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Sunday, February 24, 2019

Farm&Ag G AGRICULTURE NEWS & TRENDS

FEATURED STORIES • Buying New Equipment • Building Storage Space • Ethically Raising Livestock i


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SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2019

BUY VS. LEASE:

ARE YOU MAKING THE RIGHT CHOICE?

Agribusiness is the foundation on which we were built 117 years ago and remains a vital part of our business and the economies of Iowa’s rural communities. We work closely with our ag clients to understand their operation and remain steadfast in our commitment to provide sound financial guidance and support. The advantages of working with Lincoln Savings Bank are hard to ignore:

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Up to 100% financing & competitive rates Flexible payment schedules (can be adjusted for seasonality) Simpler balance sheet with less overhead No mortgage on property

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Tax advantages- Payments may be 100% deductible when interest is deductible In-house experts to assist with leasing vs. ownership decisions Flexible terms with no prepay penalty

Eligible Ag Leases Equipment | Farm Tile | Grain Bins | Buildings

Leasing & all related servicing is provided through our partnership with BB Community Leasing Services, Inc. - Madison, WI


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FARM & AG GUIDE | FAMILY

O

Protecting Children

ne of the greatest ways to teach your child about responsibility is by providing them with a role in a family farm’s success. It paints a clear picture of how the earth gives back and why it’s important to protect and influence the process.

While this rewarding experience will provide many benefits to children, there are important safety measures to instill and enforce. Kids can easily be enticed to explore large equipment, engage with livestock or navigate the land — both of which can result in disastrous results. Be firm with your expectations for how your children should act while on the farm. It can be the difference in a tragedy or developing a responsible member of your family and team. WHERE THE HAZARDS LIE

Farms are typically filled with potentially hazardous factors, but with safety in mind most can be avoided. While teaching your child about responsibility and pride, keep the following age-related risks from the National Ag Safety Database in mind. Toddler/Preschool At this age, children should only monitor farming activity. Due to their fascination by moving parts and curiosity, falling off farm equipment, engaging with poisonous chemicals

or drowning are major risks. Ages 5-9 Your child is now likely looking to impress the adults around them, however they are still not realistically aware of dangers. Keep a close eye on them as this age group is prone to livestock kicks or crushing and becoming entangled in moving machinery. Ages 10-13 As children develop into teenagers, their desire to be more

of an individual may cause them to perform chores without adult supervision. While they may seem mature enough, it is still crucial to accompany them on machinery designed for adults and supervise them as they navigate buildings and the farm land. Ages 13-16 At this point, your child is gaining a good grasp on behavior on the farm. However, they also may be apt to experiment with machinery, putting them at serious risk of rollovers or

ATV accidents. The NAS suggests educating children about peers who have experienced injury while performing risky activities. Ages 16-18 The last few years before your child becomes an adult are important to teach them to be a role model and crucial component to your farm’s success. This is the age where clear and consistent rules about drugs and alcohol are imperative, as the responsibility they have on the farm is as important as they are dangerous.

TOMORROW STARTS EARLIER FOR FARMERS Thank you for all of your hard work. We’re proud to provide you with the insurance you need, and we’re grateful that you provide us with the food we put on our tables. Trust in Tomorrow.®

“Trust in Tomorrow.” and “A Grinnell Mutual Member” are registered trademarks of Grinnell Mutual Reinsurance Company. © Grinnell Mutual Reinsurance Company, 2019. 801 S. State Street, Denver 1-800-366-7014


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SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2019

FARM & AG GUIDE | MODERN FARMING

New Farming Technology

T

he farming industry has been a huge beneficiary of the technology boom of the modern era. Farmers can strengthen their crops, connect them to incredible sensors and even inspect the entirety of their property from the comfort of their couch.

Running a successful farm is a time-consuming career that requires hard work, patience and a little luck. When you take advantage of cutting-edge technology, doing the job efficiently becomes simpler. CONNECTED CROPS Modern technology has a trend of connecting everything to the Internet – now you can connect your crops. The United States Department of Agriculture’s research agency, the Agricultural Research Service, has developed

innovative soil, water and plantstress sensors to automatically irrigate fields only when necessary. The agency suggests these sensors be mounted on pipelines of aboveground commercial irrigation systems. They can trigger irrigation equipment based on soil-water content. According to the Natural Resource Conservation Service, a large irrigation system consisting of pumps and permanent piping can cost up to $2,500 an acre to sufficiently water. Using these

sensors will guarantee the expensive animation of their field’s growing process doesn’t waste a drop. performance. It is easy to see where adjustments EYES ON THE SKY must be made for next growing When used by farmers to analyze season. When searching for a their property, drones can be the drone, ask your local electronics easiest and affordable ways to utilize professional about included data-driven farming. infrared cameras. Analyzing The benefits from using a drone pictures in this filter can easily extend far beyond monitoring the show distressed plants that may be furthest lines of your property for difficult to see with conventional signs of trespassing and structure photography. integrity. Because they are so easy to send on a flight, farmers can SMART FARMING use them to build a time-series Perhaps you don’t consider

your farm large enough to need assistance from self-driving tractors or “robot farmers” employed to travel the narrow rows between plants and harvest their product. However, any farmer can benefit from taking advantage of modern technology meant to make their job easier and their crops heartier. Conduct some research on your own to identify technology solutions that may make your life easier on the farm.


