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MARCH/APRIL 2012 Washington, North Carolina

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IN THIS ISSUE

FEATURES & DEPARTMENTS 49

27

34

20

18 15 40

58 Shopping 15 Spring Arrivals:

Merchants offer unique giving opportunities

HISTORY 20 War comes to

Washington: High-spirited call to arms ends in ashes

AT HOME

WELLNESS

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58

As time goes by: Market Street home combines Greek revival with plantation-style

RIVER LIFE 40

Home sweet water: A five-year plan gone wonderfully awry

FoOD

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49

AZINE

Mix it up: These salads defy the term "rabbit food"

THE MAG GTON WASHIN

ARTS Storybook Theater: Where books and dreams come to life

Yoga you: Undoing the habits of a lifetime

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4 • WASHINGTON THE MAGAZINE | MARCH/APRIL 2012

2012

. Now, , Carolina Eastern hospitals tems of yees, 10 Health Sys dicated emplo der one name iversity un 0 de ’re 11,00 lists. All united d us as Un live. We ste . to tru alth ce d cia an He pla spe You knew r trust in Vidant physicians and rolina a healthier Ca put you primary care n North m. you can dant.co ke easter reds of icesOfVi and hund one vision: to ma , visit Vo and

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Sam Carawan, Michelle Clancy, Kylee and poodle KC take advantage of a warm and sunny fall day on the Pamlico. See RIVER LIFE on page 40. (Photo by Meredith Loughlin)

MARCH/

ON THE COVER

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2012 A /APRIL CAROLIN MARCH NORTH NGTON, WASHI

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IN EVERY ISSUE 6 8 44 47 55 56 64 66

Publisher’s Note The Scene Cast a Line Word on Wine Calendar Advertiser Index Down the River Why I Love Washington


Physicians East - Arlington 1850 W. Arlington Blvd. Greenville, NC 27834

Cardiology - 413-6725 Jayesh K. Patel, MD

Dermatology - 413-6791 Russell J. Kilpatrick, MD

Endocrinology & Metabolism - 413-6683 Regina Dodis, DO / Victoria Januski, DO Claude Robey, MD / Mark L. Warren, MD

Gastroenterology - 413-6260

Mark Dellasega, MD / John Edmison, MD Joanne Matthews, MD / Peter M. Stein, MD

Bariatric & General Surgery - 413-6735

Kenneth MacDonald, MD / Timothy McGuire, MD

Colorectal & General Surgery - 413-6735

Patrick T. Brillant, MD / Howard D. Robertson, MD

Hematology & Oncology - 752-4610 J. Thomas Lee, MD / Maria Picton, MD Heather White, MD

Gynecologic Oncology - 752-4610 Diane A. Semer, MD

Internal Medicine - 413-6202

Diane Alligood, MD / R. Wayne Cox, MD Richard W. Croskery, MD / Elizabeth Fry, MD Alejandro F. Haag, MD / Sharon Robinson, MD Richard Z. Shultzaberger, MD / Karen Thomas, MD

Pulmonary Medicine - 413-6289

Robert A. Dietrich, MD / John P. Fogarty, MD Gabor T. Varju, MD

Rheumatology - 413-6643

Jeffery A. Alloway, MD / Duncan M. Fagundus, MD

Diagnostic Services 252-413-6264 1850 W. Arlington Blvd. Greenville, NC 27834

Quadrangle Endoscopy Center 252-757-3636 1850 W. Arlington Blvd. Greenville, NC 27834

Physicians East - Farmville 252-753-7141 3681 N. Main Street Farmville, NC 27828 R. Doug Barrow, MD Steven L. Hamstead, MD R. Lee Pippin, MD

Physicians East - Grifton 252-524-4463 416 McCrae Street Grifton, NC 28530 Patricia Hinson, MD

Physicians East - Urgent Care 252-355-4357 1711 E. Arlington Blvd. Greenville, NC 27858 Stephanie Griffin, MD Joseph Jordan, MD Sylvia J. Mullis, MD Shirley Patel, MD

Physicians East - Sleep Center 252-413-6360 1711 E. Arlington Blvd. Greenville, NC 27858

Physicians East - Wintervillle 252-353-4111 4796 Old Tar Road Winterville, NC 28590 Meena P. Murphy, MD Robert C. Turner, MD Fan Zhou, MD

Physicians East Greenville Obstetrics, Gynecology & Pelvic Surgery 252-758-4181 101 Bethesda Drive Greenville, NC 27834 Scott R. Avery, MD Frank L. Gay, MD Angela Haskins, MD Hale H. Stephenson, MD Richard C. Taft, MD William H. Taft, III, MD

Physicians East Greenville Women’s Clinic 252-757-3131 2251 Stantonsburg Road Greenville, NC 27834 Amy L. Blumenthal, MD William E. Brown, MD Paige H. Fisher, MD Beverly M. Harris, MD Andrew E. Haven, MD David H. Ryan, MD

Please call any of our locations to schedule an appointment. For addtional information, visit www.physicianseast.com

Serving the Healthcare Needs of Eastern North Carolina for Over 40 Years


NOTE FROM ASHLEY

It’s in the air

S

pring on the Pamlico. This is a time of celebration. It’s a celebration of a new season, rebirth, fresh starts. As the natural world begins its annual regeneration, I’m reminded of the resilience of our community as it continues to press forward in the dawn of weathered storms. Washington the Magazine continues to celebrate the enduring, vibrant community we call home. This issue is packed with spring treats: • Check out the hottest new arrivals for the season in our Spring Shopping section. • Take a minute to appreciate the Storybook Theater, where both books and dreams blossom before your eyes. • Discover a new you through the transformative powers of yoga in this

edition’s Wellness feature. The celebration doesn’t end with the new. As Beaufort County marks its 300th anniversary, the rich history of the area offers plenty more to reflect upon. • Take a peek inside Idylwild, a majestic home that has overlooked Market Street since 1901, and still sits shining today. • Explore Washington through the window of a nation in peril. Our History feature reflects on the toils of a troubling time and a city’s ability to overcome. I hope you enjoy this edition and this special time of year. May it bring you and your family opportunity and happiness.

Ashley Vansant Publisher

would love to hear what you think about Washington the Magazine. Email us at news@ Write We thewashingtondailynews.com or write to P.O. Box 1788, Washington, NC 27889. Letters chosen for publication to us may be edited for length and clarity. All submissions become the property of Washington the Magazine. 6 • WASHINGTON THE MAGAZINE | MARCH/APRIL 2012


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Publisher Ashley Vansant Editor Christ Prokos

Contributors Mike Voss Jonathan Clayborne Vail Stewart Rumley Betty Mitchell Gray Kevin Scott Cutler Meredith Loughlin Bryan Oestrreich Adam Feldhousen Larry Boyd Jane Olsen Jenny Baumgardt Ronnie Daw Margie Gardner Sylvester Rogers (Distribution) Marketing and Sales Cecilia Prokos Art Direction Ryan Webb Contact information Washington the Magazine P.O. Box 1788 Washington, NC 27889 Advertising inquiries 252-946-2144 Ext. 233 Subscriptions & change of address 252-946-2144 Washington the Magazine is published six times a year by Washington Newsmedia, LLC. Copyright 2012, Washington Newsmedia, LLC


THE SCENE

OUT AND ABOUT

February Artwalk Downtown Washington hosted its first “Artwalk” of 2012 on Feb. 9. Patrons enjoyed an evening at this quarterly-presented open house event at local galleries and studios.

Gallery owners Neil and Meredith Loughlin with Bobby Davis, Dustin Dixon & Brandia Deatherage, Shelton McNair Jr. & Virginia Finnerty at Lone Leaf Gallery

Sam Wall, David Clark and Danny Sleeper

John Grocer, Dana Eddings Jr. and Tom Haislet

Dorian Miller with Crystal Hardt, mother of budding teen artist Gunnar Hardt featuring his work

Mike Quinn, Patricia Lewis and Mr. Biggs at South Market Antiques

Johanna Huber, Carolyn Sleeper, Sheri Clark and Brenda Haislet at River Walk Gallery

Catherine Cutler, April Dove and Donnie Lynn Cutler with Charisma shop owner Jennie Jones

8 • WASHINGTON THE MAGAZINE | MARCH/APRIL 2012

Bobbie Jo and Steve Wadford of Union Alley Coffeehouse

Rebecca Clark, Carolyn Worsley, Lisa Hodges and David Carraway at Little Shoppes of Washington


OUT AND ABOUT

Friends of the Brown Library Book Sale A favorite of local bibliophiles, the Friends of the Brown Library annual book sale took place Jan. 20-22 at the Washington Civic Center. Book lovers browsed through more than 25,000 book titles donated to raise funds to support the city-owned library.

