. The program starts with an intensive pre‑orientation week at CSW prior to departure. There is an extra charge for this course.

Food & Culture

(9) This course is designed to provide firsthand experiences, lively group projects, and appropriate reading on the history, geography, and culture of food. Students take trips, work on writing exercises and analytical skill-building, discuss major themes, and engage in group work with an array of activities and projects. This course awards credit toward the social justice requirement.

Off Campus to China and Taiwan In this course, students travel to China and Taiwan to strengthen their Mandarin Chinese and learn about the history, geography, culture, life, arts, and people in the two different Chinese societies. Students will learn to better understand and appreciate American perspective and culture through the discovery of China’s and Taiwan’s. Students will attend classes and stay in homestays in China and Taiwan. Students will keep personal journals, contribute to a group a blog, and complete a personally designed research project. Enrollment is with department permission only. There is an additional charge for the course. This course awards credit toward the social justice requirement.

Pocket Players Pocket Players is CSW’s unique bilingual touring children’s theatre that performs in ASL and spoken English for Deaf and hearing children and adults throughout the greater Boston area. At the end of the module, the students perform delightful stories replete with costumes and scenery. Some rehearsals occur outside of class time. The course qualifies for ASL or arts credit and community service. Previous study of ASL is not required. This course awards credit toward the social justice requirement.

Re‑Ordering Chaos (11/12) Using math and visual arts skills, students will explore a variety of questions, assumptions, projects and theories that challenge stereotypes about math and art. Possible topics could include the following: the meaning of zero and infinity, the square root of two, Platonic Sections, the geometry of five pointed stars, what makes math beautiful, what makes art practical, what is the role of chaos and creative risk taking in math, why does art require discipline and order, what happens with fractal, and more.

Off Campus to France Students spend three weeks in France for a program of total immersion in French language and culture. During the first week, they tour Paris and Versailles. During the last two weeks, they live with families in a quaint city outside Paris, take a French course, and explore the area. Prior to departure, the group has an intensive orientation on the culture, art, history, and architecture of France. While traveling, students keep a journal and fulfill other requirements adapted to their language and/or art background. Upon their return, students prepare mandatory projects, including a research paper, to earn full credit. There is an extra charge for the course.

EXPERIENCES

The Cambridge School of Weston

33


PROMOTING AWARENESS AND COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT (PACE)

34

EXPERIENCES

The Cambridge School of Weston


Through the PACE program, we dedicate time during the mod and the year for experiential classes, events, and activities that will prepare our students to meet the demands of an increasingly complex and diverse world. A four-year co-curriculum, PACE has been designed to ensure that all CSW students develop selfawareness, social consciousness, healthy living habits, life skills, and leadership that will serve them into adulthood.

Grade 9: Foundations

In Grade 9, students explore practices and concepts related to community citizenship; creating shared language around identity, privilege, and oppression; and building a sense of self in relation to peers, adults, and their community.

Grade 10: Mind-Body Connection

The focus of the Grade 10 PACE curriculum is to promote an understanding of mental, physical, and emotional connection; learning how to exercise self-care for personal and relational health; and building a positive self-identity while practicing effective decision-making skills.

Grade 11: Alliance Building across Cultural Differences (ABCD)

In Grade 11, students will deepen their understanding of the historical roots of current inequities through study, experience, and reflection. Concurrent service learning opportunities allow students to gain a more personal understanding of equity and justice while building on their knowledge of individual and shared identities

Grade 12: Senior Seminar

SOCIAL JUSTICE REQUIREMENT

As we seek to cultivate culturally aware global citizens, social justice is a fundamental component of our mission and curriculum. In fact, CSW is proud to be the first independent school in the country to include a Social Justice Requirement among our graduation requirements. During their time at CSW, students must take classes that reflect the diverse viewpoints, complexity, and richness of the multicultural world we live in. Over 80 approved courses, spanning all departments, challenge students to explore multiple perspectives, examine models of change, and learn how to engage in meaningful and purposeful action.

SERVICE LEARNING

Service learning at CSW is an intentional effort to engage each student in planned and purposeful learning in order to become active, engaged citizens of a larger community. One of its goals is to enrich CSW’s academic program through experiences that foster a deeper understanding of self, community, leadership, and civic engagement.

