Page 1

Oklahoma Turning Point Coalition | Certified County Health Improvement Organization | 501(c)(3) Non-Profit Corporation

BOARD REFERENCE MATERIALS PO Box 3812 | Bartlesville, Oklahoma 74006-3812 918.876.3056 | info@wcwiok.org | wcwiok.org | facebook.com/wcwiok


BOARD REFERENCE MATERIALS  TABLE OF CONTENTS A. B.

C.

D.

E.

F.

G. H.

Our History Timeline and Brief History of Workgroups Organizational Documents Articles of Incorporation Certificate of Incorporation By‐Laws 501(c)(3) Letter Vision, Promise, and Goals Organizational Chart Sector Representative List Current Activities Proposed Budget Brief Summaries of Current Projects & Grants Future Activities Baldridge Method Diagram Strategic Plan Business Plan Sustainability Plan Our Healthy Community Collaborating Workgroups Table:  Includes Mission, Goals, and Contact Information Workgroup Score Cards Community Assessment Preliminary Results Focus Group Report Governance General and D&O Liability Insurance Job Description for Sector Representative Board Commitment Form Conflict of Interest Form Conflict of Interest Policy Board Member Code of Ethics Board Member Fund Development, Engagement, and Commitment Network Self‐Assessment Tool How to Reach my Sector Policies and Procedures Terminology

“This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and  Human Services (HHS) under grant number P10RH26875, Rural Health Network Development Planning Grant Program for $85,000.  This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of,  nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.”


19 June 2015 Dear WCWI Board Members, As we come to the end of our 2014-2015 Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) Planning Project, I would like to thank you for your personal contributions in growing the 2004 vision of bringing people and resources together to identify, address, and meet community needs and service gaps in a collaborative, efficient, and effective manner into the organization the Washington County Wellness Initiative (WCWI) is today! I am honored to work with the dedicated, professional, passionate individuals who comprise the workgroups, board, and leadership team of WCWI. As our organization has evolved from a grassroots gathering into an Oklahoma Turning Point Coalition, then the first certified County Health Improvement Organization and now a non-profit corporation with an IRS 501(c)(3) status, we have experienced many changes in our national, state, and local healthcare environments. We have not grown in a vacuum; the nature of the healthcare field has drastically changed over the eleven years since we began our journey. Currently, we are witnessing an industry trend moving from a focus on the volume of patients served to the value of care received by the individual patient. Within our own county we are involved in a change of ownership/leadership at our local hospital, and our non-profit clinics struggle to secure resources needed to serve our communities. These struggles leave our target population adversely impacted with less access to healthcare. Your decision to serve on the WCWI Board demonstrates your willingness to offer your time, experience, and expertise to improving our community’s health. The materials provided in this Board Reference Notebook will clarify what it really means to be part of the County Health Improvement Organization, how you can engage the sector you represent, and how major decisions are made within WCWI. The energy we exert through our individuals roles with WCWI will positively impact our communities, our county, our state, our nation, and our world. Yours in Health,

M’Liss M'Liss Jenkins, M.S., LPC, LMFT WCWI Founder/Coordinator


OUR HISTORY

A


Washington County Wellness Initiative, Inc. Timeline 1st Meeting of group that was to become WCWI (Turning Point Coalition) [January 2004] 1st Community Assessment [March 2004 - March 2005]

2004 2004 2005

[2004] Hispanic Resources Committee was formed and developed into Casa Hispana [March 2004 - March 2005] Bartlesville Regional United Way created Community Profile

Partnered with the BV Chamber of Commerce and Active Communities for Teens to launch Bartlesville th

th

Youth Leadership for 8 and 9 graders Casa Hispana opened its doors and has served over 200 Hispanics on a monthly basis since opening [January 2005]

2005 [2005] Poverty Alleviation Coalition established

[2006] Church Women United hosted Car Repair Clinics and partnered with Tri County Automotive Repair to provide free labor to reduce repair expenses to only parts costs

Church Women United Car Repair Project established [2006]

2006 Washington County Transportation Coaltion established [2006]

[2006] The Mental Health Work Group of the WCWI was established

Top 6 Needs identified from State of the County's Health [February 2006] Bartlesville selected as Walk This Way Community [2006-2007]

2006 2007

Received a Turning Point/WIC grant to provide Heart Healthy Luncheons

Dewey Find Your Path to a Healthier You event

2007 Washington County Suicide Prevention Coalition was established (WCSPC) [2007]

[2006-2007] Various Health Related Activities were Implemented

Mental Health Workgroup partnered with BRUW and Samaritan Counseling & Growth to develop the “Indigent Counseling Program�, now known as Helping Hands.


Poverty Alleviation Coalition developed Bridges Out of Poverty and Transitional Housing Program in Bartlesville [2008]

[January 2008] Washington County's Board of Health held a Stakeholder's Meeting to discuss Uninsured Residents

Access to Healthcare “Healthcare Needs Survey” received over 2,000 surveys and developed report

Access to Healthcare Established [January 2008]

Washington County Anti-Drug Network Established (WCADN) [March 2008]

2008

[June 2008] Oklahoma Insurance Commission held 2 OK Chat Sessions in Washington County (32 uninsured residents discussed barriers)

Committee to Review Federally Qualified Health Center [April 2008]

Accessto Healthcare met to review progress [October 2008] 2nd Community Assessment [August 2008 - March 2009]

[December 2008] "Healthcare Community Discussion" - Results submitted to White House

2008 2009 [2009] PHP developed Walk to School and Safe Routes to School

Preventative Health Partnership Established [2009] The Mental Health Work Group, Systems of Care Planning Function and OCCY Partnership Board combined with the Washington County Association for Mental Health (Established WCAMH) [2009] Community Assessment Results were presented to Access to Healthcare Committee (Action Plan Created) [May 2009] WCWI presented Access to Healthcare Update to Washington County Democratic Party [October 2009]

[2008] Washington County Anti-Drug Network partnered with the Cherokee Nation Behavioral Health SPF SIG grant launch

Partnered with WCADN, OJA & YMCA to develop “Run the Streets”

2009 [July 2009] Access to Healthcare Brainstorming Session


WCWI and WCHD followed the Mobilizing for Action through Planning and Partnership (MAPP) procedures to develop the County Health Improvement Plan (CHIP) [2010] Washington County Affordable Housing Coalition Established [January 2010] WCWI and WCHD followed the Mobilizing for Action through Planning and Partnership (MAPP) procedures to develop the County Health Improvement Plan (CHIP) [2010] Washington County Affordable Housing Coalition Established [January 2010] Project Prom established [2011]

[2010] Access to Healthcare and Oklahoma State Department of Health began discussions on developing a Social Health Index for Washington County

2010 Partnered with OK Commission on Children & Youth and Bartlesville Public Schools to develop School Based Services

[2011] WCADN began Run the Streets program Washington County Commissioner’s received grant from Office of Primary Care for technical assistance to help with the development of FQHC

Held a Town Hall meeting at JPMC to discuss plans to develop a FQHC (June) Held a Town Hall meeting at JPMC to discuss plans to develop a FQHC (June) Access to Healthcare established the goal to develop a coordinated care delivery system for the uninsured [January 2011]

[2011] WCADN began Student Crime Stoppers

2011

Washington County designated "Medically Underserved Population" [March 24, 2011] Four WCWI community health priority areas were established (Healthcare, Mental Health, Poverty, Lifestyle & Prevention) [May 2011] Washington County Affordable Housing Summit [August 2011] Access to Healthcare partnered with Morton Comprehensive Health Services to submit an application to HRSA to establish a "look-alike" clinic in Bartlesville. [2012]

[March 2011] Access to Healthcare partnered with Family Healthcare Clinic to submit a BRUW Venture Grant: "Washington County Integrated Health Network System" [March 30, 2011] Access to Healthcare partnered with Morton Comprehensive Health Services to submit a State Planning Grant through the Office of Primary Care. [June 2011] Town Hall Meeting held to inform public about community health centers and their impact on target population.

[2012] Access to Healthcare worked with Primary Care Extension Agent from Northeast Area Health Education Center and applied to become a Certified County Health Improvement Organization

WCAMH developed Indigent Counseling Project and Washington County Mental Health Directory [2012]

[2012] Suicide Prevention Coalition offered first suicide prevention awareness week activities

2012


Trained over 2,000 ConocoPhillips employees in QPR a gatekeeper program to help employees recognize the warning signs of suicide [2012]

2012

WCSPC offers monthly Survivors of Suicide Loss support group

[2012] PHP in partnership with City of Bartlesville received Merit Level Certified Healthy Community Status [2012, January 3] Transportation Coalition established CityRide Circuit Flexible Fixed Route (pilot project)

Partnered with WCAMH & WCSPC to offer Columbia Teen Screen at Tri County Technology Center [2012] WCSPC developed the Suicide Prevention Report Form and hosted the first Annual Suicide Prevention Awareness Summit [2013] WCWI became first certified County Health Improvement Organization (CHIO) [March 2013]

[January 2013] Family Promise of Washington County, Inc. held its first community meeting

2013

Washington County Affordable Housing hosted the first Affordable Housing Planning Summit [April 2013]

[May 2013] Morton Clinic opened in Bartlesville

WCWI Received HRSA Network Planning Grant [June 2014] WCWI received 501(c)(3) Non-profit Corporation status by IRS effective February 2014 [February 2014]

[June 2014] WCWI Network Governing Board (NGB) established

2014

National Transportation Consultant reviewed Bartleville CityRide Circuit and reported potential growth opportunities. [August 2014] 3rd Community Assessment [November 2014 - May 2015] WCWI held four Community Focus Groups as part of HRSA Network Planning Grant [March 2015] Reorganized Washington County Anti-Drug Network and renamed as CHANGE [April 2015] Family Promise has recruited 11 Host Churches [May 2015]

[March 2013] WCWI received PHIO grant for Depression Screening by Primary Care Physicians

[July 2014] Policies and Procedures prepared for NGB and CHIO Approval [December 2014] WCWI CHIO Annual Meeting and 2013-2014 Annual Report

2014 2015

2015

[November 2014 - May 2015] 3rd Community Assessment [March 2015] WCWI held four Community Focus Groups as part of HRSA Network Planning Grant [April 2015] Project Prom proved 42 girls with dresses and 17 boys with tuxedos Family Promise Day Center developed and scheduled to open in September 2015


ORGANIZATIONAL DOCUMENTS

B


Articles of Incorporation Of Washington County Wellness Initiative, Inc. The undersigned, a majority of whom are citizens of the United States, desiring to form a NonProfit Corporation under the Non-Profit Corporation Law of Oklahoma, do hereby certify:

First: The name of the Corporation shall be Washington County Wellness Initiative, Inc.

Second: The place in this state where the principal office of the Corporation is to be located is the City of Bartlesville, Washington County, Oklahoma.

Third: Said corporation is organized exclusively for charitable, religious, educational, and scientific purposes, including, for such purposes, the making of distributions to organizations that qualify as exempt organizations under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code, or the corresponding section of any future federal tax code.

Fourth: The names and addresses of the persons who are the initial trustees of the corporation are as follows:

Deb Cook, RN

Bob Walker

Roger Alexander

2201 Silver Lake Rd, #74066

3500 E Frank Phillips Blvd

5121 Jacquelyn Lane

Bartlesville, OK 74006-6223

Bartlesville, OK 74006-2411 Bartlesville, OK 74006-7723

Fifth: No part of the net earnings of the corporation shall inure to the benefit of, or be distributable to its members, trustees, officers, or other private persons, except that the corporation shall be authorized and empowered to pay reasonable compensation for services rendered and to make payments and distributions in furtherance of the purposes set forth in Article Third hereof. No substantial part of the activities of the corporation shall be the carrying on of propaganda, or otherwise attempting to influence legislation, and the corporation shall not participate in, or intervene in (including the publishing or distribution of statements) any political campaign on behalf of or in opposition to any candidate for public office. Notwithstanding any Page 1 of 2

Â


WASHINGTON COUNTY WELLNESS INITIATIVE BY-LAWS Vision Washington County is an educated, holistic, safe and neighborly community where everyone has: • access to physical and mental health services • access to progressive and caring community services and resources • an opportunity to be informed and involved Mission Strengthen and transform the public health infrastructure through community based action

ARTICLE I Name, Purpose Section 1.1

The name of the organization shall be the Washington County Wellness Initiative

Section 1.2

This Washington County Wellness Initiative is organized exclusively for charitable and educational purposes, including, for such purposes, the making of distributions to organizations that qualify as exempt organizations under section 501(c) (3) of the Internal Revenue Code, or corresponding section of any future federal tax code. ARTICLE II Membership

Section 2.1

Membership in the Coalition shall be open to all residents in Washington County and/or persons providing services to the county with an interest in public health. The Coalition shall have two categories of membership: Active and Supporting. “Active” membership shall be defined as the four executive officers and seven board members. “Active” members will be required to attend an orientation to the coalition before voting privileges are effective. “Active” members will also be expected to volunteer at events and assist with Coalition activities. Supporting members are defined as providing general endorsement of Coalition efforts and receive Coalition communications through electronic mail. Supporting members are encouraged to attend coalition meetings but have no voting privileges.

1


All “Active” and “Supporting” Coalition members shall register their email addresses and phone numbers with the Washington County Wellness Initiative Coordinator and/or Coalition Secretary and notice of meetings shall be sent or given by electronic mail to such addresses and shall be valid notice of such meeting when sent. Section 2.2

Number The number of “Active” Coalition members shall be eleven (11).

Section 2.3

Attendance and voting “Active” board membership shall be defined as the four executive officers (President, Vice-President, Secretary, and Treasurer) and seven at-large members. Active members shall not miss any more than two consecutive regular meetings and attendance at least 80% of Coalition meetings per year unless excused by the board. “Active” membership is required for voting privileges. Votes shall be cast by any method directed by the President, such as show of hands or written ballots, and recorded by the Secretary, and declared by the President. “Active” members shall have proxy-voting privileges. Any voting involving the distribution of Coalition funds will be done in a manner chosen by the President, or designee, with the intent that no special and/or conflictual interest shall prevail. In order for a motion to be approved there must be a majority of all present active members in favor of the motion. If a motion does not pass due to low attendance at a meeting, it may be brought back up at a later date. Active board members shall serve a minimum term of two (2) years, with no more than three (3) consecutive two-year terms. A former board member may be elected to the Board following a one-year absence.

Section 2.4

Conflict of Interest A conflict of interest may exist where an interested party, agency, organization or an associate of an interested party, directly or indirectly benefits or profits as a result of a decision made or partnership entered into by the organization. This policy applies to all board members and voting privileges should be recused for such a conflict. If the executive board has reason to believe that an interested party has failed to disclose an actual or potential conflict of interest, they shall inform the person of the basis for such belief and afford the person an opportunity to explain the alleged failure to disclose. The executive board will then determine voting privileges.

2


Section 2.5

Quorum The quorum is defined as a majority of “Active” members of the Washington County Wellness Initiative.

Section 2.6

Vacancies Any vacancy or vacancies in the Coalition may be filled by the affirmative vote of a majority of the remaining “Active” Coalition members, even though less than a quorum, or by a sole remaining Coalition member. A vacancy or vacancies in the Coalition membership shall be deemed to exist in case of the death, resignation or removal of any “Active” Coalition member. Vacancies need to be filled in an attempt to maintain “Active” membership for all community sectors.

Section 2.7

Removal The entire Executive Officers or any individual Coalition member may be removed from office by a vote of a 2/3 majority of the “Active” Coalition members at any annual or special meeting of the Coalition whenever in its judgment the best interests of the Coalition would be served thereby. In the event that any Executive Officer(s) or any one or more “Active” Coalition members are so removed, new Officers/Members may be elected at the same meeting. Any such Officer/Member(s) proposed to be removed shall be entitled to at least five (5) business days’ notice in writing by mail of the meeting at which such removal is to be voted upon and shall be entitled to appear before and be heard at such meeting.

Section 2.8

Maintaining “Active” Membership Any “Active” Coalition member who misses two consecutive meetings of the Coalition, and whose absences are unexcused, may be considered to have resigned and the position to be vacant. Such resignation shall be effective upon notification to the Coalition member by the President of such resignation, regardless of whether or not the member notifies the Coalition of his or her resignation.

Section 2.9

Powers and Duties All powers shall be exercised by or under the authority of, and the business and affairs of the Coalition shall be controlled by the “Active” members of the Coalition. Without prejudice to such general powers, but

3


subject to the limitations herein set forth, the “Active” Coalition members shall have the power to: (a) Conduct manage and control the affairs and business of the Coalition, and to make such rules and regulations therefore, not inconsistent with law and these By-Laws, as the Coalition may deem best, and (b) Appoint an Executive Committee and any other committee that the Coalition may deem advisable, and to delegate to the Executive Committee, or any other such committee subject to the control of the Coalition, any of the powers and authority of the Coalition, except the power to adopt, amend or repeal these By-Laws. The Executive Committee shall act only in the interval between meetings of the Coalition and shall be subject at all times to the control and direction of the Coalition, and (c) Prescribe such duties for officers, agents and employees of the Coalition which may not be inconsistent with law and these By-Laws and fix the terms of their offices and their compensation, and (d) Designate, from time to time, the office of the Coalition, and to designate from time to time any place or places where meetings of the Coalition shall or may be held, and (e) Generally do and perform every act and thing whatsoever that may pertain to a Coalition officer or to an “Active” Coalition member. ARTICLE III Meetings of Members Section 3.1

Regular Meetings The date of the regular monthly meetings will be established by the Coalition officers. Coalition meetings will be held annually unless it has been determined that a meeting is not necessary.

Section 3.2

Place of Meetings Any regular, annual or special meeting of the Coalition may be held at any place within or without the State of Oklahoma that has been designated for that purpose by the Coalition.

4


Section 3.3.

Annual Meetings Annual meetings of the Coalition shall be held during the month of December, or as designated by the Coalition at a regular or special meeting.

Section 3.4

Special Meetings Special meetings may be called by the President or by a simple majority vote of “Active” Coalition members. Any business that might be done at a regular or annual meeting of the Coalition may be done at a special meeting. The agenda of the special meeting will be limited to items specified in the meeting notice.

Section 3.5

Notice of Special Meeting Written notice of the time, place and purpose of all special meetings of the Coalition shall be given to each “Active” and “Supporting” member personally or by electronic mail at least five (5) business days before the time designated for said meeting.

Section 3.6

Executive Committee Meetings Executive Committee meetings will be convened as deemed necessary by any Executive Committee member.

Section 3.7

Consent to Action Any action which might be taken at a meeting of the Coalition or any committee meeting may be taken without a meeting if all of the “Active” members of the Coalition or committee, as the case may be, consent thereto in writing and the writing or writings are filed with the minutes of the Coalition or committee.

Section 3.8

Call of Meetings Meetings of the Coalition, other than organizational meetings, shall be called by the President; or if the President is absent or unable to act, or refuses to act, by the Vice President, Secretary or Treasurer or a majority of the Coalition members.

Section 3.9

Telephone Participation Members of the Coalition, or any committee designated by the Coalition, may participate in a meeting of the Coalition, or such committee, by means of conference telephone or similar communication equipment by

5


means of which all persons participating can hear each other; such participation shall constitute presence in person at such meeting. ARTICLE IV Officers and their Duties Section 4.1

Officers of the Coalition shall be President, Vice-President, Secretary, and Treasurer and must be “Active” members in good standing. All officers shall be elected. Officer duties shall be as follows:

(a) President – The President shall preside at all meetings of members and shall have and exercise general charge and supervision of the affairs of the Coalition and shall do and perform such other duties as outlined in the bylaws or as may be necessary to ensure effective functioning of the coalition. (b) Vice-President – The Vice-President shall act as chair in the absence of the President and shall perform such other duties as may be assigned to him/her by the President. The Vice-President shall be assigned to Ad Hock committees unless otherwise delegated by the President. (c) Secretary – The Secretary shall have charge of such books, documents, and papers as the law for the proper functioning of the Coalition; shall attend and keep minutes of all meetings of the Coalition; shall keep a register containing contact information of all Coalition members, and may sign with the President or Vice-President, in the name and on behalf of the Coalition, any contracts or agreements. In general, this person shall perform all the duties incident to the office of Secretary and shall do and perform such other duties as may be assigned by the President. (d) Treasurer – The Treasurer shall have the recording and oversight of all funds, property, and securities of the Coalition. The treasurer will have a working relationship with the fiscal agent. Section 4.2

Election and Term The Executive Committee serving during the first year of the Coalition’s existence shall hold office until the next annual meeting of the Coalition and until their successors are elected. Thereafter, each Officer shall serve for a term of two years. An Officer may serve for more than one term at the discretion of the Coalition.

6


ARTICLE V Standing Committees Section 5.1

Composition Standing committees of the Coalition shall exist as hereinafter provided. Committees shall consist of at least one “Active” member of the Coalition and must be chaired by an “Active” member of the Coalition. Other committee members may be selected from the community. Each committee member shall serve for a term of one year; provided however, that any committee member, and its chair, may be reappointed to the position.

Section 5.2

Committees

(a) Executive Committee. The Executive Committee shall consist of the officers of the Coalition, standing committee chairs and such other members as designated by the President of the Coalition. The Executive Committee shall have and may exercise any and all authority of the Coalition to conduct the business and affairs of the Coalition, except the power to adopt, amend or repeal these By-Laws, when the Coalition is not in session, provided, however, the Coalition reserves the power of review and to rescind any and all actions taken by the Executive Committee under this provision. The chair of the Executive Committee shall be the President of the Coalition. (b) Nominating Committee. The Nominating Committee shall consist of a chair and four additional “Active” Coalition members appointed by the Coalition at the Annual Meeting. The Chair and members of the Nominating Committee shall serve for a term of two years. No member may serve for more than three consecutive terms. The Nominating Committee shall be responsible to recruit and suggest replacements for vacancies on the Coalition. A slate of nominees, willing and able to serve as Officers, and members of the Nominating Committee, with one designated as the chair, shall be submitted to the Coalition for election. (c) Personnel Committee. The Personnel Committee shall be appointed by the President and consist of at least one officer and other “Active” Coalition members only. The Personnel Committee is responsible for screening and recommending candidates for positions employed through the Coalition.

7


The Personnel Committee shall be responsible for an annual evaluation of employees and recommendation of compensation to be paid. (d) Other Standing Committees. Other standing committees may be designated by the Coalition from time to time in the discretion of the Coalition. (e) Ad Hoc Committees. Ad Hoc committees may be appointed by the President of the Coalition. The vice-president shall be assigned to Ad Hoc committees unless otherwise delegated by the president. (f) Quorum. Unless otherwise provided in these By-Laws, a quorum shall consist of two thirds (2/3) of the members of any committee. ARTICLE VI Sub Coalitions/Work Groups Section 6.1

The Coalition’s work includes identifying community needs and gaps in services, as well as developing strategic planning and action plans, in order to accomplish Coalition goals. This work is done through community based sub coalitions and workgroups.

Section 6.2

Each sub coalition/workgroup may be formed to respond to a specific community need and/or gap. Each sub coalition/workgroup will report its activities to the larger Washington County Wellness Initiative and agrees to provide information for the annual report. ARTICLE VII Coalition Coordinator and Employment

Section 7.1

The Coalition, in order to carry out business, shall have a designated Coordinator who shall report directly to the Coalition and whose duty it shall be to administer the programs, policies and affairs of the Coalition on a day-to-day basis, subject to such policies and regulations as the Coalition may establish.

Section 7.2

The Coordinator shall faithfully carry out the policies, directives and regulations of the Coalition, serve as liaison between the Coalition and various funding agencies, advise the Coalition concerning and recommend to the Coalition, policies and programs which will carry forward the purposes of the Coalition. The Coordinator will fulfill the job description as outlined by the personnel committee and approved by the Coalition. The Coordinator shall keep the Coalition informed with respect to all activities and developments, both within and without the Coalition that

8


affect the programs, purposes and business of this Coalition. The Coordinator shall also develop proposals to various funding agencies for the purpose of providing financial means to carry out this Coalition’s purpose. Section 7.3

The Coalition may employ such staff as needed to assist the Coordinator in the operations of this Coalition, subject however, to approval of the Coalition. All such staff employment shall be governed by personnel policies adopted by the Coalition. Salaries and/or benefits of such staff shall be established and approved by the Coalition. ARTICLE VIII Amendment to By-laws

Section 8.1

In order for the by-laws to be amended, a three fourths (3/4) majority of the Executive Committee will be in agreement of the proposed amendment. The amended By-Laws will be taken to the next Coalition meeting for a vote of simple majority. ARTICLE IX EXECUTION OF INSTRUMENTS

Section 9.1

Written Instruments Contracts, deeds, documents and instruments shall be executed by the President, or in the President’s absence the Vice President and attested to by the Secretary or directed by the Coalition in a particular situation. In the event of a conflict of interest the elected officer will remove himself or herself.

Section 9.2

Financial All finances received on behalf of the Coalition shall be deposited into an account designated by the Executive Committee of the Washington County Wellness Initiative. The Coalition will adopt the annual budget approved by the Executive Committee. Any budget revisions or additional expenditures will be reviewed and approved by the Executive Committee and brought before the Coalition.

Section 9.3

Contracts and Fiscal Agent The Coalition may choose to select and/or contract with an existing nonprofit, governmental or faith based organization in order to conduct the fiscal needs of the Coalition. Any organization contracting with the

9


Coalition will understand the Coalition maintains complete control and decision making of all monies received on behalf of the Coalition. A signed Memorandum of Agreement/Contract outlining all responsibilities of the Coalition and contracting organization will be in place before any monies are received by the contracting organization. The Memorandum of Agreement/Contract will be reviewed by the Coalition and fiscal agent on an annual basis. ARTICLE X Miscellaneous Provision Section 10.1

Fiscal Year The initial year of the Coalition shall end on the last day of December, unless the Coalition members shall, by proper Resolution, provide for a fiscal year having a different beginning and termination.

Section 10.2

Whistle Blower Policy If a coalition member or employee reasonably believes that some policy, practice, or activity of the Washington County Wellness Initiative is in violation of the law, a written complaint may be filed with the Executive Committee. The Washington County Wellness Initiative will not retaliate against the member or employee who, in good faith, has made a protest or raised a complaint against some practice of the Coalition.

Section 10.3

Indemnification No employee or member of the Washington County Wellness Initiative shall be held personally liable for any business or activities approved by the coalition.

Section 10.4 Dissolution The Washington County Wellness Initiative may be dissolved upon the recommendation of a majority of the governing board and upon approval by a two-thirds vote of the members of the Board of Directors at a meeting of the Washington County Wellness Initiative in accordance with Article 3 of these by-laws. Section 10.5 Distribution of Assets Upon the dissolution of the Washington County Wellness Initiative, assets shall be distributed for one or more exempt purposes within the meaning of section 501 (c) (3) of the Internal Revenue Code, or corresponding section of any future federal tax code, or shall be distributed to the federal

10


government, or to state or local government, for a public purpose. Any such assets not disposed of shall be disposed of by the appropriate court of the county in which the principal office of the Washington County Wellness Initiative is then located, exclusively for such purposes or to such organization or organizations, as said Court shall determine, which are organized and operated exclusively for such purposes. Adopted this 25th day of September, 2012. ATTEST: Washington County Wellness Initiative

11


Our Vision All Washington County residents live in healthy communities with access to: physical and mental health services progressive and caring community services and resources information and community involvement opportunities

Our Promise Washington County Wellness Initiative strengthens and transforms the public health infrastructure through community-based action

Tagline Washington County Wellness Initiative: Nurturing Healthy Communities

Project Goals Goal 1 is to Achieve Efficiencies. We will focus on identifying ways to achieve better system efficiencies and improve regional and/or local rural health care services. Goal 2 is to Expand Access To, Coordinate and Improve the Quality of Essential Health Care Services. We will focus on ways to build capacity and a network infrastructure that enables entities to coordinate care and increase to build capacity and a network infrastructure that enables entities to coordinate care and increase access to care for rural communities. Goal 3 is to Strengthen the Rural Health Care System as a Whole. We will focus on ways to enhance community and partner relationships to promote involvement and participation in network planning activities.

Approved by Network Governing Board: 2 July 2014


The Oklahoma Primary Healthcare Extension System Oklahoma’s Academic     Health  Centers  

Federal Funding

Disciples ChrisOan   Church   Oklahoma Universities

WC DHS  

Oklahoma State     Department  of  Health   Elder   Care  

OKWU Caney  Valley   Medical   Clinic  

Jane Phillips   Medical  Center  

Pediatrician

Medical Reserve  Corp.   Volunteer   Oklahoma Foundation for Medical Quality

Public Health Institute of Oklahoma

State Funding

Oklahoma Department of Mental Health

Chamber of   Commerce  

Washington County  Health   Department  

COORDINATOR  

CM&R Development  

Oklahoma Center for Healthcare Improvement

Bartlesville Police   Department  

Cherokee NaOon   Behavioral   Health  

Bartlesville Ex.   Enterprise  

Bartlesville Public   Schools   OK   Turning   Point  

Community Service Council of Greater Tulsa

P&S Legal   Advocacy   BRUW  

Local Public  Funding   OPCA, OAFP, OACP, OAP, OOA, OSMA

Grand Lake   Mental   Health  

Casa Hispana   Private Funding WCWI Workgroups


Access to Health Care

Casa Hispania

Preventative Health Partnership

Washington County Affordable Housing Coalition

Washington County Anti-Drug Network

FLOWCo Walk to School Day

Family Promise of Washington County Rapid Rehab Rescue

Young Adult Koalition

Washington County Health Department (WCHD) performed Community Health Surveys in 2005 and 2010. From the results of these surveys the County Health Improvement Process (CHIP) was developed using the Mobilizing for Action through Planning and Partnerships (MAPP) Process during 20052010. The Washington County Wellness Initiative (WCWI) was established to address the four identified focus areas: Healthcare Lifestyle/Prevention Mental Health Poverty

This publication was made possible by Grant Number P10RH26875.

Washington County Association for Mental Health

Washington County Suicide Prevention Coalition

Washington County Transportation Coalition

Washington County CHIO

CityRide Circuit

Poverty Alleviation Coalition

Church Women United Car Repair Project Project Prom

WCWI FUNCTIONS:

Serve as the 501(c)(3) fiscal agent for member organizations, work groups, committees, initiatives, and projects Encourage member engagement and to pool community resources Improve Washington County communities’ capacity to obtain optimum health and social well-being outcomes for our citizens Collaborate with the Washington County Health Department to conduct assessments to identify gaps in services Implement plans and strategies to address gaps Memorialize the institutional memory of the WCWI and all of its partners to aid in sustainability and organizational compliance


WCWI Network Organizational Chart and Network Member Information

WASHINGTON COUNTY WELLNESS INITIATIVE -- COMMUNITY HEALTH IMPROVEMENT ORGANIZATION (WCWI-CHIO) EXECUTIVE BOARD, SECTOR REPRESENTATIVES, AND PHYSICANS ADVISORY BOARD

Number

Sector

Name

Title

Organization

E-mail

Phone

0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

Coordinator Business Children Elderly Faith Higher Education Hospital Law Enforcement

M'Liss Jenkins Sherri Wilt Lori Moynihan, SANE Mike Fogle Roger Alexander Deb Cook, RN Bob Walker Kevin Ickleberry

Coordinator Member Member Member Member Secretary/Treasurer President Member

DJenkins@health.ok.gov SWilt@bartlesville.com lorimoynihan@cableone.net mfogle@abouteldercare.org ralexan934@sbcglobal.net dcook@okwu.edu bwalkerus@sbcglobal.net krickleb@cityofbartlesville.org

(918) 335-6926 (918) 336-8708 (918) 440-7249 (918) 336-8500 9183335299 (918) 333-6151 (918) 333-7200 (918) 338-4001

8

Legal

Sheree L. Hukill, JD

Member

9 10 11 12 13

Media Mental Health Minority Populations Nonprofit OK Turning Point

Emily Droege Charles Danley Milagros Cappelletti Jody Burch Fauzia Khan, MD

Member Member Member Member Member

14

Primary Care

Dr. Michael Woods, MD

Vice President

Washington County Health Department Bartlesville Regional Chamber of Commerce, President SAFE-NOW Washington County Elder Care, Executive Director Disciples Christian Church, Elder Oklahoma Wesleyan Univeristy, Campus Nurse Jane Phillips Medical Center Bartlesville Police Department, Investigator P&S Legal Adovacy, PLLC and Integrated Concepts, Inc. Bartlesville Examiner Enterprise, Reporter Grand Lake Mental Health Center, CEO Casa Hispana, Executive Director Bartlesville Regional United Way Oklahoma Turning Point, Field Consultant Caney Valley Medical Clinic/OU Rural Residence Program

15

Public Health

Larry Bergner

Member

16

Schools

Kerry Ickleberry

Member

17 18

Social Services Technology

Sam Westfall Charles Moll

19

Tribal

20

Volunteer

Washington County Health Department, County Director

sheree.hukill@iconceptsinc.com

(918) 629-9742

edroege@examiner‐enterprise.com Charlesd@glmhc.net tonymilic@aol.com jody@bartlesvilleuw.org fauziak@health.ok.gov

(918) 335-8228 (918) 337-8080 (918) 336-4242 (918) 336-1044 (918) 260-8110

michael‐woods@ouhsc.edu

(918) 536-1024

larryb@health.ok.gov

(918) 335-3005

Member Member

Bartlesville Public School, Safe and Drug Free Schools Counselor Department of Human Services, County Director CM&R Development

samuel.westfall@okdhs.org charles.moll@gmail.com

(918) 337-6231 Ext. 1608 (918) 338-5700 (918) 327-9341

Sam Bradshaw

Member

Cherokee Nation Behavioral Health Precention Programs

Sam‐Bradshaw@cherokee.org

(918) 453-5000

Ellen Conn, RN

Member

Medical Reserve Corp

EllenC@health.ok.gov

(918) 335-3005

IckleberryKg@bps‐ok.org

PHYSICIANS ADVISORY GROUP The Physicians Advisory Group is a newly established group developed to monitor, report and respond to health issues as they arise in the community. The group meets every other month as a part of the “Access to Health Care” sub-coalition of the Washington County Wellness Initiative. In addition to meetings, the group communicates via email to discuss health concerns and have developed a template for discussions and data collection. Michael Woods, MD serve as chair of the group. The following serve on the Physicians Advisory Group: NAME Michael Woods, MD Maiuri Ranchhod, MD Fauzia Khan, MD Tom Britt, MD Debra Cook, RN

TITLE Chair Member Member Member Member

Organiztion

E-mail

Phone

Primary Care/OU Resident Program COO Morton Health Services OK Turning Point Emergency Room and Urgent Care Campus Nurse, Oklahoma Wesleyan University

michael‐woods@ouhsc.edu mranchhod@mortonhealth.org fauziak@health.ok.gov

(918) 536-1024 (918) 333-1111 (918) 260-8110 (918) 331-1090 (918) 333-6151

    Washington County Wellness Initiative ‐‐ CHIO

dcook@okwu.edu


CURRENT ACTIVITIES

C


PROPOSED BUDGET Washington County Wellness Initiative Line Items and Budget Justification

Sub-Totals

Annual Totals

Personnel Costs: Chief Executive Officer Chief Operating Officer Projects Manager Community Outreach Health Educator/Provider Marketing Manager Administrative Assistant/Bookkeeper

$65,000 $65,000 $65,000 $50,000 $36,000 $30,000

Fringe Benefits: Average fringe benefits are estimated at 35%

$108,850

$311,000

$108,850

Travel: Two WCWI Personnel or WCWI Members for Training and/or Technical Assistance -- One Trip Per Quarter Mileage: 2 travelers X $0.51 per mile X 100 Miles (Times Four Trips) Airfare -- Tulsa International to Regan National Airport: 2 travelers X $555 per ticket (Times Four Trips) Lodging: 2 travelers X 3 nights X $150 per night (Times Four Trips) Per Diem: 2 Full Days plus 2 Partial Travel Days (3.5 Days) X 2 travelers X $71 per day (Time Four Trips) Parking & Luggage Fees: $10 per day parking + $50 Luggage Fee 2 travelers X $60 (Times Four Trips)

$408 $4,440 $3,600 $1,988 $480

Equipment:

$10,916

$0

No equipment will be purchased.

Supplies: SurveyMonkey Platinum -- Annual Fee Copier Lease ($1,000 per month X 12 months) General Office Supplies ($350 per month X 12 months) Health Education and Outreach Supplies ($500 per month X 12 months) Software -- Annual Outlay Wi-Fi Connections ($75 per month X 12 months) Telephone ($25 per month X 12 months) Microsoft Surface Pro3 (6 units X $1,500 each)

$750 $12,000 $4,200 $6,000 $6,000 $900 $300 $7,500

$37,650

Contractual: Office Rental ($1,500 per month X 12 months) Auditor Oklahoma Center for Non-Profits -- Annual Membership Fee Bartlesville Chamber of Commerce -- Annual Membership Fee National Cooperative of Health Networks -- Annual Membership

$18,000 $5,000 $500 $125 $575

$24,200

Other: Washington County Wellness Initiative, Inc. -- Funds for each workgroup currently which are currently members of WCWI are available to help with awareness, events, education, etc. The workgroups will participate in the WCWI Grant Application Process to assure that proposed expenditures are in compliance with HRSA Grant Rules and Regulations. The WCWI Board will review and award funding in compliance with WCWI By-laws, Policies, and Procedures. Access to Healthcare Casa Hispania Hispanic Outreach Center Church Women United Car Repair Project Family Promise of Washington County, Inc. Preventative Health Partnership Project Prom Washington County Affordable Housing Coalition Washington County Anti-Drug Network Washington County Association for Mental Health Washington County Suicide Prevention Coalition Washington County Transportation Coalition

$1,200 $1,200 $1,200 $1,200 $1,200 $1,200 $1,200 $1,200 $1,200 $1,200 $1,200

Administrative Costs: $25,291

5% of Operating Budget

$13,200

$25,291

In-Kind: Volunteer Time -- We will have a system to keep track of all volunteer hours that can be utilized for In-Kind Match on grants for which we apply

$0

Use of Facilities -- We will have a system to keep track of Use of Facilities fees that can be utilized for In-Kind Match on grants for which we apply

TOTAL

17 June 2015

WCWI Business Plan

$531,107 Page 13


RESOURCES These funding sources are or will  be used in support of the work outlined in the WCWI Business/Strategic/Sustainability Plan. In‐Kind Contributions are also  delineated as are plans to solicit other grants, these items will be utilized as leverage for future grants.