Jean Williams and Carol Smith

Dorita Boyd and Jan Pernov

Ginny Warren and Phyllis Rumpp

Marcia and Jon Tingelstad

Laura Frye and Gene Fellenger

Kim Melk

Paulette Webb, Ross and Chris Hamory

Cathee Kornegay and Marty Bell

Elaine and Bobby Roberson

MARCH/APRIL 2012 | WASHINGTON THE MAGAZINE • 9


THE SCENE

OUT AND ABOUT

Arts Council 40th Kickoff The Beaufort County Arts Council launched its 40th-anniversary year with a winter-themed reception at the Washington Civic Center. A parade of speakers spoke of the history of the arts council and how it has impacted the community over the past four decades.

Janet Bradbury, Pat Holscher, Sally Scales, Cathy Whichard

Kathy & John Schermerhorn

Jeff & Kay Woolard

Arnold & Glenda Barnes

Harold Lane & Judy Meier Jennette

Steve & Debbie Ainsworth

Lee & Tom Vann

Rob Cuthrell & Neil Loughlin

10 • WASHINGTON THE MAGAZINE | MARCH/APRIL 2012

Lynn & Stan Deatherage


OUT AND ABOUT

Chamber Banquet The Washington-Beaufort County Chamber of Commerce recognized its members at the 109th-annual Membership Banquet at the Washington Yacht & Country Club. Executive director Catherine Glover presented awards to many of the business leaders in the community.

Robin Skillen & Paige Wright

Gail & Pat Kenefick, Kay & Ed Summerfield

Janet Cox & Jenny Jones

Shelley Gentner, Gayle Watson, Mark Gentner

Dominic Reisig, Sally Love, Greg & Victoria Brown

Michael Senn, Jeanne Niederhauser, Catherine Glover, Archie Jennings, Robin McKeithan

Galen Niederhauser & Steven Kendall Susan Thomas, Austin Thomas, Amy Thomas, Amy Bond

Susie & William Taylor, Alma Friedman, Ray McKeithan MARCH/APRIL 2012 | WASHINGTON THE MAGAZINE • 11


THE SCENE

OUT AND ABOUT

New Year’s Eve Party Revelers rang in 2012 at a New Year’s Eve bash hosted by innkeeper Virginia Finnerty at the Pamlico House. Guests enjoyed music, food and dancing while waiting for the ball to drop in Times Square.

Karyn Drum, Jean Belote, Sadie Fowle & Claudia Cox

Karen Tripp & Richard Sunderlin

Bob Jomle & Deborah Carter

Garleen & Hal Woolard

Gunnar, Crystal, & Keith Hardt

Beth & Bob Byrd

Virginia Finnerty & Shelton McNair

Lisa Frymier Hodges & David Carraway

12 • WASHINGTON THE MAGAZINE | MARCH/APRIL 2012

Rebecca Clark, Judi Hickson, & Jennifer Sable


Paul Funeral Home “Locally Owned and Operated Since 1926” Don’t be misled………. There are many local funeral homes that offer “cremation services” but only one funeral home in Beaufort County that has an on-site crematory. Funeral homes that provide cremation services without an on-site crematory, “outsource” or “subcontract” the process to a second or third party. Paul Funeral Home in Washington located at 900 John Small Avenue Washington, NC is the only funeral home in Beaufort County that has an on-site crematory. This means that all details in connection with the arrangements and the cremation are handled in one location without transporting your loved one to different facilities. Because we control all aspects of the cremation process, our families are ensured of the highest standards of honesty and trust from our certified cremation technicians. Paul Funeral Home & Crematory Paul Funeral Home 900 John Small Ave. 434 E. Main St. Washington, NC 27889 Belhaven, NC 27810 252-946-4144 1-800-936-7285 252-943-2321 www.paulfuneralhome.com e-mail: director@paulfuneralhome.com

You’re Already “There.”

Daily US Airways flights to Charlotte ... From There, the World! • Smaller crowds, shorter lines • Uncongested gates and timely departures • Fewer parking hassles • A comfort lounge with first-class amenities

To fly, visit www.usairways.com or call your local travel agent.


Spring Arrivals

WHAT’S IN STORE

Written by BETTY MITCHELL GRAY

Mouthful of March Madness Just in time for the upcoming NCAA basketball tournament, stop in at Inner Banks Artisans’ Center on Main Street in Washington and buy your favorite Tar Heel fan a box of Carolina truffles hand-made by Peacock Chocolates of Scotland Neck. A perfect snack for the season’s basketball tournaments, the truffles carry the UNC logo and sell six to a box. East Carolina and Pirates truffles also are available. $11.95 per box/2 boxes for $20.

Bountiful blossoms Nothing says spring like a hanging basket of colorful, blooming flowers hanging from your porch. A variety of hanging baskets in a range of colors are available at Petals and Produce at 1101 John Small Ave. in Washington or at the greenhouses at 19821 U.S. Highway 264 East in Pinetown. Hanging baskets start at $9.

For the birds The sound of birds once again enjoying the warm spring weather may make you yearn for a special birdhouse to commemorate their return. “Entourage with Red Bird” is a ceramic birdhouse made with stoneware, copper and twigs by pottery artist Carolyn Sleeper that would look good in any living room. It’s available at River Walk Gallery and Arts Center on Main Street. $425.

MARCH/APRIL 2012 | WASHINGTON THE MAGAZINE • 15


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WHAT’S IN STORE

Surround yourself with color A great accessory for that Easter dress is a hand-dyed silk scarf by Jan Lamoreaux. From her workshop at Inner Banks Artisans’ Center on Main Street in Washington, Lamoreaux offers scarves in a variety of spring colors as well as other wearables and wall hangings. Start at $39.

‘Go Green’ with accessories If you’re looking for a birthday gift for a friend, then visit Charisma in the Little Shoppes of Washington on Main Street. The store features Jillery, a collection of recycled aluminum earrings and necklaces by Jill Fagin. Ranging $28 to $36.

Fresh new shades

From farm to table Celebrate spring with fresh goat cheese made by Goat Lady Dairy of Randolph County. Wine & Words ... & Gourmet on Main Street in Washington has a ready supply of the dairy’s chevre, which work perfectly on a cool, spring day with a bottle of sauvignon blanc. Ask Chef Yvonne to prepare an Easter basket featuring the Goat Lady Dairy cheese. Current market prices.

Russell Smith, owner of Russell’s Men’s Shop on Main Street in Washington, says the must-have item for men this spring is a Southern Tide knit shirt. The shirts come in a range of colors, including this year’s hot colors of orange, peach and bubble gum. The shirt is cotton with a touch of spandex that helps it keep its shape in even the hottest weather. Striped sports shirts also are available. Solids $68, Stripes $75.

MARCH/APRIL 2012 | WASHINGTON THE MAGAZINE • 17


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Pocketful of Posies Stop by Amy’s Hallmark at 611 Washington Square Mall for a Vera Bradley tote bag in her new “Rosy Posies” pattern. It’s an eye-catching combination of small paisley designs and oversized florals in colors ranging from burgundy to berry and coral to cream that will complement your new spring wardrobe. $49.

WHAT’S IN STORE

Emerald Jewel

Coral Coolness

For something truly special this spring, stop by Stewart’s Jewelry Store at 121 N. Market St. in downtown Washington and ask to see a green amethyst necklace that also features blue diamonds. Designed in New York, the necklace is 14-carat gold with 0.18 carats of blue diamonds and a 5.38-carat green amethyst. Matching earrings are available. Inquire for pricing.

Coral is one of the hot new colors for women’s apparel as well as men’s apparel. Bloom women’s apparel at 100 W. Main St. is featuring a sleeveless, coral lace dress that will go anywhere this spring and summer. The dress, by BCBG, features a flattering, scoop neckline with a one-inch satin coral sash at the waist and a nude lining. Inquire for pricing.

Renew yourself with fitness Give you or a loved one the gift of fitness this spring with a membership in Vidant Wellness Center at 1375 Cowell Farm Road in Washington. The center offers aerobics, aquatic exercises, yoga and the new fitness craze, Zumba, as well as one-on-one personal training. Special enrollment fee currently at $99 per household plus packages by number of household members, accordingly. All fitness programs included. For membership information, contact the center at 252-975-4236. $99 enrollment special. MARCH/APRIL 2012 | WASHINGTON THE MAGAZINE • 19


War FROM OUR PAST

20 • WASHINGTON THE MAGAZINE | MARCH/APRIL 2012

Following the burning of Washington, parishioners of the First Presbyterian Church collected over 1,000 pounds of scrap metal to be cast into a bell at a foundry in the north. During its return trip, the ship sank off the coast of Hatteras but the bell washed ashore.


