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HEALTH LITERACY SERIES 2017-2018 Oral Health 1


Presented by:

M’Liss Jenkins , Penny L. Pricer, and Sheree L. Hukill WCWI Leadership Team


Today you will learn:  Washington

County Wellness Initiative is . . .  Casa Hispana is . . .  Social Determinants of Health are . . .  The Opioid Epidemic & Oral Health . . .  Oral Health: A Window to Overall Health  

I

Oral Health – Physical Health Oral Health – Mental Health

can . . .


What is the Washington County Wellness Initiative? 

501(c)(3) Non-Profit Corporation incorporated in the State of Oklahoma

WCWI is certified through the Public Health Institute of Oklahoma (PHIO) as a County Health Improvement Organization (CHIO)

We have four main focus areas 

Healthcare

Lifestyle/Prevention

Mental Health

Poverty


What is the Washington County Wellness Initiative?


What is the Casa Hispana?

WCWI Workgroup

Casa Hispana’s Mission: To positively integrate Hispanics by networking information, capabilities, and services; thereby, creating opportunities for full participation and contribution in our community.

Goal #1: To provide assistance to Hispanic individuals in learning about their community, becoming a citizen, and connecting with resources

Goal #2: To assist community organizations by providing free interpreting, translation, and case management for Hispanic individuals and families


Social Determinants of Health  A “place-based” organizing framework, reflecting five (5) key areas of social determinants of health (SDOH), was developed by Healthy People 2020. WCWI has aligned our goals and objectives with the Healthy People 2020 goals and objectives, focusing on the areas of most concern identified in the 2014-2015 Community Needs Assessment.  These five key areas (determinants) include: • Economic Stability • Education • Social and Community Context • Health and Health Care • Neighborhood and Built Environment

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Social Determinants of Health


Why Casa Hispana and Oral Health?


The Opioid Epidemic & Oral Health 

DENTISTS: The misuse and abuse of opioid pain relievers — such as hydrocodone (e.g., Vicodin®) and oxycodone (e.g., Percocet®) — has reached epidemic proportions. As prescribers of these potentially addictive pain medications, dentists are well positioned to help keep these drugs from becoming a source of harm.

PATIENTS: Please visit the MouthHealthy.org/opioids website to learn about the benefits and drawbacks of using opioid pain medications, what to ask your dentist, and how to safely secure and dispose of them at home.


The Opioid Epidemic & Oral Health Statement on the Use of Opioids in the Treatment of Dental Pain

The following statement was adopted at the 2016 meeting of the American Dental Association’s House of Delegates. 

When considering prescribing opioids, dentists should conduct a medical and dental history to determine current medications, potential drug interactions and history of substance abuse.

Dentists should follow and continually review Centers for Disease Control and State Licensing Boards recommendations for safe opioid prescribing.

Dentists should register with and utilize prescription drug monitoring program (PDMP) to promote the appropriate use of controlled substances for legitimate medical purposes, while deterring the misuse, abuse and diversion of these substances.


The Opioid Epidemic & Oral Health Statement on the Use of Opioids in the Treatment of Dental Pain - Continued 

Dentists should have a discussion with patients regarding their responsibilities for preventing misuse, abuse, storage and disposal of prescription opioids.

Dentists should consider treatment options that utilize best practices to prevent exacerbation of or relapse of opioid misuse.

Dentists should consider nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory analgesics as the first-line therapy for acute pain management.


The Opioid Epidemic & Oral Health Statement on the Use of Opioids in the Treatment of Dental Pain - Continued 

Dentists should recognize multimodal pain strategies for management for acute postoperative pain as a means for sparing the need for opioid analgesics.

Dentists should consider coordination with other treating doctors, including pain specialists when prescribing opioids for management of chronic orofacial pain.

Dentists who are practicing in good faith and who use professional judgment regarding the prescription of opioids for the treatment of pain should not be held responsible for the willful and deceptive behavior of patients who successfully obtain opioids for non-dental purposes.

Dental students, residents and practicing dentists are encouraged to seek continuing education in addictive disease and pain management as related to opioid prescribing.