Source of Funds

How Funds and Other Resources are Utilized

Amount

IMPaCT Grant

Through this grant awarded by the Public Health Institute of Oklahoma (PHIO), WCWI and PHIO contracted with Dr. Lisa  Rubenstein and Dr. Ardis Olson to provide academic detailing for primary care clinicians in recognizing the signs of  depression and suicide ideation and in using the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ 9).  The grant also provided  supplies and the services of a Performance Enhancement Assistant to aid practices in the collection of data and the  audit of charts.  This funding also provided fees for legal services and application for preparation and submission of an  application to become a 501(c)(3) nonprofit corporation. The 501(c)(3) status was granted and effective as of 8  February 2014.

$10,000

HRSA Network  Planning Grant 

This project ran from 1 June 2014 through 31 May 2015 and provided Network Planning for WCWI. The 2014‐2015  Community Health Assessment was completed, the 2015 Update for the Free and Low‐Cost Healthcare Resource Guide  was completed, seven focus groups were faciliated, policies and procedures for WCWI were implemented, and Medical  Home marketing/awareness collatoral was created and distributed.

$85,000

Bartlesville Community  Foundation Grant

The majority of these funds were used to purchase one‐year of General and D&O Liability Insurance for the WCWI  Board and Operations. Remaining funds will be utilized for leveraging other funding sources.

$2,000

Agency for  Healthcare Research  WCWI has been selected as the second of three communities to participate in this project with Principal Investigator Dr.  and Quality Healthier  James Mold in early 2015. WCWI will monitor health information technology including the types and number of health  Unknown at This  Together Project   information technology implemented, expanded or strengthened for the health information exchange, patient/disease  Time registry, and telehealth/telemedicine, as applicable.  (Through University  of Oklahoma) Agency for  Payment for primary care is increasingly tied to outcomes and to electronic documentation and reporting of those  Healthcare Research  outcomes. Until now primary care providers have been on their own to figure out how to do that. Thanks to this  grant  and Quality Grant:  Unknown at This  from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), the Oklahoma Primary Healthcare Improvement  Reducing Risk of  Cooperative (OPHIC) can help  implement many of the changes primary care providers need to qualify for the new  Time Cardiovascular Events   payments and incentives. WCWI will collaborate with Dr. Woods of the Caney Valley Medical Clinic to recruit local  (Through University  primary care physicians to participate in this project. of Oklahoma)

OU‐Tulsa College of  Medicine

As part of the  Rural Residency Program at the Caney Valley Medical Clinic and  as Clinical Assistant Professor, Dr.  Woods will provide the services of 3‐4 primary care residents each year to assist with WCWI projects as needed and as  aligns with the residency requirements.

In‐Kind Contribution

Care Coordination  Referral System  Project (Through the  University of  Oklahoma)

WCWI continue negotiations with Terrie Fritz, LCSW, Clinical Instructor and Director of the Center for Social Work and  Health with University of Oklahoma for the Care Coordination Referral System project.  Dr. Tom Britt, GAP Clinic, has  tentatively agreed to utilize the Care Coordinator. Jay Dyer, Vice President, Commercial Lending at American Heritage  Bank, has tentatively agreed to provide payment methods.

Salary for one year to  eighteen months for a  Care Coordinator

Page 1 of 2


RESOURCES These funding sources are or will  be used in support of the work outlined in the WCWI Business/Strategic/Sustainability Plan. In‐Kind Contributions are also  delineated as are plans to solicit other grants, these items will be utilized as leverage for future grants.

Source of Funds

How Funds and Other Resources are Utilized

Amount

Through this project, WCWI, in partnership with the Oklahoma Dental Foundation (ODF), plans to offer oral health  services to low‐income individuals through the use of the MobileSmiles dental van. During the first year, the WCWI  plans to bring the MobileSmiles van to various locations throughout Washington County for a total of seven clinic visits.  Dentists, dental assistants, and other employees will provide dental treatment inside their RV‐style mobile dental care unit. On average, a site visit day lasts 6‐8 hours, serves 8‐12  Bartlesville Regional  patients and delivers about $2,000 worth of dental care services. These services include: advance screenings; fillings;  United Way Venture  extractions; preventive care‐‐cleanings,sealants and fluoride varnish; and oral health education. The mobile unit does  Grant [Awarded] not provide root canals, oral surgery, dentures or partials. Additionally, ODF will provide Educational Screening Visits  wherein dental professionals visit Washington County to conduct oral health assessments and provide oral health  education. MobileSmiles Oklahoma provides all screening forms and supplies. Therefore, through this BRUW venture  grant, $600 per clinic visit will leverage approximately $2,000 worth of dental care services provided to low income  individuals in greatest need. 

$2,500

This five‐year project, slated to begin on 1 July 2015, is awarded by the Cherokee Nation, acting through its Behavioral  Health Prevention Programs (CNBHPP) Services, which developed the Cherokee Nation Community Action Network  (CAN). The CAN will target Strategic Prevention Framework‐Partnership for Success (SPF‐PFS) funds in two areas: (1)  Cherokee Nation  prescription drug misuse and abuse among persons aged 12 to 25: and (2) underage drinking among persons aged 12 to  Behavioral Health  20 in eleven Tribal Jurisdictional Service Area (TJSA) communities, one of which is Washington County. The goal of the  PP‐Partnership For  initiative is to reduce the negative consequences of substance abuse specifically prescription drug misuse and abuse  Success‐State  through a community‐based prevention strategy utilizing the Strategic Prevention Framework.  Specifically, the project  Incentive Grant [Five  will: 1) Reduce substance abuse‐related problems in communities that lie within the Cherokee Nation TJSA; 2) Prevent  Year Award, Amount  the onset and reduce the progression of the consumption and harmful consequences of prescription drug misuse and  Listed is Per Year] abuse, and  underage drinking of alcohol, within 11 counties in the TJSA;  3) Build prevention capacity and  infrastructure at the Cherokee Nation and community levels; and 4) Develop a replicable, sustainable Strategic  Prevention Framework model using learning groups within and between The Nation and community efforts.

$88,260

This three‐year project, slated to begin 1 June 2015, was not funded. We were encouraged to apply for another HRSA  Planning Grant in Fall 2015 and then apply for another HRSA Outreach Grant in Fall 2016. ORHP’s Outreach Program is a  community‐based program targeted to improve outreach and service delivery in local and regional rural communities.  The goals for the Outreach Program are the following: a. Expand the delivery of health care services to include new and  HRSA Outreach Grant  enhanced services exclusively in rural communities; b. Deliver health care services through a strong consortium, in  [Not Awarded] which every consortium member organization is actively involved and engaged in the planning and delivery of services;  c. Utilize and/or adapt an evidence‐based or promising practice model(s) in the delivery of health care services; and d.  Improve population health, demonstrate health outcomes and sustainability. The TSET Healthy Living project goals and  objectives are directly aligned with the HRSA Outreach Grant objectives.

$600,000

WCWI applied for funding which would be available from 1 July 2015 through 30 June 2016 to fulfill the purposes of the  TSET Healthy Living Project throughout Washington County.  The Oklahoma Tobacco Settlement Endowment Trust  (TSET) seeks to prevent and reduce tobacco use and obesity through strategic actions across businesses, cities and  TSET Healthy Living  governments, community institutions and organizations and schools. Interventions are based on best and promising  Grant (Not Funded) practices, which combined, help to create a comprehensive community‐based program. This funding stream is  renewable for up to five years. 

$400,000

Page 2 of 2


FUTURE ACTIVITIES

D


SUSTAINABILITY Definition Your network does work AND the work has an impact The impact can be seen and understood by members The impact is valued by members from their own perspective

BUSINESS PLANNING

Baldridge Framework

Systems Approach

Workforce & Customers

Process & Operations

Customers & Partners

Knowledge & Learning

Results

Description Product/Service is produced and can be delivered in an effective and efficient manner

Inward Communication

Outward Communication

Work Plan

Description Mission, Vision, Strategies

Product/Service has a purpose in meeting the needs of the customer

Marketing Plan

Marketing Customers, Products/ Services

Evidence of perceived value by customers

Communication Plan

Operations Workforce, Infrastructure, and Partner

Evaluation Plan

Leadership Capacity

Strategic Plan

Financial Outlook

Leadership

Strategic Planning Succession Plan

SUSTAINABILITY is sustaining the efforts and successes of our work over time.

A SYSTEM is a bunch of parts working together to create a result.

A BUSINESS PLAN illustrates for stakeholders that an organization is able to be sustained.

A NETWORK is a broad organizational structure with paying members whose purpose is to nurture a healthy community.

“This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number P10RH26875, Rural Health Network Development Planning Grant Program for $85,000. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.� Adapted from Rural Health Innovations Network Sustainability Workshop, March 2015


Strategic Plan 1 July 2015 – 30 June 2020 Our Vision All Washington County residents live in healthy communities with access to: physical and m e n t a l health services progressive and caring community services and r e s o u r c e s information community involvement opportunities

Our Promise Washington County Wellness Initiative strengthens and transforms the public health infrastructure through community-based action

Tagline Washington County Wellness Initiative: Nurturing Healthy Communities

Statement of Strategic Direction Washington County Wellness Initiative aims to strategically expand and improve quality health and healthcare services by a) assessing and prioritizing the health and health care needs of our communities, b) requesting external assistance when necessary, and c) attracting sufficient funding to hire or contract for resources needed to support community health. WCWI will offer a variety of accessible, inclusive, and outcome-rich learning opportunities delivered by safe, well-trained, and supervised professionals to citizens of Washington County with an emphasis in services to underserved populations through a network of deliberate partnerships with governmental agencies, business entities, educational institutions, community-based organizations, professionals, volunteers, families, neighborhoods, and funders.

Page 1 of 4


Goal One:

All Washington County Wellness Initiative stakeholders will have trust in, heightened awareness of, and enthusiasm for our work resulting in greater visibility and support for WCWI.

KEY RESULTS: 1. Board, staff, and volunteers will understand and be equipped to communicate the imperative of improving of health and healthcare in general and WCWI’s values, culture, and program approach in particular.    2.

Staff will employ a variety of methods to communicate with external stakeholders. NOTE: External stakeholders include, but are not limited to, program participants and their families, program partners, foundation and individual donors, corporate sponsors, universities, Public Health Institute of Oklahoma staff, Oklahoma State Department of Health staff, and the general public.     

3.

Research information and/or participate in professional development for crafting messages which effectively communicate the need for quality healthcare and healthy communities. Formulate a plan for reaching out to targeted audiences with messages crafted to address misconceptions and cultivate support. Expand board education opportunities to better equip member’s ability to act as effective ambassadors for WCWI.

Develop a system/schedule for maintenance of website areas accessible by external stakeholders and general public. Maximize use of social media. Increase the number of face-to-face opportunities to educate stakeholders about WCWI Design and regularly distribute electronic newsletters targeted to priority audiences. Review and continuously update a system/schedule for print and broadcast media.

Staff and volunteer leadership will have the capacity to effectively manage an emergency or crisis, including communications with media and the public.   

Develop emergency/crisis communication procedures: Risk Management Handbook; Business Continuity Plan. Develop a written plan specific to media communication in an emergency or crisis. Practice emergency/crisis response.

Goal Two:

Washington County Wellness Initiative will experience fiscal stability and sustainability by generating funds from a variety of different sources.

KEY RESULTS: 1.

Review fundraising events currently utilized by WCWI Workgroups.   

Calculate Return on Investment. Investigate opportunities for cross-workgroup fundraising. Analyze fundraising events and scheduling throughout service area.

Page 2 of 4


2.

Board members will strengthen their capacity and actively participate in fund development efforts.  

3.

Donor cultivation will be accelerated by intentionally reaching out to individuals, foundations, businesses and community groups.    

4.

The WCWI Leadership Team will spearhead the effort by creating a manageable implementation plan, equipping members, and monitoring progress. Utilize board contacts for donor cultivation, event sponsorship, in-kind contributions and face-to-face meetings with prospective donors.

Survey current donors for their perceptions and feedback. Develop and implement a plan to offer sponsorship opportunities to small businesses. Identify and secure grants from at least one new source every year. Identify and pursue annual giving opportunities by existing individual, foundation and corporate donors.

Paid network memberships will result in a 100% fee-for-service increase within the next five years.    

Research, develop and implement a plan to increase participant income from established local businesses. Research, develop and implement a plan to expand new WCWI-sponsored health screening programs as a source of fees. Research, develop and implement a plan to offer fee-based professional development and training. Collaborate with the Bartlesville Chamber of Commerce to implement a framework for local businesses to achieve Certified Healthy Business status.

Goal Three:

Washington County Wellness Initiative will ensure organizational growth through effective leadership, management systems, and operational structure.

KEY RESULTS: 1.

The WCWI Board will oversee and ensure a sound and effective executive leadership team.   

2.

Thoroughly explore and identify WCWI Workgroup needs. Employ best-practices for organizational management. Develop a communication plan to ensure leadership teams and workgroups understand the roles of the executive leadership team.

Attract and retain qualified and passionate volunteers to fulfill WCWI needs.   

Research and draft model policy addressing background checks and drug screening for volunteers Develop a plan to ensure that volunteer hours are properly tracked and recorded. Provide training, awareness, and professional development opportunities.

Page 3 of 4


3.

Ensure WCWI’s commitment to diversity, inclusion, and collaboration is embedded into all aspects of the organization’s operations.    

Actively incorporate principles of inclusion and collaboration throughout all WCWI projects. Evaluate WCWI’s policies, procedures and benefits to ensure they align with WCWI’s commitment to diversity, inclusion, and collaboration. Seek broad and inclusive representation among board, staff, and volunteers that reflects the breadth of the diverse populations served by WCWI. Participate in community, local, state, tribal, and national networks to ensure broadest visibility for WCWI.

Goal Four:

The Washington County Wellness Initiative will use community assessment results and other data captured from our target population to enhance the WCWI workgroup structures and provide consistent quality services and activities to serve the current needs in Washington County.

KEY RESULTS: 1.

WCWI will expand programs in relation to community needs and opportunities.   

2.

Attract and retain volunteer base to meet the needs of WCWI Workgroups.    

3.

Develop and coordinate a plan to increase participation of existing workgroups. Explore and develop new partnerships to reach populations underserved by WCWI. Ensure strong support for workgroups.

Promote health, fitness and nutrition-based activities. Capitalize on opportunities to expand programming and projects throughout Washington County. Capitalize on opportunities to infuse programming with conflict resolution awareness and skill development. Develop and implement a plan to establish needs-based groups that emphasize meeting the needs identified by our target population.

Attract and retain qualified WCWI Workgroup Chairs.    

Develop strategies to minimize loss of Workgroup Chairs. Identify new sources of Workgroup Chairs. Ensure relevance and effectiveness of leadership training. Increase the number of individuals who provide on-site assistance to Workgroup Chairs.

Page 4 of 4


WCWI BUSINESS PLAN 

                

  1.  Member Needs Assessments:  What  work/jobs  are  our  members  trying  to  get  done  or  problems  do  we  want  to  resolve?  For  purposes  of  this  initial  business  plan,  we  are  working  under  the  assumption  the  members  of  WCWI  are  the  workgroups  and  their  respective  participants.  However,  long‐term  sustainability  for  WCWI  will  require  a  membership  class  capable of and willing to maintain prolonged paid memberships within WCWI.    Work:    1. Access to Healthcare (Workgroup)  a. Gather/compile  data  to  demonstrate  Washington  County’s  need  for  access  to  healthcare  b. Write grants to fund the initiatives needed to improve access to healthcare  c. Inform  the  public  of  options  and  how  to  best  access  healthcare  in  Washington  County  i. Free and Low‐Cost Healthcare Providers’ Resource Guide  ii. Medical Home Marketing Materials  d. Improve and expand current facilities and healthcare systems needed to deliver  healthcare services  e. Work  with  legislators  and  government  agencies  to  improve  policies/laws  impacting healthcare  2. Casa Hispana Hispanic Outreach Center (501(c)(3))  a. Provide assistance to Hispanic individuals learning about their community  b. Provide assistance to Hispanic individuals becoming a citizen  c. Connect Hispanic individuals with resources  d. Assist  community  organizations  by  providing  free  interpreting,  translation  and  case management for Hispanic individuals and families  e. Operate thrift store to fund programming  f. Make and sell tamales to fund programming  3. Church Women United Car Repair Project (501(c)(3))  a. Assist low‐income individuals with transportation needs  i. Provide car repairs  ii. Provide car insurance  iii. Provide car tags  b. Secure funding to sustain programming  4. Family Promise of Washington County, Inc. (501(c)(3))  a. Secure  host  congregations  to  provide  temporary  shelter  to  homeless  children  and families  Page 1 of 10


b. Provide programming  designed  to  assist  homeless  and  low‐income  families  achieve sustainability  c. Secure passenger and cargo vans for program transportation  d. Maintain day center facility  e. Recruit and employ staff  f. Secure funding to sustain programming  5. Preventative Health Partnership (Workgroup)  a. Promote safe and healthy lifestyles  i. Support Project Fit America at Jane Phillips and Dewey Elementary  Schools  ii. Encourage other schools to implement Project Fit America  iii. Support FLOWCo which was introduced by PHP and is now supported  through Jane Phillips Medical Center  iv. Support local health fairs by providing materials and volunteers  b. Create Safe Routes to School  i. Secure and install street art at major crosswalks to get traffic to slow  down  ii. Secure volunteers to serve as crossing guards  iii. Sponsor Walking School Busses on International Walk to School Day  iv. Update Walk to School Survey  v. Support Walk to School program which was introduced by PHP and is  receiving more ownership from schools  c. Create Bicycle/Pedestrian Friendly Communities  i. Complete and implement nationally rated plan  1. Streets Policy  2. Sidewalks  3. Parking  4. Bikeways  ii. Recruit a new “champion” for the Bicycle Rodeo  iii. Recruit a new “champion” for SafeCyclist  iv. Secure maintenance for Bicycle Racks installed by PHP  v. Secure funding for more Bicycle Racks, possible cost‐share arrangement  with local businesses  vi. Support the City of Bartlesville’s maintenance of the Share the Road  program introduced by PHP  d. Spearhead the Certified Healthy Community Program  i. Introduce Lunch Hour Walking Programming  ii. Create and install QR Codes on interesting buildings  iii. Research joint use policies for school districts’ playgrounds   iv. Support maintenance, improvement, and expansion of Pathfinder  Pathways ($6,000 from Healthy Communities Grant to go for signage)  e. Maintain a social media presence  f. Recruit PHP members  g. Secure funding to sustain and increase programming  Page 2 of 10


6. Project Prom (Workgroup)  a. Provide prom experience for low‐income youth  i. Girls  1. Prom Day Hairstyling  2. Prom Day Make‐up  3. Prom Dress  4. Prom Jewelry  ii. Boys receive tuxedos for the prom  b. Secure prom dresses via donations  c. Secure cleaning of prom dresses via collaboration with local businesses  d. Secure tuxedos via cash donations and collaboration with local businesses  e. Secure cosmetology services via collaboration with local beauty school  f. Secure prom jewelry via donations  g. Secure storage and dressing room space for dress distribution  h. Secure volunteers to assist with programming  7. Washington County Affordable Housing Coalition (Workgroup)  a. Assess housing gaps and barriers  b. Maintains a housing advocacy group designed to pull community partners  together to increase and preserve the supply of decent, affordable, accessible  housing for low‐ and moderate‐income households in Washington County  c. Mobilize community partners to increase access to affordable housing through  committed action  d. Housing Resource Center  i. Create a one‐stop‐shop to help people with their housing needs and  direct them to housing resources  ii. Maintain a database of affordable housing units, applications for  subsidized housing complexes and housing information such as “How to  Avoid Foreclosure”, “HUD Homeownership”, “Housing Counseling”,  “Guide to Single Family Home Mortgage Insurance”, “Shopping for Your  Home”, and much more  e. Renter Education  i. Provide a 9‐12 hour renter education program designed to help renters  communicate with landlords, create a personalized plan for stable  housing, plan a workable household budget that makes paying rent a  priority, review rental agreements to understand common terms and  expectations, and learn how to take care of a home and how to move‐in  and move out the right way  ii. Recruit volunteers to facilitate renter education program  f. Housing Rehabilitation  i. Assist low to moderate income families with maintaining their homes in a  safe, healthy condition that encourages pride of ownership in Bartlesville  and surrounding communities  ii. Designed for residents who intend to stay in their homes  iii. Not a remodel program for resale  Page 3 of 10


g. Partnership Development  i. Provide connections and linkages between affordable housing partners  1. Develop and preserve housing for low and moderate income  citizens   2. Rehabilitate existing properties and new construction  3. Forge strategic partnerships  4. Actively support policies and initiatives promoting affordable  housing  h. Secure resources to implement, maintain, and expand programming  8. Washington County Anti‐Drug Network (Workgroup)  a. Provide a continuum of services for families, children, and youth which are  accessible, available, effective, efficient, and affordable  b. Support, strengthen and build protective factors in our community   c. Prevent youth substance abuse  d. Create a better future for families, children and youth through drug prevention  efforts  e. Reduce underage drinking   f. Shifting social norms to a no tolerance policy for underage drinking  g. Reduce the number of alcohol‐related arrests/offenses in Washington County  h. Change policy and procedures on charges made  i. Educate public on consequences of drinking and driving  j. Educate the community on healthy ways to mentor to youth  k. Strengthen our relationship with law enforcement   l. Educate law enforcement on community assessment results regarding alcohol  abuse  m. Promote programs implemented to decrease drug and alcohol use in  Washington County youth  n. Recruit workgroup members  o. Recruit Leadership Class Committee members  p. Recruit Education/Teacher Committee  q. Recruit Y2Y Campers and Adult Volunteers  r. Coordinate with WCWI Leadership Team and Cherokee Nation to implement  Cherokee Nation Partnership for Success SPF‐SIG Grant Project  s. Launch new workgroup image  i. Name:  C.H.A.N.G.E.   ii. Vision:  [This is a work in progress]  iii. Promise: Supporting and empowering one another toward positive  lifestyle change   iv. Tagline:  Creating Hope and Nurturing Great Environments for  Washington County  v. Create logo  t. Secure resources to sustain, improve, and expand programming   

Page 4 of 10


9. Washington County Association for Mental Health (501(c)(3))  a. Improve mental health throughout Washington County  b. Promoting development of community programs and policies which:   i. Increase availability of quality mental health services for children and  adults  ii. Strengthen mental health workforce recruitment, retention and training  iii. Provide a full range of preventative mental health services  iv. Include inpatient and outpatient day treatment for persons with drug  addictions  v. Improve communication and joint planning among mental health  providers  c. Recruit members  d. Secure resources to sustain, improve, and expand programming  10. Washington County Suicide Prevention Coalition (Workgroup)  a. Prevent suicide in Washington County  b. Reduce the rate of suicide in Washington County   c. Provide awareness and education  i. Create and disseminate resources to citizens and businesses  ii. Sponsor Suicide Prevention Week Summit  d. Provide effective prevention, intervention and postvention  i. Provide Question, Persuade, and Refer (QPR) Gatekeeper Training for  Suicide Prevention to 25% of Washington County residents by 2015  ii. Provide Applied Suicide Intervention Skills Training (ASIST) two times per  year  iii. Provide Mental Health First Aid training two times per year  e. Develop and Implement a Suicide Prevention Surveillance System (SPSS)  f. Assist Tri‐county Technology Center (TCT) in implementing the Columbia  TeenScreen  g. Recruit members  h. Secure resources to sustain, improve, and expand programming  11. Washington County Transportation Coalition (Workgroup)  a. Address the unmet transportation needs of Washington County in order to  improve economic development and enhance quality of life  b. Secure resources to sustain the CityRide Circuit pilot project for the flexible, fixed  route bus service  c. Secure resources to expand the CityRide Circuit routes for the flexible, fixed  route bus service  Problems:  1. Lack of workgroup participants  2. Challenges in serving all of Washington County, i.e. outside Bartlesville City Limits  3. Lack of monetary sustainability  4. Lack of full‐time, professional management and oversight  5. Lack of local and state governmental support  6. Unstable healthcare provider environment, i.e. change in ownership of local hospital  Page 5 of 10


1a. Member Pains:  Describe  the  negative  emotions,  undesired  costs,  and  situations  that  your  members  experience  before,  during,  or  after  the  work/job  done.  The  workgroup  participants experience on‐going frustration due to the inability to finish a project. For example,  each workgroup has at one time or another developed an action plan to complete the project,  started a project, and watched them fall apart or become more difficult to complete due to the  lack  of  leadership,  continuous  participation  by  members,  and/or  financial  resources.  These  barriers plus a lack of a coordinated marketing plan resulted in fewer people served than the  workgroups  hoped  to  serve.  Due  to  the  lack  of  a  centralized,  systemic  plan  to  address  the  unmet healthcare needs within the community, at times efforts are duplicated.   What  are  members’  main  challenges?  The  WCWI  Workgroups  primary  challenges  revolve  around  unstable  team  membership.  The  workgroups  are  comprised  of  volunteers,  many  of  whom participate out of passion for the issue rather than at the urging of their employer. As  such, a tremendous amount of member turnover results and workgroup participation declines.  When  this  happens,  momentum  is  lost  for  current  projects  and  the  workgroups  often  must  retrain members or in some cases “reinvent the wheel.” Although Bartlesville is an extremely  generous philanthropic community, the number of non‐profits continues to increase while the  donor base remains constant or is in slight decline.  What risks do your members’ fear? The primary fear of the WCWI Workgroups is that services  they provide will not reach the intended clientele in a timely manner, if at all. Another fear is  dissolution of the workgroup if their “champions” or key volunteers are no longer participating.  Finally, the WCWI Workgroups never seem to have enough money to meet all of their goals and  objectives.  What common mistakes do our members make? The WCWI Workgroup membership is driven  by passion. Oftentimes, planning and/or organizational documentation may not be completed  in  an  effective,  accurate,  and  timely  manner.  The  workgroups  often  fail  to  track  results  in  a  manner which can be easily translated into community impact.       1b. Member Gains:  Describe  the  benefits  your  members  expect,  desire,  or  would  be  surprised by; including functional utility, social gains, positive emotions, and cost savings. If the  WCWI Workgroups had resources to effectively, accurately, and consistently track the results of  their  work  through  surveys,  focus  groups,  one‐on‐one  interviews,  social  media,  and  other  methods,  they  may  be  surprised  by  the  social  gains  and  positive  emotions  they  have  already  provided to the community and our target population. Additionally, repeatable processes will  increase  the  functional  utility  of  each  workgroup  and  reduce  cost  and  time  investments.  By  implementation  of  these  methods,  the  community  would  benefit  from  a  reduction  in  duplication of efforts and the workgroup members would experience more positive emotions  when project are envisioned, planned, executed, and successful.  What  would  make  your  members  work  easier?  Standardized  forms  and  methodology  for  tracking  donors  and  tracking  cash  and  in‐kind  donations  would  benefit  our  members.  WCWI  and each of the member workgroups would benefit from board development and training.  How  do  your  members  measure  success  or  failure?    Currently  workgroups  track  activities  relevant to fulfilling their individual missions and appear to be more project‐oriented while not  tracking  impact  of  the  activities  provided.  Based  upon  data  gathered  and  observations  made  during the HRSA Network Planning grant period, a Balanced Score Card has been developed for  Page 6 of 10


each workgroup to aid them in gathering, reporting, and measuring data to quantify the impact  of each project.      1c. Ranking Members Pains and Gains:  Rank each gain according to its relevance to  our members (substantial ‐ insignificant, and frequency)    INTENSITY  FREQUENCY  PROBLEM/PAIN  RANKING  High  Ongoing  Lack of workgroup participants  High  Ongoing  Lack of monetary sustainability  Lack of full‐time, professional management and  Medium  Ongoing  oversight  Varies by Project  Medium  Lack of local and state governmental support  and Workgroup  Low  Ongoing  Unstable healthcare provider environment  Challenges in serving all of Washington County, i.e.  Medium  Ongoing  outside Bartlesville City Limits  Inability to fully market services to target  High  Ongoing  population  Inability to reach as many people in our target  High  Ongoing  demographic as desired    RELEVANCE  FREQUENCY  GAIN  RANKING  Substantial  Ongoing  Increase number of clients served  Substantial  Ongoing  Increase volunteer hours  Varies by Project  Medium  Reduce or streamline cost for projects  and Workgroup  Medium  Ongoing  Reduce workgroup stress  Insignificant  Ongoing  Increase workgroup satisfaction  Increase workgroup capacity and leadership  Substantial  Ongoing  retention  Medium  Ongoing  Increase workgroup “reach”  Substantial  Ongoing  Increase financial stability    2.  Description of Business Product or Services:  What  business  product  or  service  will  reduce member pains and increase member gains (needs assessment) AND is aligned with the  network’s mission vision, promise and strategic objective?    Our Vision:  All Washington County  residents live in healthy communities with access to: 1)  physical  and  mental  health  services;  2)  progressive  and  caring  community  services;  and  3)  resources information and community involvement opportunities.  Page 7 of 10


Our Promise:  Washington  County  Wellness  Initiative  strengthens  and  transforms  the  public  health infrastructure through community‐based action.    Tagline:  Washington County Wellness Initiative: Nurturing Healthy Communities    Project Goals    Goal 1:   Achieve Efficiencies. We will focus on identifying ways to achieve better system       efficiencies and improve regional and/or local rural health care services.  Goal 2:    Expand Access To, Coordinate and Improve the Quality of Essential Health Care       Services. We will focus on ways to build capacity and a network infrastructure       that enables entities to coordinate care and increase to build capacity and a       network infrastructure that enables entities to coordinate care and increase       access to care for rural communities.  Goal 3:   Strengthen the Rural Health Care System as a Whole. We will focus on ways to       enhance community and partner relationships to promote involvement and       participation in network planning activities.    Washington County Wellness Initiative (501(c)(3)) Products and Services Offered    1. Provide administrative Compliance Services for Workgroups      2. Facilitate Education and Community Awareness Activities      3. Provide Event Planning/Coordination for Workgroups      4. Facilitate community‐based action      5. Provide fund development services for WCWI and member workgroup sustainability    6. Provide grant Research/Writing/Administration      7. Conduct and disseminate legislative research, updates, alerts for local, state and federal  laws, ordinances      8. Conduct outreach to foster relationship development and partnership formation   9. Develop and Implement Policies and Procedures      10. Serve as a Liaison with PHIO, OU Medical Research, and other applicable organizations    11. Conduct strategic planning/action planning for WCWI and member workgroups        12. Assist WCWI and member workgroups with task management  13. Provide technology/marketing/social media support       14. Facilitate training and professional development activities      15. Provide workgroup integration oversight          2.a‐c.  Relieve Pains/Create Gains/Ranking Pains and Gains:  How  do  these  products  and  services  alleviate  member  pains?  How  do  these  products  or  services  create  member gains or reduce negative emotions? Rank each pain reliever according to the intensity  it  represents  for  our  members.  Rank  each  gain  creator  according  to  its  relevance  to  our  members. Rank all products and services according to their importance to our members.  See  attached chart.  Page 8 of 10


3.  Desired end‐User Experience & Relationship:  What experience do you want our members  to  have  while  they  are  receiving  or  using  our  products/services?  (I.e.  personal,  interactive,  remote, etc.)   The WCWI Leadership would like our member to experience the joy of following  an  inspired  idea  from  inception  to  manifestation  of  a  completed  goal.  We  would  like  our  members  to  collaboratively  address  each  identified  community  need  and/or  gap  in  service  in  order  to  fulfill  the  vision  of  our  organization  and  the  visions  of  each  individual  workgroup.;  thereby,  meeting  the  needs  of  our  target  population.  Interactions  with  the  WCWI  team  will  occur through personal one‐on‐one meetings, group activities, and electronic means.  What  relationship  do  our  members  expect  WCWI  to  establish  and  maintain  with  them  when  they  receive  or  use  our  products/services?    (I.e.  personal  assistance,  self‐service,  etc.)  The  WCWI Workgroup members expect WCWI Leadership to provide products and/or services in a  professional, courteous, respectful, consistent, and timely manner.    4.  Product or Service Communication and Delivery:  What  communication  methods  will  WCWI use with our members as they learn about, receive and use our products/services? What  are  the  methods  WCWI  can  use  to  deliver  our  products/services?    WCWI  currently  utilizes  a  newly designed website and Facebook page as our primary sources of marketing.  E‐mail is used  for  internal  and  external  communication  and  coordinated  with  the  Bartlesville  Community  Foundation,  Chamber  of  Commerce,  and  United  Way  to  facilitate  large  e‐mail  blasts.  The  Bartlesville  Examiner‐Enterprise  consistently  provides  coverage  of  WCWI  events  and  accomplishments.    Medical  Home  marketing  materials  are  in  print  form  for  mass  distribution  and include posters, tri‐fold brochures, and postcards. These materials can also be downloaded  from the website. WCWI also produces quarterly newsletters, an annual report, and a free and  low‐cost  healthcare  providers’  resource  guide,  also  available  in  printed  form  or  for  download  from  the  WCWI  website.  WCWI  now  has  a  hotline  available  which  is  answered  by  the  leadership  team  to  provide  information  to  the  community  as  needed.    The  WCWI  Leadership  Team  is  tracking  website  and  Facebook  visits,  calls  received,  and  number  of  materials  distributed and all methods appear to be effective at this time.    5.  Key Initiatives:  What  are  the  key  initiatives  (actions)  needed  to  develop,  implement,  support  and/or  provide  this  product/service?    The  WCWI  Leadership  Team  must  be  a  sustainable entity in order to provide the products/services outlined above. The funding stream  to achieve sustainability must be approved by the Network Governing Board.    6.  Key Resources:  What  are  the  most  important  tools,  technology,  expertise,  staffing,  materials,  and/or  financial  resources  needed  to  develop,  implement,  support  and/or  provide  this product/service?      Chief Executive Officer  SurveyMonkey Platinum  Chief Operating Officer  Copier Lease  General Office Supplies  Projects Manager  Outreach Health Educator/Provider  Health Education and Outreach Supplies  Marketing Manager  Software  Administrative Assistant/Bookkeeper  Wi‐Fi Connections  Page 9 of 10


Telephone   Bartlesville Chamber of Commerce ‐‐  Microsoft Surface Pro3  Annual Membership  Office Rental Auditor  National Cooperative of Health Networks ‐‐  Oklahoma Center for Non‐Profits ‐‐ Annual  Annual Membership  Membership    7.  Key Partners:  Who are the key partners needed to develop, implement, support and/or  provide the product/service? The WCWI Network Governing Board, the WCWI‐CHIO Board (and  the sectors they represent), the WCWI Leadership Team, and the WCWI Workgroup Chairs    8.  Development & On‐going Costs:    The  attached  proposed  “ideal”  WCWI  Budget  describes and estimates costs related to the products and services described within this plan.  The  proposed  figures  allow  implementation  of  key  initiatives,  infrastructure,  and  resources  along  with  one‐time  hardware  purchases  and  recurring  software  and  membership  fees.  The  WCWI  Budget  Forecast  Assumptions  were  based  upon  eleven  WCWI  workgroups,  current  pricing figures, and past/present staffing needs.    9.  Expected Income:    In  the  future,  to  broaden  the  reach  of  our  network  and  provide  for  sustainability,  we  would  like  to  include  local,  for‐profit,  dues‐paying  business  entities  as  members of WCWI. These dues would be paid on an annual basis. If new 501(c)(3) entities wish  to  become  members  of  WCWI,  a  small  annual  fee  could  be  assessed.  The  WCWI  Leadership  team  will  continue  to  seek  grant  funding,  foundation  support,  private  donations,  corporate  support, and in‐kind donations.      Adapted  from  the  Business  Model  Generation:    Business  Model  Canvas  and  Value  Proposition  Designer  and  designed  by  Rural  Health  Innovations,  a  subsidiary  of  the  National  Health  Resource  Center,  Duluth  Technical  Assistance Training, 2015. 

Page 10 of 10


2.a-c. Relieve Pains/Create Gains/Ranking Pains and Gains: How do these products and services alleviate member pains? How do these products or services create member gains or reduce negative emotions? Rank each pain reliever according to the intensity it represents for our members. Rank each gain creator according to its relevance to our members. Rank all products and services according to their importance to our members.