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2019

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FARM & AG GUIDE | SEASONAL

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Preparing For Spring n most regions, spring marks the beginning of the busy farming season. Fields are growing and livestock is thriving. Is your operation ready to perform at its peak?

While it may not be every farmer’s favorite part of the industry, it’s important to make sure your financial books are in as good condition as the rest of your equipment.

FROM START TO FINISH, WE DO IT ALL

Before the season takes off, be sure to complete tax returns, follow up on any invoices which require attention and nail down contract terms with suppliers. Once your books are ready — get outside and analyze the rest of your property. INSPECT PROPERTY FOR WINTER WEAR Winter weather can wreak havoc on improperly stored equipment or the structures that may have developed damage from snow and ice. Take a trip around the perimeter of your property and note any repairs crucial to the successful operation of your farm or ranch. When inspecting your property items, you’ll want to look for degradation in property’s fences, animal housing and even machines. If major repairs are necessary, it’s easy to save your already limited time by calling in a local professional. Remember that agricultural mechanics will be sparse when the season gets started, so preparing for service early is best.

GENERAL MAINTENANCE ON EQUIPMENT Performing general maintenance on the hardworking machines you rely on can be the difference in a successful season or one hindered with break downs. After the long winter, give your machines attention before putting them back to work. Hopefully, you have ample room to keep your equipment indoors – if not, rust and early deterioration is a common problem throughout the cold months. If room is an issue, you can still prevent these issues by using heavy-duty tarps when winter returns. Aside from general oil and filter changes to the engines on your farm, you’ll also benefit from inspecting planters, removing crop residue and lubricating moving parts on

your intricate machines. SPRING CLEANING ON THE FARM While cleaning a farm is a bit different (and smellier) than conventional spring cleaning, it is crucial in retaining the integrity of your livestock and property. Monitor your land for downed trees or other hazards that occurred during the winter before you begin planting crops. Your livestock may have been cooped up in their housing while the weather was cold. Once the weather warms, get them out to pasture and thoroughly clean the mess they left behind.

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SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2019

FARM & AG GUIDE | HAZARDS

I

Safety In Severe Weather

n many locations, March is known for its early-frigid temperatures and ending with more suitable farming weather as the calendar turns. With this introduction to warmer conditions, the risks of severe weather become more prominent.

Does your farm have an emergency weather plan? If forecasts show incoming conditions may be severe, you should have a strategy to protect the investments on your property. Be prepared for the numerous natural risks that put you and your farm or ranch in danger.

how to protect your livestock before, during and after a tornado. Before: Create a list of the animals on your farm and their location on the property. All livestock should have a permanent form of identification. Designate a safe shelter for animals to wait out the storm and ensure there is TORNADOES backup generators in place to According to the National perform farm operations. Oceanic and Atmospheric During: Never leave animals Administration, the United restrained outside during a States sees an average of 1,253 tornado. If possible, they should tornadoes per year. While be in a structure away from protecting your herd during windows with plenty of food these conditions can be a and water. Their behavior may struggle and dangerous to your change as livestock can sense personal safety, employing your severe weather in advance. emergency strategy at the After: Assess the storm earliest sign of potential severe damage and perform an weather will enhance your inventory of your animals. You chances of a positive outcome. should examine them closely Here are some tips to follow for injury and call a veterinarian form the Center for Food immediately if it is severe. Security and Public Health on

LIGHTNING This element is more unpredictable than tornadoes and can be devastating to a farm. The United States Department of Agriculture recommends operators install lightning-protection systems to dissipate its effect on metal structures and equipment. Consider it an efficient security measure to dissipate the electrical charge by sending it to a ground. It’s a good idea to include buildings with a metal roof and silos near power lines or trees. Contact the Lightning Protection Institute to find a certified installer in your area. INSURANCE Spring weather introduces risks of farms losing important components to their operations. In addition to employing an emergency management plan, acquiring insurance adds even more protection. Inquire with a professional about the coverage you need to keep crucial pieces of the puzzle protected.

