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HEALTH LITERACY SERIES 2017-2018 A Healthy Home for Infants to Elders

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Presented by:

M’Liss Jenkins , Penny L. Pricer, and Sheree L. Hukill WCWI Leadership Team


Pre-Test 1) 2) 3) 4) 5) 6)

Over half of teens who misuse prescription drugs get them from friends or family. True or False Name three things can you install in your home to improve safety? Children spend about 90% of their time indoors. True or False What Seven Principles of Healthy Homes? What are two ways you can protect elders in your home? What causes the most non-fatal injuries for all children ages 0 to 19 and results in the most nonfatal trauma-related hospital admissions among older adults?


Today you will learn:  Washington  Affordable  Social  The A I

County Wellness Initiative is . . .

Housing Coalition is . . .

Determinants of Health are . . .

Opioid Epidemic & Healthy Homes . . .

Healthy Home for Infants to Elders . . .

can . . .


What is the Washington County Wellness Initiative? 

501(c)(3) Non-Profit Corporation incorporated in the State of Oklahoma

WCWI is certified through the Public Health Institute of Oklahoma (PHIO) as a County Health Improvement Organization (CHIO)

We have four main focus areas 

Healthcare

Lifestyle/Prevention

Mental Health

Poverty


What is the Washington County Wellness Initiative?


What is

?

WCWI Workgroup

Mission: To mobilize community partners to increase access to affordable housing through committed action

Description of Program: The Washington County Affordable Housing Coalition is a 501 (c)(3) nonprofit organization designed to pull community partners together to increase and preserve the supply of decent, affordable, accessible housing for low- and moderate-income households in Washington County.


Social Determinants of Health  A “place-based” organizing framework, reflecting five (5) key areas of social determinants of health (SDOH), was developed by Healthy People 2020. WCWI has aligned our goals and objectives with the Healthy People 2020 goals and objectives, focusing on the areas of most concern identified in the 2014-2015 Community Needs Assessment.  These five key areas (determinants) include: • Economic Stability • Education • Social and Community Context • Health and Health Care • Neighborhood and Built Environment

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Social Determinants of Health


The Opioid Epidemic & Healthy Homes ďƒ˜

It may be convenient to store medication for easy access, but that same access could make it simple for others to find them, turning you into an accidental drug dealer.

ďƒ˜

Reports indicate over half of teens who misuse Prescription Drugs get them from friends or family.


The Opioid Epidemic & Healthy Homes 

HOW TO STORE MEDICATIONS SAFELY

Safely storing medication is an easy and effective way to prevent others from taking your medication. There are many types and sizes of medication lockboxes available with varying features.

WCWI’s Positive Influence Committee will have a few lockboxes to distribute strategically as part of the Cherokee Nation SPF-Rx project.


The Opioid Epidemic & Healthy Homes

IN-HOME DISPOSAL POUCHES

Products like Deterra pouches make the active ingredients in medications inactive, so there is no potential for abuse if found in the trash. If you have prescription opioids in your home, think SMART. Purchase a disposal pouch to protect Oklahoma’s water and your loved ones today!


The Opioid Epidemic & Healthy Homes

 Website  PSAs

-- http://www.thinksmartok.org/

– KOTV (6) and KJRH (2)

 Billboards


General Drug Safety & Healthy Homes 

Review your medicines frequently with your doctor or pharmacist and when you take new medication.

Make sure medicines are clearly labeled.

Read medicine labels in good light to ensure you have the right medicine and always take the correct dose.

Dispose of any old or used medicines.

Never borrow prescription drugs from others.

Check with your doctor or pharmacist before you mix alcohol and your drugs.

Have medication dispensed in a bubble pack or convenient dispenser.

Check with your doctor or pharmacist before mixing nonprescription drugs and prescription drugs.


A Healthy Home for Infants to Elders


Why Be Concerned About A Healthy Home?  Children

spend about 90% of their time indoors.

 Children

explore their surroundings by touch, taste and playing on floors.

 Trips

and falls are the 2nd deadliest form of accidental death in children.

 To

reduce children’s injuries-reduce or eliminate home hazards.


Why Be Concerned About A Healthy Home? ďƒ˜ Falls

are the leading cause of fatal injury and the most common cause of nonfatal trauma-related hospital admissions among older adults.

ďƒ˜ Falls

result in more than 2.8 million injuries treated in emergency departments annually, including over 800,000 hospitalizations and more than 27,000 deaths.


How Safe IS Your Home? Rodents or Pests? Mold or Mildew? Rugs and lumpy carpets? Staircase with no handrail? Spills on floors? Loose or uneven steps? Matches and lighters? Unsupervised children and some older adults? Non-working smoke and carbon monoxide detectors?


Seven Principles of Healthy Homes 1) Keep it DRY 2) Keep it CLEAN 3) Keep it CONTAMINANT-FREE 4) Keep it PEST-FREE 5) Keep it SAFE 6) Keep it MAINTAINED 7) Keep it VENTILATED


What Is A Safety Hazard?  An area, appliance or toy that can cause injury.  An item that is not used properly.  Play equipment that is not properly assembled.  Bath water that is too hot.  Unsupervised children or some older adults.


