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GlobaLens Website Launched ONLINE RESOURCE FOR BUSINESS EDUCATORS

In early 2007, the William Davidson Institute started Educational Outreach (EO), a new initiative which had two complementary elements as its strategy. First, EO aimed to work with leading thinkers to develop teaching materials on important international business topics. The second element was to create and manage a global hub for aggregating and distributing these materials to business educators around the world. After a busy year, Educational Outreach is pleased to announce that it has launched GlobaLens (www.globalens.com), an interactive website that allows business educators to purchase, sell, discuss, and design courses and other teaching materials on international business topics.

WDI, Goldman Sachs Partner to Aid Women The William Davidson Institute has joined with The Goldman Sachs Group, Inc. to bring business education to Rwandan women who have traditionally been denied opportunities in schooling and business. In March, the global banking firm kicked off a new initiative called 10,000 Women. It will provide 10,000 women, predominantly in developing and emerging markets around the world, with a business and management education over the next five years. WDI is one of a select group of leading institutions and business schools — which includes Harvard Business School, Wharton, Brown, and Columbia — partnering with Goldman Sachs to deliver programs in countries such as India, Kenya, Nigeria, Rwanda, South Africa, and Tanzania. “In many of these countries, there is very little entrepreneurial activity and very few women receive even a basic education,” said Robert > CONTINUED ON P A G E 1 8

WDI’s Executive Director Robert Kennedy said that GlobaLens is unique. He said several other institutions—most notably Harvard, Virginia, and the European Case Clearinghouse (ECCH)— develop and distribute cases, providing an online catalog on all management topics. “GlobaLens is different in two important ways,” Kennedy said. “First, we are focusing specifically in international business topics. My experience is that collaboration, learning, and discussion happen within niches. We are creating a community in the IB space that the broad line suppliers can not match.” “Second, we also provide powerful tools that allow collaboration, learning from other educators’ experiences, creating courses based on best practice, and discussing issues with colleagues,” he said. The GlobaLens website serves as an aggregator and distributor for international business teaching materials. The website features three inter-related components, captured in the tagline “Cases, Courses, and Community”: Cases: a searchable catalogue of international business cases, exercises, and other teaching materials. Courses: a searchable library of syllabi for developing international business courses. Community: an interactive space for discussing international business cases, courses, and teaching issues. John Branch, director of Educational Outreach, said: “There is a very real demand from educators for cases, videos, simulations, and other pedagogical tools in international topics. Globalens.com is a one-stop shop for our international teaching materials, but, perhaps more importantly, will also facilitate the creation of an open and global academic community for the teaching > CONTINUED ON P A G E 1 8


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Research Updates Globalization of Services......................................................................................................4 Base of the Pyramid ............................................................................................................5 Social Enterprise..................................................................................................................6

Supporting International Activities Cross-School Collaborations................................................................................................7 Global Impact Internships ................................................................................................8-9 Multidisciplinary Action Projects (MAP)........................................................................10-11 Global Impact Speaker Series.......................................................................................12-13

Program Updates Executive Education .....................................................................................................14-15 Development Consulting Services.................................................................................16-17

News Tom Lantos obituary...........................................................................................................19 WDI Calendar.....................................................................................................................20

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to the 10th issue of the Davidson Review, the William Davidson Institute’s (WDI) semiannual newsletter. It has been a busy and fulfilling time at the Institute as we continue to build communities of interest in our focus areas and engage globally with leading thinkers. Our Executive Education, led by Amy Gillett, continues to expand its partnerships with universities and organizations around the globe. Development Consulting Services, led by Khalid Al-Naif, is making great strides in raising WDI’s profile in the international development community. All three research initiatives — Globalization of Services, Social Enterprise, and Base of the Pyramid — are progressing well and are currently focused on content creation. WDI’s support of international activities at U-M continues to grow, with the Institute supporting 21 summer internships, 10 MBA Multidisciplinary Action Projects (MAP), as well as research, student projects and administrative engagements at the schools of Public Health and Medicine.

I’d like to highlight two exciting developments at WDI that are featured on the cover of this issue — the launch of GlobaLens, and our partnership with Goldman Sachs. In my former life at Harvard Business School, I saw how research and casewriting could be well integrated, to the benefit of both. When I came to the Ross School five years ago, I knew we had a strong research faculty, but it was always a little awkward to see such a high proportion of classroom teaching materials from other schools. Dean Bob Dolan had asked a faculty committee to look into the potential for developing teaching materials at Michigan. This was followed by several small, unsuccessful attempts to build this capacity inside the school. After several discussions with Dean Dolan, who also serves as the Institute’s president, and with the WDI board, we decided to launch Educational Outreach with two goals. The first was to develop the capability to take good research ideas and turn them into effective teaching materials. As of June, we had worked with 21 business school faculty on more than 50 case studies, with new proposals coming in every month. The second goal was to build a business distributing these materials both to UM and business educators around the world. Our distribution strategy is focused on a particular niche — international business. We built a very compelling site (www.GlobaLens.com) that was launched in June. GlobaLens combines a case catalog, a collection of syllabi, and a community area where registered faculty can discuss pedagogy. We are also sourcing international business materials from outside the school and aim to become a distribution hub. Our success so far with the 10,000 Women partnership with Goldman Sachs gives me an appreciation of the uniqueness of WDI and the Ross School. We have built a really unique institution, with competencies in applied research, project management, executive education, and student engagement. When Goldman Sachs decided to launch its 10k Women program and began looking for delivery partners, WDI was one of the first Institutions they approached. We had world-class project management, a strong and growing relationship with the School of Finance and Banking in Rwanda, and proven design and deliver capacity for Executive Education. The proposal came together quickly and, to date, we are the only U.S. partner with a signed contract. Goldman Sachs views the entrepreneurship program as a model for other programs, and we are discussing how to replicate the model in other developing countries. WDI does interesting work and delivers benefits on the ground. Our reputation is growing, and institutions are asking to partner with us. I’ve always had faith that this is the right kind of institution to build. But it’s nice to have that vision validated by partnerships with organizations like Goldman Sachs, IBM, CARE USA, USAID, Acumen Fund, and the Aspen Institute. As you can see, WDI is involved in all sorts of interesting activities around the world. If you are already engaged with WDI, we thank you for your involvement. If you are not, we invite you to become a part of WDI. Sincerely,

Robert E. Kennedy Executive Director

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The Globalization of Services research initiative continues to focus on content creation. Executive 4

Director Robert Kennedy and WDI Senior Researcher Ajay Sharma, who leads the Institute’s GoS initiative, are finishing up their book, “The Services Shift, Seizing the Ultimate Offshore Opportunity.” The book, due out in summer 2009, will be published under the Wharton School Publishing label.

Book on Offshoring Nearly Complete; Due Out in ’09 For the past 18 months, WDI Executive Director Robert Kennedy and GoS Research Manager Ajay Sharma have been researching and writing a managerial book on the offshoring phenomenon. It is expected to hit bookstores in winter 2009.

“Our book is a non-technical, managerial book that aims to give readers a framework on how to think about the phenomenon.” Tentatively titled The Services Shift: Seizing the Ultimate Offshore Opportunity, the book explores the increasing globalization of business services. That is, the outsourcing and offshoring of service activities, which includes both people in services sectors (e.g. banking, telecommunications, and medical transcription) and those who perform service functions within the manufacturing sector (e.g. product design, accounting, and marketing). The book looks at what is happening now and provides a framework to understand how these trends affect the practice of management. Kennedy and Sharma undertook primary research — interacting with service providers, advisory firms and organizations leveraging global delivery of business services — as well as extensive secondary research. They examined how firm boundaries have become more porous, how geographic boundaries matter less, and how organizations can increasingly leverage global talent pool. The two also researched knowledge sector policies

of the various countries, and identified primary short and long-term policy responses for developed and developing economies. Kennedy said readers will come away with a better understanding of: the four drivers of offshoring; what is actually happening in terms of activities, industries, and countries; the fact that managers really have no choice in the matter; a framework for moving forward; how this affects the process of management; and the national policy debate. Kennedy said he had been doing strategy work in emerging markets since he was a graduate student, but most it was on market entry by multinational companies. In the late 1990s, he became fascinated by the software expertise in India. In 2000, Kennedy traveled there to do a case on the Indian software industry, which was growing at 45 percent with 30 percent margins. But when interviewing software executives, he found out that they were focused elsewhere. “This was one of the best industries in the world, but all the executives were saying, ‘What we’re really excited about is IT-enabled services, known today as business process outsourcing, or BPO.’” Asked about how the idea for the book came about, Kennedy said: “I give one or two speeches a month on the globalization of services. I find that most managers know something important is happening, but they are struggling with how to think about it. Is this an opportunity or a threat? How should they get started? What pitfalls should they look out for?

