Issuu on Google+

Issues On The Commonwealth

Vol. 1 Issue No. 3

“ Our constituents gave us

a team to compliment the efforts of incumbent members in moving our people’s issues forward. ”

1 High Expectations! Industrialize Our 4 Resources- Sustainability 6

Unofficial CNMI 2012 Election Results


High

Expectations!

W

hile the Independent Republicans, Covenant and Republicans slate of Legislators, Senator and U.S. Washington Delegate exchange congratulatory remarks of their victories, the union of the people who clamored for change had its voice heard on November 6, 2012.

The island community boasted as the election results placed their candidates into office to steer the economy and the livelihood of thousands in the Commonwealth. However, it is clear that with the voice of the people, the expectations are tremendously high, hence putting forth much needed work that is expected to be seen with health care, retirement, education, safety and the grandeur issue of a prospering and vibrant economy. The idea conceived on joining and collaborating the Independent Republicans alongside the Covenant party strengthened presence. With the coalition, their strategy paved the way to an alliance with the people’s best choice candidate Kilili for U.S. Washington Delegate and Independent Repubican Ray Yumul for Senate fortified victory of their candidates where the people mandated a change in the Commonwealth by showing people power at the polls. “The essence of a successful election is through collaboration, commitment and effort. All of us in unbelievable unity proved successful,” stated Chairman (IR) Senator Pete P. Reyes. “I am surprised that all IR’s won their election. Now for some real change,” states Carl Hocog, Chairman for Congressman elect-Ralph Yumul. While celebrations kick off with incumbents - dubbed the noble 9 - are now joined with party affiliations that make up the new powerhouse Independent Republicans in the Lower House. Tactics and strategies have already commenced as the new leadership looks to devise

“The essence of a successful election is through collaboration, commitment and effort. All of us in unbelievable unity proved successful,” a plan that will stop the CNMI’s hemorrhaging and build on a stronger economy for its citizens. Additionally the re-opening of impeachment is now favorable to the noble 9 chaired by incumbent re-elect Joseph P. Delon Guerrero.

Candidates speak of their plans Small businesses in the Commonwealth continue to face severe challenges economically. Growth and expansion that would ultimately lead to local employment seems far fetched, but one candidate vows to make and support small businesses by providing opportunities from utilizing the current and possible other forms of opportunities small businesses may use to strengthen their businesses. “The economy may remain stagnant, but my office will look at small businesses and strengthen them with opportunities. We will provide the needed support as well look at viable ways to continuously develop the small businesses on island. Small businesses are the backbone of the CNMI economy and they need help,” stated Congressman-Elect Ralph Yumul. Yumul was the former SBDC director with the Department of Commerce. His inside knowledge of using federal grants and other source of available funding to expand in business allows him assist small businesses avail of such opportunities. Additionally, he intends to continuously look at ways where the CNMI will have more programs associated with small business developments and funding.

Voice cnmi

1


Newly elected officials to the 18th legislature speak of their desire to enhance their precincts. Make it safer, cleaner and support in repairing what is needed in their respective precincts. Precinct 4 Congressman-Elect Christopher D. Leon Guerrero shared his plans to get his community involved. He expresses an open communication with his constituents in town hall meetings to address their imminent concerns that he may be able to act on. However, he also expresses the need to stabilize health care as his highest priority. “Our Health Care Corporation needs funding, despite it operating as a corporation on its own, we need to ensure it remains equipped and viable for our citizens,” stated Leon Guerrero. Precinct 5 Congressman-Elect Larry Guerrero looks at the need for enhancement opportunities as well economic activity with farmers in the precinct he represents. “I see the drainage system and roads in my precinct being a need to ensure safety amongst the community. Although funding sources may be limited, I will seek federal assistance grants to make this possible for precinct 5,” stated Guerrero. Guerrero looks at the economic aspect of enhancing the land use in his precinct. Farming is a good source of economic active as the land in the Kagman and Papago are rich in nutrients for a variety of local fruits, vegetable and crops to be grown on island. “I intend t look at the export opportunities with the farmers utilizing Pellegrino’s Arctic Circle cargo plane to Guam for economic activity. In return, I hope to see more local farmers get into the business of utilizing their land for this type of development,” adds Guerrero. Incumbent Re-Elected Congressman Ralph Demapan serving his 2nd term looks at a bigger picture. Now chartered with better experience as a Representative, he now looks to building his precinct with infrastructure development to improve economic and social activities. While he understands that local funds are very limited, he promotes the need to enhance his precinct. “In my term in representing my precinct, I am committed to seeking support from my colleagues to find the necessary funding for the improvement needed. I will look towards addressing regulatory and the need for rehabilitating social halls and community parks,” stated Demapan. Business in his precinct continues to maintain presence with economic activity, yet the businesses are finding difficult times to cope with the economy. “I hope to look at creating a business summit that will enable his office to hear concerns and act upon. He sees the need to be organized with the Saipan Chamber, but also allow non-member of the chamber who would like to share their concerns as well. However, this ideal practice, if performed, will be coherently coordinated with the leaders of Saipan Chamber of Commerce,” he adds.

