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HEALTH LITERACY SERIES 2017-2018

Teen Dating Violence Prevention 1


Presented by:

M’Liss Jenkins , Penny L. Pricer, and Sheree L. Hukill WCWI Leadership Team


Today you will learn:  Washington  Project  Social  The

Prom is . . .

Determinants of Health are . . .

Opioid Epidemic & Teen Dating Violence. . .

 Teen I

County Wellness Initiative is . . .

Dating Violence vs. Healthy Relationships

can . . .


What is the Washington County Wellness Initiative? 

501(c)(3) Non-Profit Corporation incorporated in the State of Oklahoma

WCWI is certified through the Public Health Institute of Oklahoma (PHIO) as a County Health Improvement Organization (CHIO)

We have four main focus areas 

Healthcare

Lifestyle/Prevention

Mental Health

Poverty


What is the Washington County Wellness Initiative?


What is Project Prom? 

WCWI Workgroup

The vision for Project Prom is to provide the prom experience for low-income youth.

For the girls, Project Prom provides the whole day, the hair, the make-up, and a little pampering.

The girls receive prom dresses and the boys receive tuxedos.

The prom experience allows youth to become a part of the experience, become more confident, and raises their self-esteem.

Project Prom is currently in transition, if serving your community through this project sparks your interest, contact the WCWI Leadership Team!


Social Determinants of Health  A “place-based” organizing framework, reflecting five (5) key areas of social determinants of health (SDOH), was developed by Healthy People 2020. WCWI has aligned our goals and objectives with the Healthy People 2020 goals and objectives, focusing on the areas of most concern identified in the 2014-2015 Community Needs Assessment.  These five key areas (determinants) include: • Economic Stability • Education • Social and Community Context • Health and Health Care • Neighborhood and Built Environment

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Social Determinants of Health


Pre-Test 1.

________ in three adolescents in the U.S. is a victim of emotional, physical or sexual abuse from a dating partner.

2.

Only _______of teens who were in a violent relationship ever told anyone about the abuse.

3.

Dating abuse affects around _____ million teens annually.

4.

Nearly ______ percent of U.S. high school students indicated that they had used prescription drugs without a doctor's prescription at some point in their lifetime.

5.

An estimated ______ percent of 12- to 17-year-olds misused prescription drugs -- such as pain relievers, tranquilizers, stimulants and sedatives -- in the past year.


The Facts 

Every day millions of lives in the U.S. are devastated by violence. On average, 24 people a minute are victims of physical violence, rape or stalking by an intimate partner. That adds up to more than 12 million women and men a year.

The reality is that this doesn’t only affect adults. There are millions of young people in this country, many of whom may be students of yours, whose lives are affected— sometimes shaped—by violence.


The Facts 

One in three adolescents in the U.S. is a victim of emotional, physical or sexual abuse from a dating partner, a figure that far exceeds other types of youth violence.

Only 33% of teens who were in a violent relationship ever told anyone about the abuse.

Dating abuse affects around 1.5 million teens annually.


The Opioid Epidemic & Teen Dating Violence 

US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s scientific lead researcher, Heather Clayton, conducted a nationwide survey of more than 10,000 teenagers (5,100 boys and 5,300 girls, in grades 9 to 12) who had dated in the past year

The study found 

Non-medical use of prescription drugs by boys was associated with sexual dating violence

Non-medical use of prescription drugs by girls was linked more often with physical dating violence


The Opioid Epidemic & Teen Dating Violence 

In the 2015 National Youth Risk Behavior Survey, teens were asked how many times in the past year they had taken a prescription drug -- such as OxyContin, Percocet, Vicodin, codeine, Adderall, Ritalin or Xanax -- without a doctor's prescription

According to the study, nearly 17 percent of U.S. high school students indicated that they had used prescription drugs without a doctor's prescription at some point in their lifetime

An estimated 6 percent of 12- to 17-year-olds misused prescription drugs -- such as pain relievers, tranquilizers, stimulants and sedatives -- in the past year