In the Grade 12 Senior Seminar, students will reflect on and consolidate their CSW experience. As they prepare for the transition to life beyond CSW, they will continue to build skills and confidence around self-representation; hone adult life skills; and increase resourcefulness and resilience while building a strong sense of self and personal values.

EXPERIENCES

The Cambridge School of Weston

35


In addition to choices offered through the Theatre, Music, and Athletic Departments, students may select from a variety of other D Block options. A sample of those courses can be found below. Art Lab This is open to students who have received the department chair’s permission to work in the art building during D Block. Students must be enrolled in an art class during the module they take D Block Art Lab.

Driver’s Education The CSW Driver’s Education class is offered as both a convenience and D Block credit for our students. AAA Driving School teaches the course on the CSW campus.

Empty Bowls Students enrolled in the Empty Bowls D Block will be the architects of the Empty Bowls event in February. The class will oversee event planning, which includes (but is not limited to) menu planning, the service learning component, and community outreach. Students may also have the opportunity to make bowls. Participation in the D Blocks as well as participation in the February event will provide students with 15 hours of community service hours.

D BLOCK

Intensive Production

At the end of the school day, D Block balances the three core academic blocks it follows. In addition to athletics, D Block affords students the opportunity to take a variety of electives. Choices include productions and classes in the performing arts; advancement labs and academic support; and extracurricular courses such as cooking, calligraphy, robotics, and Model U.N.

Intensive Production offers students a short, rigorous rehearsal process resulting in a full production. This D Block will be audition based and material selected will typically feature small cast sizes in a variety of styles, including comedy, drama, and musical theatre. Auditions will occur the final week of the preceding mod.

Japanese Cooking In Japanese cooking, students will learn about Japanese culture through cooking various dishes. They will also find out about inclusivity and learn about using different ingredients and methods for gluten‑free, vegetarian, and vegan cooking. Dishes will include rice balls, omuraisu (fried rice in omelet), miso soup, mochi ice cream, purin (Japanese flan), sushi rolls, and udon and soba noodles.

Language Labs Students may attend the Language Lab in order to develop their skills in French, Spanish, or Mandarin. The skill levels of the students range from beginner to advanced. This is an opportunity for each student to receive individualized attention; some tackle work in their current course, while others have a chance to prepare for a future course. Students practice their oral proficiency by conversing with one another and work independently on grammar exercises or language computer software.

36

EXPERIENCES

The Cambridge School of Weston


Math Lab Students may sign up for this course if they want extra support for a math class they are taking, or if they want to review material for an upcoming course. The course is limited in size and requires permission of the instructor and the Academic Office.

Model U.N. Model U.N. is offered over multiple mods during D Block. Students are asked to sign up for at least two consecutive modules and take an active interest in current events within the U.S. and abroad. Participants in Model U.N. practice problem‑solving, conflict resolution, research, and debate. A variety of media is used to learn about global affairs, including online news sources, Google Earth, and films based on historical or current events. Model U.N. is a student‑driven organization, so students are expected to come up with discussion topics and present background information on their topic to the group in order to lay the foundation for conversation and debate. Recent topics include the conflict between Israel and Palestine, the situation in Haiti following the earthquake and cholera outbreak, the ongoing healthcare debate in the United States, and the U.S.-Mexico Drug War.

Quilting Join this student-led D Block course in making baby quilts. Each student will make a quilt for a baby in the Waltham shelter. In this course, we listen to music, sing, make quilts, and more! You don’t need to be great at sewing, and this is a wonderful way to learn and give back!

Science Lab Science Lab provides an opportunity for students to get additional support in their science classes. Students may also use it to prepare for standardized testing, or to pursue an independent project they might be interested in.

Science Lab (Bio Skills) This course is designed to offer support for students enrolled in biology courses.

Writing Lab Students receive support with their academic writing, have opportunities to develop their own writing, and can participate in writing workshops.

ATHLETICS AND FITNESS

The athletic program at CSW strives to cultivate each student’s appreciation of the lifelong benefits of physical activity. Students choose from a wide range of athletic pursuits — from interscholastic teams like soccer, basketball, and tennis to recreational activities like cycling, rock climbing, and yoga.