2 Voice cnmi

“There is also a need for government reduction while simultaneously look at businesses and see where we can make changes to accommodate the economy for growth. We will also need to ensure we (government) remain a friendly and welcoming entity for new businesses as well compliment those that are in business today,” stated Demapan.

Time to work! Lt. Governor Eloy Inos at a gathering with the Covenant and Independent Republicans stated its time to work! “You work for your family and overall the entire CNMI. The damage that has happened in the CNMI the past few years will take longer to fix with your two-year term. We must work harder!” stated Lt. Governor Inos. The social gathering was held to build on the comprised make up of the party’s visions and collaboration. Their friendly banter of speaking on what the CNMI is faced with and the needs of the people as well the mandate in which they have won their election is pressed upon extremely high expectations. “Our primary objective is to help the people,” adds Lt. Governor Inos. “I speak on behalf of our Covenant Chairman Gregorio “Kachuma” Camacho. Our Fantastic 4 – Congressman Edmund Villagomez, Ralph Demapan and Congressmen-Elects Christopher Leon Guerrero and John Paul “Pacho” Sablan – are ready and able to serve in the capacity needed for progress. We will support the leadership that will bring the CNMI back,” stated Oscar Babauta, Covenant. “The dynamics of the legislature is a difficult one. It is not easy and you all must do your part. We must work hard as mandated by our constituents,” adds Senator Pete P. Reyes, Chairman for the Independent Republicans. “We can solve the problems, but we have to do it as soon as possible, and we have to do it together”, stated former Lt. Governor Diego T. Benavente, Chairman Precinct 1 Independent Republicans.


Socio-Environmental

• Health & Safety • Legislation & Regulation • Climate Change • Crisis Management

Sustainability

An integrated approach to Environmental Social & Economic impact issues (both intenal and external) leads to long term, sustainable profit growth.

Environmental

Social

• Permit & License Compliance • Bio-diversity Management • Emissions to Air • Water/Chemical Usage and Discharges

• Respect for the Individual • Equality Opportunity • Diversity • Outreach Programmes • Human Rights

Socio-Economic Eco-Economy

Economic

Sustainability Sustainability is a simple. It is what we need for survival, our well being directly or indirectly on our natural environment. The diagram offers a look at what sustainability is. Thanks to Ray Austin for pointing this out and shared, we now share with you all the concept of sustainability. If this diagram indicates a way to prosper, then take to heart as everyone does have task involved. Albeit a resident, an employee, a student, a parent, a government official, we are all tasked to make the necessary conscience decisions to keeping sustainability working for everyone. Our environment, our social aspect and let alone our economic activity make up what we need for sustainability. Within all three, it can be achieved.

Voice cnmi

3


Industrialize Our Resources-

Sustainability

Congressman-Elect Richard B. Seman envisions an economy that would directly provide jobs and give sight to a new industry that has been talked over for many years, but lack the action to move. For his first 90 days in office and with the sentiments of being a minority bloc member, he feels it imperative to do his duties and offer assistance to where he is needed by the majority. “Although I am elected with a different view and different direction based on the outcome of the election, I will work with the majority to explore and improve upon what is on the table with the majority,” states Seman. His views to industrialize the CNMI with its natural resources remain atop his mind. While he intends to Look at what can be done, and what assistance can be achieved both locally and federally, he hopes he will see his visions of industrializing opportunities for the CNMI emerge to redefine the CNMI’s economy. “Realistic, viable and could happen tomorrow type of economic activities is what I will look forward to introducing as well assist in establishing,” adds Seman. The CNMI is surrounded with great waves of water. Pelagic fish roaming and migrating through the open ocean can be a source of revenue generation. An industry tapped only by foreigners with vessels that capture these pelagic fish and are sold for profit around the world. “Long-line fishing is an option for the CNMI. Efforts to establish this

