Page 1

“It’s about the

leader in all of us and how you lead

your life every day.” -Kathy Cloninger, CEO

The Founder

What I learned

Daisies and Brownies Juniors

Cadettes, Seniors, and Ambassadors

Troop Leaders


Juliette “Daisy”

Gordon Low

Juliette Gordon Low, founder of Girl Scouts of the USA, was born Juliette Magill Kinzie Gordon on October 31, 1860, in Savannah, Georgia. “Daisy,” as she was affectionately called by family and friends, was the second of six children of William Washington Gordon and Eleanor Kinzie Gordon. Family members on her father’s side were early settlers in Georgia, and her mother’s family played an important role in the founding of Chicago, Illinois. A talented youngster, Daisy Gordon spent a happy childhood in her Savannah home, which was purchased and restored by Girl Scouts of the USA in 1953. Young Daisy Gordon developed what was to become a lifetime interest in the arts. She wrote poems; sketched, wrote and acted in plays; and later became a skilled painter and sculptor. She had many pets throughout her life and was particularly fond of exotic birds, Georgia mockingbirds, and dogs. Daisy was also known for her great sense of humor.

Home

What I learned

Daisies and Brownies Juniors

Juliette Gordon Low spent several years searching for something useful to do with her life. Her search ended in 1911, when she met Sir Robert Baden-Powell, founder of the Boy Scouts and Girl Guides, and became interested in the new youth movement. Afterwards, she channeled all her energie into the fledgling movement. Less than a year later, she returned to the United States and made her historic telephone call to a friend (a distant cousin), saying, “I’ve got something for the girls of Savannah, and all of America, and all the world, and we’re going to start it tonight!” On March 12, 1912, Juliette Low gathered 18 girls to register the first troop of American Girl Guides. Margaret “Daisy Doots” Gordon, her niece and namesake, was the first registered member. The name of the organization was changed to Girl Scouts the following year.

Cadettes, Seniors, and Ambassadors

Troop Leaders


In developing the Girl Scout movement in the United States, Juliette brought girls of all backgrounds into the out-of-doors, giving them the opportunity to develop self-reliance and resourcefulness. She encouraged girls to prepare not only for traditional homemaking, but also for possible future roles as professional women—in the arts, sciences and business—and for active citizenship outside the home. Girl Scouting welcomed girls with disabilities at a time when they were excluded from many other activities. This idea seemed quite natural to Juliette, who never let deafness, back problems or cancer keep her from full participation in life. From the original 18 girls, Girl Scouting has grown to 3.7 million members. Girl Scouts is the largest educational organization for girls in the world and has influenced the more than 50 million girls, women and men who have belonged to it. Juliette Gordon Low accumulated admirers and friends of all ages, nationalities and walks of life. By maintaining contact with overseas Girl Guides and Girl Scouts during World War I, she helped lay the foundation for the World Association of Girl Guides and Girl Scouts. After her death from breast cancer in 1927, after her death the Juliette Low World Friendship Fund was established, which finances projects for Girl Scouts and Girl Guides around the world. Juliette Gordon Low died at her Savannah, Georgia, home on Lafayette Square January 17, 1927. She is buried at Laurel Grove Cemetery in Savannah.

Home

What I learned

Daisies and Brownies Juniors

Cadettes, Seniors, and Ambassadors

Troop Leaders


What I learned

Home

The Founder

Daisies and Brownies Juniors

Cadettes, Seniors, and Ambassadors

Troop Leaders


What Ambassadors Can Do How often have you seen something that really needed to be changed and wondered, “Why isn’t someone doing something about that?” Journey gives Girl Scout Ambassadors a way to be that someone, an advocate with the power to start the first flutter of real and lasting change. While creating their own “butterfly effect,” they’ll gain an array of skills, such as networking, planning and learning to speak up for what they believe—that will benefit them as they prepare for life beyond high school

Home

The Founder

Daisies and Brownies Juniors

Cadettes, Seniors, and Ambassadors

Troop Leaders


Daisies and Brownies

Troop Leader

Junior

Cadette, Senior & Ambassador

What a Daisy Does Girl Scout Daisies meet in groups of five to ten with two or more adult leaders in a nurturing, inclusive environment. They go on trips, learn about nature and science, and explore the arts and their communities. Girl Scout Daisies can also earn Learning Petals and receive participation patches.

What a Brownie Does Girl Scouts Brownies work together in groups, earn Girl Scout Brownie Try-Its, and explore their community. Friendship, fun, and age-appropriate activities begin at the Girl Scout Brownie meeting and move out to the community and wider world.

Home

The Founder

What I learned

Movers In order to earn your Movers Badge, Girl Scouts must be able to show that they understand how the wind moves objects, such as paper airplanes and pinwheels.

My Body In order to earn your My Body Badge, Girl Scouts must be able to show that they understand how there body works and the wonders of it.

Science in Action In order to earn your Science in Action Badge, Girl Scouts must be abe to show that they understand chemical reactions and how they work.


Juniors

Stress Less In order to earn your Stress Less Badge, Girl Scouts must be able to show that they understand how to live life relaxed and know that they can if needed.

Fiber Foods and Farming In order to earn your Fiber Foods and Farming Badge, Girl Scouts must be able to show that they understand how certin food effect the farm.

Cadette, Senior & Ambassador

Daisy & Brownie

Troop Leader

What a Junior Does Girl Scout Juniors earn badges and discover what girl power is all about through new activities and by learning to take charge of their own plans. They gain self confidence as they explore the world in partnership with their troop or group leaders.

Healthy Relationships In order to earn your Healthy Relations Badge, Girl Scouts must be abe to show that they understand what relationships are and how they can be good.

Home

The Founder

What I learned


Cadette, Senior and Ambassador

Daisy & Brownie

Troop Leader

Junior

What a Cadette, Senior, or Ambassador Does Girl Scout Cadettes, Seniors and Ambassadorstake part in Girl Scouting in many ways. Under the guidance of a trained adult advisor, girls mix and match activities and resources to suit their needs while giving back to their communities. They connect with each other and build self-esteem and confidence in their skills as they work on a range of projects and gain life experiences

Camping In order to earn your Camping Badge, Girl Scouts must be able to show that they understand how to set up a sucessful camp, ready to use.

On a High Note In order to earn your On a High Note Badge, Girl Scouts must be able to show that they understand how vary thier voices so they can reach higher notes.

Paperworks In order to earn your Paperwork Badge, Girl Scouts must be abe to show that they understandhow to fold oragami in at least ten differnt ways.

Home

The Founder

What I learned


Troop Leaders

World Trefoil Pin The World Trefoil Pin is there to show that the Girl Scout belongs to the World Association of Girl Scout Guids and Girl Scout Girls.

Girl Scout Membership Pin The Girl Scout Membership Pin is there to show that the Girl Scout has fufilled her duty as a Girl Scout and is a Member of the Girl Scouts of the USA.

Junior

Daisy & Brownie

Cadette, Senior & Ambassador

What a Troop Leader Does Every Girl Scout belongs to a troop or group guided by leaders that is a community volunteer who are parents or other adults trained by the local Girl Scout council. Leaders work with girls to determine interests and decide on activities within the framework of the Girl Scout program. Parents are asked to support the leader by helping where needed, such as with transportation, group snacks, or family outings.

Girl Scout Traditional Pin The Girl Scout Membership Pin is there to show that the Girl Scout has fufilled her duty as a Girl Scout and is a Member of the Girl Scouts of the USA.

Home

The Founder

What I learned

Girl Scouts of the USA  

Electronic Page Layout Assignment

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you