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“As a phenomenon, it has not come into focus.” “What was missing was a book that talked to managers about what’s happening, why it’s happening now, what the opportunities are for managers, and what the future is,” Kennedy said. “Our book is a non-technical, managerial book that aims to give readers a framework on how to think about the phenomenon.”

Ajay Sharma and Patricia Loh

Sharma, Loh Paper on GoS Selected for Management Journal GoS Research Manager Ajay Sharma and Research Analyst Patricia Loh presented WDI’s research findings at international conferences as well as to students at Ross. Their insights were documented in a research paper titled, “Emerging Trends in Sourcing of Business Services,” which was based on extensive interactions with industry leaders. The paper has been accepted by the Business Process Management Journal and will be published in fall 2008. It examines key trends emerging in management of business services, and provides business executives with a framework to better understand and leverage them globally.

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The BoP Initiative redefined its five-year strategy to position WDI as a worldwide thought leader 5

in the BoP space. Our on-going research is focused on four interconnected streams. (1) Carving out a unique niche for the BoP Perspective as a new and important market-based approach to poverty alleviation (2) Designing a tool that provides a holistic and robust guide for BoP ventures to assess and enhance their poverty alleviation impacts (3) Assessing how development organizations can best facilitate the growth of BoP ventures (4) Undertaking an in-depth analysis of the power of different BoP business models to achieve specific poverty alleviation outcomes

London To Speak at Berlin Conference on BoP Poverty Implications Ted London will be the keynote speaker at the conference “Poverty Reduction through Innovative Business Cases at the Base of the Pyramid (BoP)” on Sept. 15 in Berlin. The conference will bring together entrepreneurs, managers, NGOs, scientists, government officials, as well as representatives of companies and the development community. The goal is to stimulate a joint development of BoP-business models by companies, scientists, NGOs and development agencies. London’s talk will focus on exploring the unique poverty alleviation implications of the BoP Perspective and assessing the impacts of BoP ventures. The conference is organized by the Center for Cooperation with the Private Sector of the German Technical Cooperation (GTZ), on behalf of the Federal Ministry for Cooperation and Development (BMZ).

London, UM Grad Win International Award

A vision for growth at the Base of the Pyramid,” beat out a field of 26 competitors from Asia, Australia, Europe and North America. The Scojo Foundation, now know as VisionSpring, is a BoP venture that trains entrepreneurs in developing countries to give basic eye exams and sell low-cost reading glasses in their communities. This is the second time London has captured this award.

London Featured Speaker at San Diego Summit Ted London was a keynote speaker at a San Diego summit May 30. London kicked off the conference, “Peace and Prosperity through Trade and Commerce,” with a talk about the potential of multinational companies and other organizations for creating new inclusive business models with low-income groups in emerging economies. The goal of the summit was to bring executives and entrepreneurs together to talk about how they can “do well by doing good.” The summit was sponsored by the University of San Diego’s Ahlers Center for International Business and the San Diego World Trade Center.

Ted London, director of WDI’s Base of the Pyramid research initiative, and UM graduate student Molly Christiansen have won top honors in a prestigious international case writing competition.

Impact Assessment Work Continues in India and Africa

London and Christiansen took first place in the 2008 oikos Sustainability Case Writing Competition. Their case, “Scojo Foundation:

Over the past three summers, WDI conducted pilot BoP impact assessment work with VisionSpring, formerly Scojo Foundation.

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Impact assessment provides a better understanding of how a venture at the base of the pyramid measures and enhances its poverty alleviation impacts in terms of changes in economic, capacity, and relational well being. Last summer, WDI collected data for various VisionSpring stakeholders before and after the intervention in order to measure and quantify the effects that VisionSpring work had on the buyers and sellers. The analysis of the pilot impact assessment data was recently completed and presented to VisionSpring along with findings about the value of their intervention. Also, some areas for improvement in future data collection efforts were identified. This summer, WDI is refining both the process of collecting data and the content (indicators) being used. Specifically, WDI has researched and created a more robust assessment tool that leverages measures created by organizations such as WHO and the World Bank to track quality of life, health, skills development, income and other indicators. The revised survey instrument is being used in the field this summer with VisionSpring with a Ross School student as part of WDI Global Impact Internship program. It incorporates some standard assessment tools as well as some metrics specific to VisionSpring. Additionally, another UM student will work in Washington, D.C. for the International Finance Corp.’s Grassroots Business Initiative. Heidi McGowan will develop a BoP impact assessment framework for a Tanzanian microleasing firm.

Molly Christiansen did impact assessment work in India in 2006


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The Social Enterprise Initiative has had a successful year to date and expects continued growth 6

in 2009. We continue to focus on intellectual capital creation, focusing our efforts in three areas: the landscape for Social Enterprise Development in Emerging Market Economies; categorizing Social Enterprise Innovations in Emerging Markets; and Social Enterprise challenges and opportunities specific to EMEs.

Innovation the Subject of Brazil Conference

Social Enterprise Book in the Works

Janiga to Present Paper in Spain

More than 350 leaders from NGOs, government agencies, and businesses throughout Latin America, including industry leaders such as Endeavour, Avina, Ashoka, the Ethos Institute, and CARE Brazil, will convene Aug. 6-8 in Sao Paulo, Brazil for the second annual WDI conference, “Third Sector Innovation: Sustainability and Social Impact” (TSISSI).

The main focus of Social Enterprise Research Manager Kelly Janiga’s work this spring has been on developing a practitioner-oriented Social Enterprise book.

Kelly Janiga has authored a paper The Convergence of the Sectors: Fact or Fiction? which looks at how the internal decision-making of NGOs is increasingly mirroring that in the for-profit sector. Janiga will be present the paper at the annual meeting of the International Society for Third Sector Research, the largest and most well-known group of researchers doing work related to international NGOs. The meeting will take place in July in Barcelona.

The conference, held in conjunction with CNU Brasil, will focus on social innovation and sustainability issues that are occurring in the nonprofit sector across Latin America. The conference will highlight the valuable work and best practices of social enterprise organizations across the region. In addition, the conference will give attendees the opportunity to develop relationships with their global peers. The conference content will be presented in three tracks — innovative financing strategy; human resource strategy; and social and economic opportunities through technology. All of the event proceedings will be streamed on the conference website, www.impactosocial.org.br. Also, there are initial plans to develop a conference volume that would include both the 2007 and 2008 conference proceedings. “What we’ve found is that many of groundbreaking innovations are occurring in emerging market countries,” said WDI’s Andrea Shpak, who has taken the lead in organizing the Brazil conference. The conference is funded by sponsors Microsoft, Roche, Sabesp, Eletropaulo, Accor and Senac. In-kind support has been provided by Isat, InterStudio, Instituto Gesto,HDM, Tagline and Emporio das Pastas.

She has completed the framework, and has made significant progress on three of the seven chapters. In addition, she has developed more than 20 organizational profiles (largely WDI’s NGO Alliance members) which illustrate the main models and themes introduced in the book. The goals of the book are to: serve as an introductory primer of Social Enterprise concepts and models; provide a comprehensive, global look at innovations; provide descriptive case studies that illustrate models; and give some suggested best practices. Each chapter will include key social enterprise concepts, examples of innovations and models, challenges and opportunities presented by each model, and illustrative case studies. Janiga said she thinks the book is important for a few reasons. Social Enterprise is an emerging field and although there are a growing number of books on the subject, many topics and models related to the field are still under researched. There is growing interest among students, practitioners and the general public in understanding this relatively new approach to addressing social issues. The book differs from many others on the topic because it will provide a comprehensive mapping of the field, by giving an introduction to important Social Enterprise definitions, innovations, and concepts. It also will have broad audience appeal by offering a mix of academic concepts, best practices, and inspirational stories.