4 Voice cnmi

type of industry have begun and seeing it through may take 2-3 years, but that is something I am working towards establishing,” Seman states with enthusiasm. The basic idea behind industrializing the pelagic fish industry is to have an industrialized port on Saipan to receive the fish caught in the wide-open ocean. The details behind this ideal concept stems from the counter measures in negotiation with the military using Farallon de Mendinilla as a bombing target. In retrospect, the islands resources and fishing opportunity is a lost cause and the Commonwealth is staging its presence by looking at how to recover from loss of opportunity. The fishing industry is a multi-million dollar operation. The Western Pacific Fisheries Council, which Seman is a part of, continuously looks at pacific island nations to enhance economic activity with the natural resources they possess, the Ocean. “Sustaining the economy could very well depend on creating a new industry, as such industrialization of the water with its abundance in fish, we might as well look at the possibility of a mining industry in our northern islands - Pozzalan,” jest Seman. Congressman-Elect Seman is pro-business and sees no other way to change the CNMI, but create new industries that will have a sustainable effect for our people. The economic aspect coupled with the social and environment areas must all come together in creating a sustainable industry. “It is vital that we as government remove ourselves from control or any ulterior motives when this does come to reality. It is more viable to allow a management company to come in and run the programs in such a manner as a public/private corporation, hence, the government is not sticking its hands in the cookie jar at all times, but merely receiving funds such as royalties from the industry”, laments Seman.


So we know what to do to help cure poverty and to help fix the economy the right way, but implementation of sustainable solutions needs some startup funding before any funding may run out. Everyone needs to take action about this individually per household and collectively as a nation for faster results.

My experience to carry out a civic responsibility as Rising Tide member was not only noble, but an important one as it involves the future of our island and families. I did with a vigorous intention of helping in any way possible to restore trust and democracy within our government that we’ve over the past three years.

Canice Rabauliman

Comments

Ray Austin

I am a CW, probably the only Rising Tide member that doesn’t have voting rights. The reason why I am here is because what Rising Tide was fighting for was something every one of us in CNMI should be fighting for. From what I do for living and being a “non-immigrant” myself, I clearly see that corruption is not only affecting the local people, but the entire CNMI. Regardless of all the complaints they verbally make on corrupted authorities, some of my “non-immigrant” friends actually asked me why do I join these rallies. My answer to them was “why aren’t you a part of it?” Where we’re looking at and heading for is exactly the same. Why not? That’s why when I saw Glen Hunter launching the Rising Tide & looking for volunteers, I had no second thoughts, I joined immediately. I respected him for what he was doing, along side Ed Propst, and I am more than honored to be a part of what he is doing. I learned a lot about elections in CNMI through my experience this time, and I would like to thank Glen, Ed & the amazing Rising Tide crew for giving me such opportuni

Mami Ikeda

Voice cnmi

5


Unofficial

DELEGATE TO U.S. CONGRESS DEMAPAN, Ignacia Tudela (Republican)

DISTRICT

SABLAN, Gregorio Kilili Camacho (Independent)

TOTAL

ED 1A (San Antonio)

54

408

462

ED 1B (Dandan, San Vicente)

162

1,023

1,185

ED 1C (Koblerville)

117

460

577

ED 2 (Chalan Kanoa, Susupe)

128

552

680

ED 3A (San Jose)

163

358

521

ED 3B (Garapan)

264

911

1,175

ED 4A (Tanapag)

132

264

396

ED 4B (San Roque)

72

276

348

ED 4C (Capital Hill)

51

172

223

ED 4D (Northern Islands)

0

7

7

ED 5 (Kagman)

257

1,166

1,423

ED 6 (Tinian)

102

480

582

ED 7 (Rota)