EXPERIENCES

The Cambridge School of Weston

37


COMPETITIVE ATHLETICS TEAMS

Participation in interscholastic athletics helps students develop a healthy, competitive attitude, and gain a deeper understanding of mutual respect, collaboration, and the relationship of the individual to the community. CSW offers many interscholastic sports, all of which emphasize these values. We embrace all athletes, from serious players seeking high-caliber play on our championship-winning varsity teams to novice athletes eager to develop new interests and skills. At all levels of competitive play, we encourage good sportsmanship and respect for teammates, opponents, coaches, officials, and spectators.

Interscholastic Teams • Baseball • Boys Basketball • Girls Basketball • Cross Country • Field Hockey • Girls Lacrosse • Boys Soccer • Girls Soccer • Boys Tennis • Girls Tennis • Girls Volleyball • Ultimate Frisbee

Badminton Our badminton course provides students with an introduction to the rules, techniques, physical skills, and strategies of the game of badminton. Students will develop their badminton skills through a series of demonstrations and instructions, and reinforce their skill development through a wide variety of competitive games. The goals of this course are to get you exercising and have some fun in the process!

Cardio-Boxing Cardio-Boxing is a fun and energetic class where students use choreographed cardio-boxing combinations combined with calisthenics and jumping rope to obtain a great aerobic workout. In our state-of-theart Health and Fitness Center, students go from being taught how to wrap their hands to eventually completing a boxing circuit of approximately 10 rounds using standalone punching bags. Be ready to feel the burn!

5 - 10 miles. Cycling combines exercise with a chance to see the beauty of the western suburbs. Students need to bring their own bikes and helmets and should be comfortable riding on roads.

Fencing Students are taught the fundamentals of fencing, including simple attacks, parries, and proper footwork, at a nearby fencing club. Students also learn the rules and etiquette of fencing. Please note that students will not return to CSW until approximately 5 p.m. on these afternoons. There is a small, extra fee associated with this class.

Golf Our golf program is recommended for advanced‑beginner to intermediate golfers. Participants should be familiar with the fundamentals of golf and proficient enough to get around a course in reasonable fashion. Students will receive instruction from a local golf professional and spend time at the driving range and on the putting greens. Students are responsible for providing their own equipment and will be charged for golf lessons, greens fees, and range balls. Proper golf attire is required at most local golf facilities.

Indoor Games Play indoor gym games such as dodgeball, volleyball, pickleball, and soccer, among others.

Indoor Rock Climbing Students are taught basic climbing skills, proper use of climbing equipment (climbing shoes, a harness, carabiner, belay device, and chalk bag), and safe climbing habits at a local indoor climbing facility. Please note that students will not return to CSW until approximately 5 p.m. on these afternoons.

Indoor Soccer Soccer players of all ability levels learn new and fundamental skills and strategies of soccer through drills, small‑sided games, and structured scrimmages. The majority of class time is devoted to active participation in the game of soccer.

Introduction to Sports Medicine (11/12) Students interested in sport and dance medicine (athletic training, physical therapy, orthopedics, etc.) will enjoy this class. Topics to be covered include anatomy, tissue response to injury, muscle function, injury prevention techniques (taping and bracing), assessment of injuries, treatment and rehabilitation of injuries, and sports/ dance nutrition. The class will include a combination of class time and lab time.

Kundalini Yoga

Students meet on campus and depart in a group to tour the roads of Lincoln, Weston, and Concord. Depending on the skill level of the group, most rides range in distance from

Kundalini Yoga is an ancient science designed to help individuals achieve their highest potential. In each class, students learn and practice an invigorating combination of:

38

EXPERIENCES

Cycling

The Cambridge School of Weston

• Physical postures and exercises to stimulate and strengthen the muscular, glandular, circulatory, and nervous systems • Highly refined breathing techniques to help master moods and release stress and tension • Meditation techniques and deep relaxation to calm emotions and focus the mind. • Sound, rhythm, and music are used to synchronize body and mind to promote a calm, clear, and balanced state of awareness.

Martial Arts Over the years we’ve offered instruction in Tae Kwon Do, Karate, Tai Chi, Kung Fu, and Aikido, among other disciplines.

Pilates In our Pilates class, students are introduced to beginner level Pilates mat and reformer exercises, with emphasis placed on learning proper Pilates breathing, and developing “core” connection, strength, flexibility, and proper alignment. The class learns how to access their “powerhouse” muscles and how to maintain that engagement throughout movement. Students also become familiar with beginning safe ranges of motion and how to determine when they are ready to increase the challenge by increasing their range of motion.