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Survey to Look at Succession Planning Kelly Janiga has been researching leadership and succession planning, an under-studied topic in great demand in the sector. WDI developed an online survey on leadership and succession planning, which is being distributed in June to more than 100 NGOs from Latin America, with a focus on those organizations in Brazil. This project is a joint effort with Microsoft and Institute Crescer.

Workshop Looks at Advocacy Andrea Shpak and Kelly Janiga organized and participated in a workshop on Sustainability and Advocacy for Brazilian Public Health NGOs in April in Sao Paulo, Brazil. This workshop, fully funded by Roche pharmaceuticals, brought together 60 NGOs in the public health arena with faculty from UM, a representative from the UK-based Social Enterprise Coalition, and Slovak-based NGO Alliance member, the Health Policy Institute.

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In November 2006 two new collaborations were added to expand WDI’s support of international 7

activities across the University. The first involved supporting student internships and research on global health issues at the School of Public Health. The second was a joint Ross School-Medical School engagement at a hospital in Fort Portal, Uganda. Both programs were approved and launched in winter 2007. In spring 2007, a second Medical School program, focused on pediatric medicine in Ghana, was approved and launched in fall 2007. Here are updates of the three programs.

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A partnership between the Ross School of Business and the Department of Family Medicine at the Medical School is working to upgrade clinical and administrative performance at Virika Hospital in Fort Portal, Uganda. In early November 2007, a doctor, the head nurse and the chief administrator from Virika visited UM to observe practices and visit with doctors, nurses and administrators in Ann Arbor. In March, a team of MBA students from Ross spent four weeks at Virika working on the development of a costing and financial tracking system. The following month, a UM doctor visited Virika to get an update on progress in maternity ward development and to prepare for the upcoming trip of a medical student and a nurse from UM. Also in April, a physics Ph.D. student spent two weeks in Virika developing data on power usage. And in May, a medical student and a nurse from UM spent a month in Virika working on some of the goals the hospital has developed for the maternity ward. A goal has been established for Virika to be financially sustainable by November 2011. Also, since August 2007 quarterly goals have been established for the hospital. New ones are added each quarter. Some of the accomplished goals include: establishment of a private maternity ward; creation of a new price list; a survey of potential paying customers to see how Virika can alter its services to better serve them; development of new institutional customer relationships.

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School of Public Health

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This summer, eight students from the School of Public Health supported by WDI are working on projects around the world. The students will present papers on their projects in September.

WDI awarded a grant to foster collaboration between UM and the child health departments of the University of Ghana Medical School in Accra and the University of Science and Technology School of Medical Sciences in Kumasi. This project will build on prior success between the Michigan’s Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology and their counterparts in these Ghanaian institutions.

The students are studying colorectal cancer susceptibility in different ethnic groups in Israel; viral profile and liver cancer risk in Egypt; serum markers for early detection of liver cancer in Egypt; survival in inflammatory and non-inflammatory breast cancers in Egypt; risk factors for advanced breast cancer in Morocco, Egypt and Uganda; estimating the incidence of nervous system cancers in Moroccan children; molecular epidemiological characterization of inflammatory breast cancer in Morocco and Algeria; and cervical cancer in Mexico. WDI also supported research conducted by Prof. Margaret Kruk on determinants of health care utilization in Kigoma Region, Tanzania. In the first phase of the study, the professor and her Tanzanian colleagues developed a survey instrument on utilization of services. The study revealed several key barriers — including transportation, availability of drugs, and provider attitude — to utilization of health facilities. This year, Professor Kruk is implementing a study that will test the hypothesis that upgrades to health centers can effectively address some of the aforementioned barriers. She is examining three different health centers in Kigoma Region that have been recently upgraded with support from the Bloomberg Family Foundation. Key indicators will be collected at all the selected health centers in order to analyze if and how upgrades have impacted utilization.

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The goals of the collaboration are to: provide relevant, in-country training in Pediatrics to optimize retention of highly qualified pediatricians in Ghana and train current and future pediatricians who have sufficient knowledge and skills to provide high-quality care for the children of Ghana. The early months of the engagement were filled with travel between Ann Arbor and Ghana to lay the foundation for the collaboration. In April, Dr. Steve Park traveled to Ghana to facilitate more formal evaluation of the curriculum and evaluation system at each training program. He delivered didactic training for faculty regarding evaluation tools and techniques, and teaching and implementing evidence-based practice. Also taking part in the faculty exchange was Dr. Brenda Kitchen from the UM Division of Pediatric Hematology-Oncology. She provided didactic lectures in Hematology-Oncology to faculty and trainees. Dr. Kitchen also met with existing faculty to discuss augmenting their clinical services, with a primary concentration on standardizing chemotherapy protocols for pediatric cancers across Ghana.

Virika Hospital MAP team members in Uganda.


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This summer, 21 UM students have spread out across the world for WDI-sponsored internships in a number of fields. The students’ work assignments vary from Asia and Africa, Central and South America, and the United States. The interns’ responsibilities range from writing business plans to gathering data to assessing the impact of various projects. The summer internships are broken up into two categories — self-generated and initiative driven.

INITIATIVE DRIVEN INTERNSHIPS

Students who chose a WDI initiative driven internship partnered with an organization identified by the Institute that is doing work related to one of its three research initiatives: social enterprise, base of the pyramid, and globalization of services.

Emily Friedberg will work in Tanzania and Uganda for the Acumen Fund, a global non-profit venture fund serving the four billion people living on less than $4 a day. Acumen aims to create a blueprint for building financially sustainable and scalable organizations that deliver affordable, critical goods and services that elevate the lives of the poor. Friedberg will follow up on the Acumen Fund/WDI MAP project in Tanzania, leveraging the agricultural market assessment done by the MAP team and using this knowledge to source new deals in Tanzania.

Rahul Pal will work in India for Genpact, a leader in global business process outsourcing. Pal will: develop mini case studies on how Web 2.0 is impacting select industries and how early adopters are leveraging it to create business value; identify its impact on information technology, business process and knowledge process outsourcing (and offshoring) industry; and design a strategy for the company to leverage this opportunity.

Victoria Ravin will work for Agora Partnerships in Nicaragua and Washington, D.C. Agora provides consulting and investment to entrepreneurs in the developing world capable of creating successful, socially responsible businesses. Ravin will develop a scale strategy for the organization to expand its operations into several new countries in Central America.

Heidi McGowan will work in Washington, D.C. for the International Finance Corp.’s Grassroots Business Initiative. The GBI supports innovative businesses that create sustainable economic opportunities for poor people in developing countries. McGowan will develop a Base of the Pyramid impact assessment framework for a Tanzanian microleasing firm.

Daniel Duckworth will work with the Byrraju Foundation in India. The foundation is a non-profit organization dedicated to bringing about a tangible improvement in the quality of lives of the rural underprivileged. Duckworth will study the existing model of health care delivery (both direct care and telemedicine) of the foundation, and explore the feasibility of virtual delivery of primary care.

Shannon Ross will work in Georgia and Michigan for Habitat for Humanity International and its largest corporate partner, Whirlpool. Habitat is a nonprofit, ecumenical Christian housing ministry that seeks to eliminate poverty housing and homelessness from the world. Ross will help define the strategies of Global Operations, Relationships with Stakeholders, Engagement of Employees/Volunteers, Public Policy/Advocacy, and Awareness.

Juan Pablo Undurraga will work in Chile for Fundación Trascender, the only professional volunteer network in Chile. Undurraga will evaluate the feasibility of a number of social enterprise ideas, develop a business plan for

the idea found to be most feasible, and assist with the development of impact indicators.