53

381

434

ABS

254

1,225

1,479

EARLY VOTING

694

2,146

2,840

TOTAL

2,503

9,829

12,332

SENATE (1st Senatorial District - Rota) District

6 Voice cnmi

Manglona, Paul Atalig (Independent)

Hocog, Victor Borja (Republican)

ed 7

102

354

abs

279

308

ev

252

211

TOTAL

633

873


Unofficial

SENATE (2nd Senatorial District - Tinian) District

Borja, Francisco Manglona (Independent)

Borja, Joaquin Hoashi (Republican)

ed 6

405

184

abs

185

140

ev

112

126

TOTAL

702

450

SENATE (3rd Senatorial District - Saipan) District

BERMUDES, Illuminanda Reyes (Independent)

YUMUL, Ray Naraja (Independent)

TEREGEYO, Ana Sablan (Covenant)

CRISOSTIMO, Luis Palacios (Republican)

ED 1A

83

221

58

93

ED 1B

231

506

109

278

ED 1C

86

244

59

167

ED 2

113

244

157

140

ED 3A

72

165

79

179

ED 3B

186

555

128

263

ED 4A

39

137

59

145

ED 4B

42

196

17

82

ED 4C

41

95

17

64

ED 4D

0

2

0

5

ED 5

288

602

144

329

ABS

140

245

74

108

EARLY VOTING

418

776

329

573

TOTAL

1,739

3,988

1,230

2,426 Voice cnmi

7


Unofficial

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES (Election District 1 - Saipan) District

SABLAN, Antonio Pangelinan (Independent)

CABRERA, Eliceo Diaz BENAVENTE, Roman Cepeda (Republican) (Independent)

CABRERA, Vicente Camacho (Republican)

ED 1A

357

79

303

124

ED 1B

702

309

768

371

ED 1C

316

158

347

166

ABS

138

39

137

50

EARLY VOTING

419

199

440

245

TOTAL

1,932

784

1,995

956

District

DELEON GUERRERO, Joseph Pinaula (Independent)

PALACIOS, Joseph Mafnas (Republican)

TAITANO, Mariano (Independent)

SEMAN, Richard Benavente (Republian)

ED 1A

308

108

225

115

ED 1B

830

327

611

413

ED 1C

337

172

316

227

ABS

143

42

118

76

EARLY VOTING

439

218

387

307

TOTAL

2,057

867

1,657

1,138

District

DELA CRUZ, Ramon Concepcion (Republican)

LIMES, Jose Tilipao (Republican)

SABLAN, Martin Cabrera (Covenant)

MARATITA, Janet Ulloa (Independent)

ED 1A

89

61

185

336

ED 1B

229

242

380

722

ED 1C

147

197

162

315

ABS

36

32

72

157

EARLY VOTING

211

225

261

432

TOTAL

782

757

1,060

1,962

8 Voice cnmi


Unofficial

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES (Election District 2 - Saipan) District

DIAZ, Eric ATALIG, Eric HOFSCHNEIDER, AQUINO, Daniel DEMAPAN, SABLAN, John Franke Benavente Liana Sablan Jr. Iwashita Rafael Sablan Paul Palacios (Covenant) (Independent) (Republican) (Republican) (Independent) (Covenant)

ED 2

82

171

107

217

325

332

ABS

12

4

1

9

32

30

EARLY VOTING

25

103

52

75

164

185

TOTAL

119

278

160

301

521

547

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES (Election District 3 - Saipan) District

DELA CRUZ, FAJARDO, Mariano YUMUL, CABRERA, IgnaRIOS, LIZAMA, Ralph Naraja cio Villagomez Roy Taisacan Raymond Basa Francisco Santos Deleon Guerrero (Independent) (Independent) (Republican) (Independent) (Independent) (Independent)

ED 3A

82

139

181

89

177

110

ED 3B

670

357

281

234

580

446

ABS

91

67

19

22

99

49

EARLY VOTING

232

175

159

61

239

163

TOTAL

1,220

738

640

406

1,095

768

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES (Election District 3 - Saipan) District

REYES, Juan Sablan (Republican)

TORRES, Brian SAURES, TEBUTEB, Ra- OGUMORO, Feli- VILLAGOMEZ, Ayuyu Jose Pua mon Angailen cidad Taman Edmund Joseph (Republican) (Independent) (Republican) Sablan (Covenant) (Covenant)