War comes to Washington

FROM OUR PAST

High-spirited call to arms ends in ashes Written by CHRIST PROKOS Photographs By MEREDITH LOUGHLIN HISTORICAL Photographs PROVIDED By Lewis W. Martin Jr.

W

Sgt. William Cutler of the 4th North Carolina Regiment.

hether it was a “Civil War” or a “War between the States,” our nation was headed toward armed confrontation in the waning months of 1860, and North Carolina had no intention of leaving the Union. That all changed by April 1861 when President Abraham Lincoln issued a call for 75,000 troops to invade the South, including neighboring Confederate states Virginia, South Carolina, Georgia and Tennessee. Beaufort County residents did not hesitate to defend their home state against a pending federal invasion. In all, Beaufort County soldiers would comprise 11 military companies — five artillery, five infantry and one cavalry — as well as a state militia. Pvt. Thomas J. Latham Jr. recounted the scene as the Washington Grays headed off to an uncertain future on May 20, 1861, the day the Old North State seceded from the Union. “The company, having been daily drilled for more than six weeks, was called to coast defense of our state and received marching orders at once. We were assembled on the Grist premises at the west end of Main Street and drawn up in line to receive a beautiful flag which was made and presented by the ladies, through Miss Clara Hoyt who delivered an admirable address full of patriotic sentiment. MARCH/APRIL 2012 | WASHINGTON THE MAGAZINE • 21


According to The New Era, a newspaper created by federal forces during the occupation of Washington, federal troops celebrated Christmas with freed black residents of Washington in 1863 at Havens Wharf.

FROM OUR PAST

She, with 12 other young ladies of this town (noted then as now for its beautiful women) represented the 13 states of the Confederacy and were dressed in spotless white with sashes fastened by rosettes typical of the state each represented, and, at the close of the presentation, each lady gave her rosette to some soldier boy.” Federal forces recognized early on the strategic importance of Washington and New Bern as ports that would serve as supply depots. Within a year, the war arrived on the banks of the Pamlico River in Washington. Union troops captured New Bern on March 14, 1862, and soon turned their sights toward Washington. Fort Hill on the south side of the Pamlico and the Swan’s 22 • WASHINGTON THE MAGAZINE | MARCH/APRIL 2012

Point battery on the north side had a nominal Confederate force to defend the city. On March 19, the steamer USS Guide sailed up the Pamlico River accompanied by the gunboats USS Louisiana, USS Delaware and USS Commodore Perry. The fleet also included a transport vessel with eight companies of the 24th Massachusetts Volunteers. The ships were forced to stop six miles outside the city because of a barrier of wooden pilings driven into the riverbed and cut off three feet below the water line. Two companies of federal soldiers were transferred to the USS Delaware, a shallow-drafting ship able to navigate over the barricade. When Mayor Isaiah Respess sailed out to meet the Delaware,

he proclaimed that there were no Confederate troops in Washington and asked that the city be spared. The Delaware docked along the waterfront and Union troops marched through the heart of Washington — Main, Market and Second streets — stopping to nail an American flag to the courthouse flagpole. Thus began the two-year occupation of Washington by federal troops. Throughout the remainder of 1862, Confederate efforts to reclaim the city were unsuccessful. By April 1863, Confederate forces were able to mount a twoweek siege on federal troops in Washington. In desperate need of supplies for his campaign at the Battle of Suffolk in Virginia, Gen. Robert E.


FROM OUR PAST

This stained-glass window at the First Methodist Church honors Josephus Daniels Sr., a Confederate tugboat captain killed by friendly fire Jan. 28, 1865. MARCH/APRIL 2012 | WASHINGTON THE MAGAZINE • 23


FROM OUR PAST

Lee sent Gen. James Longstreet to surround Washington and gather supplies from the surrounding countryside. Longstreet sent 9,000 soldiers to Fort Hill on the south side of the Pamlico River to prevent federal supply ships from reaching the Washington waterfront. Another 4,500 troops surrounded the city for two weeks as Confederate troops foraged for food and other supplies. Longstreet was able to collect thousands of pounds of supplies for Lee before returning to Suffolk. By 1864, Washington was no longer considered strategically important, and the Union army withdrew to New Bern. Federal records indicate that Connecticut troops set fires, burning half of the city. A few days later, an accidental fire consumed the remainder. In an April 29 letter to his parents, Pvt. Charles Litz wrote,

Cpl. Wiley G. Grist of the 10th North Carolina Regiment, “Washington Grays.”

“The magazines in the forts around Washington were exploded, and the town was fired in many places by the soldiers in spite of the guard who had been ordered

to shoot anyone who was seen applying a torch.” In a May 3 letter to her sister, Martha Matilda Fowle is more specific. “Saturday morning after three days and nights of intense excitement and alarms, the last were about to move and we thought we could be left in quiet. Caddie and I tried to fix up the house a little and were at work when we heard the alarm of fire. The soldiers had set fire to some stables on William DeMille’s wharf. It was not done by orders, but it was winked at and no attempt made to stop it. The wind blew it away from us; it ran up this block, crossed the street at Mr. Hoyt’s, and almost spread to the woods in an hour.” In the 150 years since the war, Washington has developed the resilience to rise from the ashes with a bright future forged on its darkest days of the past.

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IN THE ARTS

Patch Clark poses with the cast on the storybook set.

Storybook Theatre Seventeen years ago, an ECU professor thought it was time to bring Storybook Theatre to eastern North Carolina – so she did. What she didn’t know then was just how far she would take it. MARCH/APRIL 2012 | WASHINGTON THE MAGAZINE • 27


IN THE ARTS

ECU Storybook Theatre performs throughout eastern N.C.

28 • WASHINGTON THE MAGAZINE | MARCH/APRIL 2012


IN THE ARTS

Where books and dreams come to life Written by BRYAN A. OESTERREICH Photographs PROVIDED By EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY

P

atricia “Patch” Clark, associate professor, had been teaching in the ECU School of Theatre and Dance for one year. Then she decided to see if some of her students were interested in a new program – Storybook Theatre. They were. So Clark and her students began performing short “stories” at the Greenville Barnes & Noble bookstore on Friday nights. They were encouraged by the response they received from shoppers with young children – so they began seeking other venues – like Wright Auditorium at ECU. During the succeeding years, Clark and her students performed in many areas of eastern North Carolina. “We’ve been traveling to public schools for years,” Clark said. “Many students in outlying areas don’t have the opportunity

to travel to Greenville to see a performance. We try to perform at a school at least once a semester – in addition to our performances at ECU.” One of those venues was Marine Corps Air Station in Cherry Point, where they performed for 177 young students. Another venue has been the Turnage Theater in Washington. For the past three summers, the performances there were sellouts. Clark has hopes that the theater will once again be available for her students to bring live art to Washington residents. The troupe has also performed at the Washington Civic Center, the Smoke on the Water festival and the popular Music in the Streets. The purpose of Storybook Theatre is to engage the young audience members. “Live art presents a depth of understanding

and involvement the video screen can’t duplicate,” Clark said. But audience members not only sit and watch the live performance, they sometimes are asked up onstage to participate. “We’ll have costumes and props for the children. They become part of the performance.” The theater group is made up of ECU students in all disciplines within the School of Theatre and Dance – and also includes some faculty in the department. A book is chosen by Clark, and the students begin their semesterlong rehearsals. Their most recent performance at ECU was in October when they performed “The Stinky Cheese Man – the Musical.” People were encouraged to come dressed for that performance as their favorite fairy-tale character. James and Beth Casey, of Washington, have brought their MARCH/APRIL 2012 | WASHINGTON THE MAGAZINE • 29


IN THE ARTS

young daughters, Saoirse and Aisling, to Storybook Theatre productions for several seasons. “Our daughters have enjoyed the ECU Storybook Theatre group since they were two years old when we had the opportunity to see them perform upstairs at the Brown Library in Washington.  Each year after that, we have made an effort to be at as many Storybook productions as possible,” Beth Casey said. “With each performance, our girls have begun to recognize specific performers and songs such as “Are You Reading?” to the tune of “Frere Jacques.” Patch Clark does an amazing job with her college-age performers, but she also excites the young audiences of the Storybook performances with her animated facial expressions and joyful exuberance.” One of those “college-age performers” is Bethany Bondurant. She has been involved with the Storybook Theatre program for four years – including teaching workshops and finding new stories to perform from countries like Peru and China. “Every single audience interaction that I have had has been positive. After performing in shows, we always have the opportunity to mingle with the children and talk to them. Parents, teachers and students alike normally always tell us how much fun they had, or how wonderful the theatrical experience

