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HEALTH LITERACY SERIES 2017-2018 Rx Drug Misuse and Abuse 101

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Presented by:

Sheree L. Hukill, Penny L. Pricer, and M’Liss Jenkins WCWI Leadership Team


Today you will learn:  Washington  Positive  Social

County Wellness Initiative is . . .

Influence Committee is . . .

Determinants of Health are . . .

 Prescription

(Rx) Drug Misuse and Abuse Epidemic in the United States and Washington County is . . .

I

can . . .


What is the Washington County Wellness Initiative? 

501(c)(3) Non-Profit Corporation incorporated in the State of Oklahoma

WCWI is certified through the Public Health Institute of Oklahoma (PHIO) as a County Health Improvement Organization (CHIO)

We have four main focus areas 

Healthcare

Lifestyle/Prevention

Mental Health

Poverty


What is the Washington County Wellness Initiative?


What is the Positive Influence Committee?

WCWI Workgroup

Partnering with the Cherokee Nation on a five-year grant to help identify, educate, and create community-based solutions to reduce underage drinking and RX drug misuse/abuse

Meet from 2:30 PM until 4:00 PM on the third Tuesday of each month at the Bartlesville Public Library


Social Determinants of Health  A “place-based” organizing framework, reflecting five (5) key areas of social determinants of health (SDOH), was developed by Healthy People 2020. WCWI has aligned our goals and objectives with the Healthy People 2020 goals and objectives, focusing on the areas of most concern identified in the 2014-2015 Community Needs Assessment.  These • • • • •

five key areas (determinants) include: Economic Stability Education Social and Community Context Health and Health Care Neighborhood and Built Environment 7


Social Determinants of Health


Social Determinants of Health


The Rx Drug Epidemic Throughout the United States and In Washington County


According to the Surgeon General, there are 250 million prescriptions for opioids written each year – enough for every adult in America to have a bottle of pills.


The Rx Drug Epidemic Throughout the United States and In Washington County The number of people dying from overdoses involving prescription drugs has increased 4 times since 1999

1999

NOW


WATCH THE RED –THE REDDER THE COLOR, THE BIGGER THE PROBLEM


WATCH THE RED –THE REDDER THE COLOR, THE BIGGER THE PROBLEM


WATCH THE RED –THE REDDER THE COLOR, THE BIGGER THE PROBLEM


WATCH THE RED –THE REDDER THE COLOR, THE BIGGER THE PROBLEM


WATCH THE RED –THE REDDER THE COLOR, THE BIGGER THE PROBLEM


WATCH THE RED –THE REDDER THE COLOR, THE BIGGER THE PROBLEM


The Painkiller (Opioid) Epidemic Source: The Guardian, A deadly crisis: Mapping the spread of America's drug overdose epidemic

Drug overdoses killed 47,000 in 2014, or 130 a day. The majority of those deaths, 29,000 or 80 per day involved an opioid pain killer.


The US makes up less than 5% of the world’s population, yet uses 81% of the opioid supply.


Over 2 million people in America have a prescription opioid use disorder, contributing to increased heroin use and the spread of HIV and hepatitis


Centers for Disease Control and Prevention https://www.cdc.gov/drugoverdose/data/statedeaths.html


Current data shows 91 people die every day from an opioid overdose.


The Rx Drug Epidemic Throughout the United States and In Washington County Unintentional Poisoning Death Rates by County of Residence, OK, 2007-2015

NOW Washington County: 16.7 – 21.0


The Rx Drug Epidemic Throughout the United States and In Washington County

Drug Related Deaths in Washington County  Five deaths in 2007 increased to thirteen in 2016 – almost triple  7 involved Rx drugs, 6 involved street drugs  Methamphetamine and opioids highest cause of death


Oklahoma has the fourth highest rate of death from all causes in the nation, 23 percent higher than the national rate

2014 State of the State’s Health https://ok.gov/health2/documents/SOSH%202014.pdf


Oklahoma had a nearly 50 percent increase in death due to unintentional injuries from 2000 to 2012

2014 State of the State’s Health https://ok.gov/health2/documents/SOSH%202014.pdf


Opioids were involved in 33,091 deaths in 2015, and opioid overdoses have quadrupled since 1999 in the United States.

2014 State of the State’s Health https://ok.gov/health2/documents/SOSH%202014.pdf


Oklahoma has the 18th Highest Death Rate due to Unintentional Poisoning Deaths involving Opioids

2014 State of the State’s Health https://ok.gov/health2/documents/SOSH%202014.pdf


In Oklahoma, over the past decade, unintentional poisonings increased 370% primarily due to prescription drugs.

2014 State of the State’s Health https://ok.gov/health2/documents/SOSH%202014.pdf


In Oklahoma, 81% of unintentional poisoning deaths involved at least one prescription drug.