ED 3A

180

247

222

245

188

69

ED 3B

370

297

567

330

466

182

ABS

45

11

93

38

81

32

EARLY VOTING

206

207

254

207

228

79

TOTAL

802

762

1,136

820

963

362 Voice cnmi 9


Unofficial

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES (Election District 3 - Saipan) District

BENAVENTE, Anthony TORRES, Stanley Tenorio Estanislao Tudela (Independent) Mcginnis (Independent)

MARATITA, David Reyes (Republican)

CASTRO, Jesus Manibusan (Republican)

ED 3A

161

157

202

160

ED 3B

481

303

336

285

ABS

76

40

29

24

EARLY VOTING

207

129

218

140

TOTAL

925

629

785

609

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES (Election District 4 - Saipan) *IGUEL, Sylvestre Ilo (Republican)

LEON GUERRERO, Christopher Duenas (Covenant)

CAMACHO, George Norita (Republian)

ED 4A

163

170

206

166

ED 4B

105

219

125

157

ED 4C

57

111

96

100

ED 4D

1

3

2

3

ABS

20

26

35

33

EARLY VOTING

48

110

73

68

TOTAL

394

639

537

527

District

WABOL, Jesus Jr. Igisomar (Independent)

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES (Election District 5 - Saipan) District

BASA, Ramon Sablan (Republican)

DELEON GUERRERO, AGULTO, Antonio Reyes Lorenzo Iglecias (Independent) (Independent)

QUITUGUA, Daniel Ogo (Independent)

DELEON GUERRERO, Frederick Peters (Republican)

ED 5

352

689

758

353

321

ABS

21

33

26

18

29

EARLY VOTING

95

178

188

87

79

TOTAL

468

900

972

458

429

10 Voice cnmi


Unofficial

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES (Election District 6 - Tinian) District

CONNER, Trenton Brian (Independent)

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES (Election District 7 - Rota)

ALDAN, Edwin Palacios (Republican)

District

SANTOS, Teresita Apatang (Republican)

Santos, Felix Mundo (Independent)

ED 6

358

222

ED 7

324

117

ABS

144

181

ABS

322

266

EARLY VOTING

88

142

EARLY VOTING

236

231

TOTAL

590

545

TOTAL

882

614

MUNICIPAL COUNCIL (Rota) District

APATANG, Alex- MANGLONA, Pru- BARCINAS, Gard- MARATITA, Glenn HOCOG, George Lizama Ogo ander Apatang dencio Atalig ner Trazan Delos Santos (Nonpar- (Nonpartisan) (Nonpartisan) (Nonpartisan) (Nonpartisan) tisan)

ULLOA, Robert Sikyang (Nonpartisan)

ED 7

88

116

341

343

333

83

ABS

237

296

299

290

300

213

EARLY VOTING

192

255

225

229

226

153

TOTAL

517

667

865

862

859

484

MUNICIPAL COUNCIL (Tinian and Aguiguan) District

MANGLONA, VILLAGOMEZ, Eu- CING, Reynaldo CRUZ, Joseph San BORJA, Antonio CABRERA, Estevan Nicolas San Pangelinan Patrick A. genio Henry Lizama Mendiola (Nonpartisan) (Nonpartisan) Nicolas (Nonpartisan) (Nonpartisan) (Nonpartisan) (Nonpartisan)

ED 6

227

201

244

322

406

337

ABS

170

159

215

83

190

128

EARLY VOTING

126

122

135

78

127

101

TOTAL

523

482

594

483

723

566 Voice cnmi 11


Unofficial

MUNICIPAL COUNCIL (Saipan and Northern Islands) CAMACHO, Ramon TUDELA, Antonia Manibusan Jose Blas (Nonpartisan) (Nonpartisan)

District

ED 1A

252

248

ED 1B

630

663

ED 1C

312

315

ED 2

415

394

ED 3A

276

282

ED 3B

648

608

ED 4A

236

200

ED 4B

196

186

ED 4C

132

118

ED 4D

5

3

ED 5

816

763

ABS

361

361

EARLY VOTING

1,280

1,179

TOTAL

5,559

5,320

BOARD OF EDUCATION (Rota) District

APATANG, Dexter KING, Denise R. (Nonpartisan) Peter (Nonpartisan)