Patch Clark announces the winner of the “All Aboard America” writing contest where students were invited to write stories for incorporation into Clark’s script.

made them feel.” Clark and some of her students will soon find themselves providing that same experience to audiences they probably never imagined – young people in Iraq. In 1993, John Ferguson formed the American Voices Association in order to bring American theater to foreign lands – mostly Eastern Europe. In 2007, he expanded the scope of the program to Iraq. This summer, Clark and some of her students will have the opportunity to bring some joy to a people who have suffered during a military

conflict that lasted over 10 years. “The American Voices Association believes it’s important to bring music, dance, and theater to countries coming out of conflicts and suffering,” Clark said. “We’re proud to bring our voices to those in need of some joy.” The very popular professor from ECU probably never dreamed that her small troupe performing at Barnes & Noble would ever take their performance so far. After an afternoon chatting with Patch, I’m not surprised at all. MARCH/APRIL 2012 | WASHINGTON THE MAGAZINE • 31


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HOME SWEET HOME

Named Idylwild, the 1907 home is a mix of architectural styles: Greek revival seen in the Ionic capitals above the shaft of the columns; a plantation style seen in the wraparound porch; and tall, red brick chimneys add a Tudor flair.

34 • WASHINGTON THE MAGAZINE | MARCH/APRIL 2012


HOME SWEET HOME

As time goes by MARCH/APRIL 2012 | WASHINGTON THE MAGAZINE • 35


HOME SWEET HOME

36 • WASHINGTON THE MAGAZINE | MARCH/APRIL 2012

The main staircase rises to a landing defined by four stained glass windows representing the four seasons. The windows, as is the entire house, are replicas from the Oxford, Miss., home of Sally Davis Owens.


T

Alston Daniel, a young associate in the law firm of ime goes by. Memories fade and disappear. the Honorable B.B. Nicholson, where the bride is No one remembers a 30-something widow described as walking down the main staircase to the arriving in Washington from Oxford, Miss., tune of “Lohengrin,” the home decked with pink, though she must have created a stir. No one white and yellow chrysanthemums. can say how it was that an upstanding Washingtonian It was Boo Homes who told her cousin, Pam Griffin, wooed the woman or how he proposed, but he did. both women descendants of Sally Owens Nicholson, Blake Baker Nicholson married Sally Davis Owens that the ceiling mural in the living room was a in 1901. It was six years later that he built a house panorama of blue sky with clouds and cupids. It was on Market Street, a sprawling, white confection of another cousin, Fritz Tanner, who said the Oxford, a home with a unique architectural style: Greek Miss., home — the original — had been torn down “a revival found in the temple-like front with columns; few years ago.” plantation-style in the wraparound porch; Tudor The porcelain tile in the bathrooms upstairs and influence in the tall, red-brick chimneys. He built the in several fireplace surrounds came from Italy; the eclectically styled home for his wife, of that there is carved mantelpieces no doubt — it was came from Europe, as an exact replica well — facts not quite of her home in lost or remembered Mississippi, right but part of an oral down to the stained history passed down glass windows from Nicholson to representing spring, Daniel, Daniel to summer, fall and Capehart, Capehart winter that sit like to Silverthorne, crown jewels atop Silverthorne to Gerard, the wide staircase all of whom called landing. Idylwild home over the They named their past century. home: Idylwild. Walter B. “Bubba” After that, the Gerard III spent the details become summer of 1981 hazy. Finding the restoring the home provenance of the Deep coffered ceilings add texture and depth to the dining room and nook. ornately carved On the far wall of the nook, where recessed shelving holds a collection of for his wife, Diane, and crystal, two windows once opened onto a greenhouse. their three children. mantelpieces in each “I wanted to put it room or the name of back to the original as best I could,” he explained. the artist the Nicholsons hired to paint a mural on To paint the coffered living-room ceiling alone was the living room ceiling, now lost to generations of an enormous project: one gallon of paint covering a paint, is like sifting through the fog of time — every standard ceiling was multiplied by seven due to the now and then, a glimpse of the past, pulled from the 1 ½-foot-deep sections of woodwork — the equivalent memories of those whose parents, grandparents, of painting a 15-foot-by-75-foot wall, with details. great-grandparents once lived there. Throughout the downstairs, oak floors with Some of those details still exist in a 1908 writebands of mahogany inlaid 10 inches from the walls, up of the marriage of Norfleet Martinez Bryant, decorative figure eights defining each corner, were so Sally Owens Nicholson’s daughter, to Erasmus Written by VAIL STEWART RUMLEY | Photographs by MEREDITH LOUGHLIN

MARCH/APRIL 2012 | WASHINGTON THE MAGAZINE • 37


HOME SWEET HOME

“Dr. Silverthorne told me to take care of them,” Bubba Gerard said. An appraisal by the previous owner found that the ornate mantelpieces came from Europe, as did the tile in the fireplace surrounds.

fragile they could not be machinesanded. “I sanded all the floors by hand. Couldn’t put a machine on them,” said Gerard. “I had to do it with sandpaper and steel wool. They were too thin.” Just as eras change, the needs required of a home change along with them. For the Gerards, the most pressing need arose seven years ago, when the Parkinson’s disease Diane Gerard had been diagnosed with two decades previously became more advanced. “People asked ‘Why don’t you build a house? Why don’t you downsize?’” said Gerard. “But with my wife in a wheel chair — we have this house with these big, wide doors.” Gerard enlisted the help of Diane Gerard’s best friend, Carolyn 38 • WASHINGTON THE MAGAZINE | MARCH/APRIL 2012

Wetmore, as “she knew what Diane would want” when it came to renovations. “I said, ‘We need it to look like it’s always been here. We want the same feeling from the beginning of the house to the end of the house,’” explained Wetmore. To that end, Wetmore rescued original lighting fixtures collecting dust in the attic. Now restored, they light the narrow bar area separating dining room and kitchen. What was once a law library is now a large handicapped-accessible bathroom where the decorative Ninon tiles in the walk-in shower match the exact shade of the fireplace surround tiles in the adjoining bedroom — both purchased from Italy 100 years apart. And in the addition on the back of the house, expanding the kitchen

to combine with a more informal den area, carpenter Donald Stroud painstakingly matched the existing woodwork in the house. “All of the woodwork in the kitchen, the den, the bathroom, had to be hand-milled to match the original,” said Wetmore. “I made a mistake,” Gerard laughed. “I didn’t give her a budget.” Regardless of the expense, the renovations blend seamlessly with what came before. New with old; present with past. Time may have erased the details, but when the house is filled with the Gerards’ children and grandchildren, friends and family every holiday, one thing is clear: the memories created within Idylwild’s walls are far more significant than the walls themselves.


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RIVER LIFE

40 • WASHINGTON THE MAGAZINE | MARCH/APRIL 2012


Home Sweet Water

RIVER LIFE

A five-year plan gone wonderfully awry Written by VAIL STEWART RUMLEY Photographs By MEREDITH LOUGHLIN

Michelle Clancy, boyfriend Sam Carawan and daughter Kylee with Whitey, one of their 11 roosters.

My clients ask me all the time why I live here,” Michelle Clancy says. “All I do is send them a picture.” Clancy gestures to an expanse of windows. At 6:30 p.m., night has fallen, a curtain of darkness uninterrupted but for a few twinkling lights in the distance. But the feeling of wide, open space remains because when the sun rises downriver, Clancy’s view from her home on Man–O–War Point is nothing but sky and water. “The river in the fall? There’s not a sound. A blue heron will stand in the front yard for 20 minutes,” she continues. “This is untouched God’s country.” It was meant to be a temporary landing place for Clancy. She’d created a life, had a good job in public relations on the West Coast, but after the birth of her daughter, Kylee, the native New Yorker realized she wanted to be closer to her family back East. In 1999, the Clancys packed their belongings and bought a house on the Pamlico River. The plan was to stay for five years. Twelve years later, Clancy now owns the company she once worked for, Cayenne


RIVER LIFE

Carawan and Clancy take in the view Clancy refers to as “untouched God’s country.”