Ian Swedish will work in Brazil for Instituto Crescer and Microsoft. The institute is the NGO that Microsoft partners with to provide expertise

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in project management and consulting services to its Community Affairs group. Swedish will develop a guide or framework for efficient and successful NGO leadership succession processes and provide a final presentation to both organizations, among other things. Fran Loosen will work in Michigan with the Kellogg Foundation, which focuses its resources on funding innovative strategies to support social and economic development. Loosen will conduct research and prepare an evaluation of current and future trends in the field of social enterprise. Ashok Chowdhry will work in India for NextServices, which maximizes the potential of specialist physicians in the U.S. by getting them accurate reimbursements from insurance companies. Chowdhry will: study existing operational processes and lay out qualityoriented standards and methodologies to accommodate for scale; identify and build alliances with a wide variety of industry groups; and explore future growth options and create the groundwork for the same. Timothy Johnson-Aramaki will work in India for Scojo Foundation which creates jobs and sustains livelihoods through the sale of affordable reading glasses. Johnson-Aramaki will: analyze Scojo Foundation’s current data on Vision Entrepreneurs and consumers in order to evaluate economic and social impacts; analyze impact assessment work conducted previously; and implement a third, most robust survey utilizing lessons learned.

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Paul Gruber, a 2010 Ross MBA candidate, will work in Mexico for The Water Initiative, an enterprise dedicated to creating market-driven, locally embedded, affordable, point-of-use (POU) potable water solutions for BOP markets. Gruber, along with others, will: outline near-term and longer-term business opportunities, as well as recommended courses of action, for serving these and other BoP communities sustainably; write a report detailing the set of business ideas and models co-developed with the local communities through the BoP-Protocol process; and develop a report that provides in-depth documentation of the team’s activities and key learnings in implementing the Protocol. Mladen Nikolov, a 2009 Ross MBA candidate, will work in California for Vital Wave Consulting, the leading global research and consulting firm focusing on information and communication technologies in emerging markets. Nikolov will support the Vital Wave Consulting team in its ongoing research and analysis of the telecommunications and IT sectors in emerging markets worldwide. Erica Allen, who received her Master’s of Public Policy in April, will work in Washington, D.C. for Women for Women International, which mobilizes women to change their lives by bringing a holistic approach to addressing the unique needs of women in conflict and post-conflict environments. Allen will develop a framework through which the organization can assess potential partnerships, and provide assistance with the strategic planning process.

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David Vadillo will work in California and India for 24/7 Customer, a rapidly growing Business Process Outsourcing (BPO) firm servicing the insurance, consumer and IT business segments. Vadillo will partner with company finance and

account management professionals to develop the core analytics for a worldwide indicative pricing tool and then work with sales and finance to document roles and responsibilities in the use of the tool.

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Zara Ahmed is working for Peacework in Cameroon. Peacework is a U.S.-based, non-profit NGO which aims to help alleviate conditions of poverty and promote peace and prosperity through economic development partnerships and service around the world. Ahmed will focus on community clinic revitalization and strategic planning for the rural health clinics in Cameroon. Kenneth Cheung will work on the China Water Initiative — a continuation of a MAP project located in Guangzhou, China. The project will make tangible headway in developing a system to monitor wastewater discharge compliance across China and help organizations share valuable information about water management. Timothy Polkowski will work for ChildFund Alliance in Vietnam which strives to eradicate the root causes and the effects of poverty on children by implementing sustainable solutions resulting in positive futures. Polkowski will identify appropriate systems and standards which can be used to benchmark the expected quality of the alliance’s operations, developing and aligning an appropriate quality assurance mechanism which they can use across all departments.

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Zenia Ann Lewis will work for the Malawi Rural Finance Company (MRFC) in Lilongwe, Malawi, an innovative company seeking to aid poor farmers by providing new kinds of access to savings and credit. Lewis will gather data on the individuals who are opening accounts and record information on wellbeing measures like income, nutrition, health and child education, and analyze it to identify the positive effects of the MRFC’s work.

Students who chose to do a self-generated internship identified and contacted an organization in an emerging market that is doing innovative work. The student, along with the organization, co-defined an opportunity, received a commitment from the organization, and

Tresa Kappil will work for Youth Venture in Mumbai, India, a social entrepreneurship nonprofit focused on youth empowerment, that seeks to transform young people’s role in Indian society. Kappil will focus on capacity building, marketing, and outreach. Tony Gross and Jeffrey LeBrun will work on their Mozergy project, a business that will produce and sell jatropha oil to biodiesel refiners in Mozambique. The two will: work with agronomists to identify parcels of land for the initial operations, outline the process for leasing land in Mozambique and prepare a market analysis for purchasing 50,000 hectares of land; and refine the existing cost model to include microfinance and a greater emphasis on local transportation costs.

submitted a proposal to WDI.


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map projects 10 S U P P O R T I N G I N T E R N AT I O N A L A C T I V I T I E S

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MAP

WDI sponsored 10 Multidisciplinary Action Project (MAPs)

teams this year. The projects, in conjunction with the Ross

M I C H I G A N

School of Business, allow MBA students to work full-time with international organizations to create new business models, research new directions, and strategize for the future.

WDI identifies and develops the project with the host organization. The Institute also provides financial and faculty support. On some projects, WDI may also provide logistical and administrative support. David McGuire, program director for Academy for Educational Development (AED), a Washington, D.C. nonprofit organization working globally to improve education, health, civil society and economic development, said this was the group’s first experience with MAP. “I have been impressed with the quality of the students and the guidance provided by WDI’s Ted London and Ross School professor Ravi Anupindi,” McGuire said. “The presentation went very well. The benefit to AED is not entirely clear yet, but I suspect that we will pilot some of the innovative ideas that the team has proposed, and hopefully improve the impact of our

program. We would also look to implement their ideas on other programs.” WDI organized eight MAPs in 2007. Here is a brief synopsis of each of this year’s projects. G E N P A C T Students developed growth and go-to-market strategies in some re-engineering sectors. The students considered factors such as product offering, pricing, location advantages and regulatory issues. They also identified and profiled potential business acquisition targets in order to support growth targets. Students traveled to Danbury, Conn. and New York City.

C L I N T O N F O U N DAT I O N /

For this project, students performed a market assessment for nutrition products that are manufactured in Cambodia’s Mekong region. The student team profiled the market in terms of the type of producers, their marketing schemes, the consumer base, distribution channels and other market elements.

H A G A R S O Y A LT D .

Students developed a financial reporting and tracking model for the hospital in Fort Portal, Uganda. This is one in a series of projects involving MBA students and students from the University of Michigan Medical School to help the hospital become self-sustaining. For this project, the student MBA team identified gaps in the current checks and balances. They then recommended changes that will facilitate transparency in the accounting procedures. V I R I K A H O S P I TA L

ARAVIND EYE CARE SYSTEM

The eye care system, with 8 hospitals across India, is frequently approached to partner with other institutions. And for Aravind to grow, the pace of partnerships has to increase. For this project, the student team provided a blueprint for a separate group within Aravind whose sole function will be to start up managed care (partnering) operations. Members of the Scojo MAP team.

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A C T I O N

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BUSINESS FOR SOCIAL

The MBA team conducted fieldwork and interviews in major manufacturing regions of China to prioritize critical water issues, scan current resources in China, understand the leverage of global brands, and benchmark factory water management. The students put a set of recommendations into a report for 3,000 corporate practitioners in the Business for Social Responsibility membership. RESPONSIBILITY

For this project, the students assessed the potential for agricultural sector investments in Tanzania and identified potential investments for Acumen. The report by the students helped Acumen as it begins to explore how market-based solutions can support small-scale farmers in Africa. The nonprofit, based in New York, thinks strategic investments in the agriculture sector can yield huge social impacts across Africa. ACUMEN FUND

A C U M E N F U N D For this second Acumen project, the student team studied the disposal process of old computers in India that could be used in rural kiosks as part of an Acumen-funded for-profit company. The students also found sustainable sources of computer hardware at the best price and worked out a distribution strategy to the rural areas. Finally, the team developed a servicing strategy for these computers.