2014 State of the State’s Health https://ok.gov/health2/documents/SOSH%202014.pdf


Of the 81% of unintentional poisoning deaths, nearly 90% were related to prescription painkillers.

2014 State of the State’s Health https://ok.gov/health2/documents/SOSH%202014.pdf


In Oklahoma, adults aged 35-54 accounted for more than 50% of accidental overdose deaths.

2014 State of the State’s Health https://ok.gov/health2/documents/SOSH%202014.pdf


OPIOID MISUSE IN OKLAHOMA


OPIOID MISUSE IN OKLAHOMA


The Rx Drug Epidemic Throughout the United States and In Washington County 

Pain killers (Opioids) kill 78 Americans every day. In 2015, over 33,000 Americans died from opioids-either prescription drugs or heroin or, in many cases, more powerful synthetic opioids like fentanyl.

71 people in Washington County, Oklahoma died from an accidental overdose, 50 deaths involved prescription drugs and 42 involved prescription painkillers (opioids) between 2007 – 2015. 171 overdoses were reported by Jane Phillips Medical Center in 2016. Between 2012 – 2016 there were 830 overdoses reported.

Drug overdoses are now the leading cause of injury deaths, even more than people who die from car crashes. For every 1 overdose death, 825 people used Rx drugs non-medically without the recommendation of a doctor.


What is a Prescription Pain Killer? 

A prescription pain killer is a substance most often prescribed by your doctor to relieve pain

These substances called Opiates are alkaloids derived directly from the opium poppy by departing and purifying the various chemicals in the poppy. Types of Opiates include: Morphine, Codeine, Heroin, and Opium

Opioids are synthetic or partly synthetic drugs that are manufactured to work in a similar way to opiates. Their active ingredients are made via chemical syntheses.


Common Generic/Brand Name Prescription Pain Drugs BRAND NAME Fentanyl

OTHER NAMES (Generic) Duragesic patch

Hydrocodone

Lortab, Norco, Vicodin

Methadone

Diskets, Methadose

Morphine

MS Contin, Kadian Avinza

Oxycodone

OxyContin, Percocet, Endocet

Tramadol

Tultam, Rybix, Ryzolt


Common Generic/Brand Name of Other Prescription Drugs BRAND NAME

OTHER NAMES (Generic)

Alprazolam

Xanax

Carisoprodol

Soma

Cyclobenzaprine

Flexeril, Fexmid

Diazepam

Valium

Zolpidem

Ambien, Intermezzo


What are the Dangers? 

About 60% of overdoses occur in people prescribed the drugs by a single physician, not in those who “doctor shopped” or got them on the black market and 1/3 of those were taking a low dose Used properly, opioids can ease severe short term pain from surgery, broken bones, or chronic pain from an illness such as cancer. People put themselves at risk when they inadvertently misuse the Rx drugs by:   

combining them with alcohol or other drugs such as Xanax or sleeping pills; taking them in too high a dose or for too long; or using them while driving or in other situations when they need to be alert


KNOW THE FACTS Fact:

Almost all prescriptions have some side effects even when taken as prescribed, however, when used responsibly, the vast majority will be safe

Fact:

Prescription painkillers can be highly addictive. Never take more than what you are prescribed. Always talk to your doctor before making any changes.


FACT:

Every 25 minutes a baby is born addicted to a prescription pain killer

FACT:

It is illegal to share prescription medications. Not only can you be charged with a felony, the prescription might harm them.


FACT:

The CDC (Centers for Disease Control) recommend using other ways to treat pain such as exercise, cognitive behavioral therapy, and non prescription anti-inflammatory medicines before starting painkillers

FACT:

If an overdose victim receives the life saving drug Naloxone (Narcan) within 4 minutes when they are overdosing, they have a chance to recover until an ambulance arrives


Fact: Always check with your doctor. Certain antibiotics like erythromycin or anxiety medications such as Xanax can interact with your painkiller medication and can cause an accidental overdose

Fact: Mixing alcohol with painkillers can cause your breathing to slow down to the point you may not be able to breath and can cause you to overdose


Fact: Research studies confirm that addiction is a chronic brain disease. Painkillers change brain chemistry and neuro pathways in the brain. Compulsive craving for narcotic drugs is not a moral failing.

•


Fact: There are several effective treatments for painkiller addiction: 

Medication Assisted Treatment in combination with counseling & behavioral therapies for Opioid Use Disorders

Individual and group counseling

Inpatient and residential treatment

Partial hospital programs

Case or care management

Recovery Support Services

12-Step fellowship

Peer supports


How Medication-Assisted Treatment (MAT) Works 

MAT = use of medication in combination with counseling & behavioral therapies to treat substance use disorders. Tackles both the brain chemistry and psychological factors in addiction.

MAT medications normalize brain chemistry, block euphoric effects of opioids, & relieve cravings so people can focus on recovery instead of spending all day seeking next high.