Communications, and she commutes once a month to Silicon Valley. One way, the trip — from Greenville to Charlotte, Charlotte to San Francisco — is six hours, but it’s a trip she greatly anticipates. “Do you know how much work I get done in those six hours?” she asks with a laugh. “I have six hours to be quiet. I can read a book if I want!” Clancy works in a specialized field: marketing and public relations for high-tech software companies, which she defines as “software that designs computer chips for everything — anything that’s electronic.” “We started in high-tech, but we market anything,” she explains. “I’d say 90 percent is high-tech, 10 percent is in other industries.” As president of Cayenne, the job keeps her traveling; to meet with 42 • WASHINGTON THE MAGAZINE | MARCH/APRIL 2012

clients and attend trade shows in the U.S. and Europe. Whenever possible, her daughter travels with her, which Clancy explains “is a great way to give Kylee exposure to other cultures, to other areas in the U.S.” When she’s home, Clancy keeps to business hours on California time, working either in her office beneath a wall of clocks set to East Coast, West Coast and European time, or with a laptop perched on the Federal secretary in the living room. There, she takes breaks to simply look out on the river. “It’s about quality of life,” she says. “Unless you live it, you don’t understand it.” Clancy shares that quality of life with her boyfriend, Sam Carawan. In the warmer months, they can be found on the river taking Kylee and friends “tubing” in their

23-foot-long Chaparral, jet-skiing or kayaking. They’ve taken up raising chickens in a little red barn of a chicken coop behind the house. “Down here, there were no homeowner’s restrictions. I thought it would be great for Kylee to raise chickens. Now, they’ve become a part of our lives. We get between six and 10 eggs a day,” she exclaims, then follows with a rueful, “I live on the river and I have chickens,” as if wondering how the self-professed city girl has not only landed at this point, but is loving it. “When I came here, I didn’t appreciate it. I’ve learned to respect it. To look out your window and see this?” she asks, gesturing again to the darkened windows. Even at night there is beauty in the lights sparkling across the river, stars in a thick blanket of sky. “This is a gift. I don’t think I’ll ever leave.”


RIVER LIFE

A view from the pier. Clancy’s Man–O–War Point home sits on the banks of the Pamlico River at the mouth of Broad Creek.


CAST A LINE

Transitional-fishing season approaches Written by CAPT. RICHARD ANDREWS

F

ishing during March and April on the Pamlico River is a transitional period for most fishermen. For seasonal anglers, wiping off dust and oiling their favorite reel, organizing tackle boxes and getting boats de-winterized and ready for the upcoming warmer months is the routine. For year-rounders, spring is a time to rethink strategies for targeting resident speckled trout and striped bass as water temperatures warm and to focus on the transient speckled trout, flounder and puppy drum that are moving through area inlets into the estuary from the near-shore waters of the ocean and heading upstream. The vast majority of the speckled trout and striped bass inhabiting the Pamlico this time of year are year-round residents. Speckled trout spend the winter in the backs of the deeper creeks, where they have an abundant food supply, deeper warm-water areas and a warming effect from the black, mucky bottoms, helping them survive extreme cold spells. As water temperatures begin to warm in March, these fish become more active feeders and move out of their wintering areas to roam the mouths of the creeks and the river as they follow schools of baitfish. Anglers who become effective at patterning baitfish migrations and movements will find speckled trout in close proximity on channel ledges and drop-offs near points during lower water conditions and along deeper banks and shoreline structure during higher water. As spring quickly approaches, the area’s resident speckled trout will be joined by their cousins from the ocean during their annual spring migration into the Pamlico estuary. Striped bass behave somewhat differently than speckled trout during the winter, especially the ones around downtown Washington. While many theories exist to their movement and patterns, I believe that these fish spend most of their days roaming the shallow flats in search of baitfish, stopping in one area for a few days until their food supply is gone.

44 • WASHINGTON THE MAGAZINE | MARCH/APRIL 2012

Their location at any given time can be somewhat unpredictable, but their movements can correspond strongly with the changing water levels from our wind tides. As westerly winds blow water out of the Pamlico River, much like a fan at the end of a bathtub, water levels decrease and the fish retreat from the banks into deeper waters such as ledges near the main river channel. Much like largemouth bass in a lake, they abandon the banks during low-water conditions. As strong easterly winds blow water up the river from the wider, eastern portion of the Pamlico River and the Pamlico Sound, water levels rise, and the stripers can be found most predictably around stumpy shorelines, boat docks, cypress-lined banks and other areas containing structure for them to ambush baitfish. As spring approaches, anglers will enjoy many more opportunities as water temperatures begin to increase. We should start seeing more stripers staging and fattening up in the lower Tar River before their annual spring spawning run up to Tarboro and Rocky Mount, which is where most of the spring spawning activity occurs. Speckled trout will leave the backs of the creeks following schools of baitfish around the river, a few puppy and slot drum might start to show from the ocean, and flounder will be caught with more consistency by flatfish enthusiasts. Seasonal and year-round fishermen will be looking forward to the many angling opportunities that are at your doorstep here on the bountiful Pamlico River. So, get your tackle out of the closet, your boat’s motor tuned up and head out there for some fun on the water. Capt. Richard Andrews is a resident of Washington and the owner of a loval year-round guide service offering fishing excursions on the Pamlico and nearby rivers. He can be reached at 252-945-9715 or richard@tarpamguide.com


WORD ON WINE

I

Stylin’ with wine Written by James McKelvey and Yvonne Sedgwick

f you’re puzzled about what kind of wine you need for a particular occasion, your wine-shop owner might ask you, “What are you using it for?” That’s because different styles of wine are made for different purposes. One of the first style distinctions is whether the wine is meant to be consumed on its own or is to go with a meal. For most Europeans, wine is the beverage that goes with food. That’s why Europeanstyle wines tend to be lighter in body, drier and lower in alcohol than American or Australian wines. These wines are well-behaved at the table, complementing the meal rather than calling attention to themselves. The lower alcohol content allows you to have several glasses through several courses. Most Americans, though, think of wine drinking as an activity on its own, so they want big, muscular wines with a lot of presence like California cabs or soft, fruity wines that are informal and easydrinking, like pinot grigio. The “food” or “on-its-own” styles can be further characterized by a division into “special” or “everyday.” There are food-style wines that are hearty and inexpensive and pair well with hamburgers and pizza. Some of the favorite inexpensive reds for a casual meal are the tempranillo wines of central Spain. And for a salad or sandwich, we’ll take a refreshing sauvignon blanc from Chile. This is a style of wine that wets your whistle without breaking the bank.   Then there are elegant wines that will highlight a special dinner party or celebrative occasion. These are not inexpensive, of course, because they’re special, but you should be able to get a nice bottle

to serve with your own cuisine or take to a dinner party for around $25. The wines of Burgundy, France, (reds are pinot noir and whites are chardonnay) will fill this bill, of course. But any country or culture that has a tradition of drinking wine with meals will have some famous examples. An easy food-pairing tip is to serve wines and food from the same geographic region. So, Italian wine with Italian food, German with German, American with American. And don’t forget sparkling wines. A pinot noir or riesling with bubbles (yes, there is such a thing) can make any meal into an event. Another advantage of sparklers is that they’re very adaptable. So, if you’re bringing a bottle of wine as a guest and you don’t know what’s for dinner, you can’t go wrong with bubbles. The “on-its-own” style has an everyday and special styling component, as well. For everyday, we want something that’s smooth, with a refreshing, clean finish and that costs less than $10 a bottle. Try Spanish garnacha for reds and fruity chardonnay from Australia for white. But if we’re having company over or celebrating an anniversary or giving a gift, we look for something that can be consumed slowly with thought and appreciation. For this kind of time I like a big zinfandel from Paso Robles, Calif., or maybe an Argentine malbec. Different types for different times ... that’s stylin’ with wine. James “The Wine Guy” McKelvey and “Chef Yvonne” Sedgwick are proprietors of Wine & Words ... & Gourmet in downtown Washington. MARCH/APRIL 2012 | WASHINGTON THE MAGAZINE • 47


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LET’S EAT

Mix it up Mandarin-Cashew Tossed Salad

MARCH/APRIL 2012 | WASHINGTON THE MAGAZINE • 49


LET’S EAT

These salads defy the term ‘rabbit food’ Written by KEVIN SCOTT CUTLER Photographs By MEREDITH LOUGHLIN Food PREPARATION By JANE OLSEN

M

ention the word “salad” and thoughts more often than not turn to mounds of crisp lettuce liberally tossed with bits of tomatoes, carrots, celery, cucumbers and radishes. But here in the South, a salad can run the gamut from the aforementioned “rabbit food” to a tasty side dish teeming with creamy mayonnaise, roasted nuts and savory cheese. Whatever the occasion — church picnic, family reunion or typical Sunday dinner — it is often the side

50 • WASHINGTON THE MAGAZINE | MARCH/APRIL 2012

dishes that make the meal special. Beaufort County is renowned for its good cooks, and these women (and men) usually have a specialty dish or two they prepare whenever family and friends gather. Regular readers of the Washington Daily News are treated to some of these favorite recipes on a regular basis through “Pamlico Pantry.” The column promotes fundraising cookbooks published by area churches and nonprofit organizations, and newspaper readers enjoy adding the selections to their recipe files. For your next big get-together, why not try one of these Beaufort County specialties?