There were three goals for this project. The MAP team helped Scojo, which provides affordable reading S C O J O F O U N DAT I O N

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glasses in developing countries, understand the market for eyeglass distribution and primary eye care in rural India. The team also refined and enhanced the foundation’s strategy to refer customers in need of comprehensive eye care to local clinics. And the students began an initial analysis on expanding Scojo Foundation’s distribution channels to include rural optical shops.

from left: Members of the CARE MAP team atop Mayan ruins in Honduras. Members of the Acumen MAP team in India. Erik Gomez, a member of the Hagar Soya/Clinton

A C A D E M Y F O R E D U C AT I O N A L

Foundation MAP team,

The goal of this MAP project was to improve the distribution of insecticide-treated bed nets to the base of the pyramid, particularly in rural areas. The students, who traveled to Ghana, recommended operational improvements in terms of support and distribution. They also developed recommendations on specific partnerships or innovative distribution models that local partners might employ in order to extend their reach into rural areas on a commercial basis.

sits in front of Angkor

DEVELOPMENT

CARE CENTRAL AMERICA

The MAP team worked with two base of the pyramid ventures in the middle to late stages of incubation in rural Honduras. For each venture, teams evaluated its current status and made recommendations regarding the key next steps and the resources needed for these ventures to grow and flourish. The team also evaluated what role CARE can play in facilitating future enterprise growth.

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Wat in Siem Reap, Cambodia Acumen MAP team in Tanzania.

Learn more about the Multidisciplinary Action Projects (MAP) Program at Michigan’s Ross School of Business and explore the possibility of sponsoring a business project within your organization next year. Sponsors receive top-notch findings and data-driven recommendations from a team of MBA students with diverse skills, knowledge, backgrounds and work experience. Project proposals are accepted for consideration each September through November. Projects take place during a seven-week period between early March and late April. To apply, complete an online project proposal form, which can be found along with additional information about MAP at: www.bus.umich.edu/MAP or contact the MAP office at rsb.map@umich.edu or by calling +734.763.2463.


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speaker series WDI recently hosted 5 guest speakers as part of its Global Impact Speaker Series. 12

The series features leading thinkers who work in emerging markets. The goal of the series is to spur discussion around development and developing country issues. In addition to their S U P P O R T I N G

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talks, the speakers also sat down for one-on-one video interviews which can be found at: www.wdi.umich.edu/Publications/VideoAudio.

M I C H I G A N

Maria Theresa Leal, (right) founder of Coopa Roca. Alcely Barroso (top right) of Microsoft of Brazil. Peter Marquera (bottom right) of SPi. Fadi Ghandour (top of opposite page), founder and CEO of Aramex. Alonzo Fulgham (bottom of opposite page), COO of USAID.

Maria Theresa Leal, a sociologist, founded Coopa-Roca, a sewing collective in Sao Paolo, Brazil in the early 1980s. The idea began with Leal’s repeated trips to the shanty town where her housekeeper lived. During her stays, Leal encountered many women who were talented seamstresses but had no chance to earn money for their skills. So she began the co-op and employed a small group of women who produced quilts, pillows and craft items, often made from recycled fabrics, using traditional craft techniques. As bigger orders arrived more women joined the ranks, and today the co-op employs about 150 women. At her talk on Jan. 23, Leal said the cooperative has improved the quality of life of the women and their families. Most used to be maids and cooks, jobs that took them out of the home for long stretches. The cooperative allows the

women to work from home. Over the years the cooperatives’ work has been featured in magazines and they have formed partnerships and strategic alliances with fashion designers and artists. Coopa-Roca has been sustainable since 2000 and does not receive government money, Leal said. Brazil’s Ministry of Culture, however, lets the cooperative fundraise and will help Coopa-Roca with its funding for a new building. “For the daily life of the cooperative, I need to work with the team, with the artisans to make the cooperative remain self-sustaining because in a different way, we will be like most of the social projects — dependent on someone who will give money for us to do the work,” Leal said. “It would be hard for the artisans to understand how valuable their knowledge is and how nice it is to do the things they do. It impacts directly to their identity and self-esteem.”

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Alcely Strutz Barroso

,a consultant for Microsoft in Sao Paolo, spoke to students on Feb. 13 about her work on social and economic development issues in Brazil the past six years. She said Microsoft developed a strategy to reach the region’s poor using their technology. But that technology has to be relevant, accessible and affordable. In Brazil, Microsoft donates software to local NGOs. “This helps them implement some programs and helps them leverage their work in the field,” Barroso said. The company also supplies grants so employees of nonprofits can attend computer training programs. And Microsoft makes content such as Word and Excel available as free downloads to NGOs and nonprofit organizations. Barroso said Microsoft wants to reach new markets in Brazil while also helping transform the country. “A good thing about working for a multinational

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company, you can influence the global strategy of a community and you can help the global change that is happening,” she said. Barroso began as a professor in a private university in São Paulo and later became the coordinator for undergraduate courses. While there, Barroso was also responsible for managing social development projects, extra-curricular activities and was assistant to the Dean for Social Responsiblity issues.

Peter Maquera, president and CEO of SPi, is responsible for the day-to-day management of the global services provider for business process outsourcing (BPO). He has played a key role in achieving the company’s rapid growth and positioning SPi as a leading BPO provider. It began in 1980 in the Philippines as a data entry company. About 10 years ago, SPi diversified into the publishing industry and healthcare BPO. It has about $200 million in revenue and is located mainly in the U.S., India and the Philippines. In his March 5 talk, Marquera said SPi tries to optimize the skill sets and labor costs across those countries. He said the rate of growth of BPO in the Philippines is greater than 40 percent and it is greater than 30 percent in India. “And I think you’ll increasingly see different types of services outsourced and offshored” to these countries, Marquera said. The main challenge will be countries competing for their share of BPO, he said. The Philippines may become the preferred country for the voice sector. “I’d be very concerned about China, Canada, Mexico,” Marquera said. “There will be a lot more competition and a lot more need and desire for customers to diversify among countries and different vendors.” He thinks soon offshoring will be less about the country and more about the vendor. With a vendor, a company must approach it as a strategic partnership. “And don’t focus on costs,” Marquera said. “Low cost is a tease. There are many more important factors that come into play.”

Fadi Ghandour, founder and CEO of Jordan-based Aramex International, spoke April 8. Aramex, under Ghandour’s leadership, is the largest logistics and transportation company in the Middle East and South Asia and the first company from the Arab world to go public on

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the NASDAQ stock exchange. He is actively involved in community and NGO work, serving as the chairman of the Jordan National Microfinance Bank, the vice-chairman of the Jordan River Foundation, and a member of the advisory board to the Olayan School of Business at the American University of Beirut. He is also a founder of the corporate social responsibility advocacy organization, Ruwwad Development. In 1998, he was a founding partner of Maktoob.com, the world’s largest online Arab community. At his talk, he told the story of the Middle East today. “It’s a schizophrenic story,” he admitted. On one hand, there is the war in Iraq, unrest in Palestine, Lebanon, and Iran. “People say, ‘I’m not going to invest there.’ But there’s another story, a much more important story.” He said for the first time since the 1970s, there is more liquidity coming out of the petroleum-producing nations of the Middle East than from Asia. And the bulk of that money is staying in the region. “The story of the Middle East is the story of focusing on how we deliver services, how we build our economy,” he said. For the first time, Ghandour said, there are discussions about improving the educational system to get people ready for the tens of thousands of jobs that will be coming to the region. “There is the war, yes, in the Middle East,” he said, “But there also are the trillions of dollars being poured into our world.”

Alonzo L. Fulgham, chief operating officer at the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID), also spoke April 8. At USAID, Fulgham provides leadership and direction on a wide range of operational and policy issues impacting the achievement of the U.S. Secretary of State’s transformational diplomacy goals. He is a member of the Senior Foreign Service. Most recently, he served as Mission Director in Afghanistan from June 2005 to July 2006. Prior to that, he served as the Director for South Asian Affairs in the Bureau for Asia and the Near East; as acting USAID Deputy Director for Serbia and Montenegro; and as the Regional Mission for the Caucasus’s Director for Economic Restructuring and Energy, responsible for Georgia and Azerbaijan. In June 2000, he was selected

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to study at the National Defense University (ICAF). From March 1993 to February 1998, he served in Jordan, initially as Private Sector Officer and then as Director responsible for economic policy and poverty reduction. During his talk, he spoke of USAID’s evolving role in Jordan. When USAID first arrived in Jordan in 1952, it was a small country with bad roads and fledgling industries. In 2008, Jordan has a large services sector workforce, the population has increased to 6 million, there is modern infrastructure and the economy is growing at 6 percent. Fulgham said some of the building blocks of economic growth include fiscal expenditures, trade agreements, enterprise development and securing property rights. “We’ve taken on the difficult task of putting in a macroeconomic structure to allow investments to flourish,” he said. Some of the challenges in Jordan include a lack of natural resources, one-third of the country living in poverty, 14 percent unemployment rate and displaced persons from other countries such as Iraq. There are opportunities for growth, however, Fulgham said. These include the eco-tourism field, financial products, specialty health services and ICT.