ED 7

179

218

ABS

214

350

EARLY VOTING

142

285

TOTAL

535

853

12 Voice cnmi

BOARD OF EDUCATION (Saipan and Northern Islands) District

CEPEDA, Victorino ADA, Sablan Marylou Seman (Nonpartisan) (Nonpartisan)

ED 1A ED 1B ED 1C ED 2 ED 3A ED 3B ED 4A ED 4B ED 4C ED 4D ED 5 ABS EARLY VOTING

168 502 201 220 230 536 134 154 105 1 577 319 867

180 429 201 229 177 517 164 133 101 2 564 245 848

TOTAL

4,014

3,790

TENORIO, Janice Marie Ada (Nonpartisan)

HOCOG, Angel Songao (Nonpartisan)

ED 1A ED 1B ED 1C ED 2 ED 3A ED 3B ED 4A ED 4B ED 4C ED 4D ED 5 ABS EARLY VOTING

194 584 238 394 201 513 132 163 92 3 627 279 979

125 236 180 174 155 258 141 72 55 2 302 147 602

TOTAL

4,399

2,449

District


Unofficial

LEGISLATIVE INITIATIVES DISTRICT ED 1A (San Antonio) ED 1B (Dandan, San Vicente) ED 1C (Koblerville) ED 2 (Chalan Kanoa, Susupe) ED 3A (San Jose) ED 3B (Garapan) ED 4A (Tanapag) ED 4B (San Roque) ED 4C (Capital Hill) ED 4D (Northern Islands) ED 5 (Kagman) ED 6 (Tinian) ED 7 (Rota) ABS EARLY VOTING

TOTAL

17-2, HD3, HS2 Yes No 368 870 429 530 341 861 250 267 164 3 1,083 430 352 1,208 2,092

9,248

60 179 89 96 114 241 110 53 50 4 240 30 50 222 522

2,073

17-12, HD1 Yes No

Yes

396 957 477 577 410 980 308 298 201 3 1,197 415 363 1,150 2,309

277 631 327 404 244 589 186 199 105 1 786 351 301 904 1,575

10,041

28 108 46 59 60 128 53 24 16 4 144 30 43 257 326

1,326

6,880

17-5

No 139 395 181 214 202 408 162 110 99 6 509 111 103 496 945

4,152

JUSTICE/JUDGE RETENTION QUESTION DISTRICT ED 1A (San Antonio) ED 1B (Dandan, San Vicente) ED 1C (Koblerville) ED 2 (Chalan Kanoa, Susupe) ED 3A (San Jose) ED 3B (Garapan) ED 4A (Tanapag) ED 4B (San Roque) ED 4C (Capital Hill) ED 4D (Northern Islands) ED 5 (Kagman) ED 6 (Tinian) ED 7 (Rota) ABS EARLY VOTING

TOTAL

Justice Alexandro Cruz Castro Judge David Arthus Wiseman Yes No Yes No

380 891 430 517 353 885 261 254 164 6 1,066 409 356 1,157 2,088

9,217

52 246 109 135 157 247 117 66 56 1 291 71 56 306 626

2,536

Judge Perry Borja Inos Yes No 378 897 456 521 386 884 264 256 172 7 1,052 461 400 1,229 2,289

9,652

64 230 95 135 109 246 101 70 43 0 296 82 34 238 522

2,173

Voice cnmi 13


Charcoal Barbeque

Pork Baby Back Ribs- $7.00/half slab • Pork BBQ – $1.00/stick • Chicken BBQ – $1.00/stick • Grilled Tilapia – $5.00/pc. • Grilled Milk Fish – $6.00/pc. • Fried lumpia – $1.00/3 rolls We also do • Beef Intestine – $1.00/stick party orders to go! • Beef fingers - $2.75 each • Grilled Reef Fish (Parrot Fish or Chalan Piao Mafuti) – $12.00/pc. Tel. No.: 670-235-1418

Open daily (Mon. to Sat.) 3:00 pm - 9:00 pm Wednesday, Thursday & Friday Special Lunch Days

8:00 am - 1:00 pm 14 Voice cnmi


Veterans Day Honoring all Who Served


Voice CNMI November 2012