Zesty Low-Fat Potato Salad


Broccoli-Almond Salad Sarah Braddy Tri-Community Ruritan Club

Salad: 1 bunch broccoli, finely chopped; 1 c. celery, finely chopped; 2/3 c. slivered almonds; 1 c. red seedless grapes, halved; 1 c. green seedless grapes, halved; 8 slices bacon, cooked and crumbled (or use real bacon bits); 1/2 c. green onions, chopped.

LET’S EAT

Dressing: 1 c. mayonnaise; 2 Tbsp. vinegar; 1/2 c. sugar. Toast almonds at 350 degrees until lightly browned. Mix dressing ingredients and chill. Right before serving, mix all ingredients and blend with dressing. 

Mandarin-Cashew Tossed Salad

Sonya Shamseldin Beaufort County Republican Women’s Club 5 c. torn red leaf lettuce; 5 c. torn iceberg lettuce; 3 c. torn Boston lettuce; 2 (11 oz.) cans mandarin oranges, well drained; 3/4 c. chopped green pepper; 1 celery rib, thinly sliced; 1/4 c. chopped red onion. Honey Lime Dressing: 1/4 c. vegetable oil; 1/4 c. honey; 1/2 tsp. ground mustard; 1/2 tsp. grated lime peel; 1/4 tsp. paprika; 1/8 tsp. salt; dash of white pepper; 1 c. honey roasted cashews. In a large salad bowl, combine the lettuces, oranges, green pepper, celery and onion. In a small bowl, combine oil, honey, mustard, lime peel, paprika, salt and pepper; mix well. Drizzle over salad. Add cashews; toss to coat. Serve immediately. Yields 10 to 12 servings. 

Shrimp-Pasta Salad Dr. Tom Speros Beaufort County Arts Council

2 lbs. shrimp, boiled until just done; 1 (16 oz.) pkg. shell macaroni, cooked al dente; 2 c. diced tomatoes; 1 (2 1/2 oz. or more) can black olives, sliced; 6 oz. feta cheese, crumbled; oregano, salt and pepper to taste; red wine vinegar and olive oil to taste. Toss all ingredients together. May be served at room temperature or refrigerated. 

MARCH/APRIL 2012 | WASHINGTON THE MAGAZINE • 51


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Sauerkraut Salad Jerry Bradley 1 lg. can sauerkraut, drained well; 2 c. diced celery; 1 c. diced onion; 1 c. diced green pepper; 1/8 tsp. pepper; 2 c. sugar; 1 c. vinegar. Boil sugar and vinegar three to five minutes. Mix all other ingredients well. Cool liquid and pour over sauerkraut mixture. Let stand overnight in the refrigerator. Great to serve with pinto beans and cornbread.

Zesty Low-Fat Potato Salad Ann Darkow

Beaufort County Extension Homemakers Association 10 oz. round, red potatoes; 1/4 c. chopped celery; 2 Tbsp. chopped fresh parsley; 1 (2 oz.) jar diced pimento; 1/4 c. nonfat mayonnaise; 3 Tbsp. nonfat sour cream; 1 1/2 Tbsp. canned, low sodium chicken broth; 1/4 tsp. rubbed sage; 1/4 tsp. pepper; 1/4 tsp. thyme.

321 North Market St • Washington

252-946-6151 www.morrisins.com

Wash potatoes; cook in boiling water to cover for 15 minutes or until tender. Drain and cool. Peel potatoes and cut in 1/2-inch cubes. Combine potatoes, celery, parsley and pimento. Combine mayonnaise and remaining ingredients in a small bowl. Add mayonnaise mix to potatoes; cover and chill. Yield: four (1/2 cup) servings. You may substitute canned potatoes in this recipe if you’re pushed for time. 


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OUT AND ABOUT

March 13-15 Little Art Exhibit

CALENDAR April 13 Migratory Bird River Roving

• Beaufort County Arts Council • Third Annual Little Art Exhibit. 8” x 10” canvases by the region’s best artists! $30 for one, $100 for four — which one will you get? Call the Arts Council at 252.946.2504 to participate or for more information.

• N.C. Estuarium • 10:30 a.m. Take a pontoon boat ride with the Estuarium naturalist and observe migratory birds returning to the woods and streams. Birds you might see include osprey, purple martins, and warblers. No admission fee or other cost is involved for this trip, but reservations are required. Children must be at least 12 years old for this special trip. Call 252-948-0000 for registration and information.

March 17 Shaggin’ for a Cause • Washington Civic Center • 6:30-11 p.m. Annual fundraising event for the Shepard Cancer Foundation, which supports the Marion L. Shepard Cancer Center. For tickets and information call 252.975.4308.

March 17 Shop & Swap Expo • The Blind Center • Expo held from 9 a.m. – 4 p.m. This is a crafters’ supply exchange – for supplies you thought you would use, but have not. Gift Shoppe will also be open selling unique handcrafted items. Food Court will be open. 221 N. Harvey Street, Washington, NC, corner of Harvey and Third Streets. E-mail theblindcenter@aol.com or call 252-946-6208.

March 24 Live Young 5K • Downtown Washington • 8 a.m. This popular 5K road race is back for another year, featuring a course along the scenic Washington waterfront. All proceeds will go to kids in Young Life. This event reduces the cost of their summer camp trip and funds other great Young Life programs in our community. www.runtheeast. com.

Local musicians, bands and classic cars will retake the streets of historic downtown Washington when Music in the Streets returns at 6 p.m. Friday, April 13. Music in the Streets is the third Friday of each month April through October. Call 252-946-3969 for more information. ( Photo by Jonathan Clayborne)

March 25 – May 3 Annual Student Art Show • Beaufort County Arts Council • Opening reception on Sunday, March 25, 2 p.m. until 4 p.m. The Student Art Show will be on display in the Belk Bracy Gallery of the Washington Civic Center.

March 30 Annual Rotary Reverse Raffle • Washington Civic Center • 7 p.m. until 10 p.m. For information, call Steven Wood, 252-946-7151.

April 12 Senior Dance • Washington Civic Center • 7 p.m. Singles and couples over 50 are welcome to come and dance the night away. Admission is $7. Door prizes. 50/50 drawing. No Alcohol/ No Smoking/No Children.

April 13-15 Cycle N.C. Spring Ride • Downtown Washington • Cyclists from across N.C. and beyond will gather in Washington for a weekend event with routes for even the novice rider. For information, call 252-948-9415.

April 13 Music in the Streets • Downtown Washington • 6 p.m. Enjoy a wonderful evening with your friends and neighbors in Historic Downtown Washington. No matter what your musical taste, you will find entertainers to delight you in this monthly musical event. Downtown Washington comes to life, shops stay open late and the restaurants are glad to see you. Call 252-946-3969 for information.

April 14 A Spring Luau • Ormond Amphitheatre • The Ormond Amphitheatre in Bath is holding a luau with Blue Hawaii Entertainment. Event is a fundraiser for the theatre and begins at 6 p.m. with dinner and a show. Visit BathTheatre.org for more information regarding ticket prices or call 252-9230999.

April 19 Historical Film Series: Champions (1984) • Historic Bath • In 1979, British jockey Bob Champion’s quest for the Grand National was sidelined when he was diagnosed with cancer. Told he might have only a few months to live, Champion never lost hope in this uplifting true story. For more information, call 252-923-3971.  

April 21 Rock-A-Thon & Area Craft Show • The Blind Center • 9 a.m.-4 p.m. This is The Blind Center’s biggest fundraiser each year where “rocking” clients

MARCH/APRIL 2012 | WASHINGTON THE MAGAZINE • 55


CALENDAR

OUT AND ABOUT solicit donations from individuals and businesses to sponsor their rocking. Barbeque chicken plates available $7 made possible by “Flippin’ for a Reason” Roger & Diana Cates. Live Music, Raffle; Bake Sale; Area crafters will sell products. The Blind Center Gift Shoppe and Food Court also open. Come for food, fun and fellowship at The Blind Center, 221 N. Harvey St., Washington, corner of Harvey and Third Streets. E-mail theblindcenter@ aol.com or call 252-946-6208.