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program

update

E X E C U T I V E

E D U C A T I O N

WDI’s Executive Education continues to grow its program offerings around the globe. We have 14

expanded existing partnerships, welcomed new ones, entered new markets, and offered new programs. In the spring of 2008, Executive Education delivered nine programs in seven countries in a range of areas including HR Management, Brand Building, Coaching & Empowerment, Talent Management and Leadership. A highlight of this spring was delivery of part one of a custom mini-MBA certificate program for 24 sales directors and consultants from Oracle from throughout Central & Eastern Europe and the CIS. In the fall of 2008, Executive Education will kick off a new entrepreneurship program for women in Rwanda — the Goldman Sachs Entrepreneurship Certificate Program — and offer the first of its new Professionals Programs, in the areas of HR and Marketing. We will also offer our first-ever program in Brazil, a sales management program. Twenty four programs in 11countries are planned for the fall.

Entrepreneurship Program Built for Rwandan Women The Goldman Sachs Entrepreneurship Certificate Program was designed by WDI’s Executive Education department. It is based on previous experience with entrepreneurship programs offered by WDI, but tailored to the Rwandan market. WDI designed this program in consultation with business school faculty in the United States and with WDI’s partner in Rwanda, the School of Finance & Banking. The program was then reviewed by the director of the Chamber of Women Entrepreneurs in Rwanda and further refined to meet the specific needs of women entrepreneurs in Rwanda.

Mexico University; Dr. Julie Dziekan, a WDI Faculty Affiliate and faculty at the School of Management at the University of MichiganDearborn; and Brigitte Gafaranga, an assistant lecturer in HR Management at the School of Finance and Banking, Rwanda. The Institute is also working with local organizations that will help promote the program and talk to the women about how to do business in Rwanda. Those organizations include Women to Women International in Rwanda, Business Council for Peace, and TechnoServe.

“It’s very practically-focused and hands on,” said Amy Gillett, director of WDI’s Executive Education department. “For instance, when we talk about finance and loans we’ll bring in a banker to talk about the practicalities of approaching a bank in Rwanda.”

The program is sponsored by Goldman Sachs under its new 10,000 Women initiative, which seeks to give 10,000 women around the world a business and management education over the next five years. The sponsorship means that all accepted participants will be able to attend the program free of charge. Additionally, those participants coming from outside of Kigali will receive lodging and meals.

WDI will bring in women entrepreneurs as guest lecturers and use a diverse faculty. The faculty include: Dr. Kopparthi Murty, associate professor of Marketing and director of the dual MBA program at the School of Finance & Banking in Rwanda; Dr. Etienne Musonera, a WDI Faculty Affiliate and an assistant professor of Marketing & Management at Eastern New

WDI has provided entrepreneurship training for women in the past. In 2006, 32 women in Morocco from handicrafts co-operatives attended an entrepreneurship training program organized by WDI in conjunction with Al Akhawayn University. The five-day training helped the women improve the quality of their handicrafts and taught them strategies to market

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their goods more effectively. The seminar also covered techniques for planning and budgeting for future projects and products. Participants included weavers, knitters, and potters. The Rwanda program is framed around the participants creating a successful business plan. An early session will teach participants how to draft a business plan. Subsequent sessions will discuss the specific components of the plan and cover such topics as marketing, finance, accounting, and HR management. At the end of the six-month program, each participant will present her own business plan. Two $5,000 awards for the best business plans will be given out at the end of the program. The search process for the first 60 participants has begun. A five-person committee will select the first 30 women who will start on Sept. 2. The first program will end in early February 2009, and the second group of 30 women will start later that month. The sessions last from two to four days. The women will then return to their homes and return anywhere from two to four weeks later for the next module. Sessions will be taught in the Kinyarwanda language. There may be future training conducted in French. For more information on the program, visit: www.wdi.umich.edu/ExecutiveEducation

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HR Guru to Lead Human Resource Network Workshop First Two Professionals Programs To Debut WDI Executive Education will debut two “Professionals Programs” this fall. The Marketing Professionals Program will be held Sept. 24-27 in Prague, Czech Republic and October 20-24 in Riga, Latvia. The HR Professionals Program will be Oct. 15-18 in Prague, Czech Republic and February 2-6. An Operations Management Professionals Program is planned for 2010. The Marketing Professionals Program will give participants a new approach to marketing and a set of sophisticated, state-of-the-art marketing tools for achieving success in a competitive and changing world. It will be taught by John Branch of Michigan’s Ross School of Business, Tom Baker of Clemson University, and Daniel Butler of Auburn University. Program topics include: Internet-Based Marketing; Web Surveys; Use of Consumer Panels; Pricing Models; Channel Design; Relationship Management; Brand Management; Global Marketing; and Services Marketing. The HR Professionals Program gives participants new models and a practical set of tools for enhancing their HR department and making a greater strategic impact in their company. Best practices in Human Resources will be shared. It will be taught by Anna Kayes of George Washington University, Gerard Seijts of the Ivey School of Business at the University of Western Ontario, and Carl Fey of the Stockholm School of Economics.

WDI’s Human Resource Network for Central & Eastern Europe will convene for a workshop from August 28-29 in Prague, Czech Republic. The workshop will be led by Professor Wayne Brockbank of Michigan’s Ross School of Business. The title of the workshop is “The HR Business Proposition” and the content will be based largely on the book “The HR Value Proposition,” written by Brockbank and Professor Dave Ulrich, also of the Ross School. The book explores their belief that a fundamental transformation of HR starts with a definition of HR value — who the receivers are and a clear statement of what they will receive from HR services. Transformation requires a complete picture of all the elements of HR transformation, so that piecemeal attempts do not become isolated events. Brockbank advocates for a dramatic refocusing of HR: from what is done to what is delivered; from building HR functions for efficiency to building them for stakeholder value; and from implementing best HR practices to delivering value-added HR practices. Topics to be covered during the workshop include:

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HR transformation – The next step: beginning to connect with those outside the firm as well as those inside

Anna Kayes

Premise of HR Value – Defining the channels through which HR creates value for customers and shareholders

The Human Resource Network currently consists of 16 multinational firms with business activities in Central & Eastern Europe. Members include HR Directors and Vice Presidents from such firms as IBM, SAP, Procter & Gamble, Oracle, Holcim, Lafarge, and Nestle. WDI is currently accepting membership applications for the Network. For more information, please contact the Network’s director, Sonia Ferencikova, at: ferencik@dec.euba.sk.

Wayne Brockbank is coauthor of “The HR Value Proposition” with HR guru Dave Ulrich.

Topics of the HR Professionals Program include: Change Management; Learning and Talent Development; Strategic Interviewing; Talent Management; Rewarding and Retaining Talent; and Linking HR and Organizational Strategy.

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program

update

D E V E L O P M E N T

C O N S U L T I N G

S E R V I C E S

Development Consulting Services had a record year in 2008. Business relationships have been established with three Fortune 500 companies and several non-donor agency clients. The DCS portfolio grew to 10 international projects geographically distributed across seven developing countries and a variety of sectors, including: microfinance, higher education, livelihood development, and natural resources management. A lineup of upcoming project bids in emerging markets such as Qatar, Egypt, Saudi Arabia, Kenya, India, Thailand and Guatemala indicates continued growth in the portfolio over the short and medium term. DCS maintains its edge in delivering results in technical areas where many consulting firms have failed and geographic locations where most were dissuaded. The DCS Team

Savings Study Completed in West Bank and Gaza WDI recently completed a six-week study to design policies, instruments, and institutions to promote household and corporate savings in West Bank and Gaza. The study identified the means through which the amount of funds available for loans from individual and corporate savings is sufficient to enable the banking system to provide financing for the growth of small and medium-sized enterprises in the area. This initiative is a part of the larger Small and Microenterprise Assistance for Recovery and Transition (SMART) program. SMART is a two-year, USAID-financed initiative that aims to help micro and small enterprises find sources of funding.