What Can Safety Hazards Cause?  Cuts  Bumps and bruises  Broken bones  Head injuries  Burns  Choking  Death


Attic Hazard Prevention Measures Check for water leaks from the roof. Ensure proper ventilation to prevent moisture that can promote mold growth. Seal gaps around roofing and attic openings to keep rodents and insects out. Clean up clutter to deny rodents and insects places to nest.


Bedrooms, Living Rooms, and Family Rooms Hazard Prevention Measures Install smoke and carbon monoxide alarms. Do not smoke or allow anyone else to smoke in the home. If your home was built before 1978:  Test your home for lead paint.  Fix peeling or chipping paint using leadsafe work practices.  Use safe work practices when painting, remodeling, and renovating to prevent spreading lead dust.  Keep floors clear of electrical cords and clutter.


Kitchen Hazard Prevention Measures Never use the stove or oven to heat the house. Use a range hood fan or other kitchen exhaust fan that vents outside. Install smoke and carbon monoxide alarms. Use safe cleaning and pest control products.


Kitchen Hazard Prevention Measures Stop cockroaches, ants, and mice without pesticides:  Keep them out – seal openings to the outside and between rooms.  Starve them – put away food, clean up, cover the trash and garbage.  Deny them water – fix leaks and wipe up spilled water.  When necessary, use closed baits, traps, and gels.  Never use bug bombs.


Most Dangerous Room in the House ďƒ˜ The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, has reported that every year about 235,000 people over age 15 visit emergency rooms because of injuries suffered in the bathroom, and almost 14 percent are hospitalized. ďƒ˜ More than a third of the injuries happen while bathing or showering. More than 14 percent occur while using the toilet.


Most Dangerous Room in the House  Injuries increase with age, peaking after 85.  The bathroom injury rate for women was 72 percent higher than for men.  Studies have shown that women are at higher risk than men for injuries in falls.


Bathroom Dangers  Slipping  Puddles on floor  Wet bathtub or shower stall  Scalding and burning from water that’s too hot  Drowning


Bathroom Danger Prevention  Install grab bars next to the bathtub and shower.  Use mats with nonslip rubber backs on bathroom floors.  Clean up moisture and mold safely.  Use a bathroom exhaust fan that vents outside.


Falls -- Children  Falls are the leading cause of non-fatal injuries for all children ages 0 to 19.  Every day, approximately 8,000 children are treated in U.S. emergency rooms for fall-related injuries.  This adds up to almost 2.8 million children each year.  Thankfully, many falls can be prevented, and parents and caregivers can play a key role in protecting children.


Falls -- Elderly  According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention:  One in four Americans aged 65+ falls each year.  Every 11 seconds, an older adult is treated in the emergency room for a fall; every 19 minutes, an older adult dies from a fall.  Falls are the leading cause of fatal injury and the most common cause of nonfatal trauma-related hospital admissions among older adults.  Falls result in more than 2.8 million injuries treated in emergency departments annually, including over 800,000 hospitalizations and more than 27,000 deaths.  In 2014, the total cost of fall injuries was $31 billion.  The financial toll for older adult falls is expected to increase as the population ages and may reach $67.7 billion by 2020.


Staircase Dangers  Uneven or broken stairs  Loose carpets on stairs  Toys or clutter on stairs  Poor lighting  Missing or broken handrails


Safer Stairs  Keep stairs free of clutter, toys and other trip hazards.  Do not allow children to play on or jump down the stairs.  Use handrails to go up and down stairs.  Wear non-skid footwear for hardwood staircases.  Install safety gates at top and bottom of staircase.


Hallway Hazards  Poor lighting  Extension cords  Clutter


Safer Hallways Remove or tape down extension cords. Install lights to see better. Remove toys and other objects. If not carpeted – wear non-skid footwear to prevent slips/falls. Install and maintain smoke and carbon monoxide (CO) detectors in hallways.  Change the batteries every six months.  A simple reminder is to change them every time you change your clocks for daylight savings time!


Stairways and Halls Hazard Prevention Measures Fix loose or uneven steps and rails. Attach stairway carpet firmly to every step–or remove carpet and attach nonslip rubber stair treads. Keep stairs free of clutter. Install handrails on both sides of the stairs. Keep a working light bulb in overhead lights in the hall and the stairs.


Basement, Crawl Space, Utility and Laundry Areas. Fires & Burns, Outer Parts of the House, and the Yard


Basement, Crawl Space, Utility and Laundry Areas Hazard Prevention Measures Set hot water heater at 120°F to prevent burns. Change furnace/AC filter regularly. Have gas appliances and furnaces checked yearly to make sure they don’t release extra carbon monoxide. Make sure the clothes dryer vents outside. Test for radon. If there’s a high level, hire a specialist to eliminate the hazard.