The Opioid Epidemic & Teen Dating Violence 

The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s nationwide survey also found 

Nearly 10 percent of high school students surveyed said they had experienced physical dating violence

Physical violence included such things as being:  Hit  Slammed  Injured

into something

with an object or weapon


The Opioid Epidemic & Teen Dating Violence 

The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s nationwide survey also found 

Slightly more than 10 percent said they were victims of sexual dating violence

Sexual dating violence was identified as sexual things that the teen did not want to do, such as:  Kissing  Touching  Being

physically forced to have sexual intercourse


The Opioid Epidemic & Teen Dating Violence ď ľ

Youth who experience dating violence are more likely to have symptoms of depression and anxiety, engage in unhealthy behaviors, such as using tobacco, drugs and drinking alcohol, be involved in antisocial behavior and thinking about suicide

ď ľ

The associations are likely complex and reflective of the many challenges faced by already at-risk populations


The Opioid Epidemic & Teen Dating Violence 

Dr. Elizabeth Miller, Director of Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh - Division of Adolescent and Young Adult Medicine states: 

It is likely that prescription drug abuse increases likelihood for violence victimization, and such victimization increases the chances that a young person engages in prescription drug abuse

It is important to pay attention to how sexual violence may be related to other health problems, like prescription drug abuse


The Opioid Epidemic & Teen Dating Violence ď ľ

What Can We Do? ď ś Clinicians

may consider the association between these behavioral health concerns when screening their adolescent patients for experiences of dating violence or substance use


School Personnel Community Members Parents Peers


NATIONAL RESOURCE Purpose Loveisrespect’s purpose is to engage, educate and empower young people to prevent and end abusive relationships.

Services Highly-trained advocates offer support, information and advocacy to young people who have questions or concerns about their dating relationships. They also provide information and support to concerned friends and family members, teachers, counselors, service providers and members of law enforcement. Free and confidential phone, live chat and texting services are available 24/7/365.


NATIONAL RESOURCE The Team ď ľ

National Domestic Violence Hotline The National Domestic Violence Hotline is the only 24/7 national hotline that provides direct services to anyone affected by domestic violence. Learn more about their work and the advocates who assist victims and survivors, as well as their friends and families.

ď ľ

Break the Cycle Break the Cycle is the premiere partner of loveisrespect and the leading voice dedicated to the prevention of dating abuse. Learn more about their services and resources available nationwide.


RELATIONSHIPS EXIST ON A SPECTRUM

Healthy Unhealthy Abusive


RELATIONSHIPS EXIST ON A SPECTRUM


HEALTHY RELATIONSHIPS 

Communicating: You talk openly about problems, listen to each other and respect each other’s opinions.

Respectful: You value each other as you are. You respect each other’s emotional, digital and sexual boundaries.

Trusting: You believe what your partner has to say. You do not feel the need to “prove” each other’s trustworthiness.

Honest: You are honest with each other, but can still keep some things private.

Equal: You make decisions together and hold each other to the same standards.

Enjoying Personal Time: You both can enjoy spending time apart, alone or with others. You respect each other’s need for time apart.

Source: LOVEISRESPECT.ORG HEALTHY RELATIONSHIP HIGH SCHOOL EDUCATORS TOOLKIT


UNHEALTHY RELATIONSHIPS 

Not communicating: When problems arise, you fight or you don’t discuss them at all.

Disrespectful: One or both partners is not considerate of the other’s feelings and/or personal boundaries.

Not trusting: One partner doesn’t believe what the other says, or feels entitled to invade their privacy.

Dishonest: One or both partners tells lies.

Trying to take control: One partner feels their desires and choices are more important.

Only spending time with your partner: Your partner’s community is the only one you socialize in.

Source: LOVEISRESPECT.ORG HEALTHY RELATIONSHIP HIGH SCHOOL EDUCATORS TOOLKIT


ABUSIVE RELATIONSHIPS 

Communicates in a way that is hurtful, threatening, insulting or demeaning.