The Opioid Epidemic & Oral Health You and Your Dentist  Over-the-counter medicines, like ibuprofen and acetaminophen, can be effective for pain relief following dental procedures.  There is no one-size-fits all approach to treatment.  To help your dentist decide what course of action is right for you, o Make sure you update your health history form o Talk to your dentist about medications you are currently taking o Ask plenty of questions o Feel free to include your primary medical doctor in the conversation  If you are in recovery or struggled with substance use disorder in the past, tell your dentist.  Let your dentist know if anyone in your family has struggled with substance use disorder.


The Opioid Epidemic & Oral Health You and Your Dentist ďƒ˜ What should I do if I am prescribed an opioid? ďƒ˜ If you are prescribed an opioid, ask your dentist or pharmacist the following questions before filling the prescription: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

What is the goal of this prescription? When and how should I take these? How long should I take these drugs? Are there any risks for me from this medication? What do I do with any extra medication?


The Opioid Epidemic & Oral Health You and Your Dentist How should I store and dispose of leftover pills?


The Opioid Epidemic & Oral Health You and Your Family ďƒ˜ Why is it important to talk to my family? o According to the Journal of the American Medical Association, up to 23 percent of prescribed doses are used for nonmedical reasons. o For example, a friend or family member who may take extra pills left from someone else’s prescription.


The Opioid Epidemic & Oral Health You and Your Family ďƒ˜ Why is it important to talk to my family? o Unfortunately, prescription medications have become a leading source of drug abuse among teens and young adults. o These medications are often obtained from a friend or family member who had received a prescription for a legitimate purpose. o Parents are sometimes fooled into handing over these drugs to treat an apparent symptom of physical distress or pain. o More often, they are stolen from the medicine cabinet or lifted from the trash.


The Opioid Epidemic & Oral Health You and Your Family ďƒ˜ Why is it important to talk to my family? ďƒ˜ Making your loved ones aware of how important it is to use opioids as prescribed and how to safely dispose of extra pills can help save lives.


The Opioid Epidemic & Oral Health You and Your Family ďƒ˜ If you or someone you love is struggling with substance use disorder‌ o Call the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration hotline at 1-800-662-HELP (4357) o It's confidential, free and available 24 hours a day, 365 days a year


Oral Health: A Window to Overall Health


Oral Health & Physical Health Did you know that your oral health offers clues about your overall health — or that problems in your mouth can affect the rest of your body? Protect yourself by learning more about the connection between your oral health and overall health.


Oral Health & Physical Health What's the connection between oral health and overall health?  Like many areas of the body, your mouth is teeming with bacteria — most of them harmless.  Normally the body's natural defenses and good oral health care, such as daily brushing and flossing, can keep these bacteria under control.  However, without proper oral hygiene, bacteria can reach levels that might lead to oral infections, such as tooth decay and gum disease.


Oral Health & Physical Health What's the connection between oral health and overall health?  Certain medications — such as decongestants, antihistamines, painkillers, diuretics and antidepressants — can reduce saliva flow.  Saliva washes away food and neutralizes acids produced by bacteria in the mouth, helping to protect you from microbial invasion or overgrowth that might lead to disease.


Oral Health & Physical Health What's the connection between oral health and overall health?  Studies also suggest that oral bacteria and the inflammation associated with periodontitis — a severe form of gum disease — might play a role in some diseases.  Certain diseases, such as diabetes and HIV/AIDS, can lower the body's resistance to infection, making oral health problems more severe.


Oral Health & Physical Health What conditions may be linked to oral health? ďƒ˜ Endocarditis is an infection of the inner lining of your heart (endocardium). ďƒ˜ Endocarditis typically occurs when bacteria or other germs from another part of your body, such as your mouth, spread through your bloodstream and attach to damaged areas in your heart.


Oral Health & Physical Health What conditions may be linked to oral health? Cardiovascular disease. Some research suggests that heart disease, clogged arteries and stroke might be linked to the inflammation and infections that oral bacteria can cause.


Oral Health & Physical Health What conditions may be linked to oral health? Pregnancy and birth. Periodontitis has been linked to premature birth and low birth weight.