YOUR FUTURE IS AHEAD OF YOU. JOHN DEERE IS BEHIND YOU. John Deere is committed to the FFA and its continued education and career-development opportunities. FFA is improving upon the hope for a world with more crop availability and less food insecurity. Because each day that you choose to work toward a stronger, more sustainable world is a new chance for growth within the farming community and beyond. www.JohnDeere.com


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2019

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FARM & AG GUIDE | RESPONSIBILITY

Ethically Raising Livestock

U

nethical treatment of farm animals has crippled many farms and ranches while opening the eyes of Americans who refuse to support such operations.

When committing to raise livestock ethically you benefit consumers, the planet and the animals themselves. Non-profit organizations like Humane Farm Animal Care aim to improve the lives of farm animals by demanding kinder and more responsible farm animal practices. With their help, more consumers are becoming aware of outdated farm practices and demanding ethical approaches to raising livestock. Take a look at the different benefits you provide when raising

livestock responsibly, as reported by Pasture farms also don’t treat the Ethical Farming Fund. animals with growth hormones, which are causing alarming BENEFITS FOR problems in human health. HUMAN HEALTH Pasture-raised livestock provide BETTER FOR healthier meat, dairy and eggs. The THE ANIMALS food they produce is generally lower Typically, industrial-livestock in fat, calories and cholesterol than systems work to push as many industrially produced meat. You animals to market weight without will also offer meat much higher in spending too much revenue. these important nutrients: These are known as CAFOs, or • Omega-3s concentrated animal feeding • Vitamin A operations. • Vitamin E Conditions for the health of • Conjugated Linoleic Acid livestock is often a second thought

to turning a profit. When ethically farming, animals are free to behave as they wish with plenty of space to move freely. This freedom allows them to consume the healthy ingredients found in their natural diets, which enables them to live healthy and comfortable.

locally, which is great for reducing the fossil fuels needed for transporting their meat. The EFF states that pasturebased farms are environmentally beneficial because they mimic nature. A few ways this is obtained are: • They rely on perennial plants and grasses, which nourish the soil. BETTER FOR THE • By limiting pollution caused ENVIRONMENT by disposing of animal waste, as Raising livestock responsibly helps it is welcomed into the ecosystem farmers do their parts in promoting naturally. limited damage to the environment. • Are less invasive to wildlife Ethical farms typically market habitats than feedlots cornfields.

DeSousa Livestock, L.L.C. is the area’s leading livestock specialist serving the Jesup, Independence and surrounding areas since 2014. We specialize in pig space management, hog confinement repair and power washing. • Hog Barn Repair • Pig Space Management • Powerwashing • 24 Hours Emergency Services

• Parts and Sales • Equipment Install • Woodchip Sales

Follow us on Facebook www.desousalivestockllc.com 319-230-1957 | 841 DOUGLAS ST • JESUP, IA | desousalivestock@gmail.com


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SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2019

FARM & AG GUIDE | REAL ESTATE

F

Selling A Farm or Ranch

or many, farming is a way of life. However, the years of waking up before the sun and performing backbreaking work in extreme heat can take its toll. If you’re ready to close the door on the rewarding life of being a farmer and begin your next chapter, there are several ways to make a sale quick and painless.

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The first step should be finding out if you are legally able to sell your property, especially in family farms which have been handed down for generations. To avoid delays as you begin the sales

process, it’s a good idea to confirm everything is in good standing with a lawyer. Here are some other tips to keep in mind. THE EXPERTS YOU NEED Selling your farmland

is a task best tackled of with the help of experts. your Consider hiring these professional services to make the journey less of a headache. Accredited rural appraiser: Gain a valuable perspective of the value

Simon Gingerich 319-464-7781 www.gingerichpostandframe.com


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2019

farmland. Appraisers have the expertise to analyze both production agriculture, recreational ranches and structures on the land. Real estate agent: Once you get a general idea of what your property is worth, discover your listing price with this professional. They have information regarding comparable sales in your community. Accountant: When selling a farm, taxes can be unique and difficult to understand without the help of an expert. Ensure everything is legally tight before selling it to a new owner. TAKE ATTRACTIVE PICTURES According to the National Association of Realtors, in 2017, 51 percent of homebuyers first found the property listed through online ads. This type of medium as just as important when selling your farm and property. Make sure to take plenty of pictures showcasing your land in the best light. Consider taking

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advantage of affordable drones or pursue other avenues to produce beautiful aerial displays, showcasing the entirety of your listing. PROVIDE ENOUGH INFORMATION You don’t need to reveal all your information regarding yield history, included equipment or your farm statistics on your initial ad. However, it is a good idea to disclose this data to your real estate agent, so they can have answers on hand to satisfy interested parties.