Disrespects the feelings, thoughts, decisions, opinions or physical safety of the other.

Physically hurts or injures the other partner by hitting, slapping, choking, pushing or shoving.

Blames the other partner for their harmful actions, makes excuses for abusive actions and/or minimizes the abusive behavior.

Controls and isolates the other partner by telling them what to wear, who they can hang out with, where they can go and/or what they can do.

Pressures or forces the other partner to do things they don’t want to do; threatens, hurts or blackmails their partner if they resist or say no.

Source: LOVEISRESPECT.ORG HEALTHY RELATIONSHIP HIGH SCHOOL EDUCATORS TOOLKIT


DEFINING UNHEALTHY RELATIONSHIPS & DATING ABUSE  

 

Unhealthy relationships are based on power and control, not equality and respect. In the early stages of an abusive relationship, teens may not think the unhealthy behaviors are a big deal. Possessiveness, insults, jealous accusations, yelling, humiliation, pulling hair, pushing or other negative, abusive behaviors, are—at their root—exertions of power and control. Remember -- abuse is always a choice and everyone deserves to be respected. There is no excuse for abuse of any kind.


DEFINING UNHEALTHY RELATIONSHIPS & DATING ABUSE 

Dating abuse is a pattern of destructive behaviors used to exert power and control over a dating partner. 

While dating violence is defined as a pattern, that doesn’t mean the first instance of abuse is not dating violence.

It just recognizes that dating violence usually involves a series of abusive behaviors over a course of time.

Dating violence can happen to anyone, regardless of age, race, gender, sexual orientation or background.  Drugs and alcohol can affect a person’s judgment and behavior, but they do not excuse abuse or violence.  Alternatively, if a person uses drugs/alcohol it does not mean they deserve abuse or assault. 


DEFINING UNHEALTHY RELATIONSHIPS & DATING ABUSE  Dating

violence can be:

 Physical

-- Hitting, Slapping, Choking, Kicking, Grabbing, Pulling Hair, Pushing. Shoving

 Emotional/Verbal

-- Put downs, Embarrassment in public (online or off), Threatening in any way, Telling a partner what to do or what to wear, Threatening suicide, Accusing partner of cheating


DEFINING UNHEALTHY RELATIONSHIPS & DATING ABUSE 

Dating violence can be: 

Sexual: pressuring or forcing partner to do anything sexual the partner is not comfortable with and/or does not consent to, including sexting; restricting access to birth control; unwanted kissing or touching Financial: demanding access to partner’s money; preventing partner from working; insisting that if they pay, partner owes them something in return Digital: sending threats via text, social media or email; stalking or embarrassing partner on social media; hacking partner’s social media or email accounts without permission; forcing partner to share passwords; constantly texting or calling to check up on partner; frequently looking through partner’s phone or monitoring their texts/call log


WARNING SIGNS OF ABUSE  Constantly

putting someone down  Extreme jealousy or insecurity  Explosive temper  Isolating someone from their family or friends, dictating who they can see or hang out with  Mood swings (nice one minute and angry the next)  Checking someone’s cell phone, social media or email without permission  Physically hurting someone in any way  Possessiveness  Telling someone what to do or what to wear


Not sure if a teen is in trouble? Listen to your instincts—you probably wouldn’t be worried without good reason. Also, look for these red flags: 

Problems with school attendance, particularly if it is a new problem

Lack of interest in former extracurricular activities

Sudden request for a change in schedule

Unexplained changes in behavior, grades or quality of schoolwork

Noticeable change in weight, demeanor or physical appearance

Isolation from former friends

Little social contact with anyone but their dating partner

Unexplained bruises or injuries

Making excuses or apologizing for their dating partner’s inappropriate behavior

New disciplinary problems at school, such as bullying other students or acting out

Name-calling or belittling from a dating partner


HOW TO HELP 

Be clear: Tell teens that abuse is unacceptable and that this is an issue you take very seriously.

Encourage discussion: Ask teens what they think about abuse. Encourage them to think critically about the impact of violence—in their own relationships and society at large.