PRODUCT/SERVICE

Provide administrative Compliance  Services for Workgroups

PROBLEM/PAIN

PROBLEM/PAIN ALLEVIATION

Lack of monetary sustainability, Lack of full‐time, professional  More sustainable funding, Project planning, meeting facilitation, and comprehensive project oversight management and oversight

GAINS

INTENSITY

RELEVANCE

IMPORTANCE TO MEMBERS

Full-time, professional management and oversight to insure compliance and increase capacity

High

Very

Medium

Facilitate Education and Community  Awareness Activities

Lack of workgroup participants, Lack of monetary  sustainability, Lack of local and state governmental support,  Challenges in serving all of Washington County, i.e. outside  Bartlesville City Limits, Inability to fully market services to  target population, Inability to reach as many people in our  target demographic as desired

More volunteers, More sustainable funding, Project planning, meeting facilitation, and comprehensive project oversight, More support from local and state governments, Broader reach, Stronger marketing, Increased capacity to serve more clients

Volunteer Recruitment to increase workgroup capacity, Marketing expertise to increase workgroup “reach”, Fund development guidance and plans to provide financial stability

Medium

Medium

High

Provide Event Planning/Coordination  for Workgroups

Lack of workgroup participants, Lack of monetary  sustainability, Inability to fully market services to target  population, Inability to reach as many people in our target  demographic as desired

More volunteers, More sustainable funding, Project planning, meeting facilitation, and comprehensive project oversight, More support from local and state governments, Broader reach, Stronger marketing, Increased capacity to serve more clients

Full-time, professional management and oversight to insure compliance and increase capacity, Marketing expertise to increase workgroup “reach”, Fund development guidance and plans to provide financial stability

Medium

Medium

Medium

Volunteer Recruitment to increase workgroup capacity, Full-time, professional management and oversight to insure compliance and increase capacity, Marketing expertise to increase workgroup “reach”, Fund development guidance and plans to provide financial stability

Medium

Medium

High

High

Very

High

Facilitate community‐based action

Lack of workgroup participants, Lack of monetary  More volunteers, More sustainable funding, Project sustainability, Challenges in serving all of Washington County,  planning, meeting facilitation, and comprehensive project oversight, More support from local and state i.e. outside Bartlesville City Limits, Inability to fully market  governments, Broader reach, Stronger marketing, services to target population, Inability to reach as many  Increased capacity to serve more clients people in our target demographic as desired

Provide fund development services for  WCWI and member workgroup  sustainability

Lack of monetary sustainability, Lack of local and state  governmental support

Balanced Score Card Reporting System to develop impact statements and thereby increase funding opportunities, Donor/Donation Tracking System to save time during progress reporting, improve accountability More sustainable funding, More support from local and to donors, improve appreciation outreach, and state governments establish needs for fund development, Volunteer Recruitment to increase workgroup capacity, Fund development guidance and plans to provide financial stability

Provide grant  Research/Writing/Administration

Lack of monetary sustainability, Lack of local and state  governmental support

More sustainable funding, More support from local and state governments

Full-time, professional management and oversight to insure compliance and increase capacity, Fund development guidance and plans to provide financial stability

High

Very

High

Lack of full‐time, professional management and oversight,  Project planning, meeting facilitation, and Conduct and disseminate legislative  Lack of local and state governmental support, Unstable  comprehensive project oversight, More support from research, updates, alerts for local, state  healthcare provider environment, Challenges in serving all of  local and state governments, Broader reach, Stronger and federal laws, ordinances marketing, Increased capacity to serve more clients Washington County, i.e. outside Bartlesville City Limits

Full-time, professional management and oversight to insure compliance and increase capacity

Low

Low

Medium

Medium

Medium

Medium

Volunteer Recruitment to increase workgroup capacity, Lack of workgroup participants, Lack of monetary  Full-time, professional management and oversight to Conduct outreach to foster relationship  sustainability, Challenges in serving all of Washington County,  More volunteers, More sustainable funding, More support from local and state governments, Broader insure compliance and increase capacity, Marketing development and partnership  i.e. outside Bartlesville City Limits, Inability to fully market  reach, Stronger marketing, Increased capacity to serve expertise to increase workgroup “reach”, Fund formation services to target population, Inability to reach as many  more clients development guidance and plans to provide financial stability people in our target demographic as desired

19 June 2015

WCWI Business Plan

Pages 11 and 12


2.a-c. Relieve Pains/Create Gains/Ranking Pains and Gains: How do these products and services alleviate member pains? How do these products or services create member gains or reduce negative emotions? Rank each pain reliever according to the intensity it represents for our members. Rank each gain creator according to its relevance to our members. Rank all products and services according to their importance to our members.

PRODUCT/SERVICE

PROBLEM/PAIN

Develop and Implement Policies and  Procedures

Lack of full-time, professional management and oversight, Challenges in serving all of Washington County, i.e. outside Bartlesville City Limits, Inability to fully market services to target population, Inability to reach as many people in our target demographic as desired

Lack of workgroup participants, Lack of monetary sustainability, Lack of local and state governmental support, Unstable healthcare Serve as a Liaison with PHIO, OU  provider environment, Challenges in serving all of Washington Medical Research, and other applicable  County, i.e. outside Bartlesville City Limits, Inability to fully market organizations services to target population, Inability to reach as many people in our target demographic as desired

19 June 2015

GAINS

INTENSITY

RELEVANCE

IMPORTANCE TO MEMBERS

Standardized forms to save time during progress reporting, Balanced Score Card Reporting System to More sustainable funding, Project planning, meeting develop impact statements and thereby increase facilitation, and comprehensive project oversight, More funding opportunities, Donor/Donation Tracking System support from local and state governments, Broader to save time during progress reporting, improve reach, Stronger marketing, Increased capacity to serve accountability to donors, improve appreciation more clients outreach, and establish needs for fund development, Full-time, professional management and oversight to insure compliance and increase capacity

High

Very

Medium

More volunteers, More sustainable funding, Project planning, meeting facilitation, and comprehensive Volunteer Recruitment to increase workgroup capacity, project oversight, More support from local and state Full-time, professional management and oversight to governments, Clarification on healthcare trends to insure compliance and increase capacity, Marketing provide stability in a changing environment, Broader expertise to increase workgroup “reach” reach, Stronger marketing, Increased capacity to serve more clients

Low

Low

Low

More volunteers, More sustainable funding, Project planning, meeting facilitation, and comprehensive project oversight, Broader reach, Stronger marketing, Increased capacity to serve more clients

Full-time, professional management and oversight to insure compliance and increase capacity

Low

Low

Low

Assist WCWI and member workgroups  Lack of full-time, professional management and oversight, Inability to reach as many people in our target demographic as desired with task management

More volunteers, More sustainable funding, Project planning, meeting facilitation, and comprehensive project oversight, More support from local and state governments, Broader reach, Stronger marketing, Increased capacity to serve more clients

Full-time, professional management and oversight to insure compliance and increase capacity

High

Very

High

Provide technology/marketing/social  media support 

Lack of full-time, professional management and oversight, Inability to fully market services to target population, Inability to reach as many people in our target demographic as desired

More volunteers, More sustainable funding, Project planning, meeting facilitation, and comprehensive project oversight, More support from local and state governments, Broader reach, Stronger marketing, Increased capacity to serve more clients

Donor/Donation Tracking System to save time during progress reporting, improve accountability to donors, improve appreciation outreach, and establish needs for fund development, Volunteer Recruitment to increase workgroup capacity, Full-time, professional management and oversight to insure compliance and increase capacity, Marketing expertise to increase workgroup “reach”

High

Very

High

Facilitate training and professional  development activities

Lack of workgroup participants, Lack of monetary sustainability, Lack of local and state governmental support, Unstable healthcare provider environment, Challenges in serving all of Washington County, i.e. outside Bartlesville City Limits, Inability to fully market services to target population, Inability to reach as many people in our target demographic as desired

More volunteers, More sustainable funding, Project planning, meeting facilitation, and comprehensive project oversight, More support from local and state governments, Clarification on healthcare trends to provide stability in a changing environment, Broader reach, Stronger marketing, Increased capacity to serve more clients

Board Development and Training to increase workgroup capacity and board retention

Low

Low

Medium

Provide workgroup integration  oversight

Lack of full-time, professional management and oversight

More volunteers, More sustainable funding, Project planning, meeting facilitation, and comprehensive project oversight, More support from local and state governments, Broader reach, Stronger marketing, Increased capacity to serve more clients

Full-time, professional management and oversight to insure compliance and increase capacity

Medium

Medium

High

Conduct strategic planning/action  planning for WCWI and member  workgroups

Lack of workgroup participants, Lack of monetary sustainability, Lack of full-time, professional management and oversight, Inability to fully market services to target population, Inability to reach as many people in our target demographic as desired

PROBLEM/PAIN ALLEVIATION

WCWI Business Plan

Pages 11 and 12


PROPOSED BUDGET Washington County Wellness Initiative Line Items and Budget Justification

Sub-Totals

Annual Totals

Personnel Costs: Chief Executive Officer Chief Operating Officer Projects Manager Community Outreach Health Educator/Provider Marketing Manager Administrative Assistant/Bookkeeper

$65,000 $65,000 $65,000 $50,000 $36,000 $30,000

Fringe Benefits: Average fringe benefits are estimated at 35%

$108,850

$311,000

$108,850

Travel: Two WCWI Personnel or WCWI Members for Training and/or Technical Assistance -- One Trip Per Quarter Mileage: 2 travelers X $0.51 per mile X 100 Miles (Times Four Trips) Airfare -- Tulsa International to Regan National Airport: 2 travelers X $555 per ticket (Times Four Trips) Lodging: 2 travelers X 3 nights X $150 per night (Times Four Trips) Per Diem: 2 Full Days plus 2 Partial Travel Days (3.5 Days) X 2 travelers X $71 per day (Time Four Trips) Parking & Luggage Fees: $10 per day parking + $50 Luggage Fee 2 travelers X $60 (Times Four Trips)

$408 $4,440 $3,600 $1,988 $480

Equipment:

$10,916

$0

No equipment will be purchased.

Supplies: SurveyMonkey Platinum -- Annual Fee Copier Lease ($1,000 per month X 12 months) General Office Supplies ($350 per month X 12 months) Health Education and Outreach Supplies ($500 per month X 12 months) Software -- Annual Outlay Wi-Fi Connections ($75 per month X 12 months) Telephone ($25 per month X 12 months) Microsoft Surface Pro3 (6 units X $1,500 each)

$750 $12,000 $4,200 $6,000 $6,000 $900 $300 $7,500

$37,650

Contractual: Office Rental ($1,500 per month X 12 months) Auditor Oklahoma Center for Non-Profits -- Annual Membership Fee Bartlesville Chamber of Commerce -- Annual Membership Fee National Cooperative of Health Networks -- Annual Membership

$18,000 $5,000 $500 $125 $575

$24,200

Other: Washington County Wellness Initiative, Inc. -- Funds for each workgroup currently which are currently members of WCWI are available to help with awareness, events, education, etc. The workgroups will participate in the WCWI Grant Application Process to assure that proposed expenditures are in compliance with HRSA Grant Rules and Regulations. The WCWI Board will review and award funding in compliance with WCWI By-laws, Policies, and Procedures. Access to Healthcare Casa Hispania Hispanic Outreach Center Church Women United Car Repair Project Family Promise of Washington County, Inc. Preventative Health Partnership Project Prom Washington County Affordable Housing Coalition Washington County Anti-Drug Network Washington County Association for Mental Health Washington County Suicide Prevention Coalition Washington County Transportation Coalition

$1,200 $1,200 $1,200 $1,200 $1,200 $1,200 $1,200 $1,200 $1,200 $1,200 $1,200

Administrative Costs: $25,291

5% of Operating Budget

$13,200

$25,291

In-Kind: Volunteer Time -- We will have a system to keep track of all volunteer hours that can be utilized for In-Kind Match on grants for which we apply

$0

Use of Facilities -- We will have a system to keep track of Use of Facilities fees that can be utilized for In-Kind Match on grants for which we apply

TOTAL

17 June 2015

WCWI Business Plan

$531,107 Page 13


Sustainability Plan Our Vision All Washington County residents live in healthy communities with access to: physical and m e n t a l health services progressive and caring community services and r e s o u r c e s information community involvement opportunities

Brief History The residents of Washington County came together in January, 2004 to talk about community needs and concerns. Forty-five individuals attended the first meeting from various community sectors including concerned citizens, businesses, government, social services, schools, law enforcement, neighborhoods, faith community, youth serving organizations, health care, and tribal. The group identified areas of concern which included: access for adult indigent health care, lack of affordable health care, lack of adult counseling and mental health issues, need for employee health/wellness programs, lack of affordable housing, lack of dental care, lack of transportation, high costs of medications, need for youth prevention programs, late/no prenatal care especially in the Hispanic population, as well as, medical/health literacy issues among Hispanics, need for advocacy on health issues, daycare for teen moms, children not getting immunized, and the need to educate voters on current issues. In an effort to respond to these concerns, the group formed the WCWI with a mission to strengthen and transform the public health infrastructure in Washington

On 25 May 2015, this assessment tool was adapted from: the Program Sustainability Assessment Tool, copyright 2012, Washington University, St .Louis, MO. All rights reserved. If you would like more information about the original framework or Program Sustainability Assessment Tool, visit http://www.sustaintool.org. Page 1 of 10

Â


County. The WCWI is an Oklahoma Turning Point Coalition formed as part of the Oklahoma State Department of Health, Office of Public Health Innovation, and Oklahoma Turning Point Community Partnerships initiative. WCWI has grown to a diverse group of 190 public health partners. Since that first meeting, the WCWI membership has grown to over 190 community partners from over 20 different community sectors. In December 2010, the Washington County Health Department and the WCWI began a strategy to improve the county’s health through a process called Mobilizing for Action toward Planning and Partnership. This again involved a Community Health Assessment administered countywide and the end result would be a Community Health Improvement Plan. The process included: Vision for Washington County, Four Community Based Assessments, Identification of Strategic Issues, and Formulation of Goals and Strategies. In May 2011, the data from the assessments was presented to the Initiative and four subcommittees were formed: 1) Health Care; 2) Mental Health; 3) Poverty; and 4) Lifestyle and Prevention. Each subcommittee has formulated Goals and Strategies and is working on implementation. The Public Health Institute of Oklahoma (PHIO) has established a certification process to launch a system of county health improvement organizations (CHIOs) throughout the state which can: a) assess and prioritize the health and health care needs of their communities; b) request external assistance; and c) attract sufficient funding to hire or contract for resources (e.g. care managers, registry operators, community health workers, information technology and consultants, pharmacy consultants, etc.) as needed to support primary care and community health. The WCWI was the first organization in the State of Oklahoma to receive certification as a County Health Improvement Organization (CHIO). The WCWI is now one of eighteen CHIOs that form the ground floor of a statewide network that will be able to acquire and develop the resources needed for improving the health care services and health of communities. With assistance from PHIO and University of Oklahoma Department of Family and Community Medicine, WCWI is developing a sustainable quality improvement (QI) support system for primary care providers within our service area including performance evaluation/feedback, identification/spread of best practices, academic detailing, and practice facilitation, coordinated by PHIO with the support of educational institutions.

Current Funding Sources [See Attached WCWI Resources Chart] Partners This initial Sustainability Plan for WCWI was created by the WCWI Leadership Team comprised of M’Liss Jenkins, Penny L. Pricer, and Sheree L. Hukill. The plan was generated from data collected, aggregated, and analyzed by the WCWI Leadership Team throughout the HRSA Planning Grant Project which ran from 1 June 2014 through 31 July 2015. This process was utilized to memorialize the WCWI institutional memory which was shared by M’Liss Jenkins, the founder/coordinator of WCWI and the numerous project partners and volunteers who have contributed to the organization throughout the year. The Sustainability Plan has been reviewed and approved by the 2014-2015 WCWI Network Governing Board: Bob Walker, President; Michael Woods, Vice-President; and Deb Cook, Secretary/Treasurer.

Time Frame The initial WCWI Sustainability Plan is designed to be implemented over the five-year period beginning 1 July 2015 and ending 30 June 2010. On 25 May 2015, this assessment tool was adapted from: the Program Sustainability Assessment Tool, copyright 2012, Washington University, St .Louis, MO. All rights reserved. If you would like more information about the original framework or Program Sustainability Assessment Tool, visit http://www.sustaintool.org. Page 2 of 10


Environmental Support:

Having a supportive internal and external climate for our program

Sustainability Objective: Cultivate 20 WCWI Board Sector Representatives who will identify one senior administrator “champion” within their respective sector for WCWI efforts by June 2016.

Steps to achieve objectives:

Who will do the work?

1. Build relationships with Sector Representatives and educate them about importance of our initiative. Ask them to be internal/external champions for our efforts.

NGB and Leadership Team

2. Identify a champion who is well placed to build external support for our initiative.

Sector Representatives

3. Build relationships with external individuals identified by the Sector Representatives and educate them about importance of our initiative. Ask them to be champions for our efforts.

NGB, Sector Representatives, Leadership Team

4. Determine talking points and identify a specific request that our champions will ask of leaders on behalf of our initiative.

Leadership Team

5. Hold a meeting with a key member of leadership and educate them on our program and ask them for specific support

Leadership Team and Champions

What does success look like?

What non-financial resources are needed for this step? Where will they come from?

Due Date 2015

Meeting between Sector Representatives, NGB, and Leadership Team

Time

25 Aug

Potential champions identified for each of the 20 Sectors; meeting with Leadership Held

Time

15 Dec

Meeting between Sector Representatives, NGB, Leadership Team, and potential champion

Time

Talking points and specific requests articulated and recorded

Time Resources on developing talking points Ask

Meeting between Leadership Team and Champions held; Champions increase support for WCWI

Time Commitment

2016

2017

2018

15 March

25 Aug

30 June

On 25 May 2015, this assessment tool was adapted from: the Program Sustainability Assessment Tool, copyright 2012, Washington University, St .Louis, MO. All rights reserved. If you would like more information about the original framework or Program Sustainability Assessment Tool, visit http://www.sustaintool.org. Page 3 of 10


Funding Stability:

Establishing a consistent financial base for our program.

Sustainability Objective:

Increase WCWI funding to allow implementation of key initiatives, infrastructure, and resources to broaden the reach of our network and provide for sustainability by 1 January 2018.

Steps to achieve objectives:

Who will do the work?

1. Create a culture of fundraising.

NGB, Sector Representatives, Leadership Team

2. Further develop fundraising infrastructure.

NGB, Sector Representatives, Leadership Team

What does success look like? Conduct board, staff and fundraising committee training. NGB, Sector Representatives, and Leadership Team have completed the A Framework for Fundraising Success: Assessment Checklist. All board members have agreed to an assignment. Board, volunteers & staff develop prospect lists. Routine fundraising reports are provided to board at every Board meeting. Expand volunteer infrastructure in fundraising by recruiting volunteers from clients, donors, and community partners. Create a fundraising notebook for every volunteer. Provide a pledge agreement to every Board member and volunteer. Establish a fundraising budget. Develop fundraising materials including fact sheets and gift range chart. Upgrade the fundraising database and tracking system. Secure computer and printer to handle software. Develop Fund Development Committee through a committee description, role descriptions for the members, and training. Establish fundraising policies and procedures. Establish templates: cover letters, acknowledgement letters, and proposals. Develop the website to support fundraising.

What non-financial resources are needed for this step? Where will they come from?

Due Date 2015

Time Commitment

31 Dec

Time Commitment

31 Dec

2016

2017

2018

On 25 May 2015, this assessment tool was adapted from: the Program Sustainability Assessment Tool, copyright 2012, Washington University, St .Louis, MO. All rights reserved. If you would like more information about the original framework or Program Sustainability Assessment Tool, visit http://www.sustaintool.org. Page 4 of 10

Â


Funding Stability:

Establishing a consistent financial base for our program.

Sustainability Objective:

Increase WCWI funding to allow implementation of key initiatives, infrastructure, and resources to broaden the reach of our network and provide for sustainability by 1 January 2018.

3. Increase visibility and “case for support” to the community.

NGB, Sector Representatives, Leadership Team

4. Increase donations from individual donors.

NGB, Sector Representatives, Leadership Team

5. Cultivate friends and nurture donor relations through special events.

NGB, Sector Representatives, Leadership Team

6. Generate grant funding for equipment, projects, and other needs that aren’t covered in the routine operating budget.

Leadership Team

Establish a “story bank” of success stories, testimonials and photos. Conduct community presentations. Systematically feed stories to the local media. Consistently “tell the story” through the newsletter, website, presentations, events, house parties, and media stories. Develop a PowerPoint presentation or video to support presentations; have the families tell the story. Conduct 12 week campaign beginning June 2015 focused on individual donors. Campaign elements: 1. Develop prospect lists with contact information 2. Merge lists; committee members select who they would like to approach 3. Train “askers” on how to make appointments and conduct meetings 4. Team of two conducts each donor meeting.

Time Commitment

Ongoing

Time Commitment

1 Oct

Schedule a series of host/ house parties. Hold WCWI-Wide Event in Year for all of Washington County.

Time Commitment

Research and identify grant opportunities, submit grant applications, receive grant funding

Time Commitment

Ongoing

Ongoing

Ongoing

31 Dec

Ongoing

Ongoing

Ongoing

Ongoing

On 25 May 2015, this assessment tool was adapted from: the Program Sustainability Assessment Tool, copyright 2012, Washington University, St .Louis, MO. All rights reserved. If you would like more information about the original framework or Program Sustainability Assessment Tool, visit http://www.sustaintool.org. Page 5 of 10


Partnerships:

Cultivating connections between our program and its stakeholders

Sustainability Objective: By October 2016, develop a “partnership” plan focused on enhancing current and expanding/broadening/diversifying new partnerships committed to and invested in achieving WCWI goals. Component 1 - Add new partnerships & increase funding by $200,000. Component 2 - Engaging new and untapped partners in developing healthy communities.

Steps to achieve objectives:

1. Compile list of partners needed around the table

2. Develop “ask” and talking points for each group (what is benefit to them?) 3. Train people on how to reach out to different potential partners

4. Assign people to reach out to partners 5. Hold meetings and ask potential partners to commit to involvement or to enhance current involvement

Who will do the work?

NGB, Leadership Team

What does success look like?

Completed list of existing and needed partners

What non-financial resources are needed for this step? Where will they come from? Access to partner contact info

Leadership Team

Talking points developed and tested

Best practice guidelines on developing talking points

Leadership Team, NGB, Sector Representatives, Workgroup Chairs

Communications training complete

Training facilitator with communications expertise

Leadership Team

Staff assigned to reach out to each partner

Time

Leadership Team, NGB, Sector Representatives, Workgroup Chairs

New partners agree to involvement

Time and Meeting Space

Due Date 2015

2016

2017

2018

1 Oct

20 Dec

15 March 15 April 1 Oct

On 25 May 2015, this assessment tool was adapted from: the Program Sustainability Assessment Tool, copyright 2012, Washington University, St .Louis, MO. All rights reserved. If you would like more information about the original framework or Program Sustainability Assessment Tool, visit http://www.sustaintool.org. Page 6 of 10


Organizational Capacity:

Having the internal support and resources needed to effectively manage our program and its activities

Sustainability Objective: Increase WCWI performance through stronger governance and leadership; clearly stated mission, vision, and strategy; improved program delivery and impact; increasing strategic relationships; pursuing resource development; and oversight of internal operations and management by December 2018.

Steps to achieve objectives:

Who will do the work?

1. Complete the Organizational Capacity Assessment Checklist.

NGB, Leadership Team

2. Address missing elements identified in checklist.

NGB, Leadership Team

3. Develop and complete and inventory of activities.

Leadership Team

4. Complete an activity wish list.

5. Bring all of previous work together by comparing existing organizational capacity, assets, and activities with goals for the future to help identify gaps and prioritize next steps.

Leadership Team

Leadership Team

What does success look like?

Completed Organizational Capacity Assessment Checklist

What non-financial resources are needed for this step? Where will they come from? Access to the checklist (Essential NGO Guide, Chapter 7, Organizational Capacity) Time

Due Date 2015

2016

2017

2018

Ongoing

Ongoing

30 June

All elements addressed

Time

31 Aug

Completed inventory

Time

31 Aug

Answers to the following questions: • What services do our beneficiaries need in addition to those we already provide? • What activities have we seen other organizations do that we could incorporate into our programs? Why do we want to incorporate them? Are they consistent with our mission and vision? • What activities have we wanted to implement for a long time but have had to postpone because of other pressing issues? • What are some administrative management issues that we have not dealt with properly?

Time

Completed capacity-building action plan

Work Product Time

Ongoing

Ongoing

31 Dec

On 25 May 2015, this assessment tool was adapted from: the Program Sustainability Assessment Tool, copyright 2012, Washington University, St .Louis, MO. All rights reserved. If you would like more information about the original framework or Program Sustainability Assessment Tool, visit http://www.sustaintool.org. Page 7 of 10


Program Evaluation:

Assessing our program to inform planning and document results

Sustainability Objective:

Measure WCWI outcomes and impact in a consistent manner and report findings on a quarterly basis to all stakeholders by March 2016.

Steps to achieve objectives:

Who will do the work?

What does success look like?

What non-financial resources are needed for this step? Where will they come from?

Due Date 2015

Leadership Team, Workgroups

Final version of electronic scorecard

Data Time

1 July

2. Gather progress data from each workgroup

Leadership Team, Workgroups

Monthly data from each workgroup stored in Access/Excel format

Data Time

1 July – 31 Dec

3. Determine aggregation method for WCWI outcomes using workgroup outcomes.

Leadership Team

Aggregation Plan created

Best-Practices Data Time

15 Aug

4. Develop an impact report for WCWI

Leadership Team

Completed Impact Report

Data Time

15 Sept

5. Follow the WCWI communication plan to disseminate impact report

Leadership Team

Impact Report Disseminated

Time

31 Dec

1. Refine electronic scorecard for workgroup progress reporting

2016

2017

2018

Ongoing

Ongoing

Ongoing

On 25 May 2015, this assessment tool was adapted from: the Program Sustainability Assessment Tool, copyright 2012, Washington University, St .Louis, MO. All rights reserved. If you would like more information about the original framework or Program Sustainability Assessment Tool, visit http://www.sustaintool.org. Page 8 of 10

Â


Communications:

Strategic communication with stakeholders and the public about our program

Sustainability Objective:

By September 2015, develop and implement a Communication Plan on benefits and accomplishments of WCWI efforts that increases awareness to internal and external partners.

Steps to achieve objectives:

1. Identify and agree on overall message and purpose of the communications plan.

Who will do the work?

NGB, Leadership Team

What does success look like?

Overall message and purpose of plan determined

What non-financial resources are needed for this step? Where will they come from?

Due Date 2015

Time

15 July

Best Practice Guidelines

31 July

2. Gather sample Communications Plans and research existing WCWI messages.

Leadership Team

Excel doc with list of sample Communication Plans and evidence-based messages

3. Scan assessment of what is happening in communications of organizations to discover what current methods are working.

Leadership Team

Document summarizing communication methods used by partner organizations

Time

5 Aug

4. Identify target audiences (internal and external) and develop communication goals for each audience.

Leadership Team

List of different audiences and goals

Time

5 Aug

List of evidence based messages for each audience and plan for communicating message through an appropriate method.

Time, Research on which communication method to use with which audience

31 July

5. Develop key messages for each audience and determine which method of communication to use.

Leadership Team

6. Pilot test messages with members of each audience.

Leadership Team

List of messages that resonate with audiences

Volunteers to provide feedback on messages

15 Aug

7. Document audiences, goals, messages, methods, and timeline in a formal written Communications Plan.

Leadership Team

Operational Communications Plan complete

Time

31 Aug

8. Start implementing Communications Plan by using messages with different audiences.

Leadership Team

Increased media attention. Increased inquiries from the public. Increased attendance at event. Increased web traffic.

Time

1 Sept

2016

2017

2018

On 25 May 2015, this assessment tool was adapted from: the Program Sustainability Assessment Tool, copyright 2012, Washington University, St .Louis, MO. All rights reserved. If you would like more information about the original framework or Program Sustainability Assessment Tool, visit http://www.sustaintool.org. Page 9 of 10

Â


Strategic Planning:

Using processes that guide our program’s direction, goals, and strategies

Sustainability Objective:

Implement 2015-2020 Strategic Plan to achieve "Key Results" according to the schedules included in the Strategic Plan and the Sustainability Plan.

Steps to achieve objectives:

Who will do the work?

1. Review Strategic Plan and Sustainability Plan

NGB, Sector Representatives, Workgroup Chairs, Leadership Team

2. Create Action Plans based on Strategic Plan and Sustainability Plan

NGB, Sector Representatives, Workgroup Chairs, Leadership Team

3. Implement Action Plans

NGB, Sector Representatives, Workgroup Chairs, Leadership Team

4. Track progress of Action Plan

NGB, Sector Representatives, Workgroup Chairs, Leadership Team

Program Adaptation:

What does success look like?

What non-financial resources are needed for this step? Where will they come from?

NGB, Sector Representatives, Workgroup Chairs, Leadership Team all understand Strategic and Sustainability Plans

Time Commitment

Completed WCWI Action Plan

Time Commitment

Completed Tasks by WCWI Team Members

Time Commitment

Due Date 2015

2016

2017

2018

31 Dec

Ongoing

Ongoing

Ongoing

Ongoing

Ongoing

Ongoing

1 Jan

Ongoing

Ongoing

Ongoing

Ongoing

31 Dec

1 Jan

Taking actions that adapt our program to ensure its ongoing effectiveness

Sustainability Objective:

WCWI is not in need of Program Adaptation at this time. This element will be revisited during the next Strategic Plan review.

On 25 May 2015, this assessment tool was adapted from: the Program Sustainability Assessment Tool, copyright 2012, Washington University, St .Louis, MO. All rights reserved. If you would like more information about the original framework or Program Sustainability Assessment Tool, visit http://www.sustaintool.org. Page 10 of 10

Â


OUR HEALTHY COMMUNITY

E


WORKGROUP NAME

CONTACT PERSON

TELEPHONE NUMBER

EMAIL

WEBSITE

MEETING INFORMATION

Meeting Schedule: Varies at this time, next scheduled date is 11 May 2015 Time: 11:30 AM – 1:00 PM Access to Roseanne (918)333rmshveima@ca Location: Varies at this time, next Healthcare www.wcwiok.org Shveima 3266 bleone.net meeting at Bartlesville Public Library, 2nd (Workgroup) Floor Meeting Room, 600 South Johnstone Road The mission of Access to Healthcare is that all people in Washington County who are currently uninsured or underinsured will have a “medical home” that focuses on prevention, early detection and coordinated medical care. Goals To gather/compile data to make the case that Washington County has a real problem with access to healthcare Write grants to fund the initiatives needed to improve access to health care Inform the public of their options and how to best get access to health care in Washington County To improve and expand current facilities and healthcare systems needed to deliver healthcare services Work with legislators and government agencies to improve policies/laws that impact healthcare Casa Hispana Meeting Schedule: 2nd Tuesday of each Hispanic month Milagros (918) 907- tonymilic@aol.c Outreach www.casa-hispana.org Time: 5:30 PM – 6:30 PM Cappelletti 1584 om Location: Anchor House, 822 South Center Johnstone Road, Bartlesville (501(c)(3)) The mission of Casa Hispana is to positively integrate Hispanics by networking information, capabilities and services, creating opportunities for full participation and contribution in our community. Goals To provide assistance in order to help Hispanic individuals learn about their community, becoming a citizen and connecting with resources To assist community organizations by providing free interpreting, translation and case management for Hispanic individuals and families

Church Women Nancy (918) 335- nancyn@health www.wcwiok.org Not Applicable United Car Neuen – 3005 .ok.gov Repair Project WCHD (501(c)(3)) The mission of Church Women United Car Repair Project is to assist low-income individuals with transportation needs such as car repairs, car insurance and car tags.


WORKGROUP NAME Family Promise of Washington County, Inc. (501(c)(3))

CONTACT PERSON

Amy Mabry

TELEPHONE NUMBER (918) 3326495

EMAIL contact@family promisewcok.org

WEBSITE

www.familypromisewcok.org

MEETING INFORMATION Meeting Schedule: 2nd Tuesday of each month Time: 7:00 PM – 8:00 PM Location: Anchor House, 822 South Johnstone Road, Bartlesville

Family Promise is a nonprofit and non-denominational organization for families in transition. The program provides temporary shelter hosted by host congregations. The mission is to help homeless and low-income families achieve sustainability.

Meeting Schedule: 3rd Tuesday of each Preventative month newarring@city Health Nancy (918) 338Time: 1:30 PM – 3:00 PM ofbartlesville.or www.wcwiok.org Partnership Warring 4243 Location: City of Bartlesville Offices, 401 g (Workgroup) South Johnstone Road, 2nd Floor Conference Room Preventative Health Partnerships is established to promote safe and healthy Lifestyles. Its primary goals include creating Safe Routes to School, creating a bicycle friendly community and working with the Certified Healthy Community Programs. Goals Safe Routes to School Bartlesville (International Walk to School Day, education and promotion of safety and physical activity, grant requirements) Bicycle Friendly Community Certified Healthy Programs (Make It Your Business Workshop, promotion with businesses, community, schools, campuses, and restaurants) Healthy Community Incentive Grant implementation (bike racks, bike route signage, etc.) Project Prom Ronda (918) 2142csmom@att.n www.wcwiok.org Varies (Workgroup) Nitz 6646 et The vision for Project Prom is to provide the prom experience for low-income youth. The project provides girls and boys the experience of prom. For the girls, Project Prom provides the whole day, the hair, the make-up, and a little pampering. The girls receive prom dresses and the boys receive tuxedos. The prom experience allows youth to become a part of the experience, become more confident, and raises their self-esteem.


WORKGROUP CONTACT TELEPHONE EMAIL WEBSITE MEETING INFORMATION NAME PERSON NUMBER Washington Meeting Date: 2nd Tuesday of each month County Meeting Time: 3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (918) 214- wcahcpres@gmai Affordable Meeting Location: City of Bartlesville Eric Jaekel www.wcwiok.org l.com Housing 4310 Offices, 401 South Johnstone Road, 2nd Coalition Floor Conference Room (501(c)(3)) The Affordable Housing Coalition assesses housing gaps and barriers, and maintains a housing advocacy group designed to pull community partners together to increase and preserve the supply of decent, affordable, accessible housing for low- and moderateincome households in Washington County. The mission is to mobilize community partners to increase access to affordable housing through committed action. Goals Housing Resource Center The Housing Resource Center is a one-stop-shop to help people with their housing needs and direct them to housing resources. We maintain a database of affordable housing units, applications for subsidized housing complexes and housing information such as “How to Avoid Foreclosure”, “HUD Homeownership”, “Housing Counseling”, “Guide to Single Family Home Mortgage Insurance”, “Shopping for Your Home”, and much more. Renter Education The renter education program is a 9 to 12-hour course designed to help renters communicate with landlords, create a personalized plan for stable housing, plan a workable household budget that makes paying rent a priority, review rental agreements to understand common terms and expectations, and learn how to take care of a home and how to move-in and move out the right way. Housing Rehabilitation The housing rehabilitation program was established to assist low to moderate income families with maintaining their homes in a safe, healthy condition that encourages pride of ownership in Bartlesville and surrounding communities. The program is designed for residents who intend to stay in their homes and is not a remodel program for resale. Partnership Development The Washington County Affordable Housing Coalition provides connections and linkages that allow affordable housing partners to work together to develop and preserve housing for low and moderate income citizens through the rehabilitation of existing properties and new construction. The WCAHC aims to accomplish this by forging strategic partnerships and actively supporting policies and initiatives that promote affordable housing.


WORKGROUP NAME Washington County AntiDrug Network (Workgroup)

CONTACT PERSON

Marilyn Powell

TELEPHONE NUMBER (918) 3318635

EMAIL

WEBSITE

wcpn@mail.com

Facebook: https://www.facebo ok.com/wcadn

MEETING INFORMATION Meeting Date: 2nd Tuesday of each month Meeting Time: 11:30 AM – 1:00 PM Meeting Location: Anchor House, 822 South Johnstone Road, Bartlesville

The vision of the Washington County Anti-Drug Network is that Washington County will have a continuum of services for families, children, and youth that are accessible, available, effective, efficient, and affordable to support, strengthen and build protective factors in our community and prevent youth substance abuse. Its mission is to create a better future for families, children and youth through drug prevention efforts. Currently an effort is underway to reduce underage drinking and shifting social norms. Goals To reduce the number of Alcohol-related arrests/offenses in Washington County by changing policy and procedures on charges made, educating public on consequences of drinking and driving, change the social norm of underage drinking to a no tolerance policy. To educate the community on healthy ways to mentor to youth, strengthen our relationship with law enforcement by educating them on what our alcohol abuse data shows, and promote programs implemented to decrease drug and alcohol use in Washington County youth. Washington Meeting Date: 4th Tuesday of each month County Jennifer Meeting Time: 8:30 AM – 10:00 AM Association (918) 337Meeting Location: Bartlesville Public http://wcamh.org Glenn or jglenn@glmhc.net for Mental 8080 Library, 600 South Johnstone Road, Kim Hill Health Bartlesville (501(c)(3)) The purpose of the Washington County Association for Mental Health shall be to improve mental health by promoting the development of community programs and policies which: Increase availability of quality mental health services for children and adults; Strengthen mental health workforce recruitment, retention and training; Provide a full range of preventative mental health services; Include inpatient and outpatient day treatment for persons with drug addictions; and Improve communication and joint planning among mental health providers.


WORKGROUP CONTACT TELEPHONE EMAIL WEBSITE MEETING INFORMATION NAME PERSON NUMBER Washington Meeting Date: 2nd Thursday of each month County Suicide http://www.washingto Stella (918) 338Stella.shoff@gma Meeting Time: 11:30 AM – 1:00 PM ncountysuicidepreventi Prevention Meeting Location: Contact Stella for Shoff 9737 il.com on.com Coalition Location (Workgroup) The mission of the Washington County Suicide Prevention Coalition is to prevent suicide in Washington County through awareness, education and effective prevention, intervention and postvention. Goals To reduce the rate of Suicide in Washington County. To have 25% of the community in Washington County trained in Question, Persuade, and Refer (QPR) training by 2015. To provide resources and awareness of suicide to citizens and business. Offer Gatekeeper Programs, ASIST and Mental Health First Aid, twice a year. Develop and Implement a Suicide Prevention Surveillance System (SPSS). Assist Tri-county Technology Center (TCT) in Implementing the Columbia TeenScreen. Washington County leestephens@epi Meeting Date: Varies Father Lee (918) 336Meeting Time: Varies Transportation scopalbartlesville. www.wcwiok.org Stephens 1212 Meeting Location: Varies Coalition org (Workgroup) The mission of the Washington County Transportation Coalition is to address the unmet transportation needs of Washington County in order to improve economic development and enhance quality of life. Its primary goal is to secure funding in order to sustain the pilot project and expand the routes for the flexible, fixed route bus service.

Goal To secure funding in order to sustain the pilot project and expand the routes for the flexible, fixed route bus service


WCWI Workgroup Scorecard WCWI Workgroup - Initial Information

If you want to report on more than one workgroup, you must complete a separate scorecard. Thank you for your time! 1. Other Highlights for this reporting period.

2. Your name:

3. Please choose the workgroup you are reporting on this survey. Access to Healthcare

Washington County Anti-Drug Network (C.H.A.N.G.E.)

Casa Hispania Hispanic Outreach Center

Washington County Association for Mental Health

Church Women United Car Repair Project

Washington County Suicide Prevention Coalition

Family Promise of Washington County, Inc.