Expected program outcomes include financing new loan products, studying the feasibility of savings, assisting institutions’ transformation activities facilitating limited use of loan guarantees, and evaluation of mechanisms such as insurance for agricultural production.

Leadership Center Planned for Qatar DCS is establishing a center to provide leadership development and research for senior public and private sector executives in Qatar and the greater Middle East. DCS has partnered with the Ross School of Business and will design, develop, manage, and then transfer the center to the Qatar Foundation. The leadership center will train qualified executives in leadership methodology, skills and techniques that are inclusive of subject matter in the fields of social development, political governance, and economic growth. The center will include

research, executive education, consulting, and public-private partnership departments. DCS Director Khalid Al-Naif said that DCS is seeking the best methods, programs and partners that provide current and future Qatari leaders — as well as leaders from the broader Middle East — with practical opportunities to learn and build leadership skills.” “Today’s public and private sector leaders in the Middle East are navigating a world that is undergoing continuous change,” Al-Naif said. “As the landscape changes, so will the tools needed for them to harness that change and improve national, organizational and individual performance.”

Rwanda Scholarship Program to Debut in August DCS, in cooperation with the School of Finance and Banking (SFB) in Kigali, Rwanda, has undertaken the design and implementation of the Goldman Sachs BBA Scholarship Program. DCS is entering the third year of its engagement with the Government of Rwanda to provide capacity-building programs at SFB. The objective is to transform the school into a regional center of excellence in business education.

Dr. Maurice Girgis, left, Senior WDI Consultant, working alongside Palestinian

The scholarship program focuses on underprivileged but qualified women regardless of age. The first 15 scholarships will be awarded

professionals in the West Bank.

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in August 2008. The second set of 15 scholarships will be given out in January 2009. All scholarship recipients will receive counseling and mentoring by the program manager and SFB faculty to ensure academic success. The intention is to award 15 renewable scholarships each year, with the program eventually reaching 60 women.

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The program manager, hired by WDI, will travel around the country to publicize the program and to interview prospective candidates. A scholarship committee consisting of one WDI representative, the SFB’s Vice Rector for Academic Affairs, and three distinguished Rwandans from outside the school has established the selection criteria which include financial need and academic readiness. The Goldman Sachs Scholarship Program comes at an opportune time because the Government of Rwanda has substantially reduced funding for scholarships for the 2008 academic year due to budgetary constraints.

Students Flock to Career Fair The 2nd annual Career Fair was held in late June at the Institute of National Commerce (INC) Career Center in Algeria. Approximately 40 national and international companies participated and more than 5,000 students attended. The event garnered extensive media coverage across the country. The fair is a main deliverable of the three-year program of Educating Managers, Promoting Linkages and Opportunity Integration (EMPLOI) administered by WDI. The Career Center at INC was established. Since then, WDI continues to work closely with INC’s director general and the Career Center director to build institutional capacity through coordinated trainings and

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faculty exchanges. WDI is now devising sustainability plans for the Center.

Marketing Program in Kazakhstan a Success DCS carried out a successful and well-received two-day program of marketing education at the International Academy of Business (IAB) in Kazakhstan. The program was part of the WDI-IAB partnership project titled “Marketing Education and Research Center (MERC) Project in Kazakhstan.” The project is sponsored by U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) through the Higher Education for Development (HED) office. During the first day of the program, DCS ran a “train the trainer” workshop to share teaching materials and methods with 12 IAB professors. On the program’s second day, DCS worked with the students at IAB by running a seminar on product decisions in marketing. The seminar focused on the research methods that marketing firms may use in new product development. Faculty at IAB was pleased with the program and the opportunity to develop their own skills and tools for use in the classroom. Students were equally enthusiastic about the product development seminar. Professor Andrew D. Gershoff, DCS consultant and associate professor at Michigan’s Ross

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School of Business, said: “I am very happy that I could be a part of this program, and I am looking forward to exploring future opportunities to work with the faculty and students at IAB and MERC. Building bridges and sharing knowledge are powerful steps toward improving the lives of all global citizens.”

Alyona Penchukova, MERC Executive Director, Dr. Andy Gershoff, WDI Consultant, and Gulnara Diushebekova, MERC Coordinator at IAB in Kazakhstan.

Tourism Focus of Cyprus Program A WDI-Bearing Point team has been awarded the USAID’s Promoting Private Sector Development (PPSD) program in Cyprus. The program seeks to supplement initiatives begun under the previous economic development project there to promote greater mutual cooperation and increased trade between the Greek Cypriot Community (GCC) and the Turkish Cypriot Community (TCC). DCS will provide an ecotourism expert to conduct several activities in the Cyprus tourism sector. Last year, DCS helped organize Eco Day in the northern Cyprus village of Buyukkonuk to celebrate ecotourism in the region. This year, among the many activities the Institute will do include: help create a TCC Tourism Board; coordinate with the tourism associations in the sector to design and launch a collaborative public policy advocacy campaign to promote growth within the sector; design a three-day eco-tourism management training event to promote facility and attraction management; and design a two-day international conference on environmentally-friendly tourism and community based tourism development.

A student at INC reads a brochure during the Career Fair.


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> GLOBALENS CONTINUED FROM COVER

> GOLDMAN SACHS CONTINUED

the GlobaLens catalog. Branch expects more than 100 cases and 50 syllabi to be available by the end of the summer. The GlobaLens site complements EO’s case development strategy (discussed in the last issue of the Davidson Review). EO employs a team of four full-time research associates who work with faculty members to create teaching materials that bring research topics into the classroom.

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To date, EO has either completed or is in the advanced development stages of more than 50 products with 21 WDI and Ross School faculty. There is a backlog of more than 50 case proposals.

The GlobaLens team

of international business.” Christopher Simmons, who, as WDI’s image programmer, has led the development effort for the website, said that GlobaLens “puts power in the hands of professors.” “It allows them to find and purchase cases with a click, create syllabi from the best snippets of other professors’ courses and share best practices,” he said. A preview version of the site was launched to a select group of educators in early May, which garnered immediate and enthusiastic interest. “Great idea! Fantastic! This is a service which is long overdue. International business professors around the world will be thrilled,” said Professor Veronica Velo of Coventry University in England. Even before any marketing effort for the website launch, positive word of mouth led to purchases from customers such as University of Virginia (Darden), INSEAD, Columbia Business School, Stanford, and Cornell. Now that the website is up and running, Branch is reaching out to educators, both to make people aware and generate sales, and to source new material. “The response to GlobaLens has been overwhelmingly positive,” Branch said. Branch is also working to create co-branding agreements with schools

that have collections of cases but no effective way to distribute them. Discussions are underway with the African Association of Business Schools (AABS), Moscow State University Business School, SPACE (a European association of business and language schools), and the Network of International Business Schools. In support of teaching material development, Educational Outreach will conduct case writing workshops. The first will be held in October at Moscow State University Business School. WDI partners in Croatia and Rwanda have also expressed interest. The website launched the week of June 16 with about 30 cases and a dozen syllabi available, with another 25 that are being formatted and expected to be available by mid-July. The cases cover a wide range of topics, including: ■

■ ■ ■

Operating at the Base of the Economic Pyramid The Globalization of Services Sustainability Standard international business topics such as entry mode, market assessment, and market entry.