Oral Health & Physical Health Certain conditions also might affect your oral health, including:  Diabetes. Diabetes reduces the body's resistance to infection — putting the gums at risk.  Gum disease appears to be more frequent and severe among people who have diabetes.  Research shows that people who have gum disease have a harder time controlling their blood sugar levels, and that regular periodontal care can improve diabetes control.


Oral Health & Physical Health Certain conditions also might affect your oral health, including: ďƒ˜ HIV/AIDS. Oral problems, such as painful mucosal lesions, are common in people who have HIV/AIDS. ďƒ˜ Alzheimer's disease. Worsening oral health is seen as Alzheimer's disease progresses.


Oral Health & Physical Health Certain conditions also might affect your oral health, including:  Osteoporosis — which causes bones to become weak and brittle — might be linked with periodontal bone loss and tooth loss. Drugs used to treat osteoporosis carry a small risk of damage to the bones of the jaw.


Oral Health & Physical Health Other conditions that might be linked to oral health include :

Eating disorders Rheumatoid arthritis Head and neck cancers Sjogren's syndrome — an immune system disorder that causes dry mouth


Oral Health & Physical Health

Because of these potential links, tell your dentist if you're taking any medications or have had any changes in your overall health — especially if you've had any recent illnesses or you have a chronic condition, such as diabetes.


Oral Health & Mental Health While much about the connection between oral health and mental health requires further research, there is an established link between these two areas of health and wellness


Poor Mental Health → Poor Dental Health Though research on the connection between oral health and mental health is relatively new and limited, studies have suggested numerous effects that mental health issues have on oral wellness, including:

Depression is associated with higher abuse of alcohol, caffeine, and tobacco, which may cause tooth erosion and decay Depression often causes self-neglect, which often results in poor oral hygiene and consequential tooth decay


Poor Mental Health → Poor Dental Health Though research on the connection between oral health and mental health is relatively new and limited, studies have suggested numerous effects that mental health issues have on oral wellness, including:

ďƒ˜Bipolar affective disorder often causes over-brushing that may damage gums and cause dental abrasion, mucosal lacerations, or gingival lacerations ďƒ˜Bipolar patients treated with lithium have a higher rate of xerostomia (dry mouth) and stomatitis (inflammation and ulceration)


Poor Mental Health → Poor Dental Health Though research on the connection between oral health and mental health is relatively new and limited, studies have suggested numerous effects that mental health issues have on oral wellness, including:

Acids from vomiting makes patients with eating disorders more susceptible to tooth decay Side effects of antipsychotic, antidepressant, and mood stabilizer drugs may include a higher susceptibility to oral bacterial infections


Poor Dental Health → Poor Mental Health Interestingly, the connection also goes the other way. Your dental hygiene can also affect your mental health. For example:

 Poor dental health affects speech, which can cause significant social anxiety. Likewise, bad breath can exacerbate social anxiety  Patients of mental illness are 2.8 times more likely to have lost all their teeth; this affects physical appearance, self-esteem, and self-image  Similarly, patients of mental illness have higher statistical rates of tooth decay and missing teeth, which likewise affect physical appearance and selfimage


REMEMBER Medications can be very important to your emotional AND physical well-being. If a doctor has prescribed medicine to help with your mental or physical problems, please know the facts!


Oral Health & Physical Health

To protect your oral health:

ď ś Practice good oral hygiene every day ď ś Contact your dentist as soon as an oral health problem arises


I CAN . . .  Brush my teeth at least twice a day with fluoride toothpaste  Floss daily  Eat a healthy diet and limit between-meal snacks  Replace my toothbrush every three to four months or sooner if bristles are frayed  Schedule regular dental checkups and cleanings  Avoid tobacco use


Taking care of your oral health is an investment in your overall health!


Questions & Answers WHAT QUESTIONS DO YOU HAVE?


THANK YOU!

For more information contact: Sheree L. Hukill, M’Liss Jenkins, Penny L. Pricer

Washington County Wellness Initiative 918-876-3056 info@wcwiok.org

Health Literacy Series: Oral Health  
Health Literacy Series: Oral Health  
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