Washington County Transportation Coalition

Preventative Health Partnership

WCWI Network Governing Board

Project Prom

WCWI CHIO Board

Washington County Affordable Housing Coalition

4. How is your workgroup structured? 501(c )(3)

Coalition

Incorporated

Project-Specific Workgroup

Task Force

Committee

Other (please specify)

5. Reporting Period

1


6. How many group meetings did you have during this reporting period? No meetings were held this period

5

10

1

6

11

2

7

12

3

8

More than 12

4

9

7. If you had a meeting or multiple meetings, how many people attended?

8. What methods did your workgroup use for communication among your members this period? Face-to_Face e-mail Telephone Social Media Only at Meetings Pre-distributed Agendas Disributed Meeting Minutes Other (please specify)

9. Estimate the number of hours dedicated to your workgroup during this reporting period? (Include meetings, email correspondence, special projects, etc.) 0-5 6 - 10 11 - 20 More than 20

10. Donations received this month? (Money and In-kind)

11. What issues do the CHIO members need to know about?

2


12. What is the biggest success you want everyone to know about this reporting period? It might be an upcoming training, a workday, etc..

3


WCWI Workgroup Scorecard Workgroup: Access to Healthcare Updates 13. How many medical home posters have been distributed?

14. Where were the posters distributed? Jane Phillips Medical Center

Indian Health Services

GAP Clinic

Hope Free Clinic

Family Healthcare Clinic

Nowata Family Health

Washington County Health Department

Veteran's Administration (VA)

DHS

Lifespan Medical Clinic

Caney Valley Medical Clinic

Urgent Care

Green Country Free Clinic

Morton Healthcare Clinic

Other (please specify)

15. How many medical home brochures have been distributed?

16. Where were the brochures distributed? Jane Phillips Medical Center

Indian Health Services

GAP Clinic

Hope Free Clinic

Family Healthcare Clinic

Nowata Family Health

Washington County Health Department

Veteran's Administration (VA)

DHS

Lifespan Medical Clinic

Caney Valley Medical Clinic

Urgent Care

Green Country Free Clinic

Morton Healthcare Clinic

Other (please specify)

4


17. How many clinics/physicians received the medical home "Cards"?

18. Where were the 'Cards" distributed? Jane Phillips Medical Center

Indian Health Services

GAP Clinic

Hope Free Clinic

Family Healthcare Clinic

Nowata Family Health

Washington County Health Department

Veteran's Administration (VA)

DHS

Lifespan Medical Clinic

Caney Valley Medical Clinic

Urgent Care

Green Country Free Clinic

Morton Healthcare Clinic

Other (please specify)

19. Number of new medical home patients reported by providers.

20. Number of healthcare providers using the depression/suicide screening tools?

21. Number of patients who completed the depression/suicide screening.

22. Number of participants served during Navigation Sessions (if applicable)?

5


WCWI Workgroup Scorecard Workgroup: Casa Hispana Hispanic Outreach Center Updates 23. Number of Hispanic participants served during Navigation Sessions (if applicable)?

24. Number of documents translated?

25. Number of clients served?

6


WCWI Workgroup Scorecard Workgroup: Family Promise of Washington County, Inc. Updates 26. How many churches/places of worship have signed agreements?

27. How many new families were served during this reporting period?

28. How many families "rotated out" during this reporting period?

29. How many adults were served during this reporting period?

30. How many children were served during this reporting period?

31. How many families did not meet your screening criteria?

7


WCWI Workgroup Scorecard Workgroup: Church Women United Car Repair Project Updates 32. How many car repair requests did you receive this reporting period?

33. Number of clients/cars "repaired"?

8


WCWI Workgroup Scorecard Workgroup: Project Prom Updates 34. How many girls received dresses?

35. How many boys received tuxedos?

36. Which proms were "attended" by recipients?

9


WCWI Workgroup Scorecard Workgroup: Preventative Health Partnership Updates 37. How many active participants does FLOWCo currently have?

38. How many children "Walked to School"? (If applicable)

10


WCWI Workgroup Scorecard Workgroup: Washington County Affordable Housing Updates 39. How many houses did you rehabilitate?

40. How many people helped you rehabilitate houses?

11


WCWI Workgroup Scorecard Workgroup: Washington County Anti-Drug Network (CHANGE) Updates 41. How many awareness materials were created?

42. How many youth attended camp?

12


WCWI Workgroup Scorecard Workgroup: Washington County Association for Mental Health Updates 43. How many on-going professional trainings did you have?

44. How many people attended the trainings?

13


WCWI Workgroup Scorecard Workgroup: Washington County Suicide Prevention Coalition Updates 45. How many people received QPR training during this reporting period?

46. How many companies/organizations did these people represent?

47. How many people attended the support group?

48. Briefly describe presentations made during this reporting period (Audience, Title, Approximate number of Attendees)

49. How many people attended the day session of the Suicide Prevention Summit? (If applicable)

50. How many people attended the evening session of the Suicide Prevention Summit? (If applicable)

14


WCWI Workgroup Scorecard Workgroup: Washington County Transportation Coalition Updates 51. How many "loops" were not made during this reporting period?

52. How many riders did the CityRide Circuit serve (by day or week)?

53. Please mark all the reasons/destinations reported by the riders. Work School Healthcare Paying Bills/Utilities DHS Shopping Home Running Errands Other (please specify)

15


WCWI Workgroup Scorecard Workgroup: WCWI Network Governing Board Updates 54. Describe the highlights of the NGB activities during this reporting period.

55. Describe any guests who attended NGB meetings during this reporting period. (Name and Purpose)

16


WCWI Workgroup Scorecard Workgroup: WCWI CHIO Updates 56. Describe the highlights of the CHIO activities during this reporting period.

17


March 2015 | Preliminary Community Assessment Analysis

“This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number P10RH26875,  Rural  Health Network Development Planning Grant Program for $85,000. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or  policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.”


Preliminary 2014‐2015 Community Assessment Results  These  results  are  based  upon  716  completed  surveys  containing  100,806  data  points  which  had  been  submitted on or before 1:00 PM on 15 March 2015. Surveys were completed online or using paper versions  across Washington County.  Paper surveys were collected at Mary Martha, Bartlesville Public Library, The GAP  Clinic,  Family  Healthcare  Clinic,  the  Anchor  House,  Salvation  Army,  and  the  Washington  County  Health  Department.  Thank  you  to  everyone  who  completed  a  survey,  encouraged  someone  to  complete  a  survey,  volunteered to help people complete surveys, and manually entered survey data for this project! 

DEMOGRAPHICS      

Ethnicity shows white/Caucasian (70%) and American Indian (15%)  The Majority of American Indian responses were Cherokee  Bartlesville makes up 80% and the remaining respondents are 20%  All ages were well represented  28% of Respondents indicated household income of less than $25,000/year   53% of respondents are working full‐time 

Employment Status 10% 7%

13%

7% 54% 9%

Disabled, not able to work Employed, working full‐time Employed, working part‐time Not employed, looking for work Not employed, NOT looking for work Retired  

CHALLENGES / HOMELESS    

45% of respondents struggle to pay for essentials each month  14% of respondents have been homeless within the last 10 years or are now homeless   11% of respondents worry each month about becoming homeless 

INSURANCE  

54% have other insurance besides a “standard” health insurance with copay  51% of people without health insurance reported it was due to their lack of money 


MEDICAL HOME  WCWI Definition – The doctor’s office or clinic where your family goes for healthcare.     

PERSONAL EVALUTATIONS  Definitions of Extremely Healthy vary by respondent based on the number of personal health issues  identified. 

   


TOBACCO USE  WCWI applied for a 5‐Year Tobacco Settlement Grant   

HEALTHCARE VISITS   

Private Physician was 39%  Other was 61% 

COMMUNITY SUMMARY    

34% of the time people perceive trust and respect among collaborating workgroups in the community  20% of respondents do not feel safe in the community  448 respondents believed child abuse, neglect, and domestic violence are community health issues 


  

376 respondents reported Methamphetamine as the largest substance abuse concern  17%  of neighborhood issues was road maintenance (2,826 selections were made by respondents)  The 2 most needed services according to the assessment were affordable housing and transportation 

WCWI SUMMARY   

The Workgroups have a great opportunity to broaden their reach   Here is how people learn about Washington County 

Information Sources 450 400 350 300 250 200 150 100 50 0

   


FAMILY ISSUES  Money can’t buy happiness but obviously the lack of it can cause Family Stress   

Family Issues 291

180 129 107 82 38

52 58

71

135

119 87

121 98

85 91 54

45 53

35 11

    


MARCH/APRIL 2015 FOCUS GROUPS REPORT                        “This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health  and Human Services (HHS) under grant number P10RH26875, Rural Health Network Development Planning Grant Program  for $85,000. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official  position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.” 


INTRODUCTION WCWI  held  five  focus  groups  during  March  and  April  2015  with  workgroup  representatives,  CHIO  members,  primary  healthcare  providers,  and  Free  and  Low‐Cost  Healthcare  Resource  Guide  distributors/users.    Thirty‐seven  participants  provided  input  on  healthcare  barriers  and  issues,  community  resources,  and  the  resource  guide.    This  document  represents  the  consensus  findings,  demographics, and a detailed description of the focus group process.   All participants were provided an  anonymous forum to ensure their comments would not be directly tied to them. 

OUR GOALS  The WCWI focus groups were the primary qualitative method utilized to assist in interpretation of data  collected  through  quantitative  methods  currently  available.  Previously  collected  data  includes:  sign‐in  sheets, questionnaires, project plans, statistical reports, and work group goals and objectives that have  been accumulated over the past few years. Additionally, the focus groups provided information on how  stakeholders  are  using  this  quantitative  information  in  their  work,  what  benefits  they  believe  WCWI  provides,  and  what  insights  they  have  about  how  the  WCWI  and  current  health  care  system  could  be  improved.  The  WCWI  work  plan  uses  a  variety  of  data  collection  techniques  and  mixed  methods  to  increase  validity  of  evaluation  findings.  All  methods  follow  the  five‐stage  process  of  1)  studying  the  purpose of the activities, 2) reviewing the methodology including the conceptualization and logistics, 3)  determining  the  facilitation  of  the  activity  through  preparation,  pre‐activity,  and  activity,  4)  analyzing  results, and 5) reporting results. We chose the use of focus groups as they are one of the few methods in  which accurate and complete data is gathered from a group and we have found them to be very useful  parts of mixed method approaches in sustainability planning. 

DEVELOPMENT OF FOCUS GROUP PROCESS  The  process  of  focus  groups  is  well‐grounded  in  best  practice  models.    The  WCWI  leadership  team  incorporated  these  best  practices  in  the  planning  of  our  focus  group  process.    For  example,  best  practices recommend groups never be held on any day other than a Tuesday, Wednesday, or Thursday  and  must  occur  in  a  neutral  location.    As  such,  all  the  WCWI  sessions  were  held  mid‐week  in  the  Bartlesville Public Library.  The only exception was one focus group held in the education room of the  Caney  Valley  Medical  Clinic  to  respect  the  time  constraints  of  medical  residents.    Additionally,  we  incorporated  best  practices  during  the  development  of  agendas  and  processes  in  order  to  gather  “themes” between the five focus groups.  The focus groups were held with similar participants identified  for  each  group.    The  focus  group  participants  were  selected  for  each  group  based  upon  their  WCWI  roles.  The  WCWI  roles  were:    WCHI‐CHIO  Board  Member,  WCWI  Workgroup  member,  Healthcare  providers, and Free and Low‐Cost Healthcare Resource Guide distributors/users.  If a participant serves  as a CHIO board member and is involved with a workgroup, the decision about which group(s) to attend  was made by the participant. 


During each focus group, the participants completed the Consent Form, the Demographic Form and the  Post‐Focus Group evaluation.  Three of the five groups completed CHIO/workgroup/healthcare provider  surveys. 

WCWI LEADERSHIP TEAM RESPONSIBILITIES  As part of the HRSA Network Planning Grant, the WCWI leadership team committed to planning at least  four  focus  groups,  recruiting  the  focus  group  participants,  facilitating  the  focus  groups,  and  reporting  the  focus  group  results.  The  members  of  the  Network  Governing  Board  were  excluded  from  these  processes in order for them to participate in the focus groups without predispositions or prejudices.  The focus groups were rescheduled from February to March/April due to inclement weather. 

INCENTIVES AND ACCOMMODATIONS  As  part  of  the  HRSA  Network  Planning  Grant,  funding  was  obtained  for  all  participants  in  the  focus  groups.  The  leadership  team  intentionally  selected  Braum’s  Gift  Cards  as  the  incentives  to  provide  participants with a healthy foods market that does not sell alcohol or tobacco of any kind.  Additionally,  the  Public  Health  Institute  of  Oklahoma  provided  blue  canvas  CHIO  bags  for  each  participant,  and  Integrated Concepts, Inc. provided McAlister’s Deli sandwiches or snacks for each session.  The times and dates for the focus groups were established to accommodate safe travel during severe  weather and the work schedule of the Washington County Health Department’s employees. 

QUESTION DEVELOPMENT  Best practices for focus groups encourage facilitators to limit the number of questions in order to delve  deeper  into  responses  by  participants.    In  the  case  of  our  WCWI  groups,  we  also  wanted  to  use  the  sessions  to  raise  awareness  with  the  participants  about  WCWI  activities,  ongoing  projects,  potential  funding opportunities, and the organizational structure.  With the groups scheduled for only 90 minutes,  there were three primary questions:   

1.  What are the barriers you see to our marginalized residents receiving quality healthcare? 

2.  What can we do to reduce the barriers to healthcare? 

 

3.  Who in the community should WCWI reach out to for support?  For this question, we used        the WCWI Circle of Influence as our guidepost. 

PARTICIPANT SELECTION CRITERIA  In  order  to  recruit  participants  for  the  focus  groups,  the  leadership  team  emailed  invitations  and  reminders.    M’Liss  Jenkins  and  Sheree  Hukill  also  sent  personal  emails  to  groups  in  the  Washington  County area to ensure they or their client base were represented.   


PROCESS “RULES” DURING SESSION  Each  focus  group  was  allowed  an  opportunity  to  establish  ground  rules  for  their  sessions.    Common  rules included confidentiality, respecting others opinions, and no answers were wrong.  All participants  had an opportunity to use a fictitious name during the session to ensure anonymity.  A vast majority of  the participants appreciated the anonymity.   FOCUS GROUP SAMPLE AGENDA AND PROCESS  Each group had its own agenda with date, time, location, and survey information updated based on each  group’s  specifics  and  criteria.  Each  focus  group  had  a  facilitator  and  a  note  taker.  The  following  is  a  sample  Agenda  and  note  taking  document.  Each  group  used  the  same  template  to  enable  consistent  themes to be drawn across all groups. 


DEMOGRAPHICS AND CONSENT      We had 37 participants across  the five focus groups.    Participant  Ages  Ranged  from  20 to 71  We  had  20  participants  who  were  members  of  a  WCWI  Workgroup 

GENDER Female  Male  Transgender  TOTAL 

White

# of  Participants 28 

American Indian* 

3

Asian Not Hispanic 

1 1 

White/American Indian* 

2

White/Asian Blank  * Cherokee 

1 1 

ETHNICITY

Number OF PARTICIPANTS 26  10  1  37 


POST‐SESSION ANALYSIS METHODOLOGY  The notes were reviewed within twelve hours of each session and the sticky‐tabs were entered for each  Circle  of  Influence  session.  The  audio  recordings  were  used  to  confirm  comments  and  ideas.    The  outcomes of the sessions were shared with the Leadership Team within seven days of the completion of  each session. 

FACILITATOR REFLECTIONS  Four  of  the  focus  groups  followed  the  agenda  and  primarily  accomplished  the  goals  of  the  group.   However,  due  to  a  miscommunication,  the  Free  and  Low‐Cost  Resource  Guide  session  did  not  include  end‐users of the guide. As such, much of the discussion during the session did not follow the process of 


the other  focus  groups.    Although  some  of  the  discussion  was  not  applicable  to  the  focus  group  plan,  several of the later discussion did reveal answers pertinent to the focus group goals.  A follow‐up focus  group is planned in June/July to reach the users of the guide rather than the distributors of the guide. 

CIRCLE OF INFLUENCE  The  sectors  identified  in  the  Circle  of  Influence  are  based  upon  the  Duluth  Model  for  a  coordinated  community response to social issues.  This model is successful because it is grounded in experience and  pulls the whole community together to support societal change.  When  agencies  work  together  to  create  policies  and  procedures  that  interweave  together,  the  whole  system  works  in  coordination  to  more  effectively  address  societal  issues.  Each  sector  has  a  part  in  identifying and rectifying gaps that negatively impact the health of a community. Each sector can do its  job better.  Sometimes  policies  or  plans  are  developed  and  thought  to  help  a  target  population;  however,  some  policies and plans actually cause more harm than good. The Duluth Model approach keeps the voices of  the target populations central to any policies or plans by including target populations and the advocates,  such  as  the  members  of  WCWI,  who  work  closely  with  them  in  all  decision  making.  WCWI  and  its  member workgroups hope to serve as the liaison between the target populations we serve in nurturing  healthy communities and the decision makers who implement plans, policies, procedures, regulations,  and laws which impact our communities.   FOCUS  GROUP  RESULTS  FOR  THE  CIRCLE  OF  INFLUENCE  EXERCISE  The  participants  worked  together  during  each  focus  group  to  identify  specific  “people” or “organizations” to  contact  to  influence  the  systemic  changes  needed  in  Washington County for WCWI  to  reach  its  goals.    The  following  is  a  summary  of  all  the  ideas  including  possible  typographical  errors  on  names  due  to  the  lack  of  spell‐check  on  sticky  tabs  to  resolve them:   


Health Care System   Dr. Britt – The GAP Clinic   OU Dental Hygiene   All Physicians within the county   JPMC  Medical  Staff  Meeting  Twice  a  Year  –  Contact  Kendra  at  Medical  Staff  Services   Behavioral Assessment Team (BAT) who  determines  mental  health  needs  of  a  patient at JPMC    Justice System   Judge  DeLape  –  Drug  Court  &  Run  the  Streets   Nehemiah  House  for  Recently  Paroled  Men – Arlando Parker    Education System   Oklahoma  Wesleyan  University  School  of  Nursing  –  Jessica  Johnson  (Student  Nurses)   OKWU – Spiritual Life Volunteers once a  month – Ben Rotz    Clergy   Bartlesville Ministerial Alliance –  Meets  First  Monday  or  Wednesday  of  Each  Month – Contact Jason Elmore    First  Wesleyan  Church  –  Small  Group  Volunteers – Contact Steven Little    Volunteer Days at Churches   FWC‐ Joe Colaw with booths   Contact  Family  Promise  churches  who  have agreed to be Host Churches     

Media  VolunteerBartlesville.com ‐ Dr. Cochran  at OKWU   Radio – Kevin & Dorea Potter & Charlie  C. ?   Donrey Cable Advertise   Bartlesville EE – Kelli Williams    Employers   ConcoPhillips Volunteer Day   Arvest – Andy Novack   American Heritage – Richard Trollinger    Tri‐County Volunteer Day   Bartlesville Chamber of Commerce     Government   John  Kane  &  Doann  Nguyen:  City  Council  Members  (Newly  Elected  and  Re‐elected)   Shellie  McGill  –  HR  Director  City  of  Bartlesville   Commissioners:  Contact  each  town’s  government  for  Dewey  Copan,  Wann,  Vera, Ramona, and Ochelata    Tribal   Cherokee  –  Melissa  Pitts  Johnson  or  Sam Bradshaw   Osage  –  Anthony  Shackleford,  Daisy  Spicer, Michelle Gray   Deleware ‐  Bonita Shea    Social Service Providers   Grand  Lake  Mental  Health:  Transitional  Housing for Young Adults Grant 

FOCUS GROUP RESULTS  The results of the focus groups fall into two main categories:  Healthcare Themes and Suggestions.  Healthcare Themes     

More mental health services are needed.  More quality primary care physicians are needed.  70% of patients do not take medications as supplied.  25% of the US population lives in rural communities but only 9% of physicians practice in rural  communities. 


    

The under‐ or uninsured population are not educated about insurance coverage and prevention.  People don’t know when to go to the doctor.  Money, time, convenience, and transportation are barriers to healthcare.  People need to understand “Medical Home”.  Doctors or healthcare providers need to remember to use language and terminology that can be  understood by patients.   If we can get the population that over‐use the ER into a clinic/doctor’s office, then the money  that the state uses, could go back into Medicaid and Sooner Care to address the problem.   Prescriptions cost too much.   Patients are sometimes not interested in getting to the root of the issue.    If patients don’t put anything into the process, they see no value in the services received.   Patients  often  do  not  follow  through  although  their  doctors  provide  information  on  services  available throughout the community.   People can’t find a doctor in town to see them either because there aren’t enough providers or  because they may have burnt bridges.   Uninsured residents can’t get glasses and dentures so they have to go to Tulsa.    Resources for teachers on who kids and families can talk to about healthcare needs.    It is hard to figure out how to sign up for Medicare/insurance, deciding what program to pick,  and even understanding your policy once selected.    General public has no concept of the situation faced in ERs on a daily basis.   Process  you  go  through  to  get  parents  to  realize  the  child  has  a  problem  to  get  them  help.  Usually the 3rd time they finally understand.    Mental  illness  is  not  a  “disease”  according  to  our  population  so  you  should  be  able  to  fix  it  yourself.   People overestimate what the insurance covers and since they now have to have it the patient  thinks it should cover everything.   If you are concerned about where you are going to eat your next meal . . . healthcare is not on  your radar.   Some  patients  are  on  so  many  medication  that  they  can’t  remember  what  and  when  to  take  them all.   Patient education is a huge need and the residents’ can’t do it all in the time allotted.        Suggestions  

      

The ER sees a lot of people who don’t need to be there. They need to go to an office. It is easier  because  they  don’t  have  to  pay  a  bill.    If  we  had  a  mechanism  to  where  they  could  talk  to  a  medical professional on how to manage or take care of a problem they have and schedule an  office visit, it might eliminate some of the ER visits.   Establish a new Community Garden – Garden of Eating.   Phone calls to talk people through the medical process, social services to help with paperwork,  ER doesn’t have time to solve problems, and the ER does not provide prevention services.  The ER needs to hand out the Resource Guide.  Need a Social Worker available for out‐patient clinics.  On‐call Medical Providers available for patients to ask questions.  The Farmer’s Market needs to accept SNAP.  (NOTE:  This is a work in progress.)  WCWI workgroups need more volunteers. Too many of our volunteers are spread too thin. 


Target Demographic and Technology  Many of the focus group participants commented on the use of technology by our target demographic,  however,  no  general  consensus  was  reached.    Many  of  the  focus  group  participants  think  our  target  demographic  may  not  have  a  computer,  Facebook,  or  Twitter.    On  the  other  hand,  some  of  our  participants believe our target demographic will have technology because that is priority for them.  As is  true with alcohol and drugs, if you have a mindset that those are your priority, you will find the money  for them.  

SESSION EVALUATIONS   


GOVERNANCE

F


COMMERCIAL GENERAL LIABILITY COVERAGES

The Commercial General Liability Policy provides the insurance protection needed to pay damages for bodily injury or property damages for which the insured is legally responsible. The policy provides coverage for liability arising from personal injury and advertising injury. Coverage for medical expense is also provided. The policy also covers accidents occurring on the premises or away from the premises. Coverage is provided for injury or damages arising out of goods or products made or sold by the named insured. The insured is the named insured and the employees of the named insured. However, several individuals and organizations, other than the named insured, may be covered, depending upon certain circumstances specified in the policy. In addition to the limits, the policy provides supplemental payments for attorney fees, court costs and other expenses associated with a claim or the defense of a liability suit. There are two commercial general liability coverage forms available, the occurrence form and the claimsmade form. Both forms are somewhat identical in the coverages offered. The main difference is in the way claims are handled under the two forms. The occurrence form covers bodily injury or property damage claims that occur during the policy term, regardless of when the claim is reported. The claimsmade policy form only covers claims made against the insured during the policy term. A claim made after the policy expires is not covered by a claims-made policy unless the claim is covered by an extended reporting period. The claims-made policy will only have the extended reporting period. The following terms reflect both forms.

General Aggregate The General Aggregate Limit is the most money the insurer will pay under a certain coverage for all claims occurring during the policy term.

Premises/Operations Coverage is provided for damages arising out of ownership or occupancy of the insured premises when not maintained in a reasonable manner. This also covers damages arising out of operations performed by the insured business.

Products/Completed Operations Products coverage is provided for damages arising out of products manufactured, sold, handled or distributed by the insured. Completed Operations covers damages occurring after operations have been completed or abandoned, or after an item is installed or built and released for it's intended purpose.


Medical Expense Limit Medical payments coverage pays medical expenses resulting from bodily injury caused by an accident on premises owned or rented by the insured, or locations next to such property, or when caused by the insured's operations. These payments are made without regard to the liability of the insured.

Fire Damage Limit The fire damage limit provides coverage for fire damage caused by negligence on the part of the insured to premises rented to the named insured. If a fire occurs because of negligence of the insured and causes damage to property not rented to the insured, coverage would be provided under the occurrence limit.

Personal Injury Personal Injury means injury other than bodily injury. Coverage is provided for injury resulting from offenses such as false arrest, malicious prosecution, detention or imprisonment, the wrongful entry into, wrongful eviction from and other acts of invasion, or rights of private occupancy of a room. Coverage for libel and slander is also provided in the policy.

Advertising Injury This coverage pays for damages done in the course of oral or written advertisement that disparages, libels or slanders a person's or organization's goods, products or services. Coverage for these offenses is provided under advertising injury coverage only if they occur during the course of advertising the named insured's own goods, products or services.

Each Occurrence Each occurrence is considered to be an accident, which could include continuous or repeated exposure to the same harmful conditions. An occurrence can also be a sudden event, or a result of a long term series of events.


DIRECTORS AND OFFICERS LIABILITY (often called D&O) is liability insurance payable to the directors and officers of a company, or to the organization(s) itself, as indemnification (reimbursement) for losses or advancement of defense costs in the event an insured suffers such a loss as a result of a legal action brought for alleged wrongful acts in their capacity as directors and officers. Such coverage can extend to defense costs arising out of criminal and regulatory investigations/trials as well; in fact, often civil and criminal actions are brought against directors/officers simultaneously. It has become closely associated with broader management liability insurance, which covers liabilities of the corporation itself as well as the personal liabilities for the directors and officers of the corporation.

Claims Made Form Only Basic Extended Reporting Period (Basic Tail) This coverage is provided automatically without an additional premium charge if coverage is canceled, not renewed, or the insurer renews with a later retroactive date. The basic extended reporting period starts at the end of the policy period and last for five years for claims made against the insured within the five year period and reported to the insurer within 60 days after the end of the policy period.

Supplemental Extended Reporting Period (Supplemental Tail) The supplemental extended reporting period is available under the same circumstances as the basic one. However, it becomes effective only if the named insured makes a written request within 60 days after termination of the policy period and the additional premium is paid. The supplemental extended reporting begins when the basic one ends, and it continues forever. It cannot be canceled by the insured or insurer. The supplemental tail endorsement would provide coverage for claims reported to the insurer within sixty days after the end of the policy period but did not result in a claim being made against the insured until after the end of the five year policy period. Other types of occurrence or offenses that are unknown by the insured and therefore not reported within the sixty days after the end of the policy period could also be covered by the supplemental tail. When the tail is purchased the policies general aggregate limit and the products/completed operations aggregate limit is reinstated.

Retroactive Date The retroactive date shown in the policy declarations is the same as the inception date, or the retroactive date can be a date prior to the inception date. A policy can also be written with no retroactive date.


PREMIUM QUOTATION

Insured:

Washington County Wellness Initative Inc.

COVERAGE

ANNUAL PREMIUM

General Liability

$572.40

Directors & Officers Liability

$740.00

(Limit of $1,000,000)

Per Sandy Petters of Fred Daniel and Sons, Inc. on 6 May 2015, the General Liability for WCWI covers premises liability for the meeting place where they office, 208 East 4th Street, Bartlesville, Oklahoma. Should WCWI move to a new location we will need to request a change. The policy is a premises liability policy. The workgroups under the direction of WCWI which are not 501(c)(3) organizations would fall under "insured." The workgroups which are 501(c)(3) organizations need to obtain their own coverages. If WCWI is hosting fairs, events, etc. in other locations we really need to find another carrier which will endorse the policy to cover those events under the General Liability.


Oklahoma Turning Point  Coalition ‐‐ County Health  Improvement Organization –  501(c)(3) Corporation   

 

Job Description  Sector Representative    Reports To  Description 

Network Governing Board The  Sector  Representative has  a  strategic  role  to  play  in  representing  the  vision  and purpose  of  the  WCWI  organization.  The  Sector  Representative  participates  in  WCWI functions, fully participates at meetings, discusses all relevant matters, and participates  in decision making.  Participates in completing the ongoing work of the WCWI as detailed  in the bylaws, strategic plan, and directions from the Network Governing Board. 

Purpose

The work  of  the  WCWI is  limited  to  the  specific  purpose  established  by  the  bylaws and/or  board,  as  articulated  in  the  WCWI  strategic  plan  and  action  plans.  The  WCWI‐ CHIO  Board  acts  to  complete  specific  ongoing  tasks  of  the  organization  and  fosters

Election

The Sector Representative is elected by the WCWI Board in accordance with the bylaws.  A Sector Representative is a voting member of WCWI. 

Term

 As set forth in the WCWI bylaws.

Responsibilities General 

1. 2. 3. 4.

Network Business and  Meetings 

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Time Commitment 

Abides by WCWI conflict of interest policy.  Reads, and is familiar with WCWI Board Reference Notebook and WCWI Workgroup  Action Plans.  Remains up‐to‐date on issues that may affect WCWI.  Keeps confidential matters confidential until approved for disclosure.  Attends and actively participates in preferably all, but no less than 80% of WCWI  Board meetings.  Accepts and completes assignments of work related to the mission of WCWI as  requested by the Network Governing Board.  Reviews reports in a timely manner.  Provides input and new ideas for WCWI activities on a regular basis.  Abides by WCWI Sector Representative‐specific member responsibilities as set forth in  WCWI policies. 

The role of WCWI Sector Representatives requires an estimated commitment of four (4)  hours per month. 

        APPROVED by WCWI Network Governing Board 1 June 2015 


BOARD COMMITMENT FORM 

I, ____________________________, understand as a member of the Board of Directors for Washington County Wellness Initiative, a 501(c)(3) Non-Profit Corporation formed within the State of Oklahoma, a Public Health Institute of Oklahoma-certified County Health Improvement Organization, and an Oklahoma Department of Health Turning Point Coalition, I have a legal and ethical responsibility to ensure the organization does the best work possible in pursuit of its goals. I believe in the purpose and the mission of the organization, and I will act responsibly and prudently as its steward. As part of my responsibilities as a board member: 1. I will interpret the organization’s work and values to the community, represent the organization, and act as a spokesperson for the sector and/or workgroup I represent. 2. I will attend at least 80% of board meetings, committee meetings, and special events. 3. Each year I will make a personal financial contribution at a level that is meaningful to me. 4. I will actively participate in one or more fundraising activities. 5. I will act in the best interests of the organization, and excuse myself from discussions and votes where I have a conflict of interest. 6. I will stay informed about what’s going on in the organization. I will ask questions and request information. 7. I will participate in and take responsibility for making decisions on issues, policies, and other board matters. 8. I will work in good faith with staff and other board members as partners towards achievement of our goals.

NOTE: The board chair should sign two copies of this agreement for each board member. Each new board member should sign both, Page 1 of 3 return one copy to the board chair, and keep the other for reference. APPROVED 28 April 2015


BOARD COMMITMENT FORM  If I do not fulfill these commitments to the organization, I will expect the board president to call me and discuss my responsibilities with me. In turn, the organization will be responsible to me in several ways: 1. I will be sent, without request, quarterly financial reports and an update of organizational activities that allow me to meet the “prudent person” standards of the law. 2. Opportunities will be offered to me to discuss with the WCWI Staff and the Network Governing Board the organization’s programs, goals, activities, and status; additionally, I can request such opportunities. 3. The organization will help me perform my duties by keeping me informed about issues in the industry and field in which we are working, and by offering me opportunities for professional development as a board member. 4. Board members and staff will respond in a straightforward fashion to questions I feel are necessary to carry out my fiscal, legal, and ethical responsibilities to this organization. Board members and staff will work in good faith with me towards achievement of our goals. 5. If the organization does not fulfill its commitments to me, I can call on the board president and WCWI Staff to discuss the organization’s responsibilities to me. Signed: __________________________________ Date: _____________ Member, Board of Directors __________________________________ Date: _____________ President, Board of Directors NOTE: The board chair should sign two copies of this agreement for each board member. Each new board member should sign both, Page 2 of 3 return one copy to the board chair, and keep the other for reference. APPROVED 28 April 2015


Washington County Wellness Initiative PO Box 3812 Bartlesville, OK 74006-3812 Telephone 918.876.3056 www.wcwiok.org

CONFLICT OF INTEREST Certification I certify that I have read and thoroughly understand the Washington County Wellness Initiative (WCWI) Conflict of Interest Policy. To the best of my knowledge and belief, neither I nor any of my family is engaged in any activity that might create a conflict of interest with WCWI, except as explained below.

Date

Signature

Print Name INSTRUCTIONS: Read the Conflict of Interest Policy and sign the Certification. Use the space below to explain any activity that might constitute a conflict of interest.

STOP HERE Reviewed by Network Governing Board on

, with the following findings:

No conflict exists. A conflict exists and the following restrictions will be observed:

Further information required for NGB review on

WCWI President

(date).

Employee or Board Member

Approved 13 May 2015 by Washington County Wellness Initiative’s Network Governing Board


Washington County Wellness Initiative CONFLICT OF INTEREST POLICY Introduction Washington County Wellness Initiative (WCWI) has a policy that all employees and directors have a primary responsibility to WCWI to exercise sound, ethical judgment in all business and related personal activities and they avoid activities that are, or may be, in conflict with WCWI’s best interest. It is the responsibility of all WCWI employees and board members to conduct themselves in accordance with the highest standards of integrity, honesty, and fair dealings to preclude conflict between the interests of WCWI and the personal interests of an employee or board member. Likewise, it is WCWI’s responsibility to conduct its activities in accordance with the laws and the highest ethical standards. Policy Confidentiality Confidential, proprietary or privileged information with respect to persons served, WCWI members, employees, or volunteers obtained by a director or employee in connection with his or her duties, is to be used solely for WCWI’s purposes and not as a basis for personal gain by a director or employee. In no event shall such information be communicated in any way to any person outside WCWI or even to other directors, volunteers or employees who do not need to know such information in discharging their duties to WCWI. Financial information regarding WCWI, unless it has been presented in publicly distributed material is confidential, proprietary, and privileged and is not to be communicated in any way to anyone who lacks a “need to know” of such information. Conflict of Interest A conflict of interest occurs whenever the prospect of direct or indirect personal gain improperly influences the judgment or actions of a person in the conduct of WCWI activities. Following are examples of situations that may have the potential to create a conflict of interest: 1. Acquisition or sale of any property or services by WCWI under circumstances where there is direct or indirect compensation to an employee or board member or a member of such person’s family; 2. Placement of WCWI business of any kind with a company owned or controlled by an employee or board member or such person’s family; 3. Employment by WCWI of a member of the family of an employee or board member. Employees and board members shall disclose to the Network Governing Board in writing the potential existence of any of the above described situations as well as any other potential conflict of interest situations to which they may be associated. The Network Governing Board will review the circumstances of the situation, and if, in the Network Governing Board’s judgment, the best interests of WCWI would not be prejudiced, may approve the proposed action or activity. No member of the Network Governing Board shall take part in consideration of any situation to which they or a member of their family shall be involved. Each employee and board member shall be furnished a copy of this policy and annually shall complete and return the Conflict of Interest Certification. Approved 13 May 2015 by Washington County Wellness Initiative’s Network Governing Board


BOARD MEMBER CODE OF ETHICS Directions: Washington County Wellness Initiative (WCWI) board members are expected to adhere to the highest standards of ethics in their service as trustees of WCWI. After reviewing the following statements, sign this Code of Ethics to indicate your commitment to ethical board service. As a member of the Board of Directors of Washington County Wellness Initiative, I will: 

Read, understand and adhere to WCWI’s conflict of interest policy.

Represent the interests of all people served by this organization, and not favor special interests inside or outside of WCWI.

Not use my service on the board for personal advantage or the advantage of friends or associates.

Strictly observe confidentiality of information pertaining to WCWI governance, other board members, staff, volunteers and children and families served by Washington County Wellness Initiative.

Respect and support majority decisions of the board.

Approach all board issues with an open mind, prepared to make the best decisions for everyone involved.

Do nothing to violate the trust of those who elected or appointed me to the board, or of those we serve.

Focus my efforts on the mission of WCWI and not on my personal goals.

Never exercise authority as a board member except when acting in a meeting with the full board or as delegated by the board.

Consider myself a “trustee” of Washington County Wellness Initiative and do my best to ensure that it is well maintained, financially secure, growing, and always operating in the best interests of those we serve.