Three FDA-approved meds: methadone, buprenorphine/naloxone (Suboxone), injectable naltrexone (Vivitrol).


MAT is Effective ď ľ

Longer use of MAT generally yields better results.

ď ľ

A study showed a 75% decrease in illicit opioid use among those receiving buprenorphine and counseling for one year, compared with those who receive buprenorphine for only six days followed by counseling. (Magura, Hershberger, et al., Buprenorphine and methadone maintenance in jail and post release: a randomized clinical trial, Drug & Alcohol Dependence, (2009) 99, 222230.)


80% of people struggling with opioid addiction do not receive effective treatment.


HOW TO KEEP YOURSELF AND THOSE YOU LOVE SAFE SAFE USE  SAFE STORAGE  SAFE DISPOSAL  RECOGNIZING AN OVERDOSE  NALOXONE 


1. SAFE USE  ENCOURAGE

FOLLOWING INSTRUCTIONS ON MEDICATIONS and asking pharmacist or doctor questions

 DO

NOT MIX MEDICATION WITH ALCOHOL OR OTHER DRUGS


2. SAFE STORAGE  USE

A SMALL SAFE TO LOCK UP MEDICATIONS

 KEEP

MEDICATIONS IN THE ORIGINAL CONTAINER

 DO

NO SHARE PRESCRIPTIONS


3. SAFE DISPOSAL 

TAKE UNUSED MEDICATIONS TO THE MEDICINE DROP BOX AT THE BARTLESVILLE POLICE DEPARTMENT

DO NOT FLUSH PRESCRIPTIONS DOWN THE TOILET

TAKE PRECAUTIONS WHEN THROWING MEDICINES IN THE TRASH


4. RECOGNIZING AN OVERDOSE  Someone

may become very sleepy and can’t awaken when you talk to them or shake them  Very slow-to-shallow breathing of someone who cannot be awakened  Extremely small pupils in their eyes EMERGENCY: ALWAYS CALL 911 immediately if you suspect someone is overdosing


4. RECOGNIZING AN OVERDOSE


4. USE A NALOXONE KIT 

NALOXONE IS A DRUG THAT CAN TEMPORARILY RESTORE BREATHING DURING A POSSIBLE OVERDOSE. KEEP IT ON HAND

NALOXONE IS AVAILABLE FREE TO ANY PATIENT OF GRAND LAKE MENTAL HEALTH CENTER

NALOXONE CAN BE PURCHASED AT THE JANE PHILLIPS MEDICAL CENTER PHARMACY,WALGREENS, EXPRESS SCRIPTS, FOOD PYRAMID PHARMACY, AND LIMESTONE PHARMACY

http://www.wcwiok.org/need-support/naloxone


OKLAHOMA NALOXONE SUCCESS STORIES


OKLAHOMA NALOXONE SUCCESS STORIES


OKLAHOMA NALOXONE SUCCESS STORIES


I CAN . . .


I CAN . . . BUILD A COMMUNITY OF HOPE Using a Comprehensive Approach

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration – Continuum of Care Model


I CAN. . . JOIN COMMUNITY COALITIONS Making a Difference 

POSITIVE INFLUENCE COMMITTEE

WASHINGTON COUNTY SUICIDE PREVENTION COALITION

WASHINGTON COUNTY ASSOCIATION FOR MENTAL HEALTH

ACCESS TO HEALTH CARE COMMITTEE

WASHINGTON COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COALITION


I CAN . . . Reduce Stigma • Those people • It was their choice • I’m thankful he was strong enough to stop • That doesn’t really happen here • We don’t need naloxone, if they take drugs again we should let them die.


Words to avoid

Words to use

Addict

Person with substance use disorder

Alcoholic

Person with alcohol use disorder

Drug problem, drug habit

Substance use disorder

Drug abuse

Drug misuse, harmful use

Drug abuser

Person with substance use disorder

Clean

Abstinent, not actively using

Dirty

Actively using

A clean drug screen

Testing negative for substance use

A dirty drug screen

Testing positive for substance use

Former/reformed addict/alcoholic

Person in recovery, person in long-term recovery

Opioid replacement, methadone maintenance

Medication assisted treatment


I CAN . . . Use My Voice The makers of opioid painkillers spent eight times more on lobbying and campaign contributions than the entire US gun lobby. 8 IS GREATER THAN 1


REMEMBER Medications can be very important to your emotional AND physical well-being. If a doctor has prescribed medicine to help with your mental or physical problems, please know the facts!


Questions & Answers WHAT QUESTIONS DO YOU HAVE?


THANK YOU!

For more information contact the Washington County Wellness Initiative at info@wcwiok.org Website: www.wcwiok.org

Oct 2017 Rx Drug Awareness Health Literacy  
Oct 2017 Rx Drug Awareness Health Literacy  
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