Listen: Listen to what teen tell you and what you see and hear. Let them know you care, that you are there for them and that you are paying attention.

Be prepared: Be aware of mandatory reporting requirements that apply to you and notify the appropriate agency when you suspect abuse.

Spread the word: Enlist your colleagues in raising awareness of teen dating violence.


HOW TO HELP - If you are certain teen is involved in an abusive relationship 

Tell teen you are concerned for their safety. Point out that what’s happening isn’t “normal.” Everyone deserves a safe and healthy relationship. After consulting with the student’s parents, offer to connect them with a professional, like a counselor or attorney, who they can talk to confidentially.

Be supportive and understanding. Stress that you’re on their side. Provide information and non-judgmental support. Let them know that it’s not their fault and no one “deserves” to be abused. Make it clear that you don’t blame them and you respect their choices.


HOW TO HELP - If you are certain teen is involved in an abusive relationship ď ľ

Believe them and take them seriously. The teen may be reluctant to share their experiences in fear of no one believing what they say. As you validate their feelings and show your support, they can become more comfortable and trust you with more information. Be careful not to minimize their situation due to age, inexperience or the length of their relationship.

ď ľ

Help develop a safety plan. One of the most dangerous times in an abusive relationship is when the victim decides to leave. Be especially supportive during this time and try to connect the teen to support groups or professionals that can help keep them safe.


HOW TO HELP - If you are certain teen is involved in an abusive relationship 

Remember that ultimately the teen must be the one who decides to leave the relationship.

There are many complex reasons why victims stay in unhealthy relationships.

Your support can make a critical difference in helping teens find their own way to end their unhealthy relationship.


Relationship Bill of Rights You have rights in your relationship. Everyone does, and those rights can help you set boundaries that should be respected by both partners in a healthy relationship. 

You have the right to privacy, both online and off

You have the right to feel safe and respected

You have the right to decide who you want to date or not date

You have the right to say no at any time (to sex, to drugs or alcohol, to a relationship), even if you’ve said yes before

You have the right to hang out with your friends and family and do things you enjoy, without your partner getting jealous or controlling

You have the right to end a relationship that isn’t right or healthy for you

You have the right to live free from violence and abuse


REMEMBER love is not. . . controlling what you do, who you see, or where you go, stopping you from seeing your friends and family, shoving, slapping, choking, hitting, intimidating, or threatening to you


REMEMBER love is . . . caring, trusting, secure, accepting, supportive, setting boundaries


I CAN . . . Be Clear Encourage Discussion Listen Be Prepared Spread the Word Join . . .


Post -Test 1.

One in three adolescents in the U.S. is a victim of emotional, physical or sexual abuse from a dating partner.

2.

Only 33% of teens who were in a violent relationship ever told anyone about the abuse.

3.

Dating abuse affects around 1.5 million teens annually.

4.

Nearly seventeen (17) percent of U.S. high school students indicated that they had used prescription drugs without a doctor's prescription at some point in their lifetime.

5.

An estimated six (6) percent of 12- to 17-year-olds misused prescription drugs -- such as pain relievers, tranquilizers, stimulants and sedatives -- in the past year.


Teen Dating Violence Prevention Resources 

http://www.LoveisRespect.org

National Domestic Violence Hotline http://www.thehotline.org/ 1-800-799-7233

Break the Cycle https://www.breakthecycle.org/

StrongHearts Native Helpline https://www.strongheartshelpline.org/

Oklahoma Coalition Against Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault https://www.ocadvsa.org/

Native Alliance Against Violence https://www.oknaav.org/


Questions & Answers WHAT QUESTIONS DO YOU HAVE?


Evaluation Survey Links General Public Survey: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/bplfebgeneral Staff Survey: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/bplfebstaff


THANK YOU!

For more information contact the Washington County Wellness Initiative at info@wcwiok.org Website: www.wcwiok.org

Health Literacy Series: Teen Dating Violence Prevention  
Health Literacy Series: Teen Dating Violence Prevention  
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