Date

Signature Print name

Approved 13 May 2015 by Washington County Wellness Initiative’s Network Governing Board


Board Member Fund Development Engagement and Commitment    Basic expectations:    1) A monetary gift that is meaningful for you  2) Be an enthusiastic “champion” of WCWI within your family, business, civic and social networks    In addition, each board member is asked to commit to at least two of the following activities.  Please check  two or more activities below that you intend to pursue:    1.    Serve on the Fund Development Committee  2.    “Like,” “Share” and “Comment” on WCWI’s social media sites  3.    Make thank you phone calls to major donors  4.    Make phone calls to existing donors to survey their reason/motivation for giving  5.    Handwrite thank you notes to top donors, including foundations  6.    Personally forward WCWI e‐newsletter to 3 new people each month  7.    Host/co‐host/attend a gathering of people to learn more about WCWI  8.    Host/co‐host/attend a gathering of people during which an “ask” will be made  9.    Personalize and send an appeal letters to personal contacts who might be interested in      supporting WCWI  10.    Volunteer to participate in making visits to prospective funders  11.    Volunteer to participate in making visits with existing funders  12.    Invite others to join you in observing WCWI Activities  13.    Ask three or more new donor prospects to donate $100 or more  14.    Ask one new donor prospect to donate $1,000 or more  15.     Contact small businesses to solicit sponsorships for WCWI workgroup  16.    Solicit an in‐kind service or donation  17.    Negotiate a lower rate from a vendor  18.    In lieu of gifts for a special event such as a birthday, anniversary or holiday, invite      donations to WCWI  19.    Check with your employer about a matching gift for your monetary donations and/or      volunteer time  20.    Other                                         WCWI Leadership Team and NGB to commit to:    1. Research and submit grant requests for existing and prospective support  2. Provide names/addresses for sending thank you notes to donors  3. Provide text for personalizing appeal letters  4. Develop master “Ask” letters and emails that members can personalize  Page 1 of 2


5. Regularly post information about funding opportunities on WCWI’s social media sites  6. Continually provide “Wish List” of current in‐kind donation needs  7. Provide fund development training and coaching and materials as requested    Participation in WCWI’s fundraising efforts represents a critical element of your service as a member of the  Board of Directors.  Thousands of individuals and families count on WCWI for the social services and  healthcare services needed to nurture a healthy community.      Your commitment TRULY makes a difference for everyone in Washington County.    Signatures:    WCWI Leadership Team and Network Governing Board  Board Member                                  Sheree L. Hukill, Project Director        Print Name                                  M’Liss Jenkins, Volunteer Coordinator                                  Bob Walker, President          Date                    Dr. Michael Woods, Vice‐President                    Deb Cook, Secretary/Treasurer   

APPROVED by WCWI Network Governing Board on 1 June 2015

Page 2 of 2


Network Development Self‐Assessment Tool  for HRSA Rural Health Network Development Planning Grantees 

I. Purpose  The purpose of this Self‐Assessment Tool for HRSA Rural Health Network Development Planning  Grantees  is  to  support  you  and  your  key  stakeholders  in  examining  your  organizational  leadership capacities and needs in terms of:   Leveraging innovation and creativity to design products and business lines to meet the  needs of your unique communities,    Change leadership to support momentum in your start‐up network,   Development of a highly functioning network board, and,   Effective communication with internal and external constituents.  You will have an opportunity to participate in on‐going training in each of these areas through  the  Planning  Grantee  Learning  Communities  and  you  will  have  access  to  support  for  specific  questions  from  your  TA  provider.  This  Self‐Assessment  Tool  will  provide  you  and  your  stakeholders  with  information  on  areas  of  strengths  and  challenges.  You  will  also  be  able  to  share  this  information  as  promising  practices  during  training  calls  and  at  national  meetings  as  we work together to create bench strength for rural health networks.   

II. Self‐Assessment Tool  A. General Overview  Network Name:  Washington County Wellness Initiative, Inc.  State: OK  Grant Funding Duration:    Start Date: 1 June 2014   End Date: 31 May 2015    Date of Assessment:  18 March 2015 (Finalized 23 May 2015)

Network Technical Assistance Project is funded by the Federal Office of Rural Health Policy (HRSA, DHHS) through a  contract to Rural Health Innovations, LLC, a subsidiary of the National Rural Health Resource Center. This tool was  developed by Mary Kay Chess, Ph.D. and the National Cooperative of Health Networks Association (NCHN). 


Self‐Assessment Tool (continued) 

B. Who Are We? Innovation & Creativity  1. There is an understanding of the history of rural health care networks and the intention of the  current  HRSA funding for Planning Networks:   ☐ Fully   ☒ Mostly  ☐ Generally  ☐ Somewhat  ☐ Barely  2. Describe how your Network goals support the HRSA goals:   HRSA Goals for Start‐up Networks: (choose  Proposed Network Goals: Assessment #1  2‐3 goals specific to your situation)  Date: 18 March 2015  1.    Goal  1  is  to  Achieve  Efficiencies.  We  will  focus  on  identifying  ways  to  achieve  better  system  efficiencies  and  improve  regional  and/or local rural health care services. 

1.   Goal  1  is  to  Achieve  Efficiencies.  We  will  focus  on  identifying  ways  to  achieve  better  system  efficiencies  and  improve  regional  and/or local rural health care services. 

2.  Goal 2 is to Expand Access To, Coordinate  and  Improve  the  Quality  of  Essential  Health  Care Services. We will focus on ways to build  capacity  and  a  network  infrastructure  that  enables  entities  to  coordinate  care  and  increase  to  build  capacity  and  a  network  infrastructure  that  enables  entities  to  coordinate  care  and  increase  access  to  care  for rural communities. 

2.  Goal 2 is to Expand Access To, Coordinate  and  Improve  the  Quality  of  Essential  Health  Care Services. We will focus on ways to build  capacity  and  a  network  infrastructure  that  enables  entities  to  coordinate  care  and  increase  to  build  capacity  and  a  network  infrastructure  that  enables  entities  to  coordinate  care  and  increase  access  to  care  for rural communities. 

3.   Goal  3  is  to  Strengthen  the  Rural  Health  Care  System  as  a  Whole.  We  will  focus  on  ways  to  enhance  community  and  partner  relationships  to  promote  involvement  and  participation in network planning activities. 

3.   Goal  3  is  to  Strengthen  the  Rural  Health  Care  System  as  a  Whole.  We  will  focus  on  ways  to  enhance  community  and  partner  relationships  to  promote  involvement  and  participation in network planning activities. 

3. What do  you  believe  are  some  of  the  top  challenges  you  will  encounter  in  starting  up  this  Network?  Rate  the  challenge  1  to  5  (1  =  Impossible  to  resolve,  5  =  Easy  to  resolve).  What  resources will you use to resolve these challenges?  Start‐up Challenges for  Identify the  Rate the  Potential Resources for  your Network  Stakeholders  Challenge (1‐5)   Resolution  Workgroup reps and  1. All players  network board  understanding the  umbrella (organizational  members  chart)  2. Primary care  providers wanting to  participate;  consulting  privileges but not full 

Target population,  network members,  and healthcare  providers 

3

Commitment to step up  and learn;  repetition;  meetings; new board  orientation notebook 

2

Explain need and  advantage to  healthcare providers;   Mike Reburn starting 

Self‐Assessment Tool  |   Page 2 of 16   


Self‐Assessment Tool (continued)  Washington County  Medical Association;  medical staff meetings;  meeting with Chief  Medical Officers of St.  John’s and Jane Phillips  Medical Center;  meeting with Ascension   upper‐management  representative 

hospital privileges;   Primary Care Associates  are tied to Hillcrest;  Change in hospital  leadership/ownership;  Independence of  medical providers;  no  single points of contact;   silos of work  3. Patients we are trying  to reach aren’t the  primary care providers’  income stream;  “If you  don’t serve the  demographic, you don’t  see the big problems.” 

Target population,  network members,  and healthcare  providers 

2

Innovative to get in  office doors;  lunch to  front office staff and  nurses;  volunteers in  community;  ask  workgroups to find  volunteers from clinics;   i.e. nurse practitioners  from cardiology 

4. Ship jumping – due to  overarching healthcare  issues and rapid change  in local administration,  administrators, doctors,  nurse practitioners are  all leaving the  community. We are left  with an atmosphere of  chaos and uncertainty. 

Target population,  network members,  and healthcare  providers 

1.5

Explain need and  advantage to  healthcare providers;   Mike Reburn starting  Washington County  Medical Association;  medical staff meetings;  meeting with Chief  Medical Officers of St.  John’s and Jane Phillips  Medical Center;  meeting with Ascension   upper‐management  representative;  presentation of Volume  to Value to local  providers by Terry Hill 

  C. Leadership through Effective Change  4. The  Network  leadership  and  Board  are  constantly  identifying  resources  to  discuss  promising  practices for building and sustaining viable rural health care networks:    ☒ Yes  ☐ No  ☐ Maybe    Self‐Assessment Tool  |   Page 3 of 16 


Self‐Assessment Tool (continued)  5. The Network is building relationships with other Networks to benchmark and gather  promising practices: (NGB indicates network/workgroup structure is outstanding. NGB would  like to have more information from other County Health Improvement Organizations within  Oklahoma and other networks from various states.)  ☐ Completely  ☐ In large part  ☒ Somewhat (We should reach out to more counties, states, etc. It would be nice to have an  annual County Health Improvement Organization meeting for all of Oklahoma.)  ☐ Minimally  ☐ Not at all    Benchmarking  Other Networks:  National Meetings:  Informational  Opportunities  Name and Date to  Name and Meeting  Calls/TA: Name and  List  Contact  Dates  Dates of Calls  1. HRSA Reverse Site  Visit  

Met other grantees  who attended 24‐25  March 2015 Meeting 

Rural Health  Innovations  Sustainability  Workshop, 24‐25  March 2015 

County Health  Rankings &  Roadmaps Data 201  29 Jan 2015 

2. Community  Assessment  Statistical Analysis 

WCWI Leadership  presented at  Transforming Health  Conference 24  October 2014 

Regional Meeting:  Bridging the Gap  offered by the  Oklahoma Jumpstart  Coalition in  Partnership with  Federal Reserve Bank  of Kansas City 5 Nov  2014 

Robert Woods  Johnson Foundation ‐ ‐ Crime and Public  Safety: What Does  Health Have to Do  with It? 30 Sept 2014 

3. HRSA Final  Reporting  including  the Network Self‐ Assessment Tool   

WCWI Leadership to  present at Oklahoma  Rural Health  Conference twice (17  Sept 2014 and 20  May 2015) and  connected with  numerous networks  within Oklahoma 

     

HRSA ‐‐ Navigators  for the Affordable  Care Act   

4. Focus Group  Analysis 

South Cumberland  Plateau Health  Network, Feb 26, Apr  2, March 24‐25, May  8, and May 12 

     

Rural Health  Innovations  Leadership Webinar  #1 of 4:  Innovation  and Creativity  conducted by Mary  Kay Chess, Ph.D.  29  Jan 2015 

5. Workgroup 

Lac qui Parle Health 

     

Rural Health  Self‐Assessment Tool  |   Page 4 of 16 


Self‐Assessment Tool (continued)  Scorecard Reporting  Tool   

Network, March 24‐ 25 and Apr 3 

Innovations Leadership Webinar  #2 of 4:  Change  Leadership  conducted by Mary  Kay Chess, Ph.D.  26  Feb 2015    Rural Health  Innovations  Leadership Webinar  #3 and #4 of 4:   Network Board  Development  conducted by Mary  Kay Chess, Ph.D.  19  March and 23 April  2015 (Unable to  attend “live” listened  to archived version at  a later date)    RHI Introductory Call  13 Nov 2014    RHI TA and Closeout  Call 19 May 2015    Quarterly Update  Calls w/ Amber  Berian 11 Aug 2014, 7  May 2015 

6. Going forward, the Network members are feeling:  We have come a long way! One board  member is always concerned about overextending.  Stabilization of the WCWI‐CHIO Board and  workgroups is the key!  ☐ Completely Confident  ☒ Pretty Good  ☐ Okay  ☐ Could be better  ☐ Nervous/Uncertain 

Self‐Assessment Tool  |   Page 5 of 16 


Self‐Assessment Tool (continued)  7. What challenges does the Network face and what advantages does the Network have?   Network Start‐up  Challenges  Advantages  Key Stakeholder(s)  Demands  Network members,  project staff 

1. To have all  network members  understand the  project and the  vision of WCWI  

Getting all players to the  WCWI Leadership  table at the same time  Team is very active  throughout the  community and  interacts with  network member  one‐on‐one and  through e‐mail  communication 

2. To reach all  healthcare providers  within our service  area 

The change in  leadership/management  of local hospital and  primary care provider  group; lack of access to  management  endorsement of  network of network  activities 

WCWI Network  Governing Board  members have  access to primary  care providers and  some hospital  administrators 

Healthcare providers, target  population, network  members, project  staff 

3. To effectively  coordinate with  local and state  health departments 

WCWI “champions”  retired from local health  department at  beginning of grant  period; interim director  would not communicate  with WCWI Leadership 

Newly appointed  Washington County  Health Department  Administrator has  actively participated  in WCWI activities  since 1 May 2015 

Network members,  project staff, target  population 

  8. On what issues does your Network seem to have significant understanding?   Topics with aligned  Membership  Topics with a lack of  Membership  What additional  understanding  Consensus?  understanding  Consensus?  research would  (Yes/No)  (Yes/No)  be beneficial? 

Y

Leadership structure of the  hospital and  physicians’  groups 

Y

Volume to Value  Research,  Legislative  Updates, and a  Crystal Ball 

How to reach  healthcare providers 

1. Network Vision,  Promise, and Goals  Y 

2. Needs of The  Community  Y 

How to control  federal and state  government  decisions and their  impact on how  patients receive care 

Self‐Assessment Tool  |   Page 6 of 16 


Self‐Assessment Tool (continued)  3. Resources  Available 

Y

Changing federal   and state guidelines;   no security 

Y

?

D. What Should We Look Like? Network Board Development  9. The Network’s membership structure is:   ☒ Behavioral Health Providers  ☐ CAHs  ☒ Schools/School Districts  ☐ Small Hospitals  ☒ Public Health Departments  ☒ Medium Hospitals  ☐ Free Clinics  ☐ Large Hospitals  ☒ Physician‐Owned Clinics  ☒ Rural Health Clinics 

☒ Community Health Centers ☒ Community‐Based  Organizations  ☒ Other: Law Enforcement,  Technical Consultant,  Attorneys, Faith‐based  Organizations, Community  Volunteers, Community  Foundation, Media,  SANE/DVNE, Chamber of  Commerce 

A. Why does this structure make sense for your Network?  This structure was implemented to meet, and exceed, the requirements for certification as a  County Health Improvement Organization as stipulated by the Public Health Institute of  Oklahoma. This structure also complies with evidence‐based coordinated community  response team formation which leads to systemic change throughout the community.     B. Is there any reason to consider different organizations or members? Who specifically  would you add?  Yes, to broaden the reach of our network and provide for sustainability, we would like to  include local, for‐profit, dues‐paying business entities.  10. Has the Board Agreement to Serve (Job Description) been created and published?    ☒ Yes (Full Dissemination Scheduled for 17 June 2015)  ☐ No  ☐ Will not use this public agreement  ☐ Will be developed at a later date    11. The potential Board Members have been contacted about the opportunity to serve on the  Network Board and have they received a copy of the Board Agreement to Serve (Job  Description):  ☒ Yes, we’re all set (See #10)  ☐ In communication with potential Board Members  ☐ Just starting to contact  ☐ No  12. There are Board by‐laws and the roles and responsibilities of the Network Board members are  clearly identified: 

Self‐Assessment Tool  |   Page 7 of 16 


Self‐Assessment Tool (continued)  ☒ Completely (Board Reference Materials Notebook will be distributed on 17 June 2015. We  would like to have a full board retreat to confirm thorough understanding.)   ☐ Mostly  ☐ Generally  ☐ Roughly  ☐ Barely  What remains unclear in terms of Network Board member responsibilities/roles?  N/A  13. Value Proposition: How will the Network provide value to the Board members, and what roles  will the members play in and contribute to the Network?  Need to develop this;  started from  scratch  Network Member  Value & Benefit the Network  Role this Member  Entity/Name  Provides this Member  Contributes in the Network  1. Business 

Awareness, Referrals,  Resources , Project Planning  for Healthy Business  Certification 

Abides by WCWI conflict of  interest policy; Reads, and is  familiar with the network  action plans, Remains up‐to‐ date on issues that may affect  the network; Keeps  confidential matters  confidential until approved  for disclosure; Attends and  actively participates in  preferably all, but no less  than 80% of applicable  meetings, whether in‐person  or by conference call; Accepts  and completes assignments  of work related to the mission  of the network; Reviews  network reports in a timely  manner; Provides input and  new ideas for network  activities on a regular basis;  and Abides by network‐ specific member  responsibilities as set forth in  WCWI policies; Act as  sector/workgroup liaison to  network leadership and the  community at‐large. 

2. Children 

Awareness, Referrals,  Resources 

Same as above. 

3. Elderly 

Awareness, Referrals, 

Same as above.  Self‐Assessment Tool  |   Page 8 of 16 


Self‐Assessment Tool (continued)  Resources  4. Faith 

Awareness, Referrals,  Resources 

Same as above. 

5. Higher Education 

Awareness, Referrals,  Resources 

Same as above. 

6. Hospital 

Awareness, Referrals,  Resources, Opportunities to  participate in Quality  Improvement projects 

Same as above. 

7. Law Enforcement 

Awareness, Referrals,  Resources 

Same as above. 

8. Legal 

Awareness, Referrals,  Resources 

Same as above. 

9. Media 

Awareness, Referrals,  Resources 

Same as above. 

10. Mental Health 

Awareness, Referrals,  Resources 

Same as above. 

11. Minority Populations 

Awareness, Referrals,  Resources 

Same as above. 

12. Non‐Profits 

Awareness, Referrals,  Resources, Opportunities for  Collaboration, Community  Assessment Data 

Same as above. 

13. Oklahoma Turning Point 

WCWI is also an Oklahoma  Turning Point Coalition, the  WCWI‐CHIO Board provides  structure, documentation,  and an avenue for  communication between the  state/regional  representatives and our local  providers 

Same as above. 

14. Primary Care 

Awareness, Referrals,  Resources, Opportunities to  participate in Quality  Improvement projects 

Same as above. 

15. Public Health 

Same as above.  Awareness, Referrals,  Resources, Opportunities to  participate in Quality  Improvement projects,  Community Assessment  Results, Assistance in meeting  accreditation requirements 

16. Schools 

Awareness, Referrals, 

Same as above.  Self‐Assessment Tool  |   Page 9 of 16 


Self‐Assessment Tool (continued)  Resources  17. Social Services 

Awareness, Referrals,  Resources 

Same as above. 

18. Technology 

Awareness, Referrals,  Resources 

Same as above. 

19. Tribal 

Awareness, Referrals,  Resources, Opportunities for  Collaboration 

Same as above. 

20. Volunteer 

Awareness, Referrals,  Resources 

Same as above. 

21. Access to Healthcare 

Administrative Support,  Opportunities for  Collaboration, Resources,  Outside Expertise, Liaison for  state, tribal, and federal   resources 

Same as above. 

22. Casa Hispana 

Administrative Support,  Opportunities for  Collaboration, Resources,  Outside Expertise, Liaison for  state, tribal, and federal   resources 

Same as above. 

23. Preventative Health  Partnership 

Administrative Support,  Opportunities for  Collaboration, Resources,  Outside Expertise, Liaison for  state, tribal, and federal   resources 

Same as above. 

24. WC Affordable Housing  Coalition 

Administrative Support,  Opportunities for  Collaboration, Resources,  Outside Expertise, Liaison for  state, tribal, and federal   resources 

Same as above. 

25. WC Anti‐Drug Network 

Administrative Support,  Opportunities for  Collaboration, Resources,  Outside Expertise, Liaison for  state, tribal, and federal   resources 

Same as above. 

26. WC Association for  Mental Health 

Administrative Support,  Opportunities for  Collaboration, Resources,  Outside Expertise, Liaison for  state, tribal, and federal  

Same as above. 

Self‐Assessment Tool  |   Page 10 of 16 


Self‐Assessment Tool (continued)  resources  27. WC Suicide Prevention  Coalition 

Administrative Support,  Opportunities for  Collaboration, Resources,  Outside Expertise, Liaison for  state, tribal, and federal   resources 

Same as above. 

28. WC Transportation  Coalition 

Administrative Support,  Opportunities for  Collaboration, Resources,  Outside Expertise, Liaison for  state, tribal, and federal   resources 

Same as above. 

29. Church Women United –  Car Repair Project 

Administrative Support,  Opportunities for  Collaboration, Resources,  Outside Expertise, Liaison for  state, tribal, and federal   resources 

Same as above. 

30. Project Prom 

Administrative Support,  Opportunities for  Collaboration, Resources,  Outside Expertise, Liaison for  state, tribal, and federal   resources 

Same as above. 

31. Family Promise of WC 

Administrative Support,  Opportunities for  Collaboration, Resources,  Outside Expertise, Liaison for  state, tribal, and federal   resources 

Same as above. 

32. Bartlesville Community  Foundation 

Awareness, Referrals,  Resources, Community  Assessment Data,  Opportunities for  Collaboration 

Serve as fiscal agent; provide  networking and collaborative  opportunities; share network  message with BCF Board  Members 

33. University of Oklahoma 

Access to local healthcare  providers, Community  Assessment Data 

Provide networking and  collaborative opportunities;  provide quality improvement  projects opportunities;  provide academic detailing 

E. Creating Momentum in the Network: Effective and Engaged Communication  14. The vison of the Network is:   ☒ Completely clear  Self‐Assessment Tool  |   Page 11 of 16 


Self‐Assessment Tool (continued)  ☐ Defined  ☐ Getting there  ☐ An outline  ☐ Uncertain  When the Network is one year old, what accomplishment is the membership most confident  about?  WCWI  completed  a  depression  screening  project  in  collaboration  with  the  University  of  Oklahoma and four of our local primary care providers during year one.  The network leadership  drafted,  reviewed,  approved,  and  implemented  policies  and  procedures  to  create  an  organizational structure designed to support the member workgroups. The network leadership  prepared  and  submitted  eight  grant  applications  and  organized  volunteer  teams  to  obtain  matching  funds  for  the  network  as  a  whole,  and  facilitated  donation  drives  for  specific  workgroup projects.   When the Network is one year old, what goal or intention appears the most at risk and may  not be accomplished?   The network does not currently have operational funding in place to maintain the four‐member  leadership team; without on‐going staff availability, the Network Governing Board may dissolve.   The primary function of the Network is clearly defined (products, services, or value  proposition).  ☐ Fully   ☒ Mostly  ☐ Generally  ☐ Somewhat  ☐ Barely  Describe the primary function and/or purpose of the Network in a short pitch (3‐4 sentences):  The  primary  function  of  WCWI  is  to  coordinate  services  and  patient  care  access  across  the  network  to  improve  healthcare  for  the  underserved  population  of  Washington  County.    The  primary purpose of WCIW is to provide healthy lifestyle options and education to Washington  County residents.  15. The mission of the Network is defined.  ☒ Fully   ☐ Mostly  ☐ Generally  ☐ Somewhat  ☐ Barely  16. Briefly describe the Network mission:  Washington County Wellness Initiative strengthens and transforms the public health  infrastructure through community‐based action.  17. What communities are served by the Network? Briefly describe the community support for  the Network.    Self‐Assessment Tool  |   Page 12 of 16 


Self‐Assessment Tool (continued) 

Benefit to be  provided by the  Network to the  Community 

Community Support  to be provided to the  Network 

Rate (1‐5) the  probable success of  the proposed  community support  (1 = little, 5 =  significant) 

1. Bartlesville 

Our network vision is  for all Washington  County residents to  live in healthy  communities with  access to: physical  and mental health  services; progressive  and caring  community services  and resources; and  information and  community  involvement  opportunities. The  CityRide Circuit pilot  project also serves  Bartlesville. 

Access to local  government,  healthcare providers,  school districts, faith‐ based organizations,  and volunteers.  Opportunities for  collaboration. Results  from Bartlesville  Regional United Way  and Jane Phillips  Medical Center  Community  Profile/Assessment. 

4

2. Copan 

Our network vision is  for all Washington  County residents to  live in healthy  communities with  access to: physical  and mental health  services; progressive  and caring  community services  and resources; and  information and  community  involvement  opportunities. 

Access to local  government,  healthcare providers,  school districts, faith‐ based organizations,  and volunteers.  Opportunities for  collaboration. 

2

3. Dewey 

Same as above. 

Same as above. 

3

4. Ochelata 

Same as above. 

Same as above. 

3

Same as above. 

Same as above plus  access to Caney  Valley Medical Clinic  residents and clinical  director. 

4

Community Name 

5. Ramona 

Self‐Assessment Tool  |   Page 13 of 16 


Self‐Assessment Tool (continued)  6. Vera 

Same as above. 

Same as above. 

2

7. Non‐incorporated  rural areas of the  county 

Same as above. 

Same as above. 

2

18. The Network understands and has identified the primary market or demand for the products  and/or services within the identified communities:  ☒ Fully     ☐ Mostly  ☐ Generally  ☐ Somewhat  ☐ Barely    Rate (1‐5) their  potential level of  Who is in the  When will they  What might they purchase?  engagement (1 =  Market?  be contacted?  little, 5 =  significant)  1. Un‐ and under  insured living  below the  poverty level 

Nothing

On‐going

4

2. Local  Businesses 

WCWI services which include:  will Administrative Compliance  Services for Workgroups;  Education ‐‐ Community  Awareness Activities; Event  Planning/Coordination; Network  Facilitation; Network Fund  Development; Grant  Research/Writing/Administration  for Network; Legislative  research, updates, alerts for  local, state and federal laws,  ordinances; Outreach; Network  Policy and Procedure  Development and  Implementation; Serve as  Network Liaison with PHIO, OU  Medical Research, and other  applicable organizations;  Network Strategic  Planning/Action Planning;  Network Task Management;  Network  Technology/Marketing/Social 

1 August 2015 

3

Self‐Assessment Tool  |   Page 14 of 16 


Self‐Assessment Tool (continued)  media; Training ‐‐ Professional  Development Activities;  Workgroup Integration  Oversight; Health Screenings for  Employees; and Project Plan for  Healthy Business Certification  19. The Network is aware of what communication and marketing channels will be utilized to  move the products/services to the identified communities:   ☒ Fully   ☐ Mostly  ☐ Generally  ☐ Somewhat  ☐ Barely  20. What methods will you utilize? Are these tested and evaluated methods? How do you know  they  will  work?  WCWI currently  utilizes a newly designed website and  Facebook page as our  primary  sources  of  marketing.    E‐mail  is  used  for  internal  and  external  communication  and  coordinated  with  the  Bartlesville  Community  Foundation,  Chamber  of  Commerce,  and  United  Way  to  facilitate  large  e‐mail  blasts.  The  Bartlesville  Examiner‐Enterprise  consistently  provides  coverage of WCWI events and accomplishments.  Medical Home marketing materials are in print  form  for  mass  distribution  and  include  posters,  tri‐fold  brochures,  and  postcards.  These  materials can also be downloaded from the website. WCWI also produces quarterly newsletters,  an annual report, and a free and low‐cost healthcare providers’ resource guide, also available in  printed form or for download from the WCWI website. WCWI now has a hotline available which  is answered by the leadership team to provide information to the community as needed.  The  WCWI Leadership Team is tracking website and Facebook visits, calls received, and number of  materials distributed and all methods appear to be effective at this time.  21. The  Network  has  developed  clear  processes  for  retaining  Board  Members  and  limiting  turnover:   ☒ Somewhat True  22. What are the Key Elements of the Board Retention Plan?  Elements of the Board  Key Date for Action &  Anticipated Outcome  Retention Plan  Responsible Party  1. Mentorship 

1 July 2015,  Leadership Team 

Happy, effective board members 

2. Formal Board Orientation 

17 June 2015,  Leadership Team 

Educated, effective board members 

3. Board Reference Materials   17 June 2015,  Leadership Team  4. Safe Environment for  Neutral Conveners (including  Conflict Resolution Plan) 

On‐going, Leadership  Team 

Easily accessible organizational  reference materials    Successful, sustained network 

Self‐Assessment Tool  |   Page 15 of 16 


Self‐Assessment Tool (continued)  23. The Board has identified the first year goals:   ☒ Fully   ☐ Mostly  ☐ Generally  ☐ Somewhat  ☐ Barely    24. The Network Board has created and approved the first year financial projections, including  what will be needed to make in order to break even, survive, or thrive:   ☐ Fully   ☒ Mostly  ☐ Generally  ☐ Somewhat  ☐ Barely  25. Does the Network Board have a contingency plan if the goals or the financial targets are not  met?  ☐ Yes  ☐ No   ☒ Under construction  What are the key details of this plan including dates for assessment and action?   The contingency plan is a work in progress.  26. The Network Board has a strong conflict resolution process as part of the Board Retention  Plan:   ☐ Completely True  ☐ Mostly True  ☒ Somewhat True  ☐ Not at all 

Self‐Assessment Tool  |   Page 16 of 16 


How to Reach my Sector  General Suggestions:  1. Be the voice of WCWI within your professional organization.  2. Share WCWI Newsletters with your peers, friends, and family.  3. Notify WCWI Staff of developments within your sector which impact WCWI’s mission. 

Business

Minority Populations 

Children

Nonprofit

Elderly

OK Turning Point 

Faith

Primary Care 

Higher Education 

Public Health 

Hospital

Schools

Law Enforcement 

Social Services 

Legal

Technology

Media

Tribal

Mental Health 

Volunteer


POLICIES AND PROCEDURES

G


Policies and Procedures Drafted July 2014 By Sheree L. Hukill and Penny L. Pricer


Proposed Washington County Wellness Initiative’s Rural Health Network Development Planning Grant Program Policies and Procedures

2014

TABLE OF CONTENTS Initial Policy & Procedures Manual – Acceptance Process .................................................................... 2 Document Retention/Destruction Policy .................................................................................................. 3 Document Retention Schedule ................................................................................................................. 3 Document Protection................................................................................................................................. 5 Document Destruction............................................................................................................................... 5 Provision of Documentation for Investigations or Litigation ...................................................................... 5 HRSA Grant Specific Record Keeping and Retention .............................................................................. 6 Confidentiality Policy.................................................................................................................................. 7 Conflict of Interest Policy ........................................................................................................................... 8 Ethics Policy .............................................................................................................................................. 11 Non-Discrimination and Anti-Harassment Policy .................................................................................. 12 Whistleblower Policy ................................................................................................................................ 13 Grant-Specific Fund Disbursement Policy ............................................................................................. 14 Award Funds ........................................................................................................................................... 14 Draw Downs ............................................................................................................................................ 14 Financial Records ................................................................................................................................... 15 WCWI-PLANNING Project Safe Driving Policy ....................................................................................... 17 Alcohol and Drug-Free Workplace .......................................................................................................... 18 Tobacco-Free Workplace Policy .............................................................................................................. 20 Definition ................................................................................................................................................. 20 Procedure ................................................................................................................................................ 20 Procurement Policies and Procedures ................................................................................................... 21 Standard of Conduct for Washington County Wellness Initiative’s Rural Health Network Development Planning Grant Program Participants ............................................................................. 31 Progress Reporting Policy in Compliance with HRSA Grant Reporting Requirements .................... 32 Program Income Procedures ................................................................................................................... 33 Allowable Costs ........................................................................................................................................ 33 Roles and Responsibilities ...................................................................................................................... 45 HIPPA Procedure ...................................................................................................................................... 46 Team Member Performance Assessment............................................................................................... 46 Training Management Controls and Policies ......................................................................................... 46 Transparency Reporting Policy ............................................................................................................... 47 Policy Revision Procedure ....................................................................................................................... 50 Travel Reimbursement Policy .................................................................................................................. 51

Page 1


Proposed Washington County Wellness Initiative’s Rural Health Network Development Planning Grant Program Policies and Procedures

2014

Overview ................................................................................................................................................. 51 Travel Expenses/Procedures .................................................................................................................. 52 Income Projection Policy .......................................................................................................................... 58 WCWI Grant Application Process ........................................................................................................... 59 Washington County Wellness Initiative Proposal Application............................................................. 62 Fiscal Agent Policy and Procedures ....................................................................................................... 68 WCWI Fiscal Agent Application ............................................................................................................... 69 Request for Payment Form ...................................................................................................................... 71 Travel Reimbursement Form ................................................................................................................... 72

INITIAL POLICY & PROCEDURES MANUAL – ACCEPTANCE PROCESS Policy No: Written by:

Sheree L. Hukill and Penny L. Pricer

Approved by:

Washington County Wellness Initiative Network Governing Board

Approved on / Effective from:

31 July 2014

Approval decision reference:

WCWI Network Governing Board Motion 31 July 2014

For:

WCWI Network Governing Board

Responsible for monitoring/Ownership:

Program Director

Approval pathway:

Program Director WCWI Network Governing Board

Approval By:

____________________________ Bob Walker, President WCWI Network Governing Board

31 July 2014

Approval By:

____________________________ Dr. Michael Woods, Vice-President WCWI Network Governing Board

31 July 2014

Approval By:

____________________________ Deb Cook, Secretary/Treasurer WCWI Network Governing Board

31 July 2014

Page 2


Proposed Washington County Wellness Initiative’s Rural Health Network Development Planning Grant Program Policies and Procedures

2014

DOCUMENT RETENTION/DESTRUCTION POLICY This policy specifies how Washington County Wellness Initiative’s Rural Health Network Development Planning Grant Program (Hereinafter, WCWI-Planning) important documents (hardcopy, online or other media) should be retained, protected and eligible for destruction. The policy also ensures that documents are promptly provided to authorities in the course of legal investigations or lawsuits.

DOCUMENT RETENTION SCHEDULE The following types of documents will be retained for the following periods of time. At least one copy of each document will be retained according to the following schedule. Corporate Records Article of Incorporation WCWI-PLANNING to apply for corporate status for each project partner as applicable IRS Form 1023 (in the USA) to file for tax-exempt and/or charitable status for each project partner as applicable Letter of Determination (for example, from the IRS in the USA) granting tax-exempt and/or charitable status for each project partner as applicable By Laws for each project partner as applicable Board policies for each project partner as applicable Resolutions for each project partner and the WCWI-PLANNING Project Board meeting minutes and WCWI-PLANNING Management Team minutes Sales tax exemption documents for each project partner as applicable Tax or employee identification number designation for each project partner Annual corporate filings for each project partner as applicable Financial Records Chart of Accounts Fiscal Policies and Procedures Audits Financial statements General Ledger Check registers/books Business expenses documents Bank deposit slips Cancelled checks Invoices

Page 3

Permanent Permanent Permanent Permanent Permanent Permanent Permanent Permanent Permanent Permanent Permanent Permanent Permanent Permanent Permanent 7 years 7 years 7 years 7 years 7 years


Proposed Washington County Wellness Initiative’s Rural Health Network Development Planning Grant Program Policies and Procedures

Investment records (deposits, earnings, withdrawals) Property/asset inventories Petty cash receipts/documents Credit card receipts Tax Records Annual tax filing for the organization (IRS Form 990 in the USA) Payroll registers Filings of fees paid to professionals (IRS Form 1099 in the USA) Payroll tax withholdings Earnings records Payroll tax returns W-2 statements Personnel Records Employee offer letters Confirmation of employment letters Benefits descriptions per employee Pension records Employee applications and resumes Promotions, demotions, letter of reprimand, termination Job descriptions, performance goals Workers’ Compensation records Salary ranges per job description I-9 Forms Time reports Insurance Records Property Insurance policy Directors and Officers Insurance policy Workers’ Compensation Insurance policy General Liability Insurance policy Insurance claims applications Insurance disbursements / denials

Page 4

2014

7 years 7years 3 years 3 years Permanent Permanent 7 years 7 years 7 years 7 years 7 years Permanent Permanent Permanent Permanent 7 years after termination 7 years after termination 7 years after termination 5 years 5 years 5 years after termination 3 years after termination Permanent Permanent Permanent Permanent Permanent Permanent


Proposed Washington County Wellness Initiative’s Rural Health Network Development Planning Grant Program Policies and Procedures

Contracts All insurance contracts Employee contracts Construction contracts Legal correspondence Loan / mortgage contracts Leases / deeds Vendor contracts Warranties Donations / Funder Records Grant dispersal contract Donor lists Grant applications Donor acknowledgements Management Plans and Procedures Strategic Plans Staffing, programs, marketing, finance, fundraising and evaluation plans Vendor contacts Disaster Recovery Plan

2014

Permanent Permanent Permanent Permanent Permanent Permanent 7 years 7 years Permanent 7 years 7 years 7 years 7 years 7 years 7 years 7 years

DOCUMENT PROTECTION Documents (hardcopy, online or other media) will be stored in a protected environment for the duration of the Document Retention Schedule. Computer backup media will be included.

DOCUMENT DESTRUCTION Hardcopy of documents will be destroyed by shredding after they have been retained until the end of the Document Retention Schedule. Online copies will be destroyed by fire or other proven means to destroy such media after they have been retained until the end of the Document Retention Schedule.

PROVISION OF DOCUMENTATION FOR INVESTIGATIONS OR LITIGATION Documents requested and subpoenaed by legally authorized personnel will be provided within 5 business days. The Board President will authorize provision. No documents will be concealed, altered or destroyed with the intent to obstruct the investigation or litigation.

Page 5


Proposed Washington County Wellness Initiative’s Rural Health Network Development Planning Grant Program Policies and Procedures

2014

HRSA GRANT SPECIFIC RECORD KEEPING AND RETENTION HHS recipients generally must retain financial and programmatic records, supporting documents, statistical records, and all other records that are required by the terms of an award, or may reasonably be considered pertinent to an award, for a period of 3 years from the date the final FFR is submitted. If an audit, litigation, or other action involving the records is started before the end of the appropriate retention period, the records should be maintained until the end of the appropriate retention period or until the audit, litigation, or other action is completed, whichever is later.