Fires and Burns Hazard Prevention Measures Store matches, cigarettes and lighters out of reach of children. Make and practice a fire-exit plan with your family. Put a smoke detector near bedrooms and change batteries twice per year Keep space heaters out of doorways, halls or other busy areas. Never hold a hot drink/food and a child at the same time. Do not let children play near a stove, heater or grill.


Outer Parts of House and Yard Hazard Prevention Measures Keep pests away:  Fix holes, cracks, and leaks on exterior of the house.  Eliminate standing water and food sources.  Keep trash can covered with a lid. Remove shoes before entering the house to keep dirt containing lead and other toxins outside. Maintain gutters, downspouts, and roof to prevent moisture from entering the home.


Outer Parts of House and Yard Hazard Prevention Measures ďƒ˜Use safe work practices when painting, remodeling, or renovating a home built before 1978. ďƒ˜If you have a septic tank or private well, properly maintain it to prevent illness. ďƒ˜Be ready in case of disaster: have a kit for shelter in place and plan fire escape routes.


Special Steps to Protect Children  Make sure cribs, playpens, and play equipment are safe.  Keep cribs free of soft objects or loose bedding.  Use cordless blinds and shades, or tie the cords out of reach of children.


Special Steps to Protect Children  Place infants on their back to sleep.  Place safety covers on electrical outlets.  Lock prescription and over-the-counter medications away from children and use childproof caps.  Use stair gates at the top and bottom of stairs


Special Steps to Protect Children ďƒ˜ Lock up products used for cleaning, car maintenance, gardening, and pest control. ďƒ˜ If you have a swimming pool, make sure you have proper fencing and gates around the pool


Special Steps to Protect Children  Complete a playground safety checklist if you have playground equipment in your yard.  If a firearm is kept in the home, it should be stored unloaded and locked in a secure container— inaccessible to children.


Protect Children From Choking Select age-appropriate toys and avoid common choking hazards such as:  Balloons  Toys with small parts  Hard candy  Hot dog slices  Marbles  Buttons  Coins  Batteries  Jewelry


Protect Children From Choking 

Babies should drink sitting up. Drinks like formula, milk or juice can make babies choke if they are lying down.

Never tie toys or pacifiers to children’s clothes.

Small children should not wear jewelry around their necks.

Do not let children play with strings, plastic bags or batteries.

Keep children away from medicines.


Special Steps to Protect Elders  Consider a medical alert or a buddy system.  Keep a fire extinguisher and smoke detector on every floor.  Never smoke when alone or in bed.  Encourage them to always get up slowly after sitting or lying down, taking time to make sure they have their balance.


Special Steps to Protect Elders  Wear proper fitting shoes with low heels.  Use a correctly measured walking aid.  Remove or tack down all scatter rugs.  Remove electrical or telephone cords from traffic areas.  Avoid using slippery wax on floors.  Wipe up spills promptly.  Avoid standing on ladders or chairs.


Special Steps to Protect Elders  Have sturdy rails for all stairs inside and outside the house, or, if necessary, purchase a stairlift.  Use only non-glare 100 watt or greater incandescent bulbs (or the fluorescent equivalents.)  Make sure that all stair cases have good lighting with switches at top and bottom.  Make sure that staircase steps should have a non-slip surface.


Taking care of your home is an investment in your family’s overall health!


I CAN . . .  Use the Healthy Home Checklist in my home  Install smoke and carbon monoxide detectors in my home  Change smoke and carbon monoxide detector batteries every 6 months  Declutter my home  Safely store all potentially dangerous items  Employ the Safe Use, Safe Storage, Safe Disposal Philosophy for all prescription drugs I may have in my home


Post-Test 1)

Over half of teens who misuse prescription drugs get them from friends or family. True

2)

Name three things can you install in your home to improve safety? Smoke Detector, Radon Detector, Carbon Monoxide Detector, Medication Safe, Gun Safe, Deterra pouches, Grab bars in bathroom, Nonslip bath mats

3)

Children spend about 90% of their time indoors. True

4)

What Seven Principles of Healthy Homes? 1)

Keep it DRY

2)

Keep it CLEAN

3)

Keep it CONTAMINANT-FREE

4)

Keep it PEST-FREE

5)

Keep it SAFE

6)

Keep it MAINTAINED

7)

Keep it VENTILATED

5)

What are two ways you can protect elders in your home? Consider a medical alert or a buddy system; Remove or tack down all scatter rugs; Avoid standing on ladders and chairs, Keep home well lit; Install non-slip surfaces

6)

What causes the most non-fatal injuries for all children ages 0 to 19 and results in the most nonfatal trauma-related hospital admissions among older adults? Falls


Questions & Answers WHAT QUESTIONS DO YOU HAVE?


THANK YOU!

For more information contact: Sheree L. Hukill, M’Liss Jenkins, Penny L. Pricer

Washington County Wellness Initiative 918-876-3056 info@wcwiok.org

Health Literacy Series: Healthy Home for Infants to Elders  
Health Literacy Series: Healthy Home for Infants to Elders  
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