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Chapter 6: Technology Implementation in Schools

The Technology Factor: Nine Keys to Student Achievement and Cost-Effectiveness

Table 6.3 shows some of the courses that suffer from a lack of technology. e lower usage levels in health/PE and art are understandable, but the lower usage in world languages indicates that offsetting cost savings may be possible, since these classes might be using expensive single-purpose language labs. e lower usage levels in science, ELL, social studies, and career tech for 4:1 and higher-ratio schools indicate that these students are not enjoying the benefits of technology. Science and social studies, in particular, are changing on a daily basis, and the amount of information available online far surpasses in quantity and quality that is available in traditional textbooks. Table 6.3. Frequency of use—1:1 schools vs. 4:1 or higher-ratio schools (rank order of difference) 1:1 Schools (%)

4:1 Ratio or Higher (%)

Difference

Health/PE

54

8

46

World Languages

81

51

30

Art

66

37

29

Science

93

68

25

English Language Learners

88

63

Social Studies

91

Career Tech

Subject

Chart 6.5. What was the original impetus for your technology initiative? (Q10)

Top Reason for Technology Initiative N: 978 33%

21%

12% 10% 6%

6% 3%

3%

3%

2%

2%

Enhancement of student learning and achievement

Providing equal access to greater educational opportunities

Building skills to participate in the 21st century workforce

Closing the digital divide

25

67

24

Don't know. Wasn't involved.

94

71

23

Music

56

35

21

English

99

79

20

Special Education

93

77

16

Title I

90

75

15

Math

91

77

14

Reading Intervention

87

73

14

Reading

95

82

13

Superintendent mandate Engagement of students in learning

Adequate yearly progress (AYP) concerns

Funds becoming available

Academic standing of school State mandate

Percentage of Respondents – Only One Answer Allowed

Projectred thetechnolgyfactor  
Projectred thetechnolgyfactor  
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