Modified from the adaptation from “Field Guide to Developing, Operating and Restoring Your Nonprofit Board” 3 June 2014 – Sheree L. Hukill and Penny L. Pricer (http://managementhelp.org/misc/Sample-Document-RetentionDestruction-Policy.pdf)

Page 6


Proposed Washington County Wellness Initiative’s Rural Health Network Development Planning Grant Program Policies and Procedures

2014

CONFIDENTIALITY POLICY It is the policy of Washington County Wellness Initiative’s Rural Health Network Development Planning Grant Program (Hereinafter, WCWI-PLANNING) that project partners may not disclose, divulge, or make accessible confidential information belonging to, or obtained through their affiliation with WCWI-PLANNING to any person, including relatives, friends, and business and professional associates, other than to persons who have a legitimate need for such information and to whom WCWIPLANNING has authorized disclosure. Directors, employees, volunteers and contractors shall use confidential information solely for the purpose of performing services as a project partner for WCWI-PLANNING. This policy is not intended to prevent disclosure where disclosure is required by law. Directors, employees, volunteers and contractors must exercise good judgment and care at all times to avoid unauthorized or improper disclosures of confidential information. Conversations in public places, such as restaurants, elevators, and public transportation, should be limited to matters that do not pertain to information of a sensitive or confidential nature. In addition, directors, employees, volunteers and contractors should be sensitive to the risk of inadvertent disclosure and should for example, refrain from leaving confidential information on desks or otherwise in plain view and refrain from the use of speaker phones to discuss confidential information if the conversation could be heard by unauthorized persons. At the end of a director's term in office or upon the termination of an employee's, volunteer's, or contractor's relationship with WCWI-PLANNING, he or she shall return, at the request of WCWI-PLANNING, all documents, papers, and other materials, regardless of medium, which may contain or be derived from confidential information, in his or her possession. Modified from the adaptation from “Field Guide to Developing, Operating and Restoring Your Nonprofit Board” 3 June 2014 – Sheree L. Hukill and Penny L. Pricer (http://managementhelp.org/misc/

Page 7


Proposed Washington County Wellness Initiative’s Rural Health Network Development Planning Grant Program Policies and Procedures

2014

CONFLICT OF INTEREST POLICY Washington County Wellness Initiative’s Rural Health Network Development Planning Grant Program (Hereinafter, WCWI-PLANNING) is a partnership led by Bartlesville Community Foundation, a nonprofit, tax-exempt organization depending on charitable contributions from the public. Maintenance of tax-exempt status of the lead agency is important both for continued financial stability of the WCWI-PLANNING project and for the receipt of contributions and public support. Therefore, the IRS as well as state corporate and tax officials, view the operations of Bartlesville Community Foundation and all WCWI-PLANNING project activities as a public trust which is subject to scrutiny by and accountability to such governmental authorities as well as to members of the public. Consequently, there exists between Bartlesville Community Foundation, its board and officers, and all WCWI-PLANNING project partners a fiduciary duty which carries with it a broad and unbending duty of loyalty and fidelity. The board and officers have the responsibility of administering the affairs of Bartlesville Community Foundation honestly and prudently, and of exercising their best care, skill, and judgment for the benefit of Bartlesville Community Foundation and the WCWI-PLANNING Project. Those persons shall exercise the utmost good faith in all transactions involved in their duties, and they shall not use their positions with Bartlesville Community Foundation and the WCWIPLANNING Project or knowledge gained therefrom for their personal benefit. The interests of the organization must have the first priority in all decisions and actions. This statement is directed not only to directors and officers, but to all employees/volunteers who can influence the actions of Bartlesville Community Foundation and/or WCWI-PLANNING. For example, this would include all who make purchasing decisions, all other persons who might be described as "management personnel," and all who have proprietary information concerning WCWI-PLANNING. Conflicts of interest may arise in the relations of directors, officers, and “management personnel” with any of the following third parties: 1. Persons and firms supplying goods and services to WCWI-PLANNING. 2. Persons and firms from whom WCWI-PLANNING leases property and equipment. 3. Persons and firms with whom WCWI-PLANNING is dealing or planning to deal in connection with the gift, purchase or sale of real estate, securities, or other property. 4. Competing or affinity organizations. 5. Donors and others who support WCWI-PLANNING. 6. Agencies, organizations, and associations which affect the operations of WCWIPLANNING. 7. Family members, friends, and other employees.

Page 8


Proposed Washington County Wellness Initiative’s Rural Health Network Development Planning Grant Program Policies and Procedures

2014

A material conflicting interest may be defined as an interest, direct or indirect, with any persons and firms mentioned above. Such an interest might arise through: 1. Owning stock or holding debt or other proprietary interests in any third party dealing with WCWI-PLANNING. 2. Holding office, serving on the board, participating in management, or being otherwise employed (or formerly employed) in any third party dealing with WCWIPLANNING. 3. Receiving remuneration for services with respect to individual transactions involving WCWI-PLANNING. 4. Using WCWI-PLANNING project partner's time, personnel, equipment, supplies, or good will for other than WCWI-PLANNING approved activities, programs, and purposes, except that minor, reasonable use is allowable at the discretion of the Executive Director or the WCWI Board of Directors. 5. Receiving personal gifts or loans from third parties dealing with WCWIPLANNING. Receipt of any gift is disapproved except gifts of nominal value which could not be refused without discourtesy. No personal gift of money should ever be accepted. The areas of conflicting interest listed, and the relations in those areas which may give rise to conflict, are not exhaustive. Conceivably, conflicts might arise in other areas or through other relations. It is assumed that the directors, officers, and management employees will recognize such areas and relation by analogy. The fact that one of the interests described above exists does not mean necessarily that a conflict exists, or that the conflict, if it exists, is material enough to be of practical importance, or if material that upon full disclosure of all relevant facts and circumstances that it is necessarily adverse to the interests of WCWI-PLANNING. However, it is the policy of the board that the existence of any of the interests described shall be disclosed before any transaction is consummated. It shall be the continuing responsibility of board, officers, and management employees to scrutinize their transactions and outside business interests and relationships for potential conflicts and to immediately make such disclosures. Disclosure should be made according to WCWI-PLANNING standards. Transactions with related parties may be undertaken only if all of the following are observed: 1. A material transaction is fully disclosed in the audited financial statements of the organization; 2. The related party is excluded from the discussion and approval of such transaction; 3. A competitive bid or comparable valuation exists; and 4. The organization's board has acted upon and demonstrated that the transaction is in the best interest of the organization.

Page 9


Proposed Washington County Wellness Initiative’s Rural Health Network Development Planning Grant Program Policies and Procedures

2014

Disclosure in the organization should be made to the project director (or if she is the one with the conflict, then to the Bartlesville Community Foundation board chair), who shall determine whether a conflict exists and is material, and if the matters are material, bring them to the attention of the Bartlesville Community Foundation board chair. Disclosure involving directors should be made to the Bartlesville Community Foundation board chair, who shall bring these matters, if material to the WCWI-PLANNING Project Management Team and/or the Bartlesville Community Foundation board. The management team and/or board shall determine whether a conflict exists and is material, and in the presence of an existing material conflict, whether the contemplated transaction may be authorized as just, fair, and reasonable to WCWI-PLANNING. The decision of the board on these matters will rest in their sole discretion, and their concern must be the welfare of WCWI-PLANNING and the advancement of its purpose. Modified from the adaptation from “Field Guide to Developing, Operating and Restoring Your Nonprofit Board” 3 June 2014 – Sheree L. Hukill and Penny L. Pricer (http://managementhelp.org/misc/

Page 10


Proposed Washington County Wellness Initiative’s Rural Health Network Development Planning Grant Program Policies and Procedures

2014

ETHICS POLICY We, as WCWI-PLANNING professionals (project partners, volunteers, staff and board members), dedicate ourselves to carrying out the mission of this project. We will: 1. Recognize that the chief function of WCWI-PLANNING at all times is to serve the best interests of our constituency. 2. Accept as a personal duty the responsibility to keep up to date on emerging issues and to conduct ourselves with professional competence, fairness, impartiality, efficiency, and effectiveness. 3. Respect the structure and responsibilities of the board of directors, provide them with facts and advice as a basis for their making policy decisions, and uphold and implement policies adopted by the management team. 4. Keep communities informed about issues affecting them. 5. Conduct our organizational and operational duties with positive leadership exemplified by open communication, creativity, dedication, and compassion. 6. Exercise whatever discretionary authority we have under the law to carry out the promise of the organization. 7. Serve with respect, concern, courtesy, and responsiveness in carrying out the organization's promise. 8. Demonstrate the highest standards of personal integrity, truthfulness, honesty, and fortitude in all our activities in order to inspire confidence and trust in our activities. 9. Avoid any interest or activity that is in conflict with the conduct of our official duties. 10. Respect and protect privileged information to which we have access in the course of our official duties. 11. Strive for personal and professional excellence and encourage the professional development of others.

Modified from the adaptation from “Field Guide to Developing, Operating and Restoring Your Nonprofit Board” 3 June 2014 – Sheree L. Hukill and Penny L. Pricer (http://managementhelp.org/misc/)

Page 11


Proposed Washington County Wellness Initiative’s Rural Health Network Development Planning Grant Program Policies and Procedures

2014

NON-DISCRIMINATION AND ANTI-HARASSMENT POLICY Washington County Wellness Initiative’s Rural Health Network Development Planning Grant Program (Hereinafter, WCWI-PLANNING) is committed to equal opportunity for all persons without regard to sex, age, race, color, religion, creed, national origin, marital status, disability or sexual orientation. It is the policy of WCWI-PLANNING to comply with all federal, state and local laws and regulations regarding equal opportunity. In keeping with that policy, WCWI-PLANNING is committed to maintaining a work environment that is free of unlawful discrimination and harassment. Accordingly, WCWI-PLANNING will not tolerate unlawful discrimination against or harassment of any of our employees or others present at our facilities by anyone, including any director, employee, volunteer, contractor supervisor, co-worker, vendor, client, or customer of WCWI-PLANNING. Unlawful Discrimination and Harassment

Unlawful discrimination includes treating someone less well in opportunities for work, promotions, shifts, overtime or other conditions of employment because of his or her race, national origin, sex, age, religion, disability or other protected attribute. Harassment consists of unwelcome or unwanted conduct, whether verbal, physical or visual, that is based upon a person's protected status. Examples of unlawful harassment include words, gestures, stories, jokes or nicknames that are derogatory, demeaning or insulting to a person based upon his or her race, national origin, sex, disability, age, religion or other protected attribute. Sexual Harassment Sexual harassment deserves special mention. Sexual harassment consists of: Unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature constitute sexual harassment when (1) submission to such conduct is made either explicitly or implicitly a term or condition of an individual's employment, (2) submission to or rejection of such conduct by an individual is used as the basis for employment decisions affecting such individual, or (3) such conduct has the purpose or effect of unreasonably interfering with an individual's work performance by creating an intimidating, hostile, or offensive work environment. Examples of sexual harassment may include, but are not limited to the following conduct by any employee, whether male or female: Unwanted sexual advances or propositions, offering employment benefits in exchange for sexual favors, making or threatening reprisals after a negative response to sexual advances, sexual innuendo, suggestive comments, sexually oriented "kidding" or "teasing," jokes about gender-specific traits, making sexual gestures or comments, displaying sexually suggestive objects, pictures, cartoons or postures, impeding or blocking another's movement, physical contact, such as patting, pinching, or brushing against another's body, and continued requests for a date after a rejection.

Modified from the adaptation from “Field Guide to Developing, Operating and Restoring Your Nonprofit Board” 3 June 2014 – Sheree L. Hukill and Penny L. Pricer (http://managementhelp.org/misc/

Page 12


Proposed Washington County Wellness Initiative’s Rural Health Network Development Planning Grant Program Policies and Procedures

2014

WHISTLEBLOWER POLICY This policy is intended to encourage Project Partners, board members, staff (paid and volunteer) and others to report suspected or actual occurrence(s) of illegal, unethical or inappropriate events (behaviors or practices) without retribution. 1. The Whistleblower should promptly report the suspected or actual event to the project director. 2. If the Whistleblower would be uncomfortable or otherwise reluctant to report to project director, then the Whistleblower could report the event to another member of the management team, including to an appropriate Board committee or member. 3. The Whistleblower can report the event with his/her identity or anonymously. 4. The Whistle blower shall receive no retaliation or retribution for a report that was provided in good faith – that was not done primarily with malice to damage another or the organization. 5. A Whistleblower who makes a report that is not done in good faith is subject to discipline, including termination of the partnership, board or employee relationship, or other legal means to protect the reputation of the WCWIPLANNING Project and members of its project partners’ boards, staffs, and volunteers. 6. Anyone who retaliates against the Whistleblower (who reported an event in good faith) will be subject to discipline, including termination of Board or employee status. 7. Crimes against person or property, such as assault, rape, burglary, etc., should immediately be reported to local law enforcement personnel. 8. Supervisors, managers and/or Board members who receive the reports must promptly act to investigate and/or resolve the issue. 9. The Whistleblower shall receive a report within five business days of the initial report, regarding the investigation, disposition or resolution of the issue. 10. If the investigation of a report, that was done in good faith and investigated by internal personnel, is not to the Whistleblower’s satisfaction, then he/she has the right to report the event to the appropriate legal or investigative agency. 11. The identity of the Whistleblower, if known, shall remain confidential to those persons directly involved in applying this policy, unless the issue requires investigation by law enforcement, in which case members of the organization are subject to subpoena.

Modified from the adaptation from “Field Guide to Developing, Operating and Restoring Your Nonprofit Board” 3 June 2014 – Sheree L. Hukill and Penny L. Pricer (http://managementhelp.org/misc/)

Page 13


Proposed Washington County Wellness Initiative’s Rural Health Network Development Planning Grant Program Policies and Procedures

2014

GRANT-SPECIFIC FUND DISBURSEMENT POLICY AWARD FUNDS 1. Once an award is made by HRSA, the funds are posted in recipient accounts established in the Division of Payment Management’s (DPM) Payment Management System (PMS). Funds are accessed through the PMS which is maintained by the DPM, Program Support Center. 2. Upon receipt of award the Project Director will register and set up an account with PMS. a. A packet will be sent by PMS to Bartlesville Community Foundation and Project Director to establish an account to draw funds in PMS/Smartlink. b. The packet includes the Recipient Payee Identification Number (PIN) – (email received that contained the PIN, actual hard copy packet not received) c. Direct Deposit Sign-Up Form SF-1199A. The SF-1199A provides the recipient's banking information in order to have funds electronically transmitted to recipient's banking institution. SF-1199A – Submitted 22 May 2014 after downloading from website, finalized on 2 July 2014 d. Recipient Training CD – Not Received Yet e. Primary Contact Person Form – Submitted 22 May 2014 after downloading from website, finalized on 2 July 2014 f. SF-1199A and Primary Contact Person forms were completed and returned to Division of Payment Management, P.O. Box 6021, Rockville, MD 20852 on 22 May 2014 finalized version was submitted via e-mail on 2 July 2014 g. Awaiting the designation of an Account Liaison who will provide Bartlesville Community Foundation with a temporary password for PMS/Smartlink access via certified mail. (An e-mail was sent from Thuy Than with information necessary to establish account on PMS.)

DRAW DOWNS 3. Sheree L. Hukill, Program Director, will draw down funds as necessary through the PMS web-based portal. 4. Shawn Crawford, Authorizing Official, will issue grant payments based on one of the approved advance payment methods or by cash request on a reimbursement basis. a. Advanced Payments: If the cash request is for an advance payment, the recipient may request funds monthly on the basis of expected disbursements during the succeeding month and the amount of Federal funds already on hand. b. Reimbursement: A request for reimbursement may be submitted more often, if authorized.

Page 14


Proposed Washington County Wellness Initiative’s Rural Health Network Development Planning Grant Program Policies and Procedures

2014

5. Shawn Crawford, Authorizing Official, will assure that federal funds advanced to the recipient should be fully disbursed (checks written, signed, and issued to the payees) by the close of business the next work day after receipt of the funds. 6. Shawn Crawford, Authorizing Official, will assure that federal funds are placed in an interest bearing account. Any interest earned by Bartlesville Community Foundation on advances of Federal funds under this grant award that, in the aggregate, exceeds $250 per year (nongovernmental) must be remitted annually to PMS. 7. Sheree L. Hukill, Program Director, and Shawn Crawford, Authorizing Official, will assure that Bartlesville Community Foundation submits the required FFR/SF-425 report in a timely manner. The FFR submitted through the PMS monitors the timing of cash advances and disbursements and is submitted quarterly.

FINANCIAL RECORDS 1. Sheree L. Hukill, Program Director, and Shawn Crawford, Authorizing Official, will assure that records are maintained that: a. adequately identify the sources of funds for federally assisted activities; b. adequately identify the purposes for which the award was used, including authorizations, obligations, unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or expenditures, and any program income; c. accounting records are supported by source documentation such as canceled checks, paid bills, payrolls, and time and attendance records; d. evidence effective control over and accountability for all cash, real and personal property, and other assets under the award; adequately safeguard those assets; and ensure that they are used only for authorized purposes; e. compare actual expenditures or outlays with the approved budget for the award; f. determine the allowability of costs in accordance with the applicable Federal cost principles, program regulations, and other requirements cited in the Notice of Award (This includes the ability to readily identify unobligated balances, accelerated or delayed expenditures, and cost transfers.); and g. minimize the time elapsing between any advance payment under this award and the disbursement of the funds for direct program costs and the proportionate share allowable administrative costs, and ensure that the timing and amount of any payments to sub-recipients conform to this standard. 2. Sheree L. Hukill, Program Director, will submit monthly financial reports to Shawn Crawford, Authorizing Official, that document the prior month’s financial activity and identify draw down amount for current month.

Page 15


Proposed Washington County Wellness Initiative’s Rural Health Network Development Planning Grant Program Policies and Procedures

2014

3. Shawn Crawford, Authorizing Official, will review and approve/disapprove monthly reports prior to drawdown being completed by Sheree L. Hukill, Program Director. 4. All monthly financial reports shall be filed in official HRSA grant files to be maintained by Integrated Concepts, Inc. with copies submitted to Bartlesville Community Foundation as a file backup procedure.

Page 16


Proposed Washington County Wellness Initiative’s Rural Health Network Development Planning Grant Program Policies and Procedures

2014

WCWI-PLANNING PROJECT SAFE DRIVING POLICY Texting is Prohibited While Driving on WCWI-PLANNING Project-funded Business and/or on WCWI-PLANNING Project-funded time We deeply value the safety and well-being of all WCWI-PLANING Project Participants. Due to the increasing number of accidents resulting from the use of cell phones while driving, we are instituting a reducing distracted driving policy. 1. Directors, employees, volunteers, and contractors are not permitted to read or respond to e-mails or text messages while operating a motor vehicle on WCWI-PLANNING business and/or on WCWI-PLANNING time. 2. This policy also applies to use of PDAs. 3. Directors, employees, volunteers, and contractors are required to wear safety belts while in moving vehicles on WCWI-PLANNING business and/or WCWI-PLANNING time. 4. Directors, employees, volunteers, and contractors will be given two warnings. The third time an employee, board member, student, or volunteer is found to be in violation of this policy, it is grounds for immediate dismissal from project participation and reimbursement. Your signature below certifies your agreement to comply with this policy. __________________________________ Signature

________________________ Date

This policy is enacted pursuant to Executive Order 13043 (April 16, 1997), Increasing the Use of Seat Belts in the United States. HHS recipients are encouraged to adopt and enforce on-the-job seat belt policies and programs for their employees when operating vehicles, whether organizationally owned or rented or personally owned. Additionally, pursuant to Executive Order 13513, "Federal Leadership on Reducing Text Messaging While Driving," 74 Fed. Reg. 51225 (October 1, 2009), grant recipients and sub-recipients are encouraged to adopt and enforce policies banning employees from text messaging while driving any vehicle during the course of performing work funded by this grant, and to establish workplace safety policies and conduct education, awareness, and other outreach to decrease crashes caused by distracted drivers. This policy is modeled on the National Safety Council Cell Phone Policy Kit available at http://www.nsc.org/safety_road/Distracted_Driving/Pages/EmployerPolicies.aspx “The project described was made possible by Grant Number P10RH26875. Contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the views of the Health Resources Services Administration, Rural Health Network Development Planning Grant Program, or the United States Department of Health and Human Services.”

Page 17


Proposed Washington County Wellness Initiative’s Rural Health Network Development Planning Grant Program Policies and Procedures

2014

ALCOHOL AND DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE The Drug-Free Workplace Act of 1988, 42 U.S.C. 701 et seq., requires that all organizations receiving grants from any Federal agency agree to maintain a drug-free workplace. The recipient must notify the awarding office if an employee of the recipient is convicted of violating a criminal drug statute. Failure to comply with these requirements may be cause for debarment. HHS implementing regulations are set forth in 45 CFR Part 82, “Government-wide Requirements for Drug-Free Workplace (Financial Assistance).” Washington County Wellness Initiative’s Rural Health Network Development Planning Grant Program (Hereinafter, WCWI-PLANNING) prohibits the possession, sale, consumption, or being under the influence of alcoholic beverages or illegal drugs by employees while in the office, during working hours outside the office, or while on agency business, or in an agency vehicle. Any employee or volunteer found possessing, selling, consuming, or being under the influence of alcoholic beverages while on duty will be subject to discipline, up to and including termination. Occasional exceptions to this policy against the consumption of alcoholic beverages may be made at WCWI-PLANNING's sole discretion for small quantities of such beverages reasonable under the circumstances, usually wine or beer, which may be available at office parties or WCWI-PLANNING's events. At such parties and events, all personnel are expected to exercise good judgment and moderation. In no event may any underage individual consume alcohol at any WCWI-PLANNING event, and all personnel are expected to comply fully with all laws (including laws prohibiting the operation of motor vehicles while under the influence of alcohol), and to take safety precautions including arranging for a designated sober driver. Any personnel using prescription or over-the-counter drugs that may impair the person’s ability to safely perform the job, or affect the safety or well-being of others, must notify a Program Director or Authorizing Official of such use immediately before starting or resuming work while under the influence of such prescription or over-the-counter drugs. If you have a problem with drugs and/or alcohol and wish to undertake rehabilitation, you can request an unpaid leave of absence for this purpose. It is your responsibility to seek help before the problem adversely affects your work performance or results in a violation of this policy. If you need assistance in seeking this help, you may talk to the Program Director. No one will be discriminated against for undertaking rehabilitation. As needed, WCWI-PLANNING personnel will access the resources below for further information on maintaining an alcohol and drug-free workplace: The National Clearinghouse for Alcohol and Drug Information (NCADI) is a toll-free service funded by the federal government. NCADI's information specialists will help you find information on all aspects of substance abuse from videos and prevention

Page 18


Proposed Washington County Wellness Initiative’s Rural Health Network Development Planning Grant Program Policies and Procedures

2014

materials, to specific program descriptions, resources in your state, and the latest research results. Many publications and educational materials are available free from NCADI. http://store.samhsa.gov/home or tel. 1-800-729-6686 The Drug Free Workplace Hotline is a toll-free service funded by the federal government to assist business, industry, and unions on the development and implementation of comprehensive drug-free workplace programs, tel. 1-800-843-4971.

Modified from the adaptation from “Workplace Safety Toolkit” June 2014 – Sheree L. Hukill and Penny L. Pricer (http://www.blueavocado.org/content/drug-and-alcohol-freeworkplace-policy-nonprofits)

Page 19

3


Proposed Washington County Wellness Initiative’s Rural Health Network Development Planning Grant Program Policies and Procedures

2014

TOBACCO-FREE WORKPLACE POLICY Because we recognize the hazards caused by exposure to environmental tobacco smoke, as well as the life-threatening diseases linked to the use of all forms of tobacco, it shall be the policy of Washington County Wellness Initiative’s Rural Health Network Development Planning Grant Program (Hereinafter, WCWI-PLANNING), effective 1 June 2014, to provide a tobacco-free environment for all employees and visitors. This policy covers the smoking of any tobacco product and the use of oral tobacco products or “spit” tobacco, and it applies to both employees and non-employee visitors of WCWIPLANNING.

DEFINITION 1. No use of tobacco products will be allowed within the facilities of WCWI-PLANNING at any time. 2. No tobacco use in any company vehicle. 3. There will be no use of any form of tobacco in WCWI-PLANNING vehicles at any time. 4. There will be no tobacco use in personal vehicles when transporting people on WCWI-PLANNING authorized business.

PROCEDURE 5. Employees and volunteers will be informed of this policy through signs posted in WCWI-PLANNING facilities and vehicles, newsletters, inserts in pay envelopes, the policy manual, e-mail, and/or orientation and training provided by their supervisors. 6. Visitors will be informed of this policy through signs, and it will be explained by their hosts. 7. The WCWI-PLANNING will help employees and volunteers who want to quit tobacco by helping them access recommended cessation programs and materials. 8. Any violations of this policy will be handled through the standard disciplinary procedure.

Modified from the adaptation from “Workplace Safety Toolkit” June 2014 – Sheree L. Hukill and Penny L. Pricer (http://www.cancer.org/healthy/stayawayfromtobacco/smokefreecommunities/createasmoke-freeworkplace/smoking-in-theworkplace-a-model-policy)

Page 20

3


Proposed Washington County Wellness Initiative’s Rural Health Network Development Planning Grant Program Policies and Procedures

2014

PROCUREMENT POLICIES AND PROCEDURES 1. Purpose of procurement standards. The purpose of these standards is to establish procedures for Washington County Wellness Initiative’s Rural Health Network Development Planning Grant Program (Hereinafter, WCWI-PLANNING.) for the procurement of supplies and other expendable property, equipment, real property and other services. 2. Code of conduct. No employee, officer, or agent shall participate in the selection, award, or administration of a contract if a real or apparent conflict of interest would be involved. Such a conflict would arise when the employee, officer, or agent, any member of his or her immediate family, his or her partner, or an organization which employs or is about to employ any of the parties indicated herein, has a financial or other interest in the firm selected for an award. The officers, employees, and agents of the WCWI-PLANNING shall neither solicit nor accept gratuities, favors, or anything of monetary value from contractors, or parties to sub-agreements except for where the financial interest is not substantial or the gift is an unsolicited item of nominal value. Members of the WCWI-PLANNING's board of directors shall comply with all relevant fiduciary duties, including those governing conflicts of interest, when they vote upon matters related to procurement contracts in which they have a direct or indirect financial or personal interest. Officers, employees, directors, and agents of the WCWIPLANNING shall be subject to disciplinary actions for violations of these standards. 3. Competition. All procurement transactions shall be conducted in a manner to provide, to the maximum extent practical, open and free competition. The WCWIPLANNING shall be alert to organizational conflicts of interest as well as noncompetitive practices among contractors that may restrict or eliminate competition or otherwise restrain trade. In order to ensure objective contractor performance and eliminate unfair competitive advantage, contractors that develop or draft specifications, requirements, statements of work, invitations for bids and/or requests for proposals shall be excluded from competing for such procurements. Awards shall be made to the bidder or offeror whose bid or offer is responsive to the solicitation and is most advantageous to the WCWI-PLANNING, price, quality and other factors considered. Solicitations shall clearly set forth all requirements that the bidder or offeror shall fulfill in order for the bid or offer to be evaluated by the WCWI-PLANNING. Any and all bids or offers may be rejected when it is in the WCWI-PLANNING's interest to do so. In all procurement the WCWIPLANNING shall avoid practices that are restrictive of competition. These include but are not limited to: (a)

Placing unreasonable requirements on firms in order for them to qualify to do business,

(b)

Requiring unnecessary experience and excessive bonding,

Page 21


Proposed Washington County Wellness Initiative’s Rural Health Network Development Planning Grant Program Policies and Procedures

4.

2014

(c)

Noncompetitive pricing practices between firms or between affiliated companies,

(d)

Noncompetitive awards to consultants that are on retainer contracts,

(e)

Organizational conflicts of interest,

(f)

Specifying only a brand name product instead of allowing an equal product to be offered and describing the performance of other relevant requirements of the procurement, and

(g)

Any arbitrary action in the procurement process.

Methods of Procurement to be Followed. (a) Procurement by small purchase procedures. Small purchase procedures are those relatively simple and informal procurement methods for securing services, supplies, or other property that do not cost more than the "Simplified Acquisition Threshold" fixed at 41 U.S.C. 403(11) (currently set at $100,000) and where procurement by sealed bid is not required. If small purchase procedures are used, price or rate quotations shall be obtained from an adequate number of qualified sources to insure that the selection process is competitive in accordance with these policies. (b) Procurement by sealed bids (formal advertising). Bids are publicly solicited and a firm-fixed-price contract (lump sum or unit price) is awarded to the responsible bidder whose bid, conforming to all the material terms and conditions of the invitation for bids, is the lowest in price. (i) The sealed bid method is the preferred method for procuring construction if the following conditions are present:

(ii)

(A)

A complete, adequate, and realistic specification or purchase description is available;

(B)

Two or more responsible bidders are willing and able to compete effectively and for the business; and

(C)

The procurement lends itself to a firm fixed price contract and the selection of the successful bidder can be made principally on the basis of price.

If sealed bids are used, the following requirements apply: (A)

The invitation for bids will be publicly advertised and bids shall be solicited from an adequate number of known

Page 22


Proposed Washington County Wellness Initiative’s Rural Health Network Development Planning Grant Program Policies and Procedures

2014

suppliers, providing them sufficient time prior to the date set for opening the bids; (B)

The invitation for bids, which will include any specifications and pertinent attachments, shall define the items or services in order for the bidder to properly respond;

(C)

All bids will be publicly opened at the time and place prescribed in the invitation for bids;

(D)

A firm fixed-price contract award will be made in writing to the lowest responsive and responsible bidder. Where specified in bidding documents, factors such as discounts, transportation cost, and life cycle costs shall be considered in determining which bid is lowest. Payment discounts will only be used to determine the low bid when prior experience indicates that such discounts are usually taken advantage of; and

(E)

Any or all bids may be rejected if there is a sound documented reason.

(c) Procurement by competitive proposals. The technique of competitive proposals is normally conducted with more than one source submitting an offer, and either a fixed-price or cost-reimbursement type contract is awarded. It is generally used when conditions are not appropriate for the use of sealed bids or small purchase procedures. If this method is used, the following requirements apply: (i)

Requests for proposals will be publicized and identify all evaluation factors and their relative importance. Any response to publicized requests for proposals shall be honored to the maximum extent practical;

(ii)

Proposals will be solicited from an adequate number of qualified sources;

(iii)

The WCWI-PLANNING shall evaluate responses to its solicitations and select awardees in accordance the procedures outlined in section 5 below ("Procurement Procedures")

(iv)

Awards will be made to the responsible firm whose proposal is most advantageous to the WCWI-PLANNING with price and other factors considered; and

(v)

The WCWI-PLANNING may use the competitive proposal procedures for qualifications-based procurement of

Page 23


Proposed Washington County Wellness Initiative’s Rural Health Network Development Planning Grant Program Policies and Procedures

2014

architectural/engineering (A/E) professional services whereby competitors' qualifications are evaluated and the most qualified competitor is selected, subject to negotiation of fair and reasonable compensation. A procurement process, where price is not to be used as a stated selection factor, can only be used in procurement of A/E professional services. It cannot be used to purchase other types of although A/E firms are a potential source to perform the proposed effort. (d) Procurement by noncompetitive proposals is procurement through solicitation of a proposal from only one source, or after solicitation of a number of sources, competition is determined inadequate. (i) Procurement by noncompetitive proposals may be used only when the award of a contract is infeasible under small purchase procedures, sealed bids or competitive proposals and one of the following circumstances applies:

5.

(A)

The item is available only from a single source;

(B)

The public exigency or emergency for the requirement will not permit a delay resulting from competitive solicitation;

(C)

The funding source specifically authorizes the use of noncompetitive proposals; or

(D)

After solicitation of a number of sources, competition is determined inadequate.

(ii)

Cost analysis, i.e., verifying the proposed cost data, the projections of the data, and the evaluation of the specific elements of costs and profits, is required.

(iii)

When using a noncompetitive process the WCWI-PLANNING normally would be expected to submit the proposed procurement to the relevant funding source for pre-award.

Procurement procedures. (a)

All procurement by the WCWI-PLANNING shall comply, at a minimum, with the requirements of subsections (i), (ii), and (iii) below: (i)

the WCWI-PLANNING avoid purchasing unnecessary items.

Page 24


Proposed Washington County Wellness Initiative’s Rural Health Network Development Planning Grant Program Policies and Procedures

2014

(ii)

Where appropriate, an analysis is made of lease and purchase alternatives to determine which would be the most economical and practical procurement.

(iii)

Solicitations for goods and services provide for all of the following. (A)

A clear and accurate description of the technical requirements for the material, product or service to be procured. In competitive procurements, such a description shall not contain features which unduly restrict competition.

(B)

Requirements which must be fulfill and all other factors to be used in evaluating proposal submitted in response to solicitations .

(C)

A description, whenever practicable, of technical requirements in terms of functions to be performed or performance required, including the range of acceptable characteristics or minimum acceptable standards.

(D)

When relevant, the specific features of "brand name or equal" descriptions that are to be included in responses submitted to solicitation.

(E)

The acceptance, to the extent practicable and economically feasible, of products and services dimensioned in the metric system of measurement.

(F)

Preference, to the extent practicable and economically feasible, for products and services that conserve natural resources and protect the environment and are energy efficient.

(b) Positive efforts shall be made by the WCWI-PLANNING to utilize small businesses, minority-owned firms, and women's business enterprises, whenever possible. The WCWI-PLANNING shall take all of the following steps to further this goal. (i)

Ensure that small businesses, minority-owned firms, and women's business enterprises are used to the fullest extent practicable.

(ii)

Make information on forthcoming opportunities available and arrange time frames for purchases and contracts to encourage and facilitate participation by small businesses, minority-owned firms, and women's business enterprises.

Page 25


Proposed Washington County Wellness Initiative’s Rural Health Network Development Planning Grant Program Policies and Procedures

2014

(iii)

Consider in the contract process whether firms competing for larger contracts intend to subcontract with small businesses, minorityowned firms, and women's business enterprises.

(iv)

Encourage, when practical, contracting with consortiums of small businesses, minority-owned firms and women's business enterprises when a contract is too large for one of these firms to handle individually.

(v)

Use the services and assistance, as appropriate and practical, of such organizations as the Small Business Administration and the Department of Commerce's Minority Business Development Agency in the solicitation and utilization of small businesses, minority-owned firms and women's business enterprises.

(c) The type of procuring instruments used (e.g., fixed price contracts, cost reimbursable contracts, purchase orders, and incentive contracts) shall be determined by the WCWI-PLANNING but shall be appropriate for the particular procurement and for promoting the best interest of the program or project involved. The "cost-plus-a-percentage-of- cost" or "percentage of construction cost" methods of contracting shall not be used. (d) Contracts shall be made only with responsible contractors who possess the potential ability to perform successfully under the terms and conditions of the proposed procurement. Consideration shall be given to such matters as contractor integrity, record of past performance, financial and technical resources or accessibility to other necessary resources. (e) Debarment and Suspension - No contract shall be made to parties listed on the General Services Administration's List of Parties Excluded from Federal Procurement or Non-procurement Programs in accordance with E.O.s 12549 and 12689, "Debarment and Suspension." Contractors with awards that exceed the small purchase threshold shall provide the required certification regarding its exclusion status and that of its principal employees.

Page 26


Proposed Washington County Wellness Initiative’s Rural Health Network Development Planning Grant Program Policies and Procedures

2014

6. Cost and price analysis. Some form of cost or price analysis shall be made and documented in the procurement files in connection with every procurement action above $500 in value. Price analysis may be accomplished in various ways, including the comparison of price quotations submitted, market prices and similar indicia, together with discounts. Cost analysis is the review and evaluation of each element of cost to determine reasonableness, allocability and allowability. 7. Procurement records - Procurement records and files for purchases in excess of the small purchase threshold as fixed at 41 U.S.C. 403(11) (currently $25,000) shall include the following at a minimum: (a) basis for contractor selection, (b) justification for lack of competition when competitive bids or offers are not obtained, and (c) basis for award cost or price. 8. Contract administration. A system for contract administration shall be maintained to ensure contractor conformance with the terms, conditions and specifications of the contract and to ensure adequate and timely follow up of all purchases. The WCWI-PLANNING shall evaluate contractor performance and document, as appropriate, whether contractors have met the terms, conditions and specifications of the contract. 9. Contract provisions. The WCWI-PLANNING shall include, in addition to provisions to define a sound and complete agreement, the following provisions in all contracts. The following provisions shall also be applied to subcontracts. (a) Contracts in excess of the Simplified Acquisition Threshold shall contain contractual provisions or conditions that allow for administrative, contractual, or legal remedies in instances in which a contractor violates or breaches the contract terms, and provide for such remedial actions as may be appropriate. (b) All contracts in excess of the Simplified Acquisition Threshold shall contain suitable provisions for termination by the WCWI-PLANNING, including the manner by which termination shall be effected and the basis for settlement. In addition, such contracts shall describe conditions under which the contract may be terminated for default as well as conditions where the contract may be terminated because of circumstances beyond the control of the contractor. (c) For contracts dealing with construction or facility improvements the WCWI-PLANNING shall comply with all requirements imposed by its funding sources (and the government regulations applicable to those funding sources) with regard to construction bid guarantees, performance bonds, and payment bonds.