— A worldwide leader that’s Cedar Valley strong. Tyson Fresh Meats is a worldwide leader in pork, chicken and beef production. The Waterloo facility produces fresh cuts of pork for retail, wholesale and food service customers across the globe. Tyson and its team members donate food, time and financial support to many Cedar Valley nonprofit organizations and events. Through Powering the Spirit, Tyson’s aims to end childhood hunger along with its community partners: • Northeast Iowa Food Bank • United Way • Salvation Army Additionally, we take pride in our 2,900 team members and the diversity they bring to the community. The many cultures found in our halls enrich the lives of those at Tyson as well as the Cedar Valley. 501 North Elk Run Road 319-236-2636

tysonfoods.com

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SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2019

FARM & AG GUIDE | CAPITAL EXPENDITURES

Buying New Equipment

W

hen it’s time to update the important machines that keep your farm running, it is easy to become daunted by the process. You will also be faced with several decisions pertaining to your specific situation.

USED VS. NEW If you need a machine that plays a key role in your everyday operations, it is a good idea to consider both used and new options. Although you can never be certain of the history of someone else’s equipment, you can find local professionals to inspect your potential machinery before you agree to buy it. New equipment typically comes equipped with a warranty and support from the manufacturer. When the time comes to buy, make sure you have considered all of your options. Weigh factors like cost, quality and longevity of the equipment before adding it to your farm. BUY OR LEASE? When it comes to how you obtain your new equipment, there are a couple different ways to go about it.

Each type offers its own unique advantages and disadvantages.

machines. This leaves plenty of room in the budget for even more equipment that may not WHY BUY? have been possible with Whether you finance a hefty debt towards or pay outright for new buying a new machine. machinery, when you Leasers can also return buy, it’s yours. A benefit equipment once it has is that the equipment served its purpose for itself and the labor, the season. It is a way insurance, repair and fuel to avoid paying for costs used to maintain it equipment during the are all tax deductible. dormant months of The major downside farming. Not having to of buying equipment is cover costs of machinery you are responsible for that isn’t even being the maintenance and used gives you more repairs that are required income to put towards to keep it moving. other aspects of your Some sellers may offer operation. a rollover option which A negative part of ensures farmers can the leasing process is upgrade their equipment there are not as many according to a tax breaks. Payments determined time period can be reported as by using it as a trade in ordinary expenses which for a newer option. are deductible, but in order for equipment to IS LEASING make the depreciation RIGHT FOR YOU? schedule, a purchase By leasing, farmers must be made. can usually make lower payments for their

NOW HIRING HyPro Incorporated is a value leader in the machining, manufacturing, and assembly of components and complex assemblies. HyPro relies on over 50 years of manufacturing and assembly experience. Combining state of the art C.N.C. machining equipment, manufacturing systems, strong supply chain relationships and a commitment to quality and continuous improvement. In your quest for quality components from concept to completion, you can count on Team HyPro as your turnkey business partner for your machined component, manufacturing, and assembly needs.

Apply in person at 711 Enterprise Dr. Cedar Falls, IA 50613, email your resume to: Careers@hypro.com or apply online at www.hypro.com.


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PAGE 11

FARM & AG GUIDE | FACILITIES

Building Storage Space

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s your operation grows, you likely have the need for more equipment, animal or crop supplies and more livestock housing. Spring is the perfect time to plan construction projects to enhance the functionality of your farm. You are probably familiar with traditional structures built with wood, steel and concrete. The tried and true construction methods have proven to be great for quality, longevity and operation. But there is a newer contender on the market which you may not be as familiar with. When creating blueprints for your newest structure, find a contractor in your area who is capable of constructing a fabric building. The benefits are incredible over more classic materials including: • Less cost for and time during construction; • High quality material which is easy to relocate if necessary; • Built tough and withstands inclement weather conditions; and • Produces better ventilation for both farmers and their livestock. While this technology isn’t necessarily brand new, you may have difficulty finding a professional to construct a fabric building in your area. If this is the case, do research online or ask for references from farmers who have turned to this different style of structure.

So God Made a Farmer

And The Farmer Couldn’t Live Without Safe, Pure Water CONSTRUCTION LOANS As a farm operator, you can find a great financing deal by utilizing the Farm Storage Facility Loan Program, offered by the United States Department of Agriculture. Check with a representative in your area to find out how to qualify and the stipulations of this low-interest program. Since the program was created in 2000, it has influenced over 33,000 loans for farms around the country, resulting in increasing storage capacities to an incredible 900 million bushels. While this particular loan encourages growth in storage buildings, the USDA has several options you may seek for help in acquiring the funds to provide animal or equipment housing.

CONSIDER THE LOCATION Your new structure is there to help, so make sure it doesn’t get in the way of your daily operations. When choosing the location, consider what the building’s purpose will be and create a construction strategy. For instance, if the building will require running water or electricity, save money by erecting it near a source. You also will want to avoid building on land that is susceptible to flooding or near power lines and other obstructions.

Treated, Safe, Softened, Convenient, Dependable, Rural Water! For more information about connecting to rural water, contact us:

Iowa Regional Utilities Association 800-400-6066 Formerly Central Iowa Water Association


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SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2019

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