April 21 Military Appreciation Day

• Cypress Landing Golf Club • The Cypress Landing Golf Club hosts its Fourth Military Appreciation Day Golf Tournament. Active duty troops from the North Carolina Army and Air Force National Guard, Seymour Johnson Air Force Base in Goldsboro, the U.S. Marines from Cherry Point Marine Corps Air Station (MCAS) in Havelock

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and the Marine Corps Base Camp LeJeune in Jacksonville, and the U.S. Coast Guard from several stations along Coastal North Carolina are invited to participate. Registration begins at 8 a.m. for the Captain’s choice golf format. Opening Ceremonies start at 9:45 a.m. Contributions are welcome and can be made by contacting Brenda Jackson, Cypress Landing Golf Club business manager, at 252-946-7788, Extension #4.

April 21 Saturday Market • Downtown Washington • 8 a.m.-noon. The Market begins on April 16th and runs thru October. Our market features local growers of fresh fruit, vegetables, plants and flowers. Our fishmongers offer fresh seafood from local waters. You will also want to try some

delicious, fresh baked goods. You never know what you might find; the products are always changing! Call 252-946-3969 for more information.

April 28 Washington Marine Market • Downtown Washington • Buy, sell and trade in this waterfront event. Call 252-9463969.

April 28 Race for the River Kayakalon • Goose Creek State Park • This annual triathlon with a twist benefits the Pamlico Tar River Foundation. Call 252-946-7211 or visit www. runtheast.com.

AAA Glass Service, 18 A&W Sales, 57 Acre Station Meat Farm, 54 Andrea Heekin/Coldwell Banker, 57 Bear Creek Auto Sales, 48 Beaufort County Arts Council, 53 Beaufort County Community College, 63

Gregory Poole Equipment Company, 30 Hillside Funeral Service & Cremations, 54 Little Shoppes of Washington, 24 Lone Leaf Gallery, 46 Marine Market, 56 Mauri Evans/State Farm, 18 Morris Insurance, 52

Beaufort Equipment Company, 48 Bloom Women’s Apparel, 24 Blythe House, 53 Bragaw & Co. Insurance, 46

Nauti Life, 13 Norman’s Home Furnishings, 52 Pamlico Pantry, 53 Paul Funeral Home, 13

Carver Machine Works, 46 Chamber of Commerce, 45 Charisma, 53

Peacock Chocolates, 53 Physician’s East, P.A., 5 Pitt-Greenville Airport, 13

Coastal Carolina Regional Airport, 32

Polly’s Perfections, 57

Committee of 100/TriCentennial Committee, 14 Cypress Landing Golf Club, 18

PotashCorp-Aurora, 39 Scott Campbell/Century 21, 53 South Market Antiques, 53

Down on Mainstreet, 45 ECU Performing Arts Series, 26

Stewart’s Jewelry Store, 7 Tayloe’s Hospital Pharmacy, 54

Edward Jones, 48 Executive Personnel Group, 26 Eye Care Center, 30

Telephone Connection, 3 Thin & Healthy Total Solution, 32 Tideland EMC, inside back cover

Fabrics & Fringe Interiors, 53

Ultratress, 25

Fabricate Too, 45 Feyer Ford, 16 First Bank, 54

Vidant Health, back cover Vidant Wellness Center, 33 Washington The Magazine, 32

Flanders Corporation, 33

Washington Therapy Center, 24

10th Year of Music in the streets!

Gas Solutions Installations, 53 Gas Solutions Propane Club, 45 Gaskins & Gaskins, PA, inside front cover

Washington Civic Center, 26 Wells Fargo Advisors, 25 Wine & Words...& Gourmet, 26

Go to www.whDA.org for a full schedule of all events & links to our Facebook page

Browse through all types of nautical gear – both new and used. Take advantage of the bargains on everything from fishing tackle to marine art to boats.

Saturday, April 28th 9:00AM – 8:00PM Join Us on stewart Parkway!

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Big Nautical Flea Market! New & Used Boats for Sale! Over 30 Marine Vendors & Dealers! Nautical Artisans & Antiques! And BoCO Music Festival!

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7-148

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Be sure to attend the

Starting April 13th 6 to 9PM at Market & Main


OUT AND ABOUT

March

ON EXHIBIT ‘Color Quilts’

• Lone Leaf Gallery • “Color Quilts” by Kim EichlerMessmer. This series of quilts is about exploring color. Some of them are purely color studies, exploring monochromatic gradations from light to dark and gradations from one color to another. Other quilts are inspired by the sky in the midwest – before and after thunderstorms, sunsets, and sunrises.

Local Artists • Beaufort County Arts Council • Works by local artists Linda Boyer, William Pitt, Gale Champion and Maureen Davis on display. The exhibit is located in the Belk Bracy Gallery of the Washington Civic Center.

Quilters Guild • N.C. Estuarium • Pamlico River Quilters Guild members display their wall hangings filled with creative interpretations of the Pamlico River and the people, plants and animals that call our area home.

‘Color Quilts’ • Lone Leaf Gallery • “Color Quilts” by Kim EichlerMessmer. This series of quilts is about exploring color. Some of them are purely color studies, exploring monochromatic gradations from light to dark and gradations from one color to another. Other quilts are inspired by the sky in the midwest – before and after thunderstorms, sunsets, and sunrises.

Mowers & MTV’s A&W SALES 1905 Seed Tick Neck Rd. Belhaven, NC

252.944.3398

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River Views

The Fifth Annual Shaggin’ for a Cause cuts the rug from 6:30 p.m. until 11 p.m. on St. Patrick’s Day, Saturday, March 17, at the Washington Civic Center. The event raises funds for the Shepard Cancer Foundation which supports the Marion L. Shepard Cancer Center. For tickets and information, call 252-975-4308. (Photo by Pam Shadle)

April Watercolors • NC Estuarium • Watercolor paintings by Carol Mann are on display for the month of April.

Student Show • Beaufort County Arts Council • Annual Student Art Show will be on display in the Belk Bracy Gallery of the Washington Civic Center.

• N.C. Estuarium • River Roving Educational River Tours. Learn about the history and habitats of the Washington waterfront. These boat tours cruise the Pamlico River at 10:30 a.m. and 12:45 p.m. Wednesday through Friday and at 10:30 a.m. Saturdays. No admission fee or other cost is involved for the tour, but advance reservations are required. Riders should check in 15 minutes in advance. Children must be at least 6 years old to ride; a responsible adult must accompany children under 16. Call 252-948-0000 for reservations.


FOR YOUR HEALTH

Yoga You Undoing the habits of a lifetime 58 • WASHINGTON THE MAGAZINE | MARCH/APRIL 2012


Students at the North Carolina Estuarium demonstrate reverse plank pose, a posture that requires equal elements of strength and flexibility and falls in the intermediate range of yoga postures.

FOR YOUR HEALTH

Written by VAIL STEWART RUMLEY Photographs By MEREDITH LOUGHLIN

H

abits: eating habits, sleeping habits, workout habits. We drink the same brand of coffee from the same mug every morning, put our shoes and socks on in the same order every day. By the time we reach middle age, our habits have become so ingrained we hardly realize we have them anymore. But there is an entire realm of habits we don’t think about. Ever. The physical ones, things we do with our bodies that are so ingrained, we never realize we do them. Those hours at work, hunched over a keyboard; more hours slumped in the comfy chair in front of the TV; moms propping babies Joe, Jane and Jenny on the same hip year after year — they’re no big deal, right? Right. Until we start to hurt. We start to age. And that oft-quoted adage, “If you don’t use it, you lose it,” comes back to haunt us with every inadvertent grunt as we stand up, sit down, bend over. Stiff necks, twinges of low back pain, losing our balance on solid ground — these are the ghosts of bad habits rising. Who says you have to be chained to the past? You don’t. With yoga, you can undo the bad habits of a lifetime. Ten years into its resurgent popularity in the U.S., everyone MARCH/APRIL 2012 | WASHINGTON THE MAGAZINE • 59


FOR YOUR HEALTH

The tools of the trade: mat, block, eye pillow, and bolster. Yoga mats are a must, providing a layer of cushion and preventing feet from slipping during standing postures. Blocks and bolsters are used to support yoga poses.

seems to know a little something about yoga. Studies touting its health benefits are everywhere: yoga lowers blood pressure, heart rates, triglycerides. It increases circulation, red blood cells, vitamin C and boosts the immune system. Yoga reduces toxins and decreases stress. It makes you feel better, sleep better, eat better, age better, act better, focus better, love your neighbor better. If you believe the studies, yoga is the be-all, cure-all. Even if you don’t believe a word of those studies, (which are the work of respected medical authorities), well, you should do yoga anyway. Why? Three reasons: strength, balance, flexibility. We risk losing all three if we don’t “use it,” and the losing process starts earlier than you think. But figuring out how to start may be the hardest part. Dr. Richard Young, with Pamlico Internal Medicine in Washington, supplements his own fitness regimen with yoga. “I clearly have better flexibility since I’ve been