Page 27


Proposed Washington County Wellness Initiative’s Rural Health Network Development Planning Grant Program Policies and Procedures

2014

(d) All negotiated contracts (except those for less than the Simplified Acquisition Threshold) awarded by the WCWI-PLANNING shall include a provision to the effect that the WCWI-PLANNING shall have access to any books, documents, papers and records of the contractor which are directly pertinent to a specific program for the purpose of making audits, examinations, excerpts and transcriptions. (e) All contracts, including small purchases, awarded by the WCWIPLANNING and their contractors shall contain the following procurement provisions as applicable. (i). Equal Employment Opportunity - All contracts, when funded in whole or part by monies derived from the Federal government (either directly or indirectly), shall contain a provision requiring compliance with E.O. 11246, "Equal Employment Opportunity," as amended by E.O. 11375, "Amending Executive Order 11246 Relating to Equal Employment Opportunity," and as supplemented by regulations at 41 CFR part 60, "Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs, Equal Employment Opportunity, Department of Labor." (ii). Copeland "Anti-Kickback" Act (18 U.S.C. 874 and 40 U.S.C. 276c) All contracts in excess of $2000 for construction or repair, when funded in whole or part by monies derived from the Federal government (either directly or indirectly) shall include a provision for compliance with the Copeland "Anti-Kickback" Act (18 U.S.C. 874), as supplemented by Department of Labor regulations (29 CFR part 3, "Contractors and Subcontractors on Public Building or Public Work Financed in Whole or in Part by Loans or Grants from the United States"). The Act provides that each contractor or sub-recipient shall be prohibited from inducing, by any means, any person employed in the construction, completion, or repair of public work, to give up any part of the compensation to which he is otherwise entitled. The recipient shall report all suspected or reported violations to the Federal awarding agency. (iii). Davis-Bacon Act, as amended (40 U.S.C. 276a to a-7) - When required by Federal program legislation, all construction contracts awarded by the recipients and sub-recipients of more than $2000 shall include a provision for compliance with the Davis-Bacon Act (40 U.S.C. 276a to a-7) and as supplemented by Department of Labor regulations (29 CFR part 5, "Labor Standards Provisions Applicable to Contracts Governing Federally Financed and Assisted Construction"). Under this Act, contractors shall be required to pay wages to laborers and mechanics at a rate not less than the minimum wages specified in a wage determination made by the Secretary of Labor. In addition, contractors shall be required to pay wages not less than once a week. The recipient shall place a copy of the current prevailing wage determination issued by

Page 28


Proposed Washington County Wellness Initiative’s Rural Health Network Development Planning Grant Program Policies and Procedures

2014

the Department of Labor in each solicitation and the award of a contract shall be conditioned upon the acceptance of the wage determination. The recipient shall report all suspected or reported violations to the Federal awarding agency. (iv). Contract Work Hours and Safety Standards Act (40 U.S.C. 327333) - All contracts in excess of $2000 for construction contracts and in excess of $2500 for other contracts that involve the employment of mechanics or laborers, when funded in whole or part by monies derived from the Federal government (either directly or indirectly), shall include a provision for compliance with Sections 102 and 107 of the Contract Work Hours and Safety Standards Act (40 U.S.C. 327-333), as supplemented by Department of Labor regulations (29 CFR part 5). (v). Rights to Inventions Made Under a Contract or Agreement Contracts or agreements for the performance of experimental, developmental, or research work, when funded in whole or part by monies derived from the Federal government (either directly or indirectly), shall provide for the rights of the Federal Government and the recipient in any resulting invention in accordance with 37 CFR part 401, "Rights to Inventions Made by Nonprofit Organizations and Small Business Firms Under Government Grants, Contracts and Cooperative Agreements," and any implementing regulations issued by the awarding agency. (vi). Clean Air Act (42 U.S.C. 7401 et seq.) and the Federal Water Pollution Control Act (33 U.S.C. 1251 et seq.), as amended - Contracts and sub-grants of amounts in excess of $100,000, when funded in whole or part by monies derived from the Federal government (either directly or indirectly), shall contain a provision that requires the recipient to agree to comply with all applicable standards, orders or regulations issued pursuant to the Clean Air Act (42 U.S.C. 7401 et seq.) and the Federal Water Pollution Control Act as amended (33 U.S.C. 1251 et seq.). Violations shall be reported to the Federal awarding agency and the Regional Office of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). (vii). Byrd Anti-Lobbying Amendment (31 U.S.C. 1352) Contacts for an amount above $100,000, when funded in whole or part by monies derived from the Federal government (either directly or indirectly), shall include a certification by the contracting parties that they have not and will not use Federal appropriated funds to pay any person or organization for influencing or attempting to influence an officer or employee of any agency, a member of Congress, officer or employee of Congress, or an employee of a member of Congress in connection with obtaining any Federal contract, grant or any other award covered by 31 U.S.C. 1352. and to further require disclosure of any lobbying with non-Federal funds that takes place in connection with obtaining any Federal award.

Page 29


Proposed Washington County Wellness Initiative’s Rural Health Network Development Planning Grant Program Policies and Procedures

Modified from the adaptation from “Sample Procurement Policy Manual” 3 June 2014 – Sheree L. Hukill and Penny L. Pricer (http://www.nonprofitexpert.com/sample-nonprofit-board-policiesand-procedures/)

Page 30

2014


Proposed Washington County Wellness Initiative’s Rural Health Network Development Planning Grant Program Policies and Procedures

2014

STANDARD OF CONDUCT FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY WELLNESS INITIATIVE’S RURAL HEALTH NETWORK DEVELOPMENT PLANNING GRANT PROGRAM PARTICIPANTS These HRSA Grant Requirements are covered in the Ethics Code and Conflict of Interest Polices

HHS requires recipients to establish safeguards to prevent employees, consultants, members of governing bodies, and others who may be involved in grant-supported activities from using their positions for purposes that are, or give the appearance of being, motivated by a desire for private financial gain for themselves or others, such as those with whom they have family, business, or other ties. These safeguards must be reflected in written standards of conduct. Except as provided below, HHS does not require a recipient to establish separate standards of conduct if it maintains such standards for its non-grant-supported activities, as long as those standards are consistent with State and local laws and cover, at a minimum, expected conduct in regard to financial interests, gifts, gratuities and favors, nepotism, and such other areas for governmental organizations as political participation and bribery. The standards also must do the following:    

Address the conditions under which outside activities, relationships, or financial interests are proper or improper. Provide for advance notification of outside activities, relationships, or financial interests to a responsible organizational official. Include a process for notification and review by the responsible official of potential or actual violations of the standards. Specify the nature of penalties that the recipient may impose. These penalties would be in addition to any penalties that HHS or a cognizant Federal agency may impose for infractions that also violate the terms and conditions of award.

Recipients are not required to submit its general standards of conduct to HHS for review or approval. However, a copy must be made available to each of the recipient’s officers; each employee and consultant working on the grant-supported program, project, or activity; each member of the governing board, if applicable; and, upon request, the OPDIV. The recipient is responsible for enforcing its standards of conduct, taking appropriate action on individual infractions, and, in the case of financial conflict of interest, informing the GMO if the infraction is related to a research award (see “Other Research-Related Requirements—Financial Conflict of Interest” for the specific regulatory requirements that apply to financial conflict of interest under research grants). If a suspension or separation action is taken by a recipient against a PI/PD or other key personnel, the recipient must request prior approval of the proposed replacement.

Page 31


Proposed Washington County Wellness Initiative’s Rural Health Network Development Planning Grant Program Policies and Procedures

2014

PROGRESS REPORTING POLICY IN COMPLIANCE WITH HRSA GRANT REPORTING REQUIREMENTS 1.

Due Date: Within 90 Days of Project End Date

A final programmatic report is due within 90 days of the project period end date. The format will be prescribed by the Office of Rural Health Policy at a later date. The Project Director will upload the required documentation into the HRSA Electronic Handbooks. 2.

Due Date: Within 30 Days of Budget End Date

A Performance Improvement Management System (PIMS) report is due within 30 days of the budget period end date. The Project Director will upload the required documentation into the HRSA Electronic Handbooks. 3.

Due Date: Within 90 Days of Project End Date

A self-assessment report is due within 90 days of the project end date. The format will be prescribed by the Project Officer at a later date. The Project Director will upload the required documentation in the HRSA Electronic Handbooks. 4.

Due Date: 10/30/2015

The Project Director, on behalf of the grantee, must submit an annual Federal Financial Report (FFR). The report should reflect cumulative reporting within the project period and must be submitted using the Electronic Handbooks (EHBs). The FFR due dates have been aligned with the Payment Management System quarterly report due dates, and will be due 90, 120, or 150 days after the budget period end date. Please refer to the chart below for the specific due date for FFR: Budget Period ends August:

October: FFR due January 30

Budget Period ends November:

January: FFR due April 30

Budget Period ends February:

April: FFR due July 30

Budget Period ends May:

July: FFR due October 30

Page 32


Proposed Washington County Wellness Initiative’s Rural Health Network Development Planning Grant Program Policies and Procedures

2014

PROGRAM INCOME PROCEDURES The following is the written procedure WCWI will utilize for accounting for program income. These written procedures provide reasonable assurance that program income is correctly earned, recorded, and used in accordance with HRSA program requirements as outlined in the Health and Human Services Department Grants Policy Statement. WCWI shall: 1) set realistic performance targets for the generation of program income; 2) analyze variances between expected and actual program income; and 3) have an information system that identified program income collections and usage. In the event that WCWI expends over $500,000 of federal funds (all federal funds including HRSA funds) within a WCWI fiscal year, WCWI will have an Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Circular A-133 audit performed.

ALLOWABLE COSTS The following is the written procedure WCWI will utilize for determining allowable costs for non-profits. These procedures are in accordance with OMB Cost Principles presented for non-profits in OMB A-122, 2 CFR 230, and 45 CFR 74.27. These cost principles must be followed when charging cost to a HRSA grant. Although WCWI has an approved budget, WCWI must still charge budgeted costs in a reasonable manner. Costs charged in accordance with the costs principles are considered reasonable. ITEM

ALLOWABILITY

ITEM SubOrder

DESCRIPTION

Advertising

Sometimes

1

Allowable only for recruitment of staff or trainees, procurement of goods and services, disposal of scrap or surplus materials, and other specific purpose necessary to meet the requirements of the grantsupported activity.

Alcoholic Beverages

No

1

Unallowable as an entertainment expense. Allowable if within the scope of an approved project.

Page 33


Proposed Washington County Wellness Initiative’s Rural Health Network Development Planning Grant Program Policies and Procedures

Audiovisual Activities

Audiovisual Activities

Audiovisual Activities

Audiovisual Activities

YES

YES

YES

YES

2014

1

Allowable for the production of an audiovisual. “Audiovisual” means any product containing visual imagery, sound, or both, such as motion pictures, films, videotapes, live or recorded radio or television programs or public service announcements, slide shows, filmstrips, audio recordings, multimedia presentations, or exhibits where visual imagery, sound, or both are an integral part. “Production” refers to the steps and techniques used to create a finished audiovisual product, including, but not limited to, design, layout, scriptwriting, filming or taping, fabrication, sound recording, and editing. A recipient with in-house production capability must determine whether it would be more efficient and economical to use that capability or to contract for the production of an audiovisual.

2

If an audiovisual intended for members of the general public (i.e., people who are not researchers, health professions, or service delivery personnel or who are not directly involved in project activities as employees, trainees, or participants, such as clients, volunteers or patients) is produced under an HHS grant-supported project or program, the recipient must submit two prints or tapes of the finished product along with its annual or final progress report. The costs of such prints or tapes are allowable costs.

3

Audiovisuals produced under a grant-supported project or program must bear an acknowledgment and disclaimer, such as the following:

4

The production of this [type of audiovisual (motion picture, television program, etc.)] was supported by Grant [number of grant] from [name of OPDIV]. Its contents are solely the responsibility of [name of recipient] and do not necessarily represent the official views of [name of OPDIV].

Page 34


Proposed Washington County Wellness Initiative’s Rural Health Network Development Planning Grant Program Policies and Procedures

2014

Audit Costs

YES

1

Allowable (as specified in Section 230 of OMB Circular A-133). The charges may be treated as a direct cost when the audit’s scope is limited to a single HHS grantsupported project or program, as specified in 45 CFR 74.26(d), or when it includes more than one project but the costs can be specifically identified with, and allocated to, each project on a proportional basis, and this practice is followed consistently by the recipient. Otherwise, charges for audits should be treated as indirect costs. In addition, a pass-through entity may charge an HHS award for the cost of a limited scope audit to monitor a sub recipient provided the sub recipient is not required to have a single audit and the other conditions of Section 230(b) (2) of OMB Circular A-133 are met.

Bad Debts

No

1

Unallowable.

Bid and Proposal Costs

YES

1

Allowable as an indirect cost. See 45 CFR 74.27(b)(1) for policy for non-profit organizations covered by OMB Circular A-122.

Books and Journals

YES

1

Allowable. If an organization has a library, books and journals generally should be provided as part of normal library services and treated as indirect costs.

1

Allowable if within the scope of an approved project or program or as incidental costs of a project or program if incurred to enable individuals to participate as subjects in research projects or to receive health services. Such costs also may be allowable as a fringe benefit for individuals working on a grant-supported project (see “Fringe Benefits” in this exhibit).

1

Allowable. Such costs include local and long-distance telephone calls, telegrams, express mail, postage, messenger, and electronic or computer transmittal services and usually are treated as indirect costs.

1

Allowable. A consultant is an individual retained to provide professional advice or services for a fee but usually not as an employee of the requiring organization. The term “consultant” also includes a firm that provides paid professional advice or services. Recipients must have written policies governing their use of consultants that are consistently applied regardless of the source of support. Such policies should include the conditions for paying consulting fees. The general circumstances of allowability of

Child-Care Costs

Communications

Consultant Services

YES

YES

YES

Page 35


Proposed Washington County Wellness Initiative’s Rural Health Network Development Planning Grant Program Policies and Procedures

2014

these costs, which may include fees and travel and subsistence costs, are addressed in the applicable cost principles under “professional services costs.”

Consultant Services

Consultant Services

Consultant Services

YES

YES

YES

2

In unusual situations, a person may be both a consultant and an employee of the same party, receiving compensation for some services as a consultant and for other work as a salaried employee as long as those separate services are not related to the same project and are not charged to the same project. For example, consulting fees that are paid by an educational institution to a salaried faculty member as extra compensation above that individual’s base salary are allowable, provided the consultation is across departmental lines or involves a separate or remote operation and the work performed by the consultant is in addition to his or her regular departmental workload.

3

For employee consulting costs to be allowable under grant-supported projects (including sub awards or contracts under the grant), recipients, sub recipients, and contractors must establish written guidelines permitting such payments regardless of the source of funding and indicating the conditions under which the payment of consulting fees to employees is proper. Unless subject to OMB Circular A-21, the recipient, sub recipient, or contractor also must document that it would be inappropriate or infeasible to compensate the individual for those services through payment of additional salary. Under no circumstances can an individual be paid as a consultant and an employee under the same HHS grant.

4

Authorization for consulting fees paid to individuals serving as both employees and consultants of the same party must be provided in writing, on a case-bycase basis, by the head of the recipient, sub recipient, or contractor organization incurring the costs, or his/her designee. If the designee is personally involved in the project, the authorization may be given only by the head of the organization. This authorization must include a determination that the required conditions are present and that there is no apparent or actual conflict of interest.

Page 36


Proposed Washington County Wellness Initiative’s Rural Health Network Development Planning Grant Program Policies and Procedures

Consultant Services

YES

2014

5

Recipients, sub recipients, and contractors under grants are encouraged to obtain written reports from consultants unless such a report is not feasible given the nature of the consultation or would not be useful. Documentation maintained by the receiving organization should include the name of the consulting firm or individual consultant; the nature of the services rendered and their relevance to the grant-supported activities, if not otherwise apparent from the nature of the services; the period of service; the basis for calculating the fee paid (e.g., rate per day or hour worked or rate per unit of service rendered); and the amount paid. This information may be included in the consultant’s invoice, in the report, or in another document.

Consumer/ Provider Board Participation

YES

1

Allowable in accordance with applicable program regulations. When not specifically authorized by program regulations, only the following costs are allowable with OPDIV prior approval: Reasonable and actual out-of-pocket costs incurred solely as a result of attending a scheduled meeting, including transportation, meals, babysitting fees, and lost wages; The reasonable costs of necessary meals furnished by the recipient to consumer or provider participants during scheduled meetings if not reimbursed to participants as per diem or otherwise; Where programmatic regulations permit such payments but establish a maximum annual income for eligibility for reimbursement of consumer/provider board members for wages lost by reason of their participation in board activities, the determination of eligibility will be made on the basis of gross rather than net income.

Contingency Funds

No

1

Not allowed.

1

Allowable for payment to volunteers or research subjects who contribute blood, urine samples, and other body fluids or tissues that are specifically project related.

1

Allowable if within the scope of an approved project. Project funds may not be used to purchase drugs classified by FDA as “ineffective” or “possibly effective” except in approved clinical research projects or in cases where there is no alternative other than therapy with “possibly effective” drugs. Recipient acquisition practices for drugs used in outpatient treatment must

Donor Costs

Drugs

YES

Not For Us

Page 37


Proposed Washington County Wellness Initiative’s Rural Health Network Development Planning Grant Program Policies and Procedures

2014

meet Federal requirements regarding costeffectiveness and reasonableness as found in 42 CFR part 40, Subpart E, and OMB Circulars A-122 and A87.

Dues or Membership Fees

Not For Us

1

Allowable as an indirect cost for organizational membership in business, professional, or technical organizations or societies. Payment of dues or membership fees for an individual’s membership in a professional or technical organization is allowable as a fringe benefit or an employee development cost, if paid according to an established organizational policy consistently applied regardless of the source of funds.

Entertainment Costs

No

1

Unallowable. This includes the cost of amusements, social activities, and related incidental costs.

1

Allowable for purchase of new, used, or replacement equipment as a direct cost or as part of indirect costs, depending on the intended use of the equipment. OPDIV prior approval may be required as specified in “Prior-Approval Requirements.” Funds provided under a conference grant may not be used to purchase equipment.

1

Only four types of costs—consultant fees, outpatient or subject costs, salary or fringe benefits, and travel costs—can be charged to HHS grants on behalf of Federal employees, and only under the conditions specified. Recipients should advise any Federal employees with whom these types of arrangements may be made to consult with their employing agency concerning their ability to meet the required conditions.

1

Unallowable except when resulting from violations of, or failure of the organization to comply with, Federal, State, or local laws and regulations and incurred as a result of compliance with specific provisions of an award, or when such payments are authorized in advance in writing by the GMO.

Equipment

Federal (U.S. Government) Employees

Fines and Penalties

For-profit organizations

Not For Us

Not For Us

No

YES

1

HHS requires for-profit organizations to conform with industry standards to support salary and wage charges to HHS grants. Therefore, unless an alternate system is approved by the GMO, the recipient must maintain a time-and-effort reporting system for both professional and other-than-professional staff reflecting daily afterthe-fact reporting of hours expended on individual projects or indirect activities. The system must record

Page 38


Proposed Washington County Wellness Initiative’s Rural Health Network Development Planning Grant Program Policies and Procedures

2014

both hours worked and hours absent. This information must be certified by an authorized organizational representative no less frequently than every pay period.

Fringe Benefits

Not For Us

1

Allowable as part of overall employee compensation in proportion to the amount of time or effort an employee devotes to the grant-supported project or program, provided such costs are incurred under formally established and consistently applied policies of the organization (see “Salaries and Wages” in this exhibit).

Fundraising Costs

No

1

Unallowable.

Hazardous Waste Disposal

YES

1

Allowable. Usually treated as an indirect cost.

Honoraria

Yes for us if we have a speaker fee.

1

Unallowable when the primary intent is to confer distinction on, or to symbolize respect, esteem, or admiration for, the recipient of the honorarium. A payment for services rendered, such as a speaker’s fee under a conference grant, is allowable.

1

Incentive payments to volunteers or patients participating in a grant-supported project or program are allowable. Incentive payments to individuals to motivate them to take advantage of grant-supported health care or other services are allowable if within the scope of an approved project. See “Salaries and Wages” in this exhibit for incentive payments to employees.

1

Allowable to the extent expressly provided in the award for indemnification against liabilities to third parties and any other loss or damage not compensated by insurance or otherwise. The Federal government is obligated to indemnify the institution only to the extent expressly provided for in the NoA.

Incentive Costs

Indemnification

Insurance

YES

Not For Us

Not For Us

1

Allowable. Insurance usually is treated as an indirect cost. In certain situations, however, where special insurance is required as a condition of the grant because of risks peculiar to the project, e.g., provision of health services, the premium may be charged as a direct cost if doing so is consistent with organizational policy. If so, the insurance should be treated as a direct cost and assigned to individual grants based on the manner in which the insurer allocates the risk to the

Page 39


Proposed Washington County Wellness Initiative’s Rural Health Network Development Planning Grant Program Policies and Procedures

2014

population covered by the insurance. Medical liability (malpractice) insurance is an allowable cost of research programs at educational institutions only if the research involves human subjects. The cost of insuring equipment, whether purchased with grant funds or furnished as federally owned property, normally should be included in indirect costs but may be allowable as a direct cost if this manner of charging is the normal organizational policy.

Interest

Not For Us

1

Allowable as an indirect cost for certain assets as specified in the applicable cost principles. Unallowable for hospitals.

Invention, Patent, or Licensing Costs

Not For Us

1

Unallowable as a direct cost unless specifically authorized in the NoA. May be allowable as indirect costs provided they are authorized under applicable cost principles and are included in the negotiation of indirect cost rates. Such costs include licensing or option fees, attorney’s fees for preparing or submitting patent applications, and fees paid to the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office for patent application, patent maintenance, or recordation of patent-related information.

Leave

Not For Us

1

Allowable for employees as a fringe benefit (see “Fringe Benefits” in this exhibit). See program guidance or Part IV for policy on leave for fellows and trainees.

1

Allowable. Generally treated as an indirect cost but, subject to the limitations described in the applicable cost principles, may be treated as a direct cost for legal services provided by individuals who are not employees of the recipient. Before a recipient incurs legal costs that are extraordinary or unusual, the recipient should make an advance agreement regarding the appropriateness and reasonableness of such costs with the GMO. Legal costs incurred in defending or prosecuting claims, whether equitable or monetary, including administrative grant appeals, are unallowable charges, except as provided in the applicable cost principles.

1

General library support is not allowable as a direct cost but may be included in a recipient’s indirect cost pool. These services are allowable as a direct cost when specifically required for the conduct of the project and when identifiable as an integral part of the grantsupported activity (e.g., in those programs designed to develop and support such services).

Legal Services

Library Services

YES

Not For Us

Page 40


Proposed Washington County Wellness Initiative’s Rural Health Network Development Planning Grant Program Policies and Procedures

2014

Lobbying

No

1

Generally unallowable, including costs of lobbying activities to influence the introduction, enactment, or modification of legislation by the U.S. Congress or a State legislature. Under certain circumstances, as provided in the applicable cost principles, costs associated with activities that might otherwise be considered “lobbying” that are directly related to the performance of a grant may be allowable. The recipient should obtain an advance understanding with the GMO if it intends to engage in these activities.

Meals

Maybe

1

Generally unallowable except for the following:

Meals

This might be our exception.

2

Subjects and patients under study

Meals

This might be our exception.

3

Where specifically approved as part of the project or program activity, e.g., in programs providing children’s services

4

When an organization customarily provides meals to employees working beyond the normal workday, as a part of a formal compensation arrangement

Meals

No

Meals

No

5

As part of a per diem or subsistence allowance provided in conjunction with allowable travel. Under a conference grant, when meals are a necessary and integral part of a conference, provided that meal costs are not duplicated in participants’ per diem or subsistence allowances.

NEPA Analysis

Not For Us

1

Costs associated with evaluation of the environmental effects of a proposed activity and producing the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) are allowable.

1

If patient care, including research patient care, or other direct health or social services are approved activities of the grant-supported project or program, the costs of transporting individuals participating in the program or project to the site where services are being provided, including costs of public transportation, are allowable. The purchase of motor vehicles for this purpose also may be allowable.

Patients or Service Beneficiaries

Not For Us

Page 41


Proposed Washington County Wellness Initiative’s Rural Health Network Development Planning Grant Program Policies and Procedures

Payroll Distribution

Pre-Award (PreAgreement) Costs

Public Relations Costs

Publications

Not For Us

Not For Us

YES

Not For Us

2014

1

Salary and wage amounts charged to grant-supported projects or programs for personal services must be based on an adequate payroll distribution system that documents such distribution in accordance with generally accepted practices of like organizations. Standards for payroll distribution systems are contained in the applicable cost principles (other than those for for-profit organizations). Briefly summarized, acceptable systems are as follows:

1

Allowable. Where authorized by the OPDIV as an expanded authority (see Part IV of the HHS GPS), a recipient may, at its own risk and without OPDIV prior approval, incur obligations and expenditures to cover costs up to (and including) 90 days before the beginning date of the initial budget period of a new or competing continuation award if such costs are necessary to conduct the project or program, and would be allowable under the grant, if awarded.

1

Allowable only for costs specifically required by the award or for costs of communicating with the public and the press about specific activities or accomplishments under the grant-supported activity or other appropriate matters of public concern. Such costs may be treated as direct costs but should be treated as indirect costs if they benefit more than one sponsored agreement or if they benefit the grant and other work of the organization.

1

Allowable. Page charges for publication in professional journals are allowable if the published paper reports work supported by the grant and the charges are levied impartially on all papers published by the journal, whether or not by government-sponsored authors. The costs of reprints and publishing in other media, such as books, monographs, and pamphlets, also are allowable. Publications and journal articles produced under an HHS grant-supported activity must bear an acknowledgment and disclaimer, as appropriate, as provided in “Intellectual Property—Publications.”

Page 42


Proposed Washington County Wellness Initiative’s Rural Health Network Development Planning Grant Program Policies and Procedures

2014

Recruitment Costs

Yes

1

Allowable subject to the conditions and restrictions contained in the applicable cost principles. These costs may include help-wanted advertising costs, costs of travel by applicants for interviews for prospective employment, and travel costs of employees while engaged in recruiting personnel. Grant funds may not be used for a prospective trainee’s travel costs to or from the recipient organization for the purpose of recruitment. However, other costs incurred in connection with recruitment under training programs, such as advertising, may be allocated to a grantsupported project according to the provisions of the applicable cost principles (also see “Travel” and “Relocation Costs” in this exhibit).

Registration Fees

Yes

1

Allowable for attendance at conferences, symposiums, or seminars if necessary to accomplish project or program objectives.

1

Allowable. Compensation for personal services covers all amounts, including fringe benefits, paid currently or accrued by the organization for employee services rendered to the grant-supported project or program. Compensation costs are allowable to the extent that they are reasonable, conform to the established policy of the organization consistently applied regardless of the source of funds, and reflect no more than the percentage of time actually devoted to the OPDIVfunded project or program. Where restricted by language in the HHS appropriations act, OPDIVs will not reimburse recipients for the direct salaries of individuals at a rate in excess of the level specified. Direct salary is exclusive of fringe benefits and indirect costs. If there is a salary limitation, it does not apply to consultant payments or to contracts for routine goods and services, but it does apply to sub recipients (including consortium participants). Specific considerations are addressed below.

1

Allowable as cost-of-living allowances for trainees and fellows if permitted by a program’s statute authorizing or implementing regulations. The specific amounts may be established by policy. Generally, these payments are made according to a pre-established schedule based on the individual’s experience and level of training. (See “Traineeships, Fellowships, and Similar Awards Made to Organizations on Behalf of Individuals—Allowable Costs.”) A stipend is not a fee-

Salaries and Wages

Stipends

Not For Us

Not For Us

Page 43


Proposed Washington County Wellness Initiative’s Rural Health Network Development Planning Grant Program Policies and Procedures

2014

for-service payment and is not subject to the cost accounting requirements of the cost principles. Stipends are not allowable under research grants even when they appear to benefit the research project.

Sub awards/ Contracts under Grants

YES

1

Allowable to carry out a portion of the programmatic effort or for the acquisition of routine goods or services under the grant. Such arrangements may be in the form of consortium agreements or commercial contracts and may require OPDIV approval (see “PriorApproval Requirements”).

Supplies

YES

1

Allowable.

1

Allowable. Such costs include taxes that an organization is required to pay as they relate to employment, services, travel, rental, or purchasing for a project. Recipients must avail themselves of any tax exemptions for which activities supported by Federal funds may qualify. State sales and use taxes for materials and equipment are allowable only when the State does not grant a refund or exemption on such taxes.

Taxes

YES

Toys and Nursery Items

YES

1

Allowable for the purchase of items such as toys and games to allow patients to participate in research protocols or, if age appropriate, in programs or projects serving children.

Trainee Costs

Not For Us

1

Allowable if permitted by statute, regulation, or program policy, as defined in the authorizing document, and included in the NoA.

Travel

Not For Us

1

Allowable as a direct cost where such travel will provide direct benefit to the project or program.

1

Consistent with the organization’s established travel policy, costs for employees working on the grantsupported project or program may include associated per diem or subsistence allowances and other travelrelated expenses, such as mileage allowances if travel is by personal automobile.

Travel, Employee

Not For Us

Page 44


Proposed Washington County Wellness Initiative’s Rural Health Network Development Planning Grant Program Policies and Procedures

2014

ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES BCF

Bartlesville Community Foundation is the grantee for the project and will serve as the fiscal agent for the project. BCF will disburse the grant funds once a month to ICI for services and project expenses. Shawn and Sheree will work closely together to oversee the project budget and ensure all federally required reports are submitted in a timely fashion. BCF staff and representatives will also provide consultation through participation in surveys, focus groups, and/or leadership team meetings.

ICI

Integrated Concepts will provide the day-to-day services required by the project for marketing, networking, sustainability, project administration and work plan management. Sheree Hukill will serve as the Program Director throughout the project overseeing all project related tasks and maintaining fiscal and federal compliance. ICI will prepare all project deliverables for review and approval by the other partners. ICI will also facilitate and report on the focus groups and surveys. The Program Director will work closely with all the partners to ensure project success and administrative project oversight. ICI staff will provide project coordination, focus group, survey, and leadership team planning, facilitation, and implementation, creation of Medical Home/Integrated Rural Health Care Network Pamphlets, revision and update of Free and Low Cost Healthcare Resource Guide, creation of Final Project Report (which will contain the Focus Group/Survey Results; Project Evaluation and Replication Plan, and the Washington County Wellness Initiative Operation, Strategic, and Sustainability Plan.) ICI will also provide a part-time resource administrator who will provide project administration support and collateral marketing materials services.

NGB

The Network Governing Board will provide consultation during the project regarding community issues, resources and needs. They will also serve as the project liaisons between the project, the community, and the existing CHIO. The NGB will also provide consultation through participation in surveys, focus groups, and/or leadership team meetings. The members of the NGB are: Bob Walker, Dr. Michael Woods, and Debra Cook, RN.

WCHD

The Washington County Health Department will provide consultation through input on creation of and participation in surveys, focus groups, and/or leadership team meetings plus meeting space for and leadership team meetings.

HUB

The Physician's Advisory Group, identified as the HUB for this project, will provide consultation during the project regarding community health needs and resources. They will also provide consultation through participation in surveys, focus groups, and/or leadership team meetings.

WCWI Workgroups

The existing coalitions within the Washington County Wellness Initiative will serve as resources to the project for community expertise, focus group participants and survey participants.

CHIO Sectors

The current CHIO sector representatives will serve as resources to the project for community expertise, focus group participants and survey participants. They will also play a key role in the "creation" of the sustainable network for WCWI.

PHIO

Dr. Mold will provide evaluation and consultation on the project. His services will be in-kind donations to the project.

Memorandum of Understanding partners are: Bartlesville Community Foundation, Washington County Health Department, Physician's Advisory Board, Integrated Concepts, Inc., and the Washington County Wellness Initiative - CHIO. Updated 29 June 2014

Page 45


Proposed Washington County Wellness Initiative’s Rural Health Network Development Planning Grant Program Policies and Procedures

2014

HIPPA PROCEDURE The WCWI-PLANNING will assure HIPPA compliance in all appropriate activities. Survey Monkey Platinum, which is HIPPA compliant, will be utilized for all programmatic surveys.

TEAM MEMBER PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT The WCWI Governing Board will complete the WCWI Performance Assessment for grant-funded personnel on a semi-annual basis.

TRAINING MANAGEMENT CONTROLS AND POLICIES All WCWI Governing Board and Employees will be provided copies of the Policies and Procedures Manual to assure compliance.

Page 46


Proposed Washington County Wellness Initiative’s Rural Health Network Development Planning Grant Program Policies and Procedures

2014

TRANSPARENCY REPORTING POLICY Objectives Washington County Wellness Initiative (WCWI) is committed to enhancing transparency and accountability, both internally and externally. We strive for openness and ease of access to information, to constantly improve our accountability and performance, and to be able to provide information to those who request it. This policy is designed to ensure best practice in the handling of WCWI’s information, following the principles of availability, integrity and confidentiality (in priority order), and ensuring we meet legal requirements, in order to allow information to be shared in a transparent and efficient way, while at the same time safeguarding, from abuse or compromise, our supporters’, people’s 1, allies’ and partners’ and our own sensitive information. Applicability This policy applies to all WCWI people, systems, processes and technology, and extends to activities and transactions in all areas in which WCWI directs people to operate permanently, periodically and occasionally. All WCWI people are responsible for complying with this policy, and with related management systems and procedures. Non-compliance with this policy could result in disciplinary procedures. Introduction WCWI believes that timely free flow of information in simple and accessible language, form and format is essential for ensuring accountability, learning, trust, and good performance. This policy codifies our commitment to transparency and to the sharing of information. Its purpose is to give guidance to our people on the ways and means for sharing of information, and to be able to meet our commitment to inform people external to our organization on the information they can expect or demand from WCWI. It is also guided by our commitment to our professional, moral, ethical, legal, and regulatory responsibilities to protect information that is in our possession against abuse or compromise. Meeting these responsibilities requires risk assessment, management systems and procedures, with control systems striking a balance between productivity, cost, effectiveness, and the value of the information being protected.

1

“People” are defined as all Board members, permanent and temporary salaried staff, interns, volunteers and freelancers/contractors under the direction of WCWI.

Page 47


Proposed Washington County Wellness Initiative’s Rural Health Network Development Planning Grant Program Policies and Procedures

2014

The Policy WCWI is committed to openness, transparency, and honesty about our structures, mission, policies and activities, believing that this is essential to good governance, whether by governments, businesses, or non-profit organizations. We communicate 2

actively to our stakeholders about ourselves, and make information publicly available. We freely and openly share information on: 1. Fundamentals: our vision, promise, values, goals and objectives, legal registration and status and registered office address. 2. Governance & Key Staff: Names and brief biographies of members of Board of Directors, Chair, Executive Director and Senior Management Team members, as applicable. 3. Organizational Decision-making: who decides Directors’ appointments; staff recruitment; staff development and promotion; strategies, plans and budget approval; reviews and evaluations. 4. Performance: lessons, achievements, success, failures, constraints, and innovations, through annual reports, review reports, and audit statements, as applicable.. 5. Staff: human resource statistics, Board and Executive remuneration, aggregated other staff costs, structure of departments, as applicable. 6. Funds and finance: Types, proportion and absolute figures of income; sources of income, expenditure by categories; staff costs, support costs, program cost, fundraising cost, administration cost; fundraising costs. 7. Relationships: Key relationships we have in terms of which groups, partnerships, networks, coalitions, and alliances we belong to and work with, who we receive money from, in what we invest our money, who are our bankers, auditors, lawyers. 8. Issue-based positions: Our guiding thinking and positions on issues related to our promise, objectives and strategies. 9. Grievances: guiding and decision making policies and procedures related to how we receive and deal with grievances, and how we receive complaints and comments from within and outside our organization. 10. Feedback: Regular feedback from our stakeholders publically available on our 2

WCWI stakeholders are our financial supporters, volunteers, and online communities, plus our staff, research partners, campaigning allies and those local communities we work alongside. More specifically, WCWI’s stakeholders include our financial supporters, including major donors and foundations who have funded specific projects, our staff volunteers and Boards, Directors and Voting Members and members of like-minded organizations with which we partner to achieve a common goal. We actively seek feedback from these groups in a variety of ways.

Page 48


Proposed Washington County Wellness Initiative’s Rural Health Network Development Planning Grant Program Policies and Procedures

2014

blogs and social media sites, and periodic presentation of our stakeholders’ views of us and our performance in our annual reports. We are committed to: protecting the interests of our supporters and our people by safeguarding their sensitive information from abuse or compromise; complying with regulatory requirements and directives on data security3; ensuring the effectiveness of our activities; and meeting our ethical responsibilities to our partners and allies. We will protect data f or the following reasons: 1. Legal requirements: compliance with Data Protection/Privacy laws; and information required by legal, contractual or copyright obligation to be kept in confidence; 2. Ethical obligations: to protect the sources of information we receive in confidence4; 3. Disputes: legal advice and matters in dispute or under negotiation, including disciplinary and investigative information generated in or for WCWI; 4. Respect for personal privacy: personal information about our people, including but not limited to payroll and banking records, human resources files, sexual orientation, property, and medical records; 5. Obligation to our supporters: the rights of our supporters to anonymity except in cases where the amount of their donation is such that it might be perceived to negatively impact on our independence; 6. Duty of Care for the safety and security of our people: risk assessments, security management plans and operating procedures, where release of this information could increase risk to our people or our partners; 7. Sensitive time-critical and time-limited activities: Campaign and communications plans, research and investigations information collection, sensitive financial expenditures, where premature release of information could jeopardize actions we are planning to take. 8. Cost concerns: when we determine that the cost of supplying information, in time or monetary expenditure, would be disproportional to the request, we may decline but will explain that this is the reason. 9. Anonymous requests for information may not receive a response.

3

Data security is the means of ensuring that data is kept safe from corruption and that access to it is suitably controlled. It ensures privacy and protects personal data. 4 See related WCWI Board-approved Whistleblower Policy 2014

Page 49


Proposed Washington County Wellness Initiative’s Rural Health Network Development Planning Grant Program Policies and Procedures

2014

Temporary Suspension Any temporary suspension, made only under exceptional circumstances, of all or part of this policy can only be authorized by the WCWI Network Governing Board and will be clearly explained to our people, and to the general public through the mechanisms described at (1) below. Implementation Procedures 1. Make information about WCWI publicly available including through: the WCWI website and our Program Reports. 2. Establish systems for annual review of compliance with this policy.

POLICY REVISION PROCEDURE Following the approval of all initial policies and procedures by the WCWI-PLANNING Network Governing Board, individual policies may be revised upon WCWI Board Approval. All modified policies will be documented using the following “Notation”. Policy revision status Next revision due

2016

Responsible for initiating revision

Program Director

Revision history

New Policy

Page 50


Proposed Washington County Wellness Initiative’s Rural Health Network Development Planning Grant Program Policies and Procedures

2014

TRAVEL REIMBURSEMENT POLICY OVERVIEW It is the policy of WCWI to reimburse staff/volunteers for reasonable and necessary expenses incurred in connection with approved travel on behalf of the organization. WCWI strongly encourages use of travel discounts when making travel arrangements. Travelers seeking reimbursement should incur the lowest reasonable travel expenses and exercise care to avoid impropriety or the appearance of impropriety. Reimbursement is allowed only when reimbursement has not been, and will not be, received from other sources. If a circumstance arises that is not specifically covered in this travel policy, then the most conservative course of action should be taken. Business travel policies are aligned with organization reimbursement rules. All business-related travel paid with WCWI funds must comply with organization expenditure policies. Authorization and Responsibility Staff travel must be authorized. Travelers should verify that planned travel is eligible for reimbursement before making travel arrangements. Within 30 days of completion of a trip, the traveler must submit a Travel Reimbursement form and supporting documentation to obtain reimbursement of expenses. An individual may not approve his or her own travel or reimbursement. The Travel Reimbursement form must be signed by a member of the Network Governing Board (for travel over $1,000) or by the Program Director (for travel under $1,000). Travel and reimbursement for members of the management team must be approved by the Network Governing Board (if not for that individual), and will be reviewed annually by the internal auditor. Designated approval authorities are required to review expenditures and withhold reimbursement if there is reason to believe that the expenditures are inappropriate or extravagant. Personal funds Travelers should review reimbursement guidelines before spending personal funds for business travel to determine if such expenses are reimbursable. See Travel Expenses/Procedures for details. WCWI reserves the right to deny reimbursement of travel-related expenses for failure to comply with policies and procedures.