Educators from around the world continue to submit a steady stream of cases, notes and exercises. The research associates review these materials for content and quality and the best ones are added to

“The professors at Ross are among the leaders in international business research, but Michigan has never emphasized moving this knowledge into the classroom, or developed the infrastructure to do so effectively.” Branch said. “Educational Outreach was established to help make this happen.” Educational Outreach also aims to integrate its activities with other WDI units. First on tap is a conference in cooperation with WDI Base of the Pyramid (BoP) Research Director Ted London, with a special emphasis on teaching BoP at the university level. Second, several Development Consulting Service project proposals contain a case-writing component, which could be served well by Educational Outreach. Branch said his team of research associates — Grace Augustine, Mariana Orloff, Dave Vannette, and Moses Lee — have been tremendous. “They all have such very different backgrounds — public policy, accounting, science, organizational studies — which we can leverage.” Kennedy said Educational Outreach will be a great asset for WDI, the Business School, and international business educators. “I think that the three elements are really unique,” he said. “It’s a place where faculty can come to buy cases and share ideas, be exposed to different syllabi, and it’s an outlet for their work.” To browse the GlobaLens website as a visitor, go to: www.globalens.com. www.wdi.umich.edu

Kennedy, executive director of WDI. “A program like this is an investment in the half of the population that has been neglected and whose talents are not being used. Entrepreneurship education gives women a leg up in gaining wealth, becoming independent, and participating in the transformation of their countries.” WDI’s work with the School of Finance and Banking (SFB) in Kigali, Rwanda is becoming well known in international academic and development communities. The Institute is in the third year of a five-year contract with the government of Rwanda to turn SFB into a regional center of excellence in business education by strengthening the administration, developing faculty capabilities in research and pedagogy, improving the curriculum and creating linkages with the business community. So when Goldman Sachs decided that they wanted to provide business education for underserved women in developing countries, one of the first organizations they approached was WDI. “Those of us who champion open markets must also do our part to create more opportunity to ensure economic growth is more broadly shared,” said Lloyd C. Blankfein, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of The Goldman Sachs Group, Inc. “10,000 Women focuses on a critical, yet often overlooked area where we believe Goldman Sachs can use its resources and convening power to help build the foundation to expand the ranks of businesswomen, managers and entrepreneurs around the world.” WDI submitted two proposals for the 10,000 Women project. Both proposals were approved in January and signed in May, making WDI the first U.S. Goldman partner to launch its program. The first program involves providing scholarships for 15 women each year in the BBA program at the School of Finance and Banking. The scholarships are renewable for up to four years, so the program will grow to 60 women over time. A committee of distinguished Rwandans

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will select the scholarship recipients. All scholarship recipients will receive counseling and mentoring by a program manager and SFB faculty to ensure academic success. The first 15 scholarships will be awarded in August. This program comes at a time when the government of Rwanda has substantially reduced funding for scholarships for the 2008 academic year due to budgetary constraints. (Read more about the program on page 16.) The second program, the Goldman Sachs Entrepreneurship Certificate Program, is a six-month practitioner program aimed at existing and aspiring entrepreneurs. The program was designed from scratch by WDI and SFB faculty and focuses on giving participants the knowledge and skills needed to launch or expand business enterprises in Rwanda. WDI will deliver two programs in the first year, with 30 participants in each program. The women will learn business planning, marketing, finance, accounting and management during their training at SFB. At the end of the program, participants will present their business plans to the group and program faculty. Krishna Govender, the rector at SFB, said the WDI-Goldman Sachs partnership could not have come at a better time. “The generous support of Goldman Sachs will be particularly relevant to Rwanda, and go a long way in ensuring that women are no longer marginalized but empowered to take up their rightful places in all facets of society,” Govender said. Kennedy said he is pleased with the Goldman Sachs partnership and sees the potential to duplicate the Rwanda programs in other countries. “I am happy to have a strong partner like Goldman Sachs. And I’m pleased to see that WDI’s unique capabilities—in Project Management, in-country Executive Education delivery, and applied research—are attractive to partners like Goldman Sachs.” (Read more about the program on pages 14-15.)

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WDI Mourns Death of Tom Lantos

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[1928-2008]

WDI Board member Tom Lantos, the only Holocaust survivor ever elected to Congress, died of cancer Feb. 11 at the National Naval Medical Center in Bethesda, Md. He was 80. Lantos, who spoke to UM students on Oct. 29, 2007 at Rackham Amphitheatre, was honored shortly after his death at a ceremony in Washington, D.C. World leaders such as U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon and U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice, as well as U2 singer Bono, praised Lantos for being one of the world’s leading advocates for human rights.

Tom Lantos speaking to UM students on Oct. 29.

Lantos, a native of Hungary, also was posthumously awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom by President Bush. He served 27 years in Congress during which he rose to become chairman of the House Foreign Affairs Committee. While in Hungary, Lantos twice escaped the Nazis. He lost nearly all his family to the death camps, but was able to find his childhood sweetheart, Annette Tillemann, who also had lost most of her family in the Holocaust. The couple married in 1950. A few months before his death, Lantos spoke at UM about U.S. Foreign Policy in the next decade at a talk sponsored by WDI and the Ross School of Business. He urged the next president to employ dialogue and diplomacy in dealing with rogue nations. In 2007, Bill Davidson honored Lantos with an endowed chair at the Ross School in the congressman’s name to show his appreciation for Lantos’ long service on the WDI Board, his valuable counsel, and his dedication to improving the lives of people living in emerging economies. WDI Executive Director Robert Kennedy is the first Tom Lantos Professor of Business Administration. “By his words and deeds, Tom Lantos had a great influence on many people,” Davidson said. “As a young man he survived the Holocaust and he was able to use these painful memories as an inspiration to help improve the lives of people around the world.” “He brought a unique background to our Board with his extensive experience in both the academic and public sectors. And he was instrumental in shaping our vision for the direction of the Institute in order that it has the most positive impact in emerging economies.” Ross School Dean Robert Dolan, who serves as president of WDI, called Lantos “one of the country’s great statesman and gentleman.” “Our Institute was very fortunate to have Tom as a dedicated board member from day one,” Dolan said. “We will miss his great spirit and wise counsel.”

www.wdi.umich.edu

WDI Board member Ralph Gerson, Bill Davidson, and Tom Lantos (2001)


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topfive list 20

Five best-selling cases on GlobaLens.com 1 Acumen Fund: How to Make the Greatest Impact

08 CALENDAR

2 CEMEX’s Patrimonio Hoy: At the Tipping Point? 3 Understanding Exchange Rates

Effective Sales Management Chile | Aug 11-12

General Management Program Croatia | Oct 13-28

4 Hindustan Lever at the Base of the Pyramid: Growth for the 21st Century

HRN Workshop Czech Republic | Aug 28-29

HR Professionals Program Latvia | Oct 15-18

5 Chery Automobile: Vying for a Piece of the American Pie

Goldman Sachs Entrepreneurship Certificate Program Rwanda | 9 Sessions throughout 08-09

General Management Program Serbia | Oct 15-30

Five most-popular videos on WDI website

Strategic Account Management Costa Rica | Sept 18-19 Marketing Professionals Program Czech Republic | Sept 24-27

1 Paul Farmer: Building a Health Care Movement: From Haiti to Rwanda

HR Program Uruguay | Sept 30-Oct 3

2 An Interview with Dr. Paul Farmer 3 Marcos Neto, CARE Central America: Scaling Impact at the Base of the Pyramid

Leadership for Experienced Managers Costa Rica | Oct 2-3

4 Stu Hart, Cornell University: Born in the Base of the Pyramid

Operations Management Chile | Oct 6-7 Brand Management Turkey | Oct 7-9

5 Alcely Barroso, Microsoft of Brazil: Emerging Markets: Challenges and Opportunities for Social Enterprises

Marketing Professionals Program Latvia | Oct 20-24 Strategic Account Management Chile | Oct 28-29 Coaching and Empowerment Turkey | Nov 6-8 Services Marketing Management Costa Rica | Nov 12-13 Effective Sales Management Brazil | Nov 24-25 CONFERENCES

Third Sector Innovation: Sustainability and Social Impact Brazil | Aug 6-8

NON-PROFIT U.S. POSTAGE

THE WILLIAM DAVIDSON INSTITUTE

PAID ANN ARBOR, MI

AT THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN

Tel 734.763.5020 Fax 734.763.5850 www.wdi.umich.edu

Creating, aggregating, and disseminating intellectual capital on important business and policy issues in emerging markets

William Davidson Institute 724 East University Avenue Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-1234

PERMIT NO. 144

WDI Davidson Review Summer 2008  

The summer 2008 newsletter of the William Davidson Institute.

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