60 • WASHINGTON THE MAGAZINE | MARCH/APRIL 2012

practicing in the past two years,” Young says. Young often recommends yoga to his patients, but equally often encounters resistance to the idea. “Most of the time people are opposed (to doing yoga) because they don’t think they can achieve the yoga form — they think it’s beyond them,” Young explains. “I try to tell them, ‘You go to your own level. You don’t have to do certain things.’… Once they’re introduced, they realize they are capable.” So here are some ways to help you over the first hurdle and realize you are capable of doing yoga: • Throw away your expectations. Don’t shy away from yoga because you expect you’ll have to twist yourself into a pretzel while standing on one leg and chanting a litany of “Oms.” You won’t. • Take a leap of faith — in yourself. Don’t undermine yourself with “I can’t do thats.” By continually telling ourselves we can’t do something, then it’s pretty likely we’ll never be able to do it. Start with what you can do. • Find the right class for you. Past injuries, joint


FOR YOUR HEALTH

Down Dawg Yoga studio owner, Connie Cipriano, demonstrates janushirsasana, or head-toknee forward bend. The posture promotes flexibility for hamstrings, hips, and spine and can be modified for any level yoga class.

issues, a sedentary lifestyle do not prevent you from doing yoga — start easy with a gentle yoga class. Even if you’re in great shape, begin with a basic class. Have patience. Let your practice develop gradually. • Talk to your instructor. If you have questions, ask him or her. If you have physical issues, share them. Any yoga posture can be modified or substituted to suit your body’s needs. • Lose the competitiveness. Just because the person on the mat next to you can bend over with palms flat to the floor does not mean you have to do the same. Forcing your body to do something it doesn’t want to do is a

straight-shot to injury. Be gentle with yourself. • Trade negative for positive. You’re stretching muscles you haven’t felt in years? Instead of “arrggghhh” say “ahhhhhhh,” because guess what? You’re stretching muscles you haven’t felt in years, and that’s a good thing. Yoga provides ample opportunity to revive your sense of humor, especially the ability to laugh at yourself. Have fun. • And finally, for all you men: yoga is not just for women. Why not make this the year you try some yoga, and focus on “using it” just a little bit more?

YOGA OFFERINGS Washington has several facilities that offer yoga classes: Down Dawg Yoga, 704–819–8875 (seven mixedlevel classes a week); Fitness Unlimited, 975–7400 (4 classes a week, basic to intermediate); Grace Martin Harwell Senior Center, 975–9368 (yoga for seniors); Lifestyles Medical Fitness Center, 975–4236 (seven classes a week); Marion L. Shepard Cancer Center, 975–4308 (gentle yoga class for cancer survivors and their caregivers); North Carolina Estuarium, 948–0000 (six-week series of basic yoga); Susiegray McConnell Sports Complex, 948–9420 (two classes a week).

MARCH/APRIL 2012 | WASHINGTON THE MAGAZINE • 61


FOR YOUR HEALTH

Anywhere yoga Think of yoga and most of the time an image of some bending, twisting body comes to mind. Sure, that’s yoga, but what many people don’t realize is that yoga is a much broader concept. Yoga is the practice of awareness, physical and mental. Yoga can be sitting in a quiet place for 15 minutes, focusing on breathing in, breathing out. Yoga can be studying how the muscles in your feet and lower legs work as you balance on one foot, perhaps while doing dishes or standing in line at the grocery store. As the following series of postures demonstrate, yoga can be done in your office chair, or sitting on the couch watching TV. Yoga is an anytime, anywhere, kind of practice. Lilly Jones with Fitness Unlimited demonstrates postures on a yoga mat. Michelle Shipley, a Down Dawg Yoga instructor, replicates the same postures in a chair.

Ardha Matsyendrasana (seated spinal twist) Mat and Chair: Both hips are seated firmly, spine is straight, shoulders back. Start the twist in the low back and let ribs, shoulders, then chin gradually follow. Hold for at least 20 seconds then release. Twist in the opposite direction. Stretches the shoulders, hips, neck, and energizes the spine.

Bitilasana (cow pose)

Mat: joints are stacked directly atop each other—knees

and hips; wrists, elbows, shoulders—for maximum support. Chair: feet and hips are firmly planted. On a long inhale, bring the shoulders back and gently arch the back, lifting face, and breast bone toward the ceiling. On an exhale, release slowly. This is a gentle backbend that stretches the front torso and neck.

Marjaryasana (cat pose)

Mat: joints are stacked. Chair: feet and hips are

Adho Mukha Savasana (downward-facing dog)

Mat: start on your

firmly planted; hold the knees with firm hands. On an exhale, firm the abdominal muscles

hands and knees with hands shoulders–width apart and slightly forward of the body.

to round the spine, keeping shoulders over the hips. Inhale and release slowly. Cat pose

Tuck the toes under, initially keeping knees bent. Stretch the hips toward the wall behind

stretches the back torso and neck, and gently massages the spine. Pair this posture with

you, lengthening the entire torso, then stretch heels down toward the floor. Chair: start

cow pose, using inhales and exhales to create a gentle flow from posture to posture.

standing about 2 feet from the chair. Bend knees and place hands on chair seat. Stretch hips toward the wall behind you, letting the chest move downward, lengthening both sides of the torso. Gradually start to straighten legs. If flexibility is an issue, you can do

Written by VAIL STEWART RUMLEY Photographs By MEREDITH LOUGHLIN 62 • WASHINGTON THE MAGAZINE | MARCH/APRIL 2012

this posture with hands on a table or desktop, or even on a wall. Downward-facing dog stretches shoulders, hamstrings, calves, the arches of the feet, and the hands, as well as strengthens the arms and legs. (Lilly Jones gets a little assistance from daughter Olivia.)


DOWN THE RIVER

64 • WASHINGTON THE MAGAZINE | MARCH/APRIL 2012


Nature’s Canvas The heavens provide the backdrop while the sun provides the inspiration for this sunset photo on the south side of the Pamlico River. The view is from One Fish Two Fish Catfish Farm off N.C. Highway 33 eight miles east of Chocowinity. PHOTOGRAPHY by LARRY BOYD

MARCH/APRIL 2012 | WASHINGTON THE MAGAZINE • 65


Y’ALL COME BACK

Why I love Washington

Waves of warmth

J

Written by Jay Martin PHOTO by James Martin

anuary 8 marked the 10-year anniversary of six Martins descending on Washington, then to us a little known corner of our home state and now a community into which my wife, Jeanne, and our four boys feel eternally woven into the rich tapestry of life and relationship here. There is much to embrace here, so at the risk of being a bit cliché, I decided for the purposes of reflection to try on an acrostic — 10 years, 10 letters in “Washington” and 10 reasons I love this town. Waves … Not the kind in the river but the ones you get on Main Street, in the carpool lines or even driving through a neighborhood. Waves of warmth and welcome. Age … It doesn’t take a history major like me to appreciate the depth of story, the heritage of people in this “original” slice of American pie. Age is an asset. Sunsets on the water … Too obvious, maybe, but I am regularly stunned at the majestic brush strokes of color that draw me in on a winter evening as I leave my downtown office. Hubris … Pride in community can be a good thing. I thought about “high” school with the H, for I am proud of Stunt Night and homecoming weeks! IBX … Clever complement to OBX but quite accurate. … An ‘inner’ coastal town with all the charm and allure of the water and yet somehow “protected” by the Outer Banks. Names … In Washington, friends know each others names and use them … It is a joy to walk to the melody of Music in the Streets to hear and speak the names of friends. Genuine … Not gated, guarded or garish but largely without pretense. I love that with most of

66 • WASHINGTON THE MAGAZINE | MARCH/APRIL 2012

Jay and Jeanne Martin

this community I can take at face value and trust what I see and hear. Treasure … OK, I am throwing a bone here to the Jolly Roger and pirates of yore! Real treasure here however is found in the hearts of the saints of this region. Old School … Thank you notes are still written, “Yes Ma’am” is still heard in the classrooms, recipes and carpools are still shared. Neighborly … We share … in clean up after hurricanes, in picking up mail and trash when out of town; we grieve together in loss and celebrate together the sunny days. Over these wildly varied last 10 years, W-A-S-H-I-N-G-T-O-N has become a place I love to call home and haven and healing harbor. My hope is that you love it, too!


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Washington the Magazine  

A celebration – in print – of the character and charm of Washington, NC.

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