Page 51


Proposed Washington County Wellness Initiative’s Rural Health Network Development Planning Grant Program Policies and Procedures

2014

Travelers who use personal funds to facilitate travel arrangements will not be reimbursed until after the trip occurs and proper documentation is submitted. Vacation in conjunction with business travel In cases in which vacation time is added to a business trip, any cost variance in airfare, car rental or lodging must be clearly identified on the Travel Request form. WCWI will not prepay any personal expenses with the intention of being “repaid” at a later time, nor will any personal expenses be reimbursed. Exceptions Occasionally it may be necessary for travelers to request exceptions to this travel policy. Requests for exceptions to the policy must be made in writing and approved by the Network Governing Board. Exceptions related to the president’s or the treasurer’s expenses must be submitted to the opposite person for approval. In most instances, the expected turnaround time for review and approval is five business days.

TRAVEL EXPENSES/PROCEDURES General information Authorized business travel for staff that includes prepayments must be pre-approved. Reimbursement of parking, mileage, gasoline in lieu of mileage and ferry or bus passes do not require receipts if they are under $10. Receipts for reimbursement of expenses over $10 are to be submitted on a Travel Reimbursement form.

Permissible prepaid travel expenses Before the travel, WCWI may issue prepayments for airfare, rail transportation, rental vehicles, conference registration fees and cash advances. Applicable policies and methods of payments for these prepayments follow. Airfare. Travelers are expected to obtain the lowest available airfare that reasonably meets business travel needs. Airfare may be prepaid by the business office. Travelers are encouraged to book flights at least 30 days in advance to avoid premium airfare pricing. First-class tickets are not reimbursable. Coach class or economy tickets must be purchased for domestic or international flights (defined as flight time totaling less than five consecutive hours excluding layovers). A higher-priced coach ticket cannot be purchased for a subsequent upgrade in seating.

Page 52


Proposed Washington County Wellness Initiative’s Rural Health Network Development Planning Grant Program Policies and Procedures

2014

A less-than-first-class ticket (i.e., business class) may be purchased at WCWI’s discretion for domestic or international flights (defined as flight time exceeding five consecutive hours excluding layovers). Airfare may be purchased with a credit card or check through the business office with a Request for Payment form. Rail transportation. WCWI will prepay rail transportation provided that the cost does not exceed the cost of the least expensive airfare. Rental vehicles. WCWI will pay for approved use of a rental vehicle. See the section on reimbursements below in this section. Conference registration fees. Conference registration fees can be prepaid with a credit card or check through the business office with a Request for Payment form. Business-related banquets or meals that are considered part of the conference can be paid with the registration fees; however, such meals must be deducted from the traveler’s per diem allowance. See Meals (per diem) for more detail. Travel advances. Cash advances are authorized for specific situations that might cause undue financial hardship for business travelers. These situations are limited to staff traveling on behalf of WCWI. A maximum of 80 percent of the total estimated cost can be advanced. Expenses associated with the travel must be reconciled and substantiated within two weeks of the return date. The traveler must repay WCWI for any advances in excess of the approved reimbursable expenses. The department initiating the travel is responsible for notifying the business office to deposit any excess funds into the appropriate departmental account. Travel advances are processed by submitting a completed Request for Payment form and Travel Request form to the business office. Reimbursement for any remaining expenses is processed on a Travel Reimbursement form approved by the designated approval authority. Reimbursements Requests for reimbursements of travel-related expenses are submitted on a Travel Reimbursement form. This form must be accompanied by supporting documentation. If the requested reimbursement exceeds 20 percent of the total pre-trip estimate, the Travel Reimbursement form must be signed by the project director. These forms must be submitted to the business office within two weeks after the trip is completed. Travel Reimbursement forms not submitted within this time frame require exception approval from the executive director or from the director of finance.

Page 53


Proposed Washington County Wellness Initiative’s Rural Health Network Development Planning Grant Program Policies and Procedures

2014

Reimbursement of travel expenses is based on documentation of reasonable and actual expenses supported by the original, itemized receipts where required. Reimbursements that may be paid by WCWI are shown below. Airfare. If the airfare was not prepaid by the business office, an original itemized airline receipt, an e-ticket receipt/statement or an Internet receipt/statement is required. The receipt must show the method of payment and indicate that payment was made. Travelers are expected to obtain the lowest available airfare that reasonably meets business travel needs. Travelers are encouraged to book flights at least 30 days in advance to avoid premium pricing. Coach class or economy tickets must be purchased for domestic or international flights (defined as flight time totaling less than five consecutive hours excluding layovers). A higher-priced coach ticket cannot be purchased for a subsequent upgrade in seating. A less-than-first-class ticket (i.e., business class) may be purchased at WCWI’s discretion for domestic or international flights (defined as flight time exceeding five consecutive hours excluding layovers). First-class tickets are not reimbursable. Rail transportation. WCWI will pay for rail transportation not to exceed the cost of the least expensive airfare. If rail transportation was not prepaid by the business office, an original itemized receipt, original e-ticket receipt/statement or Internet receipt/statement is required. The receipt must show the method of payment and indicate that payment was made. Automobile (personally owned—domestic travel). A valid driver’s license issued within the United States and personal automobile insurance are required for expenses to be reimbursed. Drivers should be aware of the extent of coverage (if any) provided by his or her automobile insurance organization for travel that is business or not personal in nature. Reimbursement for use of a personal automobile is based on the current Privately Owned Vehicle (POV) Mileage Reimbursement Rates. WCWI will pay for use of a personal automobile not to exceed the cost of the least expensive airfare. The Staff Travel Reimbursement form is required for reimbursement for all vehiclerelated expenses, including gasoline, wear and tear, and personal auto insurance. As of 1 January 2014, the rate is $0.56 per mile. Travelers may opt to request reimbursement for gasoline in lieu of the WCWI mileage rate. In these instances original, itemized receipts are required.

Page 54


Proposed Washington County Wellness Initiative’s Rural Health Network Development Planning Grant Program Policies and Procedures

2014

Automobile (rental—domestic travel). Reimbursement for a commercial rental vehicle as a primary mode of transportation is authorized only if the rental vehicle is more economical than any other type of public transportation, or if the destination is not otherwise accessible. Vehicle rental at a destination city is reimbursable. Original receipts are required. WCWI authorizes reimbursement for the most economic vehicle available. In certain circumstances larger vehicles may be rented, with supervisory approval. The rental agreement must clearly show the date and the points of departure/arrival, as well as the total cost. Drivers must adhere to the rental requirements, and restrictions must be followed. Original receipts are required. When vehicle rentals are necessary, WCWI encourages travelers to purchase collision damage waiver (CDW) and loss damage waiver (LDW) coverage. WCWI will reimburse the cost of CDW and LDW coverage; all other insurance reimbursements will be denied. Drivers should be aware of the extent of a coverage (if any) provided by his or her automobile insurance organization for travel that is business or not personal in nature. Parking fees, tolls and other incidental costs associated with the vehicle use are not covered by the rental agreement. Travelers are strongly encouraged to fill the gas tank before returning the vehicle to the rental agency to avoid service fees and more expensive fuel rates. Conference registration fees. If the conference fee was not prepaid, WCWI will reimburse these fees, including business-related banquets or meals that are part of the conference registration. Original receipts to support the payment are required. If the conference does not provide a receipt, then a cancelled check, credit card slip/statement or documentation that the amount was paid is required for reimbursement. A prorated amount for the meals provided must be deducted from the traveler’s per diem. See Meals (per diem) for more detail. Entertainment activities such as golf outings and sightseeing tours will not be reimbursed. Registration fees paid directly by an individual will not be reimbursed until the conference is completed. Lodging (commercial). The cost of overnight lodging (room rate and tax only) will be reimbursed to the traveler if the authorized travel is 45 miles or more from the traveler’s home or primary worksite. Exceptions to this restriction may be approved in writing by the executive director or by the director of finance.

Page 55


Proposed Washington County Wellness Initiative’s Rural Health Network Development Planning Grant Program Policies and Procedures

2014

WCWI will reimburse lodging expenses at reasonable, single occupancy or standard business room rates. When the hotel or motel is the conference or convention site, reimbursement will be limited to the conference rate. Only single room rates are authorized for payment or reimbursement unless the second party is representing the agency in an authorized capacity. If the lodging receipt shows more than a single occupancy, the single room rate must be noted. If reimbursement for more than the single room rate is requested, the name of the second person must be included. Meals (per diem). Per diem allowances are reimbursable for in-state overnight travel that is 45 miles or more from the traveler’s home or primary worksite. Per diem allowances are applicable for all out-of-state travel that is 45 miles or more from the traveler’s home or primary worksite. WCWI per diem rates are based on the U.S. General Services Administration Guidelines, which vary by city location. In addition to meals these rates include incidental expenses such as laundry, dry cleaning and service tips (e.g., housekeeping or porter tips). Incidental expenses, unless specifically cited in this policy, will not be reimbursed. Per diem reimbursements are based on departure and return times over the entire 24hour day and are prorated accordingly. If a free meal is served on the plane, included in a conference registration fee, built in to the standard, single hotel room rate or replaced by a legitimate business meal, the per diem allowance for that meal may not be claimed. Receipts are not required for per diem allowances. Per diem allowances are reimbursed after the trip is completed. Business meals. Travelers are required to follow WCWI expenditure policies when requesting reimbursement for business meals. Original itemized receipts are required. Business expenses. Business expenses, including faxes, photocopies, Internet charges, data ports and business telephone calls incurred while on travel status can be reimbursed. Original itemized receipts are required. Parking. Original receipts are required for parking fees (including airport parking) totaling $25 or more. The lodging bill can be used as a receipt when charges are included as part of the overnight stay. Telephone calls. The costs of personal telephone calls are the responsibility of the individual.

Page 56


Proposed Washington County Wellness Initiative’s Rural Health Network Development Planning Grant Program Policies and Procedures

2014

Tolls. Original receipts are required for tolls totaling $25 or more. Miscellaneous transportation. Original receipts are required for taxi, bus, subway, metro, ferry and other modes of transportation if costs are $25 or more for each occurrence. Visa, passport fees and immunizations. If these items are required for international travel, their reimbursement is left to the discretion of your supervisor. If approved by the designated authority, original itemized receipts are required. Non-reimbursable Travel Expenses The following items that may be associated with business travel will not be reimbursed by WCWI:             

Airline club memberships. Airline upgrades. Business class for domestic flights or first class for all flights. Child care, babysitting, house-sitting, or pet-sitting/kennel charges. Commuting between home and the primary work location. Costs incurred by traveler’s failure to cancel travel or hotel reservations in a timely fashion. Evening or formal wear expenses. Haircuts and personal grooming. Laundry and dry cleaning. Passports, vaccinations and visas when not required as a specific and necessary condition of the travel assignment. Personal entertainment expenses, including in-flight movies, headsets, health club facilities, hotel pay-per-view movies, in-theater movies, social activities and related incidental costs. Travel accident insurance premiums or purchase of additional travel insurance. Other expenses not directly related to the business travel.

Travel for Non-Employees Additional costs for travel, lodging, meal or other travel expenses for spouses or other family members will not be reimbursed unless the individual has a bona fide organization purpose for engaging in the travel or attending the event. Such travel is generally limited to senior management and should occur infrequently.

Page 57


Proposed Washington County Wellness Initiative’s Rural Health Network Development Planning Grant Program Policies and Procedures

2014

INCOME PROJECTION POLICY Overview In any business, it usually is advantageous to prepare various statements related to the finances and performance of the organization. One of these is the income projection statement. These statements look ahead and make some estimates about the organization's financial status -- that is, the profits the organization will have -- at a given point in the future. Definition An income projection statement is a formal document that will be prepared by finance or accounting officers within WCWI. Income projection statements look at the monies WCWI will gain over a specific period, normally one year, minus anticipated expenses for that period. Because getting a final figure for income means looking at monies both gained and lost, income projection statements sometimes are called profit and loss statements. Purpose and Applications The primary purpose of creating an income projection statement is to figure out how much money WCWI will generate in the future. This is important for planning, including the organization budget. By looking at the income projection statement and comparing it to records showing what actually happened, WCWI managers can identify possible problems and devise ways to address them. A secondary purpose of an income projection statement is to support grant proposals. Potential funders can look at the WCWI projections and the related documentation and analyze whether the projections are accurate. If the projections are well-founded, the funder may believe WCWI will be a good steward of funds. Contents The content of an income projection statement is very similar to that of a budget. For example, the income statement notes estimated sales, loan payments, earnings on investments, salaries and wages, payroll expenses, rent and utilities. It is largely this similarity that makes income projection statements so valuable for budget work. Presentation

For WCWI, The most concise way to present an income projection is a chart or graph along with short explanations of items on the chart or graph. The project director may provide the income projection statement alone or as part of a larger, formal written report.

Page 58


Proposed Washington County Wellness Initiative’s Rural Health Network Development Planning Grant Program Policies and Procedures

2014

WCWI GRANT APPLICATION PROCESS I. Definition The Washington County Wellness Initiative is a private, charitable foundation, incorporated under the laws of the State of Oklahoma and operated exclusively for one or more of the purposes as specified in Section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code, including but not limited, to making distributions to organizations engage in the promotion and support of Washington County communities. The Washington County Wellness Initiative, Inc. provides support through gifts and grants to charitable, scientific, and educational institutions which are qualified under section 501(c)(3) and which are not private foundations within the meaning of section 509(a) of the Internal Revenue Service Code of 1954 or comparable sections of the Internal Revenue Service Code added at a later date. II. Governing Body The Washington County Wellness Initiative is administered by a Board of Directors. III. Meetings The Executive Directors meet quarterly and grant proposals for 2015 will be considered at the April, July, and October meetings. IV. Response to Inquiries A response to each request or inquiry will be made by the Washington County Wellness Initiative within a reasonable time. V. Proposals The Board of Directors invite proposals and applications from qualified charitable institutions. A careful evaluation of each such request will be made. Nonprofit representatives are urged not to wait until the final deadline. A. Major areas of support by the Washington County Wellness Initiative include: 1. Health Care; 2. Life Style/Prevention; 3. Mental Health; and 4. Poverty Alleviation.

Page 59


Proposed Washington County Wellness Initiative’s Rural Health Network Development Planning Grant Program Policies and Procedures

2014

B. Needs normally outside the range of support by WCWI: 1. Local programs appropriately financed within the community; 2. Direct mail solicitations and annual campaigns; 3. Out of state institutions; 4. Hospitals; 5. Operating expenses; 6. Purchase of vehicles; 7. Grants to individuals; 8. Responsibility for permanent financing of a program; 9. Programs whose ultimate intent is to be profit making; 10. Start-up funding for new organizations; 11. Feasibility studies; 12. Grants which trigger expenditure responsibility by the Washington County Wellness Initiative; 13. Individual public or private elementary or secondary schools, unless they are serving the needs of a special population which are not being met elsewhere; and 14. Religious institutions and their subsidiaries. VI. Application Frequency Organizations are limited to one application per calendar year or twelve month period. Organizations with a current grant from Washington County Wellness Initiative are prohibited from applying for additional funding until final payment has been received. VII. Content of Proposals Washington County Wellness Initiative accepts proposals throughout the year. A copy of the application form required for submitting proposals to the Washington County Wellness Initiative may be requested by contacting the foundation. Washington County Wellness Initiative will accept hand-delivered, mailed, faxed or e-mailed proposals. Below are the primary components of the application: • Organization Information • Executive Summary • Project Information • Financial and Endowment Information • Board Information • Description of the Organization • Description of the Project • Collaborative Efforts in Your Community • Line-item Budget for the Request • List of Secured Funds and Pledges, Outstanding Requests, and Other Potential Sources of Funding

Page 60


Proposed Washington County Wellness Initiative’s Rural Health Network Development Planning Grant Program Policies and Procedures

2014

VIII. Challenge Grants The Board may, at its discretion, determine to award a grant contingent upon the fulfillment of an institution’s additional fund-raising obligation for the project in question within a specified time period. IX. Proposal Format Your application must be completed as outline on the WASHINGTON COUNTY WELLNESS INITIATIVE PROPOSAL APPLICATION or the SHORT FORM FOR CONTINUATION GRANT APPLICATIONS, as applicable.

Page 61


Proposed Washington County Wellness Initiative’s Rural Health Network Development Planning Grant Program Policies and Procedures

2014

WASHINGTON COUNTY WELLNESS INITIATIVE PROPOSAL APPLICATION PROPOSAL APPLICATION Deadline: [To Be Established]

NOT VALID AFTER [Deadline]

ORGANIZATION INFORMATION: Legal name of the organization: Employer identification number: Mailing address of the organization: Physical address of the organization: (if different than above): Telephone Number:

Fax Number:

Contact name: Contact title: Contact phone number: E-Mail Address: CEO name if different from contact: Is there a change in leadership anticipated? If yes please explain. Year the organization began: Mission statement (20 words or less): Vision statement (25 words or less): People served: A brief description of your activities and the people and geographic area you serve (25 words or less): How many unduplicated clients/customers were served in the last fiscal year? Financial information from the last fiscal year: Percent of the budget which is spent on fund-raising Percent of the budget spent on programs Percent of the budget spent on administrative expenses

Page 62


Proposed Washington County Wellness Initiative’s Rural Health Network Development Planning Grant Program Policies and Procedures Total

2014

___________%

Please indicate the approximate percentage of your organization’s funding from: Religious Organizations

Individual Donors

Civic Clubs

Private Foundations

Corporate Donors

Special Events

Endowment/Interest Income

United Way

Fees for services/products

Government Grants

Government Contracts

Other (Please Specify)

Total

__________%

Please indicate the level of coverage of each of the following: Directors and Officers Liability Insurance: General Liability Insurance: Other (Specify type and amount): What is the fiscal year end date of your most recent 990?

(MM/DD/YY)

When did you last comply with the annual requirement to register with the State of Oklahoma as a fundraising organization as mandated by state law? (MM/DD/YY) Summary of Income and Expenses for the last three complete fiscal years. Please enter the beginning and ending dates included in each column.

Year INCOME Contributions Earned Income Other: (Including Interest) TOTAL INCOME EXPENSES Salaries Occupancy Supplies Other TOTAL EXPENSES Excess of Income over (under) Expenses

Two Years Ago

Previous Year

Page 63

Most Recent


Proposed Washington County Wellness Initiative’s Rural Health Network Development Planning Grant Program Policies and Procedures

2014

Endowment Information:

Does your organization have an endowment? If no, please skip to M. If yes, please answer the following questions: How much is it? Where is it held? Total endowment earnings (or losses) for the last fiscal year: Amount of earnings available for expenditure: Board information from the last complete fiscal year (based on

governing board

members only):

How many board members do you have? What was the total number of volunteer hours in direct service to the organization, Board meetings, contributed by your Board in the last fiscal year? How many of the Board members contributed these hours? #

or

Board?

How many of the Board members made these contributions? # or

%

What is the total amount of the Board’s personal, out-of-pocket financial contribution complete fiscal year? or

for

How many members constitute a quorum? How often does your Board review the by-laws? What are the board term limits established in your by-laws? Term length? Number of consecutive terms allowed? Are limits consistent for all governing board members? If not, please explain. If there are term limits, are they strictly observed? If not, please explain.

Page 64

the

last

%

How many of your Board members are active in fund-raising on behalf of your organization? # How often does your Board meet?

including

%

What is the total value of in-kind tangible contributions from your

How many of the Board members contributed? #

not

or

%


Proposed Washington County Wellness Initiative’s Rural Health Network Development Planning Grant Program Policies and Procedures

2014

Has any Board member received compensation for services performed for the organization in the past 3 years? If yes, please describe the services performed and the compensation. Is your organization affiliated with a state-wide or national organization? If no, please skip to Part N. If yes, please name the state-wide or national organization. If yes, is the local board totally responsible for establishing policy and exercising control over governance and financial matters? Partnerships: Washington County Wellness Initiative encourages partnerships and cooperative efforts among organizations with similar constituencies or shared goals. Please list no more than five organizations/coalitions with whom you have significant working partnerships (not funders) and briefly describe the partnership or joint effort: Organization: Description: Organization: Description: Organization: Description: Organization: Description: Organization: Description: PROJECT INFORMATION: Total project cost: Amount requested:

$

or

%

The total amount of the governing Board’s personal, out-of-pocket financial contribution for this project: The number of the Board members contributing: #

or

%

Fund-raising Information: Has an outside consultant been hired to help raise the funds for this project? If so, who is it?

Page 65


Proposed Washington County Wellness Initiative’s Rural Health Network Development Planning Grant Program Policies and Procedures

2014

What are the terms of the contract? What services are provided? Is any staff person receiving additional compensation for fund-raising activities? If so, under what terms? Is any board member receiving compensation of any type for fundraising activities? The geographical area served by this project: Approximately how many people will be impacted by this project? Number Directly Impacted: Number Indirectly Impacted: EXECUTIVE SUMMARY OF YOUR REQUEST (100 words maximum): The project is... REQUIRED ATTACHMENTS: (DO NOT RESPOND ON THIS PAGE) A cover letter signed by executive director and board chair addressed to Bob Walker, Board President. A one to two page description of your organization (not project). A three to four page narrative description of your project (not your organization) including the following: An account of the problem or need. An explanation of how the project will solve or alleviate the problem. A summary of how the project relates to or helps fulfill your mission. An account of your organization’s qualifications to address that problem or need. How do you define success? How do you know when you achieve success? How do you know you are on track? A time frame for the project. A description of how ongoing or future needs will be funded after the grant ends. A line-item budget for each year of the project. A list of secured funds and pledges for this project. A list of all outstanding requests and their amounts for this project. A list of other potential sources of funding, if any, for this project. A list of current board members which includes only their names and professions.

Page 66


Proposed Washington County Wellness Initiative’s Rural Health Network Development Planning Grant Program Policies and Procedures

2014

The total number of full-time employees and total number of part-time employees. Also, a list of the names and position titles of the top ten paid employees. A complete copy of the IRS tax exempt determination letter stating that your organization is not a private foundation and that it has Internal Revenue Service Code section 501(c)(3) status. A copy of your organization’s most recent audit and management letter (within the last two fiscal years). If the organization’s yearly income or total assets are less than $500,000 a financial statement signed by the board treasurer.

Page 67


Proposed Washington County Wellness Initiative’s Rural Health Network Development Planning Grant Program Policies and Procedures

2014

Washington County Wellness Initiative, Inc. FISCAL AGENT POLICY AND PROCEDURES The request to serve as fiscal agent procedure for the Washington County Wellness Initiative, Inc. (WCWI) requires all requestors to submit their request to WCWI for consideration quarterly, on or before the following dates: January 1st April 1st July 1st October 1st Requests received outside the timeframe as listed, may not be considered until the next scheduled quarterly meeting. WCWI Board meetings will be published annually and made available upon written request to the WCWI Board. Each requestor must submit a completed Fiscal Agent Application Form with all requested documentation, including by not limited to: 1-2 page narrative, detailing the purpose of the grant funding with concise overview of their project, the amount of the request, what and how the money will be used, and a detailed budget. Additionally, the requestor must provide a one-sentence statement acknowledging that they have been informed and agree to pay WCWI the 10% Administrative Fee it accesses to any agency or organization in which we serve as their fiscal agent. The WCWI fiscal agent request meeting will take place during a regularly scheduled board meeting whereby time will be set-aside to review, discuss and decide, which (if any) requests to grant. All requestors will receive written response of the Board’s decision.

APPROVED ON THE ______ DAY OF ___________________________, 2014. President’s Signature: _____________________________________________

Page 68


Proposed Washington County Wellness Initiative’s Rural Health Network Development Planning Grant Program Policies and Procedures

2014

WCWI FISCAL AGENT APPLICATION 1.

Name of organization/institution:

2.

Executive Director:

3.

Address:

4.

Telephone Number:

5.

E-mail address:

6.

Total amount of grant for which WCWI is being asked to serve as Fiscal Agent:

7.

Date of grant:

8.

Brief description of purpose for which grant is to be solicited: (Please attach a 1-2 page narrative, detailing the purpose of the grant funding.)

Page 69


Proposed Washington County Wellness Initiative’s Rural Health Network Development Planning Grant Program Policies and Procedures

2014

PERFORMANCE EVALUATION FORM Service Provider:

Date Started:

HRSA Grant Project Title:

Date Of Review:

Evaluation of Performance

Strength/ Weakness

Comments

Team Player

Meets Deadlines

Organizational Skills

Communication Skills

Leadership Ability

Interaction With Project Participants

Attendance

Quality Of Work Team Comments

Goals

Signature of Interviewer

Name

Page 70

Next:


Proposed Washington County Wellness Initiative’s Rural Health Network Development Planning Grant Program Policies and Procedures

2014

REQUEST FOR PAYMENT FORM Payable to: Address: Street

City

Amount:

State/Province Country

$

Zip/Postal

Charge to:

Purpose: Instructions: Requested by:

Date Requested:

Approved by:

Date Approved:

Approval Signature: Processing Policies:

Request for Payment Form must be approved by the authorized person responsible for the budget item.

For Accounting Use Only G/L Account#: Date Paid: Check#: Check Amount:

Page 71

Code


TERMINOLOGY

H


KEY TERMINOLOGY, ABBREVIATIONS & ACRONYMS CHIO – County Health Improvement Organization (http://www.publichealthok.org/impactchio/) County Health Improvement Organizations are non-profit organizations that bring together multiple community partners to work toward the improvement of the health and primary healthcare in their respective counties. They are typically Turning Point Partnerships, which have chosen to meet the criteria and apply for certification through the Public Health Institute of Oklahoma. Certified CHIOs can serve to contribute to, endorse, and help carry out the County Health Improvement Plans developed through the county's public health stakeholders. The goal is to strengthen local efforts to improve health and health care in our state. The purpose of these guidelines is to clarify the features of these county health improvement organizations (CHIOs) that will make the more effective and more attractive to various funders. CHIOs will be “certified” by the Public Health Institute of Oklahoma (PHIO), which will serve as the state hub for the extension system. The purpose of CHIOs are to: • Through a certification process directed by the Public Health Institute of Oklahoma (PHIO), establish a system of county health improvement organizations (CHIOs) throughout the state, which can a) assess and prioritize the health and health care needs of their communities, b) request external assistance when necessary, and c) attract sufficient funding to hire or contract for resources (e.g. care managers, registry operators, community health workers, information technology and consultants, pharmacy consultants, etc.) needed to support primary care and community health. Turning Point Partnerships, Sooner Success, and/or other community coalitions will join with primary care clinicians to form non-profit organizations eligible for CHIO certification by PHIO. These CHIOs will then become part of a statewide network that can acquire and develop the resources needed for improving the health care services and health of communities. • Develop a sustainable quality improvement (QI) support system for primary care including performance evaluation/feedback, identification/spread of best practices, academic


detailing, and practice facilitation, coordinated by Area Health Education Centers supported by the academic health centers and other educational institutions. The CHIOs will contract with the four regional Area Health Education Centers (AHECs) to provide QI support for primary care practices by helping them with performance evaluations, connecting them to experts in the academic institutions, providing them with practice facilitators, and organizing local learning collaboratives.

CHIP – County Health Improvement Plan The Community Health Improvement Plan (CHIP) consists of two main phases: The initial phase required a holistic assessment of our community, and the second phase involves our community partners in planning strategic, targeted interventions to improve health outcomes where our community’s needs are greatest. HRSA – Health Resources and Services Administration (www.hrsa.gov) The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) is an agency of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services located in Rockville, Maryland. It is the primary federal agency for improving access to health care services for people who are uninsured, isolated or medically vulnerable. Comprising six bureaus and 13 offices, HRSA provides leadership and financial support to health care providers in every state and U.S. territory. HRSA grantees provide health care to uninsured people, people living with HIV/AIDS, and pregnant women, mothers and children. They train health professionals and improve systems of care in rural communities. MAPP – Mobilizing for Action through Planning and Partnerships MAPP is a community-wide strategic planning process for improving public health. It is a method to help communities prioritize public health issues, identify resources for addressing them, and take action. MAPP uses four assessments: •

The Community Themes and Strengths Assessment provides a deep understanding of the issues that residents feel are important by answering the questions: "What is important to our community?" "How is quality of life perceived in our community?" and "What assets do we have that can be used to improve community health?“ The Local Public Health System Assessment (LPHSA) focuses on all of the organizations and entities that contribute to the public's health. The LPHSA answers the questions: "What are the components, activities, competencies, and capacities of our local public


health system?" and "How are the Essential Services being provided to our community?“ The Community Health Status Assessment identifies priority community health and quality of life issues. Questions answered include: "How healthy are our residents?" and "What does the health status of our community look like?“ The Forces of Change Assessment focuses on identifying forces such as legislation, technology, and other impending changes that affect the context in which the community and its public health system operate. This answers the questions: "What is occurring or might occur that affects the health of our community or the local public health system?" and "What specific threats or opportunities are generated by these occurrences?"

PHIO – Public Health Institute of Oklahoma (www.publichealthok.org) The Public Health Institute of Oklahoma is a non-profit, 501(c)(3) organization founded in 2004 to promote dialogue among health care providers, the private sector, community colleges, universities, health and human service associations, and state and local government. PHIO's mission is to bridge government, academia, and communities in order to facilitate health improvement. PHIO is a partner with the Oklahoma Turning Point Council’s Annual Conference. PHIO is an affiliate member of the National Network of Public Health Institutes and a member of the Oklahoma Center for Non-profits. PHIO serves to certify the County Health Improvement Organizations (CHIOs) and helps incubate CHIOs seeking to become non-profits with organizational development support.


Abbreviations and Acronyms (Provided by Department of Family and Preventative Medicine, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma Clinical and Translational Service Institute) AAFP ABCS ABFM ABIM ACA ACIC

ACP AD AHEC AHRQ

AONP CCO

CCM CFIR

CHC CHIO

CHIP CME

American Academy of Family Physicians (profession association for family physicians that awards CME credits) Aspirin, Blood Pressure, Cholesterol, and Smoking American Board of Family Medicine (responsible for certification of family physicians and for the MOC-Part IV requirement) American Board of Internal Medicine (responsible for certification of general internists and for the MOC-Part IV requirement) Affordable Care Act (actually the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act – commonly referred to as “Obamacare”) Assessment of Chronic Illness Care survey (a paper and pencil tool to measure the processes in place in a practice to deliver excellent chronic illness care – based upon the Chronic Care Model) American College of Physicians (professional association for internists) Academic Detailing (Detailer) Area Health Education Center Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (the agency within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services responsible for the Primary Care Extension Program and, therefore, the agency that is funding DIPCOR) Association of Oklahoma Nurse Practitioners Coordinated Care Oklahoma (an organization of OKC hospitals formed to develop and share HIE; also the name used for the HIO and HIE that has been developed) Chronic Care Model or simply the Care Model (a set of principles for management of patients with chronic illnesses – now integrated into PCMH) Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research (a set of terms and definitions for the various elements of an implementation project that might be measured) Community Health Centers County Health Improvement Organization (county-based organizations certified by PHIO that are committed to improving health and healthcare in their county/ies; usually TPPs or SSCs that have chosen to meet certification criteria) County Health Improvement Plan Continuing Medical Education (required for licensure and certification; awarded by the AAFP and ACP)


CMMI

COPH CPCI

CPCQ CSC

D&I DFPM DIPCOR DMI EHR EMR FQHC FOA FM/FP GIM/GI HIE

HIO HITREC

LOI MOC Part IV MyHealth NaRCAD

NCQA

Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Innovations (a center established in the the ACA to fund experiments designed to improve outcomes and care quality/patient satisfaction and to reduce cost; the funder of CPCI and TCPI) OU College of Public Health Comprehensive Primary Care Initiative (ongoing multi-payer initiative involving 68 practices in NE OK who receive funding to implement care coordination primarily) Change Process Compatibility Questionnaire (a paper and pencil tool used to assess a practice’s priority for change and change capacity) Community Services Council (a large non-profit organization officed in Tulsa that serves as an incubator for other non-profits and assists with a variety of large and small projects that benefit Oklahomans) Dissemination and Implementation OUHSC Department of Family and Preventative Medicine In OKC Disseminating and Implementing Patient-Centered Outcomes Research (the name we have given to this AHRQ-funded project) OU Department of Medical Informatics located at the OUSCM in Tulsa Electronic Health Record Electronic Medical Record (same as EHR) Federally Qualified Health Center (essentially the same as CHC) Funding Opportunity Announcement Family Medicine/Family Physician General Internal Medicine/General Internist Health Information Exchange (software that links the various caches of electronic health information in order to improve coordination of patient care) Health Information Organization (an organization that owns and operates an HIE) Health Information Technology Regional Extension Center (located within OFMQ; its extension agents have helped more than 1000 Oklahoma practices implement EHRs; 4 of these individuals will be involved in DIPCOR) Letter of Intent (to apply for funding; required/requested by most funding agencies) Maintenance of Certification Part IV (a QI project requirement for board certification in both Family Medicine and General Internal Medicine) MyHealth Access Network (HIO and HIE similar to but distinct from CCO) National Resource Center for Academic Detailing (a resource center located in Boston, funded by AHRQ, that trains and support academic detailers throughout the country; NaRCAD will train many of the academic detailers involved in DIPCOR) National Committee for Quality Assurance (a national accrediting organization for health care providers; e.g. can provide PCMH accreditation/certification)


NIH NQF OAFP OAPA OCAITHB OCHI OCPE OCTSI

OFMQ OkHCA OKPCA OKPRN OOA OPHES OPHIC

OSCTR

OSU-CHS OSDH OUHSC OUSCM PCMH PCORI/PCOR

PEA

National Institutes of Health (the largest federal funder of biomedical research; funder for the OCTSI and OSCTR) National Quality Form – organization that endorses quality measures Oklahoma Academy of Family Practitioners Oklahoma Academy of Physician Assistants Oklahoma City Area Inter-Tribal Health Board Oklahoma Center for Healthcare Improvement OUHSC Office of Continuing Professional Education (the office in charge of helping DIPCOR participants receive CME and MOC-Part IV credits) OUHSC Oklahoma Clinical and Translational Science Institute (a newly established institute, physically located at the OUHSC in OKC but with multiple institutional partners including the OSU-CHS; it currently houses OSCTR and OPHIS) Oklahoma Foundation for Medical Quality Oklahoma Health Care Authority (The Medicaid organization in Oklahoma) Oklahoma Primary Care Association Oklahoma Physicians Resource/Research Network Oklahoma Osteopathic Association Oklahoma Primary Healthcare Extension System (a statewide extension system made up of multiple independent CHIOs; coordinated through PHIO) Oklahoma Primary Healthcare Improvement Cooperative (a functional entity within the Oklahoma Clinical and Translational Science Institute, located at the OUHSC whose mission is to help primary care practices throughout Oklahoma improve their care processes by helping them to translate research into practice and by facilitating the translation of practice into research) Oklahoma Shared Clinical and Translational Resources (a set of key component activities [KCAs] intended to increase the quantity and quality of clinical and translational research in Oklahoma and to ultimately improve the health of Oklahomans Oklahoma State University Center for Health Sciences in Tulsa Oklahoma State Department of Health University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center in Oklahoma City OUHSC School of Community Medicine (formerly OUHSC –Tulsa; located at the Schusterman Center) Patient Centered Medical Home (advanced primary care incorporating the CCM, HIT/HIE, and patient-centeredness principles) Patient Centered Outcomes Research Institute/Patient-Centered Outcomes Research (an institute established in the ACA as an independent non-profit organization, separate from government to fund patient-centered outcomes research) Practice Enhancement Assistant (also called practice facilitator, practice coach, QI coordinator)


PET PFC PHIO PI PMT PNC QI REC-PA RHC RFC RFA SSC SHIP TCPI

Telligen

TMF TSET TPP VA

Project Evaluation Team (a team made up of the researchers involved in DIPCOR in the COPH; chaired by Dr. Ann Chou) Practice Facilitator Coordinator Public Health Institute of Oklahoma Principal Investigator (for DIPCOR, that is Dr. Dan Duffy) Program Management Team (composed of Drs. Duffy, Crawford, Mold, Kendrick, Chou and the Program Manager PCOR Navigation and Collaboration Function Quality Improvement Health Information Technology Regional Extension Center Practice Advisor Rural Health Clinic Regional Field Consultant (individuals hired by the OSDH to assist Turning Point Partnerships) Request for Applications Sooner Success Coalition (county-based coalitions focused on health and healthcare needs of children and their families) State Health Improvement Plan Transforming Clinical Practice Initiative (a new CMMI-sponsored initiative that will be taking place at the same time as DIPCOR in some states – possibly OK; within that initiative, CMMI plans to fund Practice Transformation Networks [TPNs] and Support and Alignment Networks [SANs]) The Quality Improvement Organization for Iowa and Illinois, which has the Health Management Program contract with OkHCA and which is applying for the TCPI Texas Medical Foundation (the federally-funded Quality Improvement Organization for Texas, Oklahoma, and two other states) Oklahoma Tobacco Settlement Endowment Trust Turning Point Partnership (county-based volunteer organizations dedicated to improving health and health care within their county) Department of Veterans Affairs

2015 WCWI Board Packet  
2015 WCWI Board Packet  
Advertisement