Recreational Frisbee Ultimate Frisbee is an exciting, fast‑paced, non‑contact team sport that combines the athletic skills of running, jumping, and catching a disc in an energetic, fun‑filled environment. Students learn the proper throwing and catching techniques as well as fundamental offensive and defensive principles through instruction, drills, and games. The majority of class time is devoted to active participation in the game of Ultimate.

Recreational Soccer Soccer players of all ability levels learn new and fundamental skills and strategies of soccer through drills, small‑sided games, and structured scrimmages. The majority of class time is devoted to active participation in the game of soccer.

Recreational Tennis Tennis players of all ability levels learn the fundamental skills and strategies of tennis through instruction, drills, and a variety of games. The majority of class time is devoted to active participation in the game of tennis.

Running for Fitness The course title is self-explanatory. Similar to our Spring Running class, this class is offered to those students who run simply because they like to run. Students enrolled in this course may also reap the benefits more commonly associated with running such as improved cardiovascular health and bone density, weight loss, and stress management.


Self-Defense Course

Strength Training & Conditioning

Walking for Fitness

This self-defense course is open to all students. This course is brought to CSW students by IMPACT Boston, an organization that teaches practical self‑defense skills that give students the experience of facing their fears and finding their power. In this class, students are taught how to avoid altercations, resist intimidation, communicate assertively, and escape potential assaults. Students learn how to set verbal boundaries and de‑escalate potentially dangerous situations. The course will also teach ways to physically defend against a number of threatening scenarios including front confrontations, attacks from the rear, attempted sexual assault, and ground fighting. Scenarios will be empowering, practical, and useful.

This individualized program involving regular workouts utilizes our new weight training area. Students will learn correct techniques to improve their power, strength, and flexibility.

We offer a Walking for Fitness class in the late fall and winter months on our indoor walking track. Students enrolled in this course walk with the intention of reaping the cardiovascular benefits associated with completing approximately 3-5 miles in each class. Students may also enjoy the many benefits associated with walking, such as greater bone density, weight loss, stress management, and improved mental health.

Spring Running This class is offered to those students who run simply because they like to run. Of course, students enrolled in this course may also reap the benefits commonly associated with running, including improved cardiovascular health and bone density, weight loss, and stress management. We’ll run around campus, on the streets, and in the local woods of Weston.

Table Tennis Table tennis is one of the most popular sports in the world. More commonly played in a recreational format and referred to as “Ping Pong” in the United States, it is, in fact, an Olympic sport. Students will learn the official rules of the game, basic serves, forehands, backhands, and offensive and defensive strategies. The majority of class time is devoted to active participation in games, both singles and doubles.

Vinyasa Yoga Vinyasa yoga offers students a fun and challenging way to work out and reduce stress. This style of yoga utilizes active yoga postures with breathing, allowing the poses to be linked together. In addition to improving strength and flexibility, a cardiovascular benefit can also be derived. This class is appropriate for all levels.

Volleyball Learn how to serve, bump, set, and spike. Instruction and game play are provided.

EXPERIENCES

The Cambridge School of Weston

Wilderness Trips There are three module‑break trips per year: a fall hiking trip, a winter skiing/snowshoeing/mountaineering trip, and a spring canoe or sea kayaking trip. During these trips, eight to ten students learn outdoor and survival skills, engage in group cooperation, and experience personal challenges and limitations. There is an extra charge for wilderness trips.

Zumba® Are you ready to move and groove and dance yourself into shape? That’s exactly what our Zumba® program is all about. This exhilarating, effective, easy-to-follow, Latin-inspired, calorie-burning dance fitness party is open to participants of all skill levels.

39


40

EXPERIENCES

The Cambridge School of Weston


LEARN MORE csw.org Applying to CSW csw.org/apply Tuition and Financial Aid csw.org/tuition College Placement csw.org/college


45 Georgian Road Weston, Massachusetts 02493 781-642-8650

42

EXPERIENCES

csw.org

The Cambridge School of Weston

The Cambridge School of Weston Viewbook  

The Insider's Guide to The Cambridge School of Weston.

The Cambridge School of Weston Viewbook  

The Insider's Guide to The Cambridge School of Weston.

Advertisement